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Sample records for acoustic microscopy sam

  1. Application of scanning acoustic microscopy to advanced structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex; Klima, Stanley J.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presentod of research investigations of several acoustic microscopy techniques for application to structural ceramics for advanced heat engines. Results obtained with scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM), scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM), scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM), and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) are compared. The techniques were evaluated on research samples of green and sintered monolithic silicon nitrides and silicon carbides in the form of modulus-of-rupture bars containing deliberately introduced flaws. Strengths and limitations of the techniques are described with emphasis on statistics of detectability of flaws that constitute potential fracture origins.

  2. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  3. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  4. Application of acoustic microscopy to assessment of cardiovascular biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saijo, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Hidehiko; Nitta, Shin-ichi; Tanaka, Motonao; Joergensen, Claus S.; Falk, Erling

    2002-11-01

    Acoustic microscopy provides information on physical and mechanical properties of biological tissues, while optical microscopy with various staining techniques provides chemical properties. The biomechanics of tissues is especially important in cardiovascular system because its pathophysiology is closely related with mechanical stresses such as blood pressure or blood flow. A scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) system with tone-burst ultrasound in the frequency range of 100-200 MHz has been developed, and attenuation and sound speed of tissues have been measured. In human coronary arteries, attenuation and sound speed were high in calcification and collagen, while both values were low in smooth muscle and lipid. Another SAM system with 800-MHz-1.3-GHz ultrasound was applied for aortas of Apo-E deficient mouse, which is known to develop atherosclerosis. Attenuation of ultrasound was significantly higher in type 1 collagen compared to type 3 collagen. Recently, a new type FFT-SAM using a single-pulse, broadband frequency range ultrasound (20-150 MHz) has been developed. Cardiac allograft was observed by FFT-SAM and the acoustic properties were able to grade allograft rejection. SAM provides very useful information for assessing cardiovascular biomechanics and for understanding normal and abnormal images of clinical ultrasound.

  5. Evaluation of the biomechanics of atherosclerosis by acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saijo, Yoshifumi; Nitta, Shin-ichi; Schiott Jorgensen, Claus; Falk, Erling

    2001-07-01

    Acoustic microscopy provides not only the morphology, but also the biomechanical properties of the biological soft tissues. The biomechanics of atherosclerosis is important because the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis is closely related with mechanical properties and mechanical stress. Rupture of the fibrous cap of atheromatous plaque is the initial event in acute coronary syndrome such as acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina. In addition to extrinsic physical stresses to the plaque, the intrinsic biomechanical property of the plaque is important for assessing the mechanism of the rupture. Two sets of SAMs operating in 100 to 200 MHz and in 800 MHz to 1.3 GHz were equipped to measure the acoustic properties of atherosclerosis of human or mouse arteries. The values of attenuation and sound speed in the tissue components of atherosclerosis were measured by analyzing the frequency dependent characteristics of the amplitude and phase signals. Both values were highest in calcification and lowest in lipid pool. Although attenuation and sound speed were relatively high in intimal fibrosis, the inhomogeneity of acoustic parameters was found within the fibrous cap. Polarized microscopy for the collagen stained with Picrosirius red showed that the attenuation of ultrasound was significantly higher in type I collagen with orange polarized color compared to type III collagen with green color. SAM has shown the possibility to detect the plaque vulnerability and it might improve our understanding of the sudden rupture from micro-mechanical point of view.

  6. Evaluation of the implant type tissue-engineered cartilage by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoko; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Fujihara, Yuko; Yamaoka, Hisayo; Nishizawa, Satoru; Nagata, Satoru; Ogasawara, Toru; Asawa, Yukiyo; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2012-02-01

    The tissue-engineered cartilages after implantation were nonuniform tissues which were mingling with biodegradable polymers, regeneration cartilage and others. It is a hard task to evaluate the biodegradation of polymers or the maturation of regenerated tissues in the transplants by the conventional examination. Otherwise, scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) system specially developed to measure the tissue acoustic properties at a microscopic level. In this study, we examined acoustic properties of the tissue-engineered cartilage using SAM, and discuss the usefulness of this devise in the field of tissue engineering. We administered chondrocytes/atelocollagen mixture into the scaffolds of various polymers, and transplanted the constructs in the subcutaneous areas of nude mice for 2 months. We harvested them and examined the sound speed and the attenuation in the section of each construct by the SAM. As the results, images mapping the sound speed exhibited homogenous patterns mainly colored in blue, in all the tissue-engineered cartilage constructs. Contrarily, the images of the attenuation by SAM showed the variation of color ranged between blue and red. The low attenuation area colored in red, which meant hard materials, were corresponding to the polymer remnant in the toluidine blue images. The localizations of blue were almost similar with the metachromatic areas in the histology. In conclusion, the SAM is regarded as a useful tool to provide the information on acoustic properties and their localizations in the transplants that consist of heterogeneous tissues with various components.

  7. Differences in acoustic impedance of fresh and embedded human trabecular bone samples-Scanning acoustic microscopy and numerical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ojanen, Xiaowei; Töyräs, Juha; Inkinen, Satu I; Malo, Markus K H; Isaksson, Hanna; Jurvelin, Jukka S

    2016-09-01

    Trabecular bone samples are traditionally embedded and polished for scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). The effect of sample processing, including dehydration, on the acoustic impedance of bone is unknown. In this study, acoustic impedance of human trabecular bone samples (n = 8) was experimentally assessed before (fresh) and after embedding using SAM and two-dimensional (2-D) finite-difference time domain simulations. Fresh samples were polished with sandpapers of different grit (P1000, P2500, and P4000). Experimental results indicated that acoustic impedance of samples increased significantly after embedding [mean values 3.7 MRayl (fresh), 6.1 MRayl (embedded), p < 0.001]. After polishing with different papers, no significant changes in acoustic impedance were found, even though higher mean values were detected after polishing with finer (P2500 and P4000) papers. A linear correlation (r = 0.854, p < 0.05) was found between the acoustic impedance values of embedded and fresh bone samples polished using P2500 SiC paper. In numerical simulations dehydration increased the acoustic impedance of trabecular bone (38%), whereas changes in surface roughness of bone had a minor effect on the acoustic impedance (-1.56%/0.1 μm). Thereby, the numerical simulations corroborated the experimental findings. In conclusion, acoustic impedance measurement of fresh trabecular bone is possible and may provide realistic material values similar to those of living bone.

  8. Acoustic Microscopy at Cryogenic Temperatures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    intensities are used, and quantitatitvely acount for the onset of nonlinear excess attenuation. Aooeuuaiol For DTIC TAB Unaranounc ed Just if icat to By...to acoustic power is a reasonable value and can be acounted for by assuming a one-way transducer conversion loss of 5 dB, a lens illumination loss of

  9. Reflection Acoustic Microscopy for Micro-NDE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    WORDS (Coni, wu rere side. 14 It noeeeey And Idenify1 by block esife) Nondestructive Evaluation Acoustic Microscopy I Subsurface Imaging Pulsecio Cmrsin... subsurface imaging is presented and it is shown that with such lenses it is possible to obtain good focussing performance over a wide depth range...typically few millimeters at 50 MHz. A major problem in subsurface imaging derives from the large reflection obtained frnm the surface, and the small amount

  10. Mapping the Micromechanical Properties of Cryo-sectioned Aortic Tissue with Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Riaz; Sherratt, Michael J.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Kundu, Tribikram; Derby, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Although the gross mechanical properties of ageing tissues have been extensively documented, biological tissues are highly heterogeneous and little is known concerning the variation of micro-mechanical properties within tissues. Here, we use Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (SAM) to map the acoustic wave speed (a measure of stiffness) as a function of distance from the outer adventitial layer of cryo-sectioned ferret aorta. With a 400 MHz lens, the images of the aorta samples matched those obtained following chemical fixation and staining of sections which were viewed with fluorescence microscopy. Quantitative analysis was conducted with a frequency scanning or V(f) technique by imaging the tissue from 960 MHz to 1.1 GHz. Undulating acoustic wave speed (stiffness) distributions corresponded with elastic fibre locations in the tissue; there was a decrease in wave speed of around 40 ms-1 from the adventitia (outer layer) to the intima (innermost). PMID:19603080

  11. Gigahertz scanning acoustic microscopy analysis of voids in Cu-Sn micro-connects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, G.; Vuorinen, V.; Petzold, M.; Paulasto-Kröckel, M.; Brand, S.

    2017-01-01

    Gigahertz scanning acoustic microscopy (GHz-SAM) is applied to the characterization of bulk voids in the Cu-Sn material system, often used in micro-connects. An increased demand for the development of miniaturized interconnect technologies, such as micro-connects, means that fast characterization methods are required for the assessment and detection of reliability impacting defects. This study attempts to formulate an analytical technique aimed at detecting micro-structural defects in Cu-Sn micro-connects, such as micro-bumps for 1st level interconnects and solid-liquid interdiffusion bonds for nano- and microelectromechanical systems. To study the potential of the analytical method, a specific electroplating chemistry was used that increases the probability of defect formation in the electroplated Cu film. The chemistry is known under certain electroplating overpotentials to promote hydrogen bubble induced voids within the Cu. The samples containing voids were inspected by GHz-SAM with a highly focused acoustic lens operating at 1.12 GHz. To validate the results, GHz-SAM micrographs were compared with focused ion beam prepared cross-sections of the selected samples. Advances in acoustic transducer technology operating in the GHz frequency band allow for micron sized defect examination of materials with enhanced lateral resolution and sub-surface sensitivity.

  12. Imaging and quantitative data acquisition of biological cell walls with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tittmann, B. R.; Xi, X.

    2014-09-01

    This chapter demonstrates the feasibility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (HF-SAM) as tools to characterize biological tissues. Both the AFM and the SAM have shown to provide imaging (with different resolution) and quantitative elasticity measuring abilities. Plant cell walls with minimal disturbance and under conditions of their native state have been examined with these two kinds of microscopy. After descriptions of both the SAM and AFM, their special features and the typical sample preparation is discussed. The sample preparation is focused here on epidermal peels of onion scales and celery epidermis cells which were sectioned for the AFM to visualize the inner surface (closest to the plasma membrane) of the outer epidermal wall. The nm-wide cellulose microfibrils orientation and multilayer structure were clearly observed. The microfibril orientation and alignment tend to be more organized in older scales compared with younger scales. The onion epidermis cell wall was also used as a test analog to study cell wall elasticity by the AFM nanoindentation and the SAM V(z) feature. The novelty in this work was to demonstrate the capability of these two techniques to analyze isolated, single layered plant cell walls in their natural state. AFM nanoindentation was also used to probe the effects of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and calcium ion treatment to modify pectin networks in cell walls. The results suggest a significant modulus increase in the calcium ion treatment and a slight decrease in EDTA treatment. To complement the AFM measurements, the HF-SAM was used to obtain the V(z) signatures of the onion epidermis. These measurements were focused on documenting the effect of pectinase enzyme treatment. The results indicate a significant change in the V(z) signature curves with time into the enzyme treatment. Thus AFM and HF-SAM open the door to a systematic nondestructive structure and mechanical property

  13. Microstress contrast in scanning electron acoustic microscopy of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model of image contrast in scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) due to the effect of residual stresses in materials is presented. It is found that in regions near the ends of the radial cracks induced by Vickers indentation the SEAM micrographs reveal a rather large variation of the acoustic output signal.

  14. OSTEOBLAST ADHESION OF BREAST CANCER CELLS WITH SCANNING ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaki Miyasaka; Robyn R. Mercer; Andrea M. Mastro; Ken L. Telschow

    2005-03-01

    Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the bone. Upon colonizing bone tissue, the cancer cells stimulate osteoclasts (cells that break bone down), resulting in large lesions in the bone. The breast cancer cells also affect osteoblasts (cells that build new bone). Conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. Under these conditions the osteoblasts acquired a changed morphology and appeared to adherer in a different way to the substrate and to each other. To characterize cell adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for two days, and then assayed with a mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscope (SAM). The SAM indicated that in normal medium the MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were firmly attached to their plastic substrate. However, MC3T3-E1 cells cultured with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium displayed both an abnormal shape and poor adhesion at the substrate interface. The cells were fixed and stained to visualize cytoskeletal components using optical microscopic techniques. We were not able to observe these differences until the cells were quite confluent after 7 days of culture. However, using the SAM, we were able to detect these changes within 2 days of culture with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium

  15. Integrated acoustic-resolution and optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using a single multifunctional acoustic lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Heng; Xi, Lei

    2016-10-01

    With the rapid development of photoacoustic imaging, it has been widely used in various research fields such as biology, medicine and nanotechnology. Due to the huge difference among photoacoustic imaging systems, it is hard to integrate them in one platform. To solve this problem, we propose to develop a new universal photoacoustic imaging platform that integrates acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy and optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy through a multifunctional liquid lens. This lens takes advantage of an inherently low acoustic impedance and a tunable focal length that was characterized by the infusion volume of the liquid. In this paper, the liquid lens was used to realize confocal of laser illumination and acoustic detection for both acoustic-resolution and optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy. The home-made polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) acoustic transducer had a center frequency of 10MHz and -6dB frequency spectrum from 4MHz to 15MHz which yielded to an axial resolution of 70 μm. The lateral resolutions of acoustic- and optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy were evaluated to be 180 μm and 4.8 μm, respectively. The vasculature of rat ears was carried out to evaluate the performance of optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy.

  16. Characterization of human breast cancer by scanning acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Di; Malyarenko, Eugene; Seviaryn, Fedar; Yuan, Ye; Sherman, Mark; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Gierach, Gretchen; Greenway, Christopher W.; Maeva, Elena; Strumban, Emil; Duric, Neb; Maev, Roman

    2013-03-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to characterize human breast cancer tissues by the measurement of microacoustic properties. Methods: We investigated eight breast cancer patients using acoustic microscopy. For each patient, seven blocks of tumor tissue were collected from seven different positions around a tumor mass. Frozen sections (10 micrometer, μm) of human breast cancer tissues without staining and fixation were examined in a scanning acoustic microscope with focused transducers at 80 and 200 MHz. Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) stained sections from the same frozen breast cancer tissues were imaged by optical microscopy for comparison. Results: The results of acoustic imaging showed that acoustic attenuation and sound speed in cancer cell-rich tissue regions were significantly decreased compared with the surrounding tissue regions, where most components are normal cells/tissues, such as fibroblasts, connective tissue and lymphocytes. Our observation also showed that the ultrasonic properties were influenced by arrangements of cells and tissue patterns. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate that attenuation and sound speed imaging can provide biomechanical information of the tumor and normal tissues. The results also demonstrate the potential of acoustic microscopy as an auxiliary method for operative detection and localization of cancer affected regions.

  17. Quantitative flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.; Roth, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Surface roughness and diffraction are two factors that have been observed to affect the accuracy of flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy. In accuracies can arise when the surface of the test sample is acoustically rough. It is shown that, in this case, Snell's law is no longer valid for determining the direction of sound propagation within the sample. The relationship between the direction of sound propagation within the sample, the apparent flaw depth, and the sample's surface roughness is investigated. Diffraction effects can mask the acoustic images of minute flaws and make it difficult to establish their size, depth, and other characteristics. It is shown that for Fraunhofer diffraction conditions the acoustic image of a subsurface defect corresponds to a two-dimensional Fourier transform. Transforms based on simulated flaws are used to infer the size and shape of the actual flaw.

  18. Theory and application of scanning electron acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu; Chen, Ruiyi; Yost, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional theoretical model based on the application of the thermal conduction and Navier equations to a chopped electron beam incident on a disk specimen is used to obtain the particle displacement field in the specimen. The results lead to a consideration of the signal generation, spatial resolution, and contrast mechanisms in scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM). The model suggests that the time-variant heat source produced by the beam chopping generates driving source, thermal wave, and acoustic wave displacements simultaneously in the specimen. Evidence of the correctness of the prediction is obtained from the mathematically similar problem of pulsed laser light injection into a tank of water. High speed Schlieren photographs taken following laser injection show the simultaneous evolution of thermal and acoustic waveforms. Examples of contrast reversal, stress-induced contrast, and acoustic zone contrast and resolution with SEAM are presented and explained in terms of the model features.

  19. Quantitative flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Generazio, E.R.; Roth, D.J.

    1986-06-01

    Surface roughness and diffraction are two factors that have been observed to affect the accuracy of flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy. Inaccuracies can arise when the surface of the test sample is acoustically rough. It is shown that, in this case, Snell's law is no longer valid for determining the direction of sound propagation within the sample. The relationship between the direction of sound propagation within the sample, the apparent flaw depth, and the sample's surface roughness is investigated. Diffraction effects can mask the acoustic images of minute flaws and make it difficult to establish their size, depth, and other characteristics. It is shown that for Fraunhofer diffraction conditions the acoustic image of a subsurface defect corresponds to a two-dimensional Fourier transform. Transforms based on simulated flaws are used to infer the size and shape of the actual flaw. 15 references.

  20. Quantitative flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.; Roth, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Surface roughness and diffraction are two factors that have been observed to affect the accuracy of flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy. Inaccuracies can arise when the surface of the test sample is acoustically rough. It is shown that, in this case, Snell's law is no longer valid for determining the direction of sound propagation within the sample. The relationship between the direction of sound propagation within the sample, the apparent flaw depth, and the sample's surface roughness is investigated. Diffraction effects can mask the acoustic images of minute flaws and make it difficult to establish their size, depth, and other characteristics. It is shown that for Fraunhofer diffraction conditions the acoustic image of a subsurface defect corresponds to a two-dimensional Fourier transform. Transforms based on simulated flaws are used to infer the size and shape of the actual flaw.

  1. Fundamental Potential for Acoustic Microscopy Evaluation of Dental Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, L. A.; Maev, R. Gr.; Rusanov, F. S.; Maeva, A. R.; Denisov, A. F.; Gavrilov, D. Yu.; Bakulin, E. Yu.; Severin, F. M.

    Comprehensive analysis of the present-day acoustic microscopy experimental approaches from the standpoint of their potential application in dental research and diagnostics has been performed. Whole extracted human teeth and specially prepared dental tissue samples have been investigated. The results of the study demonstrate that there are several experimental techniques that can be used for precise quantitative evaluation of the tissues local mechanical properties in flat-parallel teeth slices, for the pathomorphological investigation of the tissues strength spatial distribution in flat cuts. In the whole tooth, the acoustic microscopy techniques allow us to precisely measure the enamel and dentine layers thickness, the distance between the external surface and pulp, to reveal hidden caries and restoration disbonding. These opportunities form a real ground for the further design of the special acousto-microscopical methods and new equipment for the clinical diagnostics

  2. Mapping dynamical mechanical properties of osteonal bone by scanning acoustic microscopy in time-of-flight mode.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Stéphane; Puchegger, Stephan; Roschger, Andreas; Berzlanovich, Andrea; Fratzl, Peter; Klaushofer, Klaus; Roschger, Paul

    2014-06-01

    An important determinant of mechanical properties of bone is Young's modulus and its variation in individual osteons of cortical bone tissue. Its mechanical behavior also depends on deformation rate owing to its visco- or poroelastic properties. We developed a method to measure dynamical mechanical properties of bulk bone tissue at osteonal level based on scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) using time-of-flight (TOF) measurements in combination with quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI). SAM-TOF yields local sound velocities and qBEI corresponding material densities together providing elastic properties. Osteons (n=55) were measured in three human femoral diaphyseal ground bone sections (∼ 30 µm in thickness). In addition, subchondral bone and mineralized articular cartilage were investigated. The mean mineral contents, the mean sound velocities, and the mean elastic modulus of the osteons ranged from 20 to 26 wt%, from 3,819 to 5,260 m/s, and from 21 to 44 GPa, respectively. There was a strong positive correlation between material density and sound velocity (Pearson's r=0.701; p<0.0001) of the osteons. Sound velocities between cartilage and bone was similar, though material density was higher in cartilage (+4.46%, p<0.0001). These results demonstrate the power of SAM-TOF to estimate dynamic mechanical properties of the bone materials at the osteonal level.

  3. Multispectral photoacoustic microscopy based on an optical–acoustic objective

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Rui; Kilroy, Joseph P.; Ning, Bo; Wang, Tianxiong; Hossack, John A.; Hu, Song

    2015-01-01

    We have developed reflection-mode multispectral photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) based on a novel optical–acoustic objective that integrates a customized ultrasonic transducer and a commercial reflective microscope objective into one solid piece. This technical innovation provides zero chromatic aberration and convenient confocal alignment of the optical excitation and acoustic detection. With a wavelength-tunable optical-parametric-oscillator laser, we have demonstrated multispectral PAM over an ultrabroad spectral range of 270–1300 nm. A near-constant lateral resolution of ∼2.8 μm is achieved experimentally. Capitalizing on the consistent performance over the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared range, multispectral PAM enables label-free concurrent imaging of cell nucleus (DNA/RNA contrast at 270 nm), blood vessel (hemoglobin contrast at 532 nm), and sebaceous gland (lipid contrast at 1260 nm) at the same spatial scale in a living mouse ear. PMID:26236641

  4. Multispectral photoacoustic microscopy based on an optical-acoustic objective.

    PubMed

    Cao, Rui; Kilroy, Joseph P; Ning, Bo; Wang, Tianxiong; Hossack, John A; Hu, Song

    2015-06-01

    We have developed reflection-mode multispectral photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) based on a novel optical-acoustic objective that integrates a customized ultrasonic transducer and a commercial reflective microscope objective into one solid piece. This technical innovation provides zero chromatic aberration and convenient confocal alignment of the optical excitation and acoustic detection. With a wavelength-tunable optical-parametric-oscillator laser, we have demonstrated multispectral PAM over an ultrabroad spectral range of 270-1300 nm. A near-constant lateral resolution of ∼2.8 μm is achieved experimentally. Capitalizing on the consistent performance over the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared range, multispectral PAM enables label-free concurrent imaging of cell nucleus (DNA/RNA contrast at 270 nm), blood vessel (hemoglobin contrast at 532 nm), and sebaceous gland (lipid contrast at 1260 nm) at the same spatial scale in a living mouse ear.

  5. Mechanisms of CFR composites destruction studying with pulse acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronyuk, Y. S.; Morokov, E. S.; Levin, V. M.; Ryzhova, T. B.; Chernov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    Non-destructive inspection of carbon-fiber-reinforced (CFR) composites applied in aerospace industry attracts a wide attention. In the paper, high frequency focused ultrasound (50-100 MHz) has been applied to study the bulk microstructure of the CFR material and mechanisms of its destruction under the mechanical loading. It has been shown impulse acoustic microscopy provides detecting the areas of adhesion loss at millimeter and micron level. Behavior of the CFR laminate structure fabricated by prepreg or infusion technology has been investigated under the tensile and impact loading.

  6. Evaluation of the inner-surface morphology of an artificial heart by acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Y; Okawai, H; Sasaki, H; Yambe, T; Nitta, S; Tanaka, M; Kobayashi, K; Honda, Y

    2000-01-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is being developed for permanent replacement of the natural heart instead of heart transplantation. The need for detecting the material fatigue in the TAH is increasing in order to guarantee long-term use. In this study, the inner surface morphology of the TAH was evaluated by a specially developed scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) system operating in the frequency range of 100-200 MHz. The inner sac of our TAH consisted of polyvinylchloride coated with polyurethane, and the SAM investigations were performed before and after the implantations in goats. The amplitude images of the SAM demonstrated protein adhesion on the inner surface of the TAH after the animal experiment, and the phase images showed distortion of the wall with spatial resolution of 0.2 microm. These results suggest the feasibility of a high-frequency ultrasound for evaluating the material fatigue of TAH.

  7. In vivo switchable optical- and acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Seungwan; Kim, Jaewoo; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) provides high resolution and large penetration depth by utilizing the high optical sensitivity and low scattering of ultrasound. Hybrid PAM systems can be classified into two categories: opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) and acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM). ORPAM provides a very high lateral resolution with a strong optical focus, but the penetration depth is limited to one optical transport mean free path. AR-PAM provides a relatively greater penetration depth using diffused light in biological tissues. The resolution of AR-PAM is determined by its ultrasonic parameters. In this study, we performed an in vivo testing of a switchable OR-/AR-PAM system. In this system, two modes can be switched by changing its collimator lens and optical fiber. The lateral resolution of OR-PAM was measured using a resolution test target, and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the edge spread function was 2.5 μm. To calculate the lateral resolution of ARPAM, a 6-μm-diameter carbon fiber was used, and the FWHM of the line spread function was 80.2 μm. We successfully demonstrated the multiscale imaging capability of the switchable OR-/AR-PAM system by visualizing microvascular networks in mouse ears, brain, legs, skin, and eyes.

  8. Investigation of crossed SAW fields by scanning acoustic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Behme, G; Hesjedal, T

    2001-07-01

    We used multimode scanning acoustic force microscopy (SAFM) for studying noncollinearly propagating Rayleigh and Love wave fields. By analyzing torsion and bending movement of SAFM cantilever, normal and in-plane wave oscillation components are accessible. The SAFM principle is the down-conversion of surface oscillations into cantilever vibrations caused by the nonlinearity of the tip-sample interaction. Through mixing of complementary oscillation components, phase velocities of crossed Rayleigh waves on GaAs and crossed Rayleigh and Love waves on the layered system SiO2/ST-cut quartz were obtained simultaneously. Now, it is possible to investigate elastic properties of submicron areas through multimode SAFM measurements. Finally, we present mixing experiments of four SAWs on GaAs and discuss the various influences on the measured SAFM amplitude and phase contrast.

  9. Acoustic and photoacoustic microscopy imaging of single leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Moore, Michael J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    An acoustic/photoacoustic microscope was used to create micrometer resolution images of stained cells from a blood smear. Pulse echo ultrasound images were made using a 1000 MHz transducer with 1 μm resolution. Photoacoustic images were made using a fiber coupled 532 nm laser, where energy losses through stimulated Raman scattering enabled output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm. The laser was focused onto the sample using a 20x objective, and the laser spot co-aligned with the 1000 MHz transducer opposite the laser. The blood smear was stained with Wright-Giemsa, a common metachromatic dye that differentially stains the cellular components for visual identification. A neutrophil, lymphocyte and a monocyte were imaged using acoustic and photoacoustic microscopy at two different wavelengths, 532 nm and 600 nm. Unique features in each imaging modality enabled identification of the different cell types. This imaging method provides a new way of imaging stained leukocytes, with applications towards identifying and differentiating cell types, and detecting disease at the single cell level.

  10. Actuation of atomic force microscopy microcantilevers using contact acoustic nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Torello, D.; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2013-11-15

    A new method of actuating atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers is proposed in which a high frequency (>5 MHz) wave modulated by a lower frequency (∼300 kHz) wave passes through a contact acoustic nonlinearity at the contact interface between the actuator and the cantilever chip. The nonlinearity converts the high frequency, modulated signal to a low frequency drive signal suitable for actuation of tapping-mode AFM probes. The higher harmonic content of this signal is filtered out mechanically by the cantilever transfer function, providing for clean output. A custom probe holder was designed and constructed using rapid prototyping technologies and off-the-shelf components and was interfaced with an Asylum Research MFP-3D AFM, which was then used to evaluate the performance characteristics with respect to standard hardware and linear actuation techniques. Using a carrier frequency of 14.19 MHz, it was observed that the cantilever output was cleaner with this actuation technique and added no significant noise to the system. This setup, without any optimization, was determined to have an actuation bandwidth on the order of 10 MHz, suitable for high speed imaging applications. Using this method, an image was taken that demonstrates the viability of the technique and is compared favorably to images taken with a standard AFM setup.

  11. Subsurface defect of amorphous carbon film imaged by near field acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, J. T.; Zhao, K. Y.; Zeng, H. R.; Song, H. Z.; Zheng, L. Y.; Li, G. R.; Yin, Q. R.

    2008-05-01

    Amorphous carbon films were examined by low frequency scanning-probe acoustic microscopy (LF-SPAM). Local elastic properties as well as topography were imaged in the acoustic mode. Two kinds of subsurface defects were revealed by the LF-SPAM method. The influence of the subsurface defects on the elastic properties was also discussed. The ability to image subsurface defects was dependent on the scan area and the scan speed. Our results showed that the low frequency scanning-probe acoustic microscopy is a useful method for imaging subsurface defects with high resolution.

  12. Evaluation of near-surface stress distributions in dissimilar welded joint by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Dong Ryul; Yoshida, Sanichiro; Sasaki, Tomohiro; Todd, Judith A; Park, Ik Keun

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results from a set of experiments designed to ultrasonically measure the near surface stresses distributed within a dissimilar metal welded plate. A scanning acoustic microscope (SAM), with a tone-burst ultrasonic wave frequency of 200 MHz, was used for the measurement of near surface stresses in the dissimilar welded plate between 304 stainless steel and low carbon steel. For quantitative data acquisition such as leaky surface acoustic wave (leaky SAW) velocity measurement, a point focus acoustic lens of frequency 200 MHz was used and the leaky SAW velocities within the specimen were precisely measured. The distributions of the surface acoustic wave velocities change according to the near-surface stresses within the joint. A three dimensional (3D) finite element simulation was carried out to predict numerically the stress distributions and compare with the experimental results. The experiment and FE simulation results for the dissimilar welded plate showed good agreement. This research demonstrates that a combination of FE simulation and ultrasonic stress measurements using SAW velocity distributions appear promising for determining welding residual stresses in dissimilar material joints.

  13. Scanning probe acoustic microscopy of extruded starch materials: direct visual evidence of starch crystal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongdong; Liu, Boxiang; Li, Mengxing; Wei, Min; Li, Hua; Liu, Peng; Wan, Tuo

    2013-10-15

    Scanning probe acoustic microscopy (SPAM) has been successfully used to study inorganic and keratin biomaterials. However, few studies have attempted to apply SPAM to structural study of non-keratin organic materials such as starch based materials. This study investigated hardness and surface finish to establish sample preparation method suitable for SPAM imaging and acquired clear acoustic images of extruded starch materials. Acquired acoustic images directly exhibited certain structure of starch materials and provided visual evidence of starch material components and aggregates. In addition, through correlating acoustic images with X-ray diffraction data, crystal-structural information in nano-scale was obtained and acoustic image contrast showed a linear relationship with starch amylose content in extruded starch materials.

  14. Quantitative photoacoustic microscopy of optical absorption coefficients from acoustic spectra in the optical diffusive regime.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zijian; Favazza, Christopher; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Wang, Lihong V

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) microscopy (PAM) can image optical absorption contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution in the optical diffusive regime. Conventionally, accurate quantification in PAM requires knowledge of the optical fluence attenuation, acoustic pressure attenuation, and detection bandwidth. We circumvent this requirement by quantifying the optical absorption coefficients from the acoustic spectra of PA signals acquired at multiple optical wavelengths. With the acoustic spectral method, the absorption coefficients of an oxygenated bovine blood phantom at 560, 565, 570, and 575 nm were quantified with errors of <3%. We also quantified the total hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygen saturation in a live mouse. Compared with the conventional amplitude method, the acoustic spectral method provides greater quantification accuracy in the optical diffusive regime. The limitations of the acoustic spectral method was also discussed.

  15. High-spatial-resolution sub-surface imaging using a laser-based acoustic microscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Balogun, Oluwaseyi; Cole, Garrett D; Huber, Robert; Chinn, Diane; Murray, Todd W; Spicer, James B

    2011-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy techniques operating at frequencies in the gigahertz range are suitable for the elastic characterization and interior imaging of solid media with micrometer-scale spatial resolution. Acoustic wave propagation at these frequencies is strongly limited by energy losses, particularly from attenuation in the coupling media used to transmit ultrasound to a specimen, leading to a decrease in the depth in a specimen that can be interrogated. In this work, a laser-based acoustic microscopy technique is presented that uses a pulsed laser source for the generation of broadband acoustic waves and an optical interferometer for detection. The use of a 900-ps microchip pulsed laser facilitates the generation of acoustic waves with frequencies extending up to 1 GHz which allows for the resolution of micrometer-scale features in a specimen. Furthermore, the combination of optical generation and detection approaches eliminates the use of an ultrasonic coupling medium, and allows for elastic characterization and interior imaging at penetration depths on the order of several hundred micrometers. Experimental results illustrating the use of the laser-based acoustic microscopy technique for imaging micrometer-scale subsurface geometrical features in a 70-μm-thick single-crystal silicon wafer with a (100) orientation are presented.

  16. Characterizing intestinal strictures with acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hao; Xu, Guan; Liu, Shengchun; Johnson, Laura A.; Moons, David S.; Higgins, Peter D. R.; Rice, Michael D.; Ni, Jun; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease, which may cause obstructing intestinal strictures due to inflammation, fibrosis (deposition of collagen), or a combination of both. Identifying the different stages of the disease progression is still challenging. In this work, we indicated the feasibility of non-invasively characterizing intestinal strictures using photoacoustic imaging (PAI), utilizing the uniquely optical absorption of hemoglobin and collagen. Surgically removed human intestinal stricture specimens were investigated with a prototype PAI system. 2D PA images with acoustic resolution at wavelength 532, 1210 and 1310 nm were formulated, and furthermore, the PA histochemical components images which show the microscopic distributions of histochemical components were solved. Imaging experiments on surgically removed human intestinal specimens has demonstrated the solved PA images were significantly different associated with the presence of fibrosis, which could be applied to characterize the intestinal strictures for given specimens.

  17. Nondestructive monitoring damage in composites using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, A. C.; Kessler, L. W.; Dos Reis, H. L. M.

    1992-01-01

    Several Nicalon fiber reinforced LAS (lithium alumino-silicate) glass matrix composites were tested to study the relation between the residual strength and the different amounts of damage. The samples were fatigued by four-point cyclic loading at a 5 Hz rate at 500 C for a different number of cycles. 10 MHz scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM) images were taken to monitor damage on the samples. Our SLAM results indicate that there were defects already existing throughout the sample before fatigue, and the resultant damage pattern from fatigue could be related to the initial defect distribution in the sample. Finally, the fatigued samples were fractured and the residual strength data could not be explained by the cyclic fatigue alone. Rather, the damage patterns evident in the SLAM images were needed to explain the scatter in the data. The results show that SLAM is useful in nondestructively monitoring damage and estimating residual strength of fatigued ceramic composites.

  18. Characterization of organic film with scanning acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, Chiaki; Du, Jikai; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2003-08-01

    The present article reports a technique to measure velocity of an organic film deposited on a homogeneous substrate, wherein the thickness of the film and the diameter of the measured area of the specimen are in the order of a few microns. A thinly sliced human kidney was selected as an example of an organic film. The thickness of the specimen was substantially 3 μm. For the substrate, fused quartz was used because its elastic properties are known and stable. The spherical acoustic lens was used to determine the position for measurement. The frequencies at 400 MHz and 600 MHz were used for the measurement and the visualization, respectively. The generation of the Rayleigh waves under the above conditions was simulated by numerical calculations based onthe wave propagation theory for layered media.

  19. Early detection of melanoma with the combined use of acoustic microscopy, infrared reflectance and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagiannis, Georgios T.; Grivas, Ioannis; Tsingotjidou, Anastasia; Apostolidis, Georgios K.; Grigoriadou, Ifigeneia; Dori, I.; Poulatsidou, Kyriaki-Nefeli; Doumas, Argyrios; Wesarg, Stefan; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2015-03-01

    Malignant melanoma is a form of skin cancer, with increasing incidence worldwide. Early diagnosis is crucial for the prognosis and treatment of the disease. The objective of this study is to develop a novel animal model of melanoma and apply a combination of the non-invasive imaging techniques acoustic microscopy, infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies, for the detection of developing tumors. Acoustic microscopy provides information about the 3D structure of the tumor, whereas, both spectroscopic modalities give qualitative insight of biochemical changes during melanoma development. In order to efficiently set up the final devices, propagation of ultrasonic and electromagnetic waves in normal skin and melanoma simulated structures was performed. Synthetic and grape-extracted melanin (simulated tumors), endermally injected, were scanned and compared to normal skin. For both cases acoustic microscopy with central operating frequencies of 110MHz and 175MHz were used, resulting to the tomographic imaging of the simulated tumor, while with the spectroscopic modalities IR and Raman differences among spectra of normal and melanin- injected sites were identified in skin depth. Subsequently, growth of actual tumors in an animal melanoma model, with the use of human malignant melanoma cells was achieved. Acoustic microscopy and IR and Raman spectroscopies were also applied. The development of tumors at different time points was displayed using acoustic microscopy. Moreover, the changes of the IR and Raman spectra were studied between the melanoma tumors and adjacent healthy skin. The most significant changes between healthy skin and the melanoma area were observed in the range of 900-1800cm-1 and 350-2000cm-1, respectively.

  20. Quantitative void characterization in structural ceramics using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Generazio, E. R.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) to characterize artificially seeded voids in sintered silicon nitride structural ceramic specimens was investigated. Using trigonometric relationships and Airy's diffraction theory, predictions of internal void depth and size were obtained from acoustic diffraction patterns produced by the voids. Agreement was observed between actual and predicted void depths. However, predicted void diameters were generally much greater than actual diameters. Precise diameter predictions are difficult to obtain due to measurement uncertainty and the limitations of 100 MHz SLAM applied to typical ceramic specimens.

  1. Two-axis water-immersible microscanning mirror for scanning optics and acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Song; Zou, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Fast multiaxis scanning is useful for not only optical but also acoustic microscopic imaging. Although they have been used for optical scanning, the application of (MEMS) scanning mirrors in acoustic microscopy is still very limited due to their small mirror plate size, and more importantly, inability to operate in liquids (as ultrasound coupling media). A microfabricated two-axis water-immersible scanning mirror for optical and acoustic microscopy is reported. It has an optical and acoustically reflective mirror plate (6 mm×4 mm) to provide numerical aperture for ultrasound beam steering. Electromagnetic and mechanical analysis and simulation were conducted to estimate the mechanical tilting angle and resonance frequency of both fast and slow axes, which matches well with the measurement results. The fast axis has a resonant frequency of 320 Hz in air and 220 Hz in water, which is more than 10 times higher than that of the slow axis (24 Hz in air and 14 Hz in water). Under a 100-mA driving current, the scanning angles of the fast axis reached ±9.5 deg in both air and water at the resonance frequency, respectively. The scanning angles of the slow axis reached ±15 deg in air and ±12.5 deg in water at resonant frequencies, respectively. Raster scanning of a collimated laser beam was achieved by driving both axes simultaneously close to their own resonance frequencies. The feasibility of using the two-axis water-immersible scanning mirror in scanning acoustic microscopy was also demonstrated.

  2. Performance Characterization of a Switchable Acoustic Resolution and Optical Resolution Photoacoustic Microscopy System.

    PubMed

    Moothanchery, Mohesh; Pramanik, Manojit

    2017-02-12

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a scalable bioimaging modality; one can choose low acoustic resolution with deep penetration depth or high optical resolution with shallow imaging depth. High spatial resolution and deep penetration depth is rather difficult to achieve using a single system. Here we report a switchable acoustic resolution and optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-OR-PAM) system in a single imaging system capable of both high resolution and low resolution on the same sample. Lateral resolution of 4.2 µm (with ~1.4 mm imaging depth) and lateral resolution of 45 μm (with ~7.6 mm imaging depth) was successfully demonstrated using a switchable system. In vivo blood vasculature imaging was also performed for its biological application.

  3. Performance Characterization of a Switchable Acoustic Resolution and Optical Resolution Photoacoustic Microscopy System

    PubMed Central

    Moothanchery, Mohesh; Pramanik, Manojit

    2017-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a scalable bioimaging modality; one can choose low acoustic resolution with deep penetration depth or high optical resolution with shallow imaging depth. High spatial resolution and deep penetration depth is rather difficult to achieve using a single system. Here we report a switchable acoustic resolution and optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-OR-PAM) system in a single imaging system capable of both high resolution and low resolution on the same sample. Lateral resolution of 4.2 µm (with ~1.4 mm imaging depth) and lateral resolution of 45 μm (with ~7.6 mm imaging depth) was successfully demonstrated using a switchable system. In vivo blood vasculature imaging was also performed for its biological application. PMID:28208676

  4. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of residual stresses in ceramics: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu

    1992-01-01

    Several reviews have highlighted a number of applications of scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) to metals and semiconductors which show that SEAM can provide new information on surface and near-surface features of such materials, but there have been few studies attempting to determine the capabilities of SEAM for characterizing ceramic materials. We have recently observed image contrast in SEAM from residual stress fields induced in brittle materials by Vickers indentations that is strongly dependent on the electron beam chopping frequency. We have also recently developed a three-dimensional mathematical model of signal generation and contrast in SEAM, appropriate to the brittle materials studied, that we use as a starting point in this paper for modeling the effect of residual stress fields on the generated electron acoustic signal. The influence of the electron beam chopping frequency is also considered under restrictive assumptions.

  5. Characterization of Homopolymer and Polymer Blend Films by Phase Sensitive Acoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Wannemacher, Reinhold; Grill, Wolfgang

    2003-03-01

    CHARACTERIZATION OF HOMOPOLYMER AND POLYMER BLEND FILMS BY PHASE SENSITIVE ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY W Ngwa, R Wannemacher, W Grill Institute of Experimental Physics II, University of Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig, Germany Abstract We have used phase sensitive acoustic microscopy (PSAM) to study homopolymer thin films of polystyrene (PS) and poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), as well as PS/PMMA blend films. We show from our results that PSAM can be used as a complementary and highly valuable technique for elucidating the three-dimensional (3D) morphology and micromechanical properties of thin films. Three-dimensional image acquisition with vector contrast provides the basis for: complex V(z) analysis (per image pixel), 3D image processing, height profiling, and subsurface image analysis of the polymer films. Results show good agreement with previous studies. In addition, important new information on the three dimensional structure and properties of polymer films is obtained. Homopolymer film structure analysis reveals (pseudo-) dewetting by retraction of droplets, resulting in a morphology that can serve as a starting point for the analysis of polymer blend thin films. The outcome of confocal laser scanning microscopy studies, performed on the same samples are correlated with the obtained results. Advantages and limitations of PSAM are discussed.

  6. Reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy for detecting internal voids in structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The reliability of 100 MHz scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting internal voids in sintered specimens of silicon nitride and silicon carbide was evaluated. The specimens contained artificially implanted voids and were positioned at depths ranging up to 2 mm below the specimen surface. Detection probability of 0.90 at a 0.95 confidence level was determined as a function of material, void diameter, and void depth. The statistical results presented for void detectability indicate some of the strengths and limitations of SLAM as a nondestructive evaluation technique for structural ceramics.

  7. Cutting down the forest of peaks in acoustic dynamic atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, C; Ares, P; de Pablo, P J; Gómez-Herrero, J

    2008-12-01

    Acoustic dynamic force microscopy in liquids is a fundamental technique for the investigation of biological samples under physiological conditions. However, it shows an important drawback that consists of producing a myriad of resonance peaks, known as the forest of peaks, which hides the natural resonance frequency of the cantilever and prevents an optimum operation of the microscope. In this work, we propose a simple remedy for this problem, which consists on adding a small clay damper to the dither piezoelectric. The resulting frequency spectrum exhibits a single resonance peak that is comparable with the one obtained using magnetic excitation.

  8. Tensile strain measurements of ceramic fibers using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Renee M.; Vary, Alex

    1992-08-01

    A noncontacting technique using scanning laser acoustic microscopy for making in situ tensile strain measurements of small diameter fibers was implemented for the tensile strain analysis of individual Nicalon SiC fibers (nominal diameter 15 microns). Stress vs strain curves for the fibers were plotted from the experimental data. The mean elastic modulus of the fibers was determined to be 185.3 GPa. Similar measurements were made for Carborundum SiC fibers (nominal diameter 28 microns) and Saphikon sapphire fibers (nominal diameter 140 microns).

  9. Microstructure-Sensitive Investigation of Fracture Using Acoustic Emission Coupled With Electron Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisner, Brian; Cabal, Mike; Vanniamparambiland, Prashanth A.; Leser, William; Hochhalter, Jacob; Kontsos, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    A novel technique using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring is proposed to investigate microstructure-sensitive fatigue and fracture of metals. The coupling between quasi in situ microscopy with actual in situ nondestructive evaluation falls into the ICME framework and the idea of quantitative data-driven characterization of material behavior. To validate the use of AE monitoring inside the SEM chamber, Aluminum 2024-B sharp notch specimen were tested both inside and outside the microscope using a small scale mechanical testing device. Subsequently, the same type of specimen was tested inside the SEM chamber. Load data were correlated with both AE information and observations of microcracks around grain boundaries as well as secondary cracks, voids, and slip bands. The preliminary results are in excellent agreement with similar findings at the mesoscale. Extensions of the application of this novel technique are discussed.

  10. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of residual stresses in ceramics - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a three-dimensional mathematical model of signal generation and contrast in brittle materials and uses the model to simulate the effect of residual stress fields on the scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM)-generated electron acoustic signal. According to the model, a positive (tensile) strain produces an increase in the output signal, whereas a negative (compressive) strain produces a decrease in the ouput signal. Dark field contrast conditions occur at a chopping frequency at which V2 - V1 is greater than 0 (where V2 = V is the SEAM output in a region of residual stresses, and V1 is the output in a stress-free region of the sample). Under ideal conditions (maximum contrast) V1 approaches zero. It was found that tensile strains of the order 0.2-0.3 percent, possible in brittle materials, would produce a variation of the acoustic output signal of the order 10 nV (about 1 percent), well within the image contrast and signal processing capability of the SEAM electronics.

  11. Visualization of localized elastic properties in human tooth and jawbone as revealed by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shelke, Amit; Blume, Maximilian; Mularczyk, Michael; Landes, Constantin; Sader, Robert; Bereiter-Hahn, Jurgen

    2013-05-01

    The elastic properties of human canine and supporting alveolar bone are measured by the distribution of localized speed of sound using scanning acoustic microscopy. Methods for the dynamic, non-destructive diagnostics of dental hard tissues can have a key role in the early detection of demineralization processes and carious lesions, and they are supposed to open the possibility of early dental restorations. The localized distribution of the ultrasound velocity in canine tooth and alveolar bone was obtained using scanning acoustic microscopy with a 5- and 30-MHz transducer. An acoustic material signature curve signifies the interference of the waves and quantitatively maps the localized speed of sound in alveolar bone and the canine tooth. Seven samples, consisting of alveolar jawbone and tooth sliced along the coronally apical axis, were investigated. The average speed of sound was determined along three independent cross sections at enamel, dentin and cortical bone. The average speed of sound in enamel, bone and dentin was SD 3460 ± 193 m/s, 3232 ± 113 m/s and 2928 ± 106 m/s. The distribution of sound wave propagation reveals a decrease in sound speed from the peripheral parts within the enamel and dentin layers toward the proximal zones. These results prove the possibility of linking the elastic properties to different areas within the osseous and dental hard tissues and visualize them in an extremely high local resolution. The results serve as a basis for further study and substantiate the enormous potential of ultrasound based analysis in the field of dento-alveolar diagnosis.

  12. SAM in a Nutshell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Givens, Larry R.

    2000-01-01

    Explains what the Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers' Strategic Assessment Model (SAM) is and how to use it to achieve organizational excellence through continuous improvement. Showing features of both the Malcolm Baldrige programs and the Balanced Scorecard, the SAM components are described along with an explanation of the four…

  13. Heterotypic Sam-Sam association between Odin-Sam1 and Arap3-Sam: binding affinity and structural insights.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Flavia A; Marasco, Daniela; Pirone, Luciano; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina L; Pedone, Emilia M; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Leone, Marilisa

    2013-01-02

    Arap3 is a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase effector protein that plays a role as GTPase activator (GAP) for Arf6 and RhoA. Arap3 contains a sterile alpha motif (Sam) domain that has high sequence homology with the Sam domain of the EphA2-receptor (EphA2-Sam). Both Arap3-Sam and EphA2-Sam are able to associate with the Sam domain of the lipid phosphatase Ship2 (Ship2-Sam). Recently, we reported a novel interaction between the first Sam domain of Odin (Odin-Sam1), a protein belonging to the ANKS (ANKyrin repeat and Sam domain containing) family, and EphA2-Sam. In our latest work, we applied NMR spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to characterize the association between Arap3-Sam and Odin-Sam1. We show that these two Sam domains interact with low micromolar affinity. Moreover, by means of molecular docking techniques, supported by NMR data, we demonstrate that Odin-Sam1 and Arap3-Sam might bind with a topology that is common to several Sam-Sam complexes. The revealed structural details form the basis for the design of potential peptide antagonists that could be used as chemical tools to investigate functional aspects related to heterotypic Arap3-Sam associations.

  14. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of indentation-induced cracks and residual stresses in ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu; Ravichandran, M. V.; Knowles, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) to characterize ceramic materials is assessed. SEAM images of Vickers indentations in SiC whisker-reinforced alumina clearly reveal not only the radial cracks, the length of which can be used to estimate the fracture toughness of the material, but also reveal strong contrast, interpreted as arising from the combined effects of lateral cracks and the residual stress field left in the SiC whisker-reinforced alumina by the indenter. The strong contrast is removed after the material is heat treated at 1000 C to relieve the residual stresses around the indentations. A comparison of these observations with SEAM and reflected polarized light observations of Vickers indentations in soda-lime glass both before and after heat treatment confirms the interpretation of the strong contrast.

  15. Jitter reduction technique for acoustic radiation force impulse microscopy via photoacoustic detection

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Bong Jin; Yoon, Changhan; Man Park, Jin; Hwang, Jae Youn; Shung, K. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a jitter noise reduction technique for acoustic radiation force impulse microscopy via photoacoustic detection (PA-ARFI), which promises to be capable of measuring cell mechanics. To reduce the jitter noise induced by Q-switched pulsed laser operated at high repetition frequency, photoacoustic signals from the surface of an ultrasound transducer are aligned by cross-correlation and peak-to-peak detection, respectively. Each method is then employed to measure the displacements of a target sample in an agar phantom and a breast cancer cell due to ARFI application, followed by the quantitative comparison between their performances. The suggested methods for PA-ARFI significantly reduce jitter noises, thus allowing us to measure displacements of a target cell due to ARFI application by less than 3 μm. PMID:26367579

  16. Noncontact microrheology at acoustic frequencies using frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S

    2010-08-01

    We report an atomic force microscopy (AFM) method for assessing elastic and viscous properties of soft samples at acoustic frequencies under non-contact conditions. The method can be used to measure material properties via frequency modulation and is based on hydrodynamics theory of thin gaps we developed here. A cantilever with an attached microsphere is forced to oscillate tens of nanometers above a sample. The elastic modulus and viscosity of the sample are estimated by measuring the frequency-dependence of the phase lag between the oscillating microsphere and the driving piezo at various heights above the sample. This method features an effective area of pyramidal tips used in contact AFM but with only piconewton applied forces. Using this method, we analyzed polyacrylamide gels of different stiffness and assessed graded mechanical properties of guinea pig tectorial membrane. The technique enables the study of microrheology of biological tissues that produce or detect sound.

  17. Reliability of void detection in structural ceramics using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Klima, S. J.; Kiser, J. D.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting surface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. Specimens of sintered silicon nitride and sintered silicon carbide, seeded with surface voids, were examined by SLAM at an ultrasonic frequency of 100 MHz in the as fired condition and after surface polishing. It was observed that polishing substantially increased void detectability. Voids as small as 100 micrometers in diameter were detected in polished specimens with 0.90 probability at a 0.95 confidence level. In addition, inspection times were reduced up to a factor of 10 after polishing. The applicability of the SLAM technique for detection of naturally occurring flaws of similar dimensions to the seeded voids is discussed. A FORTRAN program listing is given for calculating and plotting flaw detection statistics.

  18. In situ measurement of the reinforcement modulus in a metal matrix composite by acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Canumalla, S.; Gordon, G.A.; Pangborn, R.N.

    1995-12-31

    The mechanical properties of metal-matrix composites have been observed to be a strong function of the content of non-fiber inclusions. Shot particles, with the nominal composition of the reinforcement, have been found to crack prematurely, thus representing prefer-red failure initiation sites under mechanical and thermal fatigue of discontinuous, alumina-silicate fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composites. To better understand the differences between the responses of the shot and fibers to loading, the Young`s modulus of the shot is measured and compared to that of the fibers. Scanning acoustic microscopy is used to nondestructively measure the modulus of the shot in situ, and the fiber modulus is obtained from the previously measured composite response. The shot, with a modulus of 131.5 GPa, has a Young`s modulus that is approximately 40% lower than that of the fibers. The influence of this on the composite response will be discussed.

  19. Full-circular surface acoustic wave excitation for high resolution acoustic microscopy using spherical lens and time gate technology.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, I; Katakura, K; Ogura, Y

    1999-01-01

    With a fixed gate width under the condition where the focus of an acoustic lens was set inside the sample, we varied signal taking-in time. Discrimination was made between differences in time required for an ultrasonic signal reflected from the sample to reach the acoustic lens. This process also enabled three types of images to be obtained separately: the surface reflection wave image, a combination of images based on the interference of the surface reflection wave with surface acoustic waves, and the surface acoustic wave image. Thus it was presumed that this process also would reveal the causes of image contrast and allow an easy interpretation of images. Furthermore, the image resolution was improved, because the surface acoustic wave image was drawn by an ultrasonic beam produced by full-circular surface acoustic wave excitation propagating toward the center converging concentrically; the theoretical resolution was 0.4 times the value of the surface acoustic wave wavelength lambda(R) and independent of the defocus value of the acoustic lens. Several kinds of samples were observed with this method. The results showed that the new method permitted observation of the internal structures of samples while offering new knowledge through the data reflecting the ultrasonic wave damping and scatter drawn on the display.

  20. Synthia Tonn, SAM Engineer

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) is a suite of instruments developed for use on the Mars Science Laboratory, designed to help find out whether or not Mars ever supported life. This video profiles ...

  1. SAM Photovoltaic Model Technical Reference

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, P.

    2015-05-27

    This manual describes the photovoltaic performance model in the System Advisor Model (SAM). The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory maintains and distributes SAM, which is available as a free download from https://sam.nrel.gov. These descriptions are based on SAM 2015.1.30 (SSC 41).

  2. Mechanical characterization of porous nano-thin films by use of atomic force acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kopycinska-Müller, M; Clausner, A; Yeap, K-B; Köhler, B; Kuzeyeva, N; Mahajan, S; Savage, T; Zschech, E; Wolter, K-J

    2016-03-01

    The indentation modulus of thin films of porous organosilicate glass with a nominal porosity content of 30% and thicknesses of 350nm, 200nm, and 46nm is determined with help of atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM). This scanning probe microscopy based technique provides the highest possible depth resolution. The values of the indentation modulus obtained for the 350nm and 200nm thin films were respectively 6.3GPa±0.2GPa and 7.2GPa±0.2GPa and free of the substrate influence. The sample with the thickness of 46nm was tested in four independent measurement sets. Cantilevers with two different tip radii of about 150nm and less than 50nm were applied in different force ranges to obtain a result for the indentation modulus that was free of the substrate influence. A detailed data analysis yielded value of 8.3GPa±0.4GPa for the thinnest film. The values of the indentation modulus obtained for the thin films of porous organosilicate glasses increased with the decreasing film thickness. The stiffening observed for the porous films could be explained by evolution of the pore topology as a function of the film thickness. To ensure that our results were free of the substrate influence, we analyzed the ratio of the sample deformation as well as the tip radius to the film thickness. The results obtained for the substrate parameter were compared for all the measurement series and showed, which ones could be declared as free of the substrate influence.

  3. Real time and non-destructive analysis of tablet coating thickness using acoustic microscopy and infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bikiaris, D; Koutri, I; Alexiadis, D; Damtsios, A; Karagiannis, G

    2012-11-15

    Tablet coating thicknesses were estimated using several techniques such as weight gain and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), in comparison with acoustic microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Acoustic microscopy, used for the first time in such an application, is based on the physical phenomenon of ultrasound propagation through the materials and the echoes generated by their interfaces. Based on the time of flights (TOFs) of the echoes from the coating surface and the tablet, it is possible to calculate the coating thickness. In order to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of these methods, drug tablets were coated with Kollicoat SR polymer for several times, so that to prepare tablets with different coating thicknesses. Tablets with 3, 6 and 9 wt% coating material have been prepared and based on SEM micrographs it was found that the tablet coating thickness is 71.99 ± 1.2 μm, 92.5 ± 1.7 μm and 132.3 ± 2.1 μm, respectively (SEM analysis). The tablet coating thicknesses measured with acoustic microscopy and infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, were in agreement with those obtained using SEM. This verifies that both techniques can be successfully applied for real time and non-destructive thickness measurements of tablet coating. Furthermore, both techniques, compared with SEM and weight gained measurements, are fast and fully automated.

  4. Atomic force acoustic microscopy: Influence of the lateral contact stiffness on the elastic measurements.

    PubMed

    Flores-Ruiz, F J; Espinoza-Beltrán, F J; Diliegros-Godines, C J; Siqueiros, J M; Herrera-Gómez, A

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force acoustic microscopy is a dynamic technique where the resonances of a cantilever, that has its tip in contact with the sample, are used to quantify local elastic properties of surfaces. Since the contact resonance frequencies (CRFs) monotonically increase with the tip-sample contact stiffness, they are used to evaluate the local elastic properties of the surfaces through a suitable contact mechanical model. The CRFs depends on both, normal and lateral contact stiffness, kN and kS respectively, where the last one is taken either as constant (kS<1), or as zero, leading to uncertainty in the estimation of the elastic properties of composite materials. In this work, resonance spectra for free and contact vibration were used in a finite element analysis of cantilevers to show the influence of kS in the resonance curves due to changes in the kS/kN ratio. These curves have regions for the different vibrational modes that are both, strongly and weakly dependent on kS, and they can be used in a selective manner to obtain a precise mapping of elastic properties.

  5. Calibration-free absolute quantification of optical absorption coefficients using acoustic spectra in 3D photoacoustic microscopy of biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zijian; Hu, Song; Wang, Lihong V

    2010-06-15

    Optical absorption is closely associated with many physiological important parameters, such as the concentration and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, and it can be used to quantify the concentrations of nonfluorescent molecules. We propose a method to use acoustic spectra of photoacoustic signals to quantify the absolute optical absorption. This method is self-calibrating and thus insensitive to variations in the optical fluence. Factors such as system bandwidth and acoustic attenuation can affect the quantification but can be canceled by dividing the acoustic spectra measured at two optical wavelengths. Using optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy, we quantified the absolute optical absorption of black ink samples with various concentrations. We also quantified both the concentration and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in a live mouse in absolute units.

  6. A scanning acoustic microscope discriminates cancer cells in fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Katsutoshi; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) discriminates lesions in sections by assessing the speed of sound (SOS) or attenuation of sound (AOS) through tissues within a few minutes without staining; however, its clinical use in cytological diagnosis is unknown. We applied a thin layer preparation method to observe benign and malignant effusions using SAM. Although SAM is inferior in detecting nuclear features than light microscopy, it can differentiate malignant from benign cells using the higher SOS and AOS values and large irregular cell clusters that are typical features of carcinomas. Moreover, each single malignant cell exhibits characteristic cytoplasmic features such as a large size, irregular borders and secretory or cytoskeletal content. By adjusting the observation range, malignant cells are differentiated from benign cells easily using SAM. Subtle changes in the functional and structural heterogeneity of tumour cells were pursuable with a different digital data of SAM. SAM can be a useful tool for screening malignant cells in effusions before light microscopic observation. Higher AOS values in malignant cells compared with those of benign cells support the feasibility of a novel sonodynamic therapy for malignant effusions.

  7. Adapting SAM for CDF

    SciTech Connect

    D. Bonham et al.

    2003-10-13

    The CDF and D0 experiments probe the high-energy frontier and as they do so have accumulated hundreds of Terabytes of data on the way to petabytes of data over the next two years. The experiments have made a commitment to use the developing Grid based on the SAM system to handle these data. The D0 SAM has been extended for use in CDF as common patterns of design emerged to meet the similar requirements of these experiments. The process by which the merger was achieved is explained with particular emphasis on lessons learned concerning the database design patterns plus realization of the use cases.

  8. Analytical Model of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever Tip-Sample Surface Interactions for Various Acoustic-Atomic Force Microscopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model of the interaction of the cantilever tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is developed that accounts for the nonlinearity of the tip-surface interaction force. The interaction is modeled as a nonlinear spring coupled at opposite ends to linear springs representing cantilever and sample surface oscillators. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a standard iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and the commonly used intermittent contact mode (TappingMode) generally available on AFMs. The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample for the amplitude and phase images generated by the A-AFM techniques. Application of the model to RDF-AFUM and intermittent soft contact phase images of LaRC-cp2 polyimide polymer is discussed. The model predicts variations in the Young modulus of the material of 24 percent from the RDF-AFUM image and 18 percent from the intermittent soft contact image. Both predictions are in good agreement with the literature value of 21 percent obtained from independent, macroscopic measurements of sheet polymer material.

  9. Mapping of elasticity and damping in an α + β titanium alloy through atomic force acoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Phani, M Kalyan; Kumar, Anish; Jayakumar, T; Samwer, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Summary The distribution of elastic stiffness and damping of individual phases in an α + β titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) measured by using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) is reported in the present study. The real and imaginary parts of the contact stiffness k * are obtained from the contact-resonance spectra and by using these two quantities, the maps of local elastic stiffness and the damping factor are derived. The evaluation of the data is based on the mass distribution of the cantilever with damped flexural modes. The cantilever dynamics model considering damping, which was proposed recently, has been used for mapping of indentation modulus and damping of different phases in a metallic structural material. The study indicated that in a Ti-6Al-4V alloy the metastable β phase has the minimum modulus and the maximum damping followed by α′- and α-phases. Volume fractions of the individual phases were determined by using a commercial material property evaluation software and were validated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) studies on one of the heat-treated samples. The volume fractions of the phases and the modulus measured through AFAM are used to derive average modulus of the bulk sample which is correlated with the bulk elastic properties obtained by ultrasonic velocity measurements. The average modulus of the specimens estimated by AFAM technique is found to be within 5% of that obtained by ultrasonic velocity measurements. The effect of heat treatments on the ultrasonic attenuation in the bulk sample could also be understood based on the damping measurements on individual phases using AFAM. PMID:25977847

  10. High frequency acoustic microscopy for the determination of porosity and Young's modulus in high burnup uranium dioxide nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, M.; Laux, D.; Cappia, F.; Laurie, M.; Van Uffelen, P.; Rondinella, V.V.; Despaux, G.

    2015-07-01

    During irradiation UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel experiences the development of a non-uniform distribution of porosity which contributes to establish varying mechanical properties along the radius of the pellet. Radial variations of the porosity and of elastic properties in high burnup UO{sub 2} pellet can be investigated via high frequency acoustic microscopy. Ultrasound waves are generated by a piezoelectric transducer and focused on the sample, after having travelled through a coupling liquid. The elastic properties of the material are related to the velocity of the generated Rayleigh surface wave (VR). A 67 MWd/kgU UO{sub 2} pellet was characterized using the acoustic microscope installed in the hot cells of the Institute of Transuranium Elements: 90 MHz frequency was applied, methanol was used as coupling liquid and VR was measured at different radial positions. By comparing the porosity values obtained via acoustic microscopy with those determined using ceramographic image analysis a good agreement was found, especially in the areas close to the centre. In addition Young's modulus was calculated and its radial profile was correlated to the corresponding burnup profile. (authors)

  11. Characterization of acoustic lenses with the Foucault test by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed Mohamed, E. T.; Abdelrahman, A.; Pluta, M.; Grill, W.

    2010-03-01

    In this work, the Foucault knife-edge test, which has traditionally been known as the classic test for optical imaging devices, is used to characterize an acoustic lens for operation at 1.2 GHz. A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) was used as the illumination and detection device utilizing its pinhole instead of the classical knife edge that is normally employed in the Foucault test. Information about the geometrical characteristics, such as the half opening angle of the acoustic lens, were determined as well as the quality of the calotte of the lens used for focusing. The smallest focal spot size that could be achieved with the examined lens employed as a spherical reflector was found to be about 1 μm. By comparison to the idealized resolution a degradation of about a factor of 2 can be deduced. This limits the actual quality of the acoustic focus.

  12. Scanning Acoustic Microscope of 3D-Interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wai Kong, Lay; Diebold, A. C.; Rudack, A.; Arkalgud, S.

    2009-09-01

    The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering of the University at Albany in collaboration with International SEMATECH is investigating the use of Scanning Acoustic Microscope (SAM) for analyzing 3D Interconnects. SAM is a non-destructive metrology technique which utilizes high frequency ultrasound to generate a microscopic image of the internal parts of a specimen. The goal of this project is to develop microscopic techniques for evaluating Through-Silicon Vias (TSVs) for 3D-Interconnects. Preliminary data shows voids and other defects in the interface between bonded wafers as shown in Figure 1. Our SAM laboratory system operates at 230 MHz and has a spatial resolution of 5-10 μm and focal length of 5.9 mm on a silicon wafer. The spatial resolution and sampling depth depend on the ultrasonic frequency, sound velocity, focal length and diameter of piezoelectric crystal. Typically, the silicon wafers have a thickness of 775 μm before they are bonded. Our initial work is focused on blanket wafers in order to develop the bonding process. The next step is to bond wafers with test die where the patterning obscures the interface. This paper will discuss the limitations of SAM and compare it to infrared microscopy which is another important imaging capability for 3D Interconnect. We also discuss the current status of research into more advanced acoustic microscopy methods and how this might impact 3D Interconnect imaging.

  13. Other Resources Related to SAM

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn more about websites and information related to EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM), including key EPA collaborators, laboratories, and research centers.

  14. Numerical and experimental analysis of high frequency acoustic microscopy and infrared reflectance system for early detection of melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagiannis, Georgios; Apostolidis, Georgios; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma is a very malicious type of cancer as it metastasizes early and hence its late diagnosis leads to death. Consequently, early diagnosis of melanoma and its removal is considered the most effective way of treatment. We present a design of a high frequency acoustic microscopy and infrared reflectance system for the early detection of melanoma. Specifically, the identification of morphological changes related to carcinogenesis is required. In this work, we simulate of the propagation of the ultrasonic waves of the order of 100 MHz as well as of electromagnetic waves of the order of 100 THz in melanoma structures targeting to the estimation and optimization of the basic characteristics of the systems. The simulation results of the acoustic microscopy subsystem aim to provide information such as the geometry of the transducer, the center frequency of operation, the focal length where the power transmittance is optimum and the spot size in focal length. As far as the infrared is concerned the optimal frequency range and the spot illumination size of the external probe is provided. This information is next used to assemble a properly designed system which is applied to melanoma phantoms as well as real skin lesions. Finally, the measurement data are visualized to reveal the information of the experimented structures, proving noteworthy accuracy.

  15. Cryogenic acoustic microscopy. Annual technical report, 1 April 1985-31 March 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Quate, C.F.

    1986-07-01

    The progress on the ultrahigh-resolution acoustic microscope is described. Two main areas are investigated: signal-to-noise ratio and a mechanical scanner. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is improved by developing higher-efficiency acoustic transducers for generating coherent sound and superconducting bolometers for broadband detection of sound. Some experiments to understand the effects of pressurizing liquid helium on the propagation of high-intensity focused sound waves in superfluid helium are described. The possibility of utilizing parametric amplification of sound in liquid helium to improve the SNR is reported. Finally, the design and development of a new scanner with a wider scanning range with great precision operating in pressurized liquid helium are also described.

  16. Determination of near-surface material properties by line-focus acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Achenbach, J.D.; Li, W.

    1996-12-31

    A line-focus acoustic microscope is used in conjunction with a multiple wave-mode method to determine elastic constants from a single V(z) measurement. V(z) curves which include contributions from different wave modes, measured using the line-focus acoustic microscope at 225 MHz, have been compared with theoretical results predicted by a V(z) measurement model. The determination of elastic constants has been achieved numerically by seeking a set of elastic constants that leads to the best fit, in the least square sense, of the theoretical results to the experimental ones. The method has been applied to isotropic materials in bulk, and plate and thin-film configurations. Elastic constants for each of these cases have been determined. The consistency, convergence, sensitivity and accuracy of the procedure have been investigated.

  17. Quantitative investigation of surface and subsurface fatigue cracks near rivets in riveted joints using acoustic, electron and optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Zayna Marie

    2000-10-01

    Using scanning acoustic microscopy, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, in conjunction with fractography of fractured surfaces, the crack formation and growth kinetics of subsurface fatigue cracks and surface breaking fatigue cracks near rivets have been characterized in detail in this research. The scanning acoustic microscope was used to quantitatively investigate subsurface fatigue cracks (even when they were very small) at and near countersunk rivets in riveted lap joint specimens that are similar to the riveted lap joints found in the fuselages of many aircraft. It was found that the maximum nominal applied stress influences the fatigue crack initiation and propagation behavior. Eyebrow type cracks develop at lower stresses and centerline cracks develop at higher stresses. At low stress ranges, the fatigue cracks initiate a short distance from the rivet at or near the hidden surface of the chamfered panel. At higher stress amplitudes, the cracks initiate at the blunt knife edge. Residual compressive stresses and fretting are suggested to play more important roles at lower stress ranges. Both types of cracks initiate in a shear mode but transform to tensile, mode I, cracks as they grow. This transition occurs much more rapidly at the higher stress amplitude. At both high and low stresses, the cracks are longer on the fayed surface of the panel than elsewhere. In a comparison of Alclad 2024-T3 and Alclad 2524-T3, it was found that the high purity aluminum alloy 2524 nucleates cracks at a greater number of cycles than the less pure aluminum alloy 2024. At high stress, crack initiation plays less of a roll and the 2024 alloy has a longer life. The scanning acoustic microscope enabled us to study subsurface fatigue cracks. The understanding gained from the characterization of the subsurface fatigue cracks will help in the modeling of crack initiation and growth in the riveted lap joint and will also aid in the improvement of NDE techniques for the

  18. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  19. Fast axial-scanning photoacoustic microscopy using tunable acoustic gradient lens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoquan; Jiang, Bowen; Song, Xianlin; Wei, Jianshuang; Luo, Qingming

    2017-04-03

    An optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope (OR-PAM) with capability of fast axial-scanning was developed by using a tunable acoustic gradient (TAG) lens. The TAG lens was designed to continuously changing the focal plane of OR-PAM by modulating its refractive power with fast-changing ultrasonic standing wave. The performance was shown by imaging a carbon fiber. We achieved a DoF of about 750 μm. The head of a zebrafish was also imaged to further demonstrate the feasibility of our method.

  20. SAM Companion Documents and Sample Collection Procedures

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAM Companion Documents and Sample Collection Procedures provide information intended to complement the analytical methods listed in Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  1. Local elastic modulus of RF sputtered HfO{sub 2} thin film by atomic force acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jena, S. Tokas, R. B. Sarkar, P. Thakur, S.; Sahoo, N. K.; Misal, J. S.; Rao, K. D.

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) is a useful nondestructive technique for measurement of local elastic modulus of materials at nano-scale spatial resolution by measuring the contact resonance spectra for higher order modes of the AFM cantilever. The elastic modulus of RF sputtered HfO{sub 2} thin film has been measured quantitatively, using reference approach in which measurements are performed on the test and reference samples. Using AFAM, the measured elastic modulus of the HfO{sub 2} thin film is 223±27 GPa, which is in agreement with the literature value of 220±40 GPa for atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} thin film using nanoindentation technique.

  2. Detection of internal cracks and ultrasound characterization of nanostructured Bi₂Te₃-based thermoelectrics via acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Prokhorov, V M; Pivovarov, G I

    2011-08-01

    The search for thermoelectric (TE) materials for highly efficient devices aims at improving the TE efficiency and broadening their areas of applications. We created nanostructured thermoelectric Bi-Sb-Te-family materials by high energy (ball milling) pre-treatment of the parent materials followed by high-pressure/high-temperature treatment. Bi₀.₅Sb₁.₅Te₃ compositions with the superfluous maintenance of tellurium was used for the synthesis of the samples with p-type electrical conductivity. Acoustic microscopy was used to study elastic properties and bulk irregularities and to detection of internal cracks both in the parent materials and in the created nanostructured samples. The data has been used for optimization of parameters of synthesis of nanostructured thermoelectrics.

  3. Features of CO2 fracturing deduced from acoustic emission and microscopy in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Chen, Youqing; Bennour, Ziad; Yamashita, Hiroto; Inui, Shuhei; Nagaya, Yuya; Naoi, Makoto; Chen, Qu; Nakayama, Yoshiki; Nagano, Yu

    2016-11-01

    We conducted hydraulic fracturing (HF) experiments on 170 mm cubic granite specimens with a 20 mm diameter central hole to investigate how fluid viscosity affects HF process and crack properties. In experiments using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2), liquid carbon dioxide (L-CO2), water, and viscous oil with viscosity of 0.051-336.6 mPa · s, we compared the results for breakdown pressure, the distribution and fracturing mechanism of acoustic emission, and the microstructure of induced cracks revealed by using an acrylic resin containing a fluorescent compound. Fracturing with low-viscosity fluid induced three-dimensionally sinuous cracks with many secondary branches, which seem to be desirable pathways for enhanced geothermal system, shale gas recovery, and other processes.

  4. Faces of Marshall: Sam Ortega

    NASA Video Gallery

    Several Marshall employees were interviewed as part of Marshall's 50th Anniversary activities. Engineer Sam Ortega tells his story of how he came to work as an engineer at Marshall and how sewing a...

  5. Sam's progress with learning mathematics.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Lynne

    2007-07-01

    Sam is 18 years old and has Down syndrome. He achieved a grade in the standard assessment of mathematics (GCSE) at 16 years of age. This paper describes the part played in his success in school by the Kumon method of teaching mathematics, identifies the benefits of the small steps and lots of practice built in to the method and illustrates the way Sam applied his Kumon learning in school.

  6. A two-axis water-immersible MEMS scanning mirror for scanning optical and acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Song; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Fast scanning is highly desired for both ultrasound and photoacoustic microscopic imaging. Limited by water environment required for acoustic propagation, traditional mircoelectromechanical system (MEMS) scanning mirrors could not be widely used. In this paper, a new water-immersible scanning mirror microsystem has been designed, fabricated and tested. Polymer hinges were employed to achieve reliable under water performance. Two pairs of high strength neodymium magnet disc and three compact RF choke inductor were used to actuate mirror module. Experimental results show that the fast axis can reach a mechanical scanning angle of +/-15° at the resonance frequency of 350 Hz in air, and +/-12.5° at the resonance frequency of 240 Hz in water, respectively. The slow axis can reach a mechanical scanning angle of +/-15° at the resonance frequency of 20 Hz in air, and +/-12.5° at the resonance frequency of 13 Hz in water, respectively. The two scanning axes have very different resonance frequencies, which are suitable for raster scanning.

  7. Multi-Layer Phase Analysis: Quantifying the Elastic Properties of Soft Tissues and Live Cells with Ultra-High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuegen; Akhtar, Riaz; Nijenhuis, Nadja; Wilkinson, Steven J.; Murphy, Lilli; Ballestrem, Christoph; Sherratt, Michael. J.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Derby, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy is potentially a powerful tool for characterising the elastic properties of soft biological tissues and cells. In this paper, we present a method, Multi-Layer Phase Analysis (MLPA), which can be used to extract local speed of sound values, for both thin tissue sections mounted on glass slides and cultured cells grown on cell culture plastic, with a resolution close to 1 μm. The method exploits the phase information that is preserved in the interference between the acoustic wave reflected from the substrate surface and internal reflections from the acoustic lens. In practice, a stack of acoustic images are captured beginning with the acoustic focal point 4 μm above the substrate surface and moving down in 0.1 μm increments. Scanning parameters, such as acoustic wave frequency and gate position, were adjusted to obtain optimal phase and lateral resolution. The data were processed offline to extract the phase information with the contribution of any inclination in the substrate removed prior to the calculation of sound speed. Here, we apply this approach to both skin sections and fibroblast cells, and compare our data with the V(f) (voltage vs frequency) method that has previously been used for characterisation of soft tissues and cells. Compared with the V(f) method, the MPLA method not only reduces signal noise but can be implemented without making a priori assumptions with regards to tissue or cell parameters. PMID:22547273

  8. AE (Acoustic Emission) for Flip-Chip CGA/FCBGA Defect Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2014-01-01

    C-mode scanning acoustic microscopy (C-SAM) is a nondestructive inspection technique that uses ultrasound to show the internal feature of a specimen. A very high or ultra-high-frequency ultrasound passes through a specimen to produce a visible acoustic microimage (AMI) of its inner features. As ultrasound travels into a specimen, the wave is absorbed, scattered or reflected. The response is highly sensitive to the elastic properties of the materials and is especially sensitive to air gaps. This specific characteristic makes AMI the preferred method for finding "air gaps" such as delamination, cracks, voids, and porosity. C-SAM analysis, which is a type of AMI, was widely used in the past for evaluation of plastic microelectronic circuits, especially for detecting delamination of direct die bonding. With the introduction of the flip-chip die attachment in a package; its use has been expanded to nondestructive characterization of the flip-chip solder bumps and underfill. Figure 1.1 compares visual and C-SAM inspection approaches for defect detection, especially for solder joint interconnections and hidden defects. C-SAM is specifically useful for package features like internal cracks and delamination. C-SAM not only allows for the visualization of the interior features, it has the ability to produce images on layer-by-layer basis. Visual inspection; however, is only superior to C-SAM for the exposed features including solder dewetting, microcracks, and contamination. Ideally, a combination of various inspection techniques - visual, optical and SEM microscopy, C-SAM, and X-ray - need to be performed in order to assure quality at part, package, and system levels. This reports presents evaluations performed on various advanced packages/assemblies, especially the flip-chip die version of ball grid array/column grid array (BGA/CGA) using C-SAM equipment. Both external and internal equipment was used for evaluation. The outside facility provided images of the key features

  9. Integrated cantilever fabrication and system development for ultrasonic and acoustic scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Stephen; Sankaran, Balasubramanian; Altemus, Bruce; Xu, Bai; Geer, Robert

    2005-05-01

    Although the conventional optical lever technology typically used for scanning probe microscope applications has proven highly sensitive, accurate, and cost effective for most applications involving micromachined cantilever deflection measurements, frequency limitations and space needs limit its applicability to emerging ultrasonic-based SPM applications. Recently, the fabrication of cantilevers integrated with actuation and sensing components has opened avenues for feedback-based driving of micromachined cantilevers at higher-order resonance frequencies while sensing average deflection without the need for an optical deflection pathway for average deflection sensing. The work presented here will review recent efforts by our group in fabricating micromachined cantilevers with integrated piezoresistive deflection-sensing components combined with integrated ZnO actuation layers to induce cantilever deflection. These cantilevers are being fabricated for use in a heterodyne force microscopy system (HFM) to enable SPM imaging contrast based on viscoelastic response of a surface in contact with a micromachined tip wherein active-feedback technology is being applied to maintain ultrasonic tip excitation at higher order cantilever resonances. The first and second-pass fabrication results will be presented and reviewed regarding cantilever release and ZnO actuator (and electrode) fabrication. Dynamic response data from these structures, measured via laser Doppler vibrometery reveal the expected resonance structure for a cantilever of these dimensions.

  10. Substation alarm multiplexing system (SAMS)

    SciTech Connect

    ElBadaly, H.; Gaughan, J.; Ward, G.; Amengual, S.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes an on going R&D project to develop, design, install, and assess the field performance of an advanced substation alarm system. SAMS provides a highly fault-tolerant system for the reporting of equipment alarms. SAMS separates and identifies each of the multiple alarm contacts, transmits an alarm condition over existing substation two-wire system, and displays the alarm source, and its associated technical information, on a touch-screen monitor inside the substation control room, and a remote central location and on a hand held terminal which may be carried anywhere within the substation. SAMS is currently installed at the Sherman Creek substation in the Bronx for the purpose of a three month field evaluation.

  11. SAM Overview: The Habitability of Mars

    NASA Video Gallery

    Featuring an interview with Paul Mahaffy, SAM's Principal Investigator, this video gives a general overview of SAM's mission aboard the Mars Science Laboratory, otherwise known as the Curiosity rover.

  12. Ion Acoustic Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    Paul Doyle 1 AMXMR-STM, Mr. Jim Kidd 1 AMXMR-MCP, Dr. George Quinn I AMXMR-OP, Dr. Robert E. Singler 1 AMXMR-MCP, Dr. Dennis Viechniechi 1 AMXMR-OM...Dr. George Mayer 1 Dr. Frederick Rothwarf I Dr. Andrew Crowson 1 Dr. Mack Mellor 1 Commander, Naval Coastal Systems Center ATTN: Code 715, Mr. Steve...Harry Diamond Laboratories ATTN: DELHD-TD 2800 Powder Mill Road Adelphi, MD 20783 Dr. Robert P. Walson Cunmmins Engine Company, Inc. Mail Code 50165

  13. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on MIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskowitz, Milton E.; Hrovat, Kenneth; Finkelstein, Robert; Reckart, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    During NASA Increment 3 (September 1996 to January 1997), about 5 gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station, Mir. The data were recorded on 11 optical disks and were returned to Earth on STS-81. During this time, SAMS data were collected in the Priroda module to support the following experiments: the Mir Structural Dynamics Experiment (MiSDE) and Binary Colloidal Alloy Tests (BCAT). This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity environment to which these experiments were exposed. Also documented are mission events of interest such as the docked phase of STS-81 operations, a Progress engine burn, attitude control thruster operation, and crew exercise. Also included are a description of the Mir module orientations, and the panel notations within the modules. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. Variations in the acceleration environment caused by unique activities such as crew exercise and life-support fans are presented. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous mission summary reports published by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) group.

  14. Sam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James C.

    1988-01-01

    A father writes about his six-year-old son born with hydrocephalus. He describes such day-to-day experiences as going to a baseball game and the grocery store, reactions of friends and strangers to his son's social interactions, and a special day at preschool. The boy's medical treatment, including surgeries, are also described. (VW)

  15. Measuring elastic properties of cells by evaluation of scanning acoustic microscopy V(Z) values using simplex algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, T.; Bereiter-Hahn, J.; Hillmann, K.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a new technique is proposed to determine the acoustic properties as well as the thickness (and volume) of biological cells. Variations of thickness, density, acoustic wave velocity, stiffness, and attenuation coefficient of a living or dead cell are obtained by scanning the cell by an acoustic microscope. The distance between the cell and the microscope lens is varied and several voltage curves are thus obtained. These curves are then inverted by simplex optimization technique to obtain the cell parameters. The spatial resolution of the method is limited to the resolution of the scanning acoustic microscope. It allows to take advantage of the full range of frequencies and amplification of the microscope. Characteristic distributions of stiffness are exemplified with an endothelial cell in culture. The main part of the thin, lamellar cytoplasm has high stiffness, which drops close to the lamella/cell body transition region and only slightly increases again through the central part of the cell. Acoustic attenuation seems to be related to two factors, cytoplasm accumulation (in the lamellar parts) and scattering in the central part rich in organelles. ImagesFIGURE 10 PMID:19431793

  16. Sam37 is crucial for formation of the mitochondrial TOM–SAM supercomplex, thereby promoting β-barrel biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Ellenrieder, Lars; Qiu, Jian; Bohnert, Maria; Zufall, Nicole; van der Laan, Martin; Becker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial β-barrel proteins requires two preprotein translocases, the general translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). TOM and SAM form a supercomplex that promotes transfer of β-barrel precursors. The SAM core complex contains the channel protein Sam50, which cooperates with Sam35 in precursor recognition, and the peripheral membrane protein Sam37. The molecular function of Sam37 has been unknown. We report that Sam37 is crucial for formation of the TOM–SAM supercomplex. Sam37 interacts with the receptor domain of Tom22 on the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane and links TOM and SAM complexes. Sam37 thus promotes efficient transfer of β-barrel precursors to the SAM complex. We conclude that Sam37 functions as a coupling factor of the translocase supercomplex of the mitochondrial outer membrane. PMID:26416958

  17. Surface adhesion and confinement variation of Bacillus subtilis on SAM surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiger, Lauren; Pasquale, Rose; Calabrese, Joseph; Senevirathne, Indrajith

    2012-02-01

    Controlled surface adhesion of non - pathogenic gram positive strain, Bacillus subtilis is interesting as a model system due to possible development of respective biosensors for prevention and detection of the pathogenic variants B. anthracis and B. cereus. Further as a study for bio-machine interfacing systems. Self Assembled Monolayers (SAM) with engineered surfaces of linear thiols on Au(111) were used as the substrate. Sub cultured B. subtilis were used for the analysis. The SAM layered surfaces were dipped in 2 -- 5 Log/ml B. subtilis solution. Subsequent surface adhesion at different bacterial dilutions on surfaces will be discussed, and correlated with quantitative and qualitative adhesion properties of bacteria on the engineered SAM surfaces. The bacteria adhered SAM surfaces were investigated using intermittent contact, noncontact, lateral force and contact modes of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM).

  18. Surface adhesion and confinement variation of Staphylococcus aurius on SAM surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amroski, Alicia; Olsen, Morgan; Calabrese, Joseph; Senevirathne, Reshani; Senevirathne, Indrajith

    2012-02-01

    Controlled surface adhesion of non - pathogenic gram positive strain, Staphylococcus aureus is interesting as a model system due to possible development of respective biosensors for prevention and detection of the pathogenic strain methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and further as a study for bio-machine interfacing. Self Assembled Monolayers (SAM) with engineered surfaces of linear thiols on Au(111) were used as the substrate. Sub cultured S. aureus were used for the analysis. The SAM layered surfaces were dipped in 2 -- 4 Log/ml S. aureus solution. Subsequent surface adhesion at different bacterial dilutions on surfaces will be discussed, and correlated with quantitative and qualitative adhesion properties of bacteria on the engineered SAM surfaces. The bacteria adhered SAM surfaces were investigated using intermittent contact, noncontact, lateral force and contact modes of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM).

  19. SAM 2 balloon test (stratospheric aerosol measurement)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, T. J.

    1976-01-01

    As a parallel effort to the LACATE balloon experiment a small optical system was constructed to enable a balloon test of a diode filter system similar to the type planned for the Nimbus-G SAM II experiment. The system was called the SAM II Balloon Test. Results of the balloon flight are summarized.

  20. Non-destructive analysis of hydrogen-induced cracking of api steels using acoustic microscopy and small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, S. B.; Choi, Y.; Jung, H. G.; Kho, S. W.; Lee, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic microscopy and small-angle neutron scattering were applied to non-destructively evaluate the hydrogen-induced cracking of API steels and to find the initiation time of the crack. The API steels had equiaxed grains with about 4 to 12-μm average grain size along the rolling, sample-normal, and transverse directions. For 5 days of immersion in a sodium-acetic solution with chloride ions (NaCl: CH3COOH: H2O: FeCl2 = 50: 5: 944: 1, pH = 2.7), micro-sized cracks were not formed in the as-received specimen, but they did form in the 7% deformed specimen. Nano-sized cracks were observed in the specimen after 3 days of immersion by small-angle neutron scattering.

  1. Patterning NHS-terminated SAMs on germanium.

    PubMed

    Morris, Carleen J; Shestopalov, Alexander A; Gold, Brian H; Clark, Robert L; Toone, Eric J

    2011-05-17

    Here we report a simple, robust approach to patterning functional SAMs on germanium. The protocol relies on catalytic soft-lithographic pattern transfer from an elastomeric stamp bearing pendant immobilized sulfonic acid moieties to an NHS-functionalized bilayer molecular system comprising a primary ordered alkyl monolayer and a reactive ester secondary overlayer. The catalytic polyurethane-acrylate stamp was used to form micrometer-scale features of chemically distinct SAMs on germanium. The methodology represents the first example of patterned SAMs on germanium, a semiconductor material.

  2. STS-134 Crew Talks With Sam Ting

    NASA Video Gallery

    The STS-134 crew talks with Sam Ting, principal investigator for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, following the installation of the particle physics detector on the International Space Station duri...

  3. NES Live Video Chat: Engineer Sam Ortega

    NASA Video Gallery

    The NES project invited all K-12 students to participate in a one-hour-long NASA video webchat on April 19, 2011 with NASA engineer Sam Ortega. Ortega answered questions about building and testing ...

  4. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Radiochemical Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the radiochemistry methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  5. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Biotoxin Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the pathogen methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  6. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Pathogen Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the biotoxin methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  7. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Chemical Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the chemistry methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  8. Acoustic Communications for UUVs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Acoustic Communications for UUVs Josko Catipovic Lee Freitag Naval Undersea Warfare Center Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Newport, RI 02841... Woods Hole, MA 02543 (401) 832-3259 (508) 289-3285 catipovicj@npt.nuwc.navy.mil lfreitag@whoi.edu Dan Nagle Sam Smith Naval Undersea Warfare Center...positioned within a streamlined flow shield which reduces drag and protects them from damage. While the HF transducers are placed on the structure and the

  9. Sam, Brookhaven, and the Physical Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, Martin

    2010-03-01

    Sam Goudsmit came to Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1948, just after the first year of operation of the new institution, and after a year of his postwar appointment as Professor of Physics at Northwestern University. He was named an associate editor of the Physical Review at that time, under the then Managing Editor John T. Tate of the University of Minnesota. Tate had been Editor since 1926, and had presided over the growth of Physical Review to leadership of publication in the world of physics. Tate died in 1950, and after a search under an interim Editor Sam was, in 1951, named Managing Editor. In 1952 he became Chair of the Brookhaven Physics Department, founded Physical Review Letters, and served as department chair until 1960, when he stepped down but remained an Associate Chair. I will discuss my own interactions with Sam during this later period, when I learned of his many faceted talents and accomplishments.

  10. Validation of SAM 2 and SAGE satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Wang, P.-H.; Farrukh, U. O.; Yue, G. K.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are the results of a validation study of data obtained by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment I (SAGE I) and Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement II (SAM II) satellite experiments. The study includes the entire SAGE I data set (February 1979 - November 1981) and the first four and one-half years of SAM II data (October 1978 - February 1983). These data sets have been validated by their use in the analysis of dynamical, physical and chemical processes in the stratosphere. They have been compared with other existing data sets and the SAGE I and SAM II data sets intercompared where possible. The study has shown the data to be of great value in the study of the climatological behavior of stratospheric aerosols and ozone. Several scientific publications and user-oriented data summaries have appeared as a result of the work carried out under this contract.

  11. The nuclear protein Sam68 is redistributed to the cytoplasm and is involved in PI3K/Akt activation during EV71 infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Cong, Haolong; Song, Lei; Tien, Po

    2014-02-13

    Nuclear proteins can be triggered to be redistributed to the cytoplasm to assist with EV71 virus replication. This process is frequently involved in cellular signal transduction upon virus infection. In this study, we have demonstrated that a new nuclear protein, 68-kDa Src-associated in mitosis protein (Sam68), was translocated to the cytoplasm and was co-localized with EV71 during virus infection. Confocal microscopy and subcellular fractionation assay confirmed that virus 3C protease triggered the redistribution of Sam68 to the cytoplasm. Knockdown of Sam68 expression using ShRNA significantly inhibited virus replication, suggesting that Sam68 may be a host factor involved in EV71 life cycle. In addition, EV71-induced Akt phosphorylation involved a PI3K-dependent mechanism. Sam68 is known to be an upstream regulator of PI3K and our immunoprecipitation studies confirmed that Sam68 interacted directly with the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3K and mediated PI3K/Akt activation during EV71 infection. On the contrary, silencing of Sam68 dramatically abrogated Akt phosphorylation. These data, plus the fact that Sam68 is known to be a signaling adaptor protein, indicated that Sam68 is a signal molecule with a functional role in the PI3K/Akt signal pathway during EV71 infection.

  12. Essay: Physical Review Letters; Sam Goudsmit's Vision.

    PubMed

    Adair, Robert K

    2008-01-18

    Sam Goudsmit implemented his vision of converting the Letters section of Physical Review into a distinct journal fifty years ago. Physical Review Letters was designed to publish "only papers that really deserve rapid communication." The new journal became so successful with physicists throughout the world that Physical Review Letters now publishes 3500 Letters per year.

  13. Sam's Journey to "Reach for the Stars"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Sue

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experiences as a parent of a child with Down syndrome. Although her son Sam's first years were filled with numerous hospitalizations and visits to pediatricians, which she feared would further delay his development, she soon discovered an organization known as the National Association of Child Development…

  14. Structural Basis for Methyl Transfer by a Radical SAM Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Grove, Tyler L.; McLaughlin, Monica I.; Yennawar, Neela H.; Booker, Squire J.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2014-10-02

    The radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes RlmN and Cfr methylate 23S ribosomal RNA, modifying the C2 or C8 position of adenosine 2503. The methyl groups are installed by a two-step sequence involving initial methylation of a conserved Cys residue (RlmN Cys{sup 355}) by SAM. Methyl transfer to the substrate requires reductive cleavage of a second equivalent of SAM. Crystal structures of RlmN and RlmN with SAM show that a single molecule of SAM coordinates the [4Fe-4S] cluster. Residue Cys{sup 355} is S-methylated and located proximal to the SAM methyl group, suggesting the SAM that is involved in the initial methyl transfer binds at the same site. Thus, RlmN accomplishes its complex reaction with structural economy, harnessing the two most important reactivities of SAM within a single site.

  15. Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM) - Home

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The SAM Home page provides access to all information provided in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM), and includes a query function allowing users to search methods by analyte, sample type and instrumentation.

  16. Expanding Radical SAM Chemistry by Using Radical Addition Reactions and SAM Analogues.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xinjian; Li, Yongzhen; Xie, Liqi; Lu, Haojie; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Qi

    2016-09-19

    Radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes utilize a [4Fe-4S] cluster to bind SAM and reductively cleave its carbon-sulfur bond to produce a highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (dAdo) radical. In almost all cases, the dAdo radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrates or from enzymes, thereby initiating a highly diverse array of reactions. Herein, we report a change of the dAdo radical-based chemistry from hydrogen abstraction to radical addition in the reaction of the radical SAM enzyme NosL. This change was achieved by using a substrate analogue containing an olefin moiety. We also showed that two SAM analogues containing different nucleoside functionalities initiate the radical-based reactions with high efficiencies. The radical adduct with the olefin produced in the reaction was found to undergo two divergent reactions, and the mechanistic insights into this process were investigated in detail. Our study demonstrates a promising strategy in expanding radical SAM chemistry, providing an effective way to access nucleoside-containing compounds by using radical SAM-dependent reactions.

  17. On LAM's and SAM's for Halley's rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, Stanton J.

    1992-01-01

    Non principal axis rotation for comet Halley is inferred from dual periodicities evident in the observations. The modes where the spin axis precesses around the axis of minimum moment of inertia (long axis mode or LAM) and where it precesses around the axis of maximum moment of inertia (short axis mode or SAM) are described from an inertial point of view. The currently favored LAM model for Halley's rotation state satisfies observational and dynamical constraints that apparently no SAM can satisfy. But it cannot reproduce the observed post perihelion brightening through seasonal illumination of localized sources on the nucleus, whereas a SAM can easily produce post or pre perihelion brightening by this mechanism. However, the likelihood of a LAM rotation for elongated nuclei of periodic comets such as Halley together with Halley's extreme post perihelion behavior far from the Sun suggest that Halley's post perihelion brightening may be due to effects other than seasonal illumination of localized sources, and therefore such brightening may not constrain its rotation state.

  18. Fabrication and tribological properties of self-assembled monolayer of n-alkyltrimethoxysilane on silicon: Effect of SAM alkyl chain length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Lixia; Du, Pengcheng; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Kaifeng; Liu, Peng

    2017-02-01

    It is well known that the self-assembled organic molecules on a solid surface exhibit the friction-reducing performance. However, the effect of the molecular size of the self-assembled organic molecules has not been established. In the present work, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of n-alkyltrimethoxysilanes with different alkyl chain lengths (C6, C12, or C18) were fabricated on silicon substrate. The water contact angles of the SAMs increased from 26.8° of the hydroxylated silicon substrate to near 60° after self-assembly. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis results showed that the mean roughness (Ra) of the SAMs decreased with increasing the alkyl chain length. The tribological properties of the SAMs sliding against Al2O3 ball were evaluated on an UMT-2 tribometer, and the worn surfaces of the samples were analyzed by means of Nano Scratch Tester and surface profilometry. It was found that lowest friction coefficient and smallest width of wear were achieved with the SAMs of C12 alkyl chain (C12-SAM). The superior friction reduction and wear resistance of the SAMs in comparison with the bare silicon substrate are attributed to good adhesion of the self-assembled films to the substrate, especially the C12-SAM with desirable alkyl chain length.

  19. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor; Hearing loss - acoustic; Tinnitus - acoustic ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  20. System Advisor Model, SAM 2014.1.14: General Description

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A. P.; Freeman, J.; Neises, T.; Wagner, M.; Ferguson, T.; Gilman, P.; Janzou, S.

    2014-02-01

    This document describes the capabilities of the U.S. Department of Energy and National Renewable Energy Laboratory's System Advisor Model (SAM), Version 2013.9.20, released on September 9, 2013. SAM is a computer model that calculates performance and financial metrics of renewable energy systems. Project developers, policy makers, equipment manufacturers, and researchers use graphs and tables of SAM results in the process of evaluating financial, technology, and incentive options for renewable energy projects. SAM simulates the performance of photovoltaic, concentrating solar power, solar water heating, wind, geothermal, biomass, and conventional power systems. The financial model can represent financial structures for projects that either buy and sell electricity at retail rates (residential and commercial) or sell electricity at a price determined in a power purchase agreement (utility). SAM's advanced simulation options facilitate parametric and sensitivity analyses, and statistical analysis capabilities are available for Monte Carlo simulation and weather variability (P50/P90) studies. SAM can also read input variables from Microsoft Excel worksheets. For software developers, the SAM software development kit (SDK) makes it possible to use SAM simulation modules in their applications written in C/C++, C#, Java, Python, and MATLAB. NREL provides both SAM and the SDK as free downloads at http://sam.nrel.gov. Technical support and more information about the software are available on the website.

  1. Peptide Fragments of Odin-Sam1: Conformational Analysis and Interaction Studies with EphA2-Sam.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Flavia A; Di Natale, Concetta; Pirone, Luciano; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina L; Marasco, Daniela; Pedone, Emilia M; Saviano, Michele; Leone, Marilisa

    2015-07-27

    Odin is a protein belonging to the ANKS family, and has two tandem Sam domains. The first, Odin-Sam1, binds to the Sam domain of the EphA2 receptor (EphA2-Sam); this interaction could be crucial for the regulation of receptor endocytosis and might have an impact on cancer. Odin-Sam1 associates with EphA2-Sam by adopting a "mid-loop/end-helix" model. In this study three peptide sequences, encompassing the mid-loop interacting portion of Odin-Sam1 and its C-terminal α5 helix, were designed. Their conformational properties were analyzed by CD and NMR. In addition, their abilities to interact with EphA2-Sam were investigated by SPR studies. The peptides adopt a predominantly disordered state in aqueous buffer, but a higher helical content is evident in the presence of the cosolvent trifluoroethanol. Dissociation constants towards EphA2-Sam were in the high micromolar range. The structural findings suggest further routes for the design of potential anti-cancer therapeutics as inhibitors of EphA2-Sam heterotypic interactions.

  2. SOAR Adaptive Module (SAM): Seeing Improvement with a UV Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Cantarutti, Rolando; Tighe, Roberto; Schurter, Patricio; Martinez, Manuel; Thomas, Sandrine; van der Bliek, Nicole

    2016-12-01

    The adaptive module of the 4.1 m SOAR telescope, SOAR Adaptive Module (SAM), corrects ground-layer turbulence using an ultraviolet laser guide star. It has been commissioned in 2013 and it is in regular science operation since 2014. SAM works with the CCD imager covering a 3‧ field or with the speckle camera. It operates routinely and stably, delivering resolution in the I band equal to the free-atmosphere seeing. This paper describes the SAM system as a whole, providing essential reference for its users and technical information of interest to instrumentalists. Operation of the instrument, its performance, and science projects done with SAM so far are reviewed.

  3. General Quality Control (QC) Guidelines for SAM Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  4. Study of the resistance of SAMs on aluminium to acidic and basic solutions using dynamic contact angle measurement.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Newman, Roger C; McAlpine, Eoghan; Alexander, Morgan R

    2007-01-30

    We report the development of a method to determine the aqueous stability of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) using the Wilhelmy plate dynamic contact angle (DCA) experiment. The DCA is measured in solutions over a range of pH values for alkyl carboxylic and alkyl phosphonic acid SAMs formed on magnetron-sputtered aluminum. The change in DCA on repeated immersion is used as a measure of the degradation of the SAMs by hydrolytic attack. The short and intermediate chain length alkyl acids are not stable in water of neutral pH, whereas molecules with the longest alkyl chains show considerably greater stability in neutral and both high and low pH solutions. The packing density inferred from the DCA and the contact angle hysteresis suggests the C18CO2H monolayer to be slightly less well packed than that of the C18P(=O)(OH)2; this is consistent with related friction force microscopy and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy findings published elsewhere (Foster, T. T.; Alexander, M. R.; Leggett, G. J.; McAlpine, E. Langmuir 2006, 22, 9254-9259). The resistance of the SAMs to acid and alkaline environments is discussed in the context of aluminum oxide solubility, SAM packing density, and the resistance of the interfacial phosphate and carboxylate functionalities to different aqueous conditions.

  5. Theodore Roosevelt Chloroforming Uncle Sam "In the Hopeless Ward".

    PubMed

    Drew, Benjamin A; Bause, George S

    2016-10-01

    In March of 1905 in Judge magazine, Louis Dalrymple published his political cartoon of Theodore Roosevelt chloroforming "Uncle Sam." Having sampled a host of Democratic remedies, the 125-year-old Sam can expect that Roosevelt's chloroform will either cure him with major Republican surgery or kill him with Osler-linked euthanasia.

  6. Student Activities in Meteorology (SAM), June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, B.L.; Passarelli, E.

    1994-06-01

    In an effort to inspire student interest in science and technology, scientists from the Forecast Systems Laboratory, a laboratory within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Environmental Research Laboratories, and classroom teachers from the Boulder Valley School District collaborated to produce a series of classroom science activities on meteorology and atmospheric science. We call this series 'Student Activities in Meteorology,' or SAM. The goal is to provide activities that are interesting to students, and at the same time convenient and easy to use for teachers. The activity topics chosen are to incorporate trend setting scientific research and cutting edge technology. Several of the activities focus on the meteorological concerns of the Denver metropolitan area because many of NOAA's research labs are located in Boulder, where much of the research and testing for the region is performed. We believe that these activities are versatile and can be easily integrated into current science, environmental studies, health, social studies, and math curricula.

  7. Speed of sound in diseased liver observed by scanning acoustic microscopy with 80 MHz and 250 MHz.

    PubMed

    Irie, So; Inoue, Kenta; Yoshida, Kenji; Mamou, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the speed of sound (SOS) of two types of rat livers (eight normal livers, four cirrhotic livers) was measured with a scanning acoustic microscope using two transducers, one of which had an 80-MHz and the other a 250-MHz center frequency. The 250-MHz transducer had a better spatial resolution adapted to studying fiber or hepatic parenchymal cells. In normal livers, averages of the SOS values were from 1598 to 1677 m/s at 80-MHz and from 1568 to 1668 m/s at 250-MHz. In the fiber tissue of cirrhotic livers, averages of the SOS values were from 1645 to 1658 m/s at 80-MHz and from 1610 to 1695 m/s at 250-MHz, while the SOS values in the other tissue of cirrhotic livers ranged from 1644 to 1709 m/s at 80-MHz and from 1641 to 1715 m/s at 250-MHz. In one liver, SOS in fiber tissue was larger than that of tissues without fiber while in others it was lower. The resulting two-dimensional SOS maps provide a unique quantitative insight of liver acoustic microstructures in a healthy liver and in a cirrhotic ones. This study would be helpful to understand the complex relationship between acoustic properties and liver disease including fiber tissue.

  8. System Advisor Model, SAM 2011.12.2: General Description

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, P.; Dobos, A.

    2012-02-01

    This document describes the capabilities of the U.S. Department of Energy and National Renewable Energy Laboratory's System Advisor Model (SAM), Version 2011.12.2, released on December 2, 2011. SAM is software that models the cost and performance of renewable energy systems. Project developers, policy makers, equipment manufacturers, and researchers use graphs and tables of SAM results in the process of evaluating financial, technology, and incentive options for renewable energy projects. SAM simulates the performance of solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, and conventional power systems. The financial model can represent financing structures for projects that either buy and sell electricity at retail rates (residential and commercial) or sell electricity at a price determined in a power purchase agreement (utility). Advanced analysis options facilitate parametric, sensitivity, and statistical analyses, and allow for interfacing SAM with Microsoft Excel or with other computer programs. SAM is available as a free download at http://sam.nrel.gov. Technical support and more information about the software are available on the website.

  9. SAM 2 and SAGE data management and processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, M. T.; Trepte, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    The data management and processing supplied by ST Systems Corporation (STX) for the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement 2 (SAM 2) and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) experiments for the years 1983 to 1986 are described. Included are discussions of data validation, documentation, and scientific analysis, as well as the archival schedule met by the operational reduction of SAM 2 and SAGE data. Work under this contract resulted in the archiving of the first seven years of SAM 2 data and all three years of SAGE data. A list of publications and presentations supported was also included.

  10. SAM Chlorine Observations at Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, P. G.; Farley, K. A.; Vasconcelos, P. M.; Malespin, C.; Franz, H.; McAdam, A.; Sutter, B.; Stern, J. C.; Clark, B. C.; Atreya, S. K.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars investigation has detected Cl-bearing phases of various oxidation states in its thermally evolved gas measurements of both a wind drift deposit of fines and three different rock samples delivered as sieved drill powders to the instrument suite. In addition to HCl (Leshin et al, 2013; Ming et al, 2013) and chlorinated hydrocarbon detections (Glavin et al, 2013; Freissinet et al, in review), oxygen releases consistent with the decomposition of perchlorate salts are also observed. We have also measured chlorine isotope ratios of the four different solid samples, which yielded variable and more negative δ37Cl than typically observed in SNC meteorite analyses. We summarize our chlorine observations in the context of other gases observed in the SAM solid sample analyses, including water, sulfur- and nitrogen-bearing compounds, and REMS observations of Relative Humidity and Temperature, and compare with knowledge of martian chlorine obtained from the SNC meteorites. Finally, we examine the implications of surface/atmosphere Cl interactions and isotopic ratios for the rise and decline of habitable surface environments on Mars. This research was supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Mars Science Laboratory mission.

  11. Crystal structures of the SAM-III/S[subscript MK] riboswitch reveal the SAM-dependent translation inhibition mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, C.; Smith, A.M.; Fuchs, R.T.; Ding, F.; Rajashankar, K.; Henkin, T.M.; Ke, A.

    2010-01-07

    Three distinct classes of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-responsive riboswitches have been identified that regulate bacterial gene expression at the levels of transcription attenuation or translation inhibition. The SMK box (SAM-III) translational riboswitch has been identified in the SAM synthetase gene in members of the Lactobacillales. Here we report the 2.2-{angstrom} crystal structure of the Enterococcus faecalis SMK box riboswitch. The Y-shaped riboswitch organizes its conserved nucleotides around a three-way junction for SAM recognition. The Shine-Dalgarno sequence, which is sequestered by base-pairing with the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence in response to SAM binding, also directly participates in SAM recognition. The riboswitch makes extensive interactions with the adenosine and sulfonium moieties of SAM but does not appear to recognize the tail of the methionine moiety. We captured a structural snapshot of the SMK box riboswitch sampling the near-cognate ligand S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH) in which SAH was found to adopt an alternative conformation and fails to make several key interactions.

  12. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... search IRSA's site Unique Hits since January 2003 Acoustic Neuroma Click Here for Acoustic Neuroma Practice Guideline ... to microsurgery. One doctor's story of having an acoustic neuroma In August 1991, Dr. Thomas F. Morgan ...

  13. Technical Manual for the SAM Physical Trough Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M. J.; Gilman, P.

    2011-06-01

    NREL, in conjunction with Sandia National Lab and the U.S Department of Energy, developed the System Advisor Model (SAM) analysis tool for renewable energy system performance and economic analysis. This paper documents the technical background and engineering formulation for one of SAM's two parabolic trough system models in SAM. The Physical Trough model calculates performance relationships based on physical first principles where possible, allowing the modeler to predict electricity production for a wider range of component geometries than is possible in the Empirical Trough model. This document describes the major parabolic trough plant subsystems in detail including the solar field, power block, thermal storage, piping, auxiliary heating, and control systems. This model makes use of both existing subsystem performance modeling approaches, and new approaches developed specifically for SAM.

  14. Curiosity Shakes, Bakes, and Tastes Mars with SAM

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Curiosity rover analyzed its first solid sample of Mars with a variety of instruments, including the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite. Developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight ...

  15. In-Orbit Calibration of a SAMS Triaxial Sensor Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chestney, Louis S.; Sicker, Ronald J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the results of in orbit calibration data collected for a Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) Triaxial Sensor Head (TS H) and the methods used to process the data for bias and gravity levels.

  16. General Safety and Waste Management Related to SAM

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The General Safety and Waste Management page offers section-specific safety and waste management details for chemicals, radiochemicals, pathogens, and biotoxins included in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  17. Safety and Waste Management for SAM Chemistry Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The General Safety and Waste Management page offers section-specific safety and waste management details for the chemical analytes included in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  18. Safety and Waste Management for SAM Radiochemical Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The General Safety and Waste Management page offers section-specific safety and waste management details for the radiochemical analytes included in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  19. Safety and Waste Management for SAM Pathogen Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The General Safety and Waste Management page offers section-specific safety and waste management details for the pathogens included in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  20. Rio Hondo Sediment Assessment Analysis Using SAM. Numerical Model Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    MISCELLANEOUS PAPER HL-91-1 M ~ RIO HONDO SEDIMENT ASSESSMENT ANALYSIS USING SAM Numerical Model Investigation AD-A238 572Ii 1 11byIll lil Nolan K...FUNDING NUMBERS Rio Hondo Sediment Assessment Analysis Using SAM; Numerical Model Investigation 6. AUTHOR(S) Nolan K. Raphelt Michael J. Trawle William A... Rio Hondo through Roswell, NM, was conducted. The investigation represented a sediment assessment level study conducted to test for potential

  1. Isothiourea-Mediated Organocatalytic Michael Addition-Lactonization on a Surface: Modification of SAMs on Silicon Oxide Substrates.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Ross; Parkin, John D; Smith, Andrew D; Hähner, Georg

    2016-04-05

    Tailoring the functionality of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) can be achieved either by depositing prefunctionalized molecules with the appropriate terminal groups or by chemical modification of an existing SAM in situ. The latter approach is particularly advantageous to allow for diversity of surface functionalization from a single SAM and if the incorporation of bulky groups is desired. In the present study an organocatalytic isothiourea-mediated Michael addition-lactonization process analogous to a previously reported study in solution is presented. An achiral isothiourea, 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrimido[2,1-b]benzothiazole (DHPB), promotes the intermolecular Michael addition-lactonization of a trifluoromethylenone terminated SAM and a variety of arylacetic acids affording C(6)-trifluoromethyldihydropyranones tethered to the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle, and ellipsometry analysis were conducted to confirm the presence of the substituted dihydropyranone. A model study of this approach was also performed in solution to probe the reaction diastereoselectivity as it cannot be measured directly on the surface.

  2. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir from June to November 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard; Hrovat, Ken; Moskowitz, Milton; McPherson, Kevin

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) sponsors science experiments on a variety of microgravity carriers, including sounding rockets, drop towers, parabolic aircraft, and Orbiter missions. The MSAD sponsors the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) to support microgravity science experiments with acceleration measurements to characterize the microgravity environment to which the experiments were exposed. The Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project at the NASA Lewis Research Center supports principal investigators of microgravity experiments as they evaluate the effects of varying acceleration levels on their experiments. In 1993, a cooperative effort was started between the United States and Russia involving science utilization of the Russian Mir space station by scientists from the United States and Russia. MSAD is currently sponsoring science experiments participating in the Shuttle-Mir Science Program in cooperation with the Russians on the Mir space station. Included in the complement of MSAD experiments and equipment is a SAMS unit In a manner similar to Orbiter mission support, the SAMS unit supports science experiments from the U.S. and Russia by measuring the microgravity environment during experiment operations. The initial SAMS supported experiment was a Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) experiment from June to November 1995. SAMS data were obtained during the PCG operations on Mir in accordance with the PCG Principal Investigator's requirements. This report presents an overview of the SAMS data recorded to support this PCG experiment. The report contains plots of the SAMS 100 Hz sensor head data as an overview of the microgravity environment, including the STS-74 Shuttle-Mir docking.

  3. SAM68: Signal Transduction and RNA Metabolism in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Frisone, Paola; Pradella, Davide; Di Matteo, Anna; Belloni, Elisa; Ghigna, Claudia; Paronetto, Maria Paola

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in expression and/or activity of splicing factors as well as mutations in cis-acting splicing regulatory sequences contribute to cancer phenotypes. Genome-wide studies have revealed more than 15,000 tumor-associated splice variants derived from genes involved in almost every aspect of cancer cell biology, including proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle control, metabolism, apoptosis, motility, invasion, and angiogenesis. In the past decades, several RNA binding proteins (RBPs) have been implicated in tumorigenesis. SAM68 (SRC associated in mitosis of 68 kDa) belongs to the STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA metabolism) family of RBPs. SAM68 is involved in several steps of mRNA metabolism, from transcription to alternative splicing and then to nuclear export. Moreover, SAM68 participates in signaling pathways associated with cell response to stimuli, cell cycle transitions, and viral infections. Recent evidence has linked this RBP to the onset and progression of different tumors, highlighting misregulation of SAM68-regulated splicing events as a key step in neoplastic transformation and tumor progression. Here we review recent studies on the role of SAM68 in splicing regulation and we discuss its contribution to aberrant pre-mRNA processing in cancer. PMID:26273626

  4. SAM, the Starfire Optical Range Atmospheric Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillar, Earl J.; Shoemake, Marjorie A.; Slavin, Ann C.

    2011-10-01

    We describe the Starfire Optical Range (SOR) Atmospheric Monitor (SAM). SAM is a 40 cm telescope feeding a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor with 20 subapertures across the telescope aperture, which in turn feeds a 1 kHz CCD camera. The unique features of SAM include the ability to work through both day and night and the ability to estimate r0 values down to 1.5 cm at 750 nm. Because SAM can measure 200 tilts simultaneously in 1 ms, it is able to detect rapid changes in turbulence parameters. It will be able to estimate the Fried parameter r0, the Greenwood parameter fg, scintillation, and a rough profile simultaneously. After describing the basic design and construction of SAM and our algorithm for estimating r0, we describe the initial capabilities of the system. We show some initial data regarding the diurnal variation of r0 at the SOR, simulations of SAM’s performance, and a validation against another system. We conclude with future plans for the system.

  5. Differential phase acoustic microscope for micro-NDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, David D.; Pusateri, T. L.; Huang, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    A differential phase scanning acoustic microscope (DP-SAM) was developed, fabricated, and tested in this project. This includes the acoustic lens and transducers, driving and receiving electronics, scanning stage, scanning software, and display software. This DP-SAM can produce mechanically raster-scanned acoustic microscopic images of differential phase, differential amplitude, or amplitude of the time gated returned echoes of the samples. The differential phase and differential amplitude images provide better image contrast over the conventional amplitude images. A specially designed miniature dual beam lens was used to form two foci to obtain the differential phase and amplitude information of the echoes. High image resolution (1 micron) was achieved by applying high frequency (around 1 GHz) acoustic signals to the samples and placing two foci close to each other (1 micron). Tone burst was used in this system to obtain a good estimation of the phase differences between echoes from the two adjacent foci. The system can also be used to extract the V(z) acoustic signature. Since two acoustic beams and four receiving modes are available, there are 12 possible combinations to produce an image or a V(z) scan. This provides a unique feature of this system that none of the existing acoustic microscopic systems can provide for the micro-nondestructive evaluation applications. The entire system, including the lens, electronics, and scanning control software, has made a competitive industrial product for nondestructive material inspection and evaluation and has attracted interest from existing acoustic microscope manufacturers.

  6. Communication: Scanning tunneling microscopy study of the reaction of octanethiolate self-assembled monolayers with atomic chlorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobbins, Matthew M.; Lee, David Y.; Kandel, S. Alex

    2012-04-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy was used to investigate the reaction of octanethiolate self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with atomic chlorine. We have found that exposing a SAM to low fluxes of radical Cl results primarily in the formation of new defects in areas with close-packed alkanethiolates, but has little to no effect on the domain boundaries of the SAM. Dosing high quantities of atomic chlorine results in the near-complete loss of surface order at room temperature, but not the complete removal of the thiolate monolayer. These observations are in stark contrast to the results of previous measurements of the reaction of atomic hydrogen with alkanethiolate SAMs.

  7. Description of ferrocenylalkylthiol SAMs on gold by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Goujon, F; Bonal, C; Limoges, B; Malfreyt, P

    2009-08-18

    Molecular dynamics simulations of mixed monolayers consisting of Fc(CH2)12S-/C10S-Au SAMs are carried out to calculate structural (density profiles, angular distributions, positions of atoms) and energetic properties. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible inhomogeneity of the neutral ferrocene moieties within the monolayer. Five systems have been studied using different grafting densities for the ferrocenylalkylthiolates. The angular distributions are described in terms of the relative contributions from isolated and clustered ferrocene moieties in the binary SAMs. It is shown that the energetic contributions strongly depend on the state of the ferrocene. The ability of molecular dynamics simulations to enable better understanding the SAM structure is illustrated in this work.

  8. Imaging and clinical findings in segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM).

    PubMed

    Alhalabi, Kinan; Menias, Christine; Hines, Robert; Mamoun, Ihsan; Naidu, Sailendra

    2017-02-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is an uncommon, non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory arteriopathy that tends to affect the medium-sized splanchnic branches of the aorta along with renal, carotid, cerebral, and coronary arteries. The clinical presentation ranges from asymptomatic to severe, life-threatening intra-abdominal hemorrhage and shock. SAM overlaps clinically and radiologically with other inflammatory vasculitides. This article describes the pathologic-radiologic correlation, imaging findings, and the management of the disease. Radiologists should be familiar with this disease entity as imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis.

  9. Technoeconomic Modeling of Battery Energy Storage in SAM

    SciTech Connect

    DiOrio, Nicholas; Dobos, Aron; Janzou, Steven; Nelson, Austin; Lundstrom, Blake

    2015-09-01

    Detailed comprehensive lead-acid and lithium-ion battery models have been integrated with photovoltaic models in an effort to allow System Advisor Model (SAM) to offer the ability to predict the performance and economic benefit of behind the meter storage. In a system with storage, excess PV energy can be saved until later in the day when PV production has fallen, or until times of peak demand when it is more valuable. Complex dispatch strategies can be developed to leverage storage to reduce energy consumption or power demand based on the utility rate structure. This document describes the details of the battery performance and economic models in SAM.

  10. Obituary: Sam Roweis (1972-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, David

    2011-12-01

    Computer scientist and statistical astronomer Sam Roweis took his own life in New York City on 2010 January 12. He was a brilliant and accomplished researcher in the field of machine learning, and a strong advocate for the use of computational statistics for automating discovery and scientific data analysis. He made several important contributions to astronomy and was working on adaptive astronomical data analysis at the time of his death. Roweis obtained his PhD in 1999 from the California Institute of Technology, where he worked on a remarkable range of subjects, including DNA computing, modeling of dynamical systems, signal processing, and speech recognition. During this time he unified and clarified some of the most important data analysis techniques, including Principal Component Analysis, Hidden Markov Models, and Expectation Maximization. His work was aimed at making data analysis and modeling faster, but also better justified scientifically. The last years of his PhD were spent in Princeton NJ, where he came in contact with a young generation of cosmologists thinking about microwave background and large-scale structure data. In a postdoc at University College London, Roweis co-created the Locally Linear Embedding (LLE) algorithm; a simple but flexible technique for mapping a large data set onto a low-dimensional manifold. The LLE paper obtained more than 2700 citations in 9 years, launched a new sub-field of machine learning known as "manifold learning," and inspired work in data visualization, search, and applied mathematics. In 2001, Roweis took a faculty job at the University of Toronto Computer Science Department. He continued working on data analysis methods that have probabilistic interpretation and therefore scientific applicability, but at the same time have good performance on large data sets. He was awarded a Sloan Fellowship, a Canada Research Chair, and a fellowship of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, among other honors and awards

  11. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  12. Directed immobilization of reduced antibody fragments onto a novel SAM on gold for myoglobin impedance immunosensing.

    PubMed

    Billah, Md Morsaline; Hodges, Christopher S; Hays, Henry C W; Millner, P A

    2010-11-01

    The successful construction of an immunosensor depends on having an effective procedure for immobilising the bio-recognition element to the transducer surface. In the present study, an amino-terminated 4-aminothiophenol (ATP) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was modified with heterobifunctional crosslinker sulfosuccinimidyl 4-[N-maleimidomethyl] cyclohexane-1-carboxylate to couple reduced anti-myoglobin half-antibody fragments. The disulphide groups present in the hinge region of IgG molecules were selectively cleaved by 2-mercaptoethylamine to produce reduced half-antibody fragments with free sulphydryl groups. The maleimide terminated 4-ATP SAM modified surface was coupled to these reduced antibody fragments to produce highly oriented immobilization of the half-antibody via its Fc domain and to allow free access to the Fv bindings sites. This represents an improvement by comparison with biotin/avidin mediated IgG attachment which is essentially randomly oriented. Functional immunosensors were able to detect myoglobin in both phosphate buffered saline and whole serum over the range of concentrations from 10(-13)M to 10(-6)M, and order of magnitude better than avidin/biotin linked immunosensors. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was carried out to elucidate the nanotopology of the immunosensor surface at different stages of fabrication; the images demonstrate that half antibodies bind as described and show structural changes on subsequent antigen binding.

  13. Acoustic Seaglider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-07

    a national naval responsibility. Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial...problem and acoustic navigation and communications within the context of distributed autonomous persistent undersea surveillance sensor networks...Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial coherence and the description of ambient

  14. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  15. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  16. 77 FR 67813 - Sam Rayburn Dam Project Power Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... Southwestern Power Administration Sam Rayburn Dam Project Power Rate AGENCY: Southwestern Power Administration, DOE. ACTION: Notice of Rate Order Approving an Extension of Power Rate on an Interim Basis. SUMMARY..., Assistant Administrator, Southwestern Power Administration, Department of Energy, Williams Center Tower...

  17. The fSAM Model of False Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Daniel R.; Smith, Troy A.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a new theory of false memory building upon existing associative memory models and implemented in fSAM, the first fully specified quantitative model of false recall. Participants frequently intrude unstudied critical words while recalling lists comprising their strongest semantic associates but infrequently produce other…

  18. SAMS Acceleration Measurement on Mir From March to September 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskowitz, Milton E.; Hrovat, Ken; Truong, Duc; Reckart, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    During NASA Increment 2 (March to September 1996), over 15 gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station, Mir. The data were recorded on 55 optical disks and were returned to Earth on STS-79. During this time, SAMS data were collected in the Kristall and Kvant modules, and in the Priroda module to support the following experiments: the Queen's University Experiments in Liquid Diffusion (QUELD), the Technological Evaluation of the MIM (TEM), the Forced Flow Flame Spreading Test (FFFT), and Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM). This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity environment to which these experiments were exposed. Also documented are mission events of interest such as the docked phase of STS-76 operations, an extravehicular activity (EVA) to install and deploy solar panels on the Kvant module, a Progress engine burn to raise Mir's altitude, and an on-orbit SAMS calibration procedure. Also included are a description of the Mir module orientations, and the panel notations within the modules. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. Variations in the acceleration environment caused by unique activities such as crew exercise and life-support fans are presented. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous mission summary reports published by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) group.

  19. The Discovery of Polar Stratospheric Clouds by SAM II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, L. R.; McCormick, M. P.

    2005-12-01

    Until the advent of spaceborne observations, clouds were thought to occur very rarely in the extremely dry stratosphere. This view changed dramatically following the launch of the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II instrument on the Nimbus 7 spacecraft in October 1978. SAM II was a single channel solar photometer designed to measure stratospheric aerosol extinction profiles at a wavelength of 1.0 micron at latitudes from 64-80 degrees in both hemispheres. An analysis of SAM II data from the Arctic for January 1979 revealed a number of profiles in which the extinction was 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than expected. Careful study showed that these large extinction values were not artifacts, but were indeed due to dramatic reductions in the amount of solar radiance reaching the instrument. Further analyses showed that these so-called polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were observed only when the local stratospheric temperature was very low (185-200 K). The interest in PSCs was primarily academic until the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985, which was quickly followed by studies associating this ozone depletion with the release of active chlorine through heterogeneous chemical reactions catalyzed by PSC particles. A large body of research over the ensuing two decades has firmly established this link. In this paper, we will recount the serendipitous discovery of PSCs in SAM II data more than 25 years ago and highlight other advances in our understanding of PSCs that have stemmed from spaceborne observations.

  20. Social Activity Method (SAM): A Fractal Language for Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Paul

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I shall present and develop my organisational language, "social activity method" (SAM), and illustrate some of its applications. I shall introduce a new scheme for "modes of recontextualisation" that enables the analysis of the ways in which one activity--which might be school mathematics or social research or any…

  1. Laser Induced Temperature Field on Surfaces: Application to SAM Patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadnam, Mohammad Reza; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2004-03-01

    Laser is used to thermally desorb a self assembeled monolayer (SAM) from a gold substrate. This process is a key step in making patterned surfaces. In many applications making curvilinear features is useful. Heating of a surface by a CW laser along a nonlinear trajectory is considered using Green's functions. Temperature profiles are calculated for heating along circular-arc trajectories of different curvatures. The effect of heating trajectory's radius of curvature and heating spot's velocity (Laser scanning rate) on resulting surface temperature is studied. It is shown that within the range of parameters considered, the induced surface temperature profiles are symmetric. It is also shown that change of heating trajectory's radius of curvature by one order of magnitude at heating velocity of 0.1 mm/s changes the induced surface temperatures by 12 K; this temperature increase will be 36 K at 1 mm/s. The effect of such temperature increases are discussed in terms of laser processing of SAM coated surfaces. For a case of heating along straight line, the kinetics of SAM desorption is coupled with heat diffusion equation to predict the percentage of SAM desorped and determine the feature size. The resulting surface chemical composition profiles are compared with experimental measurements and good agreement is reported.

  2. Astronaut Curtis Brown works with SAMS on Shuttle Atlantis middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    On the Space Shuttle Atlantis' mid-deck, astronaut Curtis L. Brown, pilot, works with the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS), which is making its eleventh Shuttle flight. This system supports the Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) experiments onboard by collecting and recording data characterizing the microgravity environment in the Shuttle mid-deck.

  3. Information System through ANIS at CeSAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, C.; Agneray, F.; Gimenez, S.

    2015-09-01

    ANIS (AstroNomical Information System) is a web generic tool developed at CeSAM to facilitate and standardize the implementation of astronomical data of various kinds through private and/or public dedicated Information Systems. The architecture of ANIS is composed of a database server which contains the project data, a web user interface template which provides high level services (search, extract and display imaging and spectroscopic data using a combination of criteria, an object list, a sql query module or a cone search interfaces), a framework composed of several packages, and a metadata database managed by a web administration entity. The process to implement a new ANIS instance at CeSAM is easy and fast : the scientific project has to submit data or a data secure access, the CeSAM team installs the new instance (web interface template and the metadata database), and the project administrator can configure the instance with the web ANIS-administration entity. Currently, the CeSAM offers through ANIS a web access to VO compliant Information Systems for different projects (HeDaM, HST-COSMOS, CFHTLS-ZPhots, ExoDAT,...).

  4. Wind Technology Modeling Within the System Advisor Model (SAM) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A.; Ferguson, T.; Freeman, J.; Gilman, P.; Whitmore, J.

    2014-05-01

    This poster provides detail for implementation and the underlying methodology for modeling wind power generation performance in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). SAM's wind power model allows users to assess projects involving one or more large or small wind turbines with any of the detailed options for residential, commercial, or utility financing. The model requires information about the wind resource, wind turbine specifications, wind farm layout (if applicable), and costs, and provides analysis to compare the absolute or relative impact of these inputs. SAM is a system performance and economic model designed to facilitate analysis and decision-making for project developers, financers, policymakers, and energy researchers. The user pairs a generation technology with a financing option (residential, commercial, or utility) to calculate the cost of energy over the multi-year project period. Specifically, SAM calculates the value of projects which buy and sell power at retail rates for residential and commercial systems, and also for larger-scale projects which operate through a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a utility. The financial model captures complex financing and rate structures, taxes, and incentives.

  5. EFFECTS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON OF SAM-COATED ELECTRODES USING FERRYICYANIDE AS THE REDOX INDICATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrochemical responses on self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-coated polycrystalline gold electrodes were investigated using cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry with a three electrode system. Experimental results show potential in the application of pyrene-imprinted SAM...

  6. Selective Plasma Deposition of Fluorocarbon Films on SAMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, Mark M., III; Walsh, Kevin M.; Cohn, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    A dry plasma process has been demonstrated to be useful for the selective modification of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiolates. These SAMs are used, during the fabrication of semiconductor electronic devices, as etch masks on gold layers that are destined to be patterned and incorporated into the devices. The selective modification involves the formation of fluorocarbon films that render the SAMs more effective in protecting the masked areas of the gold against etching by a potassium iodide (KI) solution. This modification can be utilized, not only in the fabrication of single electronic devices but also in the fabrication of integrated circuits, microelectromechanical systems, and circuit boards. In the steps that precede the dry plasma process, a silicon mold in the desired pattern is fabricated by standard photolithographic techniques. A stamp is then made by casting polydimethylsiloxane (commonly known as silicone rubber) in the mold. The stamp is coated with an alkanethiol solution, then the stamp is pressed on the gold layer of a device to be fabricated in order to deposit the alkanethiol to form an alkanethiolate SAM in the desired pattern (see figure). Next, the workpiece is exposed to a radio-frequency plasma generated from a mixture of CF4 and H2 gases. After this plasma treatment, the SAM is found to be modified, while the exposed areas of gold remain unchanged. This dry plasma process offers the potential for forming masks superior to those formed in a prior wet etching process. Among the advantages over the wet etching process are greater selectivity, fewer pin holes in the masks, and less nonuniformity of the masks. The fluorocarbon films formed in this way may also be useful as intermediate layers for subsequent fabrication steps and as dielectric layers to be incorporated into finished products.

  7. STM characterization of DNA immobilized via Zr ion glue onto gold thiol SAMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourbeyram, S.; Shervedani, R. K.; Sabzyan, H.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) onto gold-mercaptopropionic acid self-assembled monolayer via Zr(IV) ion glue, Au-MPA-Zr(IV)-ct-DNA SAM, is monitored by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) technique. The STM images of Au-MPA-Zr(IV) template show well-organized arrays of rod-like peaks. ct-DNA has been immobilized on the Au-MPA-Zr(IV) surface in hilly forms, implying globular structure for the immobilized ct-DNA. This immobilization strategy offers a simple and fast method to prepare the Au-MPA-Zr(IV)-ct-DNA template with promising applications for immobilization and study of the other compounds.

  8. DNA adenine methylation of sams1 gene in symbiont-bearing Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Taeck J

    2008-10-01

    The expression of amoeba sams genes is switched from sams1 to sams2 when amoebae are infected with Legionella jeonii. To elucidate the mechanism for the inactivation of host sams1 gene by endosymbiotic bacteria, methylation states of the sams1 gene of D and xD amoebae was compared in this study. The sams1 gene of amoebae was methylated at an internal adenine residue of GATC site in symbiont-bearing xD amoebae but not in symbiont-free D amoebae, suggesting that the modification might have caused the inactivation of sams1 in xD amoebae. The sams1 gene of xD amoebae was inactivated at the transcriptional level. Analysis of DNA showed that adenine residues in L. jeonii sams were also methylated, implying that L. jeonii bacteria belong to a Dam methylase-positive strain. In addition, both SAM and Met appeared to act as negative regulators for the expression of sams1 whereas the expression of sams2 was not affected in amoebae.

  9. An ADC for the SAM on the SOAR Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tighe, Roberto; Tokovinin, Andrei; Schurter, Patricio; Martínez, Manuel; Cantarutti, Rolando

    2016-08-01

    SAM (Soar Adaptive-optics Module), the SOAR (Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research) GLAO facility is in service since 2011, with a UV, 355nm Laser Guide Star (LGS). The atmospheric wavefront error is therefore measured at 355nm and the star images are corrected in the visible range (BVRI bands). An ADC is required for High Resolution imaging at low telescope elevation, especially at shorter wavelengths of the visible spectrum. The ADC is based on 80mm diameter rotating prisms. This compact unit, fully automated, can be inserted or removed from the tightly constrained SAM collimated beam space-envelope, it adjusts to the parallactic angle and corrects the atmospheric dispersion. Here we present the optical and opto-mechanical design, the control design, the operational strategy and performance results obtained from extensive use in on-sky HR Speckle Imaging.

  10. Integration of sample analysis method (SAM) for polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Monagle, M.; Johnson, R.C.

    1996-05-01

    A completely integrated Sample Analysis Method (SAM) has been tested as part of the Contaminant Analysis Automation program. The SAM system was tested for polychlorinated biphenyl samples using five Standard Laboratory Modules{trademark}: two Soxtec{trademark} modules, a high volume concentrator module, a generic materials handling module, and the gas chromatographic module. With over 300 samples completed within the first phase of the validation, recovery and precision data were comparable to manual methods. Based on experience derived from the first evaluation of the automated system, efforts are underway to improve sample recoveries and integrate a sample cleanup procedure. In addition, initial work in automating the extraction of semivolatile samples using this system will also be discussed.

  11. First use of SAM onboard calibration gas cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malespin, C.; Trainer, M. G.; Manning, H. L.; Franz, H. B.; Conrad, P. G.; Raaen, E.; Webster, C. R.; Flesch, G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Wong, M. H.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument (Mahaffy et al 2012) suite on Curiosity completed its first measurement of the onboard calibration gas cell on MSL Mission Sol 1042. The cell consists of a gas mixture of four primary gases, along with trace fluorinated hydrocarbon high mass calibrants. The mix is comprised of approximately 25% CO2, N2, Xe and Ar, where the 129Xe has been given a three times enrichment relative to terrestrial xenon in order to distinguish it isotopically from Martian atmospheric Xe. Analysis of the calibration cell is intended to identify changes in instrument performance between pre-launch calibrations and operations on Mars, for any of the three main subsystems in SAM: the Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS), and Gas Chromatograph (GC). Here we present the experimental approach, results, and implications for instrument performance after almost three years of measurements on Mars.

  12. Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Michael J.; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. PMID:25275114

  13. Spill Assessment Model (SAM) Procedure for Manual Field Calculations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    SPECIFICALLY, THE PART OF SAM UTILIZED AS THE BASIS FOR THE FIELD CALCULATIONS ADDRESSES ONLY INSTANTANEOUS POINT SOURCE DISCHARGES INTO A FLOWING RIVER. FOR...instantaneous point source discharges into a flowing river. For field use, the primary requirement is to assess the maximum concentrations which may result...different classes of chemicals, reference sources such as the Chemical Hazard Response Information ,’stem (CHRIS) of the U.S. Coast Guard should be

  14. Technical Manual for the SAM Biomass Power Generation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, J.; Gilman, P.; Dobos, A.

    2011-09-01

    This technical manual provides context for the implementation of the biomass electric power generation performance model in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). Additionally, the report details the engineering and scientific principles behind the underlying calculations in the model. The framework established in this manual is designed to give users a complete understanding of behind-the-scenes calculations and the results generated.

  15. The ALICE Glance Shift Accounting Management System (SAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins Silva, H.; Abreu Da Silva, I.; Ronchetti, F.; Telesca, A.; Maidantchik, C.

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is an experiment at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider) studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma. The experiment operation requires a 24 hours a day and 7 days a week shift crew at the experimental site, composed by the ALICE collaboration members. Shift duties are calculated for each institute according to their correlated members. In order to ensure the full coverage of the experiment operation as well as its good quality, the ALICE Shift Accounting Management System (SAMS) is used to manage the shift bookings as well as the needed training. ALICE SAMS is the result of a joint effort between the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) and the ALICE Collaboration. The Glance technology, developed by the UFRJ and the ATLAS experiment, sits at the basis of the system as an intermediate layer isolating the particularities of the databases. In this paper, we describe the ALICE SAMS development process and functionalities. The database has been modelled according to the collaboration needs and is fully integrated with the ALICE Collaboration repository to access members information and respectively roles and activities. Run, period and training coordinators can manage their subsystem operation and ensure an efficient personnel management. Members of the ALICE collaboration can book shifts and on-call according to pre-defined rights. ALICE SAMS features a user profile containing all the statistics and user contact information as well as the Institutes profile. Both the user and institute profiles are public (within the scope of the collaboration) and show the credit balance in real time. A shift calendar allows the Run Coordinator to plan data taking periods in terms of which subsystems shifts are enabled or disabled and on-call responsible people and slots. An overview display presents the shift crew present in the control room and allows the Run Coordination team to confirm the presence

  16. Mercury astronauts at the Sam Houston Colosseum, Houston, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    The original seven Mercury astronauts, each wearing new cowboy hats and a badge in the shape of a star, are pictured on stage at the Sam Houston Colosseum. A large crowd was on hand to welcome them to Houston, Texas. Left to right are astronauts M. Scott Carpenter, L. Gordon Cooper Jr., John H. Glenn Jr., Virgil I. Grissom, Walter M. Schirra Jr., Alan B. Shepard Jr., and Donald K. Slayton. Sen. John Tower (R.-Texas) is seen in far right background.

  17. Summary Status of the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS), September 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) was developed to measure the microgravity acceleration environment to which NASA science payloads are exposed during microgravity science missions on the shuttle. Six flight units have been fabricated to date. The inaugural flight of a SAMS unit was on STS-40 in June 1991 as part of the First Spacelab Life Sciences mission. Since that time, SAMS has flown on six additional missions and gathered eighteen gigabytes of data representing sixty-eight days of microgravity environment. The SAMS units have been flown in the shuttle middeck and cargo bay, in the Spacelab module, and in the Spacehab module. This paper summarizes the missions and experiments which SAMS has supported. The quantity of data and the utilization of the SAMS data is described. Future activities are briefly described for the SAMS project and the Microgravity Measurement and Analysis project (MMAP) to support science experiments and scientists with microgravity environment measurement and analysis.

  18. CE-SAM: a conversational interface for ISR mission support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzocaro, Diego; Parizas, Christos; Preece, Alun; Braines, Dave; Mott, David; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.

    2013-05-01

    There is considerable interest in natural language conversational interfaces. These allow for complex user interactions with systems, such as fulfilling information requirements in dynamic environments, without requiring extensive training or a technical background (e.g. in formal query languages or schemas). To leverage the advantages of conversational interactions we propose CE-SAM (Controlled English Sensor Assignment to Missions), a system that guides users through refining and satisfying their information needs in the context of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) operations. The rapidly-increasing availability of sensing assets and other information sources poses substantial challenges to effective ISR resource management. In a coalition context, the problem is even more complex, because assets may be "owned" by different partners. We show how CE-SAM allows a user to refine and relate their ISR information needs to pre-existing concepts in an ISR knowledge base, via conversational interaction implemented on a tablet device. The knowledge base is represented using Controlled English (CE) - a form of controlled natural language that is both human-readable and machine processable (i.e. can be used to implement automated reasoning). Users interact with the CE-SAM conversational interface using natural language, which the system converts to CE for feeding-back to the user for confirmation (e.g. to reduce misunderstanding). We show that this process not only allows users to access the assets that can support their mission needs, but also assists them in extending the CE knowledge base with new concepts.

  19. Sam68: a new STAR in the male fertility firmament.

    PubMed

    Sette, Claudio; Messina, Valeria; Paronetto, Maria Paola

    2010-01-01

    Male infertility accounts for approximately 50% of the cases of sterile human couples, and in many instances the genetic or molecular defects involved remain unknown. Studies conducted in animal models have elucidated the key role played by RNA-binding proteins and by the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression during spermatogenesis. Ablation of proteins involved in each of the steps required for the processing and the utilization of messenger RNAs impairs the production of fertile spermatozoa. Recent evidence indicates that the RNA-binding protein Sam68 is absolutely required for the correct progression of spermatogenesis and for male fertility in the mouse. Sam68 belongs to the evolutionary conserved signal transduction and activation of RNA (STAR) family of RNA-binding proteins. The members of this family have been demonstrated to play crucial roles in cell differentiation and development, including male and female gametogenesis. In this review we will summarize the observations gathered on the functions of STAR proteins in different organisms, with particular emphasis on the role of Sam68 in male fertility.

  20. Mechanistic Enzymology of the Radical SAM Enzyme DesII.

    PubMed

    Ruszczycky, Mark W; Liu, Hung-Wen

    2015-04-01

    DesII is a member of the radical SAM family of enzymes that catalyzes radical-mediated transformations of TDP-4-amino-4,6-didexoy-D-glucose as well as other sugar nucleotide diphosphates. Like nearly all radical SAM enzymes, the reactions begin with the reductive homolysis of SAM to produce a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical which is followed by regiospecific hydrogen atom abstraction from the substrate. What happens next, however, depends on the nature of the substrate radical so produced. In the case of the biosynthetically relevant substrate, a radical-mediated deamination ensues; however, when this amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl, one instead observes dehydrogenation. The factors that govern the fate of the initially generated substrate radical as well as the mechanistic details underlying these transformations have been a key focus of research into the chemistry of DesII. This review will discuss recent discoveries pertaining to the enzymology of DesII, how it may relate to understanding other radical-mediated lyases and dehydrogenases and the working hypotheses currently being investigated regarding the mechanism of DesII catalysis.

  1. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir (NASA Increment 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1998-01-01

    During NASA Increment 4 (January to May 1997), about 5 gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurements System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station, Mir. The data were recorded on 28 optical disks which were returned to Earth on STS-84. During this increment, SAMS data were collected in the Priroda module to support the Mir Structural Dynamics Experiment (MiSDE), the Binary Colloidal Alloy Tests (BCAT), Angular Liquid Bridge (ALB), Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM), Diffusion Controlled Apparatus Module (DCAM), Enhanced Dynamic Load Sensors (EDLS), Forced Flow Flame Spreading Test (FFFr), Liquid Metal Diffusion (LMD), Protein Crystal Growth in Dewar (PCG/Dewar), Queen's University Experiments in Liquid Diffusion (QUELD), and Technical Evaluation of MIM (TEM). This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity environment to which these experiments were exposed. Also documented are mission events of interest such as the docked phase of STS-84 operations, a Progress engine bum, Soyuz vehicle docking and undocking, and Progress vehicle docking. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous summary reports prepared by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) group.

  2. The SAMS: Smartphone Addiction Management System and verification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heyoung; Ahn, Heejune; Choi, Samwook; Choi, Wanbok

    2014-01-01

    While the popularity of smartphones has given enormous convenience to our lives, their pathological use has created a new mental health concern among the community. Hence, intensive research is being conducted on the etiology and treatment of the condition. However, the traditional clinical approach based surveys and interviews has serious limitations: health professionals cannot perform continual assessment and intervention for the affected group and the subjectivity of assessment is questionable. To cope with these limitations, a comprehensive ICT (Information and Communications Technology) system called SAMS (Smartphone Addiction Management System) is developed for objective assessment and intervention. The SAMS system consists of an Android smartphone application and a web application server. The SAMS client monitors the user's application usage together with GPS location and Internet access location, and transmits the data to the SAMS server. The SAMS server stores the usage data and performs key statistical data analysis and usage intervention according to the clinicians' decision. To verify the reliability and efficacy of the developed system, a comparison study with survey-based screening with the K-SAS (Korean Smartphone Addiction Scale) as well as self-field trials is performed. The comparison study is done using usage data from 14 users who are 19 to 50 year old adults that left at least 1 week usage logs and completed the survey questionnaires. The field trial fully verified the accuracy of the time, location, and Internet access information in the usage measurement and the reliability of the system operation over more than 2 weeks. The comparison study showed that daily use count has a strong correlation with K-SAS scores, whereas daily use times do not strongly correlate for potentially addicted users. The correlation coefficients of count and times with total K-SAS score are CC = 0.62 and CC =0.07, respectively, and the t-test analysis for the

  3. Seismic, Acoustic, and Magnetic Test Results from US/German Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    SEISMIC, ACOUSTIC, AND MAGNETIC TEST RESULTS FROM US/GERMAN TESTING John Sledge CHICKEN LITTLE Program Office Eglin AFB Florida 32542 ABSTRACT...conducted at the Meppen Test Range during the period of October 1997. The CHICKEN LITTLE, Sensor/Seeker Seismic, Acoustic, and Magnetic (SAM) team...Number Performing Organization Name(s) and Address(es) CHICKEN LITTLE Program Office Eglin AFB Florida 32542 Performing Organization Number(s

  4. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  5. Acoustic emission technique for monitoring the pyrolysis of composites for process control.

    PubMed

    Tittmann, B R; Yen, C E

    2008-11-01

    Carbonization is the first step in the heat and pressure treatment (pyrolysis) of composites in preparing carbon-carbon parts. These find many uses, including aircraft brakes, rocket nozzles and medical implants. This paper describes the acoustic emissions (AE) from various stages of the manufacturing process of carbon-carbon composites. This process involves carbonization at a high temperature and this results in both thermal expansion and volume change (due to pyrolysis in which a sacrificial polymer matrix is converted to carbon). Importantly the resultant matrix is porous and has a network of small intra-lamina cracks. The formation of these microcracks produces AE and this paper describes how this observation can be used to monitor (and eventually control) the manufacturing process. The aim is to speed up manufacture, which is currently time-consuming. The first section of the paper describes the design of unimodal waveguides to enable the AE to propagate to a cool environment where a transducer can be located. The second part of the paper describes various experimental observations of AE under a range of process conditions. In particular, this paper presents a technique based on detecting acoustic emissions and (1) uses wire waveguides to monitor parts within the autoclave to 800 degrees C, (2) monitors microcracking during pyrolysis, (3) uses a four-level threshold to distinguish between low- and high-amplitude cracking events, (4) recognizes the occurrence of harmful delaminations, and (5) guides the control of the heating rate for optimum efficiency of the pyrolysis process. In addition, supporting data are presented of in situ measurements of porosity, weight loss, cross-ply shrinkage, and mass spectroscopy of gases emitted. The process evolution is illustrated by the use of interrupted manufacturing cycle micrographs obtained by optical, scanning acoustic (SAM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy. The technique promotes in-process monitoring and

  6. Systematic biochemical characterization of the SAM domains in Eph receptor family from Mus Musculus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Li, Qingxia; Zheng, Yunhua; Li, Gang; Liu, Wei

    2016-05-13

    The Eph receptor family is the largest subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases and well-known for their pivotal roles in axon guidance, synaptogenesis, artery/venous differentiation and tumorigenesis, etc. Activation of the Eph receptor needs multimerization of the receptors. The intracellular C-terminal SAM domain of Eph receptor was reported to mediate self-association of Eph receptors via the homo SAM-SAM interaction. In this study, we systematically expressed and purified the SAM domain proteins of all fourteen Eph receptors of Mus musculus in Escherichia coli. The FPLC (fast protein liquid chromatography) results showed the recombinant SAM domains were highly homogeneous. Using CD (circular dichroism) spectrometry, we found that the secondary structure of all the SAM domains was typically alpha helical folded and remarkably similar. The thermo-stability tests showed that they were quite stable in solution. SEC-MALS (size exclusion chromatography coupled with multiple angle light scattering) results illustrated 200 μM Eph SAM domains behaved as good monomers in the size-exclusion chromatography. More importantly, DLS (dynamic light scattering) results revealed the overwhelming majority of SAM domains was not multimerized in solution either at 200 μM or 2000 μM protein concentration, which indicating the SAM domain alone was not sufficient to mediate the polymerization of Eph receptor. In summary, our studies provided the systematic biochemical characterizations of the Eph receptor SAM domains and implied their roles in Eph receptor mediated signaling pathways.

  7. Acoustic microscope based on magneto-elastic wave phase conjugator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brysev, A.; Krutyansky, L.; Pernod, P.; Preobrazhensky, V.

    2000-05-01

    Acoustic C-scan imaging (acoustic microscopy) by means of supercritical parametric wave phase conjugation (WPC) is studied experimentally. A phase conjugator based on a magneto-acoustic active material is used for compensating phase distortions introduced by solid and polymer aberration layers covering objects (electronic integrated circuits as examples). Improvement of images is demonstrated on an acoustic microscope, operating at a frequency of 10 MHz.

  8. GABAergic inhibition shapes SAM responses in rat auditory thalamus.

    PubMed

    Cai, R; Caspary, D M

    2015-07-23

    Auditory thalamus (medial geniculate body [MGB]) receives ascending inhibitory GABAergic inputs from inferior colliculus (IC) and descending GABAergic projections from the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) with both inputs postulated to play a role in shaping temporal responses. Previous studies suggested that enhanced processing of temporally rich stimuli occurs at the level of MGB, with our recent study demonstrating enhanced GABA sensitivity in MGB compared to IC. The present study used sinusoidal amplitude-modulated (SAM) stimuli to generate modulation transfer functions (MTFs), to examine the role of GABAergic inhibition in shaping the response properties of MGB single units in anesthetized rats. Rate MTFs (rMTFs) were parsed into "bandpass (BP)", "mixed (Mixed)", "highpass (HP)" or "atypical" response types, with most units showing the Mixed response type. GABAA receptor blockade with iontophoretic application of the GABAA receptor (GABAAR) antagonist gabazine (GBZ) selectively altered the response properties of most MGB neurons examined. Mixed and HP units showed significant GABAAR-mediated SAM-evoked rate response changes at higher modulation frequencies (fms), which were also altered by N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor blockade (2R)-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (AP5). BP units, and the lower arm of Mixed units responded to GABAAR blockade with increased responses to SAM stimuli at or near the rate best modulation frequency (rBMF). The ability of GABA circuits to shape responses at higher modulation frequencies is an emergent property of MGB units, not observed at lower levels of the auditory pathway and may reflect activation of MGB NMDA receptors (Rabang and Bartlett, 2011; Rabang et al., 2012). Together, GABAARs exert selective rate control over selected fms, generally without changing the units' response type. These results showed that coding of modulated stimuli at the level of auditory thalamus is at least, in part, strongly controlled by GABA

  9. Introducing the aerosol-climate model MAECHAM5-SAM2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommel, R.; Timmreck, C.; Graf, H. F.

    2009-04-01

    We are presenting a new global aerosol model MAECHAM5-SAM2 to study the aerosol dynamics in the UTLS under background and volcanic conditions. The microphysical core modul SAM2 treats the formation, the evolution and the transport of stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. The aerosol size distribution and the weight percentage of the sulphuric acid solution is calculated dependent on the concentrations of H2SO4 and H2O, their vapor pressures, the atmospheric temperature and pressure. The fixed sectional method is used to resolve an aerosol distribution between 1 nm and 2.6 micron in particle radius. Homogeneous nucleation, condensation and evaporation, coagulation, water-vapor growth, sedimentation and sulphur chemistry are included. The module is applied in the middle-atmosphere MAECHAM5 model, resolving the atmosphere up to 0.01 hPa (~80 km) in 39 layers. It is shown here that MAECHAM5-SAM2 well represents in-situ measured size distributions of stratospheric background aerosol in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes. Distinct differences can be seen when derived integrated aerosol parameters (surface area, effective radius) are compared with aerosol climatologies based on the SAGE II satellite instrument (derived by the University of Oxford and the NASA AMES laboratory). The bias between the model and the SAGE II data increases as the moment of the aerosol size distribution decreases. Thus the modeled effective radius show the strongest bias, followed by the aerosol surface area density. Correspondingly less biased are the higher moments volume area density and the mass density of the global stratospheric aerosol coverage. This finding supports the key finding No. 2 of the SPARC Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties (2006), where it was shown that during periods of very low aerosol load in the stratosphere, the consistency between in-situ and satellite measurements, which exist in a volcanically perturbed stratosphere, breaks down and significant

  10. Analytical Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

  11. Paramagnetic Intermediates Generated by Radical S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus A [4Fe–4S]+ cluster reduces a bound S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) molecule, cleaving it into methionine and a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical (5′-dA•). This step initiates the varied chemistry catalyzed by each of the so-called radical SAM enzymes. The strongly oxidizing 5′-dA• is quenched by abstracting a H-atom from a target species. In some cases, this species is an exogenous molecule of substrate, for example, l-tyrosine in the [FeFe] hydrogenase maturase, HydG. In other cases, the target is a proteinaceous residue as in all the glycyl radical forming enzymes. The generation of this initial radical species and the subsequent chemistry involving downstream radical intermediates is meticulously controlled by the enzyme so as to prevent unwanted reactions. But the manner in which this control is exerted is unknown. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has proven to be a valuable tool used to gain insight into these mechanisms. In this Account, we summarize efforts to trap such radical intermediates in radical SAM enzymes and highlight four examples in which EPR spectroscopic results have shed significant light on the corresponding mechanism. For lysine 2,3-aminomutase, nearly each possible intermediate, from an analogue of the initial 5′-dA• to the product radical l-β-lysine, has been explored. A paramagnetic intermediate observed in biotin synthase is shown to involve an auxiliary [FeS] cluster whose bridging sulfide is a co-substrate for the final step in the biosynthesis of vitamin B7. In HydG, the l-tyrosine substrate is converted in unprecedented fashion to a 4-oxidobenzyl radical on the way to generating CO and CN– ligands for the [FeFe] cluster of hydrogenase. And finally, EPR has confirmed a mechanistic proposal for the antibiotic resistance protein Cfr, which methylates the unactivated sp2-hybridized C8-carbon of an adenosine base of 23S ribosomal RNA. These four systems provide just a brief survey of the ever-growing set

  12. Carbon extension in peptidylnucleoside biosynthesis by radical-SAM enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lilla, Edward A.; Yokoyama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Nikkomycins and polyoxins are antifungal peptidylnucleoside (PN) antibiotics active against human and plant pathogens. Here, we report that during PN biosynthesis in Streptomyces cacaoi and Streptomyces tendae, the C5′-extension of the nucleoside essential for downstream structural diversification is catalyzed by a conserved radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzyme, PolH or NikJ. This is distinct from the nucleophilic mechanism reported for antibacterial nucleosides and represents a novel mechanism of nucleoside natural product biosynthesis. PMID:27642865

  13. The p53 status can influence the role of Sam68 in tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Naomi; Ngo, Chau Tuan-Anh; Aleynikova, Olga; Beauchemin, Nicole; Richard, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The expression and activities of RNA binding proteins are frequently dysregulated in human cancer. Their roles, however, appears to be complex, with reports indicating both pro-tumorigenic and tumor suppressive functions. Here we show, using two classical mouse cancer models, that the role of KH-type RNA binding protein, Sam68, in tumor development can be influenced by the status of the p53 tumor suppressor. We demonstrate that in mice expressing wild type p53, Sam68-deficiency resulted in a higher incidence and malignancy of carcinogen-induced tumors, suggesting a tumor suppressive role for Sam68. In marked contrast, Sam68-haploinsufficiency significantly delayed the onset of tumors in mice lacking p53 and prolonged their survival, indicating that Sam68 accelerates the development of p53-deficient tumors. These findings provide considerable insight into a previously unknown relationship between Sam68 and the p53 tumor suppressor in tumorigenesis. PMID:27690217

  14. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  15. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  16. Cardiological aging in SAM model: effect of chronic treatment with growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Forman, K; Vara, E; García, C; Ariznavarreta, C; Escames, G; Tresguerres, J A F

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aging on different parameters related to inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis in hearts from two types of male mice models: senescence-accelerated mice (SAM-P8) and senescence-accelerated-resistant (SAM-R1), and the influence of chronic administration of Growth Hormone (GH) on old SAM-P8 mice. Forty male mice were used. Animals were divided into five experimental groups: two 10 month old untreated groups (SAM-P8/SAM-R1), two 2 month old young groups (SAM-P8/SAM-R1) and one 10 month old group (SAM-P8) treated with GH for 30 days. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 1, interleukin 10, heme oxygenases 1 and 2, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases, NFkB, Bad, Bax and Bcl-2 were determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results were submitted to a two way ANOVA statistical evaluation using the Statgraphics program. Inflammation, as well as, oxidative stress and apoptosis markers were increased in the heart of old SAM-P8 males, as compared to young controls and this situation was not observed in the old SAM-R1 mice. Exogenous GH administration reverted the effect of aging in the described parameters of old SAM-P8 mice. Our results suggest that inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress could play an important role in the observed cardiovascular alterations related to aging of SAM-P8 mice and that GH may play a potential protective effect on the cardiovascular system of these animals.

  17. Comparative studies of aerosol extinction measurements made by the SAM II and SAGE II satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, Glenn K.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Wang, P.; Osborn, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    Results from the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II are compared for measurement locations which are coincident in time and space. At 1.0 micron, the SAM II and SAGE II aerosol extinction profiles are similar within their measurement errors. In addition, sunrise and sunset aerosol extinction data at four different wavelengths are compared for occasions when the SAGE II and SAM II measurements are nearly coincident in space and about 12 hours apart.

  18. The nuclear protein Sam68 is cleaved by the FMDV 3C protease redistributing Sam68 to the cytoplasm during FMDV infection of host cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Paul; Schafer, Elizabeth A.; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2012-03-30

    Picornavirus infection can lead to disruption of nuclear pore traffic, shut-off of cell translation machinery, and cleavage of proteins involved in cellular signal transduction and the innate response to infection. Here, we demonstrated that the FMDV 3C{sup pro} induced the cleavage of nuclear RNA-binding protein Sam68 C-terminus containing the nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Consequently, it stimulated the redistribution of Sam68 to the cytoplasm. The siRNA knockdown of Sam68 resulted in a 1000-fold reduction in viral titers, which prompted us to study the effect of Sam68 on FMDV post-entry events. Interestingly, Sam68 interacts with the internal ribosomal entry site within the 5 Prime non-translated region of the FMDV genome, and Sam68 knockdown decreased FMDV IRES-driven activity in vitro suggesting that it could modulate translation of the viral genome. The results uncover a novel role for Sam68 in the context of picornaviruses and the proteolysis of a new cellular target of the FMDV 3C{sup pro}.

  19. Conjugal immunity of Streptomyces strains carrying the integrative element pSAM2 is due to the pif gene (pSAM2 immunity factor).

    PubMed

    Possoz, Christophe; Gagnat, Josette; Sezonov, Guennadi; Guérineau, Michel; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    2003-03-01

    Mechanisms of conjugal immunity preventing redundant exchange between two cells harbouring the same conjugative element have been reported in diverse bacteria. Such a system does exist for pSAM2, a conjugative and integrative element of Streptomyces. The apparition of the conjugative free form of pSAM2 in the donor strain during mating can be considered as the initial step of transfer. We analysed the genes involved in transfer inhibition by mating donors harbouring pSAM2 with recipient strains containing different regions of pSAM2. The conjugal immunity was previously thought to be mediated by the transcriptional repressor KorSA. Although the transfer efficiency is reduced by its presence in the recipient, the initiation of the transfer process is not affected. In contrast, the presence in the recipient strain of a single pSAM2 gene, pif (pSAM2 immunity factor), was sufficient to abolish both transfer and initiation of transfer. Thus, the clustered genes korSA and pif act complementarily to maintain pSAM2 in a 'prophage' state under non-conjugal conditions. KorSA is involved in intracellular signalling, whereas Pif participates in intercellular signalling. The Pif nudix motif is essential for its activity. This is the first protein of the nudix family shown to be involved in bacterial conjugation.

  20. Characterization of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on silicon substrate comparative with polymer substrate for Escherichia coli O157:H7 detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, Carmen; Mihailescu, Carmen; Stan, Dana; Ruta, Lavinia; Iosub, Rodica; Gavrila, Raluca; Purica, Munizer; Vasilica, Schiopu

    2009-08-01

    This article presents the characterization of two substrates, silicon and polymer coated with gold, that are functionalized by mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) in order to efficiently immobilize the anti- Escherichia coli O157:H7 polyclonal purified antibody. A biosurface functionalized by SAMs (self-assembled monolayers) technique has been developed. Immobilization of goat anti- E. coli O157:H7 antibody was performed by covalently bonding of thiolate mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) realized on two substrates: polymer coated with gold and silicon coated with gold. The F(ab') 2 fragments of the antibodies have been used for eliminating nonspecific bindings between the Fc portions of antibodies and the Fc receptor on cells. The properties of the monolayers and the biofilm formatted with attached antibody molecules were analyzed at each step using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). In our study the gold-coated silicon substrates approach yielded the best results. These experimental results revealed the necessity to investigate each stage of the immobilization process taking into account in the same time the factors that influence the chemistry of the surface and the further interactions as well and also provide a solid basis for further studies aiming at elaborating sensitive and specific immunosensor or a microarray for the detection of E. coli O157:H7.

  1. Updates to Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    View information on the latest updates to methods included in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM), including the newest recommended methods and publications.

  2. The first year: Development of a LANDSAT capability at Sam Houston State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bounds, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Problems encountered in initiating a LANDSAT data processing capability at Sam Houston State University are discussed. Computer requirements, financing, and academic and administrative support are addressed.

  3. SAM-2 ground-truth plan: Correlative measurements for the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement-2 (SAM 2) sensor on the Nimbus G satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Pepin, T. J.; Chu, W. P.; Swissler, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The SAM-2 will fly aboard the Nimbus-G satellite for launch in the fall of 1978 and measure stratospheric vertical profiles of aerosol extinction in high latitude bands. The plan gives details of the location and times for the simultaneous satellite/correlative measurements for the nominal launch time, the rationale and choice of the correlative sensors, their characteristics and expected accuracies, and the conversion of their data to extinction profiles. The SAM-2 expected instrument performance and data inversion results are presented. Various atmospheric models representative of polar stratospheric aerosols are used in the SAM-2 and correlative sensor analyses.

  4. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  5. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors.

  6. Correlative Microscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microscopy and Imaging offers many opportunities to collaborate and cooperate with scientists in many different fields nationally and internationally. Images have proven to be very important components in basic research, product development and understanding structure/function relationships in addit...

  7. Regioselective patterning of multiple SAMs and applications in surface-guided smart microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanzhao; Xu, Pengcheng; Li, Xinxin

    2014-12-24

    A top-down nanofabrication technology is developed to integrate multiple SAMs (self-assembled monolayers) into regioselective patterns. With ultraviolet light exposure through regioselectively hollowed hard mask, an existing SAM at designated microregions can be removed and a dissimilar kind of SAM can be regrown there. By repeating the photolithography-like process cycle, diverse kinds of SAM building blocks can be laid out as a desired pattern in one microfluidic channel. In order to ensure high quality of the surface modifications, the SAMs are vapor-phase deposited before the channel is closed by a bonding process. For the first time the technique makes it possible to integrate three or more kinds of SAMs in one microchannel. The technique is very useful for multiplex surface functionalization of microfluidic chips where different segments of a microfluidic channel need to be individually modified with different SAMs or into arrayed pattern for surface-guided fluidic properties like hydrophobicity/philicity and/or oleophobicity/philicity, etc. The technique has been well validated by experimental demonstration of various surface-directed flow-guiding functions. By modifying a microchannel surface into an arrayed pattern of multi-SAM "two-tone" stripe array, surface-guiding-induced 3D swirling flow is generated in a microfluidic channel that experimentally exhibits quick oil/water mixing and high-efficiency oil-to-water chemical extraction.

  8. Sam2bam: High-Performance Framework for NGS Data Preprocessing Tools

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yinhe; Tzeng, Tzy-Hwa Kathy

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a high-throughput software tool framework called sam2bam that enables users to significantly speed up pre-processing for next-generation sequencing data. The sam2bam is especially efficient on single-node multi-core large-memory systems. It can reduce the runtime of data pre-processing in marking duplicate reads on a single node system by 156–186x compared with de facto standard tools. The sam2bam consists of parallel software components that can fully utilize multiple processors, available memory, high-bandwidth storage, and hardware compression accelerators, if available. The sam2bam provides file format conversion between well-known genome file formats, from SAM to BAM, as a basic feature. Additional features such as analyzing, filtering, and converting input data are provided by using plug-in tools, e.g., duplicate marking, which can be attached to sam2bam at runtime. We demonstrated that sam2bam could significantly reduce the runtime of next generation sequencing (NGS) data pre-processing from about two hours to about one minute for a whole-exome data set on a 16-core single-node system using up to 130 GB of memory. The sam2bam could reduce the runtime of NGS data pre-processing from about 20 hours to about nine minutes for a whole-genome sequencing data set on the same system using up to 711 GB of memory. PMID:27861637

  9. Overview of SAM results obtained at Gale Crater during the 180 first sols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.; Archer, D.; Atreya, S. K.; Benna, M.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Brunner, A.; Buch, A.; Conrad, P.; Coscia, D.; Dobson, N.; Dworkin, J.; Eigenbrode, J.; Farley, K.; Flesch, G.; Franz, H.; Freissinet, C.; Galvin, D.; Gorevan, S.; Harpold, D.; Hengemihle, J.; Jaeger, F.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, M.; Jones, J.; Lefavor, M.; Leshin, L.; Lyness, E.; Malespin, C.; Manning, H.; Martin, D.; McAdam, A.; McKay, C.; Miller, K.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Navarro-González, R.; Niles, P.; Nolan, T.; Owen, T.; Pavolv, A.; Prats, B.; Pepin, R.; Raaen, E.; Raulin, F.; Steele, A.; Stern, J.; Squyres, S.; Sutter, B.; Summons, R. E.; Szopa, C.; Tan, F.; Teinturier, S.; Trainer, M.; Wong, M.; Wray, J.

    2013-09-01

    During the first 180 sols of Curiosity's landed mission on Mars (8/6/2012 to 2/7/2013) SAM sampled the atmosphere more than a dozen times, the dusty sandpile named Rocknest and a basin site named John Klein on the floor of Gale crater. The atmospheric experiments utilized SAM's quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and its tunable laser spectrometer (TLS) while the solid sample experiments also utilized the gas chromatograph (GC). Although a number of core experiments were pre-programmed and stored in SAM EEProm, the high level SAM scripting language enabled the team to often optimize experiments based on prior runs. SAM and its Experiment Sequences exercised during the First 120 Sols: The SAM instruments, its gas processing system (GPS) and its sample manipulation system (SMS) have been already described [1]. During the first few weeks of the landed mission SAM carried out a variety of instrument health checks and then began a series of atmospheric experiments to measure atmospheric composition and isotope ratios. From sol 56 to 102 Curiosity lingered at Rocknest to clean out the surfaces of the sample processing system by scooping several times into this fine grained material, vibrating to abrade possible contamination from surfaces, and then discarding before delivery of sample to SAM from the 5th scoop.

  10. Winning Attitude & Dedication to Physical Therapy Keep Sam Schmidt on Track

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosley, Nikki Prevenslik

    2006-01-01

    This article relates how Sam Schmidt returned to living a productive life after an accident left him with spinal cord injury. Schmidt was a former Indy Racing League driver who founded Sam Schmidt Motorsports after his accident in 2000. Schmidt's car hit the wall as he exited turn two during a practice session at Walt Disney World Speedway in…

  11. High expression level and nuclear localization of Sam68 are associated with progression and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Src-associated in mitosis (Sam68; 68 kDa) has been implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of several human cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinicopathologic significance of Sam68 expression and its subcellular localization in colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods Sam68 expression was examined in CRC cell lines, nine matched CRC tissues and adjacent noncancerous tissues using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Sam68 protein expression and localization were determined in 224 paraffin-embedded archived CRC samples using immunohistochemistry. Statistical analyses were applied to evaluate the clinicopathologic significance. Results Sam68 was upregulated in CRC cell lines and CRC, as compared with normal tissues; high Sam68 expression was detected in 120/224 (53.6%) of the CRC tissues. High Sam68 expression correlated significantly with poor differentiation (P = 0.033), advanced T stage (P < 0.001), N stage (P = 0.023) and distant metastasis (P = 0.033). Sam68 nuclear localization correlated significantly with poor differentiation (P = 0.002) and T stage (P =0.021). Patients with high Sam68 expression or Sam68 nuclear localization had poorer overall survival than patients with low Sam68 expression or Sam68 cytoplasmic localization. Patients with high Sam68 expression had a higher risk of recurrence than those with low Sam68 expression. Conclusions Overexpression of Sam68 correlated highly with cancer progression and poor differentiation in CRC. High Sam68 expression and Sam68 nuclear localization were associated with poorer overall survival. PMID:23937454

  12. S.A.M., the Italian Martian simulation chamber.

    PubMed

    Galletta, G; Ferri, F; Fanti, G; D'Alessandro, M; Bertoloni, G; Pavarin, D; Bettanini, C; Cozza, P; Pretto, P; Bianchini, G; Debei, S

    2006-12-01

    The Martian Environment Simulator (SAM "Simulatore di Ambiente Marziano") is a interdisciplinary project of Astrobiology done at University of Padua. The research is aimed to the study of the survival of the microorganisms exposed to the "extreme" planetary environment. The facility has been designed in order to simulate Mars' environmental conditions in terms of atmospheric pressure, temperature cycles and UV radiation dose. The bacterial cells, contained into dedicated capsules, will be exposed to thermal cycles simulating diurnal and seasonal Martian cycles. The metabolism of the different biological samples will be analysed at different phases of the experiment, to study their survival and eventual activity of protein synthesis (mortality, mutations and capability of DNA repairing). We describe the experimental facility and provide the perspectives of the biological experiments we will perform in order to provide hints on the possibility of life on Mars either autochthonous or imported from Earth.

  13. Radical SAM-Mediated Methylation of Ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovic, Vanja; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional modifications of RNA play an important role in a wide range of biological processes. In ribosomal RNA (rRNA), methylation of nucleotide bases is the predominant modification. In recent years, methylation of adenosine 2503 (A2503) in bacterial 23S rRNA has attracted significant attention due to both the unusual regioselectivity of the methyl group incorporation, as well as the pathophysiological roles of the resultant methylations. Specifically, A2503 is methylated at the C2 and C8 positions of the adenine ring, and the introduced modifications have a profound impact on translational fidelity and antibiotic resistance, respectively. These modifications are performed by RlmN and Cfr, two members, of the recently discovered class of radical S-adenosylmethionine (radical SAM) methylsynthases. Here, we present several methods that can be used to evaluate the activity of these enzymes, under both in vivo and in vitro conditions. PMID:26253978

  14. Solution structure of the first Sam domain of Odin and binding studies with the EphA2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Flavia Anna; Marasco, Daniela; Pirone, Luciano; Pedone, Emilia Maria; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Leone, Marilisa

    2012-03-13

    The EphA2 receptor plays key roles in many physiological and pathological events, including cancer. The process of receptor endocytosis and the consequent degradation have attracted attention as possible means of overcoming the negative outcomes of EphA2 in cancer cells and decreasing tumor malignancy. A recent study indicates that Sam (sterile alpha motif) domains of Odin, a member of the ANKS (ankyrin repeat and sterile alpha motif domain-containing) family of proteins, are important for the regulation of EphA2 endocytosis. Odin contains two tandem Sam domains (Odin-Sam1 and -Sam2). Herein, we report on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solution structure of Odin-Sam1; through a variety of assays (employing NMR, surface plasmon resonance, and isothermal titration calorimetry techniques), we clearly demonstrate that Odin-Sam1 binds to the Sam domain of EphA2 in the low micromolar range. NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments and molecular modeling studies point out that the two Sam domains interact with a head-to-tail topology characteristic of several Sam-Sam complexes. This binding mode is similar to that we have previously proposed for the association between the Sam domains of the lipid phosphatase Ship2 and EphA2. This work further validates structural elements relevant for the heterotypic Sam-Sam interactions of EphA2 and provides novel insights for the design of potential therapeutic compounds that can modulate receptor endocytosis.

  15. Correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loussert Fonta, Céline; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years correlative microscopy, combining the power and advantages of different imaging system, e.g., light, electrons, X-ray, NMR, etc., has become an important tool for biomedical research. Among all the possible combinations of techniques, light and electron microscopy, have made an especially big step forward and are being implemented in more and more research labs. Electron microscopy profits from the high spatial resolution, the direct recognition of the cellular ultrastructure and identification of the organelles. It, however, has two severe limitations: the restricted field of view and the fact that no live imaging can be done. On the other hand light microscopy has the advantage of live imaging, following a fluorescently tagged molecule in real time and at lower magnifications the large field of view facilitates the identification and location of sparse individual cells in a large context, e.g., tissue. The combination of these two imaging techniques appears to be a valuable approach to dissect biological events at a submicrometer level. Light microscopy can be used to follow a labelled protein of interest, or a visible organelle such as mitochondria, in time, then the sample is fixed and the exactly same region is investigated by electron microscopy. The time resolution is dependent on the speed of penetration and fixation when chemical fixatives are used and on the reaction time of the operator for cryo-fixation. Light microscopy can also be used to identify cells of interest, e.g., a special cell type in tissue or cells that have been modified by either transfections or RNAi, in a large population of non-modified cells. A further application is to find fluorescence labels in cells on a large section to reduce searching time in the electron microscope. Multiple fluorescence labelling of a series of sections can be correlated with the ultrastructure of the individual sections to get 3D information of the distribution of the marked proteins: array

  16. Social activity method (SAM): A fractal language for mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Paul

    2013-09-01

    In this paper I shall present and develop my organisational language, social activity method (SAM), and illustrate some of its applications. I shall introduce a new scheme for modes of recontextualisation that enables the analysis of the ways in which one activity - which might be school mathematics or social research or any empirically observed regularity of practice - recontextualises the practice of another and I shall also present, deploy, and develop an existing scheme - domains of action - in an analysis of school mathematics examination papers and in the structuring of what I refer to as the esoteric domain. This domain is here conceived as a hybrid domain of, first, linguistic and extralinguistic resources that are unambiguously mathematical in terms of both expression and content and, second, pedagogic theory - often tacit - that enables the mathematical gaze onto other practices and so recontextualises them. A second and more general theme that runs through the paper is the claim that there is nothing that is beyond semiosis, that there is nothing to which we have direct access, unmediated by interpretation. This state of affairs has implications for mathematics education. Specifically, insofar as an individual's mathematical semiotic system is under continuous development - the curriculum never being graspable all at once - understanding - as a stable semiotic moment - of any aspect or object of mathematics is always localised to the individual and is at best transient, and the sequencing of such moments may well also be more individualised than consistent in some correspondence with the sequencing of the curriculum. This being the case, a concentration on understanding as a goal may well serve to inhibit the pragmatic acquisition and deployment of mathematical technologies, which should be the principal aim of mathematics teaching and learning. The paper is primarily concerned with mathematics education. SAM, however, is a language that is available for

  17. Economic Analysis Case Studies of Battery Energy Storage with SAM

    SciTech Connect

    DiOrio, Nicholas; Dobos, Aron; Janzou, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Interest in energy storage has continued to increase as states like California have introduced mandates and subsidies to spur adoption. This energy storage includes customer sited behind-the-meter storage coupled with photovoltaics (PV). This paper presents case study results from California and Tennessee, which were performed to assess the economic benefit of customer-installed systems. Different dispatch strategies, including manual scheduling and automated peak-shaving were explored to determine ideal ways to use the storage system to increase the system value and mitigate demand charges. Incentives, complex electric tariffs, and site specific load and PV data were used to perform detailed analysis. The analysis was performed using the free, publically available System Advisor Model (SAM) tool. We find that installation of photovoltaics with a lithium-ion battery system priced at $300/kWh in Los Angeles under a high demand charge utility rate structure and dispatched using perfect day-ahead forecasting yields a positive net-present value, while all other scenarios cost the customer more than the savings accrued. Different dispatch strategies, including manual scheduling and automated peak-shaving were explored to determine ideal ways to use the storage system to increase the system value and mitigate demand charges. Incentives, complex electric tariffs, and site specific load and PV data were used to perform detailed analysis. The analysis was performed using the free, publically available System Advisor Model (SAM) tool. We find that installation of photovoltaics with a lithium-ion battery system priced at $300/kWh in Los Angeles under a high demand charge utility rate structure and dispatched using perfect day-ahead forecasting yields a positive net-present value, while all other scenarios cost the customer more than the savings accrued.

  18. Radical SAM catalysis via an organometallic intermediate with an Fe-[5'-C]-deoxyadenosyl bond.

    PubMed

    Horitani, Masaki; Shisler, Krista; Broderick, William E; Hutcheson, Rachel U; Duschene, Kaitlin S; Marts, Amy R; Hoffman, Brian M; Broderick, Joan B

    2016-05-13

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to cleave SAM to initiate diverse radical reactions. These reactions are thought to involve the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate, which has not yet been detected. We used rapid freeze-quenching to trap a catalytically competent intermediate in the reaction catalyzed by the radical SAM enzyme pyruvate formate-lyase activating enzyme. Characterization of the intermediate by electron paramagnetic resonance and (13)C, (57)Fe electron nuclear double-resonance spectroscopies reveals that it contains an organometallic center in which the 5' carbon of a SAM-derived deoxyadenosyl moiety forms a bond with the unique iron site of the [4Fe-4S] cluster. Discovery of this intermediate extends the list of enzymatic bioorganometallic centers to the radical SAM enzymes, the largest enzyme superfamily known, and reveals intriguing parallels to B12 radical enzymes.

  19. New insights into the electrochemical desorption of alkanethiol SAMs on gold

    PubMed Central

    Pensa, Evangelina; Vericat, Carolina; Grumelli, Doris; Salvarezza, Roberto C.; Park, Sung Hyun; Longo, Gabriel S.; Szleifer, Igal

    2012-01-01

    A combination of Polarization Modulation Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (PMIRRAS) under electrochemical control, Electrochemical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (ECSTM) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations has been used to shed light on the reductive desorption process of dodecanethiol (C12) and octadecanethiol (C18) SAMs on gold in aqueous electrolytes. Experimental PMIRRAS, ECSTM and MD simulations data for C12 desorption are consistent with formation of randomly distributed micellar aggregates stabilized by Na+ ions, coexisting with a lying-down phase of molecules. The analysis of pit and Au island coverage before and after desorption is consistent with the thiolate-Au adatoms models. On the other hand, PMIRRAS and MD data for C18 indicate that the desorbed alkanethiolates adopt a Na+ ion-stabilized bilayer of interdigitated alkanethiolates, with no evidence of lying down molecules. MD simulations also show that both the degree of order and tilt angle of the desorbed alkanethiolates change with the surface charge on the metal, going from bilayers to micelles. These results demonstrate the complexity of the alkanethiol desorption in the presence of water and the fact that chain length and counterions play a key role in a complex structure. PMID:22870508

  20. Sam68 is Overexpressed in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer and Promotes Tumor Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lijuan; Che, Hailuo; Li, Mingmei; Li, Xuepeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the deadliest gynecological malignancy, and evidence is accumulating on how molecular markers may be associated with the origin and process of EOC. Sam68 (Src-associated in mitosis, of 68 kD), is a K homology domain RNA-binding protein that has been investigated as a risk factor in multiple types of tumors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of the Sam68 gene in the pathogenesis of EOC. Material/Methods Western blot assay and real-time quantitative PCR methods were performed to examine Sam68 expression in EOC tissue specimens. The association of Sam68 expression with clinic-pathologic variables of EOC was evaluated. Then gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies were adopted to examine the regulation of Sam68 on the proliferation of EOC OVCAR-3 cells using CCK-8 and colony forming assays. Results Sam68 was overexpressed in both mRNA and protein levels in EOC tumor tissue (n=152) in an association with malignant factors of EOC such as International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, residual tumor size (cm), histological grade, and lymph node metastasis. In vitro results demonstrated that Sam68 overexpression was upregulated while Sam68 knockdown downregulated the proliferation of EOC OVCAR-3 cells via regulation of cell growth and colony formation. Conclusions Sam68 was overexpressed in EOC tissue in association with such cancer malignant factors of FIGO stage, histological grade, and lymph node metastasis, and also positively regulated the proliferation of EOC cells. Our research suggests that Sam68 might accelerate cell cycle progression, and present as a prognostic marker for EOC. PMID:27623016

  1. Nonlinear Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-02-14

    Wester- velt. [60] Streaming. In 1831, Michael Faraday [61] noted that currents of air were set up in the neighborhood of vibrating plates-the first... ducei in the case of a paramettc amy (from Berktay an Leahy 141). C’ "". k•, SEC 10.1 NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS 345 The principal results of their analysis

  2. Expansion Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W.; Boyden, Edward S.

    2014-01-01

    In optical microscopy, fine structural details are resolved by using refraction to magnify images of a specimen. Here we report the discovery that, by synthesizing a swellable polymer network within a specimen, it can be physically expanded, resulting in physical magnification. By covalently anchoring specific labels located within the specimen directly to the polymer network, labels spaced closer than the optical diffraction limit can be isotropically separated and optically resolved, a process we call expansion microscopy (ExM). Thus, this process can be used to perform scalable super-resolution microscopy with diffraction-limited microscopes. We demonstrate ExM with effective ~70 nm lateral resolution in both cultured cells and brain tissue, performing three-color super-resolution imaging of ~107 μm3 of the mouse hippocampus with a conventional confocal microscope. PMID:25592419

  3. Sensitivity of photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Building on its high spatial resolution, deep penetration depth and excellent image contrast, 3D photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has grown tremendously since its first publication in 2005. Integrating optical excitation and acoustic detection, PAM has broken through both the optical diffusion and optical diffraction limits. PAM has 100% relative sensitivity to optical absorption (i.e., a given percentage change in the optical absorption coefficient yields the same percentage change in the photoacoustic amplitude), and its ultimate detection sensitivity is limited only by thermal noise. Focusing on the engineering aspects of PAM, this Review discusses the detection sensitivity of PAM, compares the detection efficiency of different PAM designs, and summarizes the imaging performance of various endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. It then describes representative PAM applications with high detection sensitivity, and outlines paths to further improvement. PMID:25302158

  4. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of corrosion passivation and nanometer-scale lithography with self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamborini, Francis Patrick

    The research in this dissertation examines the possible applications of organomercaptan self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for corrosion passivation and nanometer-scale lithography. We examined linear-chain n-alkanethiol and aromatic SAMs in these studies and used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as the main tool for surface characterization. The corrosion passivation properties of n-alkanethiol SAMs were studied on Au in aqueous CN- and Br - solutions and on underpotentially deposited Cu on Au (Au/Cu-UPD) in aqueous HClO4. All SAMs suppress corrosion and shift the potential for corrosion to more positive potentials compared to that on the unmodified metals. We found that corrosion of n-alkanethiol SAM-modified Au begins at defects in the monolayer and the surface morphology depends on the functional end group of the SAM. Corrosion on the unpassivated metal surface begins at high energy sites such as step edges and pits. The chain length and functional end group of SAMs were varied to determine which factors were most important for the best protection against corrosion. We found that corrosion passivation improves with increasing chain length and more hydrophilic functional end groups like OH and COOH protect better than hydrophobic end groups like CH3. The passivation properties of linear-chain SAMs was compared with aromatic SAMs and we found that if they are equally thick and contain the same functional end group, the aromatic SAMs are superior. One goal of this research was to improve the barrier properties of SAMs. We found that depositing a single layer of Cu onto Au before adsorbing the SAM improved its barrier properties dramatically compared to when the SAM was adsorbed directly to the Au. In summary, the corrosion-related studies in this dissertation discuss the corrosion mechanism of SAM-modified metal surfaces, the important factors that determine the passivation properties of SAMs, and a strategy for dramatically improving the barrier properties of

  5. High-Frequency Acoustic Impedance Imaging of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Fadhel, Muhannad N; Berndl, Elizabeth S L; Strohm, Eric M; Kolios, Michael C

    2015-10-01

    Variations in the acoustic impedance throughout cells and tissue can be used to gain insight into cellular microstructures and the physiologic state of the cell. Ultrasound imaging can be used to create a map of the acoustic impedance, on which fluctuations can be used to help identify the dominant ultrasound scattering source in cells, providing information for ultrasound tissue characterization. The physiologic state of a cell can be inferred from the average acoustic impedance values, as many cellular physiologic changes are linked to an alteration in their mechanical properties. A recently proposed method, acoustic impedance imaging, has been used to measure the acoustic impedance maps of biological tissues, but the method has not been used to characterize individual cells. Using this method to image cells can result in more precise acoustic impedance maps of cells than obtained previously using time-resolved acoustic microscopy. We employed an acoustic microscope using a transducer with a center frequency of 375 MHz to calculate the acoustic impedance of normal (MCF-10 A) and cancerous (MCF-7) breast cells. The generated acoustic impedance maps and simulations suggest that the position of the nucleus with respect to the polystyrene substrate may have an effect on the measured acoustic impedance value of the cell. Fluorescence microscopy and confocal microscopy were used to correlate acoustic impedance images with the position of the nucleus within the cell. The average acoustic impedance statistically differed between normal and cancerous breast cells (1.636 ± 0.010 MRayl vs. 1.612 ± 0.006 MRayl), indicating that acoustic impedance could be used to differentiate between normal and cancerous cells.

  6. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir from November 1995 to March 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) sponsors science experiments on a variety of microgravity carriers, including Orbiter missions and Russia's Mir space station. The MSAD sponsors the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LERC) to support these science experiments by providing acceleration measurements to characterize the microgravity environment to which the experiments were exposed. The LeRC Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) project supports principal investigations of microgravity science experiments as they evaluate the effects of varying acceleration levels on their experiments. In 1994, a SAMS unit was installed on the Mir space station. In a manner similar to Orbiter mission support, the SAMS unit supports science experiments from the U.S. and Russia by measuring the microgravity environment during experiment operations. Previous reports have summarized the SAMS data acquired during the period from September 1994 to November 1995. During the time period from November 1995 to March 1996, the primary SAMS-supported experiment was a Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) experiment. SAMS data were obtained during the PCG operations on Mir in accordance with the requirements specified by the PCG Principal Investigator. Also included in this data are mission events of interest, such as the undocking of STS-74 from Mir (November 1995) and the docking of Atlantis (STS-76) to Mir in March 1996. This report presents an overview of the SAMS data recorded in the interval from November 1995 to March 1996.

  7. The integrated conjugative plasmid pSAM2 of Streptomyces ambofaciens is related to temperate bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Boccard, F; Smokvina, T; Pernodet, J L; Friedmann, A; Guérineau, M

    1989-03-01

    Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877 and derivatives contain the 11-kb element pSAM2 present in an integrated state or as a free and integrated plasmid. This element, able to integrate site-specifically in the genome of different Streptomyces species, is conjugative and mobilizes chromosomal markers. Besides these plasmid functions, we have shown that the site-specific recombination system of pSAM2 presents strong similarities with that of several temperate phages. The integration event is promoted by a site-specific recombinase of the integrase family. The int gene encoding this integrase is closely linked to the plasmid attachment site (attP). A small open reading frame (ORF) overlaps the int gene and the predicted protein exhibits similarities with Xis proteins involved in phages excision. The integrated copy of pSAM2 in strain ATCC23877 is flanked by att sequences (attL and attR). Another att sequence (attX) is present in this strain and attX and attL are the boundaries of a 42-kb fragment (xSAM1) absent, as well as pSAM2, from S.ambofaciens DSM40697. Sequences partially similar to pSAM2 int gene are found near the chromosomal integration zone in both S.ambofaciens strains. The possible origin of pSAM2, an element carrying plasmid as well as phage features, is discussed.

  8. The integrative element pSAM2 from Streptomyces: kinetics and mode of conjugal transfer.

    PubMed

    Possoz, C; Ribard, C; Gagnat, J; Pernodet, J L; Guérineau, M

    2001-10-01

    pSAM2 is an 11 kb integrative element from Streptomyces ambofaciens that is capable of conjugal transfer. A system based on differential DNA modification by SalI methyltransferase was used to localize pSAM2 in the donor or recipient strain, and thus to determine the various steps associated with transfer. Initiation (i.e. excision and replication of pSAM2 in the donor) occurs a few hours after mating with a recipient strain. pSAM2 replicates in the recipient strain, spreads within the mycelium and then integrates into the chromosome. Transfer generally involves single-stranded DNA. In Streptomyces, only a few genes, such as traSA for pSAM2, are required for conjugal transfer. Using the differential sensitivity to the SalI restriction-modification system of transfers involving single- and double-stranded DNA, we found that pSAM2 was probably transferred to the recipient as double-stranded DNA. This provides the first experimental evidence for the transfer of double-stranded DNA during bacterial conjugation. Thus, TraSA, involved in pSAM2 transfer, and SpoIIIE, which is involved in chromosome partitioning in Bacillus subtilis, display similarities in both sequence and function: both seem to transport double-stranded DNA actively, either from donor to recipient or from mother cell to prespore.

  9. Cyclodextrin-based surface acoustic wave chemical microsensors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.Q.; Shi, J.X.; Springer, K.; Swanson, B.I.

    1996-07-01

    Cyclodextrin thin films were fabricated using either self-assembled monolayer (SAM) or solgel techniques. The resulting host receptor thin films on the substrates of surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators were studied as method of tracking organic toxins in vapor phase. The mass loading of surface-attached host monolayers on SAW resonators gave frequency shifts corresponding to typical monolayer surface coverages for SAM methods and ``multilayer`` coverages for sol-gel techniques. Subsequent exposure of the coated SAW resonators to organic vapors at various concentrations, typically 5,000 parts per millions (ppm) down to 100 parts per billions (ppb) by mole, gave responses indicating middle-ppb-sensitivity ({approximately}50 ppb) for those sensor-host-receptors and organic-toxin pairs with optimum mutual matching of polarity, size, and structural properties.

  10. The association of Sam68 with Vav1 contributes to tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Lazer, Galit; Pe'er, Liron; Schapira, Vered; Richard, Stéphane; Katzav, Shulamit

    2007-12-01

    Vav1 functions in the hematopoietic system as a specific GDP/GTP nucleotide exchange factor regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation. An intact C-terminal SH3 domain of Vav1 (Vav1SH3C) was shown to be necessary for Vav1-induced transformation, yet the associating protein(s) necessary for this activity have not yet been identified. Using a proteomics approach, we identified Sam68 as a Vav1SH3C-associating protein. Sam68 (Src-associated in mitosis of 68 kD) belongs to the heteronuclear ribonucleoprotein particle K (hnRNP-K) homology (KH) domain family of RNA-binding proteins. The Vav1/Sam68 interaction was observed in vitro and in vivo. Mutants of Vav1SH3C previously shown to lose their transforming potential did not associate with Sam68. Co-expression of Vav1 and Sam68 in Jurkat T cells led to increased localization of Vav1 in the nucleus and changes in cell morphology. We then tested the contribution of Sam68 to known functions of Vav1, such as focus-forming in NIH3T3 fibroblasts and NFAT stimulation in T cells. Co-expression of oncogenic Vav1 with Sam68 in NIH3T3 fibroblasts resulted in a dose-dependent increase in foci, yet no further enhancement of NFAT activity was observed in Jurkat T cells, as compared to cells overexpressing only Vav1 or Sam68. Our results strongly suggest that Sam68 contributes to transformation by oncogenic Vav1.

  11. Sam68 Mediates the Activation of Insulin and Leptin Signalling in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Pérez, Antonio; Sánchez-Jiménez, Flora; Vilariño-García, Teresa; de la Cruz, Luis; Virizuela, Juan A.; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a well-known risk factor for breast cancer development in postmenopausal women. High insulin and leptin levels seem to have a role modulating the growth of these tumours. Sam68 is an RNA-binding protein with signalling functions that has been found to be overexpressed in breast cancer. Moreover, Sam68 may be recruited to insulin and leptin signalling pathways, mediating its effects on survival, growth and proliferation in different cellular types. We aimed to study the expression of Sam68 and its phosphorylation level upon insulin and leptin stimulation, and the role of Sam68 in the proliferative effect and signalling pathways that are activated by insulin or leptin in human breast adenocarcinoma cells. In the human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and BT-474, Sam68 protein quantity and gene expression were increased upon leptin or insulin stimulation, as it was checked by qPCR and immunoblot. Moreover, both insulin and leptin stimulation promoted an increase in Sam68 tyrosine phosphorylation and negatively regulated its RNA binding capacity. siRNA was used to downregulate Sam68 expression, which resulted in lower proliferative effects of both insulin and leptin, as well as a lower activation of MAPK and PI3K pathways promoted by both hormones. These effects may be partly explained by the decrease in IRS-1 expression by down-regulation of Sam68. These results suggest the participation of Sam68 in both leptin and insulin receptor signaling in human breast cancer cells, mediating the trophic effects of these hormones in proliferation and cellular growth. PMID:27415018

  12. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  14. A comparative study of aerosol extinction measurements made by the SAM II and SAGE satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    SAM II and SAGE are two satellite experiments designed to measure stratospheric aerosol extinction using the technique of solar occultation or limb extinction. Although each sensor is mounted aboard a different satellite, there are occasions when their measurement locations are nearly coincident, thereby providing opportunities for a measurement comparison. In this paper, the aerosol extinction profiles and daily contour plots for some of these events in 1979 are reported. The comparisons shown in this paper demonstrate that SAM II and SAGE are producing similar aerosol extinction profiles within their measurement errors and that since SAM II has been previously validated, these results show the validity of the SAGE aerosol measurements.

  15. The fSAM Model of False Recall

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, Daniel R.; Smith, Troy A.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report a new theory of false memory building upon existing associative memory models and implemented in fSAM, the first fully specified quantitative model of false recall. Participants frequently intrude unstudied critical words while recalling lists comprising their strongest semantic associates but infrequently produce other extralist and prior-list intrusions. The authors developed the theory by simulating recall of such lists, using factorial combinations of semantic mechanisms operating at encoding, retrieval, or both stages. During encoding, unstudied words' associations to list context were strengthened in proportion to their strength of semantic association either to each studied word or to all co-rehearsed words. During retrieval, words received preference in proportion to their strength of semantic association to the most recently recalled single word or multiple words. The authors simulated all intrusion types and veridical recall for lists varying in semantic association strength among studied and critical words from the same and different lists. Multiplicative semantic encoding and retrieval mechanisms performed well in combination. Using such combined mechanisms, the authors also simulated several core findings from the Deese–Roediger–McDermott paradigm literature, including developmental patterns, specific list effects, association strength effects, and true–false correlations. These results challenge existing false-memory theories. PMID:17907869

  16. OARE and SAMS on STS-94/MSL-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskowitz, Milton; Hrovat, Kenneth; McPherson, Kevin; Tschen, Peter; DeLombard, Richard; Nati, Maurizio

    1998-01-01

    Four microgravity acceleration measurement instruments were included on MSL-1 to measure the accelerations and vibrations to which science experiments were exposed during their operation on the mission. The data were processed and presented to the principal investigators in a variety of formats to aid their assessment of the microgravity environment during their experiment operations. Two accelerometer systems managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) supported the MSL-1 mission: the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), and the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS). In addition, the Microgravity Measurement Assembly (MMA) and the Quasi- Steady Acceleration Measurement (QSAM) system, both sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division, collected acceleration data as a part of the MSL-1 mission. The NIMA was funded and designed by the European Space Agency in the Netherlands (ESA/ESTEC), and the QSAM system was funded and designed by the German Space Agency (DLR). The Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) project at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) supports Principal Investigators (PIs) of the Microgravity science community as they evaluate the effects of acceleration on their experiments. PIMS primary responsibility is to support NASA-sponsored investigators in the area of acceleration data analysis and interpretation. A mission summary report was prepared and published by PIMS in order to furnish interested experiment investigators with a guide for evaluating the acceleration environment during the MSL-1 mission.

  17. Sam Goudsmit--His Physics and His Statesmanship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bederson, Benjamin

    2010-03-01

    Sam Goudsmit was already a famous theoretical physicist in his thirties, mainly because of his co-discovery of electron spin with George Uhlenbeck while both were students of Paul Ehrenfest in Holland in 1925. He and Uhlenbeck continued their thriving careers at the University of Michigan. Goudsmit's style as a physicist was always to make as close a connection between theory and experiment as possible. Thus, for example, his development with his student Robert Bacher of the technique called ``fractional parentage'' used fruitfully in both atomic and nuclear physics to compute energy levels of unknown states in terms of know ones. He also delved deeply into problems related to determinations of nuclear spins and moments. Partly because of his service as scientific leader of the Alsos project at the end of WWII he became a leading statesman of science. I will describe some of his achievements both as a physicist and as a statesman, prior to his becoming Editor in Chief of the American Physical Society.

  18. Positron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Xu, J.

    1995-02-01

    The negative work function property that some materials have for positrons make possible the development of positron reemission microscopy (PRM). Because of the low energies with which the positrons are emitted, some unique applications, such as the imaging of defects, can be made. The history of the concept of PRM, and its present state of development will be reviewed. The potential of positron microprobe techniques will be discussed also.

  19. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  20. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  1. Tandem SAM Domain Structure of Human Caskin1: A Presynaptic, Self-Assembling Scaffold for CASK

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, Ryan L.; Hinde, Elizabeth; Knight, Mary Jane; Pennella, Mario A.; Ear, Jason; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Bowie, James U.

    2012-02-07

    The synaptic scaffolding proteins CASK and Caskin1 are part of the fibrous mesh of proteins that organize the active zones of neural synapses. CASK binds to a region of Caskin1 called the CASK interaction domain (CID). Adjacent to the CID, Caskin1 contains two tandem sterile a motif (SAM) domains. Many SAM domains form polymers so they are good candidates for forming the fibrous structures seen in the active zone. We show here that the SAM domains of Caskin1 form a new type of SAM helical polymer. The Caskin1 polymer interface exhibits a remarkable segregation of charged residues, resulting in a high sensitivity to ionic strength in vitro. The Caskin1 polymers can be decorated with CASK proteins, illustrating how these proteins may work together to organize the cytomatrix in active zones.

  2. Stability of binary SAMs formed by omega-acid and alcohol functionalized thiol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Tielens, Frederik; Humblot, Vincent; Pradier, Claire-Marie; Calatayud, Monica; Illas, Francesc

    2009-09-01

    A simple model is presented to describe the mixing process of acid- and alcohol-terminated thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111). It was found that the low-concentration acid-terminated SAMs are enriched in acid thiol compared with the original solution from which the SAM is made. Due to the relatively strong interaction between acid and alcohol head groups, homogeneously mixed SAMs showing alcohol/acid pairs are preferred when the acid-terminated thiol fraction in solution is below or equal to 50%. This particular behavior affecting the mixing process is explained using atomistic first-principle thermodynamics. The calculated phase diagram has been discussed and interpreted with the help of XPS.

  3. A Stratified Acoustic Model Accounting for Phase Shifts for Underwater Acoustic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Zhang, Lin; Li, Victor O. K.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate acoustic channel models are critical for the study of underwater acoustic networks. Existing models include physics-based models and empirical approximation models. The former enjoy good accuracy, but incur heavy computational load, rendering them impractical in large networks. On the other hand, the latter are computationally inexpensive but inaccurate since they do not account for the complex effects of boundary reflection losses, the multi-path phenomenon and ray bending in the stratified ocean medium. In this paper, we propose a Stratified Acoustic Model (SAM) based on frequency-independent geometrical ray tracing, accounting for each ray's phase shift during the propagation. It is a feasible channel model for large scale underwater acoustic network simulation, allowing us to predict the transmission loss with much lower computational complexity than the traditional physics-based models. The accuracy of the model is validated via comparisons with the experimental measurements in two different oceans. Satisfactory agreements with the measurements and with other computationally intensive classical physics-based models are demonstrated. PMID:23669708

  4. CD and NMR conformational studies of a peptide encompassing the Mid Loop interface of Ship2-Sam.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Flavia A; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina L; Di Natale, Concetta; Marasco, Daniela; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Leone, Marilisa

    2014-11-01

    The lipid phosphatase Ship2 is a protein that intervenes in several diseases such as diabetes, cancer, neurodegeneration, and atherosclerosis. It is made up of a catalytic domain and several protein docking modules such as a C-terminal Sam (Sterile alpha motif) domain. The Sam domain of Ship2 (Ship2-Sam) binds to the Sam domains of the EphA2 receptor (EphA2-Sam) and the PI3K effector protein Arap3 (Arap3-Sam). These heterotypic Sam-Sam interactions occur through formation of dimers presenting the canonical "Mid Loop/End Helix" binding mode. The central region of Ship2-Sam, spanning the C-terminal end of α2, the α3 and α4 helices together with the α2α3 and α3α4 interhelical loops, forms the Mid Loop surface that is needed to bind partners Sam domains. A peptide encompassing most of the Ship2-Sam Mid Loop interface (Shiptide) capable of binding to both EphA2-Sam and Arap3-Sam, was previously identified. Here we investigated the conformational features of this peptide, through solution CD and NMR studies in different conditions. These studies reveal that the peptide is highly flexible in aqueous buffer, while it adopts a helical conformation in presence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol. The discovered structural insights and in particular the identification of a helical motif, may lead to the design of more constrained and possibly cell permeable Shiptide analogs that could work as efficient antagonists of Ship2-Sam heterotypic interactions and embrace therapeutic applications.

  5. Bringing a Chemical Laboratory Named Sam to Mars on the 2011 Curiosity Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Bleacher, L.; Jones, A.; Atreya, S. K.; Manning, H. L.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.; Sam Team

    2010-12-01

    Introduction: An important goal of upcoming missions to Mars is to understand if life could have developed there. The task of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite of instruments [1] and the other Curiosity investigations [2] is to move us steadily toward that goal with an assessment of the habitability of our neighboring planet through a series of chemical and geological measurements. SAM is designed to search for organic compounds and inorganic volatiles and measure isotope ratios. Other instruments on Curiosity will provide elemental analysis and identify minerals. SAM will analyze both atmospheric samples and gases evolved from powdered rocks that may have formed billions of years ago with Curiosity providing access to interesting sites scouted by orbiting cameras and spectrometers. SAM Instrument Suite: SAM’s instruments are a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), a 6-column Gas Chromatograph (GC), and a 2-channel Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS). SAM can identify organic compounds in Mars rocks to sub-ppb sensitivity and secure precise isotope ratios for C, H, and O in carbon dioxide and water and measure trace levels of methane and its carbon 13 isotope. The SAM gas processing system consists of valves, heaters, pressure sensors, gas scrubbers and getters, traps, and gas tanks used for calibration or combustion experiments [2]. A variety of calibrant compounds interior and exterior to SAM will allow the science and engineering teams to assess SAM’s performance. SAM has been calibrated and tested in a Mars-like environment. Keeping Educators and the Public Informed: The Education and Public Outreach (EPO) goals of the SAM team are to make this complex chemical laboratory and its data widely available to educators, students, and the public. Formal education activities include developing templates for professional development workshops for educators to teach them about SAM and Curiosity, incorporating data into Mars Student Data Teams, and writing articles

  6. A role of the SAM domain in EphA2 receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaojun; Hapiak, Vera; Zheng, Ji; Muller-Greven, Jeannine; Bowman, Deanna; Lingerak, Ryan; Buck, Matthias; Wang, Bing-Cheng; Smith, Adam W.

    2017-01-01

    Among the 20 subfamilies of protein receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), Eph receptors are unique in possessing a sterile alpha motif (SAM domain) at their C-terminal ends. However, the functions of SAM domains in Eph receptors remain elusive. Here we report on a combined cell biology and quantitative fluorescence study to investigate the role of the SAM domain in EphA2 function. We observed elevated tyrosine autophosphorylation levels upon deletion of the EphA2 SAM domain (EphA2ΔS) in DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells and a skin tumor cell line derived from EphA1/A2 knockout mice. These results suggest that SAM domain deletion induced constitutive activation of EphA2 kinase activity. In order to explain these effects, we applied fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to investigate the lateral molecular organization of EphA2. Our results indicate that SAM domain deletion (EphA2ΔS-GFP) increases oligomerization compared to the full length receptor (EphA2FL-GFP). Stimulation with ephrinA1, a ligand for EphA2, induced further oligomerization and activation of EphA2FL-GFP. The SAM domain deletion mutant, EphA2ΔS-GFP, also underwent further oligomerization upon ephrinA1 stimulation, but the oligomers were larger than those observed for EphA2FL-GFP. Based on these results, we conclude that the EphA2 SAM domain inhibits kinase activity by reducing receptor oligomerization. PMID:28338017

  7. The Combustion Experiment on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suite on the Curiosity Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. C.; Malespin, C. A.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Graham, H. V.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Brunner, A. E.; Freissinet, C.; Franz, H. B.; Fuentes, J.; Glavin, D. P.; Leshin, L. A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D. W.; Navvaro-Gonzales, R.; Niles, P. B.; Steele, A.

    2014-01-01

    The combustion experiment on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite on Curiosity will heat a sample of Mars regolith in the presence of oxygen and measure composition of the evolved gases using quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) and tunable laser spectrometry (TLS). QMS will enable detection of combustion products such as CO, CO2, NO, and other oxidized species, while TLS will enable precise measurements of the abundance and carbon isotopic composition (delta(sup 13)C) of the evolved CO2 and hydrogen isotopic composition (deltaD) of H2O. SAM will perform a two-step combustion to isolate combustible materials below approx.550 C and above approx.550 C. The combustion experiment on SAM, if properly designed and executed, has the potential to answer multiple questions regarding the origins of volatiles seen thus far in SAM evolved gas analysis (EGA) on Mars. Constraints imposed by SAM and MSL time and power resources, as well as SAM consumables (oxygen gas), will limit the number of SAM combustion experiments, so it is imperative to design an experiment targeting the most pressing science questions. Low temperature combustion experiments will primarily target the quantification of carbon (and nitrogen) contributed by SAM wet chemistry reagants MTBSTFA (N-Methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide) and DMF (Dimethylformamide), which have been identified in the background of blank and sample runs and may adsorb to the sample while the cup is in the Sample Manipulation System (SMS). In addition, differences between the sample and "blank" may yield information regarding abundance and delta(sup 13)C of bulk (both organic and inorganic) martian carbon. High temperature combustion experiments primarily aim to detect refractory organic matter, if present in Cumberland fines, as well as address the question of quantification and deltaD value of water evolution associated with hydroxyl hydrogen in clay minerals.

  8. Identification of trans-acting factors regulating SamDC expression in Oryza sativa

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Supratim; Roychoudhury, Aryadeep; Sengupta, Dibyendu N.

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • Identification of cis elements responsible for SamDC expression by in silico analysis. • qPCR analysis of SamDC expression to abiotic and biotic stress treatments. • Detection of SamDC regulators using identified cis-elements as probe by EMSA. • Southwestern Blot analysis to predict the size of the trans-acting factors. - Abstract: Abiotic stress affects the growth and productivity of crop plants; to cope with the adverse environmental conditions, plants have developed efficient defense machinery comprising of antioxidants like phenolics and flavonoids, and osmolytes like polyamines. SamDC is a key enzyme in the polyamine biosynthesis pathway in plants. In our present communication we have done in silico analysis of the promoter region of SamDC to look for the presence of different cis-regulatory elements contributing to its expression. Based on the presence of different cis-regulatory elements we completed comparative analysis of SamDC gene expression in rice lamina of IR-29 and Nonabokra by qPCR in response to the abiotic stress treatments of salinity, drought, cold and the biotic stress treatments of ABA and light. Additionally, to explore the role of the cis-regulatory elements in regulating the expression of SamDC gene in plants we comparatively analyzed the binding of rice nuclear proteins prepared from IR-29 and Nonabokra undergoing various stress treatments. The intensity of the complex formed was low and inducible in IR-29 in contrast to Nonabokra. Southwestern blot analysis helped in predicting the size of the trans-acting factors binding to these cis-elements. To our knowledge this is the first report on the comprehensive analysis of SamDC gene expression in rice and identification of the trans-acting factors regulating its expression.

  9. Fast and slow responses of Southern Ocean sea surface temperature to SAM in coupled climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Yavor; Marshall, John; Hausmann, Ute; Armour, Kyle C.; Ferreira, David; Holland, Marika M.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate how sea surface temperatures (SSTs) around Antarctica respond to the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) on multiple timescales. To that end we examine the relationship between SAM and SST within unperturbed preindustrial control simulations of coupled general circulation models (GCMs) included in the Climate Modeling Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). We develop a technique to extract the response of the Southern Ocean SST (55°S-70°S) to a hypothetical step increase in the SAM index. We demonstrate that in many GCMs, the expected SST step response function is nonmonotonic in time. Following a shift to a positive SAM anomaly, an initial cooling regime can transition into surface warming around Antarctica. However, there are large differences across the CMIP5 ensemble. In some models the step response function never changes sign and cooling persists, while in other GCMs the SST anomaly crosses over from negative to positive values only 3 years after a step increase in the SAM. This intermodel diversity can be related to differences in the models' climatological thermal ocean stratification in the region of seasonal sea ice around Antarctica. Exploiting this relationship, we use observational data for the time-mean meridional and vertical temperature gradients to constrain the real Southern Ocean response to SAM on fast and slow timescales.

  10. Contribution of sams-1 and pmt-1 to lipid homoeostasis in adult Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingxiu; Na, Keun; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Lee, Eun-Young; Paik, Young-Ki

    2011-05-01

    Accumulation of lipids inside the cell is primarily caused by disorders of lipid metabolism. S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAMS) produces SAM, an important methyl donor in various phospholipid methyltransferase reactions catalysed by phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PMT-1). A gel-based, quantitative proteomic analysis of the RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated inactivation of the pod-2 gene, which encodes acetyl-CoA carboxylase, showed a substantial down-regulation of SAMS-1. Consequently, RNAi of either sams-1 or pmt-1 caused a significant increase in lipid droplet size in the intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans. Lipid droplets exhibited increased triacylglycerol (TG) and decreased phosphatidylcholine (PC) levels, suggesting a reciprocal relationship between TG and PC regulation. These lipid-associated phenotypes were rescued by choline feeding. Among the five fat metabolism-related genes examined, two genes were highly induced by inactivation of sams-1 or pmt-1: pod-2 and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (fat-7). Thus, both SAMS-1 and PMT-1 were shown to contribute to the homoeostasis of TG and PC levels in C. elegans, which would provide an important survival strategy under harsh environmental conditions.

  11. Sam68 Is Required for DNA Damage Responses via Regulating Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Andrea; Wier, Eric M.; Wen, Matthew G.; Kamenyeva, Olena; Xia, Xue; Koo, Lily Y.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid and robust synthesis of polymers of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose (PAR) chains, primarily catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), is crucial for cellular responses to DNA damage. However, the precise mechanisms through which PARP1 is activated and PAR is robustly synthesized are not fully understood. Here, we identified Src-associated substrate during mitosis of 68 kDa (Sam68) as a novel signaling molecule in DNA damage responses (DDRs). In the absence of Sam68, DNA damage-triggered PAR production and PAR-dependent DNA repair signaling were dramatically diminished. With serial cellular and biochemical assays, we demonstrated that Sam68 is recruited to and significantly overlaps with PARP1 at DNA lesions and that the interaction between Sam68 and PARP1 is crucial for DNA damage-initiated and PARP1-conferred PAR production. Utilizing cell lines and knockout mice, we illustrated that Sam68-deleted cells and animals are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA-damaging agents. Together, our findings suggest that Sam68 plays a crucial role in DDR via regulating DNA damage-initiated PAR production. PMID:27635653

  12. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-01

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5‧-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  13. CNK and HYP form a discrete dimer by their SAM domains to mediate RAF kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Rajakulendran, Thanashan; Sahmi, Malha; Kurinov, Igor; Tyers, Mike; Therrien, Marc; Sicheri, Frank

    2008-02-26

    RAF kinase functions in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway to transmit growth signals to the downstream kinases MEK and ERK. Activation of RAF catalytic activity is facilitated by a regulatory complex comprising the proteins CNK (Connector enhancer of KSR), HYP (Hyphen), and KSR (Kinase Suppressor of Ras). The sterile alpha-motif (SAM) domain found in both CNK and HYP plays an essential role in complex formation. Here, we have determined the x-ray crystal structure of the SAM domain of CNK in complex with the SAM domain of HYP. The structure reveals a single-junction SAM domain dimer of 1:1 stoichiometry in which the binding mode is a variation of polymeric SAM domain interactions. Through in vitro and in vivo mutational analyses, we show that the specific mode of dimerization revealed by the crystal structure is essential for RAF signaling and facilitates the recruitment of KSR to form the CNK/HYP/KSR regulatory complex. We present two docking-site models to account for how SAM domain dimerization might influence the formation of a higher-order CNK/HYP/KSR complex.

  14. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    DOE PAGES

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; ...

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active sitemore » metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.« less

  15. CE-SAM: A Conversational Interface for ISR Mission Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    BLDG E2929 DESERT STORM DRIVE FORT BRAGG NC 28310 1 ARMY G1 (PDF) DAPE MR B KNAPP 300 ARMY PENTAGON RM 2C489 WASHINGTON DC 20310-0300...the kind of sensing capability assigned (for example, by means of acoustic, visual, infrared, seismic , or radar sensing). We now go into more detail for...Information Retrieval: A Survey , 2000. [12] M. Gomez, A. D. Preece, M. P. Johnson, G. de Mel, W. Vasconcelos, C. Gibson, A. Bar-Noy, K. Borowiecki, T. F

  16. Acoustic iridescence.

    PubMed

    Cox, Trevor J

    2011-03-01

    An investigation has been undertaken into acoustic iridescence, exploring how a device can be constructed which alter sound waves, in a similar way to structures in nature that act on light to produce optical iridescence. The main construction had many thin perforated sheets spaced half a wavelength apart for a specified design frequency. The sheets create the necessary impedance discontinuities to create backscattered waves, which then interfere to create strongly reflected sound at certain frequencies. Predictions and measurements show a set of harmonics, evenly spaced in frequency, for which sound is reflected strongly. And the frequency of these harmonics increases as the angle of observation gets larger, mimicking the iridescence seen in natural optical systems. Similar to optical systems, the reflections become weaker for oblique angles of reflection. A second construction was briefly examined which exploited a metamaterial made from elements and inclusions which were much smaller than the wavelength. Boundary element method predictions confirmed the potential for creating acoustic iridescence from layers of such a material.

  17. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  18. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  19. SAM-Like Evolved Gas Analyses of Phyllosilicate Minerals and Applications to SAM Analyses of the Sheepbed Mudstone, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Franz, H. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Stern, J. C.; Brunner, B.; Sutter, B.; Archer, P. D.; Ming , D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Bish, D. L.; Atreya, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    While in Yellowknife Bay, the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover collected two drilled samples, John Klein (hereafter "JK") and Cumberland ("CB"), from the Sheepbed mudstone, as well as a scooped sample from the Rocknest aeolian bedform ("RN"). These samples were sieved by Curiosity's sample processing system and then several subsamples of these materials were delivered to the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite and the CheMin X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence instrument. CheMin provided the first in situ X-ray diffraction-based evidence of clay minerals on Mars, which are likely trioctahedral smectites (e.g., Fe-saponite) and comprise 20 wt% of the mudstone samples [1]. SAM's evolved gas analysis (EGA) mass spectrometry analyses of JK and CB subsamples, as well as RN subsamples, detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, OCS, CS2 and other trace gases evolved during pyrolysis. The identity of evolved gases and temperature( s) of evolution can augment mineral detection by CheMin and place constraints on trace volatile-bearing phases present below the CheMin detection limit or those phases difficult to characterize with XRD (e.g., X-ray amorphous phases). Here we will focus on the SAM H2O data, in the context of CheMin analyses, and comparisons to laboratory SAM-like analyses of several phyllosilicate minerals including smectites.

  20. Sam68 marks the transcriptionally active stages of spermatogenesis and modulates alternative splicing in male germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Paronetto, Maria Paola; Messina, Valeria; Barchi, Marco; Geremia, Raffaele; Richard, Stéphane; Sette, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Sam68 plays an essential role in mouse spermatogenesis and male fertility. Herein, we report an interaction between Sam68 and the phosphorylated forms of the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) in meiotic spermatocytes. RNase treatment decreased but did not abolish the interaction, consistently with in vitro binding of RNAPII to the Sam68 carboxyl-terminal region. Sam68 retention in the spermatocyte nucleus was dependent on the integrity of cellular RNAs, suggesting that the protein is recruited to transcriptionally active chromatin. Mouse knockout models characterized by stage-specific arrest of spermatogenesis and staining with the phosphorylated form of RNAPII documented that Sam68 expression is confined to the transcriptionally active stages of spermatogenesis. Furthermore, Sam68 associates with splicing regulators in germ cells and we report that alternative splicing of Sgce exon 8 is regulated in a Sam68-dependent manner during spermatogenesis. RNA and chromatin crosslink immunoprecipitation experiments showed that Sam68 binds in vivo to sequences surrounding the intron 7/exon 8 boundary, thereby affecting the recruitment of the phosphorylated RNAPII and of the general splicing factor U2AF65. These results suggest that Sam68 regulates alternative splicing at transcriptionally active sites in differentiating germ cells and provide new insights into the regulation of Sam68 expression during spermatogenesis. PMID:21355037

  1. Structural analysis of loci involved in pSAM2 site-specific integration in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Boccard, F; Smokvina, T; Pernodet, J L; Friedmann, A; Guérineau, M

    1989-01-01

    pSAM2 is an 11-kb plasmid integrated in the Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877 and ATCC15154 genomes and found additionally as a free replicon in an uv derivative. After transfer into S. ambofaciens DSM40697 (devoid of pSAM2) or into Streptomyces lividans, specific integration of pSAM2 occurred very efficiently. A 58-bp sequence (att) present in both pSAM2 (attP) and S. ambofaciens strain DSM40697 (attB) attachment regions is found at the boundaries (attL and attR) of integrated pSAM2 in S. ambofaciens strain ATCC23877. The S. lividans chromosomal integration zone contained an imperfectly conserved att sequence (attB), and the integration event of pSAM2 was located within a 49-bp sequence of attB. Only one primary functional attB sequence was present in the S. lividans or S. ambofaciens DSM40697 total DNA. The integration zone of S. lividans hybridized with the integration zone of S. ambofaciens DSM40697. The two integration zones were homologous only to the right side of the att sequence. The conserved region contained an open reading frame (ORF A) with a stop codon located 99 bp from the attB sequence in both strains. S. ambofaciens DSM40697 contained DNA sequences related to pSAM2 on the left side of the att site. The att sequence was included in a region conserved in Streptomyces antibioticus, Streptomyces actuosus, Streptomyces bikiniensis, Streptomyces coelicolor, Streptomyces glaucescens, and Streptomyces parvulus. Site-specific integration of a pSAM2 derivative was characterized in another unrelated strain, Streptomyces griseofuscus. This strain contained an imperfectly conserved 58-bp attB sequence, and the integration event took place within a 45-bp sequence of attB. Site-specific integration of pSAM2 in three nonrelated Streptomyces strains suggests the wide host range of pSAM2 integration in Streptomyces.

  2. The Sounds of Nanoscience: Acoustic STM Analogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Euler, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    A hands-on model of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) is presented. It uses near-field imaging with sound and computer assisted visualization to create acoustic mappings of resonator arrangements. Due to the (partial) analogy of matter and sound waves the images closely resemble STM scans of atoms. Moreover, the method can be extended to build…

  3. Drug delivery from therapeutic self-assembled monolayers (T-SAMs) on 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Mahapatro, Anil; Johnson, Dave M; Patel, Devang N; Feldman, Marc D; Ayon, Arturo A; Agrawal, C Mauli

    2008-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic agents from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on 316L stainless steel (SS) has been demonstrated as a viable method to deliver drugs for localized coronary artery stent application. SAMs are highly-ordered, nano-sized molecular coatings, adding 1-10 nm thickness to a surface. Hydroxyl terminated alkanethiol SAMs of 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (-OH SAM) were formed on 316L SS with 48 hr immersion in ethanolic solutions. Attachment of ibuprofen (a model drug) to the functional SAMs was carried out in toluene for 5 hrs at 60 degrees C using Novozume-435 as a biocatalyst. SAM formation and subsequent attachment of ibuprofen was characterized collectively using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and contact angle (CA) measure-ments. The quantitative in vitro release of ibuprofen into a "physiological" buffer solution was characterized using reverse phase HPLC. Drug release kinetics showed that 14.1 microg of ibuprofen eluted over a period of 35 days with 2.7microg being eluted in the first day and the remaining being eluted over a period of 35 days. The drug release kinetics showed an increase in ibuprofen elution that occurred during first 14 days (2.7microg in 1 day to 9.5 microg in 14 days), following which there was a decrease in the rate of elution. Thus, functional SAMs on 316L SS could be used as tethers for drug attachment and could serve as a drug delivery mechanism from stainless steel implants such as coronary artery stents.

  4. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  5. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  6. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  7. SAM Sample preparation and its impact on the detection of organic compounds on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Szopa, Cyril; Coll, Patrice; Freissinet, Caroline; Glavin, Daniel; Belmahdi, Imene; François, Pascaline; Millan, Maeva; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; navarro, Rafael; Stern, Jennifer; Pinnick, Veronica; Coscia, David; Teinturier, Samuel; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Mahaffy, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The wet chemistry experiments on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) [1] experiment in the Curiosity rover of the Mars Science Laboratory mission supports extraction of polar organic compounds from solid samples that improves their detection either by increasing the release of chemical species from solid sample matrices, or by changing their chemical structure to make compounds more amenable to gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). The wet chemistry approach provides an alternative to the nominal inert-thermal desorption/pyrolysis analytical protocol used by SAM [1] that is more aptly suited for polar components. SAM, includes two different wet chemistry experiments: MTBSTFA derivatization [2-3] and TMAH thermochemolysis [4]. Here we report on the nature of the MTBSTFA derivatization experiment on SAM, the detection of MTBSTFA products in the SAM evolved gas analysis and GCMS experiments, and the implications of this detection. Solid sample were heated up to approximately 840°C at a rate of 35°C/min under He flow. For GC analyses, the majority of the gas released was trapped on a hydrocarbon trap (Tenax®) over a specific temperature range. Adsorbed volatiles on the GC injection trap (IT) were then released into the GC column (CLP-MXT 30m x 0.25mm x 0.25µm) by rapidly heating the IT to 300°C. Then, in order better understand the part of compounds detected coming from internal reaction we have performed several lab experiments to mimic the SAM device. We have investigated the thermal degradation of Tenax®, and possible interaction with MTBSTFA and perchlorate in the SAM trap (Tenax®) to better constrain interpretations of SAM results on Mars. References: [1] Mahaffy, P. et al. (2012) Space Sci Rev, 170, 401-478. [2] Buch, A. et al. (2009) J chrom. A, 43, 143-151. [3] Stalport, F. et al. (2012) Planet. Space Sci. 67: 1-13 [4] Geffroy-Rodier, C. et al. (2009) JAAP, 85, 454-459. Acknowledgements: SAM-GC team acknowledges support from the French Space Agency

  8. Carbon-sulfur bond-forming reaction catalysed by the radical SAM enzyme HydE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohac, Roman; Amara, Patricia; Benjdia, Alhosna; Martin, Lydie; Ruffié, Pauline; Favier, Adrien; Berteau, Olivier; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.; Nicolet, Yvain

    2016-05-01

    Carbon-sulfur bond formation at aliphatic positions is a challenging reaction that is performed efficiently by radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzymes. Here we report that 1,3-thiazolidines can act as ligands and substrates for the radical SAM enzyme HydE, which is involved in the assembly of the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenase. Using X-ray crystallography, in vitro assays and NMR spectroscopy we identified a radical-based reaction mechanism that is best described as the formation of a C-centred radical that concomitantly attacks the sulfur atom of a thioether. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a radical SAM enzyme that reacts directly on a sulfur atom instead of abstracting a hydrogen atom. Using theoretical calculations based on our high-resolution structures we followed the evolution of the electronic structure from SAM through to the formation of S-adenosyl-L-cysteine. Our results suggest that, at least in this case, the widely proposed and highly reactive 5‧-deoxyadenosyl radical species that triggers the reaction in radical SAM enzymes is not an isolable intermediate.

  9. The relative influence of ENSO and SAM on Antarctic Peninsula climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clem, Kyle R.; Renwick, James A.; McGregor, James; Fogt, Ryan L.

    2016-08-01

    Recent warming of the Antarctic Peninsula during austral autumn, winter, and spring has been linked to sea surface temperature (SST) trends in the tropical Pacific and tropical Atlantic, while warming of the northeast Peninsula during summer has been linked to a strengthening of westerly winds traversing the Peninsula associated with a positive trend in the Southern Annular Mode (SAM). Here we demonstrate that circulation changes associated with the SAM dominate interannual temperature variability across the entire Antarctic Peninsula during both summer and autumn, while relationships with tropical Pacific SST variability associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are strongest and statistically significant primarily during winter and spring only. We find the ENSO-Peninsula temperature relationship during autumn to be weak on interannual time scales and regional circulation anomalies associated with the SAM more important for interannual temperature variability across the Peninsula during autumn. Consistent with previous studies, western Peninsula temperatures during autumn, winter, and spring are closely tied to changes in the Amundsen Sea Low (ASL) and associated meridional wind anomalies. The interannual variability of ASL depth is most strongly correlated with the SAM index during autumn, while the ENSO relationship is strongest during winter and spring. Investigation of western and northeast Peninsula temperatures separately reveals that interannual variability of northeast Peninsula temperatures is primarily sensitive to zonal wind anomalies crossing the Peninsula and resultant leeside adiabatic warming rather than to meridional wind anomalies, which is closely tied to variability in the zonal portion of the SAM pattern.

  10. SAM-FS: LSC's New Solaris-Based Storage Management Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, Kent

    1996-01-01

    SAM-FS is a full featured hierarchical storage management (HSM) device that operates as a file system on Solaris-based machines. The SAM-FS file system provides the user with all of the standard UNIX system utilities and calls, and adds some new commands, i.e. archive, release, stage, sls, sfind, and a family of maintenance commands. The system also offers enhancements such as high performance virtual disk read and write, control of the disk through an extent array, and the ability to dynamically allocate block size. SAM-FS provides 'archive sets' which are groupings of data to be copied to secondary storage. In practice, as soon as a file is written to disk, SAM-FS will make copies onto secondary media. SAM-FS is a scalable storage management system. The system can manage millions of files per system, though this is limited today by the speed of UNIX and its utilities. In the future, a new search algorithm will be implemented that will remove logical and performance restrictions on the number of files managed.

  11. Oxygen Attachment on Alkanethiolate SAMs Induced by Low-Energy Electron Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Sylvain; Bass, Andrew D.; Steffenhagen, Marie; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    Reactions of 18O2 with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films of 1-dodecanethiol, 1-octadecanethiol, 1-butanethiol, and benzyl mercaptan chemisorbed on gold, were studied by the electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of anionic fragments over the incident electron energy range 2–20 eV. Dosing the SAMs with 18O2 at 50 K, results in the ESD of 18O− and 18OH−. Electron irradiation of samples prior to 18O2 deposition demonstrates that intensity of subsequent 18O− and 18OH− desorption signals increase with electron fluence and that absent electron pre-irradiation, no 18O− and 18OH− ESD signals are observed, since oxygen is unable to bind to the SAMs. A minimum incident electron energy of 6–7 eV is required to initiate the binding of 18O2 to the SAMs. O2 binding is proposed to proceed by the formation of CHx−1• radicals via resonant dissociative electron attachment and non-resonant C–H dissociation processes. The weaker signals of 18O− and 18OH− from short-chain SAMs are related to the latter’s resistance to electron induced damage, due to the charge-image dipole quenching and electron delocalization. Comparison between the present results and those for DNA oligonucleotides self-assembled on Au [Mirsaleh-Kohan, N. et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2012, 136, 235104] indicates that the oxygen binding mechanism is common to both systems. PMID:23537075

  12. ER residency of the ceramide phosphoethanolamine synthase SMSr relies on homotypic oligomerization mediated by its SAM domain

    PubMed Central

    Cabukusta, Birol; Kol, Matthijs; Kneller, Laura; Hilderink, Angelika; Bickert, Andreas; Mina, John G. M.; Korneev, Sergei; Holthuis, Joost C. M.

    2017-01-01

    SMSr/SAMD8 is an ER-resident ceramide phosphoethanolamine synthase with a critical role in controlling ER ceramides and suppressing ceramide-induced apoptosis in cultured cells. SMSr-mediated ceramide homeostasis relies on the enzyme’s catalytic activity as well as on its N-terminal sterile α-motif or SAM domain. Here we report that SMSr-SAM is structurally and functionally related to the SAM domain of diacylglycerol kinase DGKδ, a central regulator of lipid signaling at the plasma membrane. Native gel electrophoresis indicates that both SAM domains form homotypic oligomers. Chemical crosslinking studies show that SMSr self-associates into ER-resident trimers and hexamers that resemble the helical oligomers formed by DGKδ-SAM. Residues critical for DGKδ-SAM oligomerization are conserved in SMSr-SAM and their substitution causes a dissociation of SMSr oligomers as well as a partial redistribution of the enzyme to the Golgi. Conversely, treatment of cells with curcumin, a drug disrupting ceramide and Ca2+ homeostasis in the ER, stabilizes SMSr oligomers and promotes retention of the enzyme in the ER. Our data provide first demonstration of a multi-pass membrane protein that undergoes homotypic oligomerization via its SAM domain and indicate that SAM-mediated self-assembly of SMSr is required for efficient retention of the enzyme in the ER. PMID:28120887

  13. Characterization of pra, a gene for replication control in pSAM2, the integrating element of Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed

    Sezonov, G; Hagège, J; Pernodet, J L; Friedmann, A; Guérineau, M

    1995-08-01

    pSAM2 is a genetic element found integrated in Streptomyces ambofaciens (B2) and additionally in a replicating form in two mutants B3 and B4. The presence of the pSAM2 replicating form in these mutants was the result of mutations located on pSAM2 in the pra locus, named pra3 and pra4, respectively. The pra gene is not directly involved in replication, but its inactivation led to the disappearance of the pSAM2 free form; therefore, it was considered as a replication regulator. The pra3 and pra4 mutations were located in the pra promoter and were shown to be point substitutions that increase the promoter strength. The replication regulator role of pra was demonstrated by the fact that its constitutive expression in cells harbouring pSAM2B2, which is normally only integrated, led to the appearance of the pSAM2 replicating form. Northern analysis showed that the pra gene transcript can be detected only for the replicating mutants B3 and B4 and that the three adjacent genes korSA, pra and traSA were transcribed separately. As replication of pSAM2 is not needed for its maintenance but is an indispensable stage of its transfer, the pra gene, described formally as an activator of pSAM2 replication, is patently involved in pSAM2 transfer.

  14. The crystal structure of a novel SAM-dependent methyltransferase PH1915 from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W.; Xu, X.; Pavlova, M.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Savchenko, A.; Christendat, D.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Toronto; Univ. Health Network

    2005-01-01

    The S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferases represent a diverse and biologically important class of enzymes. These enzymes utilize the ubiquitous methyl donor SAM as a cofactor to methylate proteins, small molecules, lipids, and nucleic acids. Here we present the crystal structure of PH1915 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, a predicted SAM-dependent methyltransferase. This protein belongs to the Cluster of Orthologous Group 1092, and the presented crystal structure is the first representative structure of this protein family. Based on sequence and 3D structure analysis, we have made valuable functional insights that will facilitate further studies for characterizing this group of proteins. Specifically, we propose that PH1915 and its orthologs are rRNA- or tRNA-specific methyltransferases.

  15. SPASM and Twitch Domains in S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) Radical Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Grell, Tsehai A. J.; Goldman, Peter J.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM, also known as AdoMet) radical enzymes use SAM and a [4Fe-4S] cluster to catalyze a diverse array of reactions. They adopt a partial triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold with N- and C-terminal extensions that tailor the structure of the enzyme to its specific function. One extension, termed a SPASM domain, binds two auxiliary [4Fe-4S] clusters and is present within peptide-modifying enzymes. The first structure of a SPASM-containing enzyme, anaerobic sulfatase-maturating enzyme (anSME), revealed unexpected similarities to two non-SPASM proteins, butirosin biosynthetic enzyme 2-deoxy-scyllo-inosamine dehydrogenase (BtrN) and molybdenum cofactor biosynthetic enzyme (MoaA). The latter two enzymes bind one auxiliary cluster and exhibit a partial SPASM motif, coined a Twitch domain. Here we review the structure and function of auxiliary cluster domains within the SAM radical enzyme superfamily. PMID:25477505

  16. Distributed processing and analysis of physics data in the D0 SAM system at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Igor V. Terekhov

    2001-08-30

    SAM (Sequential Access through Meta-data) is the data access system for the D0 high energy physics (HEP) experiment at Fermilab. The system is being developed and used to handle the Petabyte-scale experiment data. The D0 applications, like virtually all HEP applications, are data-intensive, which poses special problems for the data management and job control facilities in the distributed environment. The fundamental problem is to bring the user applications and the data together, and SAM attacks the problems from both sides. First, we describe how the system moves the data through the distributed disk cache. Second, we describe how SAM interacts with the batch system to synchronize parallel user jobs with the data availability. All the design solutions herein have been implemented in a real system that handles the mission-critical data of the D0 experiment; thus, we present our work from the standpoint of real experience.

  17. Bringing a Chemical Laboratory Named Sam to Mars on the 2011 Curiosity Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Bleacher, L.; Jones, A.; Conrad, P. G.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.; Atreya, S. A.; Manning, H.

    2010-01-01

    An important goal of upcoming missions to Mars is to understand if life could have developed there. The task of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite of instruments [1] and the other Curiosity investigations [2] is to move us steadily toward that goal with an assessment of the habitability of our neighboring planet through a series of chemical and geological measurements. SAM is designed to search for organic compounds and inorganic volatiles and measure isotope ratios. Other instruments on Curiosity will provide elemental analysis and identify minerals. SAM will analyze both atmospheric samples and gases evolved from powdered rocks that may have formed billions of years ago with Curiosity providing access to interesting sites scouted by orbiting cameras and spectrometers.

  18. Detection of Organics at Mars: How Wet Chemistry Onboard SAM Helps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buch, A.; Freissinet, Caroline; Szopa, C.; Glavin, D.; Coll, P.; Cabane, M.; Eigenbrode, J.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Coscia, D.; Teinturier, S.; Mahaffy, P.

    2013-01-01

    For the first time in the history of space exploration, a mission of interest to astrobiology could be able to analyze refractory organic compounds in the soil of Mars. Wet chemistry experiment allow organic components to be altered in such a way that improves there detection either by releasing the compounds from sample matricies or by changing the chemical structure to be amenable to analytical conditions. The latter is particular important when polar compounds are present. Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM), on the Curiosity rover of the Mars Science Laboratory mission, has onboard two wet chemistry experiments: derivatization and thermochemolysis. Here we report on the nature of the MTBSTFA derivatization experiment on SAM, the detection of MTBSTFA in initial SAM results, and the implications of this detection.

  19. Data handling with SAM and art at the NOνA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurisano, A.; Backhouse, C.; Davies, G. S.; Illingworth, R.; Mayer, N.; Mengel, M.; Norman, A.; Rocco, D.; Zirnstein, J.

    2015-12-01

    During operations, NOvA produces between 5,000 and 7,000 raw files per day with peaks in excess of 12,000. These files must be processed in several stages to produce fully calibrated and reconstructed analysis files. In addition, many simulated neutrino interactions must be produced and processed through the same stages as data. To accommodate the large volume of data and Monte Carlo, production must be possible both on the Fermilab grid and on off-site farms, such as the ones accessible through the Open Science Grid. To handle the challenge of cataloging these files and to facilitate their off-line processing, we have adopted the SAM system developed at Fermilab. SAM indexes files according to metadata, keeps track of each file's physical locations, provides dataset management facilities, and facilitates data transfer to off-site grids. To integrate SAM with Fermilab's art software framework and the NOvA production workflow, we have developed methods to embed metadata into our configuration files, art files, and standalone ROOT files. A module in the art framework propagates the embedded information from configuration files into art files, and from input art files to output art files, allowing us to maintain a complete processing history within our files. Embedding metadata in configuration files also allows configuration files indexed in SAM to be used as inputs to Monte Carlo production jobs. Further, SAM keeps track of the input files used to create each output file. Parentage information enables the construction of self-draining datasets which have become the primary production paradigm used at NOvA. In this paper we will present an overview of SAM at NOvA and how it has transformed the file production framework used by the experiment.

  20. The survey of autobiographical memory (SAM): a novel measure of trait mnemonics in everyday life.

    PubMed

    Palombo, Daniela J; Williams, Lynne J; Abdi, Hervé; Levine, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Compared to the abundance of laboratory-based memory tasks, few measures exist to assess self-reported memory function. This need is particularly important for naturalistic mnemonic capacities, such as autobiographical memory (recall of events and facts from one's past), because it is difficult to reliably assess in the laboratory. Furthermore, naturalistic mnemonic capacities may show stable individual differences that evade the constraints of laboratory testing. The Survey of Autobiographical Memory (SAM) was designed to assess such trait mnemonics, or the dimensional characterization of self-reported mnemonic characteristics. The SAM comprises items assessing self-reported episodic autobiographical, semantic, and spatial memory, as well as future prospection. In a large sample of healthy young adults, the latent dimensional structure of the SAM was characterized with multiple correspondence analysis (MCA). This analysis revealed dimensions corresponding to general mnemonic abilities (i.e., good vs poor memory across subtypes), spatial memory, and future prospection. While episodic and semantic items did not separate in this data-driven analysis, these categories did show expected dissociations in relation to depression history and to laboratory-based measures of recollection. Remote spatial memory as assessed by the SAM showed the expected advantage for males over females. Spatial memory was also related to autobiographical memory performance. Brief versions of the SAM are provided for efficient research applications. Individual differences in memory function are likely related to other health-related factors, including personality, psychopathology, dementia risk, brain structure and function, and genotype. In conjunction with laboratory or performance based assessments, the SAM can provide a useful measure of naturalistic self-report trait mnemonics for probing these relationships.

  1. Searching for Reduced Carbon on the Surface of Mars: The SAM Combustion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. C.; Malespin, C. A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Webster, C. R.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Brunner, A. E.; Freissinet, C.; Franz, H. B.; Glavin, D. P.; Graham, H. V.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D. W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Niles, P. B.; Steele, A.; Sutter, B.; Trainer, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    The search for reduced carbon has been a major focus of past and present missions to Mars. Thermal evolved gas analysis was used by the Viking and Phoenix landers and is currently in use by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) to characterize volatiles evolved from solid samples, including those associated with reduced organic species. SAM has the additional capability to perform a combustion experiment, in which a sample of Mars regolith is heated in the presence of oxygen and the composition of the evolved gases is measured using quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) and tunable laser spectrometry (TLS) [1]. Organics detection on the Martian surface has been complicated by oxidation and destruction during heating by soil oxidants [2], including oxychlorine compounds, and terrestrial organics in the SAM background contributed by one of the SAM wet chemistry reagents MTBSTFA (N-Methyl-N-tertbutyldimethylsilyl- trifluoroacetamide) [3,4]. Thermal Evolved Gas Analysis (TEGA) results from Phoenix show a mid temperature CO2 release between 400 C - 680 C speculated to be carbonate, CO2 adsorbed to grains, or combustion of organics by soil oxidants [5]. Low temperature CO2 evolutions (approx. 200 C - 400 C) were also present at all three sites in Gale Crater where SAM Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA) was performed, and potential sources include combustion of terrestrial organics from SAM, as well as combustion and/or decarboxylation either indigenous martian or exogenous organic carbon [4,6]. By performing an experiment to intentionally combust all reduced materials in the sample, we hope to compare the bulk abundance of CO2 and other oxidized species evolved by combustion to that evolved during an EGA experiment to estimate how much CO2 could be contributed by reduced carbon sources. In addition, C, O, and H isotopic compositions of CO2 and H2O measured by TLS can contribute information regarding the potential sources of these

  2. Results from the Curiosity Rover's SAM Investigation at Gale Crater and links to Habitability of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, P. J.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Webster, C. R.; Cabane, M.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Navarro-gonzalez, R.; SAM; MSL Science Teams

    2013-05-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Mission (MSL) has as its goal an exploration of the potential of the ancient Gale Crater to support life. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite (3) contributes to this exploration of habitability with (1) a search for organic compounds in rocks and soils, (2) a determination of the composition of inorganic volatiles compounds in the atmosphere or extracted from solid materials, and (3) measurements of the isotopic composition of several of these volatiles. The initial exploration of the region near the landing point has revealed a diverse geology and SAM has made measurements of both atmospheric and solid samples. Additional prime exploration targets are the clay and sulfate layers in the central mound (Mt. Sharp) of Gale crater. SAM is located in the interior of the Curiosity rover. Nine other instruments complete the payload including an XRD/XRF instrument and a variety of imaging, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, and elemental analysis instrumentation. Several of these instruments serve to locate sampling sites and interrogate candidate materials before solid sample is collected either with a drill or a scoop for delivery to SAM and the XRD/XRF instruments. SAM's instruments are a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), and a 6-column gas chromatograph (GC) coupled through a solid sample transport system and a gas processing and enrichment system. SAM atmospheric runs include a determination of: new volume mixing ratios for the 5 major isotopic constituents; an upper limit for the volume mixing ratio of methane; C and O isotope ratios in CO2; D/H in water; and the 40Ar/36Ar ratio. Major evolved gases from fines scooped from an eolian drift were H2O, CO2, O2, SO2, and a number of minor species. Chlorine containing compounds in this material were tentatively identified as perchlorates.

  3. Data handling with SAM and art at the NOvA experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Aurisano, A.; Backhouse, C.; Davies, G. S.; ...

    2015-12-23

    During operations, NOvA produces between 5,000 and 7,000 raw files per day with peaks in excess of 12,000. These files must be processed in several stages to produce fully calibrated and reconstructed analysis files. In addition, many simulated neutrino interactions must be produced and processed through the same stages as data. To accommodate the large volume of data and Monte Carlo, production must be possible both on the Fermilab grid and on off-site farms, such as the ones accessible through the Open Science Grid. To handle the challenge of cataloging these files and to facilitate their off-line processing, we havemore » adopted the SAM system developed at Fermilab. SAM indexes files according to metadata, keeps track of each file's physical locations, provides dataset management facilities, and facilitates data transfer to off-site grids. To integrate SAM with Fermilab's art software framework and the NOvA production workflow, we have developed methods to embed metadata into our configuration files, art files, and standalone ROOT files. A module in the art framework propagates the embedded information from configuration files into art files, and from input art files to output art files, allowing us to maintain a complete processing history within our files. Embedding metadata in configuration files also allows configuration files indexed in SAM to be used as inputs to Monte Carlo production jobs. Further, SAM keeps track of the input files used to create each output file. Parentage information enables the construction of self-draining datasets which have become the primary production paradigm used at NOvA. In this study we will present an overview of SAM at NOvA and how it has transformed the file production framework used by the experiment.« less

  4. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  5. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  6. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... ANAUSA.org Connect with us! What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Each heading slides to reveal information. Important ... Acoustic Neuroma Important Points To Know About an Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular ...

  7. SAGE II aerosol data validation - Comparative studies of SAGE II and SAM II data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Wang, P. H.; Osborn, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    Data from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II) satellite are compared with data from the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM II) satellite. Both experiments produce aerosol extinction profiles by measuring the attenuation of solar radiation during each sunrise and sunset observed by the satelltie. The SAGE II obtains profiles at 1.02 microns and three smaller wavelengths, whereas the SAM II measures at only one radiometric channel at 1.0 microns. It is found that the differences between the two sets of data are generally within the error bars associated with each measurement. In addition, the sunrise and sunset data from SAGE II are analyzed.

  8. Mechanistic studies of the radical SAM enzyme spore photoproduct lyase (SPL).

    PubMed

    Li, Lei

    2012-11-01

    Spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) repairs a special thymine dimer 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, which is commonly called spore photoproduct or SP at the bacterial early germination phase. SP is the exclusive DNA photo-damage product in bacterial endospores; its generation and swift repair by SPL are responsible for the spores' extremely high UV resistance. The early in vivo studies suggested that SPL utilizes a direct reversal strategy to repair the SP in the absence of light. The research in the past decade further established SPL as a radical SAM enzyme, which utilizes a tri-cysteine CXXXCXXC motif to harbor a [4Fe-4S] cluster. At the 1+ oxidation state, the cluster provides an electron to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which binds to the cluster in a bidentate manner as the fourth and fifth ligands, to reductively cleave the CS bond associated with the sulfonium ion in SAM, generating a reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (5'-dA) radical. This 5'-dA radical abstracts the proR hydrogen atom from the C6 carbon of SP to initiate the repair process; the resulting SP radical subsequently fragments to generate a putative thymine methyl radical, which accepts a back-donated H atom to yield the repaired TpT. SAM is suggested to be regenerated at the end of each catalytic cycle; and only a catalytic amount of SAM is needed in the SPL reaction. The H atom source for the back donation step is suggested to be a cysteine residue (C141 in Bacillus subtilis SPL), and the H-atom transfer reaction leaves a thiyl radical behind on the protein. This thiyl radical thus must participate in the SAM regeneration process; however how the thiyl radical abstracts an H atom from the 5'-dA to regenerate SAM is unknown. This paper reviews and discusses the history and the latest progress in the mechanistic elucidation of SPL. Despite some recent breakthroughs, more questions are raised in the mechanistic understanding of this intriguing DNA repair enzyme. This article is part of a Special Issue

  9. The Combustion Experiment on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suite on the Curiosity Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. C.; Malespin, C. A.; Eigenbrode, J.; Graham, H. V.; Archer, P. D.; Brunner, A.; Freissinet, C.; Franz, H. B.; Fuentes, J.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D. W.; Niles, P. B.; Steele, A.

    2014-01-01

    The combustion experiment on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite on Curiosity will heat a sample of Mars regolith in the presence of oxygen and measure composition of the evolved gases using quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) and tunable laser spectrometry (TLS). QMS will enable detection of combustion products such as CO, CO2, NO, and other oxidized species, while TLS will enable precision measurements of the abundance and carbon isotopic composition (delta C-13) of the evolved CO2 and hydrogen isotopic composition (delta D) of H2O. SAM will perform a two-step combustion to isolate combustible materials below approx. 550 C and above approx. 550 C.

  10. The nucleation and growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate on self- assembled monolayers (SAMs)

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.A.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Graff, G.L.; Fryxell, G.E.; Rieke, P.C.

    1992-05-01

    A physical chemical approach was used to study calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) nucleation and growth on various organic interfaces. Self-assembling monolayers (SAMs), containing derivatized organic functional groups, were designed to mimic various amino acid residues present in both urine and stone matrix macromolecules. Derivatized surfaces include SAMs with terminal methyl, bromo, imidazole, and thiazolidine-carboxylic acid functional groups. Pronounced differences in COM deposition were observed for the various interfaces with the imidazole and thiazolidine surfaces having the greatest effect and the methyl and bromo groups having little or no nucleating potential.

  11. Mineral classification map using MF and SAM techniques: A case study in the Nohwa Island, Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Young-Sun; Yoon, Wang-Jung

    2015-03-10

    The purpose of this study is to map pyprophyllite distribution at surface of the Nohwa deposit, Korea by using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflectance Radiometer (ASTER) data. For this, combined Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM), and Matched Filtering (MF) technique based on mathematical algorithm was applied. The regional distribution of high-grade and low-grade pyrophyllite in the Nohwa deposit area could be differentiated by this method. The results of this study show that ASTER data analysis using combination of SAM and MF techniques will assist in exploration of pyrophyllite at the exposed surface.

  12. Basis for ligand discrimination between ON and OFF state riboswitch conformations: the case of the SAM-I riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Boyapati, Vamsi Krishna; Huang, Wei; Spedale, Jessica; Aboul-Ela, Fareed

    2012-06-01

    Riboswitches are RNA elements that bind to effector ligands and control gene expression. Most consist of two domains. S-Adenosyl Methionine (SAM) binds the aptamer domain of the SAM-I riboswitch and induces conformational changes in the expression domain to form an intrinsic terminator (transcription OFF state). Without SAM the riboswitch forms the transcription ON state, allowing read-through transcription. The mechanistic link between the SAM/aptamer recognition event and subsequent secondary structure rearrangement by the riboswitch is unclear. We probed for those structural features of the Bacillus subtilis yitJ SAM-I riboswitch responsible for discrimination between the ON and OFF states by SAM. We designed SAM-I riboswitch RNA segments forming "hybrid" structures of the ON and OFF states. The choice of segment constrains the formation of a partial P1 helix, characteristic of the OFF state, together with a partial antiterminator (AT) helix, characteristic of the ON state. For most choices of P1 vs. AT helix lengths, SAM binds with micromolar affinity according to equilibrium dialysis. Mutational analysis and in-line probing confirm that the mode of SAM binding by hybrid structures is similar to that of the aptamer. Altogether, binding measurements and in-line probing are consistent with the hypothesis that when SAM is present, stacking interactions with the AT helix stabilize a partially formed P1 helix in the hybrids. Molecular modeling indicates that continuous stacking between the P1 and the AT helices is plausible with SAM bound. Our findings raise the possibility that conformational intermediates may play a role in ligand-induced aptamer folding.

  13. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  14. NPL closes acoustics department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Extance, Andy

    2016-11-01

    The UK's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has withdrawn funding for its acoustics, polymer and thermoelectrics groups, triggering concern among airborne acoustics specialists that the move could undermine the country's noise-management policies.

  15. Identifying the Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  16. Study of microcontact printed patterns by chemical force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujihira, M; Furugori, M; Akiba, U; Tani, Y

    2001-01-01

    Patterned self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on sputtered gold films prepared by microcontact printing (microCP) were studied by mapping adhesive forces with pulsed-force-mode atomic force microscopy. A stamp for microCP was fabricated by pouring polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) over a photolithographically prepared master. The patterned SAMs were prepared by two methods. One is called the wet-inking method, in which inking was done by placing a thiol ethanol solution for 30 s on the stamp and then removing the excess ink solution under a stream of nitrogen. The other is called the contact-inking method, in which a pad made of PDMS was dipped overnight in a thiol ethanol solution and then the stamp was placed on the inker pad impregnated with the thiol ethanol solution. The second step for pattern formation was the same for both of the two different microCP methods. Namely, the gold surfaces stamped with alkanethiols were further reacted with a thiol terminating in COOH in ethanol. The resulting patterns with CH3- and COOH-terminated regions were analyzed by imaging the adhesive forces with the chemically modified gold coated AFM tips with a SAM of CH3 or COOH terminal functional groups.

  17. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  18. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-17

    under-ice scattering , bathymetric diffraction and the application of the ocean acoustic Parabolic Equation to infrasound. 2. Tasks a. Task 1...QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Figure 10. Estimated reflection coefficient as a function of frequency by taking the difference of downgoing and...OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

  19. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-19

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-093015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...number. 1. REPORT DATE OCT 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2015 to 30-09-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to develop

  20. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies James F. Lynch MS #12...N00014-14-1-0040 http://acoustics.whoi.edu/sw06/ LONG TERM GOALS The long term goals of our shallow water acoustics work are to: 1) understand the...nature of low frequency (10-1500 Hz) acoustic propagation, scattering and noise in shallow water when strong oceanic variability is present in the

  1. Analysis of the interactions between host factor Sam68 and viral elements during foot-and-mouth disease virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nuclear protein Src-associated protein of 68 kDa in mitosis (Sam68) is known to bind RNA and be involved in cellular processes triggered in response to environmental stresses, including virus infection. Interestingly, Sam68, is a multi-functional protein implicated in the life cycle of retroviru...

  2. Targeting EphA2-Sam and Its Interactome: Design and Evaluation of Helical Peptides Enriched in Charged Residues.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Flavia A; Marasco, Daniela; Di Natale, Concetta; Pirone, Luciano; Costantini, Susan; Pedone, Emilia M; Leone, Marilisa

    2016-11-17

    The EphA2 receptor controls diverse physiological and pathological conditions and its levels are often upregulated in cancer. Targeting receptor overexpression, through modulation of endocytosis and consequent degradation, appears to be an appealing strategy for attacking tumor malignancy. In this scenario, the Sam domain of EphA2 plays a pivotal role because it is the site where protein regulators of endocytosis and stability are recruited by means of heterotypic Sam-Sam interactions. Because EphA2-Sam heterotypic complexes are largely based on electrostatic contacts, we have investigated the possibility of attacking these interactions with helical peptides enriched in charged residues. Several peptide sequences with high predicted helical propensities were designed, and detailed conformational analyses were conducted by diverse techniques including NMR, CD, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Interaction studies were also performed by NMR, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and microscale thermophoresis (MST) and led to the identification of two peptides capable of binding to the first Sam domain of Odin. These molecules represent early candidates for the generation of efficient Sam domain binders and antagonists of Sam-Sam interactions involving EphA2.

  3. Rotary-scanning optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Weizhi; Xi, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) is currently one of the fastest evolving photoacoustic imaging modalities. It has a comparable spatial resolution to pure optical microscopic techniques such as epifluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy, and two-photon microscopy, but also owns a deeper penetration depth. In this paper, we report a rotary-scanning (RS)-ORPAM that utilizes a galvanometer scanner integrated with objective to achieve rotary laser scanning. A 15 MHz cylindrically focused ultrasonic transducer is mounted onto a motorized rotation stage to follow optical scanning traces synchronously. To minimize the loss of signal to noise ratio, the acoustic focus is precisely adjusted to reach confocal with optical focus. Black tapes and carbon fibers are firstly imaged to evaluate the performance of the system, and then in vivo imaging of vasculature networks inside the ears and brains of mice is demonstrated using this system.

  4. Acoustical spinner tweezers with nonparaxial Hermite-Gaussian acoustical-sheets and particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2017-01-01

    Hermite-Gaussian (HGl) acoustical-sheets are introduced and their beamforming properties are examined. A general nonparaxial mathematical solution for the incident beam of any order l is derived based on the angular spectrum decomposition in plane waves. The beam-shape coefficients characterizing the incident beam in cylindrical coordinates are expressed in an integral form and computed using the standard numerical integration procedure based on the trapezoidal rule. The analysis is further extended to calculate the longitudinal and transverse acoustic radiation force functions as well as the axial radiation torque function for a viscous fluid cylindrical cross-section submerged in a non-viscous fluid and located arbitrarily in space in the field of the HGl beams in the Rayleigh and resonance (Mie) regimes. The numerical results show that the absorptive cylinder can be pulled, pushed, or manipulated and rotated around its center of mass when placed in the acoustical field of a HGl beam. Clockwise or anticlockwise rotations can arise depending on the cylinder position in the acoustic field. Moreover, a particle dynamics analysis is established based on Newton's second law of motion during which the trajectories of the cylinder subjected to the acoustical field of forces are computed. The results can find potential applications in particle manipulation and handling, acoustical microscopy imaging, and surface acoustic waves to name a few examples.

  5. Coding Acoustic Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Xie, Boyang; Tang, Kun; Cheng, Hua; Liu, Zhengyou; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Jianguo

    2017-02-01

    Coding acoustic metasurfaces can combine simple logical bits to acquire sophisticated functions in wave control. The acoustic logical bits can achieve a phase difference of exactly π and a perfect match of the amplitudes for the transmitted waves. By programming the coding sequences, acoustic metasurfaces with various functions, including creating peculiar antenna patterns and waves focusing, have been demonstrated.

  6. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  7. Characterisation of Desulfovibrio vulgaris haem b synthase, a radical SAM family member.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Susana A L; Lawrence, Andrew D; Romão, Célia V; Warren, Martin J; Teixeira, Miguel; Saraiva, Lígia M

    2014-07-01

    An alternative route for haem b biosynthesis is operative in sulfate-reducing bacteria of the Desulfovibrio genus and in methanogenic Archaea. This pathway diverges from the canonical one at the level of uroporphyrinogen III and progresses via a distinct branch, where sirohaem acts as an intermediate precursor being converted into haem b by a set of novel enzymes, named the alternative haem biosynthetic proteins (Ahb). In this work, we report the biochemical characterisation of the Desulfovibrio vulgaris AhbD enzyme that catalyses the last step of the pathway. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that AhbD promotes the cleavage of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and converts iron-coproporphyrin III via two oxidative decarboxylations to yield haem b, methionine and the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy studies demonstrated that AhbD contains two [4Fe-4S](2+/1+) centres and that binding of the substrates S-adenosylmethionine and iron-coproporphyrin III induces conformational modifications in both centres. Amino acid sequence comparisons indicated that D. vulgaris AhbD belongs to the radical SAM protein superfamily, with a GGE-like motif and two cysteine-rich sequences typical for ligation of SAM molecules and iron-sulfur clusters, respectively. A structural model of D. vulgaris AhbD with putative binding pockets for the iron-sulfur centres and the substrates SAM and iron-coproporphyrin III is discussed.

  8. The transcription factor FBI-1 inhibits SAM68-mediated BCL-X alternative splicing and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Pamela; Busà, Roberta; Di Stasi, Savino M; Munoz, Manuel J; Botti, Flavia; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Sette, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is tightly coupled to transcription for the majority of human genes. However, how these two processes are linked is not well understood. Here, we unveil a direct role for the transcription factor FBI-1 in the regulation of AS. FBI-1 interacts with the splicing factor SAM68 and reduces its binding to BCL-X mRNA. This, in turn, results in the selection of the proximal 5' splice site in BCL-X exon 2, thereby favoring the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant and counteracting SAM68-mediated apoptosis. Conversely, depletion of FBI-1, or expression of a SAM68 mutant lacking the FBI-1 binding region, restores the ability of SAM68 to induce BCL-XS splicing and apoptosis. FBI-1's role in splicing requires the activity of histone deacetylases, whose pharmacological inhibition recapitulates the effects of FBI-1 knockdown. Our study reveals an unexpected function for FBI-1 in splicing modulation with a direct impact on cell survival.

  9. 16. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE). DETAIL OF TURN-SPAN MECHANISM. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  10. 15. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) PIVOT PIER - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  11. 13. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) NORTH SIDE ELEVATION. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  12. 17. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) APPROACH SPAN FENDER - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  13. 12. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) SOUTH SIDE ELEVATION. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  14. 14. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) TURN-SPAN AND LOCKING MECHANISM - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  15. The formation of ACC and competition between polyamines and ethylene for SAM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethylene biosynthesis involves the conversion of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) by ACC synthase (ACS). ACC is then converted to ethylene. The genes that encode enzymes in this pathway all belong to a family of genes. Differential transcriptional regulation ...

  16. Initial SAM calibration gas experiments on Mars: Quadrupole mass spectrometer results and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Heather B.; Trainer, Melissa G.; Malespin, Charles A.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Becker, Richard H.; Benna, Mehdi; Conrad, Pamela G.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Freissinet, Caroline; Manning, Heidi L. K.; Prats, Benito D.; Raaen, Eric; Wong, Michael H.

    2017-04-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover is equipped to analyze both martian atmospheric gases and volatiles released by pyrolysis of solid surface materials, with target measurements including chemical and isotopic composition (Mahaffy et al., 2012). To facilitate assessment of instrument performance and validation of results obtained on Mars, SAM houses a calibration cell containing CO2, Ar, N2, Xe, and several fluorinated hydrocarbon compounds (Franz et al., 2014; Mahaffy et al., 2012). This report describes the first two experiments utilizing this calibration cell on Mars and gives results from analysis of data acquired with the SAM Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS). These data support the accuracy of isotope ratios obtained with the QMS (Conrad et al., 2016; Mahaffy et al., 2013) and provide ground-truth for reassessment of analytical constants required for atmospheric measurements, which were reported in previous contributions (Franz et al., 2015, 2014). The most significant implication of the QMS data involves reinterpretation of pre-launch contamination previously believed to affect only CO abundance measurements (Franz et al., 2015) to affect N2 abundances, as well. The corresponding adjustment to the N2 calibration constant presented here brings the atmospheric volume mixing ratios for Ar and N2 retrieved by SAM into closer agreement with those reported by the Viking mission (Owen et al., 1977; Oyama and Berdahl, 1977).

  17. Case Studies Comparing System Advisor Model (SAM) Results to Real Performance Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A.; Sather, N.

    2012-06-01

    NREL has completed a series of detailed case studies comparing the simulations of the System Advisor Model (SAM) and measured performance data or published performance expectations. These case studies compare PV measured performance data with simulated performance data using appropriate weather data. The measured data sets were primarily taken from NREL onsite PV systems and weather monitoring stations.

  18. Construct Validation of the Louisiana School Analysis Model (SAM) Instructional Staff Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray-Clark, Nikki; Bates, Reid

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the Louisiana SAM Instructional Staff Questionnaire, a key component of the Louisiana School Analysis Model. The model was designed as a comprehensive evaluation tool for schools. Principle axis factoring with oblique rotation was used to uncover the underlying structure of the SISQ. (Contains 1 table.)

  19. Statement of Facts for 1977 City-Wide Mock Trial Competitions. Walker Thomas v. Sam Nomad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Citizen Education in the Law, Washington, DC.

    Prepared by the District of Columbia Street Law Project for its annual city-wide mock trial competition, this instructional handout provides material for a civil case over an automobile accident. Walker Thomas is suing Sam Nomad for damages that resulted from a collision, for which both parties blame the other. The handout clarifies the laws and…

  20. 77 FR 187 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Transition to the System for Award Management (SAM)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ...: Deletes the definition at 2.101 for ``business partner network,'' which is no longer necessary in the SAM architecture. Deletes reference to ``business partner network'' at 4.1100, Scope, which is no longer necessary....101, in paragraph (b)(2) by removing the definition ``Business Partner Network (BPN)'' and...

  1. Halomethane production in plants: Structure of the biosynthetic SAM-dependent halide methyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana**

    PubMed Central

    Schmidberger, Jason W.; James, Agata B.; Edwards, Robert; Naismith, James H.; O’Hagan, David

    2012-01-01

    A product structure of the halomethane producing enzyme in plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) is reported and a model for presentation of chloride/bromide ion to the methyl group of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) is presented to rationalise nucleophilic halide attack for halomethane production, gaseous natural products that are produced globally. PMID:20376845

  2. What can we learn from Wet Chemistry onboard the Mars Science Laboratory SAM Suite?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Szopa, C.; Coll, P.; Eigenbrode, J.; Coscia, D.; Navarro Gonzalez, R.; Cabane, M.; MSL Science Team

    2013-09-01

    Direct pyrolysis of Mars soil samples has been used up today today to analyse their content in volatile molecules. However, this technique has been shown to have limitation for the analysis of a few chemical families, or macromolecules. The SAM experiment is the first space instrument onboarding a device based on wet chemistry to overcome this limitation.

  3. Treating Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Schizophrenia: The Case of Sam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peasley-Miklus, Catherine; Massie, Elise; Baslett, Gaston; Carmin, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the case of Sam, a 22-year-old male with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and schizophrenia. The patient's background, the development and characteristics of his OCD and schizophrenia, and the history of what became a rather complicated treatment are described. In addition, four problem areas of therapy are identified.

  4. Molten Salt Power Tower Cost Model for the System Advisor Model (SAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, C. S.; Heath, G. A.

    2013-02-01

    This report describes a component-based cost model developed for molten-salt power tower solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), using data from several prior studies, including a contracted analysis from WorleyParsons Group, which is included herein as an Appendix. The WorleyParsons' analysis also estimated material composition and mass for the plant to facilitate a life cycle analysis of the molten salt power tower technology. Details of the life cycle assessment have been published elsewhere. The cost model provides a reference plant that interfaces with NREL's System Advisor Model or SAM. The reference plant assumes a nominal 100-MWe (net) power tower running with a nitrate salt heat transfer fluid (HTF). Thermal energy storage is provided by direct storage of the HTF in a two-tank system. The design assumes dry-cooling. The model includes a spreadsheet that interfaces with SAM via the Excel Exchange option in SAM. The spreadsheet allows users to estimate the costs of different-size plants and to take into account changes in commodity prices. This report and the accompanying Excel spreadsheet can be downloaded at https://sam.nrel.gov/cost.

  5. 19. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE). NAVIGATIONAL LIGHT LOCATED ON TOP OF FENDER - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  6. Local sphere-based co-registration for SAM group analysis in subjects without individual MRI.

    PubMed

    Steinstraeter, O; Teismann, Inga K; Wollbrink, A; Suntrup, S; Stoeckigt, K; Dziewas, R; Pantev, C

    2009-03-01

    Synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM) is a powerful MEG source localization method to analyze evoked as well as induced brain activity. To gain structural information of the underlying sources, especially in group studies, individual magnetic resonance images (MRI) are required for co-registration. During the last few years, the relevance of MEG measurements on understanding the pathophysiology of different diseases has noticeable increased. Unfortunately, especially in patients and small children, structural MRI scans cannot always be performed. Therefore, we developed a new method for group analysis of SAM results without requiring structural MRI data that derives its geometrical information from the individual volume conductor model constructed for the SAM analysis. The normalization procedure is fast, easy to implement and integrates seamlessly into an existing landmark based MEG-MRI co-registration procedure. This new method was evaluated on different simulated points as well as on a pneumatic index finger stimulation paradigm analyzed with SAM. Compared with an established MRI-based normalization procedure (SPM2) the new method shows only minor errors in single subject results as well as in group analysis. The mean difference between the two methods was about 4 mm for the simulated as well as for finger stimulation data. The variation between individual subjects was generally higher than the error induced by the missing MRIs. The method presented here is therefore sufficient for most MEG group studies. It allows accomplishing MEG studies with subject groups where MRI measurements cannot be performed.

  7. Constraints on the Mineralogy of Gale Crater Mudstones from MSL SAM Evolved Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Hogancamp, J. V. (Clark); Knudson, C. A.; Andrejkovicova, S.; Archer, P. D.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2017-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) have analysed more than 150 micron fines from 14 sites at Gale Crater. Here we focus on the mudstone samples. Two were drilled from sites John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB) in the Sheepbed mudstone. Six were drilled from Murray Formation mudstone: Confidence Hills (CH), Mojave (MJ), Telegraph Peak (TP), Buckskin (BK), Oudam (OU), Marimba (MB). SAM's evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS) detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, and other trace gases, including organic fragments. The identity and evolution temperature of evolved gases can support CheMin mineral detection and place constraints on trace volatile-bearing phases or phases difficult to characterize with X-ray diffraction (e.g., amorphous phases). Here we will focus on SAM H2O data and comparisons to SAM-like analyses of key reference materials.

  8. Mercury astronaut John Glenn at the Sam Houston Colosseum, Houston, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Mercury astronaut John H. Glenn Jr., wearing a new cowboy hat and a badge in the shape of a star, leafs through his program as he is served his food at the Sam Houston Colosseum. A large crowd was on hand to welcome them to Houston, Texas.

  9. Mechanism elucidation of the radical SAM enzyme spore photoproduct lyase (SPL)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) repairs a special thymine dimer 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, which is commonly called spore photoproduct or SP at the bacterial early germination phase. SP is the exclusive DNA photo-damage product in bacterial endospores; its generation and swift repair by SPL are responsible for the spores’ extremely high UV resistance. The early in vivo studies suggested that SPL utilizes a direct reversal strategy to repair the SP in the absence of light. The research in the past decade further established SPL as a radical SAM enzyme, which utilizes a tri-cysteine CXXXCXXC motif to harbor a [4Fe-4S] cluster. At the 1+ oxidation state, the cluster provides an electron to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which binds to the cluster in a bidentate manner as the fourth and fifth ligands, to reductively cleave the C-S bond associated with the sulfonium ion in SAM, generating a reactive 5′-deoxyadenosyl (5′-dA) radical. This 5′-dA radical abstracts the proR hydrogen atom from the C6 carbon of SP to initiate the repair process; the resulting SP radical subsequently fragments to generate a putative thymine methyl radical, which accepts a back-donated H atom to yield the repaired TpT. SAM is suggested to be regenerated at the end of each catalytic cycle; and only a catalytic amount of SAM is needed in the SPL reaction. The H atom source for the back donation step is suggested to be a cysteine residue (C141 in B. subtilis SPL), and the H-atom transfer reaction leaves a thiyl radical behind on the protein. This thiyl radical thus must participate in the SAM regeneration process; however how the thiyl radical abstracts an H atom from the 5′-dA to regenerate SAM is unknown. This paper reviews and discusses the history and the latest progress in the mechanistic elucidation of SPL. Despite some recent breakthroughs, more questions are raised in the mechanistic understanding of this intriguing DNA repair enzyme. PMID:22197590

  10. Indoor acoustic gain design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha-Abarca, Justo Andres

    2002-11-01

    The design of sound reinforcement systems includes many variables and usually some of these variables are discussed. There are criteria to optimize the performance of the sound reinforcement systems under indoor conditions. The equivalent acoustic distance, the necessary acoustic gain, and the potential acoustic gain are parameters which must be adjusted with respect to the loudspeaker array, electric power and directionality of loudspeakers, the room acoustics conditions, the distance and distribution of the audience, and the type of the original sources. The design and installation of front of the house and monitoring systems have individual criteria. This article is about this criteria and it proposes general considerations for the indoor acoustic gain design.

  11. Determination of the Possible Source of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons Detected By SAM during MSL Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Belmahdi, I.; Szopa, C.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Francois, P.; Coll, P. J.; Miller, K.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Stern, J. C.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; McAdam, A.; Teinturier, S.; Bonnet, J. Y.; Summons, R. E.; Millan, M.; Dequaire, T.; Cabane, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    The SAM GC-MS instrument on the Curiosity rover allows to analyze volatile compounds from the atmosphere or volatile compounds from the Martian regolith and refractory compounds in the regolith after sample treatment using wet chemistry. One portion of the wet chemistry experiment is composed of MTBSTFA (N-methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide) / DMF (dimethylformamide). Abundant chlorinated hydrocarbons have been detected with SAM when analyzing samples collected in several sites explored by Curiosity rover. Some of these chlorohydrocarbons are produced during pyrolysis by the reaction of Martian oxychlorine compounds in the samples with terrestrial carbon from a derivatization agent (MTBSTFA) used in SAM (1, 2). Chlorobenzene cannot be formed by the direct reaction of MTBSTFA and DMF when heated in the presence of fused silica and perchlorates under SAM-like conditions (1)) therefore two other reaction pathways for chlorobenzene were proposed : (1) reactions between the volatile thermal degradation products of perchlorates (e.g. O2, Cl2 and HCl) and Tenax® and (2) the interaction of perchlorates with organic material from the martian regolith such as benzenecarboxylates (3, 4). This study investigates several propositions for chlorinated hydrocarbon formation by looking for: (1) all products coming from the interaction of Tenax® (which is part of the SAM hydrocarbon trap) and perchlorates, (2) also between some soil sample and perchlorates in the presence or absence of MTBSTFA and (c) sources of chlorinated hydrocarbon precursors. References: 1. D. P. Glavin et al.(2013) JGR 118, 1955-1973. 2. L. a Leshin et al. (2013) Science 341, 1238937. 3. C. Freissinet et al. (2014) LPSC XXXXV Abstract 2796. 4. D. Glavin et al. (2014) LPSC XXXV Abstract #1157.

  12. A scanning probe microscopy study of the physisorption and chemisorption of protein molecules onto carboxylate terminated self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, N.; Davies, M. C.; Heaton, R. J.; Roberts, C. J.; Tendler, S. J. B.; Williams, P. M.

    Scanning probe microscopy offers the possibility of investigating biomolecular structure and function. However, successful imaging is technically limited by interactions between the probe and the sample. A strong attachment of the biomolecule to the substrate is often required. Here, we investigate the binding of the protein catalase to gold surfaces modified by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The chemical and physical adsorption of the protein molecules onto SAMs of 3-mercaptopropanoic acid (3-MPA), 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (11-MUA) and a mixture of the two acid thiols (Mixed) was investigated utilizing tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The surface concentration of catalase adsorbed on the SAMs decreased in the order: Mixed>11-MUA>3-MPA. Utilizing the terminal carboxylic acid functionalities, catalase was immobilized with a water soluble carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). Immobilization resulted in increased coverage of the protein. SPR studies on silver surfaces modified by these SAMs indicate immobilization of carbodiimide and NHS decreased in the order: Mixed>11-MUA>3-MPA.

  13. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of the SAMS gene during adventitious root development in IBA-induced tetraploid black locust.

    PubMed

    Quan, Jine; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Chunxia; Meng, Sen; Zhao, Zhong; Xu, Xuexuan

    2014-01-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAMS) catalyzes the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a precursor for ethylene and polyamine biosynthesis. Here, we report the isolation of the 1498 bp full-length cDNA sequence encoding tetraploid black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) SAMS (TrbSAMS), which contains an open reading frame of 1179 bp encoding 392 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of TrbSAMS has more than 94% sequence identity to SAMSs from other plants, with a closer phylogenetic relationship to SAMSs from legumes than to SAMS from other plants. The TrbSAMS monomer consists of N-terminal, central, and C-terminal domains. Subcellular localization analysis revealed that the TrbSAMS protein localizes mainly to in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of onion epidermal cells and Arabidopsis mesophyll cell protoplasts. Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-treated cuttings showed higher levels of TrbSAMS transcript than untreated control cuttings during root primordium and adventitious root formation. TrbSAMS and its downstream genes showed differential expression in shoots, leaves, bark, and roots, with the highest expression observed in bark. IBA-treated cuttings also showed higher SAMS activity than control cuttings during root primordium and adventitious root formation. These results indicate that TrbSAMS might play an important role in the regulation of IBA-induced adventitious root development in tetraploid black locust cuttings.

  14. Analogue Experiments Identify Possible Precursor Compounds for Chlorohydrocarbons Detected in SAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K.; Summons, R. E.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Martin, M. G.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    Since landing at Gale Crater on August 6, 2012, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite, aboard the Curiosity Rover, has conducted multiple analyses of scooped and drilled samples and has identified a suite of chlorohydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene (Glavin et al., 2013; Leshin et al., 2013). These compounds were identified after samples were pyrolysed at temperatures up to ~835°C through a combination of Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA) and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GCMS). Since these chlorinated species were well above the background levels determined by empty cup blanks analyzed prior to solid sample analyses, thermal degradation of oxychlorine phases, such as perchlorate, present in the Martian soil, are the most likely source of chlorine needed to generate these chlorohydrocarbons. Laboratory analogue experiments show that terrestrial organics internal to SAM, such as N-methyl-N(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a derivatization agent, can react with perchlorates to produce all of the chlorohydrocarbons detected by SAM. However, in pyrolysis-trap-GCMS laboratory experiments with MTBSTFA, C4 compounds are the predominant chlorohydrocarbon observed, whereas on SAM the C1 chlorohydrocarbons dominate (Glavin et al., 2013). This, in addition to the previous identification of chloromethane and dichloromethane by the 1976 Viking missions (Biemann et al., 1977), suggest that there could be another, possibly Martian, source of organic carbon contributing to the formation of the C1 chlorohydrocarbons, or other components of the solid samples analyzed by SAM are having a catalytic effect on chlorohydrocarbon generation. Laboratory analogue experiments investigated a suite of organic compounds that have the potential to accumulate on Mars (Benner et al., 2000) and thus serve as sources of carbon for the formation of chlorohydrocarbons detected by the SAM and

  15. Sam68/KHDRBS1 is critical for colon tumorigenesis by regulating genotoxic stress-induced NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kai; Sun, Xin; Wier, Eric M; Hodgson, Andrea; Liu, Yue; Sears, Cynthia L; Wan, Fengyi

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated transcription is an important mediator for cellular responses to DNA damage. Genotoxic agents trigger a 'nuclear-to-cytoplasmic' NF-κB activation signaling pathway; however, the early nuclear signaling cascade linking DNA damage and NF-κB activation is poorly understood. Here we report that Src-associated-substrate-during-mitosis-of-68kDa/KH domain containing, RNA binding, signal transduction associated 1 (Sam68/KHDRBS1) is a key NF-κB regulator in genotoxic stress-initiated signaling pathway. Sam68 deficiency abolishes DNA damage-stimulated polymers of ADP-ribose (PAR) production and the PAR-dependent NF-κB transactivation of anti-apoptotic genes. Sam68 deleted cells are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA damaging agents. Upregulated Sam68 coincides with elevated PAR production and NF-κB-mediated anti-apoptotic transcription in human and mouse colon cancer. Knockdown of Sam68 sensitizes human colon cancer cells to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis and genetic deletion of Sam68 dampens colon tumor burden in mice. Together our data reveal a novel function of Sam68 in the genotoxic stress-initiated nuclear signaling, which is crucial for colon tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15018.001 PMID:27458801

  16. Comparative electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy study of nonionic fluorosurfactant zonyl FSN self-assembled monolayers on Au(111) and Au(100): a potential-induced structural transition.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongan; Yan, Jiawei; Zhu, Feng; Sun, Chunfeng; Mao, Bingwei

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the structure of nonionic fluorosurfactant zonyl FSN self-assembled monolayers on Au(111) and Au(100) in 0.05 M H(2)SO(4) as a function of the electrode potential by electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ECSTM). On Au(111), a (3(1/2) × 3(1/2))R30° arrangement of the FSN SAMs is observed, which remains unchanged in the potential range where the redox reaction of FSN molecules does not occur. On Au(100), some parallel corrugations of the FSN SAMs are observed, which originate from the smaller distance and the repulsive interaction between FSN molecules to make the FSN molecules deviate from the bridging sites, and ECSTM reveals a potential-induced structural transition of the FSN SAMs. The experimental observations are rationalized by the effect of the intermolecular interaction. The smaller distance between molecules on Au(100) results in the repulsive force, which increases the probability of structural change induced by external factors (i.e., the electrode potential). The appropriate distance and interactions of FSN molecules account for the stable structure of FSN SAMs on Au(111). Surface crystallography may influence the intermolecular interaction through changing the molecular arrangements of the SAMs. The results benefit the molecular-scale understanding of the behavior of the FSN SAMs under electrochemical potential control.

  17. Coupling liquids acoustic velocity effects on elastic metallic bioglass properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metiri, W.; Hadjoub, F.; Doghmane, A.; Hadjoub, Z.

    2009-11-01

    The effect of surface acoustic wave, SAW, velocities of coupling liquids on acoustical properties of several bulk metallic glasses, BMG, has been investigated using simulation program based on acoustic microscopy. Thus, we determined variations of critical angles at which the excitation of longitudinal mode, θL and Rayleigh mode, θR occurs as a function of wave velocities in different coupling liquids, Vliq. Linear relations of the form θi =ai0 +βiVliq were deduced. The importance of such formula, used with Snell's law, lies in the direct determination of SAW velocities and consequently mechanical properties of BMGs.

  18. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  19. Antarctic SAM-temperature relationships in the historical CMIP5 model runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, G.; Bracegirdle, T.

    2013-12-01

    Variability in the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is associated with a distinct spatial pattern of near-surface temperature anomalies across the Antarctic continent: a more positive SAM is generally linked with warming over the Antarctic Peninsula and cooler temperatures over East Antarctica. However, recent studies have shown that on decadal timescales these SAM-temperature relationships (STRs) can break down and even reverse in sign. Due to the relatively short (~50 years) timescale of available observations it is difficult to determine whether such reversals have occurred in response to anthropogenic forcing or are simply part of natural internal climate variability. Future Antarctic temperature change over the 21st Century is likely to be highly dependent on how the SAM responds to a combination of ozone recovery and greenhouse gas increases, which modelling studies suggest will have opposing effects on the sign of the SAM. Decadal variability in Antarctic STRs will be a major contributing factor to the uncertainty attached to such predictions. Therefore, as a first step in refining such predictions, we examine how well the Coupled Model Intercomparison Phase 5 (CMIP5) models, which provide climate projections for the latest IPCC assessment report, capture STR decadal variability across Antarctica. We analyze the seasonal STR at six Antarctic stations in the historical CMIP5 model runs, which typically encompass the period from 1850-2005. The stations were chosen because they have different seasonal patterns of STR; e.g. consistent across all seasons, one season where the STR is much stronger, or a change in the STR sign across the year. We utilize data from 50 different CMIP5 models comprising 183 separate model runs. First, we examine how well the models determine the long-term seasonal STR correlation and regression coefficients for the 1961-2000 period at each station, as compared to equivalent observations. Second, we investigate whether the models capture

  20. Early Results from the Curiosity Rover's SAM Investigation at Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Webster, Chris; Cabane, Michael; Coll, Patrice

    2013-04-01

    The goals of the Mars Science Laboratory Mission (1, 2) are to explore the potential of the Gale Crater landing site to support life either in the distant past or the present. The contribution of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite (3) in this exploration of habitability is (A) to search for organic compounds in rocks and soils, (B) to determine the composition of inorganic volatiles compounds in the atmosphere or extracted from solid materials, and (C) to measure the isotopic composition of several of these volatiles. While prime exploration targets of MSL's Curiosity Rover are the layers in the central mound (Mt. Sharp) of Gale crater the initial exploration of region near the landing point has revealed a diverse geology and the early part of the mission has been spent both commissioning the 10 Curiosity instruments and the Rover subsystems and making first time measurements of both atmospheric and solid samples. SAM is located in the interior of MSL's Curiosity rover next to the XRD/XRF CheMin instrument. A variety of imaging, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, and elemental analysis instrumentation serves to locate sampling sites and interogate candidate materials before solid sample is collected either with a drill or a scoop for delivery to SAM and CheMin. SAM's instruments are a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), and a 6-column gas chromatograph (GC). These are coupled through a solid sample transport system and a gas processing and enrichment system. The SAM suite is able to measure a suite of light isotopes and to analyze volatiles directly from the atmosphere or thermally released from solid samples. Early results from SAM atmospheric runs include a determination of: new volume mixing ratios for the 5 major isotopic constituents showing Ar approximately equal to N2; an upper limit of 3.5 ppb for the volume mixing ratio of methane; C and O isotope ratios showing both heavier than terrestrial averages

  1. Early Evolved Gas Results from the Curiosity Rover’s SAM Investigation at Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Franz, H.; McAdam, A.; Brunner, A.; Eigenbrode, J.; Stern, J.; SAM Science Team; MSL Science Team

    2013-10-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Mission is designed to explore the habitability of the selected landing site at Gale crater. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite contributes to this study with a search for organic compounds, an analysis of the composition of inorganic volatiles, and measurements of the isotopic composition light elements. Both atmospheric and solid samples are analyzed. The layers in the central mound (Mt. Sharp) of Gale crater are important targets for the MSL mission. However, in situ measurements made during the past year of interesting regions close to the Bradbury landing site have revealed a diverse geology and several primary mission objectives have already been realized. SAM is located in the interior of the Curiosity rover. The MSL cameras, a laser induced breakdown spectrometer, and elemental analysis instrumentation serves to locate sampling sites and interogate candidate materials before solid sample is collected either with a drill or a scoop for delivery to SAM and the XRD instrument CheMin. SAM integrates a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), and a 6-column gas chromatograph (GC) with a solid sample transport system and a gas processing and enrichment system. Results of SAM atmospheric composition analyses have already been reported (1,2). To date, multiple SAM evolved gas experiments have examined samples from fines scooped from an aeolian drift and from two drilled samples of a mudstone. Major evolved gases are H2O, CO2, O2, SO2, H2S, H2, and a number of minor species. These data help confirm the likely presence of perchlorates, the presence of phylosillicates, and both reduced and oxidized compounds evolved from the same sample. 1) P.R. Mahaffy et al., Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Gases in the Martian Atmosphere from the Curiosity Rover, Science 343, (2013). 2) C.R. Webster et al., Isotope Ratios of H, C and O in Martian Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Water Measured by the

  2. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  3. Successful treatment tailored to each splanchnic arterial lesion due to segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM): report of a case.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Deguchi, Juno; Endo, Hisako; Miyata, Tetsuro

    2008-11-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is a rare condition characterized by splanchnic arterial catastrophe caused by mediolysis. We report a 59-year-old man with a ruptured splenic arterial aneurysm who was successfully treated by coil embolization. He underwent additional resection of large gastroepiploic and residual splenic aneurysms. Pathological examination showed mediolysis and tearing, compatible with SAM. Furthermore, he developed acute dissection of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) one and a half years later, demonstrated by computed tomography. This report demonstrates that SAM is characterized by multiple lesions of the splanchnic arteries at different times, and requires treatment suited to the lesions, including careful long-term observation.

  4. Curiosity's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Investigation: Overview of Results from the First 120 Sols on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.; Archer, P. D.; Atreya, S. K.; Benna, M.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Brunner, A. E.; Buch, A.; Coll, P.; Conrad, P. G.; Coscia, D.; Dobson, N.; Dworkin, J. P.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Farley, K. A.; Flesch, G.; Franz, H. B.; Freissinet, C.; Gorevan, S.; Glavin, D. P.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Harpold, D. N.; Hengemihle, J.; Jaeger, F.

    2013-01-01

    During the first 120 sols of Curiosity s landed mission on Mars (8/6/2012 to 12/7/2012) SAM sampled the atmosphere 9 times and an eolian bedform named Rocknest 4 times. The atmospheric experiments utilized SAM s quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and tunable laser spectrometer (TLS) while the solid sample experiments also utilized the gas chromatograph (GC). Although a number of core experiments were pre-programmed and stored in EEProm, a high level SAM scripting language enabled the team to optimize experiments based on prior runs.

  5. Evolved Gas Analyses of Sedimentary Materials in Gale Crater, Mars: Results of the Curiosity Rover's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument from Yellowknife Bay to the Stimson Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; McAdam, A. C.; Rampe, E. B.; Ming, D. W.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Stern, J. C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Archer, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument aboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover has analyzed 10 samples from Gale Crater. All SAM evolved gas analyses have yielded a multitude of volatiles (e.g, H2O, SO2, H2S, CO2, CO, NO, O2, HC1). The objectives of this work are to 1) Characterize the evolved H2O, SO2, CO2, and O2 gas traces of sediments analyzed by SAM through sol 1178, 2) Constrain sediment mineralogy/composition based on SAM evolved gas analysis (SAM-EGA), and 3) Discuss the implications of these results releative to understanding the geochemical history of Gale Crater.

  6. Nearfield Acoustical Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Sabih I.

    Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is a method by which a set of acoustic pressure measurements at points located on a specific surface (called a hologram) can be used to image sources on vibrating surfaces on the acoustic field in three-dimensional space. NAH data are processed to take advantage of the evanescent wavefield to image sources that are separated less that one-eighth of a wavelength.

  7. Deep Water Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-28

    Estimates of basin-wide sound speed ( temperature ) fields obtained by the combination of acoustic, altimetry, and other data types with ocean...of acoustic coherence at long ranges in the ocean. Estimates of basin-wide sound speed ( temperature ) fields obtained by the combination of acoustic...index.html Award Number N00014-13-1-0053 LONG-TERM GOALS The ultimate limitations to the performance of long-range sonar are due to ocean sound speed

  8. Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-14

    Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD Tam Nguyen 2531 Jefferson Davis Hwy Arlington, VA 22242 phone: (703) 604-6013 ext 520 fax: (703) 604-6056...email: NguyenTL@navsea.navy.mil Award # N0001499PD30007 LONG-TERM GOALS The goal of the recently completed Acoustic Communications Advanced...Technology Demonstration program (ACOMMS ATD) was to demonstrate long range and moderate data rate underwater acoustic communications between a submarine

  9. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-043016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to...improve our understanding. During the past few years, the physics effects studied have been three-dimensional propagation on global scales, deep water

  10. Optimized Model Surfaces for Advanced Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of Surface Nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Song, Bo; Zhou, Yi; Schönherr, Holger

    2016-11-01

    The formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of binary mixtures of 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHDA) and 1-octadecanethiol (ODT) on ultraflat template-stripped gold (TSG) surfaces was systematically investigated to clarify the assembly behavior, composition, and degree of possible phase segregation in light of atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of surface nanobubbles on these substrates. The data for SAMs on TSG were compared to those obtained by adsorption on rough evaporated gold, as reported in a previous study. Quartz crystal microbalance and surface plasmon resonance data acquired in situ on TSG indicate that similar to SAM formation on conventional evaporated gold substrates ODT and MHDA form monolayers and bilayers, respectively. The second layer on MHDA, whose formation is attributed to hydrogen bonding, can be easily removed by adequate rinsing with water. The favorable agreement of the grazing incidence reflection Fourier transform infrared (GIR FTIR) spectroscopy and contact angle data analyzed with the Israelachvili-Gee model suggests that the binary SAMs do not segregate laterally. This conclusion is fully validated by high-resolution friction force AFM observations down to a length scale of 8-10 nm, which is much smaller than the typical observed surface nanobubble radii. Finally, correspondingly functionalized TSG substrates are shown to be valuable supports for studying surface nanobubbles by AFM in water and for addressing the relation between surface functionality and nanobubble formation and properties.

  11. Polar stratospheric cloud sightings by SAM II. [Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement onboard Nimbus 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Steele, H. M.; Hamill, P.; Swissler, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    The functions and data gained regarding stratospheric cloud sightings by the stratospheric aerosol measurement (SAM) II experiment on board the Numbus 7 spacecraft are reported. SAM II comprises a single channel sun photometer centered at 1.0 micron wavelength for measuring the solar intensity when the sun descends below an apparent 300 km altitude until the sun is occulted by clouds or the horizon. Readings are also made during sunrise in an opposite fashion. Transmission profiles are developed from the data and used to construct profiles of aerosol extinction with a 1 km resolution. Polar stratospheric clouds have been observed in more than 90% of the cases when the minimum temperature is 185 K or less, and 45% of the time when the temperature is 193 K or less. The clouds were more prevalent in the Antarctic winter than during the Arctic winter, and cloud height was lower than indicated by previous data.

  12. Catch-and-Release of Target Cells Using Aptamer-Conjugated Electroactive Zwitterionic Oligopeptide SAM

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Junko; Kageyama, Tatsuto; Osaki, Tatsuya; Bonalumi, Flavia; Marchese, Francesca; Gautieri, Alfonso; Bianchi, Elena; Dubini, Gabriele; Arrigoni, Chiara; Moretti, Matteo; Fukuda, Junji

    2017-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers possess attractive features such as specific molecular recognition, high-affinity binding, and rapid acquisition and replication, which could be feasible components for separating specific cells from other cell types. This study demonstrates that aptamers conjugated to an oligopeptide self-assembled monolayer (SAM) can be used to selectively trap human hepatic cancer cells from cell mixtures containing normal human hepatocytes or human fibroblasts. Molecular dynamics calculations have been performed to understand how the configurations of the aptamers are related to the experimental results of selective cell capture. We further demonstrate that the captured hepatic cancer cells can be detached and collected along with electrochemical desorption of the oligopeptide SAM, and by repeating these catch-and-release processes, target cells can be enriched. This combination of capture with aptamers and detachment with electrochemical reactions is a promising tool in various research fields ranging from basic cancer research to tissue engineering applications. PMID:28266533

  13. Sam the Monkey After His Ride in the Little Joe 2 Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Sam, the Rhesus monkey, after his ride in the Little Joe-2 (LJ-2) spacecraft. A U.S. Navy destroyer safely recovered Sam after he experienced three minutes of weightlessness during the flight. Animals were often used during test flights for Project Mercury to help determine the effects of spaceflight and weightlessness on humans. LJ-2 was one in a series of flights that led up to the human orbital flights of NASA's Project Mercury program. The Little Joe rocket booster was developed as a cheaper, smaller, and more functional alternative to the Redstone rockets. Little Joe could be produced at one-fifth the cost of Redstone rockets and still have enough power to carry a capsule payload. Seven unmanned Little Joe rockets were launched from Wallops Island, Virginia from August 1959 to April 1961.

  14. Parabolic Trough Reference Plant for Cost Modeling with the Solar Advisor Model (SAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, C.

    2010-07-01

    This report describes a component-based cost model developed for parabolic trough solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), assisted by WorleyParsons Group Inc., for use with NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM). This report includes an overview and explanation of the model, two summary contract reports from WorleyParsons, and an Excel spreadsheet for use with SAM. The cost study uses a reference plant with a 100-MWe capacity and six hours of thermal energy storage. Wet-cooling and dry-cooling configurations are considered. The spreadsheet includes capital and operating cost by component to allow users to estimate the impact of changes in component costs.

  15. Catch-and-Release of Target Cells Using Aptamer-Conjugated Electroactive Zwitterionic Oligopeptide SAM.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Junko; Kageyama, Tatsuto; Osaki, Tatsuya; Bonalumi, Flavia; Marchese, Francesca; Gautieri, Alfonso; Bianchi, Elena; Dubini, Gabriele; Arrigoni, Chiara; Moretti, Matteo; Fukuda, Junji

    2017-03-07

    Nucleic acid aptamers possess attractive features such as specific molecular recognition, high-affinity binding, and rapid acquisition and replication, which could be feasible components for separating specific cells from other cell types. This study demonstrates that aptamers conjugated to an oligopeptide self-assembled monolayer (SAM) can be used to selectively trap human hepatic cancer cells from cell mixtures containing normal human hepatocytes or human fibroblasts. Molecular dynamics calculations have been performed to understand how the configurations of the aptamers are related to the experimental results of selective cell capture. We further demonstrate that the captured hepatic cancer cells can be detached and collected along with electrochemical desorption of the oligopeptide SAM, and by repeating these catch-and-release processes, target cells can be enriched. This combination of capture with aptamers and detachment with electrochemical reactions is a promising tool in various research fields ranging from basic cancer research to tissue engineering applications.

  16. Wide Range Vacuum Pumps for the SAM Instrument on the MSL Curiosity Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Paul; Kline-Schoder, Robert; Farley, Rodger

    2014-01-01

    Creare Incorporated and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center developed and space qualified two wide range pumps (WRPs) that were included in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument. This instrument was subsequently integrated into the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) "Curiosity Rover," launched aboard an Atlas V rocket in 2011, and landed on August 6, 2012, in the Gale Crater on Mars. The pumps have now operated for more than 18 months in the Gale Crater and have been evacuating the key components of the SAM instrument: a quadrupole mass spectrometer, a tunable laser spectrometer, and six gas chromatograph columns. In this paper, we describe the main design challenges and the ways in which they were solved. This includes the custom design of a miniaturized, high-speed motor to drive the turbo drag pump rotor, analysis of rotor dynamics for super critical operation, and bearing/lubricant design/selection.

  17. Equatorial semiannual oscillation in zonally averaged temperature observed by the Nimbus 7 SAMS and LIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delisi, Donald P.; Dunkerton, Timothy J.

    1988-04-01

    Zonally averaged equatorial temperatures obtained aboard Nimbus 7 by the stratospheric and mesospheric sounder (SAMS) are compared to comparable data obtained from the limb IR monitor of the stratosphere. The SAMS data are shown to confirm the seasonal asymmetry in semiannual wind regimes previously noted in rocketsonde observations near the equator. Two explanations for the asymmetry are considered: (1) an improved Kelvin and gravity wave transmissivity in stronger equatorial easterlies (resulting from planetary Rossby wave momentum transport), implying stronger westerly mean flow acceleration in the first cycle than in the second; and (2) evidence of strong polar-tropical coupling in the northern winter indicating that mean meridional circulations are present on a global scale.

  18. The Identification of Nanoscale Structures According to a Parameters of Acoustic Structuroscopy Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababkov, N. V.; Smirnov, A. N.; Bykova, N. V.

    2016-04-01

    The fracture surface of a destroyed steam turbine rotor is studied by acoustic structuroscopy method. The structural-phase state of the metal of the destroyed rotor of a steam turbine is studied using the methods of electron microscopy. It was established that in the areas of control, where the values of the acoustic characteristics have significant differences from the rest of the metal, detected nanocrystalline structure. The possibility of determining the structure of the nanoscale metal by acoustic structuroscopy is shown.

  19. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  20. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-07

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  1. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  2. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  3. 20. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE). DETAIL OF FENDER SYSTEM FOR TURN-SPAN PIVOT PIER. OPERATOR'S HOUSE LOCATED ON UPPER SECTION OF TRUSS - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  4. SAM II aerosol profile measurements, Poker Flat, Alaska; July 16-19, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Grams, G. W.; Herman, B. M.; Pepin, T. J.; Russell, P. B.; Swissler, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    SAM II satellite measurements during the July 1979 Poker Flat mission, yielded an aerosol extinction coefficient of 0.0004/km at 1.0 micron wavelength, in the region of the stratospheric aerosol mixing ratio peak (12-16 km). The stratospheric aerosol optical depth for these data, calculated from the tropopause through 30 km, is approximately 0.001. These results are consistent with the average 1979 summertime values found throughout the Arctic.

  5. Sarm1-mediated axon degeneration requires both SAM and TIR interactions.

    PubMed

    Gerdts, Josiah; Summers, Daniel W; Sasaki, Yo; DiAntonio, Aaron; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2013-08-14

    Axon degeneration is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that eliminates damaged or unneeded axons. Manipulation of this poorly understood pathway may allow treatment of a wide range of neurological disorders. In an RNAi-based screen performed in cultured mouse DRG neurons, we observed strong suppression of injury-induced axon degeneration upon knockdown of Sarm1 [SARM (sterile α-motif-containing and armadillo-motif containing protein)]. We find that a SARM-dependent degeneration program is engaged by disparate neuronal insults: SARM ablation blocks axon degeneration induced by axotomy or vincristine treatment, while SARM acts in parallel with a soma-derived caspase-dependent pathway following trophic withdrawal. SARM is a multidomain protein that associates with neuronal mitochondria. Deletion of the N-terminal mitochondrial localization sequence disrupts SARM mitochondrial localization in neurons but does not alter its ability to promote axon degeneration. In contrast, mutation of either the SAM (sterile α motif) or TIR (Toll-interleukin-1 receptor) domains abolishes the ability of SARM to promote axonal degeneration, while a SARM mutant containing only these domains elicits axon degeneration and nonapoptotic neuronal death even in the absence of injury. Protein-protein interaction studies demonstrate that the SAM domains are necessary and sufficient to mediate SARM-SARM binding. SARM mutants lacking a TIR domain bind full-length SARM and exhibit strong dominant-negative activity. These results indicate that SARM plays an integral role in the dismantling of injured axons and support a model in which SAM-mediated multimerization is necessary for TIR-dependent engagement of a downstream destruction pathway. These findings suggest that inhibitors of SAM and TIR interactions represent therapeutic candidates for blocking pathological axon loss and neuronal cell death.

  6. Observational constraints on the response function of Southern Ocean SST to SAM forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, U.; Ferreira, D.; Marshall, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent coupled model studies of the polar Southern Ocean (SO) revealed an initial (fast) cooling, but longer-term (slow) and equilibrium warming, of sea surface temperature (SST) in response to stratospheric ozone depletion and the concurrent shift of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) to its positive phase. Yet there is much spread across models in the amplitude and time scale of the equilibration, so that even the sign of the implied recent-decade SST response to ozone depletion is not robust. Here we use the framework of a simple layered model (representing mixed layer, seasonal thermocline and upper permanent thermocline of the SO south of the polar front) combined with observations of the SO, to derive constraints on the equilibrium response of the real-world SO to annually-repeating seasonal SAM forcing. We obtain simple expressions for the equilibrium response in terms of the SAM-induced air-sea fluxes of heat and momentum and the SO horizontal and vertical temperature stratifications. These are then evaluated using satellite observations and atmospheric reanalysis data, as well as in-situ ocean climatologies. Our estimates suggest that, for observed characteristics (mixed layer depths, stratification, phasing of the SAM-forcing in season and space), the well-documented surface-forced fast SO SST cooling is large in comparison to the dynamically-induced subsurface-forced warming, and thus also largely sets the sign and amplitude of the equilibrium response.Exploration of the parameter space of coupled model versus observed ratios of horizontal to vertical stratifications provides a rationale for the discrepant equilibrium responses.

  7. 18. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) APPROACH SPAN FENDER. DOLPHIN LOCATED AT RIGHT. NAVIGATIONAL LIGHT LOCATED ON TOP OF FENDER - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  8. Parabolic Trough Collector Cost Update for the System Advisor Model (SAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurup, Parthiv; Turchi, Craig S.

    2015-11-01

    This report updates the baseline cost for parabolic trough solar fields in the United States within NREL's System Advisor Model (SAM). SAM, available at no cost at https://sam.nrel.gov/, is a performance and financial model designed to facilitate decision making for people involved in the renewable energy industry. SAM is the primary tool used by NREL and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for estimating the performance and cost of concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies and projects. The study performed a bottom-up build and cost estimate for two state-of-the-art parabolic trough designs -- the SkyTrough and the Ultimate Trough. The SkyTrough analysis estimated the potential installed cost for a solar field of 1500 SCAs as $170/m2 +/- $6/m2. The investigation found that SkyTrough installed costs were sensitive to factors such as raw aluminum alloy cost and production volume. For example, in the case of the SkyTrough, the installed cost would rise to nearly $210/m2 if the aluminum alloy cost was $1.70/lb instead of $1.03/lb. Accordingly, one must be aware of fluctuations in the relevant commodities markets to track system cost over time. The estimated installed cost for the Ultimate Trough was only slightly higher at $178/m2, which includes an assembly facility of $11.6 million amortized over the required production volume. Considering the size and overall cost of a 700 SCA Ultimate Trough solar field, two parallel production lines in a fully covered assembly facility, each with the specific torque box, module and mirror jigs, would be justified for a full CSP plant.

  9. Experience producing simulated events for the DZero experiment on the SAM-Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Garzoglio, G.; Terekhov, I.; Snow, J.; Jain, S.; Nishandar, A.; /Texas U., Arlington

    2004-12-01

    Most of the simulated events for the DZero experiment at Fermilab have been historically produced by the ''remote'' collaborating institutions. One of the principal challenges reported concerns the maintenance of the local software infrastructure, which is generally different from site to site. As the understanding of the distributed computing community over distributively owned and shared resources progresses, the adoption of grid technologies to address the production of Monte Carlo events for high energy physics experiments becomes increasingly interesting. SAM-Grid is a software system developed at Fermilab, which integrates standard grid technologies for job and information management with SAM, the data handling system of the DZero and CDF experiments. During the past few months, this grid system has been tailored for the Monte Carlo production of DZero. Since the initial phase of deployment, this experience has exposed an interesting series of requirements to the SAM-Grid services, the standard middleware, the resources and their management and to the analysis framework of the experiment. As of today, the inefficiency due to the grid infrastructure has been reduced to as little as 1%. In this paper, we present our statistics and the ''lessons learned'' in running large high energy physics applications on a grid infrastructure.

  10. Major Volatiles from MSL SAM Evolved Gas Analyses: Yellowknife Bay Through Lower Mount Sharp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Niles, P. B.; Stern, J. C.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Atreya, S. K.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; McKay, C. P.; Wilhelm, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) analysed several subsamples of <150 µm fines from five sites at Gale Crater. Three were in Yellowknife Bay: the Rocknest aeolian bedform ("RN") and drilled Sheepbed mudstone from sites John Klein ("JK") and Cumberland ("CB"). One was drilled from the Windjana ("WJ") site on a sandstone of the Kimberly formation investigated on route to Mount Sharp. Another was drilled from the Confidence Hills ("CH") site on a sandstone of the Murray Formation at the base of Mt. Sharp (Pahrump Hills). Outcrops are sedimentary rocks that are largely of fluvial or lacustrine origin, with minor aeolian deposits.. SAM's evolved gas analysis (EGA) mass spectrometry detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, and other trace gases, including organic fragments. The identity and evolution temperature (T) of evolved gases can support CheMin mineral detection and place constraints on trace volatile-bearing phases or phases difficult to characterize with XRD (e.g., X-ray amorphous phases). They can also give constraints on sample organic chemistry. Here, we discuss trends in major evolved volatiles from SAM EGA analyses to date.

  11. SAM: speech-aware applications in medicine to support structured data entry.

    PubMed

    Wormek, A K; Ingenerf, J; Orthner, H F

    1997-01-01

    In the last two years, improvement in speech recognition technology has directed the medical community's interest to porting and using such innovations in clinical systems. The acceptance of speech recognition systems in clinical domains increases with recognition speed, large medical vocabulary, high accuracy, continuous speech recognition, and speaker independence. Although some commercial speech engines approach these requirements, the greatest benefit can be achieved in adapting a speech recognizer to a specific medical application. The goals of our work are first, to develop a speech-aware core component which is able to establish connections to speech recognition engines of different vendors. This is realized in SAM. Second, with applications based on SAM we want to support the physician in his/her routine clinical care activities. Within the STAMP project (STAndardized Multimedia report generator in Pathology), we extend SAM by combining a structured data entry approach with speech recognition technology. Another speech-aware application in the field of Diabetes care is connected to a terminology server. The server delivers a controlled vocabulary which can be used for speech recognition.

  12. SAM 2 Measurements of the Polar Stratospheric Aerosol, volume 2. April 1979 to October 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Steele, H. M.; Hamill, P.

    1982-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II sensor is abroad the Earth orbiting Nimbus 7 spacecraft proving extinction measurements of the Antarctic and Arctic stratospheric aerosol with a vertical resolution of 1 km. Representative examples and weekly averages of aerosol data and corresponding temperature profiles for the time and place of each SAM II measurement (April 29, 1979, to October 27, 1979) is presented. Contours of aerosol extinction as a function of altitude and longitude or time were plotted and weekly aerosol optical depths were calculated. Seasonal variations and variations in space (altitude and longitude) for both polar regions are easily seen. Typical values of aerosol extinction at the SAM II wavelength of 1.0 micron for the time priod were 1 to 3 x 10 to the -4th power km -1 in the main stratospheric aerosol layer. Optical depths for the stratosphere were about 0.002. Polar stratospheric clouds at altitudes between the tropopause and 20 km were observed during the Antarctic winter at various times and locations. A ready-to-use format containing a representative sample of the second 6 months of data to be used in atmospheric and climatic studies is presented.

  13. Integration, Validation, and Application of a PV Snow Coverage Model in SAM

    SciTech Connect

    Ryberg, David; Freeman, Janine

    2015-09-01

    Due to the increasing deployment of PV systems in snowy climates, there is significant interest in a method capable of estimating PV losses resulting from snow coverage that has been verified for a wide variety of system designs and locations. A scattering of independent snow coverage models have been developed over the last 15 years; however, there has been very little effort spent on verifying these models beyond the system design and location on which they were based. Moreover, none of the major PV modeling software products have incorporated any of these models into their workflow. In response to this deficiency, we have integrated the methodology of the snow model developed in the paper by Marion et al. [1] into the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) System Advisor Model (SAM). In this work we describe how the snow model is implemented in SAM and discuss our demonstration of the model's effectiveness at reducing error in annual estimations for two PV arrays. Following this, we use this new functionality in conjunction with a long term historical dataset to estimate average snow losses across the United States for a typical PV system design. The open availability of the snow loss estimation capability in SAM to the PV modeling community, coupled with our results of the nation-wide study, will better equip the industry to accurately estimate PV energy production in areas affected by snowfall.

  14. Background and Artifacts Generated by the by the Sample Preparation Experiment on SAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmahdi, Imene; Buch, Arnaud; Szopa, Cyril; Freissinet, Caroline; Glavin, Daniel; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Millan, Maeva; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Stern, Jennifer; Coscia, David; Bonnet, Jean-Yves; Teinturier, Samuel; Morisson, Marietta; Stambouli, Moncef; Dequaire, Tristan; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) is one of the instruments of the Mars Science Laboratory mission. Three analytical devices composed the SAM experiment: the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS), the Gas Chromatography (GC) and the Mass Spectrometer (MS). To adapt the nature of a sample to the analytical devices used, a sample preparation and gas processing system implemented with (a) a pyrolysis system, (b) wet chemistry: MTBSTFA and TMAH (c) the hydrocarbon trap (silica beads, Tenax® TA and Carbosieve G) and the injection trap (Tenax® GR composed of Tenax® TA and 30% of graphite) are employed to concentrate volatiles released from the sample prior to GC-MS analysis. Our study investigates several propositions for chlorinated hydrocarbon formation detected in the SAM background by looking for: (a) all products coming from the interaction of Tenax® and perchlorates present on Mars, (b) also between some soil sample and perchlorates and (c) sources of chlorinated hydrocarbon precursors. Here we report on the detection of chlorohydrocarbon compounds and their potential origin.

  15. Serine and SAM Responsive Complex SESAME Regulates Histone Modification Crosstalk by Sensing Cellular Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Swanson, Selene K; Gogol, Madelaine; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Workman, Jerry L; Suganuma, Tamaki

    2015-11-05

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is a key enzyme for glycolysis and catalyzes the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate, which supplies cellular energy. PKM2 also phosphorylates histone H3 threonine 11 (H3T11); however, it is largely unknown how PKM2 links cellular metabolism to chromatin regulation. Here, we show that the yeast PKM2 homolog, Pyk1, is a part of a novel protein complex named SESAME (Serine-responsive SAM-containing Metabolic Enzyme complex), which contains serine metabolic enzymes, SAM (S-adenosylmethionine) synthetases, and an acetyl-CoA synthetase. SESAME interacts with the Set1 H3K4 methyltransferase complex, which requires SAM synthesized from SESAME, and recruits SESAME to target genes, resulting in phosphorylation of H3T11. SESAME regulates the crosstalk between H3K4 methylation and H3T11 phosphorylation by sensing glycolysis and glucose-derived serine metabolism. This leads to auto-regulation of PYK1 expression. Thus, our study provides insights into the mechanism of regulating gene expression, responding to cellular metabolism via chromatin modifications.

  16. SAM: speech-aware applications in medicine to support structured data entry.

    PubMed Central

    Wormek, A. K.; Ingenerf, J.; Orthner, H. F.

    1997-01-01

    In the last two years, improvement in speech recognition technology has directed the medical community's interest to porting and using such innovations in clinical systems. The acceptance of speech recognition systems in clinical domains increases with recognition speed, large medical vocabulary, high accuracy, continuous speech recognition, and speaker independence. Although some commercial speech engines approach these requirements, the greatest benefit can be achieved in adapting a speech recognizer to a specific medical application. The goals of our work are first, to develop a speech-aware core component which is able to establish connections to speech recognition engines of different vendors. This is realized in SAM. Second, with applications based on SAM we want to support the physician in his/her routine clinical care activities. Within the STAMP project (STAndardized Multimedia report generator in Pathology), we extend SAM by combining a structured data entry approach with speech recognition technology. Another speech-aware application in the field of Diabetes care is connected to a terminology server. The server delivers a controlled vocabulary which can be used for speech recognition. PMID:9357730

  17. Determinants of tRNA Recognition by the Radical SAM Enzyme RlmN

    PubMed Central

    Fitzsimmons, Christina M.; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2016-01-01

    RlmN, a bacterial radical SAM methylating enzyme, has the unusual ability to modify two distinct types of RNA: 23S rRNA and tRNA. In rRNA, RlmN installs a methyl group at the C2 position of A2503 of 23S rRNA, while in tRNA the modification occurs at nucleotide A37, immediately adjacent to the anticodon triplet. Intriguingly, only a subset of tRNAs that contain an adenosine at position 37 are substrates for RlmN, suggesting that the enzyme carefully probes the highly conserved tRNA fold and sequence features to identify its targets. Over the past several years, multiple studies have addressed rRNA modification by RlmN, while relatively few investigations have focused on the ability of this enzyme to modify tRNAs. In this study, we utilized in vitro transcribed tRNAs as model substrates to interrogate RNA recognition by RlmN. Using chimeras and point mutations, we probed how the structure and sequence of RNA influences methylation, identifying position 38 of tRNAs as a critical determinant of substrate recognition. We further demonstrate that, analogous to previous mechanistic studies with fragments of 23S rRNA, tRNA methylation requirements are consistent with radical SAM reactivity. Together, our findings provide detailed insight into tRNA recognition by a radical SAM methylating enzyme. PMID:27902775

  18. SAMSVM: A tool for misalignment filtration of SAM-format sequences with support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianfeng; Ding, Xiaofan; Sun, Xing; Tsang, Shui-Ying; Xue, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Sequence alignment/map (SAM) formatted sequences [Li H, Handsaker B, Wysoker A et al., Bioinformatics 25(16):2078-2079, 2009.] have taken on a main role in bioinformatics since the development of massive parallel sequencing. However, because misalignment of sequences poses a significant problem in analysis of sequencing data that could lead to false positives in variant calling, the exclusion of misaligned reads is a necessity in analysis. In this regard, the multiple features of SAM-formatted sequences can be treated as vectors in a multi-dimension space to allow the application of a support vector machine (SVM). Applying the LIBSVM tools developed by Chang and Lin [Chang C-C, Lin C-J, ACM Trans Intell Syst Technol 2:1-27, 2011.] as a simple interface for support vector classification, the SAMSVM package has been developed in this study to enable misalignment filtration of SAM-formatted sequences. Cross-validation between two simulated datasets processed with SAMSVM yielded accuracies that ranged from 0.89 to 0.97 with F-scores ranging from 0.77 to 0.94 in 14 groups characterized by different mutation rates from 0.001 to 0.1, indicating that the model built using SAMSVM was accurate in misalignment detection. Application of SAMSVM to actual sequencing data resulted in filtration of misaligned reads and correction of variant calling.

  19. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir From January to May 1997 (NASA Increment 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1998-01-01

    During NASA Increment 4 (January to May 1997), about 5 gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurements System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station, Mir. The data were recorded on 28 optical disks which were returned to Earth on STS-84. During this increment, SAMS data were collected in the Priroda module to support the Mir Structural Dynamics Experiment (MiSDE), the Binary Colloidal Alloy Tests (BCAT), Angular Liquid Bridge (ALB), Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM), Diffusion Controlled Apparatus Module (DCAM), Enhanced Dynamic Load Sensors (EDLS), Forced Flow Flame Spreading Test (FFFT), Liquid Metal Diffusion (LMD), Protein Crystal Growth in Dewar (PCG/Dewar), Queen's University Experiments in Liquid Diffusion (QUELD), and Technical Evaluation of MIM (TEM). This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity environment to which these experiments were exposed. Also documented are mission events of interest such as the docked phase of STS-84 operations, a Progress engine burn, Soyuz vehicle docking and undocking, and Progress vehicle docking. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous summary reports prepared by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) group.

  20. A magnesium-induced triplex pre-organizes the SAM-II riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Susmita; Lammert, Heiko; Dayie, T. Kwaku; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2017-01-01

    Our 13C- and 1H-chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiments previously revealed a dynamic exchange between partially closed and open conformations of the SAM-II riboswitch in the absence of ligand. Here, all-atom structure-based molecular simulations, with the electrostatic effects of Manning counter-ion condensation and explicit magnesium ions are employed to calculate the folding free energy landscape of the SAM-II riboswitch. We use this analysis to predict that magnesium ions remodel the landscape, shifting the equilibrium away from the extended, partially unfolded state towards a compact, pre-organized conformation that resembles the ligand-bound state. Our CEST and SAXS experiments, at different magnesium ion concentrations, quantitatively confirm our simulation results, demonstrating that magnesium ions induce collapse and pre-organization. Agreement between theory and experiment bolsters microscopic interpretation of our simulations, which shows that triplex formation between helix P2b and loop L1 is highly sensitive to magnesium and plays a key role in pre-organization. Pre-organization of the SAM-II riboswitch allows rapid detection of ligand with high selectivity, which is important for biological function. PMID:28248966

  1. Internal strain analysis of ceramics using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Renee M.

    1993-03-01

    Quantitative studies of material behavior characteristics are essential for predicting the functionality of a material under its operating conditions. A nonintrusive methodology for measuring the in situ strain of small dimeter (to 11 microns) ceramic fibers under uniaxial tensile loading and the local internal strains of ceramics and ceramic composites under flexural loading is introduced. The strain measurements and experimentally observed mechanical behavior are analyzed in terms of the microstructural development and fracture behavior of each test specimen evaluated. Measurement and analysis of Nicalon silicon carbide (SiC) fiber (15 microns diameter) indicate that the mean elastic modulus of the individual fiber is 185.3 GPa. Deviations observed in the experimentally determined elastic modulus values between specimens were attributed to microstructural variations which occur during processing. Corresponding variations in the fracture surface morphology were also observed. The observed local mechanical behavior of a lithium alumino-silicate (LAS) glass ceramic, a LAS/SiC monofilament composite, and a calcium alumino-silicate (CAS)/SiC fully reinforced composite exhibits nonlinearities and apparent hysteresis due to the subcritical mechanical loading. Local hysteresis in the LAS matrices coincided with the occurrence of multiple fracture initiation sites, localized microcracking, and secondary cracking. The observed microcracking phenomenon was attributed to stress relaxation of residual stresses developed during processing, and local interaction of the crack front with the microstructure. The relaxation strain and stress predicted on apparent mechanical hysteresis effects were defined and correlated with the magnitude of the measured fracture stress for each specimen studied. This quantitative correlation indicated a repeatable measure of the stress at which matrix microcracking occurred for stress relief of each material system. Stress relaxation occurred prior to the onset of steady state cracking conditions. The relaxation stress occurred at 18.5 percent of the fracture stress in LAS and 11.0 percent of the yield stress in CAS/SiC. The relaxation stress ratio was dependent upon the dominant fracture mode of the LAS/SiC specimens. Relaxation stress ratios greater than 0.30 were observed for specimens which fractured due to shear at the fiber matrix interface; specimens which fracture due to tensile cracking had relaxation stress ratios less than 0.30. The stress relaxation ratio appeared to be a specific characteristic of the glass ceramic material. The measured stress relaxation for LAS indicated a measure of the inherent residual stresses in the material due to processing and suggested localized toughening mechanisms for brittle material structures.

  2. Internal strain analysis of ceramics using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, Renee M.

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative studies of material behavior characteristics are essential for predicting the functionality of a material under its operating conditions. A nonintrusive methodology for measuring the in situ strain of small dimeter (to 11 microns) ceramic fibers under uniaxial tensile loading and the local internal strains of ceramics and ceramic composites under flexural loading is introduced. The strain measurements and experimentally observed mechanical behavior are analyzed in terms of the microstructural development and fracture behavior of each test specimen evaluated. Measurement and analysis of Nicalon silicon carbide (SiC) fiber (15 microns diameter) indicate that the mean elastic modulus of the individual fiber is 185.3 GPa. Deviations observed in the experimentally determined elastic modulus values between specimens were attributed to microstructural variations which occur during processing. Corresponding variations in the fracture surface morphology were also observed. The observed local mechanical behavior of a lithium alumino-silicate (LAS) glass ceramic, a LAS/SiC monofilament composite, and a calcium alumino-silicate (CAS)/SiC fully reinforced composite exhibits nonlinearities and apparent hysteresis due to the subcritical mechanical loading. Local hysteresis in the LAS matrices coincided with the occurrence of multiple fracture initiation sites, localized microcracking, and secondary cracking. The observed microcracking phenomenon was attributed to stress relaxation of residual stresses developed during processing, and local interaction of the crack front with the microstructure. The relaxation strain and stress predicted on apparent mechanical hysteresis effects were defined and correlated with the magnitude of the measured fracture stress for each specimen studied. This quantitative correlation indicated a repeatable measure of the stress at which matrix microcracking occurred for stress relief of each material system. Stress relaxation occurred prior to the onset of steady state cracking conditions. The relaxation stress occurred at 18.5 percent of the fracture stress in LAS and 11.0 percent of the yield stress in CAS/SiC. The relaxation stress ratio was dependent upon the dominant fracture mode of the LAS/SiC specimens. Relaxation stress ratios greater than 0.30 were observed for specimens which fractured due to shear at the fiber matrix interface; specimens which fracture due to tensile cracking had relaxation stress ratios less than 0.30. The stress relaxation ratio appeared to be a specific characteristic of the glass ceramic material. The measured stress relaxation for LAS indicated a measure of the inherent residual stresses in the material due to processing and suggested localized toughening mechanisms for brittle material structures.

  3. Acoustic Monitor for Solid-Liquid Slurries Measurements at Low Weight Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Tavlarides, Lawrence L.; Shcherbakov, Oleksandr; Dievendorf, Eric; Sangini, Ashok

    2003-09-10

    We have developed an acoustic monitor for accurate, real-time measurement of solids concentration in solid-liquid (S-L) and solid-gas-liquid (S-G-L) slurries at low solids weight percent (0.5 to 10 wt. %). The Syracuse Acoustic Monitor (SAM) has potential for slurry transport monitoring, processing stream monitoring, and process control capabilities for nuclear wastes treatment throughout the DOE complex. The SAM is based on theory that predicts attenuation of small-amplitude acoustic waves propagating through S-L and S-L-G suspensions. We developed a prototype in-line system with robust data acquisition capabilities to continually acquire attenuation data (response time of 0.5 sec) for a 0.6-12 MHz frequency range with an array of transducers. Test results on an integrated flow loop indicate high accuracy between 0.5 and 8.0 weight percent solids for ceramic microspheres (80 {micro}m average diameter) and kaolin-bentonite slurries. Results of removal of the interference caused by gas bubbles, thus providing the solids weight percent, will also be discussed.

  4. Conformational heterogeneity of the SAM-I riboswitch transcriptional ON state: a chaperone-like role for S-adenosyl methionine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Kim, Joohyun; Jha, Shantenu; Aboul-Ela, Fareed

    2012-05-18

    Riboswitches are promising targets for the design of novel antibiotics and engineering of portable genetic regulatory elements. There is evidence that variability in riboswitch properties allows tuning of expression for genes involved in different stages of biosynthetic pathways by mechanisms that are not currently understood. Here, we explore the mechanism for tuning of S-adenosyl methionine (SAM)-I riboswitch folding. Most SAM-I riboswitches function at the transcriptional level by sensing the cognate ligand SAM. SAM-I riboswitches orchestrate the biosynthetic pathways of cysteine, methionine, SAM, and so forth. We use base-pair probability predictions to examine the secondary-structure folding landscape of several SAM-I riboswitch sequences. We predict different folding behaviors for different SAM-I riboswitch sequences. We identify several "decoy" base-pairing interactions involving 5' riboswitch residues that can compete with the formation of a P1 helix, a component of the ligand-bound "transcription OFF" state, in the absence of SAM. We hypothesize that blockage of these interactions through SAM contacts contributes to stabilization of the OFF state in the presence of ligand. We also probe folding patterns for a SAM-I riboswitch RNA using constructs with different 3' truncation points experimentally. Folding was monitored through fluorescence, susceptibility to base-catalyzed cleavage, nuclear magnetic resonance, and indirectly through SAM binding. We identify key decision windows at which SAM can affect the folding pathway towards the OFF state. The presence of decoy conformations and differential sensitivities to SAM at different transcript lengths is crucial for SAM-I riboswitches to modulate gene expression in the context of global cellular metabolism.

  5. Nuclear Protein Sam68 Interacts with the Enterovirus 71 Internal Ribosome Entry Site and Positively Regulates Viral Protein Translation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Song, Lei; Cong, Haolong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71) recruits various cellular factors to assist in the replication and translation of its genome. Identification of the host factors involved in the EV71 life cycle not only will enable a better understanding of the infection mechanism but also has the potential to be of use in the development of antiviral therapeutics. In this study, we demonstrated that the cellular factor 68-kDa Src-associated protein in mitosis (Sam68) acts as an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) trans-acting factor (ITAF) that binds specifically to the EV71 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR). Interaction sites in both the viral IRES (stem-loops IV and V) and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K homology (KH) domain of Sam68 protein were further mapped using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and biotin RNA pulldown assay. More importantly, dual-luciferase (firefly) reporter analysis suggested that overexpression of Sam68 positively regulated IRES-dependent translation of virus proteins. In contrast, both IRES activity and viral protein translation significantly decreased in Sam68 knockdown cells compared with the negative-control cells treated with short hairpin RNA (shRNA). However, downregulation of Sam68 did not have a significant inhibitory effect on the accumulation of the EV71 genome. Moreover, Sam68 was redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and interacts with cellular factors, such as poly(rC)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), during EV71 infection. The cytoplasmic relocalization of Sam68 in EV71-infected cells may be involved in the enhancement of EV71 IRES-mediated translation. Since Sam68 is known to be a RNA-binding protein, these results provide direct evidence that Sam68 is a novel ITAF that interacts with EV71 IRES and positively regulates viral protein translation. IMPORTANCE The nuclear protein Sam68 is found as an additional new host factor that interacts with the EV71 IRES during infection

  6. Evidence for Perchlorates and the Origin of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons Detected by SAM at the Rocknest Aeolian Deposit in Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Freissinet, Caroline; Miller, Kristen E.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brunner, Anna E.; Buch, Arnaud; Sutter, Brad; Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cabane, Michel; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela G.; Coscia, David; Dworkin, Jason P.; Franz, Heather B.; Grotzinger, John P.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Martin, Mildred G.; McKay, Christopher; Ming, Douglas W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Pavlov, Alexander; Steele, Andrew; Summons, Roger E.; Szopa, Cyril; Teinturier, Samuel; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    A single scoop of the Rocknest aeolian deposit was sieved (less than 150 micrometers), and four separate sample portions, each with a mass of approximately 50 mg, were delivered to individual cups inside the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument by the Mars Science Laboratory rover's sample acquisition system. The samples were analyzed separately by the SAM pyrolysis evolved gas and gas chromatograph mass spectrometer analysis modes. Several chlorinated hydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, a chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene were identified by SAM above background levels with abundances of approximately 0.01 to 2.3 nmol. The evolution of the chloromethanes observed during pyrolysis is coincident with the increase in O2 released from the Rocknest sample and the decomposition of a product of N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a chemical whose vapors were released from a derivatization cup inside SAM. The best candidate for the oxychlorine compounds in Rocknest is a hydrated calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2·nH2O), based on the temperature release of O2 that correlates with the release of the chlorinated hydrocarbons measured by SAM, although other chlorine-bearing phases are being considered. Laboratory analog experiments suggest that the reaction of Martian chlorine from perchlorate decomposition with terrestrial organic carbon from MTBSTFA during pyrolysis can explain the presence of three chloromethanes and a chloromethylpropene detected by SAM. Chlorobenzene may be attributed to reactions of Martian chlorine released during pyrolysis with terrestrial benzene or toluene derived from 2,6-diphenylphenylene oxide (Tenax) on the SAM hydrocarbon trap. At this time we do not have definitive evidence to support a nonterrestrial carbon source for these chlorinated hydrocarbons, nor do we exclude the possibility that future SAM analyses will reveal the presence of organic compounds native to the

  7. A Study of the Effects of Sensor Noise and Guidance Laws on SAM Effectiveness Against Cruise Missiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    EFFECTS OF SENSOR NOISE AND GUIDANCE LAWS ON SAM EFFECTIVENESS AGAINST CRUISE MISSILES by Murat Dogen June 2015 Thesis Advisor: Robert G...2015 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF SENSOR NOISE AND GUIDANCE LAWS ON SAM...EFFECTIVENESS AGAINST CRUISE MISSILES 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR( S ) Murat DOGEN 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval

  8. Evidence for perchlorates and the origin of chlorinated hydrocarbons detected by SAM at the Rocknest aeolian deposit in Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Freissinet, Caroline; Miller, Kristen E.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brunner, Anna E.; Buch, Arnaud; Sutter, Brad; Archer, P. Douglas; Atreya, Sushil K.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cabane, Michel; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela G.; Coscia, David; Dworkin, Jason P.; Franz, Heather B.; Grotzinger, John P.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Martin, Mildred G.; McKay, Christopher; Ming, Douglas W.; Navarro-González, Rafael; Pavlov, Alexander; Steele, Andrew; Summons, Roger E.; Szopa, Cyril; Teinturier, Samuel; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2013-10-01

    A single scoop of the Rocknest aeolian deposit was sieved (< 150 µm), and four separate sample portions, each with a mass of ~50 mg, were delivered to individual cups inside the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument by the Mars Science Laboratory rover's sample acquisition system. The samples were analyzed separately by the SAM pyrolysis evolved gas and gas chromatograph mass spectrometer analysis modes. Several chlorinated hydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, a chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene were identified by SAM above background levels with abundances of ~0.01 to 2.3 nmol. The evolution of the chloromethanes observed during pyrolysis is coincident with the increase in O2 released from the Rocknest sample and the decomposition of a product of N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a chemical whose vapors were released from a derivatization cup inside SAM. The best candidate for the oxychlorine compounds in Rocknest is a hydrated calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2·nH2O), based on the temperature release of O2 that correlates with the release of the chlorinated hydrocarbons measured by SAM, although other chlorine-bearing phases are being considered. Laboratory analog experiments suggest that the reaction of Martian chlorine from perchlorate decomposition with terrestrial organic carbon from MTBSTFA during pyrolysis can explain the presence of three chloromethanes and a chloromethylpropene detected by SAM. Chlorobenzene may be attributed to reactions of Martian chlorine released during pyrolysis with terrestrial benzene or toluene derived from 2,6-diphenylphenylene oxide (Tenax) on the SAM hydrocarbon trap. At this time we do not have definitive evidence to support a nonterrestrial carbon source for these chlorinated hydrocarbons, nor do we exclude the possibility that future SAM analyses will reveal the presence of organic compounds native to the Martian regolith.

  9. Confocal photoacoustic microscopy using a single multifunctional lens.

    PubMed

    Xi, Lei; Song, Chaolong; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-06-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has remained one of the fastest developing biomedical imaging modalities in the past decade. The confocal strategy of optical illumination and acoustic detection is a way to boost the sensitivity of PAM. To achieve confocal PAM, current PAM systems utilize separate acoustic and optical converging devices, making the systems bulky and complicated. In this Letter, we demonstrate the use of a single-liquid lens to successfully achieve acoustic and optical confocal configuration for optical-resolution PAM (ORPAM). Using the lens with a numerical aperture of 0.43, we show that the resolution of the ORPAM system is 4.8 μm with a significantly improved sensitivity of acoustic detection. We also apply this compact ORPAM system to in vivo imaging of the vasculature of a rat ear.

  10. The Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System (SAMS) for OSI - Experiences from IFE14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gestermann, Nicolai; Sick, Benjamin; Häge, Martin; Blake, Thomas; Labak, Peter; Joswig, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    An on-site inspection (OSI) is the third of four elements of the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The sole purpose of an OSI is to confirm whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of the treaty and to gather any facts which might assist in identifying any possible violator. It thus constitutes the final verification measure under the CTBT if all other available measures are not able to confirm the nature of a suspicious event. The Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) carried out the Integrated Field Exercise 2014 (IFE14) in the Dead Sea Area of Jordan from 3 November to 9. December 2014. It was a fictitious OSI whose aim was to test the inspection capabilities in an integrated manner. The technologies allowed during an OSI are listed in the Treaty. The aim of the Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System (SAMS) is to detect and localize aftershocks of low magnitudes of the triggering event or collapses of underground cavities. The locations of these events are expected in the vicinity of a possible previous explosion and help to narrow down the search area within an inspection area (IA) of an OSI. The success of SAMS depends on the main elements, hardware, software, deployment strategy, the search logic and not least the effective use of personnel. All elements of SAMS were tested and improved during the Built-Up Exercises (BUE) which took place in Austria and Hungary. IFE14 provided more realistic climatic and hazardous terrain conditions with limited resources. Significant variations in topography of the IA of IFE14 in the mountainous Dead Sea Area of Jordan led to considerable challenges which were not expected from experiences encountered during BUE. The SAMS uses mini arrays with an aperture of about 100 meters and with a total of 4 elements. The station network deployed during IFE14 and results of the data analysis will be presented. Possible aftershocks of

  11. First results from the CheMin, DAN and SAM instruments on Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, D. F.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Mitrofanov, I.

    2012-12-01

    One of the principal goals of the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity is to identify and characterize the early habitable environments of Mars, as recorded in the stratified rocks and soil of Gale crater. The suite of instruments aboard Curiosity will make measurements useful for determining the presence and lateral/vertical distribution of hydrated phases, the mineralogy and "preservation potential" of sediments and rocks, and the identity and isotopic composition of organic and other carbon containing molecules, should such be present. Three of Curiosity's instruments, DAN ("Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons," a soil hydrogen detector), CheMin ("Chemistry and Mineralogy," a mineralogy instrument) and SAM ("Surface Analysis at Mars," an organic molecule and isotopic analysis instrument) are uniquely suited to this purpose. DAN consists of a pulsed neutron generator and neutron detector that will measure the hydrogen content (i.e., hydrated phases, water ice) in the upper meter of the soil. Both passive and active measurements will be obtained, resulting in a meter-scale resolution transect map of near-surface hydrogen along the path of the rover. These measurements will provide context for the mineralogical and organic measurements of drilled and scooped samples analyzed by CheMin and SAM. CheMin, a powder X-ray Diffraction (pXRD) instrument, will determine the mineralogy of scooped soils and powders obtained from drilled rocks. Hydrated minerals will be identified, along with whole-rock mineralogy for characterizing the environment of formation and preservation potential for organic molecules. SAM consists of a sample handling system, a gas chromatograph, a mass spectrometer, and a tunable laser spectrometer. SAM will accept the same powdered rock and soil samples as CheMin, and will measure and identify organic carbon in these samples as well as evolved inorganic gases such as CO2, CH4, and H2O. Isotopic composition of noble gases and several light elements are

  12. Detecting Complex Organic Compounds Using the SAM Wet Chemistry Experiment on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freissinet, C.; Buch, A.; Glavin, D. P.; Brault, A.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Kashyap, S.; Martin, M. G.; Miller, K.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    The search for organic molecules on Mars can provide important first clues of abiotic chemistry and/or extinct or extant biota on the planet. Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) is currently the most relevant space-compatible analytical tool for the detection of organic compounds. Nevertheless, GC separation is intrinsically restricted to volatile molecules, and many molecules of astrobiological interest are chromatographically refractory or polar. To analyze these organics such as amino acids, nucleobases and carboxylic acids in the Martian regolith, an additional derivatization step is required to transform them into volatile derivatives that are amenable to GC analysis. As part of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment onboard Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover, a single-step protocol of extraction and chemical derivatization with the silylating reagent N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) has been developed to reach a wide range of astrobiology-relevant refractory organic molecules (Mahaffy et al. 2012; Stalport et al. 2012). Seven cups in the SAM instrument are devoted to MTBSTFA derivatization. However, this chemical reaction adds a protective silyl group in place of each labile hydrogen, which makes the molecule non-identifiable in common mass spectra libraries. Therefore, we have created an extended library of mass spectra of MTBSTFA derivatized compounds of interest, considering their potential occurrence in Mars soils. We then looked specifically for MTBSTFA derivatized compounds using the existing and the newly created library, in various Mars analog soils. To enable a more accurate interpretation of the in situ derivatization GC-MS results that will be obtained by SAM, the lab experiments were performed as close as possible to the SAM flight instrument experimental conditions. Our first derivatization experiments display promising results, the laboratory system permitting an extraction and detection

  13. Evidence for Smectite Clays from MSL SAM Analyses of Mudstone at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdam, A.; Franz, H.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Stern, J. C.; Brunner, A.; Sutter, B.; Archer, P. D.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Atreya, S. K.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    Drilled samples of mudstone from the Sheepbed unit at Yellowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL instruments including the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments in MSL's Analytical Laboratory. CheMin analyses revealed the first in situ X-ray diffraction based evidence of clay minerals on Mars, which are likely trioctahedral smectites (e.g., saponite) and comprise ~20% of the mudstone sample (e.g., Bristow et al., this meeting). SAM analyses, which heated the mudstone samples to 1000oC and monitored volatiles evolved to perform in situ evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS), resulted in a H2O trace exhibiting a wide evolution at temperatures <500oC, and an evolution peak at higher temperatures near ~750oC. The low temperature H2O evolution has many potential contributors, including adsorbed H2O, smectite interlayer H2O, and structural H2O/OH from bassanite and akaganeite (identified by CheMin) and H2O/OH from amorphous phases in the sample. The high temperature H2O is consistent with the evolution of H2O from the dehydroxylation of the smectite clay mineral. Comparison to EGA-MS data collected under SAM-like conditions on a variety of clay mineral reference materials indicate that a trioctahedral smectite, such as saponite, is most consistent with the high temperature H2O evolution observed. There may also be SAM EGA-MS evidence for a small high temperature H2O evolution from scoop samples from the Yellowknife Bay Rocknest sand shadow bedform. As in the mudstone samples, this evolution may indicate the detection of smectite clays, and the idea that minor clays may be present in Rocknest materials that could be expected to be at least partially derived from local sources is reasonable. But, because smectite clays were not definitively observed in CheMin analyses of Rocknest materials, they must be present at much lower abundances than the ~20% observed in the mudstone samples. This potential detection underscores the

  14. Evidence for Smectite Clays from MSL SAM Analyses of Mudstone at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, Amy; Franz, Heather; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Brunner, Anna; Archer, Paul Douglas; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Atreya, Sushil K.

    2013-01-01

    Drilled samples of mudstone from the Sheepbed unit at Yellowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL instruments including the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments in MSL's Analytical Laboratory. CheMin analyses revealed the first in situ X-ray diffraction based evidence of clay minerals on Mars, which are likely trioctahedral smectites (e.g., saponite) and comprise approx 20% of the mudstone sample (e.g., Bristow et al., this meeting). SAM analyses, which heated the mudstone samples to 1000 C and monitored volatiles evolved to perform in situ evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS), resulted in a H2O trace exhibiting a wide evolution at temperatures < 500 C, and an evolution peak at higher temperatures near approx 750 C. The low temperature H2O evolution has many potential contributors, including adsorbed H2O, smectite interlayer H2O, and structural H2O/OH from bassanite and akaganeite (identified by CheMin) and H2O/OH from amorphous phases in the sample. The high temperature H2O is consistent with the evolution of H2O from the dehydroxylation of the smectite clay mineral. Comparison to EGA-MS data collected under SAM-like conditions on a variety of clay mineral reference materials indicate that a trioctahedral smectite, such as saponite, is most consistent with the high temperature H2O evolution observed. There may also be SAM EGA-MS evidence for a small high temperature H2O evolution from scoop samples from the Yellowknife Bay Rocknest sand shadow bedform. As in the mudstone samples, this evolution may indicate the detection of smectite clays, and the idea that minor clays may be present in Rocknest materials that could be expected to be at least partially derived from local sources is reasonable. But, because smectite clays were not definitively observed in CheMin analyses of Rocknest materials, they must be present at much lower abundances than the approx 20% observed in the mudstone samples. This potential detection

  15. The Acoustical Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melissa

    Asserting that without an adequate acoustical environment, learning activities can be hindered, this paper reviews the literature on classroom acoustics, particularly noise, reverberation, signal-to-noise ratio, task performance, and recommendations for improvement. Through this review, the paper seeks to determine whether portable classrooms…

  16. Cystic acoustic schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, P; Missori, P; Mastronardi, L; Fortuna, A

    1991-01-01

    Three cases with large space-occupying cysts in the cerebellopontine angle are reported. CT and MRI findings were not typical for acoustic schwannomas but at operation, besides the large cysts, small acoustic schwannomas could be detected and removed. The clinical and neuroradiological features of this unusual variety and the CT and MRI differential diagnosis of cerebellopontine angle lesions are discussed.

  17. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  18. Acoustic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic levitation system is described, with single acoustic source and a small reflector to stably levitate a small object while the object is processed as by coating or heating it. The system includes a concave acoustic source which has locations on opposite sides of its axis that vibrate towards and away from a focal point to generate a converging acoustic field. A small reflector is located near the focal point, and preferably slightly beyond it, to create an intense acoustic field that stably supports a small object near the reflector. The reflector is located about one-half wavelength from the focal point and is concavely curved to a radius of curvature (L) of about one-half the wavelength, to stably support an object one-quarter wavelength (N) from the reflector.

  19. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  20. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  1. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  2. Direct Field Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Paul; Goldstein, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the methods and procedures used in Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT). The paper will discuss some of the recent techniques and developments that are currently being used and the future publication of a reference standard. Acoustic testing using commercial sound system components is becoming a popular and cost effective way of generating a required acoustic test environment both in and out of a reverberant chamber. This paper will present the DFAT test method, the usual setup and procedure and the development and use of a closed-loop, narrow-band control system. Narrow-band control of the acoustic PSD allows all standard techniques and procedures currently used in random control to be applied to acoustics and some examples are given. The paper will conclude with a summary of the development of a standard practice guideline that is hoped to be available in the first quarter of next year.

  3. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-03-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  4. Dictionary of Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Julian

    2005-10-01

    The past decade has seen huge advances in the application of microscopy in all areas of science. This welcome development in microscopy has been paralleled by an expansion of the vocabulary of technical terms used in microscopy: terms have been coined for new instruments and techniques and, as microscopes reach even higher resolution, the use of terms that relate to the optical and physical principles underpinning microscopy is now commonplace. The Dictionary of Microscopy was compiled to meet this challenge and provides concise definitions of over 2,500 terms used in the fields of light microscopy, electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, x-ray microscopy and related techniques. Written by Dr Julian P. Heath, Editor of Microscopy and Analysis, the dictionary is intended to provide easy navigation through the microscopy terminology and to be a first point of reference for definitions of new and established terms. The Dictionary of Microscopy is an essential, accessible resource for: students who are new to the field and are learning about microscopes equipment purchasers who want an explanation of the terms used in manufacturers' literature scientists who are considering using a new microscopical technique experienced microscopists as an aide mémoire or quick source of reference librarians, the press and marketing personnel who require definitions for technical reports.

  5. Influence of chain ordering on frictional properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) in nano-lubrication.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hefa; Hu, Yuanan

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion of organic films to substrates is important in applications that involve solid surfaces in sliding contact. Although the thickness of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is only a few nanometers, they can drastically modify the frictional properties of the underlying substrate, and thus have great potential for serving as boundary lubricants on micro- and nano-scales. This review focuses on the relationship between the structural and compositional properties of SAMs and their frictional response. Adhesion of SAMs to the substrate surface usually occurs through chemisorption of the head groups on the constituent molecules, with molecular interactions such as van der Waals interactions playing important roles in organizing the molecules into surface films, and in controlling their tribological behavior. The durability and wear resistance of SAMs depend on the nature and strength of the binding forces between the head groups and the substrate surfaces, while the adhesion and friction forces are strongly influenced by the interactions of the terminal groups with the counterfaces. Results from both experimental measurements and molecular dynamics simulations consistently indicate that structural ordering of alkyl chains in SAMs reduces their frictional response, and that SAMs formed by molecules with alkyl chains longer than 8 to 10 methylene units are well organized, exhibiting low levels of friction. Less densely packed or more disordered monolayers inherently possess greater numbers of conformational defects at room temperature and present lower barriers to defect creation under the action of a contacting surface, and thus exhibit higher friction. Cross-linking of the spacer chains can reduce the frictional response of disordered films by increasing the chain ordering, but has little impact on SAMs that are already well ordered. On the other hand, introduction of sterically demanding terminal groups and dissimilar molecules reduces molecular ordering in SAMs

  6. Loving Sam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasky, Kathryn

    1998-01-01

    Describes how the author came to love Mark Twain's writings, taught "Huckleberry Finn" and other of Twain's writings to a ninth-grade class in a Hasidic Jewish Academy, and learned to really love Samuel Clemens. Describes how this love inspired the author to write two books celebrating what she has valued most in 40 years of reading Mark…

  7. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  8. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  9. Acoustic sniper localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  10. Probing confined acoustic phonons in free standing small gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mankad, Venu; Jha, Prafulla K.; Ravindran, T. R.

    2013-02-21

    Polarized and depolarized spectra from gold (Au) nanoparticles of different sizes are investigated in the small size range, between 3 and 7 nm, using low frequency Raman spectroscopy. Acoustic vibrations of the free-standing Au nanoparticles are demonstrated with frequencies ranging from 5 to 35 cm{sup -1}, opening the way to the development of the acoustic resonators. A blue shift in the phonon peaks along with the broadening is observed with a decrease in particle size. Comparison of the measured frequencies with vibrational dynamics calculation and an examination as from the transmission electron microscopy results ascertain that the low frequency phonon modes are due to acoustic phonon quantization. Our results show that the observed low frequency Raman scattering originates from the spherical (l = 0) and quadrupolar (l = 2) vibrations of the spheroidal mode due to plasmon mediated acoustic vibrations in Au nanoparticles.

  11. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. Rameez; Yao, Junjie; Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    pH is a tightly regulated indicator of metabolic activity. In mammalian systems, imbalance of pH regulation may result from or result in serious illness. Even though the regulation system of pH is very robust, tissue pH can be altered in many diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus. Traditional high-resolution optical imaging techniques, such as confocal microscopy, routinely image pH in cells and tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent dyes, which change their fluorescence properties with the surrounding pH. Since strong optical scattering in biological tissue blurs images at greater depths, high-resolution pH imaging is limited to penetration depths of 1mm. Here, we report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of commercially available pH-sensitive fluorescent dye in tissue phantoms. Using both opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we explored the possibility of recovering the pH values in tissue phantoms. In this paper, we demonstrate that PAM was capable of recovering pH values up to a depth of 2 mm, greater than possible with other forms of optical microscopy.

  12. Evidence for Perchlorates and the Origin of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons Detected by SAM at the Rocknest Aeolian Deposit in Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Freissinet, Caroline; Miller, Kristen E.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brunner, Anna E.; Buch, Arnaud; Sutter, Brad; Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cabane, Michael; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela G.; Coscia, David; Dworkin, Jason P.; Franz, Heather B.; Grotzinger, John P.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Martin, Mildred G.; McKay, Christopher; Ming, Douglas W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Pavlov, Alexander; Steele, Andrew; Summons, Roger E.; Szopa, Cyril; Teinturier, Samuel; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Four individual sample portions from a single scoop of the Rocknest aeolian deposit were sieved ( 150 m) and delivered to the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument by the Mars Science Laboratory rover's sample acquisition system. The samples were analyzed separately by the SAM pyrolysis evolved gas and gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis modes. Several chlorinated hydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, a chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene were identified by SAM above background levels with abundances of 0.01 to 2.3 nanomole.The evolution of the chloromethanes observed during pyrolysis is coincident with the increase in O2 released from the Rocknest sample and the decomposition of a product of N-methyl-N- (tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a chemical that leaked from a derivatization cup inside SAM.The best candidate for the oxychloride phase in Rocknest is a hydrated calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2nH2O), based on the temperature release of O2 that correlates with the release of the chlorinated species measured by SAM, although other chlorine bearing phases are being considered. Laboratory pyrolysis experiments suggest that reaction of martian chlorine with organic carbon from MTBSTFA can explain the presence of the chloromethanes and a chloromethylpropene also detected by SAM.However, we cannot exclude the possibility that traces of organic carbon of either martian or exogenous origin contributed to some of the chloromethanes measured by SAM. Although the alteration history and exposure age of the Rocknest deposit is unknown, it is possible that oxidative degradation of complex organic matter by ionizing radiation or other chemical processes in Rocknest has occurred.

  13. Plasmids in different strains of Streptomyces ambofaciens: free and integrated form of plasmid pSAM2.

    PubMed

    Pernodet, J L; Simonet, J M; Guérineau, M

    1984-01-01

    Five strains of Streptomyces ambofaciens were examined for their plasmid content. Among these strains, four belong to the same lineage (strains B) and the other was isolated independently (strain A). A large plasmid (ca. 80 kb), called pSAM1 in this paper and already described, was present in all B strains, and absent in strain A. A second plasmid, not described before, was found as covalently closed circular DNA in two of the four B strains. This plasmid with a size of 11.1 kb was called pSAM2. A restriction map for 14 enzymes was established. Hybridization experiments showed that a unique sequence homologous to this plasmid is integrated in a larger replicon, which is not pSAM1 and is probably the chromosome, in all B strains and not in strain A. It seems probable that the integrated sequence is the origin of the free plasmid found in two strains of the B family. It is noteworthy that the integrated form and the free plasmid may be found together. Transformation experiments proved that pSAM2 may be maintained autonomously in S. ambofaciens strain A and in S. lividans. pSAM2 is a self-transmissible plasmid, able to elicit the lethal zygosis reaction. pSAM2 was compared to the plasmids SLP1, pIJ110 and pIJ408, which all come from integrated sequences in three Streptomyces species and are found as autonomous plasmids after transfer to S. lividans. If pSAM2 resembles these plasmids in its origin, it does not appear to be related directly to them. Concerning their plasmid content, the two isolates of S. ambofaciens are very different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. The room acoustic rendering equation.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Lokki, Tapio; Kiminki, Sami; Savioja, Lauri

    2007-09-01

    An integral equation generalizing a variety of known geometrical room acoustics modeling algorithms is presented. The formulation of the room acoustic rendering equation is adopted from computer graphics. Based on the room acoustic rendering equation, an acoustic radiance transfer method, which can handle both diffuse and nondiffuse reflections, is derived. In a case study, the method is used to predict several acoustic parameters of a room model. The results are compared to measured data of the actual room and to the results given by other acoustics prediction software. It is concluded that the method can predict most acoustic parameters reliably and provides results as accurate as current commercial room acoustic prediction software. Although the presented acoustic radiance transfer method relies on geometrical acoustics, it can be extended to model diffraction and transmission through materials in future.

  15. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  16. Acoustic well cleaner

    DOEpatents

    Maki, Jr., Voldi E.; Sharma, Mukul M.

    1997-01-21

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

  17. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  18. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  19. Genome Mining for Radical SAM Protein Determinants Reveals Multiple Sactibiotic-Like Gene Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Kiera; O'Sullivan, Orla; Rea, Mary C.; Cotter, Paul D.; Ross, R. Paul; Hill, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Thuricin CD is a two-component bacteriocin produced by Bacillus thuringiensis that kills a wide range of clinically significant Clostridium difficile. This bacteriocin has recently been characterized and consists of two distinct peptides, Trnβ and Trnα, which both possess 3 intrapeptide sulphur to α-carbon bridges and act synergistically. Indeed, thuricin CD and subtilosin A are the only antimicrobials known to possess these unusual structures and are known as the sactibiotics (sulplur to alpha carbon-containing antibiotics). Analysis of the thuricin CD-associated gene cluster revealed the presence of genes encoding two highly unusual SAM proteins (TrnC and TrnD) which are proposed to be responsible for these unusual post-translational modifications. On the basis of the frequently high conservation among enzymes responsible for the post-translational modification of specific antimicrobials, we performed an in silico screen for novel thuricin CD–like gene clusters using the TrnC and TrnD radical SAM proteins as driver sequences to perform an initial homology search against the complete non-redundant database. Fifteen novel thuricin CD–like gene clusters were identified, based on the presence of TrnC and TrnD homologues in the context of neighbouring genes encoding potential bacteriocin structural peptides. Moreover, metagenomic analysis revealed that TrnC or TrnD homologs are present in a variety of metagenomic environments, suggesting a widespread distribution of thuricin-like operons in a variety of environments. In-silico analysis of radical SAM proteins is sufficient to identify novel putative sactibiotic clusters. PMID:21760885

  20. Forest Classification Accuracy as Influenced by Multispectral Scanner Spatial Resolution. [Sam Houston National Forest, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalepka, R. F. (Principal Investigator); Sadowski, F. E.; Sarno, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A supervised classification within two separate ground areas of the Sam Houston National Forest was carried out for two sq meters spatial resolution MSS data. Data were progressively coarsened to simulate five additional cases of spatial resolution ranging up to 64 sq meters. Similar processing and analysis of all spatial resolutions enabled evaluations of the effect of spatial resolution on classification accuracy for various levels of detail and the effects on area proportion estimation for very general forest features. For very coarse resolutions, a subset of spectral channels which simulated the proposed thematic mapper channels was used to study classification accuracy.

  1. A RubisCO like protein links SAM metabolism with isoprenoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Tobias J.; Evans, Bradley S.; Cho, Kyuil; Warlick, Benjamin P.; Sriram, Jaya; Wood, B. McKay; Imker, Heidi J.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Tabita, F. Robert; Gerlt, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Functional assignment of uncharacterized proteins is a challenge in the era of large-scale genome sequencing. Here, we combine in extracto-NMR, proteomics, and transcriptomics with a newly developed (knock-out) metabolomics platform to determine a potential physiological role for a ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO)-like protein (RLP) from Rhodospirillum rubrum. Our studies unravelled an unexpected link in bacterial central carbon metabolism between S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent polyamine metabolism and isoprenoid biosynthesis and also provide an alternative approach to assign enzyme function at the organismic level. PMID:23042035

  2. [Research on identification of cabbages and weeds combining spectral imaging technology and SAM taxonomy].

    PubMed

    Zu, Qin; Zhang, Shui-fa; Cao, Yang; Zhao, Hui-yi; Dang, Chang-qing

    2015-02-01

    Weeds automatic identification is the key technique and also the bottleneck for implementation of variable spraying and precision pesticide. Therefore, accurate, rapid and non-destructive automatic identification of weeds has become a very important research direction for precision agriculture. Hyperspectral imaging system was used to capture the hyperspectral images of cabbage seedlings and five kinds of weeds such as pigweed, barnyard grass, goosegrass, crabgrass and setaria with the wavelength ranging from 1000 to 2500 nm. In ENVI, by utilizing the MNF rotation to implement the noise reduction and de-correlation of hyperspectral data and reduce the band dimensions from 256 to 11, and extracting the region of interest to get the spectral library as standard spectra, finally, using the SAM taxonomy to identify cabbages and weeds, the classification effect was good when the spectral angle threshold was set as 0. 1 radians. In HSI Analyzer, after selecting the training pixels to obtain the standard spectrum, the SAM taxonomy was used to distinguish weeds from cabbages. Furthermore, in order to measure the recognition accuracy of weeds quantificationally, the statistical data of the weeds and non-weeds were obtained by comparing the SAM classification image with the best classification effects to the manual classification image. The experimental results demonstrated that, when the parameters were set as 5-point smoothing, 0-order derivative and 7-degree spectral angle, the best classification result was acquired and the recognition rate of weeds, non-weeds and overall samples was 80%, 97.3% and 96.8% respectively. The method that combined the spectral imaging technology and the SAM taxonomy together took full advantage of fusion information of spectrum and image. By applying the spatial classification algorithms to establishing training sets for spectral identification, checking the similarity among spectral vectors in the pixel level, integrating the advantages of

  3. Possible Detection of Perchlorates by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument: Comparison with Previous Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro-Gonzalex, Rafael; Sutter, Brad; Archer, Doug; Ming, Doug; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Franz, Heather; Glavin, Daniel; McAdam, Amy; Stern, Jennifer; McKay, Christopher; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Mahaffy, Paul; Conrad, Pamela; Martin-Torres, Francisco; Zorzano-Mier, Maria; Grotzinger, John

    2013-01-01

    The first chemical analysis of soluble salts in the soil was carried out by the Phoenix Lander in the Martian Arctic [1]. Surprisingly, chlorine was present as magnesium or calcium perchlorate at 0.4 to 0.6 percent. Additional support for the identification of perchlorate came from the evolved gas analysis which detected the release of molecular oxygen at 350-550C [1]. When Mars-like soils from the Atacama Desert were spiked with magnesium perchlorate (1 percent) and heated using the Viking GC-MS protocol, nearly all the organics were combusted but a small amount was chlorinated, forming chloromethane and dichloromethane [2]. These chlorohydrocarbons were detected by the Viking GC-MS experiments when the Martian soil was analyzed but they were considered to be terrestrial contaminants [3]. Reinterpretation of the Viking results suggests <0.1 percent perchlorate and ppm levels of organic carbon at landing site 1 and 2 [2]. The suggestion of perchlorate in the Viking sites [2] has been challenged on the grounds that the detected compounds (CH3Cl and CH2Cl2) were carried from Earth [4]. Recently the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) ran four samples from an aeolian bedform named Rocknest. The samples analyzed were portioned from the fifth scoop at this location. The samples were heated to 835C at 35C/min with a He flow. The SAM QMS detected a major oxygen release (300-500C) [5], coupled with the release of chlorinated hydrocarbons (chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, and chloromethylpropene) detected both by SAM QMS and GC-MS derived from known Earth organic contaminants in the instrument [6]. Calcium perchlorate appears to be the best candidate for evolved O2 in the Rocknest samples at this time but other Cl species (e.g., chlorates) are possible and must be evaluated. The potential detection of perchlorates in Rocknest material adds weight to the argument that both Viking Landers measured signatures of

  4. Atomistic characterization of SAM coatings as gate insulators in Si-based FET devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gala, F.; Zollo, G.

    2014-06-19

    Many nano-material systems are currently under consideration as possible candidates for gate dielectric insulators in both metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOSFET) and organic (OFET) field-effect transistors. In this contribution, the possibility of employing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of hydroxylated octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) chains on a (111) Si substrate as gate dielectrics is discussed; in particular ab initio theoretical simulations have been employed to study the structural properties, work function modifications, and the insulating properties of OTS thin film coatings on Si substrates.

  5. P-SAMS: a web site for plant artificial microRNA and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNA design

    PubMed Central

    Fahlgren, Noah; Hill, Steven T.; Carrington, James C.; Carbonell, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The Plant Small RNA Maker Site (P-SAMS) is a web tool for the simple and automated design of artificial miRNAs (amiRNAs) and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNAs (syn-tasiRNAs) for efficient and specific targeted gene silencing in plants. P-SAMS includes two applications, P-SAMS amiRNA Designer and P-SAMS syn-tasiRNA Designer. The navigation through both applications is wizard-assisted, and the job runtime is relatively short. Both applications output the sequence of designed small RNA(s), and the sequence of the two oligonucleotides required for cloning into ‘B/c’ compatible vectors. Availability and implementation: The P-SAMS website is available at http://p-sams.carringtonlab.org. Contact: acarbonell@ibmcp.upv.es or nfahlgren@danforthcenter.org PMID:26382195

  6. Acoustic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  7. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  8. Acoustic borehole logging

    SciTech Connect

    Medlin, W.L.; Manzi, S.J.

    1990-10-09

    This patent describes an acoustic borehole logging method. It comprises traversing a borehole with a borehole logging tool containing a transmitter of acoustic energy having a free-field frequency spectrum with at least one characteristic resonant frequency of vibration and spaced-apart receiver, repeatedly exciting the transmitter with a swept frequency tone burst of a duration sufficiently greater than the travel time of acoustic energy between the transmitter and the receiver to allow borehole cavity resonances to be established within the borehole cavity formed between the borehole logging tool and the borehole wall, detecting acoustic energy amplitude modulated by the borehole cavity resonances with the spaced-apart receiver, and recording an amplitude verses frequency output of the receiver in correlation with depth as a log of the borehole frequency spectrum representative of the subsurface formation comprising the borehole wall.

  9. Acoustic imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Tool detects noise sources by scanning sound "scene" and displaying relative location of noise-producing elements in area. System consists of ellipsoidal acoustic mirror and microphone and a display device.

  10. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  11. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  12. Acoustic bubble traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Reinhard; Kurz, Thomas; Lauterborn, Werner

    2000-07-01

    A small, oscillating bubble in a liquid can be trapped in the antinode of an acoustic standing wave field. Bubble stability is required for the study of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). The properties of the acoustic resonator are essential for the stable trapping of sonoluminescing bubbles. Resonators can be chosen according to the intended application: size and geometry can be varied in a wide range. In this work, the acoustic responses of different resonators were measured by means of holographic interferometry, hydrophones and a laser vibrometer. Also, high-speed photography was used to observe the bubble dynamics. Several single, stable sonoluminescent bubbles were trapped simultaneously within an acoustic resonator in the pressure antinodes of a higher harmonic mode (few bubble sonoluminescence, FBSL).

  13. Department of Cybernetic Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The development of the theory, instrumentation and applications of methods and systems for the measurement, analysis, processing and synthesis of acoustic signals within the audio frequency range, particularly of the speech signal and the vibro-acoustic signal emitted by technical and industrial equipments treated as noise and vibration sources was discussed. The research work, both theoretical and experimental, aims at applications in various branches of science, and medicine, such as: acoustical diagnostics and phoniatric rehabilitation of pathological and postoperative states of the speech organ; bilateral ""man-machine'' speech communication based on the analysis, recognition and synthesis of the speech signal; vibro-acoustical diagnostics and continuous monitoring of the state of machines, technical equipments and technological processes.

  14. Basic Linear Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Alan D.

    This chapter deals with the physical and mathematical aspects of sound when the disturbances are, in some sense, small. Acoustics is usually concerned with small-amplitude phenomena, and consequently a linear description is usually acoustics applicable. Disturbances are governed by the properties of the medium in which they occur, and the governing equations are the equations of continuum mechanics, which apply equally to gases, liquids, and solids. These include the mass, momentum, and energy equations, as well as thermodynamic principles. The viscosity and thermal conduction enter into the versions of these equations that apply to fluids. Fluids of typical great interest are air and sea water, and consequently this chapter includes a summary of their relevant acoustic properties. The foundation is also laid for the consideration of acoustic waves in elastic solids, suspensions, bubbly liquids, and porous media.

  15. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  16. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... this sponsor... Platinum Sponsor More from this sponsor... Gold Sponsor University of Colorado Acoustic Neuroma Program Rocky Mountain Gamma Knife Center More from this sponsor... Gold Sponsor NYU Langone Medical Center Departments of Neurosurgery ...

  17. Mitochondrial Sorting and Assembly Machinery Subunit Sam37 in Candida albicans: Insight into the Roles of Mitochondria in Fitness, Cell Wall Integrity, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yue; Jelicic, Branka; Pettolino, Filomena; Perry, Andrew; Lo, Tricia L.; Hewitt, Victoria L.; Bantun, Farkad; Beilharz, Traude H.; Peleg, Anton Y.; Lithgow, Trevor; Djordjevic, Julianne T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that mitochondrial functions impinge on cell wall integrity, drug tolerance, and virulence of human fungal pathogens. However, the mechanistic aspects of these processes are poorly understood. We focused on the mitochondrial outer membrane SAM (Sorting and Assembly Machinery) complex subunit Sam37 in Candida albicans. Inactivation of SAM37 in C. albicans leads to a large reduction in fitness, a phenotype not conserved with the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our data indicate that slow growth of the sam37ΔΔ mutant results from mitochondrial DNA loss, a new function for Sam37 in C. albicans, and from reduced activity of the essential SAM complex subunit Sam35. The sam37ΔΔ mutant was hypersensitive to drugs that target the cell wall and displayed altered cell wall structure, supporting a role for Sam37 in cell wall integrity in C. albicans. The sensitivity of the mutant to membrane-targeting antifungals was not significantly altered. The sam37ΔΔ mutant was avirulent in the mouse model, and bioinformatics showed that the fungal Sam37 proteins are distant from their animal counterparts and could thus represent potential drug targets. Our study provides the first direct evidence for a link between mitochondrial function and cell wall integrity in C. albicans and is further relevant for understanding mitochondrial function in fitness, antifungal drug tolerance, and virulence of this major pathogen. Beyond the relevance to fungal pathogenesis, this work also provides new insight into the mitochondrial and cellular roles of the SAM complex in fungi. PMID:22286093

  18. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-11-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell’s law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  19. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-11-24

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  20. Structural insights into recognition and repair of UV-DNA damage by Spore Photoproduct Lyase, a radical SAM enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Benjdia, Alhosna; Heil, Korbinian; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Carell, Thomas; Schlichting, Ilme

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial spores possess an enormous resistance to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. This is largely due to a unique DNA repair enzyme, Spore Photoproduct Lyase (SP lyase) that repairs a specific UV-induced DNA lesion, the spore photoproduct (SP), through an unprecedented radical-based mechanism. Unlike DNA photolyases, SP lyase belongs to the emerging superfamily of radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes and uses a [4Fe–4S]1+ cluster and SAM to initiate the repair reaction. We report here the first crystal structure of this enigmatic enzyme in complex with its [4Fe–4S] cluster and its SAM cofactor, in the absence and presence of a DNA lesion, the dinucleoside SP. The high resolution structures provide fundamental insights into the active site, the DNA lesion recognition and binding which involve a β-hairpin structure. We show that SAM and a conserved cysteine residue are perfectly positioned in the active site for hydrogen atom abstraction from the dihydrothymine residue of the lesion and donation to the α-thyminyl radical moiety, respectively. Based on structural and biochemical characterizations of mutant proteins, we substantiate the role of this cysteine in the enzymatic mechanism. Our structure reveals how SP lyase combines specific features of radical SAM and DNA repair enzymes to enable a complex radical-based repair reaction to take place. PMID:22761404

  1. Ocean Acoustic Observatory Federation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    J., C. G. Fox, and F. K. Duennebier, Hydroacoustic detection of submarine landslides on Kilauea volcano , Geophys. Res. Lett., vol. 28, 1811-1814...acoustic tomography experiments in the vicinity of coastal North America, • Monitor, in real time, marine mammals, earthquakes and volcanoes in the...distances, coastal tomography and thermometry, and earthquakes and volcanoes in the northern Pacific. APPROACH The members of the Ocean Acoustic

  2. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  3. The neonatal acoustic reflex.

    PubMed

    Weatherby, L A; Bennett, M J

    1980-01-01

    Probe tones from 220 Hz to 2 000 Hz were used to measure the static and dynamic acoustic impedance of 44 neonates. Acoustic reflex thresholds to broad band noise were obtained from every neonate tested when employing the higher frequency probe tones. The reflex threshold levels measured are similar to those of adults. The static impedance values are discussed to give a possible explanation of why reflex thresholds cannot be detected using conventional 220 Hz impedance bridges.

  4. Directional Acoustic Density Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-13

    fluctuations of fluid density at a point . (2) DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART [0004] Conventional vector sensors measure particle velocity, v (vx,Vytvz...dipole-type or first order sensor that is realized by measuring particle velocity at a point , (which is the vector sensor sensing approach for...underwater sensors), or by measuring the gradient of the acoustic pressure at two closely spaced (less than the wavelength of an acoustic wave) points as it

  5. Low Frequency Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    with NOAA , ONR is providing technical services that will help establish a baseline for assessment of long- term VLF acoustic trends in selected...ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 sponsored by NOAA , was added to the...with NOAA (NMFS) and other parties has dealt with ocean acoustics related to issues stimulated by the Marine Mammal Protection Act. A focal point has

  6. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  7. Axial Plane Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin; Wong, Zi Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We present axial plane optical microscopy (APOM) that can, in contrast to conventional microscopy, directly image a sample's cross-section parallel to the optical axis of an objective lens without scanning. APOM combined with conventional microscopy simultaneously provides two orthogonal images of a 3D sample. More importantly, APOM uses only a single lens near the sample to achieve selective-plane illumination microscopy, as we demonstrated by three-dimensional (3D) imaging of fluorescent pollens and brain slices. This technique allows fast, high-contrast, and convenient 3D imaging of structures that are hundreds of microns beneath the surfaces of large biological tissues. PMID:25434770

  8. Light sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Mickoleit, Michaela; Huisken, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This chapter introduces the concept of light sheet microscopy along with practical advice on how to design and build such an instrument. Selective plane illumination microscopy is presented as an alternative to confocal microscopy due to several superior features such as high-speed full-frame acquisition, minimal phototoxicity, and multiview sample rotation. Based on our experience over the last 10 years, we summarize the key concepts in light sheet microscopy, typical implementations, and successful applications. In particular, sample mounting for long time-lapse imaging and the resulting challenges in data processing are discussed in detail.

  9. Evolved Gas Analyses of the Murray Formation in Gale Crater, Mars: Results of the Curiosity Rover's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; McAdam, A. C.; Rampe, E. B.; Thompson, L. M.; Ming, D. W.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Stern, J. C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Archer, P. D.

    2017-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument aboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover has analyzed 13 samples from Gale Crater. All SAM-evolved gas analyses have yielded a multitude of volatiles (e.g., H2O, SO2, H2S, CO2, CO, NO, O2, HCl) [1- 6]. The objectives of this work are to 1) Characterize recent evolved SO2, CO2, O2, and NO gas traces of the Murray formation mudstone, 2) Constrain sediment mineralogy/composition based on SAM evolved gas analysis (SAM-EGA), and 3) Discuss the implications of these results relative to understanding the geological history of Gale Crater.

  10. Two Fe-S clusters catalyse sulfur insertion by Radical-SAM methylthiotransferases

    PubMed Central

    Forouhar, Farhad; Arragain, Simon; Atta, Mohamed; Gambarelli, Serge; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Hussain, Munif; Xiao, Rong; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Acton, Thomas B.; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2014-01-01

    How living organisms create carbon-sulfur bonds during biosynthesis of critical sulphur-containing compounds is still poorly understood. The methylthiotransferases MiaB and RimO catalyze sulfur insertion into tRNAs and ribosomal protein S12, respectively. Both belong to a sub-group of Radical-SAM enzymes that bear two [4Fe-4S] clusters. One cluster binds S-Adenosylmethionine and generates an Ado• radical via a well- established mechanism. However, the precise role of the second cluster is unclear. For some sulfur-inserting Radical-SAM enzymes, this cluster has been proposed to act as a sacrificial source of sulfur for the reaction. In this paper, we report parallel enzymological, spectroscopic and crystallographic investigations of RimO and MiaB, which provide the first evidence that these enzymes are true catalysts and support a new sulfation mechanism involving activation of an exogenous sulfur co-substrate at an exchangeable coordination site on the second cluster, which remains intact during the reaction. PMID:23542644

  11. Absence of molecular slip on ultraclean and SAM-coated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, Justin; Wood, Clay; Burton, Justin

    2016-11-01

    The liquid/solid boundary condition is a complex problem that is becoming increasingly important for the development of nanoscale fluidic devices. Many groups have now measured slip near an interface at nanoscale dimensions using a variety of experimental techniques. In simple systems, large slip lengths are generally measured for non-wetting liquid/solid combinations, but many conflicting measurements and interpretations remain. We have developed a novel pseudo-differential technique using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to measure slip lengths on various surfaces. A drop of one liquid is grown on the QCM in the presence of a second, ambient liquid. We have isolated any anomalous boundary effects such as interfacial slip by choosing two liquids which have identical bulk effects on the QCM frequency and dissipation in the presence of no-slip. Slip lengths are -less than 2 nm- for water (relative to undecane) on all surfaces measured, including plasma cleaned gold, SiO2, and two different self assembled monolayers (SAMs), regardless of contact angle. We also find that surface cleanliness is crucial to accurately measure slip lengths. Additionally, clean glass substrates appear to have a significant adsorbed water layer and SAM surfaces show excess dissipation, possibly associated with contact line motion. In addition to investigating other liquid pairs, future work will include extending this technique to surfaces with independently controllable chemistry and roughness, both of which are known to strongly affect interfacial hydrodynamics.

  12. Unliganded EphA3 dimerization promoted by the SAM domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristova, Kalina; Singh, Deo; King, Christopher; Ahmed, Fozia; Pasquale, Elena

    The EphA3 receptor tyrosine kinase regulates morphogenesis during development, and is overexpressed and mutated in a variety of cancers. EphA3 activation is believed to follow a ``seeding mechanism'' model, in which ligand binding to the monomeric receptor acts as a trigger for signal-productive receptor clustering. We use a novel approach to study EphA3 lateral interactions on the surface of live cells, and we demonstrate that EphA3 forms dimers in the absence of ligand binding. We further show that these dimers are stabilized by interactions involving the EphA3 SAM domain. The discovery of unliganded EphA3 dimers challenges the current understanding of the chain of EphA3 activation events, and suggests that EphA3 may follow the ``pre-formed dimer'' model of activation known to be relevant for other receptor tyrosine kinases. This work also establishes a new role for the SAM domain in promoting Eph receptor lateral interactions and signaling on the cell surface.

  13. αβ'-NAC cooperates with Sam37 to mediate early stages of mitochondrial protein import.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Rojas, José Carlos; Avendaño-Monsalve, Maria Clara; Yañez-Falcón, Armando Roberto; Jaimes-Miranda, Fabiola; Garay, Erika; Torres-Quiroz, Francisco; DeLuna, Alexander; Funes, Soledad

    2017-03-01

    The mitochondrial proteome is mostly composed of nuclear-encoded proteins. Such polypeptides are synthesized with signals that guide their intracellular transport to the surface of the organelle and later within the different mitochondrial subcompartments until they reach their functional destination. It has been suggested that the nascent-polypeptide associated complex (NAC) - a cytosolic chaperone that recognizes nascent chains on translationally active ribosomes - has a role in the import of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the NAC-mediated cotranslational import are still not clear. Here, we show that a particular NAC heterodimer formed by subunits α and β' in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is specifically involved in the process of mitochondrial import and functionally cooperates with Sam37, an outer membrane protein subunit of the sorting and assembly machinery complex. Mutants in both components display growth defects, incorrectly accumulate precursor forms of mitochondrial proteins in the cytosol, and have an altered mitochondrial protein content. We propose that αβ'-NAC and Sam37 are members of the system that recognizes mitochondrial proteins at early stages of their synthesis, escorting them to the import machinery of mitochondria.

  14. Superhydrophobic SAM Modified Electrodes for Enhanced Current Limiting Properties in Intrinsic Conducting Polymer Surge Protection Devices.

    PubMed

    Jabarullah, Noor H; Verrelli, Emanuele; Mauldin, Clayton; Navarro, Luis A; Golden, Josh H; Madianos, Leonidas M; Kemp, Neil T

    2015-06-09

    Surface interface engineering using superhydrophobic gold electrodes made with 1-dodecanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) has been used to enhance the current limiting properties of novel surge protection devices based on the intrinsic conducting polymer, polyaniline doped with methanesulfonic acid. The resulting devices show significantly enhanced current limiting characteristics, including current saturation, foldback, and negative differential effects. We show how SAM modification changes the morphology of the polymer film directly adjacent to the electrodes, leading to the formation of an interfacial compact thin film that lowers the contact resistance at the Au-polymer interface. We attribute the enhanced current limiting properties of the devices to a combination of lower contact resistance and increased Joule heating within this interface region which during a current surge produces a current blocking resistive barrier due to a thermally induced dedoping effect caused by the rapid diffusion of moisture away from this region. The effect is exacerbated at higher applied voltages as the higher temperature leads to stronger depletion of charge carriers in this region, resulting in a negative differential resistance effect.

  15. SAM 2 measurements of the polar stratospheric aerosol. Volume 9: October 1982-April 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Mcmaster, L.R.; Powell, K.A.

    1991-02-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II sensor aboard Nimbus 7 is providing 1.0 micron extinction measurements of Antarctic and Arctic stratospheric aerosols with a vertical resolution of 1 km. Representative examples and weekly averages including corresponding temperature profiles provided by NOAA for the time and place of each SAM II measurement are presented. Contours of aerosol extinction as a function of altitude and longitude or time are plotted, and aerosol optical depths are calculated for each week. Typical values of aerosol extinction and stratospheric optical depth in the Arctic are unusually large due to the presence of material from the El Chichon volcano eruption in the Spring of 1982. For example, the optical depth peaked at 0.068, more than 50 times background values. Typical values of aerosol extinction and stratospheric optical depth in the Antarctic varied considerably during this period due to the transport and arrival of the material from the El Chichon eruption. For example, the stratospheric optical depth varied from 0.002 in October 1982, to 0.021 in January 1983. Polar stratospheric clouds were observed during the Arctic winter, as expected. A representative sample is provided of the ninth 6-month period of data to be used in atmospheric and climatic studies.

  16. SALT FOG TEST OF SAM2X5 COATED STAINLESS STEEL CYLINDER

    SciTech Connect

    Aprigliano, L F; Rebak, R B; Choi, J; Lian, T; Day, S D

    2007-04-23

    A salt fog test of an iron-based amorphous metal, SAM2X5, coated Type 316L stainless steel (SS316L) cylinder was made. The cylinder was 30-inch diameter by 88-inch long, and 3/8-inch thick. One end was welded shut with a SS316L end cap before coating. The body of the cylinder and the end cap were both coated. The cylinder was coated with SAM2X5 by the HVOF thermal spray process. The coating thickness was 0.015-inch to 0.019-inch thick. The cylinder was tested in a horizontal position. Also included in the test for reference purposes were five coupons (2-inch x 2-inch x 1/8-inch) of uncoated Type 1018 carbon steel (1018CS). The test used an abbreviated form of GM 9540P. Each cycle was 6 hours in duration and the cylinder and reference samples were exposed to a total of eight cycles. The cylinder was in relatively good condition after the test. Along the body of the cylinder only two pinpoint spot sized signs of rust were seen. The 1018CS reference specimens were extensively rusted.

  17. Structure of the chromosomal insertion site for pSAM2: functional analysis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Raynal, A; Tuphile, K; Gerbaud, C; Luther, T; Guérineau, M; Pernodet, J L

    1998-04-01

    The element pSAM2 from Streptomyces ambofaciens integrates into the chromosome through site-specific recombination between the element (attP) and the chromosomal (attB) sites. These regions share an identity segment of 58bp extending from the anti-codon loop through the 3' end of a tRNA(Pro) gene. To facilitate the study of the attB site, the int and xis genes, expressed from an inducible promoter, and attP from pSAM2 were cloned on plasmids in Escherichia coil. Compatible plasmids carrying the different attB regions to be tested were introduced in these E. coli strains. Under these conditions, Int alone could promote site-specific integration; Int and Xis were both required for site-specific excision. This experimental system was used to study the sequences required in attB for efficient site-specific recombination. A 26 bp sequence, centred on the anti-codon loop region and not completely included in the identity segment, retained all the functionality of attB; shorter sequences allowed integration with lower efficiencies. By comparing the 26-bp-long attB with attP, according to the Lambda model, we propose that B and B', C and C' core-type Int binding sites consist of 9 bp imperfect inverted repeats separated by a 5 bp overlap region.

  18. Wet Chemistry on SAM: How it Helps to Detect Organics on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Freissinet, Caroline; Szopa, Cyril; Glavin, Danny; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Eigenbrode, Jen; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Stern, Jen; Coscia, David; Teinturier, Samuel; Dworkin, Jason; Mahaffy, Paul; MSL Science Team

    2013-04-01

    For the first time in the history of space exploration, a mission of interest to astrobiology could be able to analyze refractory organic compounds in the soil of Mars with wet chemistry. This analytical technique modifies organic components in such a way that improves their detection, either by releasing the compounds from sample matrices, or by changing the chemical structure to be amenable to analytical conditions. The latter effect is particularly important when polar compounds are present. Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM), on the Curiosity rover of the Mars Science Laboratory mission, onboards two wet chemistry experiments: derivatization [1-2] and thermochemolysis [3-4]. Here we report on the nature of the MTBSTFA derivatization experiment in SAM, the detection of MTBSTFA in the first SAM analyzes, and the implications of this detection. Chemical derivatization of polar molecular compounds is achieved by the MTBSTFA (N-Methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide) / DMF (Dimethylformamide) silylation reaction in order to transform refractory polar compounds into a more volatile form that can be analyzed and detected by GCMS. The first samples of Martian soil (Rocknest, Gale crater) have been analyzed by evolved gas analysis (EGA) and via GC using thermal conductivity (TCD) and MS detection. The samples have been heated up to approximately 840°C with a heating rate of 35°C/min under He flow. The evolved gas was analyzed directly by the QMS in EGA mode. For GC analyses, the majority of the gas released was trapped on a hydrocarbon trap (silica beads, Tenax TA, Carbosieve G) over a specific temperature range. Trapped volatiles were then released by heating the trap to ~300 °C and sent to the GC under He flow. The first results obtained when running an analysis with an empty cup (no solid sample) showed the presence of MTBSTFA in the system. MTBSTFA was first detected in the EGA-QMS analysis blank then by GC-TCD-QMS analysis. This means that MTBSTFA is part

  19. Toward a prediction of the redox properties of electroactive SAMs: a free energy calculation by molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Filippini, Gaëlle; Goujon, Florent; Bonal, Christine; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2010-10-14

    We report free energy calculations of FcC(6)S-/C(4)S-Au and FcC(6)S-/C(12)S-Au binary self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed by one ferrocenylhexanethiolate chain and alkylthiolate chains. We demonstrate that the free energy perturbation methods are able to reproduce the positive shift of the redox potential when the coadsorbed butanethiolate C(4)S chains are replaced by dodecanethiolate C(12)S chains. The different contributions to the Ewald summation involved in the perturbation process are thoroughly described. We complete the study by a microscopic description of the binary SAMs before and after oxidation. The molecular dynamics (MD) simulations evidence that the formation of the ion-pair between the ferricinium and a single perchlorate anion of the supporting electrolyte is more favored in FcC(6)S-/C(12)S-Au SAM.

  20. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir from May 1997 to June 1998 (NASA Increments 5, 6, and 7)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1999-01-01

    During NASA Increments 5, 6, and 7 (May 1997 to June 1998), about eight gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station Mir. The data were recorded on twenty-seven optical disks which were returned to Earth on Orbiter missions STS-86, STS-89, and STS-91. During these increments, SAMS data were collected in the Priroda module to support various microgravity experiments. This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity acceleration environment to which the experiments were exposed. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous Mir increment summary reports prepared by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project.

  1. Mode and origin of replication of pSAM2, a conjugative integrating element of Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed

    Hagège, J; Pernodet, J L; Friedmann, A; Guérineau, M

    1993-11-01

    pSAM2 is an 11 kb integrating element from Streptomyces ambofaciens that is capable of replication. It generates single-stranded DNA during replication, and is therefore the first Streptomyces integrating element to be described that may belong to the family of elements, called the ssDNA elements, that replicate by a rolling-circle mechanism. The direction of replication has been identified. The plus origin (ori) of replication and minus origin (M-O) have been located. Streptomyces lividans harbouring replicating pSAM2 also contain numerous small covalently closed circular DNA molecules (scm) derived from pSAM2. These scm contain ori and extend on both sides of the putative nick site. Sequences at the junction points of these scm are heterogeneous but short direct repeats were always found in the vicinity of these junctions.

  2. Lasers for nonlinear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wise, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Various versions of nonlinear microscopy are revolutionizing the life sciences, almost all of which are made possible because of the development of ultrafast lasers. In this article, the main properties and technical features of short-pulse lasers used in nonlinear microscopy are summarized. Recent research results on fiber lasers that will impact future instruments are also discussed.

  3. Data handling with SAM and art at the NOvA experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aurisano, A.; Backhouse, C.; Davies, G. S.; Illingworth, R.; Mayer, N.; Mengel, M.; Norman, A.; Rocco, D.; Zirnstein, J.

    2015-12-23

    During operations, NOvA produces between 5,000 and 7,000 raw files per day with peaks in excess of 12,000. These files must be processed in several stages to produce fully calibrated and reconstructed analysis files. In addition, many simulated neutrino interactions must be produced and processed through the same stages as data. To accommodate the large volume of data and Monte Carlo, production must be possible both on the Fermilab grid and on off-site farms, such as the ones accessible through the Open Science Grid. To handle the challenge of cataloging these files and to facilitate their off-line processing, we have adopted the SAM system developed at Fermilab. SAM indexes files according to metadata, keeps track of each file's physical locations, provides dataset management facilities, and facilitates data transfer to off-site grids. To integrate SAM with Fermilab's art software framework and the NOvA production workflow, we have developed methods to embed metadata into our configuration files, art files, and standalone ROOT files. A module in the art framework propagates the embedded information from configuration files into art files, and from input art files to output art files, allowing us to maintain a complete processing history within our files. Embedding metadata in configuration files also allows configuration files indexed in SAM to be used as inputs to Monte Carlo production jobs. Further, SAM keeps track of the input files used to create each output file. Parentage information enables the construction of self-draining datasets which have become the primary production paradigm used at NOvA. In this study we will present an overview of SAM at NOvA and how it has transformed the file production framework used by the experiment.

  4. Measuring acoustic habitats.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies.

  5. Measuring acoustic habitats

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies. PMID:25954500

  6. Insight into Sam Francis' painting techniques through the analytical study of twenty-eight artworks made between 1946 and 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defeyt, Catherine; Mazurek, Joy; Zebala, Aneta; Burchett-Lere, Debra

    2016-11-01

    The present paper proposes an overview of the painting materials experimented with over the years by Sam Francis, leading figure of the post-World War II American painting, through the analytical study of an extended number of paint samples supplied by the Sam Francis Foundation. In total, 279 samples taken from twenty-eight artworks made between 1946 and 1992, were analyzed by Raman, FTIR and Py-GC/MS techniques. The obtained results revealed the Francis' preference in terms of pigments, i.e., phthalocyanine blues and greens, and outlined unconventional combination of binder media.

  7. Hierarchical Storage Management at the NASA Center for Computational Sciences: From UniTree to SAM-QFS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salmon, Ellen; Tarshish, Adina; Palm, Nancy; Patel, Sanjay; Saletta, Marty; Vanderlan, Ed; Rouch, Mike; Burns, Lisa; Duffy, Daniel; Caine, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the data management issues associated with a large center like the NCCS and how these issues are addressed. More specifically, the focus of this paper is on the recent transition from a legacy UniTree (Legato) system to a SAM-QFS (Sun) system. Therefore, this paper will describe the motivations, from both a hardware and software perspective, for migrating from one system to another. Coupled with the migration from UniTree into SAM-QFS, the complete mass storage environment was upgraded to provide high availability, redundancy, and enhanced performance. This paper will describe the resulting solution and lessons learned throughout the migration process.

  8. Inversion of solar extinction data from the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (ASTP/SAM) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    The inversion methods are reported that have been used to determine the vertical profile of the extinction coefficient due to the stratospheric aerosols from data measured during the ASTP/SAM solar occultation experiment. Inversion methods include the onion skin peel technique and methods of solving the Fredholm equation for the problem subject to smoothing constraints. The latter of these approaches involves a double inversion scheme. Comparisons are made between the inverted results from the SAM experiment and near simultaneous measurements made by lidar and balloon born dustsonde. The results are used to demonstrate the assumptions required to perform the inversions for aerosols.

  9. COOH-terminated SAMs on Gold Fabricated from an Azobenzene Derivative with a 1,2-dithiolane Headgroup

    SciTech Connect

    Siemeling, U.; Rittinghaus, S; Weidner, T; Brison, J; Castner, D

    2010-01-01

    Well-defined and homogeneous, contamination-free self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were fabricated by the chemisorption of lip-NH-p-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-N {double_bond} N-p-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-COOH (lip = {alpha}-lipoyl) onto gold. This adsorbate species is composed of a 1,2-dithiolane-based headgroup, an azobenzene-based (and hence photochromic) spacer unit and a carboxylic acid functional group. The SAM constituents are covalently attached to the substrate by the bidentate thiolate anchor groups and exhibit a strongly tilted binding configuration.

  10. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  11. Three-dimensional optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V

    2011-05-03

    Optical microscopy, providing valuable insights at the cellular and organelle levels, has been widely recognized as an enabling biomedical technology. As the mainstays of in vivo three-dimensional (3-D) optical microscopy, single-/multi-photon fluorescence microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) have demonstrated their extraordinary sensitivities to fluorescence and optical scattering contrasts, respectively. However, the optical absorption contrast of biological tissues, which encodes essential physiological/pathological information, has not yet been assessable. The emergence of biomedical photoacoustics has led to a new branch of optical microscopy optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), where the optical irradiation is focused to the diffraction limit to achieve cellular or even subcellular level lateral resolution. As a valuable complement to existing optical microscopy technologies, OR-PAM brings in at least two novelties. First and most importantly, OR-PAM detects optical absorption contrasts with extraordinary sensitivity (i.e., 100%). Combining OR-PAM with fluorescence microscopy or with optical-scattering-based OCT (or with both) provides comprehensive optical properties of biological tissues. Second, OR-PAM encodes optical absorption into acoustic waves, in contrast to the pure optical processes in fluorescence microscopy and OCT, and provides background-free detection. The acoustic detection in OR-PAM mitigates the impacts of optical scattering on signal degradation and naturally eliminates possible interferences (i.e., crosstalks) between excitation and detection, which is a common problem in fluorescence microscopy due to the overlap between the excitation and fluorescence spectra. Unique for optical absorption imaging, OR-PAM has demonstrated broad biomedical applications since its invention, including, but not limited to, neurology, ophthalmology, vascular biology, and dermatology. In this video, we teach the system

  12. Acoustic diagnosis for nondestructive evaluation of ceramic coatings on steel substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Aizawa, Tatsuhiko; Kihara, Junji; Ito, Manabu

    1995-11-01

    New methodology is proposed and developed to make quantitative nondestructive evaluation of TiN coated SKH steel substrates. Since the measured acoustic structure is in precise correspondence with the multi-layered elastic media, change of elastic properties by degradation and damage can be easily distinguished by the acoustic spectro microscopy. In particular, rather complex acoustic structure can be measured by the present method for ceramic coated steel substrate system, but it is completely described by the two-layer model in two dimensional elasticity. Typical example is the cut-off phenomenon where the dispersion curve for the leaky surface wave velocity is forced to be terminated by alternative activation of shear wave instead of it. The quantitative nondestructive diagnosis was developed on the basis of this predictable acoustic structure. Furthermore, the effect of coating conditions on the acoustic structure is also discussed to make residual stress distribution analysis in coating by the acoustic spectro microscopy with reference to the X-ray stress analysis. Some comments are made on further advancement of the present acoustic spectro microscopy adaptive to precise characterization of ceramic coatings and practical sensing system working in practice.

  13. MSL SAM-Like Evolved Gas Analyses of Si-rich Amorphous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, Amy; Knudson, Christine; Sutter, Brad; Andrejkovicova, Slavka; Archer, P. Douglas; Franz, Heather; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Morris, Richard; Ming, Douglas; Sun, Vivian; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Chemical and mineralogical analyses of several samples from Murray Formation mudstones and Stimson Formation sandstones by the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) revealed the presence of Si-rich amorphous or poorly ordered materials. It is possible to identify the presence of high-SiO2 vs. lower SiO2 amorphous materials (e.g., basaltic glasses), based on the position of the resulting wide diffraction features in XRD patterns from the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument, but it is not possible to distinguish between several candidate high-SiO2 amorphous materials such as opal-A or rhyolitic glass. In the Buckskin (BS) sample from the upper Murray Formation, and the Big Sky (BY) and Greenhorn (GH) samples from the Stimson Formation, analyses by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument showed very broad H2O evolutions during sample heating at temperatures >450-500degC which had not been observed from previous samples. BS also had a significant broad evolution <450-500degC. We have undertaken a laboratory study targeted at understanding if the data from SAM can be used to place constraints on the nature of the amorphous phases. SAM-like evolved gas analyses have been performed on several opal and rhyolitic glass samples. Opal-A samples exhibited wide <500degC H2O evolutions, with lesser H2O evolved above 500degC. H2O evolution traces from rhyolitic glasses varied, having either two broad H2O peaks, <300degC and >500degC, or a broad peak centered around 400degC. For samples that produced two evolutions, the lower temperature peak is more intense than the higher temperature peak, a trend also exhibited by opal-A. This trend is consistent with data from BS, but does not seem consistent with data from BY and GH which evolved most of their H2O >500degC. It may be that dehydration of opal-A and/or rhyolitic glass can result in some preferential loss of lower temperature H2O, to produce traces that more closely resemble BY and GH. This is currently under investigation

  14. Effects of the murine skull in optoacoustic brain microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kneipp, Moritz; Turner, Jake; Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Shoham, Shy; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great promise behind the recent introduction of optoacoustic technology into the arsenal of small-animal neuroimaging methods, a variety of acoustic and light-related effects introduced by adult murine skull severely compromise the performance of optoacoustics in transcranial imaging. As a result, high-resolution noninvasive optoacoustic microscopy studies are still limited to a thin layer of pial microvasculature, which can be effectively resolved by tight focusing of the excitation light. We examined a range of distortions introduced by an adult murine skull in transcranial optoacoustic imaging under both acoustically- and optically-determined resolution scenarios. It is shown that strong low-pass filtering characteristics of the skull may significantly deteriorate the achievable spatial resolution in deep brain imaging where no light focusing is possible. While only brain vasculature with a diameter larger than 60 µm was effectively resolved via transcranial measurements with acoustic resolution, significant improvements are seen through cranial windows and thinned skull experiments.

  15. Surface acoustic wave/silicon monolithic sensor/processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowel, S. T.; Kornreich, P. G.; Nouhi, A.; Kilmer, R.; Fathimulla, M. A.; Mehter, E.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for sputter deposition of piezoelectric zinc oxide (ZnO) is described. An argon-ion milling system was converted to sputter zinc oxide films in an oxygen atmosphere using a pure zinc oxide target. Piezoelectric films were grown on silicon dioxide and silicon dioxide overlayed with gold. The sputtered films were evaluated using surface acoustic wave measurements, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and resistivity measurements. The effect of the sputtering conditions on the film quality and the result of post-deposition annealing are discussed. The application of these films to the generation of surface acoustic waves is also discussed.

  16. ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOELLE, LESLIE L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

  17. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  18. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  19. Architectural-acoustics consulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Anthony K.

    2004-05-01

    Consulting involves both the science of acoustics and the art of communication, requiring an array of inherent and created skills. Perhaps because consulting on architectural acoustics is a relatively new field, there is a remarkable variety of career paths, all influenced by education, interest, and experience. Many consultants juggle dozens of chargeable projects at a time, not to mention proposals, seminars, teaching, articles, business concerns, and professional-society activities. This paper will discuss various aspects of career paths, projects, and clients as they relate to architectural-acoustics consulting. The intended emphasis will be considerations for those who may be interested in such a career, noting that consultants generally seem to thrive on the numerous challenges.

  20. High temperature acoustic levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically levitating an object within a portion of a chamber that is heated to a high temperature, while a driver at the opposite end of the chamber is maintained at a relatively low temperature. The cold end of the chamber is constructed so it can be telescoped to vary the length (L sub 1) of the cold end portion and therefore of the entire chamber, so that the chamber remains resonant to a normal mode frequency, and so that the pressure at the hot end of the chamber is maximized. The precise length of the chamber at any given time, is maintained at an optimum resonant length by a feedback loop. The feedback loop includes an acoustic pressure sensor at the hot end of the chamber, which delivers its output to a control circuit which controls a motor that varies the length (L) of the chamber to a level where the sensed acoustic pressure is a maximum.

  1. Basic Linear Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Alan

    This chapter deals with the physical and mathematical aspects of sound when the disturbances are, in some sense, small. Acoustics is usually concerned with small-amplitude phenomena, and consequently a linear description is usually applicable. Disturbances are governed by the properties of the medium in which they occur, and the governing equations are the equations of continuum mechanics, which apply equally to gases, liquids, and solids. These include the mass, momentum, and energy equations, as well as thermodynamic principles. The viscosity and thermal conduction enter into the versions of these equations that apply to fluids. Fluids of typical great interest are air and sea water, and consequently this chapter includes a summary of their relevant acoustic properties. The foundation is also laid for the consideration of acoustic waves in elastic solids, suspensions, bubbly liquids, and porous media.

  2. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Self-Administration of Medication (SAM) Schemes in the Hospital Setting: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Suzanna J.; Brooks, Hannah L.; Bramley, George; Coleman, Jamie J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Self-administration of medicines is believed to increase patients' understanding about their medication and to promote their independence and autonomy in the hospital setting. The effect of inpatient self-administration of medication (SAM) schemes on patients, staff and institutions is currently unclear. Objective To systematically review the literature relating to the effect of SAM schemes on the following outcomes: patient knowledge, patient compliance/medication errors, success in self-administration, patient satisfaction, staff satisfaction, staff workload, and costs. Design Keyword and text word searches of online databases were performed between January and March 2013. Included articles described and evaluated inpatient SAM schemes. Case studies and anecdotal studies were excluded. Results 43 papers were included for final analysis. Due to the heterogeneity of results and unclear findings it was not possible to perform a quantitative synthesis of results. Participation in SAM schemes often led to increased knowledge about drugs and drug regimens, but not side effects. However, the effect of SAM schemes on patient compliance/medication errors was inconclusive. Patients and staff were highly satisfied with their involvement in SAM schemes. Conclusions SAM schemes appear to provide some benefits (e.g. increased patient knowledge), but their effect on other outcomes (e.g. compliance) is unclear. Few studies of high methodological quality using validated outcome measures exist. Inconsistencies in both measuring and reporting outcomes across studies make it challenging to compare results and draw substantive conclusions about the effectiveness of SAM schemes. PMID:25463269

  3. Acoustic Liners for Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G (Inventor); Grady, Joseph E (Inventor); Kiser, James D. (Inventor); Miller, Christopher (Inventor); Heidmann, James D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An improved acoustic liner for turbine engines is disclosed. The acoustic liner may include a straight cell section including a plurality of cells with straight chambers. The acoustic liner may also include a bent cell section including one or more cells that are bent to extend chamber length without increasing the overall height of the acoustic liner by the entire chamber length. In some cases, holes are placed between cell chambers in addition to bending the cells, or instead of bending the cells.

  4. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher; Chu, S. Reynold

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles to ensure compliance with acoustic requirements and thus provide a safe and habitable acoustic environment for the crews, and to validate developed models via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements.

  5. Tools for grid deployment of CDF offline and SAM data handling systems for summer 2004 computing

    SciTech Connect

    Kreymer, A.; Baranovski, A.; Garzoglio, G.; Herber, R.; Illingworth, R.; Kennedy, R.; Loebel-Carpenter, L.; Lyon, A.; Merritt, W.; Stonjek, S.; Terekhov, I.; Trumbo, J.; Veseli, S.; White, S.; Bartsch, V.; Leslie, M.; Belforte, S.; Burgon-Lyon, M.; St. Denis, R.; Kerzel, U.; Ratnikov, F.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Texas Tech.

    2004-12-01

    The Fermilab CDF Run-II experiment is now providing official support for remote computing, which has provided approximately 35% of the total CDF computing capacity during the summer of 2004. We face the challenge of unreliable networks, time differences, and remote managers having little experience with this particular software. The approach we have taken has been to separate the data handling components from the main CDF offline code releases by means of shared libraries, permitting live upgrades to otherwise frozen code. We now use a special ''development lite'' release to ensure that all sites have the latest tools available. We have put substantial effort into revision control, so that essentially all active CDF sites are running exactly the same SAM code.

  6. Soil Moisture Monitoring Using GNSS-R Signals; First Experimental Results with the SAM Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egido, A.; Martin-Puig, C.; Felip, D.; Garcia, M.; Caparrini, M.; Farres, E.; Ruffini, G.

    2009-04-01

    is the most sensitive band to soil volumetric water content, i.e. soil moisture. Secondly, variations on thermal background do not contaminate GNSS-R signals as they do for other remote sensing techniques, such as radiometry. Finally, GNSS scatterometry from space has a potential higher spatial resolution than microwave radiometry, due to the highly stable carrier and code modulations of the incident signals which enables the use of Delay Doppler Mapping. However, in order to be able to obtain accurate SM estimates there are several effects that need to be taken into consideration. Some of those are mainly due to diffuse scattering effects over the soil surface, for instance effects due to surface roughness, vegetation canopy, and noise. This paper reviews the theoretical approach for SM retrieval using GNSS-R, and focuses on the description of the development of an innovative GNSS-R system for soil moisture retrieval (named SAM). The validation campaigns performed with the SAM sensor, together with the results obtained are presented in the paper, which is finalized with the conclusions achieved and the ideas for future work on GNSS-R based sensors. AKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to thank the European Space Agency for partially funding the SAM system development in the framework of the GSTP program, and Tragsatec for their collaboration in the acquisition of ground truth data and satellite imagery processing used for the SAM instrument validation. REFERENCES [1] A. Kavak, G. Xu, W.J. Vogel, GPS Multipath Fade Meassurements to Determine L-Band Ground Reflectivity Properties, University of Texas, Austin, 1998. [2] D. Masters, V. Zavorotny, S. Katzberg, W. Emery GPS Signal Scattering from Land for Moisture Content Determination IGARSS Proceedings, July 24-28, 2000.

  7. SAGE 1 and SAM 2 measurements of 1 micron aerosol extinction in the free troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Farrukh, U. O.; Wang, P. H.; Deepak, A.

    1988-01-01

    The SAGE 1 and SAM 2 satellite sensors were designed to measure, with global coverage, the 1 micron extinction produced by the stratospheric aerosol. In the absence of high altitude cloud, similar measurements may be made for the free tropospheric aerosol. Median extinction values in the Northern Hemisphere, for altitudes between 5 and 10 km, are found to be one-half to one order of magnitude greater than values at corresponding latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. In addition, a seasonal increase by a factor of 1.5 yields 2 is observed in both hemispheres in local spring and summer. Following major volcanic eruptions, a long-lived enhancement of the aerosol extinction is observed for altitudes above 5 km.

  8. Constraining the source of chlorinated hydrocarbons detected on Mars with the SAM experiment onboard Curiosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmahdi, I.; Buch, A.; Szopa, C.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D.; François, P.; Coll, P.; Eigenbrode, J.; Navarro-Gonzalez, A. R.; Dequaire, T.; Millan, M.; Tenturier, S.; Bonnet, J. Y.; Mahaffy, P.; Cabane, M.

    2015-10-01

    Organic molecules have been at the origin of the prebiotic chemistry that led to the emergence of life on Earth. Therefore, they are one of the key ingredients required to assess the habitability in environments of the solar system. On Mars, no endogenous organics were found until very recently (1) whereas they are expected to be present in the soil, either because they were kept safe in rocks since the early history of the planet, or because they are still brought to the Mars surface by exogenous sources. Because of their importance for astrobiology, efforts are still ongoing to search for these species in the Gale crater by the Curiosity rover, and especially the SAM experiment on its board.

  9. Re-engineering SAM or Changing the Engine in the Train While it is Running

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, R.; Mengel, M.; Norman, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the last few years at Fermilab we re-architect-ed our SAM1[1] family of data catalog and file transfer tools - including major changes - while continuing to transfer over 1 Pb/month of data to multiple existing experiments and bring new experiments on board. This work was done with less than 3 FTE-years of effort, and the changes made include major ones, such as changing interprocess communication protocols, migrating database back-ends, removing and replacing major components, and supporting new file delivery methods. This paper will summarize the approaches we have used to do this, including using design patterns like the Facade, Adapter, and Command patterns, and assisting experiments one at a time with client migration. This process has allowed us to modernize our infrastructure with reasonable costs in both calendar time and developer effort, while continuing to provide the operating service to our customers with minimal interruptions.

  10. Folding of SAM-II riboswitch explored by replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xu; Yongjun, Wang; Zhihong, Li

    2015-01-21

    Riboswitches are cis-acting RNA fragments that function via a conformational transition mechanism when a specific target molecule binds to its binding pocket, representing an inviting new class of biomolecular target for the development of antibiotics. To understand the folding mechanism of SAM-II riboswitch, occurring predominantly in proteobacteria, a 100ns replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulation in explicit solvent is performed. Our results show that this RNA pseudoknot has multiple folding pathways, and various intermediate structures. The resultant riboswitch conformational transition map is well consistent with the recent fluorescence measurement, which confirms the dynamical properties of this pseudoknot. Moreover, a novel transition pathway is predicted. The global folding dynamics is mainly coupled with the helix rather than the loop region. The potential folding pathways of the riboswitch presented here should lead to a deeper understanding of the folding mechanism of the riboswitch, as well as the conformational change of RNA pseudoknot.

  11. SAGE I and SAM II measurements of 1 micron aerosol extinction in the free troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Farrukh, U. O.; Wang, P. H.; Deepak, A.

    1988-01-01

    The SAGE-I and SAM-II satellite sensors were designed to measure, with global coverage, the 1 micron extinction produced by the stratospheric aerosol. In the absence of high altitude clouds, similar measurements may be made for the free tropospheric aerosol. Median extinction values at middle and high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, for altitudes between 5 and 10 km, are found to be one-half to one order of magnitude greater than values at corresponding latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. In addition, a seasonal increase by a factor of 1.5-2 was observed in both hemispheres, in 1979-80, in local spring and summer. Following major volcanic eruptions, a long-lived enhancement of the aerosol extinction is observed for altitudes above 5 km.

  12. SAGE and SAM II measurements of global stratospheric aerosol optical depth and mass loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Several volcanic eruptions between November 1979 and April 1981 have injected material into the stratosphere. The SAGE and SAM II satellite systems have measured, with global coverage, the 1-micron extinction produced by this material, and examples of the data product are shown in the form of global maps of stratospheric optical depth and altitude-latitude plots of zonal mean extinction. These data, and that for the volcanically quiet period in early 1979, have been used to determine the changes in the total stratospheric mass loading. Estimates have also been made of the contribution to the total aerosol mass from each eruption. It has been found that between 1979 and mid-1981, the total stratospheric aerosol mass increased from a background level of approximately 570,000 metric tons to a peak of approximately 1,300,000 metric tons.

  13. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  14. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  15. Broadband Acoustic Hyperbolic Metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen; Xie, Yangbo; Sui, Ni; Wang, Wenqi; Cummer, Steven A; Jing, Yun

    2015-12-18

    In this Letter, we report on the design and experimental characterization of a broadband acoustic hyperbolic metamaterial. The proposed metamaterial consists of multiple arrays of clamped thin plates facing the y direction and is shown to yield opposite signs of effective density in the x and y directions below a certain cutoff frequency, therefore, yielding a hyperbolic dispersion. Partial focusing and subwavelength imaging are experimentally demonstrated at frequencies between 1.0 and 2.5 kHz. The proposed metamaterial could open up new possibilities for acoustic wave manipulation and may find usage in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  16. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  17. Electromechanical acoustic liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Cattafesta, III, Louis N. (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikazu (Inventor); Horowitz, Stephen Brian (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A multi-resonator-based system responsive to acoustic waves includes at least two resonators, each including a bottom plate, side walls secured to the bottom plate, and a top plate disposed on top of the side walls. The top plate includes an orifice so that a portion of an incident acoustical wave compresses gas in the resonators. The bottom plate or the side walls include at least one compliant portion. A reciprocal electromechanical transducer coupled to the compliant portion of each of the resonators forms a first and second transducer/compliant composite. An electrical network is disposed between the reciprocal electromechanical transducer of the first and second resonator.

  18. Broadband Acoustic Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    fluidized mud, which has sound speeds at (or sometimes below) the sound speed of the water column, here 1512 m/s. Interestingly, there is a sound speed...data. 3 specular 25m Figure 1. The map shows the AUV track (red line) overlaid on multibeam bathymetry. Mean water depth is about 165m...Preston, and D.A. Abraham, Long-range acoustic scattering from a shallow- water mud volcano cluster J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 122, 1946-1958, 2007. [3

  19. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  20. Investigating the Origin of Chlorohydrocarbons Detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument at Rocknest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D.; Archer, D.; Brunner, A.; Buch, A.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Conrad, P.; Coscia, D.; Dworkin J.; Eigenbrode, J.; Freissinet, C.; Mahaffy, P.; Martin, M.; McKay, C.; Miller, K.; Ming, D.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Steele, A.; Summons, R. E.; Sutter, B.; Szopa, C.; Teinturier, S.

    2013-01-01

    The search for organic compounds on Mars, including molecules of either abiotic or biological origin is one of the key goals of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. Previously the Viking and Phoenix Lander missions searched for organic compounds, but did not find any definitive evidence of martian organic material in the soils. The Viking pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) instruments did not detect any organic compounds of martian or exogenous origin above a level of a few parts-per-billion (ppb) in the near surface regolith at either landing site [1]. Viking did detect chloromethane and dichloromethane at pmol levels (up to 40 ppb) after heating the soil samples up to 500 C (Table 1), although it was originally argued that the chlorohydrocarbons were derived from cleaning solvents used on the instrument hardware, and not from the soil samples themselves [1]. More recently, it was suggested that the chlorohydrocarbons detected by Viking may have been formed by oxidation of indigenous organic matter during pyrolysis of the soil in the presence of perchlorates [2]. Although it is unknown if the Viking soils contained perchlorates, Phoenix did reveal relatively high concentrations (0.6 wt%) of perchlorate salt in the icy regolith [3], therefore, it is possible that the chlorohydrocarbons detected by Viking were produced, at least partially, during the experiments [2,4]. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on MSL analyzed the organic composition of the soil at Rocknest in Gale Crater using a combination of pyrolysis evolved gas analysis (EGA) and GCMS. One empty cup procedural blank followed by multiple EGA-GCMS analyses of the Rocknest soil were carried out. Here we will discuss the results from these SAM measurements at Rocknest and the steps taken to determine the source of the chlorohydrocarbons.