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Sample records for acoustic mismatch model

  1. Statistical weighting of model-based optoacoustic reconstruction for minimizing artefacts caused by strong acoustic mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2011-03-01

    A modified quantitative inversion algorithm is presented that minimizes the effects of internal acoustic reflections or scattering in tomographic optoacoustic images. The inversion procedure in our model-based algorithm consists in solving a linear system of equations in which each individual equation corresponds to a given position of the acoustic transducer and to a given time instant. Thus, the modification that we propose in this work consists in weighting each equation of the linear system with the probability that the measured wave is not distorted by reflection or scattering phenomena. We show that the probability that a reflected or scattered wave is detected at a given position and at a given instant is approximately proportional to the size of the area in which the original wave could have been generated, which is dependent on the position of the transducer and on the time instant, so that such probability can be used to weight each equation of the linear system. Thereby, the contribution of the waves that propagate directly to the transducer to the reconstructed images is emphasized. We experimentally test the proposed inversion algorithm with tissue-mimicking agar phantoms in which air-gaps are included to cause reflections of the acoustic waves. The tomographic reconstructions obtained with the modification proposed herein show a clear reduction of the artefacts due to these acoustic phenomena with respect to the reconstructions yielded with the original algorithm. This performance is directly related to in-vivo small animal imaging applications involving imaging in the presence of bones, lungs, and other highly mismatched organs.

  2. Acoustic Evidence for Phonologically Mismatched Speech Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gormley, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Speech errors are generally said to accommodate to their new phonological context. This accommodation has been validated by several transcription studies. The transcription methodology is not the best choice for detecting errors at this level, however, as this type of error can be difficult to perceive. This paper presents an acoustic analysis of…

  3. Coherent phonon modulation by nanoscale acoustically mismatched interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shangjie; Ouyang, Min

    2015-03-01

    Precise engineering of phonon spectrum by material design is essential for in-depth understanding of fundamental physical phenomena as well as new technology breakthrough. When phonons propagate through two different constituents, their mismatched interface can coherently modulate phonon spectrum. In this talk, we will demonstrate the phonon characteristics can be precisely tailored through nanoscale interfacial coupling by investigating acoustically mismatched core-shell hetero-nanostructures with ultrafast pump-probe technique. Coherent phonon coupling between core and shell through their interface has been experimentally revealed, which agrees well with theoretical simulation. This interfacial phonon coupling also represents a unique fingerprint of complex nanostructures.

  4. Biophysical modeling of mismatch repair proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsbury, Freddie

    2009-03-01

    Mismatch repair proteins play a vital role in the bology of cancer due to their dual functions as repair proteins and as sensors of DNA damage. Computational modeling of mismatch repair proteins in conjunction with biological experimentation has demonstrated the role of long-range communication in the functions of these proteins. Furthermore, different conformations have been shown to be associated with different cellular functions, and these differences are being exploited in drug discovery. The latest results in this modeling will be presented.

  5. Binaural Benefit with and without a Bilateral Spectral Mismatch in Acoustic Simulations of Cochlear Implant Processing

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yang-soo; Shin, You-Ree; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated whether a spectral mismatch across ears influences the benefit of redundancy, squelch, and head shadow differently in speech perception using acoustic simulation of bilateral cochlear implant (CI) processing. Design Ten normal hearing subjects participated in the study, and acoustic simulations of CIs were used to test these subjects. Sentence recognition, presented unilaterally and bilaterally, was measured at +5 dB and +10 dB signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) with bilaterally matched and mismatched conditions. Unilateral and bilateral CIs were simulated using 8-channel sine-wave vocoders. Binaural spectral mismatch was introduced by changing the relative simulated insertion depths across ears. Subjects were tested while listening with headphones; head-related transfer functions were applied before the vocoder processing to preserve natural interaural level and time differences. Results For both SNRs, greater and more consistent binaural benefit of squelch and redundancy occurred for the matched condition while binaural interference of squelch and redundancy occurred for the mismatched condition. However, significant binaural benefit of head shadow existed irrespective of spectral mismatches and SNRs. Conclusions The results suggest that bilateral spectral mismatch may have a negative impact on the binaural benefit of squelch and redundancy for bilateral CI users. The results also suggest that clinical mapping should be carefully administrated for bilateral CI users to minimize the difference in spectral patterns between the two CIs. PMID:22968427

  6. Plasticity in Human Pitch Perception Induced by Tonotopically Mismatched Electro-Acoustic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Lina A.J.; Turner, Christopher W.; Karsten, Sue A.; Gantz, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Under normal conditions, the acoustic pitch percept of a pure tone is determined mainly by the tonotopic place of the stimulation along the cochlea. Unlike acoustic stimulation, electric stimulation of a cochlear implant (CI) allows for the direct manipulation of the place of stimulation in human subjects. CI sound processors analyze the range of frequencies needed for speech perception and allocate portions of this range to the small number of electrodes distributed in the cochlea. Because the allocation is assigned independently of the original resonant frequency of the basilar membrane associated with the location of each electrode, CI users who have access to residual hearing in either or both ears often have tonotopic mismatches between the acoustic and electric stimulation. Here we demonstrate plasticity of place pitch representations of up to 3 octaves in Hybrid CI users after experience with combined electro-acoustic stimulation. The pitch percept evoked by single CI electrodes, measured relative to acoustic tones presented to the non-implanted ear, changed over time in directions that reduced the electro-acoustic pitch mismatch introduced by the CI programming. This trend was particularly apparent when the allocations of stimulus frequencies to electrodes were changed over time, with pitch changes even reversing direction in some subjects. These findings show that pitch plasticity can occur more rapidly and on a greater scale in the mature auditory system than previously thought possible. Overall, the results suggest that the adult auditory system can impose perceptual order on disordered arrays of inputs. PMID:24157931

  7. A multivariate CAR model for mismatched lattices.

    PubMed

    Porter, Aaron T; Oleson, Jacob J

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we develop a multivariate Gaussian conditional autoregressive model for use on mismatched lattices. Most current multivariate CAR models are designed for each multivariate outcome to utilize the same lattice structure. In many applications, a change of basis will allow different lattices to be utilized, but this is not always the case, because a change of basis is not always desirable or even possible. Our multivariate CAR model allows each outcome to have a different neighborhood structure which can utilize different lattices for each structure. The model is applied in two real data analysis. The first is a Bayesian learning example in mapping the 2006 Iowa Mumps epidemic, which demonstrates the importance of utilizing multiple channels of infection flow in mapping infectious diseases. The second is a multivariate analysis of poverty levels and educational attainment in the American Community Survey. PMID:25457598

  8. Compensating Acoustic Mismatch Using Class-Based Histogram Equalization for Robust Speech Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Youngjoo; Kim, Sungtak; Kim, Hoirin

    2007-12-01

    A new class-based histogram equalization method is proposed for robust speech recognition. The proposed method aims at not only compensating for an acoustic mismatch between training and test environments but also reducing the two fundamental limitations of the conventional histogram equalization method, the discrepancy between the phonetic distributions of training and test speech data, and the nonmonotonic transformation caused by the acoustic mismatch. The algorithm employs multiple class-specific reference and test cumulative distribution functions, classifies noisy test features into their corresponding classes, and equalizes the features by using their corresponding class reference and test distributions. The minimum mean-square error log-spectral amplitude (MMSE-LSA)-based speech enhancement is added just prior to the baseline feature extraction to reduce the corruption by additive noise. The experiments on the Aurora2 database proved the effectiveness of the proposed method by reducing relative errors by[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] over the mel-cepstral-based features and by[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] over the conventional histogram equalization method, respectively.

  9. Effective acoustic modeling for robust speaker recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan Al Banna, Taufiq

    Robustness due to mismatched train/test conditions is the biggest challenge facing the speaker recognition community today, with transmission channel and environmental noise degradation being the prominent factors. Performance of state-of-the art speaker recognition methods aim at mitigating these factors by effectively modeling speech in multiple recording conditions, so that it can learn to distinguish between inter-speaker and intra-speaker variability. The increasing demand and availability of large development corpora introduces difficulties in effective data utilization and computationally efficient modeling. Traditional compensation strategies operate on higher dimensional utterance features, known as supervectors, which are obtained from the acoustic modeling of short-time features. Feature compensation is performed during front-end processing. Motivated by the covariance structure of conventional acoustic features, we envision that feature normalization and compensation can be integrated into the acoustic modeling. In this dissertation, we investigate the following fundamental research challenges: (i) analysis of data requirements for effective and efficient background model training, (ii) introducing latent factor analysis modeling of acoustic features, (iii) integration of channel compensation strategies in mixture-models, and (iv) development of noise robust background models using factor analysis. The effectiveness of the proposed solutions are demonstrated in various noisy and channel degraded conditions using the recent evaluation datasets released by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). These research accomplishments make an important step towards improving speaker recognition robustness in diverse acoustic conditions.

  10. A mishmash of methods for mitigating the model mismatch mess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ker, Andrew D.; Pevný, Tomáš

    2014-02-01

    The model mismatch problem occurs in steganalysis when a binary classifier is trained on objects from one cover source and tested on another: an example of domain adaptation. It is highly realistic because a steganalyst would rarely have access to much or any training data from their opponent, and its consequences can be devastating to classifier accuracy. This paper presents an in-depth study of one particular instance of model mismatch, in a set of images from Flickr using one fixed steganography and steganalysis method, attempting to separate different effects of mismatch in feature space and find methods of mitigation where possible. We also propose new benchmarks for accuracy, which are more appropriate than mean error rates when there are multiple actors and multiple images, and consider the case of 3-valued detectors which also output `don't know'. This pilot study demonstrates that some simple feature-centering and ensemble methods can reduce the mismatch penalty considerably, but not completely remove it.

  11. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher; Chu, S. Reynold

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles to ensure compliance with acoustic requirements and thus provide a safe and habitable acoustic environment for the crews, and to validate developed models via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements.

  12. A Computational Model for Biomechanical Effects of Arterial Compliance Mismatch

    PubMed Central

    He, Fan; Hua, Lu; Gao, Li-jian

    2015-01-01

    Background. Compliance mismatch is a negative factor and it needs to be considered in arterial bypass grafting. Objective. A computational model was employed to investigate the effects of arterial compliance mismatch on blood flow, wall stress, and deformation. Methods. The unsteady blood flow was assumed to be laminar, Newtonian, viscous, and incompressible. The vessel wall was assumed to be linear elastic, isotropic, and incompressible. The fluid-wall interaction scheme was constructed using the finite element method. Results. The results show that there are identical wall shear stress waveforms, wall stress, and strain waveforms at different locations. The comparison of the results demonstrates that wall shear stresses and wall strains are higher while wall stresses are lower at the more compliant section. The differences promote the probability of intimal thickening at some locations. Conclusions. The model is effective and gives satisfactory results. It could be extended to all kinds of arteries with complicated geometrical and material factors. PMID:27019580

  13. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, S. Reynold; Allen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles. The use of such a model will help ensure compliance with acoustic requirements. Also, this project includes modeling validation and development feedback via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements to compare with the predictions.

  14. The binaural performance of a cross-talk cancellation system with matched or mismatched setup and playback acoustics

    PubMed Central

    Akeroyd, Michael A.; Chambers, John; Bullock, David; Palmer, Alan R.; Summerfield, A. Quentin; Nelson, Philip A.; Gatehouse, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Cross-talk cancellation is a method for synthesising virtual auditory space using loudspeakers. One implementation is the “Optimal Source Distribution” technique [T. Takeuchi and P. Nelson, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112, 2786-2797 (2002)], in which the audio bandwidth is split across three pairs of loudspeakers, placed at azimuths of ±90°, ±15°, and ±3°, conveying low, mid and high frequencies, respectively. A computational simulation of this system was developed and verified against measurements made on an acoustic system using a manikin. Both the acoustic system and the simulation gave a wideband average cancellation of almost 25 dB. The simulation showed that when there was a mismatch between the head-related transfer functions used to set up the system and those of the final listener, the cancellation was reduced to an average of 13 dB. Moreover, in this case the binaural ITDs and ILDs delivered by the simulation of the OSD system often differed from the target values. It is concluded that only when the OSD system is set up with “matched” head-related transfer functions can it deliver accurate binaural cues. PMID:17348528

  15. Decentralized Adaptive Control of Systems with Uncertain Interconnections, Plant-Model Mismatch and Actuator Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patre, Parag; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2011-01-01

    Decentralized adaptive control is considered for systems consisting of multiple interconnected subsystems. It is assumed that each subsystem s parameters are uncertain and the interconnection parameters are not known. In addition, mismatch can exist between each subsystem and its reference model. A strictly decentralized adaptive control scheme is developed, wherein each subsystem has access only to its own state but has the knowledge of all reference model states. The mismatch is estimated online for each subsystem and the mismatch estimates are used to adaptively modify the corresponding reference models. The adaptive control scheme is extended to the case with actuator failures in addition to mismatch.

  16. Real-time observation of coherent acoustic phonons generated by an acoustically mismatched optoacoustic transducer using x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, A. I. H.; Andreasson, B. P.; Enquist, H.; Jurgilaitis, A.; Larsson, J.

    2015-11-14

    The spectrum of laser-generated acoustic phonons in indium antimonide coated with a thin nickel film has been studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction. Strain pulses that can be considered to be built up from coherent phonons were generated in the nickel film by absorption of short laser pulses. Acoustic reflections at the Ni–InSb interface leads to interference that strongly modifies the resulting phonon spectrum. The study was performed with high momentum transfer resolution together with high time resolution. This was achieved by using a third-generation synchrotron radiation source that provided a high-brightness beam and an ultrafast x-ray streak camera to obtain a temporal resolution of 10 ps. We also carried out simulations, using commercial finite element software packages and on-line dynamic diffraction tools. Using these tools, it is possible to calculate the time-resolved x-ray reflectivity from these complicated strain shapes. The acoustic pulses have a peak strain amplitude close to 1%, and we investigated the possibility to use this device as an x-ray switch. At a bright source optimized for hard x-ray generation, the low reflectivity may be an acceptable trade-off to obtain a pulse duration that is more than an order of magnitude shorter.

  17. Arctic acoustics ultrasonic modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamuel, Jacques R.

    1990-03-01

    A unique collection of laboratory ultrasonic modeling results are presented revealing and characterizing hidden pulsed seismoacoustic wave phenomena from 3-D range dependent liquid/solid boundaries. The research succeeded in isolating and identifying low frequency (10 to 500 Hz) transmission loss mechanisms and provided physical insight into Arctic acoustic problems generally beyond the state-of-the-art of theoretical and numerical analysis. The ultrasonic modeling studies dealt with controversial issues and existing discrepancies on seismo-acoustic waves at water/ice interface, sea ice thickness determination, low frequency transmission loss, and bottom leaky Rayleigh waves. The areas investigated include leaky Rayleigh waves at water/ice interface, leaky flexural waves in floating ice plates, effects of dry/wet cracks in sea ice on plate waves and near grazing acoustic waves, edge waves in floating plates, low frequency backscatter from ice keel width resonances, conversion of underwater acoustic waves into plate waves by keels, nondispersive flexural wave along apex of small angle solid wedge, Scholte and leaky Rayleigh waves along apex of immersed 90 ice wedge, backscatter from trailing edge of floes, floating plate resonances associated with near-grazing underwater acoustic waves, acoustic coupling between adjacent floes, and multiple bottom leaky Rayleigh wave components in water layer over solid bottom.

  18. Coherent heat transport in 2D phononic crystals with acoustic impedance mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arantes, A.; Anjos, V.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we have calculated the cumulative thermal conductivities of micro-phononic crystals formed by different combinations of inclusions and matrices at a sub-Kelvin temperature regime. The low-frequency phonon spectra (up to tens of GHz) were obtained by solving the generalized wave equation for inhomogeneous media with the plane wave expansion method. The thermal conductivity was calculated from Boltzmann transport theory highlighting the role of the low-frequency thermal phonons and neglecting phonon-phonon scattering. A purely coherent thermal transport regime was assumed throughout the structures. Our findings show that the cumulative thermal conductivity drops dramatically when compared with their bulk counterpart. Depending on the structural composition this reduction may be attributed to the phonon group velocity due to a flattening of the phonon dispersion relation, the extinction of phonon modes in the density of states or due to the presence of complete band gaps. According to the contrast between the inclusions and the matrices, three types of two dimensional phononic crystals were considered: carbon/epoxy, carbon/polyethylene and tungsten/silicon, which correspond respectively to a moderate, strong and very strong mismatch in the mechanical properties of these materials.

  19. A Direct Adaptive Control Approach in the Presence of Model Mismatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.; Tao, Gang; Khong, Thuan

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of direct model reference adaptive control when the plant-model matching conditions are violated due to abnormal changes in the plant or incorrect knowledge of the plant's mathematical structure. The approach consists of direct adaptation of state feedback gains for state tracking, and simultaneous estimation of the plant-model mismatch. Because of the mismatch, the plant can no longer track the state of the original reference model, but may be able to track a new reference model that still provides satisfactory performance. The reference model is updated if the estimated plant-model mismatch exceeds a bound that is determined via robust stability and/or performance criteria. The resulting controller is a hybrid direct-indirect adaptive controller that offers asymptotic state tracking in the presence of plant-model mismatch as well as parameter deviations.

  20. Modeling of channel mismatch in time-interleaved SAR ADC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dengquan, Li; Liang, Zhang; Zhangming, Zhu; Yintang, Yang

    2015-09-01

    In a time-interleaved analog-to-digital converter (TI ADC), several individual ADCs operate in parallel to achieve a higher sampling rate. Low power consumption as well as good linearity can be obtained by applying successive approximation register (SAR) converters as sub-channel ADCs. In spite of the advantages, this structure suffers from three mismatches, which are offset mismatch, gain mismatch, and time skew. This paper focuses on a TI SAR ADC with a number of channels. The mismatch effects in the frequency domain are analyzed and the derived close form formulas are verified based on Matlab. In addition, we clarify that the standard deviation of DNL and INL of an M-channel TI ADC is reduced by a factor of \\sqrt M compared to a single channel ADC. The formulas can be used to derive the corresponding requirements when designing a TI ADC. Our analysis process is able to inform the study of calibration algorithms. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61234002, 61322405, 61306044, 61376033) and the National High-Tech Program of China (No. 2013AA014103).

  1. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Lift-Off Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janie D.

    2011-01-01

    The lift-off acoustic (LOA) environment is an important design factor for any launch vehicle. For the Ares I vehicle, the LOA environments were derived by scaling flight data from other launch vehicles. The Ares I LOA predicted environments are compared to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) preliminary results.

  2. Model Mismatch Paradigm for Probe based Nanoscale Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Pranav

    Scanning Probe Microscopes (SPMs) are widely used for investigation of material properties and manipulation of matter at the nanoscale. These instruments are considered critical enablers of nanotechnology by providing the only technique for direct observation of dynamics at the nanoscale and affecting it with sub Angstrom resolution. Current SPMs are limited by low throughput and lack of quantitative measurements of material properties. Various applications like the high density data storage, sub-20 nm lithography, fault detection and functional probing of semiconductor circuits, direct observation of dynamical processes involved in biological samples viz. motor proteins and transport phenomena in various materials demand high throughput operation. Researchers involved in material characterization at nanoscale are interested in getting quantitative measurements of stiffness and dissipative properties of various materials in a least invasive manner. In this thesis, system theoretic concepts are used to address these limitations. The central tenet of the thesis is to model, the known information about the system and then focus on perturbations of these known dynamics or model, to sense the effects due to changes in the environment such as changes in material properties or surface topography. Thus a model mismatch paradigm for probe based nanoscale imaging is developed. The topic is developed by presenting physics based modeling of a particular mode of operation of SPMs called the dynamic mode operation. This mode is modeled as a forced Lure system where a linear time invariant system is in feedback with an unknown static memoryless nonlinearity. Tools from averaging theory are used to tame this complex nonlinear system by approximating it as a linear system with time varying parameters. Material properties are thus transformed from being parameters of unknown nonlinear functions to being unknown coefficients of a linear plant. The first contribution of this thesis

  3. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Vargas, Magda B.

    2013-01-01

    Subscale rocket acoustic data is used to predict acoustic environments for full scale rockets. Over the last several years acoustic data has been collected during horizontal tests of solid rocket motors. Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) was designed to evaluate the acoustics of the SLS vehicle including the liquid engines and solid rocket boosters. SMAT is comprised of liquid thrusters scalable to the Space Shuttle Main engines (SSME) and Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motors scalable to the 5-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSTMV). Horizontal testing of the liquid thrusters provided an opportunity to collect acoustic data from liquid thrusters to characterize the acoustic environments. Acoustic data was collected during the horizontal firings of a single thruster and a 4-thruster (Quad) configuration. Presentation scope. Discuss the results of the single and 4-thruster acoustic measurements. Compare the measured acoustic levels of the liquid thrusters to the Solid Rocket Test Motor V - Nozzle 2 (SRTMV-N2).

  4. Acoustical scale modeling of roadway traffic noise

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.S.

    1980-03-01

    During the planning and design of any federally assisted highway project, noise levels must be predicted for the highway in its operational mode. The use of an acoustical scale modeling technique to predict roadway traffic noise is described. Literature pertaining to acoustical scale modeling of outdoor noise propagation, particularly roadway noise, is reviewed. Field and laboratory measurements validated the predictions of the acoustical scale modeling technique. (1 photo)

  5. Computational ocean acoustics: Advances in 3D ocean acoustic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Henrik; Jensen, Finn B.

    2012-11-01

    The numerical model of ocean acoustic propagation developed in the 1980's are still in widespread use today, and the field of computational ocean acoustics is often considered a mature field. However, the explosive increase in computational power available to the community has created opportunities for modeling phenomena that earlier were beyond reach. Most notably, three-dimensional propagation and scattering problems have been prohibitive computationally, but are now addressed routinely using brute force numerical approaches such as the Finite Element Method, in particular for target scattering problems, where they are being combined with the traditional wave theory propagation models in hybrid modeling frameworks. Also, recent years has seen the development of hybrid approaches coupling oceanographic circulation models with acoustic propagation models, enabling the forecasting of sonar performance uncertainty in dynamic ocean environments. These and other advances made over the last couple of decades support the notion that the field of computational ocean acoustics is far from being mature. [Work supported by the Office of Naval Research, Code 321OA].

  6. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, SShao-sheng R.; Allen, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic modeling can be used to identify key noise sources, determine/analyze sub-allocated requirements, keep track of the accumulation of minor noise sources, and to predict vehicle noise levels at various stages in vehicle development, first with estimates of noise sources, later with experimental data. In FY09, the physical mockup developed in FY08, with interior geometric shape similar to Orion CM (Crew Module) IML (Interior Mode Line), was used to validate SEA (Statistical Energy Analysis) acoustic model development with realistic ventilation fan sources. The sound power levels of these sources were unknown a priori, as opposed to previous studies that RSS (Reference Sound Source) with known sound power level was used. The modeling results were evaluated based on comparisons to measurements of sound pressure levels over a wide frequency range, including the frequency range where SEA gives good results. Sound intensity measurement was performed over a rectangular-shaped grid system enclosing the ventilation fan source. Sound intensities were measured at the top, front, back, right, and left surfaces of the and system. Sound intensity at the bottom surface was not measured, but sound blocking material was placed tinder the bottom surface to reflect most of the incident sound energy back to the remaining measured surfaces. Integrating measured sound intensities over measured surfaces renders estimated sound power of the source. The reverberation time T6o of the mockup interior had been modified to match reverberation levels of ISS US Lab interior for speech frequency bands, i.e., 0.5k, 1k, 2k, 4 kHz, by attaching appropriately sized Thinsulate sound absorption material to the interior wall of the mockup. Sound absorption of Thinsulate was modeled in three methods: Sabine equation with measured mockup interior reverberation time T60, layup model based on past impedance tube testing, and layup model plus air absorption correction. The evaluation/validation was

  7. Processes influencing model-data mismatch in drought-stressed, fire-disturbed eddy flux sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Stephen; Beven, Keith; Freer, Jim; Law, Beverly

    2011-06-01

    Semiarid forests are very sensitive to climatic change and among the most difficult ecosystems to accurately model. We tested the performance of the Biome-BGC model against eddy flux data taken from young (years 2004-2008), mature (years 2002-2008), and old-growth (year 2000) ponderosa pine stands at Metolius, Oregon, and subsequently examined several potential causes for model-data mismatch. We used the Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation methodology, which involved 500,000 model runs for each stand (1,500,000 total). Each simulation was run with randomly generated parameter values from a uniform distribution based on published parameter ranges, resulting in modeled estimates of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) that were compared to measured eddy flux data. Simulations for the young stand exhibited the highest level of performance, though they overestimated ecosystem C accumulation (-NEE) 99% of the time. Among the simulations for the mature and old-growth stands, 100% and 99% of the simulations underestimated ecosystem C accumulation. One obvious area of model-data mismatch is soil moisture, which was overestimated by the model in the young and old-growth stands yet underestimated in the mature stand. However, modeled estimates of soil water content and associated water deficits did not appear to be the primary cause of model-data mismatch; our analysis indicated that gross primary production can be accurately modeled even if soil moisture content is not. Instead, difficulties in adequately modeling ecosystem respiration, mainly autotrophic respiration, appeared to be the fundamental cause of model-data mismatch.

  8. Overview of geometrical room acoustic modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Savioja, Lauri; Svensson, U Peter

    2015-08-01

    Computerized room acoustics modeling has been practiced for almost 50 years up to date. These modeling techniques play an important role in room acoustic design nowadays, often including auralization, but can also help in the construction of virtual environments for such applications as computer games, cognitive research, and training. This overview describes the main principles, landmarks in the development, and state-of-the-art for techniques that are based on geometrical acoustics principles. A focus is given to their capabilities to model the different aspects of sound propagation: specular vs diffuse reflections, and diffraction. PMID:26328688

  9. Advanced Concepts for Underwater Acoustic Channel Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etter, P. C.; Haas, C. H.; Ramani, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines nearshore underwater-acoustic channel modeling concepts and compares channel-state information requirements against existing modeling capabilities. This process defines a subset of candidate acoustic models suitable for simulating signal propagation in underwater communications. Underwater-acoustic communications find many practical applications in coastal oceanography, and networking is the enabling technology for these applications. Such networks can be formed by establishing two-way acoustic links between autonomous underwater vehicles and moored oceanographic sensors. These networks can be connected to a surface unit for further data transfer to ships, satellites, or shore stations via a radio-frequency link. This configuration establishes an interactive environment in which researchers can extract real-time data from multiple, but distant, underwater instruments. After evaluating the obtained data, control messages can be sent back to individual instruments to adapt the networks to changing situations. Underwater networks can also be used to increase the operating ranges of autonomous underwater vehicles by hopping the control and data messages through networks that cover large areas. A model of the ocean medium between acoustic sources and receivers is called a channel model. In an oceanic channel, characteristics of the acoustic signals change as they travel from transmitters to receivers. These characteristics depend upon the acoustic frequency, the distances between sources and receivers, the paths followed by the signals, and the prevailing ocean environment in the vicinity of the paths. Properties of the received signals can be derived from those of the transmitted signals using these channel models. This study concludes that ray-theory models are best suited to the simulation of acoustic signal propagation in oceanic channels and identifies 33 such models that are eligible candidates.

  10. Wastewater treatment models in teaching and training: the mismatch between education and requirements for jobs.

    PubMed

    Hug, Thomas; Benedetti, Lorenzo; Hall, Eric R; Johnson, Bruce R; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Nopens, Ingmar; Rieger, Leiv; Shaw, Andrew; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2009-01-01

    As mathematical modeling of wastewater treatment plants has become more common in research and consultancy, a mismatch between education and requirements for model-related jobs has developed. There seems to be a shortage of skilled people, both in terms of quantity and in quality. In order to address this problem, this paper provides a framework to outline different types of model-related jobs, assess the required skills for these jobs and characterize different types of education that modelers obtain "in school" as well as "on the job". It is important to consider that education of modelers does not mainly happen in university courses and that the variety of model related jobs goes far beyond use for process design by consulting companies. To resolve the mismatch, the current connection between requirements for different jobs and the various types of education has to be assessed for different geographical regions and professional environments. This allows the evaluation and improvement of important educational paths, considering quality assurance and future developments. Moreover, conclusions from a workshop involving practitioners and academics from North America and Europe are presented. The participants stressed the importance of non-technical skills and recommended strengthening the role of realistic modeling experience in university training. However, this paper suggests that all providers of modeling education and support, not only universities, but also software suppliers, professional associations and companies performing modeling tasks are called to assess and strengthen their role in training and support of professional modelers. PMID:19237769

  11. Numerical Modeling of Ocean Acoustic Wavefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappert, Frederick

    1997-08-01

    The U.S. Navy requires real-time ``acoustic performance prediction'' models in order to optimize sonar tactics in naval combat situations. The need for numerical models that solve the acoustic wave equation in realistic ocean environments is being met by a collaborative effort between university researchers, industrial contractors, and navy laboratory workers. This paper discusses one particularly successful numerical model, called the PE/SSF model, that was originally developed by the author. Here PE stands for Parabolic Equation, a good approximation to the elliptic Helmholtz equation; and SSF stands for the Split-Step Fourier algorithm, a highly efficient marching algorithm for solving parabolic type equations. These techniques are analyzed, and examples are displayed of ocean acoustic wavefields generated by the PE/SSF model.

  12. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas; Houston, Janice

    2012-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I liftoff acoustic environments and to determine the acoustic reduction gained by using an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and Mobile Launcher with tower. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by over 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to Ares I-X flight data.

  13. Acoustic modeling of the speech organ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacprowski, J.

    The state of research on acoustic modeling of phonational and articulatory speech producing elements is reviewed. Consistent with the physical interpretation of the speech production process, the acoustic theory of speech production is expressed as the product of three factors: laryngeal involvement, sound transmission, and emanations from the mouth and/or nose. Each of these factors is presented in the form of a simplified mathematical description which provides the theoretical basis for the formation of physical models of the appropriate functional members of this complex bicybernetic system. Vocal tract wall impedance, vocal tract synthesizers, laryngeal dysfunction, vowel nasalization, resonance circuits, and sound wave propagation are discussed.

  14. Computational acoustic modeling of cetacean vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Michael Dixon

    A framework for computational acoustic modeling of hypothetical vocal production mechanisms in cetaceans is presented. As a specific example, a model of a proposed source in the larynx of odontocetes is developed. Whales and dolphins generate a broad range of vocal sounds, but the exact mechanisms they use are not conclusively understood. In the fifty years since it has become widely accepted that whales can and do make sound, how they do so has remained particularly confounding. Cetaceans' highly divergent respiratory anatomy, along with the difficulty of internal observation during vocalization have contributed to this uncertainty. A variety of acoustical, morphological, ethological and physiological evidence has led to conflicting and often disputed theories of the locations and mechanisms of cetaceans' sound sources. Computational acoustic modeling has been used to create real-time parametric models of musical instruments and the human voice. These techniques can be applied to cetacean vocalizations to help better understand the nature and function of these sounds. Extensive studies of odontocete laryngeal morphology have revealed vocal folds that are consistently similar to a known but poorly understood acoustic source, the ribbon reed. A parametric computational model of the ribbon reed is developed, based on simplified geometrical, mechanical and fluid models drawn from the human voice literature. The physical parameters of the ribbon reed model are then adapted to those of the odontocete larynx. With reasonable estimates of real physical parameters, both the ribbon reed and odontocete larynx models produce sounds that are perceptually similar to their real-world counterparts, and both respond realistically under varying control conditions. Comparisons of acoustic features of the real-world and synthetic systems show a number of consistencies. While this does not on its own prove that either model is conclusively an accurate description of the source, it

  15. Multiple scale model for cell migration in monolayers: Elastic mismatch between cells enhances motility.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Benoit; Bresler, Yony; Wirtz, Denis; Grant, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a multiscale model for monolayer of motile cells that comprise normal and cancer cells. In the model, the two types of cells have identical properties except for their elasticity; cancer cells are softer and normal cells are stiffer. The goal is to isolate the role of elasticity mismatch on the migration potential of cancer cells in the absence of other contributions that are present in real cells. The methodology is based on a phase-field description where each cell is modeled as a highly-deformable self-propelled droplet. We simulated two types of nearly confluent monolayers. One contains a single cancer cell in a layer of normal cells and the other contains normal cells only. The simulation results demonstrate that elasticity mismatch alone is sufficient to increase the motility of the cancer cell significantly. Further, the trajectory of the cancer cell is decorated by several speed "bursts" where the cancer cell quickly relaxes from a largely deformed shape and consequently increases its translational motion. The increased motility and the amplitude and frequency of the bursts are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments. PMID:26134134

  16. Acoustical model of a Shoddy fibre absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, John Peter

    Shoddy fibres or "Shoddies" are a mixture of post-consumer and post-industrial fibres diverted from textile waste streams and recycled into their raw fibre form. They have found widespread use as a raw material for manufacturing sound absorbers that include, but are not limited to: automotive, architectural and home appliance applications. The purpose of this project is to develop a simple acoustic model to describe the acoustic behaviour of sound absorbers composed primarily of Shoddy fibres. The model requires knowledge of the material's bulk density only. To date, these materials have not been the focus of much published research and acoustical designers must rely on models that were developed for other materials or are overly complex. For modelling purposes, an equivalent fluid approach is chosen to balance complexity and accuracy. In deriving the proposed model, several popular equivalent fluid models are selected and the required input parameters for each model identified. The models are: the model of Delaney and Bazley, two models by Miki, the model of Johnson in conjunction with the model of Champoux and Allard and the model of Johnson in conjunction with the model of Lafarge. Characterization testing is carried out on sets of Shoddy absorbers produced using three different manufacturing methods. The measured properties are open porosity, tortuosity, airflow resistivity, the viscous and thermal characteristic lengths and the static thermal permeability. Empirical relationships between model parameters and bulk density are then derived and used to populate the selected models. This yields several 'simplified' models with bulk density as the only parameter. The most accurate model is then selected by comparing each model's prediction to the results of normal incidence sound absorption tests. The model of Johnson-Lafarge populated with the empirical relations is the most accurate model over the range of frequencies considered (approx. 300 Hz - 4000 Hz

  17. An Analytical Model for Top-Hat Long Transient Mode-Mismatched Thermal Lens Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaeian, M.; Rezaei, H.

    2016-02-01

    It has been shown that a top-hat excitation beam gives rise to a more sensitive signal for the thermal lens spectroscopy (TLS). Recently, a numerical model has been presented for a top- hat excitation beam in a dual-beam mod-mismatched TLS [Opt. Lett. 33(13), 1464-1466 (2008)]. In this work, we present a full analytical version of this model. Our model was based on a new solution of time-dependent heat equation for a finite radius cylindrical sample exposed to a top-hat excitation laser beam. The Fresnel diffraction integration method was then used to calculate on-axis probe-beam intensity variations due to thermal lensing by taking the aberrant nature of the thermal lens into account. The model was confirmed with experimental data of LSCAS-2 with an excellent agreement.

  18. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale representation of the SLS vehicle, mobile launcher, tower, and launch pad trench. The SLS launch propulsion system will be comprised of the Rocket Assisted Take-Off (RATO) motors representing the solid boosters and 4 Gas Hydrogen (GH2) thrusters representing the core engines. The GH2 thrusters were tested in a horizontal configuration in order to characterize their performance. In Phase 1, a single thruster was fired to determine the engine performance parameters necessary for scaling a single engine. A cluster configuration, consisting of the 4 thrusters, was tested in Phase 2 to integrate the system and determine their combined performance. Acoustic and overpressure data was collected during both test phases in order to characterize the system's acoustic performance. The results from the single thruster and 4- thuster system are discussed and compared.

  19. Criteria for determining whether mismatch responses exist in animal models: Focus on rodents.

    PubMed

    Harms, Lauren; Michie, Patricia T; Näätänen, Risto

    2016-04-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) component of the auditory event-related potential, elicited in response to unexpected stimuli in the auditory environment, has great value for cognitive neuroscience research. It is changed in several neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. The ability to measure and manipulate MMN-like responses in animal models, particularly rodents, would provide an enormous opportunity to learn more about the neurobiology underlying MMN. However, the MMN in humans is a very specific phenomenon: how do we decide which features we should focus on emulating in an animal model to achieve the highest level of translational validity? Here we discuss some of the key features of MMN in humans and summarise the success with which they have been translated into rodent models. Many studies from several different labs have successfully shown that the rat brain is capable of generating deviance detection responses that satisfy of the criteria for the human MMN. PMID:26196895

  20. Acoustic Models of Optical Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, V. V.; Varaksina, E. I.

    2014-01-01

    Students form a more exact idea of the action of optical mirrors if they can observe the wave field being formed during reflection. For this purpose it is possible to organize model experiments with flexural waves propagating in thin elastic plates. The direct and round edges of the plates are used as models of plane, convex and concave mirrors.…

  1. SLS Scale Model Acoustic Test Liftoff Results and Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, Douglas; Giacomoni, Clothilde

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible design phase test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments.

  2. Modelling acoustic scattering by suspended flocculating sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Peter D.; MacDonald, Iain T.; Vincent, Christopher E.

    2014-10-01

    The development of a theoretical description of how sound interacts with flocculating sediments has been lacking and this deficiency has impeded sound being used to extract quantitative suspended sediment parameters in suspensions containing flocs. As a step towards theoretically examining this problem a relatively simple heuristic approach has been adopted to provide a description of the interaction of sound with suspensions that undergo flocculation. A model is presented for the interpretation of acoustic scattering from suspensions of fine sediments as they transition from primary particles, through an intermediate regime, to the case where low density flocs dominate the acoustic scattering. The approach is based on modified spherical elastic solid and elastic fluid scatterers and a combination of both. To evaluate the model the variation of density and compressional velocity within the flocs as they form and grow in size is required. The density can be estimated from previous studies; however, the velocity is unknown and is formulated here using a fluid mixture approach. Uncertainties in these parameters can have a significant effect on the predicted scattering characteristics and are therefore investigated in the present study. Furthermore, to assess the proposed model, outputs are compared with recently published laboratory observations of acoustic scattering by flocculating cohesive suspensions.

  3. Model-based ocean acoustic passive localization

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Sullivan, E.J.

    1994-01-24

    The detection, localization and classification of acoustic sources (targets) in a hostile ocean environment is a difficult problem -- especially in light of the improved design of modern submarines and the continual improvement in quieting technology. Further the advent of more and more diesel-powered vessels makes the detection problem even more formidable than ever before. It has recently been recognized that the incorporation of a mathematical model that accurately represents the phenomenology under investigation can vastly improve the performance of any processor, assuming, of course, that the model is accurate. Therefore, it is necessary to incorporate more knowledge about the ocean environment into detection and localization algorithms in order to enhance the overall signal-to-noise ratios and improve performance. An alternative methodology to matched-field/matched-mode processing is the so-called model-based processor which is based on a state-space representation of the normal-mode propagation model. If state-space solutions can be accomplished, then many of the current ocean acoustic processing problems can be analyzed and solved using this framework to analyze performance results based on firm statistical and system theoretic grounds. The model-based approach, is (simply) ``incorporating mathematical models of both physical phenomenology and the measurement processes including noise into the processor to extract the desired information.`` In this application, we seek techniques to incorporate the: (1) ocean acoustic propagation model; (2) sensor array measurement model; and (3) noise models (ambient, shipping, surface and measurement) into a processor to solve the associated localization/detection problems.

  4. Theory and modeling of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Lihong; Lim, C. W.; Zhao, Xiushao; Geng, Daxing

    2016-06-01

    Models both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed and the corresponding acoustic pressure solutions are obtained. The acoustic pressure for an individual carbon nanotube (CNT) as a function of input power is investigated analytically and it is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. Further numerical analysis on the acoustic pressure response and characteristics for varying input frequency and distance are also examined both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions. Through detailed theoretical and numerical studies on the acoustic pressure solution for thinfilm-solid cylindrical transduction, it is concluded that a solid with smaller thermal conductivity favors to improve the acoustic performance. In general, the proposed models are applicable to a variety of cylindrical thermo-acoustic devices performing in different gaseous media.

  5. Hybrid Speaker Recognition Using Universal Acoustic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Jun; Kuroda, Tadahiro

    We propose a novel speaker recognition approach using a speaker-independent universal acoustic model (UAM) for sensornet applications. In sensornet applications such as “Business Microscope”, interactions among knowledge workers in an organization can be visualized by sensing face-to-face communication using wearable sensor nodes. In conventional studies, speakers are detected by comparing energy of input speech signals among the nodes. However, there are often synchronization errors among the nodes which degrade the speaker recognition performance. By focusing on property of the speaker's acoustic channel, UAM can provide robustness against the synchronization error. The overall speaker recognition accuracy is improved by combining UAM with the energy-based approach. For 0.1s speech inputs and 4 subjects, speaker recognition accuracy of 94% is achieved at the synchronization error less than 100ms.

  6. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and tower mounted on the Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments located throughout the test article. There were four primary ASMAT instrument suites: ignition overpressure (IOP), lift-off acoustics (LOA), ground acoustics (GA), and spatial correlation (SC). Each instrumentation suite incorporated different sensor models which were selected based upon measurement requirements. These requirements included the type of measurement, exposure to the environment, instrumentation check-outs and data acquisition. The sensors were attached to the test article using different mounts and brackets dependent upon the location of the sensor. This presentation addresses the observed effect of the sensors and mounts on the acoustic and pressure measurements.

  7. Mismatch responses and deviance detection in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor hypofunction and developmental models of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Harms, Lauren

    2016-04-01

    Reductions in the size of the mismatch negativity (MMN), an event-related potential component elicited in response to unexpected stimuli, are arguably the most robust neurophysiological findings in schizophrenia. Several studies have now demonstrated that 'true' human-like deviance detection mismatch responses (MMRs) can be generated in the rodent brain and therefore that animal models can be used to examine the neurobiology of schizophrenia-like MMR impairments and investigate the efficacy of new treatments in addressing underlying neurobiological mechanisms. Two broad categories of animal models have been examined for schizophrenia-like MMRs: models involving N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction, and models involving an insult or exposure during development. While these models have been shown to exhibit reductions in MMRs, it is still unclear whether or not these reductions involve changes to neural adaptation to repetitive stimuli or whether they reflect impairments in the response to unexpected deviations in regular patterns. PMID:26159809

  8. Improving Acoustic Models by Watching Television

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witbrock, Michael J.; Hauptmann, Alexander G.

    1998-01-01

    Obtaining sufficient labelled training data is a persistent difficulty for speech recognition research. Although well transcribed data is expensive to produce, there is a constant stream of challenging speech data and poor transcription broadcast as closed-captioned television. We describe a reliable unsupervised method for identifying accurately transcribed sections of these broadcasts, and show how these segments can be used to train a recognition system. Starting from acoustic models trained on the Wall Street Journal database, a single iteration of our training method reduced the word error rate on an independent broadcast television news test set from 62.2% to 59.5%.

  9. Modeling and adaptive control of acoustic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Ravinder

    Active noise control is a problem that receives significant attention in many areas including aerospace and manufacturing. The advent of inexpensive high performance processors has made it possible to implement real-time control algorithms to effect active noise control. Both fixed-gain and adaptive methods may be used to design controllers for this problem. For fixed-gain methods, it is necessary to obtain a mathematical model of the system to design controllers. In addition, models help us gain phenomenological insights into the dynamics of the system. Models are also necessary to perform numerical simulations. However, models are often inadequate for the purpose of controller design because they involve parameters that are difficult to determine and also because there are always unmodeled effects. This fact motivates the use of adaptive algorithms for control since adaptive methods usually require significantly less model information than fixed-gain methods. The first part of this dissertation deals with derivation of a state space model of a one-dimensional acoustic duct. Two types of actuation, namely, a side-mounted speaker (interior control) and an end-mounted speaker (boundary control) are considered. The techniques used to derive the model of the acoustic duct are extended to the problem of fluid surface wave control. A state space model of small amplitude surfaces waves of a fluid in a rectangular container is derived and two types of control methods, namely, surface pressure control and map actuator based control are proposed and analyzed. The second part of this dissertation deals with the development of an adaptive disturbance rejection algorithm that is applied to the problem of active noise control. ARMARKOV models which have the same structure as predictor models are used for system representation. The algorithm requires knowledge of only one path of the system, from control to performance, and does not require a measurement of the disturbance nor

  10. Criteria and prediction models for mismatch repair gene mutations: a review.

    PubMed

    Win, Aung Ko; Macinnis, Robert J; Dowty, James G; Jenkins, Mark A

    2013-12-01

    One of the strongest predictors of colorectal cancer risk is carrying a germline mutation in a DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene. Once identified, mutation carriers can be recommended for intensive screening that will substantially reduce their high colorectal cancer risk. Conversely, the relatives of carriers identified as non-carriers can be relieved of the burden of intensive screening. Criteria and prediction models that identify likely mutation carriers are needed for cost-effective, targeted, germline testing for MMR gene mutation. We reviewed 12 criteria/guidelines and 8 prediction models (Leiden, Amsterdam-plus, Amsterdam-alternative, MMRpro, PREMM1,2,6, MMRpredict, Associazione Italiana per lo studio della Familiarità ed Ereditarietà dei tumori Gastrointestinali (AIFEG) and the Myriad Genetics Prevalence table) for identifying mutation carriers. While criteria are only used to identify individuals with colorectal cancer (yes/no for screening followed by germline testing), all prediction models except MMRpredict and Myriad tables can predict the probability of carrying mutations for individuals with or without colorectal cancer. We conducted a meta-analysis of the discrimination performance of 17 studies that validated the prediction models. The pooled estimate for the area under curve was 0.80 (95% CI 0.72 to 0.88) for MMRpro, 0.81 (95% CI 0.73 to 0.88) for MMRpredict, 0.84 (95% CI 0.81 to 0.88) for PREMM, and 0.85 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.91) for Leiden model. Given the high degree of overlap in the CIs, we cannot state that one model has a higher discrimination than any of the others. Overall, the existing statistical models have been shown to be sensitive and specific (at a 5% cut-off) in predicting MMR gene mutation carriers. Future models may need to: provide prediction of PMS2 mutations, take into account a wider range of Lynch syndrome-associated cancers when assessing family history, and be applicable to all people irrespective of any cancer diagnosis

  11. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  12. A numerical model of acoustic choking. II - Shocked solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkington, N. J.; Eversman, W.

    1986-01-01

    The one dimensional equations of gas dynamics are used to model subsonic acoustic choking. This model can accommodate non-linear distortion of waves and the eventual formation of shock waves. Several finite differencing schemes are adapted to obtain solutions. The results obtained with the various schemes are compared with the asymptotic results available. The results suggest that no one finite differencing scheme gives solutions significantly better than the others and that most of the difference solutions are close to the asymptotic results. If the acoustic shock wave is sufficiently strong it almost annihilates the acoustic wave; in this situation numerical errors may dominate the results. Such solutions involve very large acoustic attenuations.

  13. Coupled vibro-acoustic model updating using frequency response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehete, D. V.; Modak, S. V.; Gupta, K.

    2016-03-01

    Interior noise in cavities of motorized vehicles is of increasing significance due to the lightweight design of these structures. Accurate coupled vibro-acoustic FE models of such cavities are required so as to allow a reliable design and analysis. It is, however, experienced that the vibro-acoustic predictions using these models do not often correlate acceptably well with the experimental measurements and hence require model updating. Both the structural and the acoustic parameters addressing the stiffness as well as the damping modeling inaccuracies need to be considered simultaneously in the model updating framework in order to obtain an accurate estimate of these parameters. It is also noted that the acoustic absorption properties are generally frequency dependent. This makes use of modal data based methods for updating vibro-acoustic FE models difficult. In view of this, the present paper proposes a method based on vibro-acoustic frequency response functions that allow updating of a coupled FE model by considering simultaneously the parameters associated with both the structural as well as the acoustic model of the cavity. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical studies on a 3D rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate. Updating parameters related to the material property, stiffness of joints between the plate and the rectangular cavity and the properties of absorbing surfaces of the acoustic cavity are considered. The robustness of the method under presence of noise is also studied.

  14. Collapsing factors in multitrait-multimethod models: examining consequences of a mismatch between measurement design and model

    PubMed Central

    Geiser, Christian; Bishop, Jacob; Lockhart, Ginger

    2015-01-01

    Models of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) are frequently applied to examine the convergent validity of scores obtained from multiple raters or methods in so-called multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) investigations. Many applications of CFA-MTMM and similarly structured models result in solutions in which at least one method (or specific) factor shows non-significant loading or variance estimates. Eid et al. (2008) distinguished between MTMM measurement designs with interchangeable (randomly selected) vs. structurally different (fixed) methods and showed that each type of measurement design implies specific CFA-MTMM measurement models. In the current study, we hypothesized that some of the problems that are commonly seen in applications of CFA-MTMM models may be due to a mismatch between the underlying measurement design and fitted models. Using simulations, we found that models with M method factors (where M is the total number of methods) and unconstrained loadings led to a higher proportion of solutions in which at least one method factor became empirically unstable when these models were fit to data generated from structurally different methods. The simulations also revealed that commonly used model goodness-of-fit criteria frequently failed to identify incorrectly specified CFA-MTMM models. We discuss implications of these findings for other complex CFA models in which similar issues occur, including nested (bifactor) and latent state-trait models. PMID:26283977

  15. Hybrid CFD/CAA Modeling for Liftoff Acoustic Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Liever, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents development efforts at the NASA Marshall Space flight Center to establish a hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) simulation system for launch vehicle liftoff acoustics environment analysis. Acoustic prediction engineering tools based on empirical jet acoustic strength and directivity models or scaled historical measurements are of limited value in efforts to proactively design and optimize launch vehicles and launch facility configurations for liftoff acoustics. CFD based modeling approaches are now able to capture the important details of vehicle specific plume flow environment, identifY the noise generation sources, and allow assessment of the influence of launch pad geometric details and sound mitigation measures such as water injection. However, CFD methodologies are numerically too dissipative to accurately capture the propagation of the acoustic waves in the large CFD models. The hybrid CFD/CAA approach combines the high-fidelity CFD analysis capable of identifYing the acoustic sources with a fast and efficient Boundary Element Method (BEM) that accurately propagates the acoustic field from the source locations. The BEM approach was chosen for its ability to properly account for reflections and scattering of acoustic waves from launch pad structures. The paper will present an overview of the technology components of the CFD/CAA framework and discuss plans for demonstration and validation against test data.

  16. A molecular model for lipid-protein interaction in membranes: the role of hydrophobic mismatch.

    PubMed Central

    Fattal, D R; Ben-Shaul, A

    1993-01-01

    The interaction free energy between a hydrophobic, transmembrane, protein and the surrounding lipid environment is calculated based on a microscopic model for lipid organization. The protein is treated as a rigid hydrophobic solute of thickness dP, embedded in a lipid bilayer of unperturbed thickness doL. The lipid chains in the immediate vicinity of the protein are assumed to adjust their length to that of the protein (e.g., they are stretched when dP > doL) in order to bridge over the lipid-protein hydrophobic mismatch (dP-doL). The bilayer's hydrophobic thickness is assumed to decay exponentially to its asymptotic, unperturbed, value. The lipid deformation free energy is represented as a sum of chain (hydrophobic core) and interfacial (head-group region) contributions. The chain contribution is calculated using a detailed molecular theory of chain packing statistics, which allows the calculation of conformational properties and thermodynamic functions (in a mean-field approximation) of the lipid tails. The tails are treated as single chain amphiphiles, modeled using the rotational isometric state scheme. The interfacial free energy is represented by a phenomenological expression, accounting for the opposing effects of head-group repulsions and hydrocarbon-water surface tension. The lipid deformation free energy delta F is calculated as a function of dP-doL. Most calculations are for C14 amphiphiles which, in the absence of a protein, pack at an average area per head-group ao approximately equal to 32 A2 (doL approximately 24.5 A), corresponding to the fluid state of the membrane. When dP = doL, delta F > 0 and is due entirely to the loss of conformational entropy experienced by the chains around the protein. When dP > doL, the interaction free energy is further increased due to the enhanced stretching of the tails. When dP < doL, chain flexibility (entropy) increases, but this contribution to delta F is overcounted by the increase in the interfacial free energy

  17. Acoustic characteristics of 1/20-scale model helicopter rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenoy, Rajarama K.; Kohlhepp, Fred W.; Leighton, Kenneth P.

    1986-01-01

    A wind tunnel test to study the effects of geometric scale on acoustics and to investigate the applicability of very small scale models for the study of acoustic characteristics of helicopter rotors was conducted in the United Technologies Research Center Acoustic Research Tunnel. The results show that the Reynolds number effects significantly alter the Blade-Vortex-Interaction (BVI) Noise characteristics by enhancing the lower frequency content and suppressing the higher frequency content. In the time domain this is observed as an inverted thickness noise impulse rather than the typical positive-negative impulse of BVI noise. At higher advance ratio conditions, in the absence of BVI, the 1/20 scale model acoustic trends with Mach number follow those of larger scale models. However, the 1/20 scale model acoustic trends appear to indicate stall at higher thrust and advance ratio conditions.

  18. On Modeling Eavesdropping Attacks in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks †

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiu; Dai, Hong-Ning; Li, Xuran; Wang, Hao; Xiao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The security and privacy of underwater acoustic sensor networks has received extensive attention recently due to the proliferation of underwater activities. This paper proposes an analytical model to investigate the eavesdropping attacks in underwater acoustic sensor networks. Our analytical framework considers the impacts of various underwater acoustic channel conditions (such as the acoustic signal frequency, spreading factor and wind speed) and different hydrophones (isotropic hydrophones and array hydrophones) in terms of network nodes and eavesdroppers. We also conduct extensive simulations to evaluate the effectiveness and the accuracy of our proposed model. Empirical results show that our proposed model is quite accurate. In addition, our results also imply that the eavesdropping probability heavily depends on both the underwater acoustic channel conditions and the features of hydrophones. PMID:27213379

  19. On Modeling Eavesdropping Attacks in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiu; Dai, Hong-Ning; Li, Xuran; Wang, Hao; Xiao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The security and privacy of underwater acoustic sensor networks has received extensive attention recently due to the proliferation of underwater activities. This paper proposes an analytical model to investigate the eavesdropping attacks in underwater acoustic sensor networks. Our analytical framework considers the impacts of various underwater acoustic channel conditions (such as the acoustic signal frequency, spreading factor and wind speed) and different hydrophones (isotropic hydrophones and array hydrophones) in terms of network nodes and eavesdroppers. We also conduct extensive simulations to evaluate the effectiveness and the accuracy of our proposed model. Empirical results show that our proposed model is quite accurate. In addition, our results also imply that the eavesdropping probability heavily depends on both the underwater acoustic channel conditions and the features of hydrophones. PMID:27213379

  20. Tests Of Shear-Flow Model For Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrot, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1992-01-01

    Tests described in report conducted to validate two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determination of acoustic impedance of acoustic liner in grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment by use of infinite-waveguide method. Tests successful for both upstream and downstream propagations. Work has potential for utility in testing of engine ducts in commercial aircraft.

  1. Numerical modeling of the acoustic guitar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine; Derveaux, Grégoire; Joly, Patrick; Bécache, Eliane

    2003-10-01

    An interactive DVD has been created, based on a numerical model of the acoustic guitar. In a first chapter, the retained physical model is described and illustrated, from the pluck to the 3D radiation field. The second chapter is devoted to the presentation of the numerical tools used for solving the equations of the model. Numerical simulations of plate vibrations and radiated sound pressure are shown in the third chapter. A number of simulated sounds are presented and analyzed in the fourth chapter. In addition, the DVD includes a discussion between a guitar maker, an acoustician, a guitar player and a mathematician. This discussion is entitled ``towards a common language.'' Its aim is to show the interest of simulations with respect to complementary professional approaches of the instrument. This DVD received the Henri Poincaré Prize from the 8th Research Film Festival of Nancy (June 2003), sponsored by the CNRS, in the category ``Documents for the scientific community and illustrations of the research for teaching purpose.''

  2. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2012-01-01

    Launch environments, such as Liftoff Acoustic (LOA) and Ignition Overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA which are used in the development of the vibro-acoustic environments. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe to mitigate at the component level, reduction of the launch environments is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I launch environments and to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to the Ares I LOA predictions and water suppression effectiveness results are presented.

  3. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2012-01-01

    Launch environments, such as Liftoff Acoustic (LOA) and Ignition Overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA which are used in the development of the vibro-acoustic environments. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe to mitigate at the component level, reduction of the launch environments is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I launch environments and to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to the Ares I LOA predictions and water suppression effectiveness results are presented.

  4. Effects of primer-template mismatches on the polymerase chain reaction: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 model studies.

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, S; Kellogg, D E; McKinney, N; Spasic, D; Goda, L; Levenson, C; Sninsky, J J

    1990-01-01

    We investigated the effects of various primer-template mismatches on DNA amplification of an HIV-1 gag region by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Single internal mismatches had no significant effect on PCR product yield while those at the 3'-terminal base had varied effects. A:G, G:A, and C:C mismatches reduced overall PCR product yield about 100-fold, A:A mismatches about 20-fold. All other 3'-terminal mismatches were efficiently amplified, although the G:G mismatches appeared to be more sensitive to sequence context and dNTP concentrations than other mismatches. It should be noted that mismatches of T with either G, C, or T had a minimal effect on PCR product yield. Double mismatches within the last four bases of a primer-template duplex where one of the mismatches is at the 3' terminal nucleotide, in general, reduced PCR product yield dramatically. The presence of a mismatched T at the 3'-terminus, however, allowed significant amplification even when coupled with an adjacent mismatch. Furthermore, even two mismatched Ts at the 3'-terminus allowed efficient amplification. Images PMID:2179874

  5. A Stratified Acoustic Model Accounting for Phase Shifts for Underwater Acoustic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Zhang, Lin; Li, Victor O. K.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate acoustic channel models are critical for the study of underwater acoustic networks. Existing models include physics-based models and empirical approximation models. The former enjoy good accuracy, but incur heavy computational load, rendering them impractical in large networks. On the other hand, the latter are computationally inexpensive but inaccurate since they do not account for the complex effects of boundary reflection losses, the multi-path phenomenon and ray bending in the stratified ocean medium. In this paper, we propose a Stratified Acoustic Model (SAM) based on frequency-independent geometrical ray tracing, accounting for each ray's phase shift during the propagation. It is a feasible channel model for large scale underwater acoustic network simulation, allowing us to predict the transmission loss with much lower computational complexity than the traditional physics-based models. The accuracy of the model is validated via comparisons with the experimental measurements in two different oceans. Satisfactory agreements with the measurements and with other computationally intensive classical physics-based models are demonstrated. PMID:23669708

  6. Towards a model to interpret driver behaviour in terms of mismatch between real world complexity and invested effort.

    PubMed

    Broström, Robert; Davidsson, Staffan

    2012-01-01

    Driving behaviour has been less documented than driver workload. The possibilities to define a framework that could be part of a driving behaviour model were investigated. The results present a framework that defines twelve scenarios in which drivers have misinterpreted a driving situation. The descriptions show evidence of increased user experience for some scenarios while other indicates reduced traffic safety. The results suggest that by using the framework-descriptions on how and why mismatches occur, design guidelines for in-vehicle systems can be developed. PMID:22317506

  7. Optimization of energy window and evaluation of scatter compensation methods in MPS using the ideal observer with model mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaly, Michael; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we used the ideal observer (IO) and IO with model mismatch (IO-MM) applied in the projection domain and an anthropomorphic Channelized Hotelling Observer (CHO) applied to reconstructed images to optimize the acquisition energy window width and evaluate various scatter compensation methods in the context of a myocardial perfusion SPECT defect detection task. The IO has perfect knowledge of the image formation process and thus reflects performance with perfect compensation for image-degrading factors. Thus, using the IO to optimize imaging systems could lead to suboptimal parameters compared to those optimized for humans interpreting SPECT images reconstructed with imperfect or no compensation. The IO-MM allows incorporating imperfect system models into the IO optimization process. We found that with near-perfect scatter compensation, the optimal energy window for the IO and CHO were similar; in its absence the IO-MM gave a better prediction of the optimal energy window for the CHO using different scatter compensation methods. These data suggest that the IO-MM may be useful for projection-domain optimization when model mismatch is significant, and that the IO is useful when followed by reconstruction with good models of the image formation process.

  8. Acoustic field distribution of sawtooth wave with nonlinear SBE model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaozhou Zhang, Lue; Wang, Xiangda; Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    For precise prediction of the acoustic field distribution of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with an ellipsoid transducer, the nonlinear spheroidal beam equations (SBE) are employed to model acoustic wave propagation in medium. To solve the SBE model with frequency domain algorithm, boundary conditions are obtained for monochromatic and sawtooth waves based on the phase compensation. In numerical analysis, the influence of sinusoidal wave and sawtooth wave on axial pressure distributions are investigated.

  9. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  10. Acoustic test and analyses of three advanced turboprop models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, B. M.; Metzger, F. B.

    1980-01-01

    Results of acoustic tests of three 62.2 cm (24.5 inch) diameter models of the prop-fan (a small diameter, highly loaded. Multi-bladed variable pitch advanced turboprop) are presented. Results show that there is little difference in the noise produced by unswept and slightly swept designs. However, the model designed for noise reduction produces substantially less noise at test conditions simulating 0.8 Mach number cruise speed or at conditions simulating takeoff and landing. In the near field at cruise conditions the acoustically designed. In the far field at takeoff and landing conditions the acoustically designed model is 5 db quieter than unswept or slightly swept designs. Correlation between noise measurement and theoretical predictions as well as comparisons between measured and predicted acoustic pressure pulses generated by the prop-fan blades are discussed. The general characteristics of the pulses are predicted. Shadowgraph measurements were obtained which showed the location of bow and trailing waves.

  11. Speaker height estimation from speech: Fusing spectral regression and statistical acoustic models.

    PubMed

    Hansen, John H L; Williams, Keri; Bořil, Hynek

    2015-08-01

    Estimating speaker height can assist in voice forensic analysis and provide additional side knowledge to benefit automatic speaker identification or acoustic model selection for automatic speech recognition. In this study, a statistical approach to height estimation that incorporates acoustic models within a non-uniform height bin width Gaussian mixture model structure as well as a formant analysis approach that employs linear regression on selected phones are presented. The accuracy and trade-offs of these systems are explored by examining the consistency of the results, location, and causes of error as well a combined fusion of the two systems using data from the TIMIT corpus. Open set testing is also presented using the Multi-session Audio Research Project corpus and publicly available YouTube audio to examine the effect of channel mismatch between training and testing data and provide a realistic open domain testing scenario. The proposed algorithms achieve a highly competitive performance to previously published literature. Although the different data partitioning in the literature and this study may prevent performance comparisons in absolute terms, the mean average error of 4.89 cm for males and 4.55 cm for females provided by the proposed algorithm on TIMIT utterances containing selected phones suggest a considerable estimation error decrease compared to past efforts. PMID:26328721

  12. Modeling and validation of polyurethane based passive underwater acoustic absorber.

    PubMed

    Jayakumari, V G; Shamsudeen, Rahna K; Ramesh, R; Mukundan, T

    2011-08-01

    The acoustic behavior of an acoustically transparent polyurethane and an interpenetrating polymer network of polyurethane with polydimethyl siloxane were studied using dynamic mechanical analysis, finite element modeling, and experimental evaluation of acoustic properties in a water-filled pulse tube setup. Dynamic mechanical measurements in the temperature range -50 °C to +70 °C were carried out, and the data were used for time temperature superposition to generate material behavior at high frequencies. These inputs were used for modeling the acoustic behavior of these materials using ATILA, which is a commercial finite element code, capable of computing transmission and reflection characteristics of materials. From this data, absorption characteristics were computed. The results were compared with the experimental results obtained using a water-filled pulse tube facility. PMID:21877787

  13. Optimization of energy window for {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung SPECT imaging for detection tasks using the ideal observer with model-mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Rong Xing; Ghaly, Michael; Frey, Eric C.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: In yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) microsphere brachytherapy (radioembolization) of unresectable liver cancer, posttherapy {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been used to document the distribution of microspheres in the patient and to help predict potential side effects. The energy window used during projection acquisition can have a significant effect on image quality. Thus, using an optimal energy window is desirable. However, there has been great variability in the choice of energy window due to the continuous and broad energy distribution of {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung photons. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the ideal observer (IO) is a widely used figure of merit (FOM) for optimizing the imaging system for detection tasks. The IO implicitly assumes a perfect model of the image formation process. However, for {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung SPECT there can be substantial model-mismatch (i.e., difference between the actual image formation process and the model of it assumed in reconstruction), and the amount of the model-mismatch depends on the energy window. It is thus important to account for the degradation of the observer performance due to model-mismatch in the optimization of the energy window. The purpose of this paper is to optimize the energy window for {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung SPECT for a detection task while taking into account the effects of the model-mismatch. Methods: An observer, termed the ideal observer with model-mismatch (IO-MM), has been proposed previously to account for the effects of the model-mismatch on IO performance. In this work, the AUC for the IO-MM was used as the FOM for the optimization. To provide a clinically realistic object model and imaging simulation, the authors used a background-known-statistically and signal-known-statistically task. The background was modeled as multiple compartments in the liver with activity parameters independently following a

  14. Modeling ground vehicle acoustic signatures for analysis and synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, G.; Stanfield, R.

    1995-07-01

    Security and weapon systems use acoustic sensor signals to classify and identify moving ground vehicles. Developing robust signal processing algorithms for this is expensive, particularly in presence of acoustic clutter or countermeasures. This paper proposes a parametric ground vehicle acoustic signature model to aid the system designer in understanding which signature features are important, developing corresponding feature extraction algorithms and generating low-cost, high-fidelity synthetic signatures for testing. The authors have proposed computer-generated acoustic signatures of armored, tracked ground vehicles to deceive acoustic-sensored smart munitions. They have developed quantitative measures of how accurately a synthetic acoustic signature matches those produced by actual vehicles. This paper describes parameters of the model used to generate these synthetic signatures and suggests methods for extracting these parameters from signatures of valid vehicle encounters. The model incorporates wide-bandwidth and narrow- bandwidth components that are modulated in a pseudo-random fashion to mimic the time dynamics of valid vehicle signatures. Narrow- bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate frequency, amplitude and phase information contained in a single set of narrow frequency- band harmonics. Wide-bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate parameters of a correlated-noise-floor model. Finally, the authors propose a method of modeling the time dynamics of the harmonic amplitudes as a means adding necessary time-varying features to the narrow-bandwidth signal components. The authors present results of applying this modeling technique to acoustic signatures recorded during encounters with one armored, tracked vehicle. Similar modeling techniques can be applied to security systems.

  15. A comparative analysis of acoustic energy models for churches.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Umberto; Cirillo, Ettore; Martellotta, Francesco

    2009-10-01

    Different models to improve prediction of energy-based acoustic parameters in churches have been proposed by different researchers [E. Cirillo and F. Martellotta, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 118, 232-248 (2005); T. Zamarreño et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 121, 234-250 (2006)]. They all suggested variations to the "revised" theory proposed by Barron and Lee [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, 618-628 (1988)], starting from experimental observations. The present paper compares these models and attempts to generalize their use taking advantage of the measurements carried out in 24 Italian churches differing in style, typology, and location. The whole sample of churches was divided into two groups. The first was used to fine-tune existing models, with particular reference to the "mu model," which was originally tested only on Mudejar-Gothic churches. Correlations between model parameters and major typological and architectural factors were found, leading to a classification that greatly simplifies parameter choice. Finally, the reliability of each model was verified on the rest of the sample, showing that acoustic parameters can be predicted with reasonable accuracy provided that one of the specifically modified theories is used. The results show that the model requiring more input parameters performs slightly better than the other which, conversely, is simpler to apply. PMID:19813798

  16. Drive Rig Mufflers for Model Scale Engine Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David

    2010-01-01

    Testing of air breathing propulsion systems in the 9x15 foot wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center depends on compressed air turbines for power. The drive rig turbines exhaust directly to the wind tunnel test section, and have been found to produce significant unwanted noise that reduces the quality of the acoustic measurements of the model being tested. In order to mitigate this acoustic contamination, a muffler can be attached downstream of the drive rig turbine. The modern engine designs currently being tested produce much less noise than traditional engines, and consequently a lower noise floor is required of the facility. An acoustic test of a muffler designed to mitigate this extraneous noise is presented, and a noise reduction of 8 dB between 700 Hz and 20 kHz was documented, significantly improving the quality of acoustic measurements in the facility.

  17. Acoustic intensity calculations for axisymmetrically modeled fluid regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambric, Stephen A.; Everstine, Gordon C.

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for calculating acoustic intensities from a time harmonic pressure field in an axisymmetric fluid region is presented. Acoustic pressures are computed in a mesh of NASTRAN triangular finite elements of revolution (TRIAAX) using an analogy between the scalar wave equation and elasticity equations. Acoustic intensities are then calculated from pressures and pressure derivatives taken over the mesh of TRIAAX elements. Intensities are displayed as vectors indicating the directions and magnitudes of energy flow at all mesh points in the acoustic field. A prolate spheroidal shell is modeled with axisymmetric shell elements (CONEAX) and submerged in a fluid region of TRIAAX elements. The model is analyzed to illustrate the acoustic intensity method and the usefulness of energy flow paths in the understanding of the response of fluid-structure interaction problems. The structural-acoustic analogy used is summarized for completeness. This study uncovered a NASTRAN limitation involving numerical precision issues in the CONEAX stiffness calculation causing large errors in the system matrices for nearly cylindrical cones.

  18. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  19. Applied topology optimization of vibro-acoustic hearing instrument models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Søndergaard, Morten Birkmose; Pedersen, Claus B. W.

    2014-02-01

    Designing hearing instruments remains an acoustic challenge as users request small designs for comfortable wear and cosmetic appeal and at the same time require sufficient amplification from the device. First, to ensure proper amplification in the device, a critical design challenge in the hearing instrument is to minimize the feedback between the outputs (generated sound and vibrations) from the receiver looping back into the microphones. Secondly, the feedback signal is minimized using time consuming trial-and-error design procedures for physical prototypes and virtual models using finite element analysis. In the present work it is demonstrated that structural topology optimization of vibro-acoustic finite element models can be used to both sufficiently minimize the feedback signal and to reduce the time consuming trial-and-error design approach. The structural topology optimization of a vibro-acoustic finite element model is shown for an industrial full scale model hearing instrument.

  20. 2-D modeling of laterally acoustically coupled thin film bulk acoustic wave resonator filters.

    PubMed

    Pensala, Tuomas; Meltaus, Johanna; Kokkonen, Kimmo; Ylilammi, Markku

    2010-11-01

    A 2-D model is developed for calculating lateral acoustical coupling between adjacent thin film BAW resonators forming an electrical N-port. The model is based on solution and superposition of lateral eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a structure consisting of adjacent regions with known plate wave dispersion properties. Mechanical and electrical response of the device are calculated as a superposition of eigenmodes according to voltage drive at one electrical port at a time while extracting current induced in the other ports, leading to a full Y-parameter description of the device. Exemplary cases are simulated to show the usefulness of the model in the study of the basic design rules of laterally coupled thin film BAW resonator filters. Model predictions are compared to an experimental 1.9-GHz band-pass filter based on aluminum nitride thin film technology and lateral acoustical coupling. Good agreement is obtained in prediction of passband behavior. The eigenmode-based model forms a useful tool for fast simulation of laterally coupled acoustic devices. It allows one to gain insight into basic device physics in a very intuitive fashion compared with more detailed but heavier finite element method. Shortcomings of this model and possible improvements are discussed. PMID:21041141

  1. Recent Advances in Underwater Acoustic Modelling and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ETTER, P. C.

    2001-02-01

    A comprehensive review of international developments in underwater acoustic modelling is used to construct an updated technology baseline containing 107 propagation models, 16 noise models, 17 reverberation models and 25 sonar performance models. This updated technology baseline represents a 30% increase over a previous baseline published in 1996. When executed in higher-level simulations, these models can generate predictive and diagnostic outputs that are useful to acoustical oceanographers or sonar technologists in the analysis of complex systems operating in the undersea environment. Recent modelling developments described in the technical literature suggest two principal areas of application: low-frequency, inverse acoustics in deep water; and high-frequency, bottom-interacting acoustics in coastal regions. Rapid changes in global geopolitics have opened new avenues for collaboration, thereby facilitating the transfer of modelling and simulation technologies among members of the international community. This accelerated technology transfer has created new imperatives for international standards in modelling and simulation architectures. National and international activities to promote interoperability among modelling and simulation efforts in government, industry and academia are reviewed and discussed.

  2. Theoretical vibro-acoustic modeling of acoustic noise transmission through aircraft windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloufi, Badr; Behdinan, Kamran; Zu, Jean

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a fully vibro-acoustic model for sound transmission across a multi-pane aircraft window is developed. The proposed model is efficiently applied for a set of window models to perform extensive theoretical parametric studies. The studied window configurations generally simulate the passenger window designs of modern aircraft classes which have an exterior multi-Plexiglas pane, an interior single acrylic glass pane and a dimmable glass ("smart" glass), all separated by thin air cavities. The sound transmission loss (STL) characteristics of three different models, triple-, quadruple- and quintuple-paned windows identical in size and surface density, are analyzed for improving the acoustic insulation performances. Typical results describing the influence of several system parameters, such as the thicknesses, number and spacing of the window panes, on the transmission loss are then investigated. In addition, a comparison study is carried out to evaluate the acoustic reduction capability of each window model. The STL results show that the higher frequencies sound transmission loss performance can be improved by increasing the number of window panels, however, the low frequency performance is decreased, particularly at the mass-spring resonances.

  3. Fluid mechanical model of the acoustic impedance of small orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Rogers, T.

    1976-01-01

    A fluid mechanical model of the acoustic behavior of small orifices is presented which predicts orifice resistance and reactance as a function of incident sound pressure level, frequency, and orifice geometry. Agreement between predicted and measured values is excellent. The model shows the following: (1) The acoustic flow in immediate neighborhood of the orifice can be modeled as a locally spherical flow. Within this near field, the flow is, to a first approximation, unsteady and incompressible. (2) At very low sound pressure levels, the orifice viscous resistance is directly related to the effect of boundary-layer displacement along the walls containing the orifice, and the orifice reactance is directly related to the inertia of the oscillating flow in the neighborhood of the orifice. (3) For large values of the incident acoustic pressure, the impedance is dominated by nonlinear jet-like effects. (4) For low values of the pressure, the resistance and reactance are roughly equal.

  4. Numerical modelling of nonlinear full-wave acoustic propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto; Rendón, Pablo L.

    2015-10-01

    The various model equations of nonlinear acoustics are arrived at by making assumptions which permit the observation of the interaction with propagation of either single or joint effects. We present here a form of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics which are deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A two-dimensional, finite-volume method using Roe's linearisation has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. This code, which has been written for parallel execution on a GPU, can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, to parametric acoustic arrays and nonlinear propagation in acoustic waveguides. Examples related to these applications are shown and discussed.

  5. Numerical modelling of nonlinear full-wave acoustic propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto Rendón, Pablo L.

    2015-10-28

    The various model equations of nonlinear acoustics are arrived at by making assumptions which permit the observation of the interaction with propagation of either single or joint effects. We present here a form of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics which are deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A two-dimensional, finite-volume method using Roe’s linearisation has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. This code, which has been written for parallel execution on a GPU, can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, to parametric acoustic arrays and nonlinear propagation in acoustic waveguides. Examples related to these applications are shown and discussed.

  6. Comparison of Transmission Line Methods for Surface Acoustic Wave Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William; Atkinson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, extremely low power and can be used to develop passive wireless sensors. For these reasons, NASA is investigating the use of SAW technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace structures. To facilitate rapid prototyping of passive SAW sensors for aerospace applications, SAW models have been developed. This paper reports on the comparison of three methods of modeling SAWs. The three models are the Impulse Response Method (a first order model), and two second order matrix methods; the conventional matrix approach, and a modified matrix approach that is extended to include internal finger reflections. The second order models are based upon matrices that were originally developed for analyzing microwave circuits using transmission line theory. Results from the models are presented with measured data from devices. Keywords: Surface Acoustic Wave, SAW, transmission line models, Impulse Response Method.

  7. Frequency and Time Domain Modeling of Acoustic Liner Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a research program directed at the acoustics of advanced subsonic propulsion systems undertaken at NASA Langley, Duke University was funded to develop a boundary condition model for bulk-reacting nacelle liners. The overall objective of the Langley program was to understand and predict noise from advanced subsonic transport engines and to develop related noise control technology. The overall technical areas included: fan and propeller source noise, acoustics of ducts and duct liners, interior noise, subjective acoustics, and systems noise prediction. The Duke effort was directed toward duct liner acoustics for the development of analytical methods to characterize liner behavior in both frequency domain and time domain. A review of duct acoustics and liner technology can be found in Reference [1]. At that time, NASA Langley was investigating the propulsion concept of an advanced ducted fan, with a large diameter housed inside a relatively short duct. Fan diameters in excess of ten feet were proposed. The lengths of both the inlet and exhaust portions of the duct were to be short, probably less than half the fan diameter. The nacelle itself would be relatively thin-walled for reasons of aerodynamic efficiency. The blade-passage frequency was expected to be less than I kHz, and very likely in the 200 to 300 Hz range. Because of the design constraints of a short duct, a thin nacelle, and long acoustic wavelengths, the application of effective liner technology would be especially challenging. One of the needs of the NASA Langley program was the capability to accurately and efficiently predict the behavior of the acoustic liner. The traditional point impedance method was not an adequate model for proposed liner designs. The method was too restrictive to represent bulk reacting liners and to allow for the characterization of many possible innovative liner concepts. In the research effort at Duke, an alternative method, initially developed to handle bulk

  8. Design, characterization and modeling of biobased acoustic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari Mosanenzadeh, Shahrzad

    Polymeric open cell foams are widely used as sound absorbers in sectors such as automobile, aerospace, transportation and building industries, yet there is a need to improve sound absorption of these foams through understanding the relation between cell morphology and acoustic properties of porous material. Due to complicated microscopic structure of open cell foams, investigating the relation between foam morphology and acoustic properties is rather intricate and still an open problem in the field. The focus of this research is to design and develop biobased open cell foams for acoustic applications to replace conventional petrochemical based foams as well as investigating the link between cell morphology and macroscopic properties of open cell porous structures. To achieve these objectives, two industrially produced biomaterials, polylactide (PLA) and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) and their composites were examined and highly porous biobased foams were fabricated by particulate leaching and compression molding. Acoustic absorption capability of these foams was enhanced utilizing the effect of co-continuous blends to form a bimodal porous structure. To tailor mechanical and acoustic properties of biobased foams, blends of PLA and PHA were studied to reach the desired mechanical and viscoelastic properties. To enhance acoustic properties of porous medium for having a broad band absorption effect, cell structure must be appropriately graded. Such porous structures with microstructural gradation are called Functionally Graded Materials (FGM). A novel graded foam structure was designed with superior sound absorption to demonstrate the effect of cell arrangement on performance of acoustic fixtures. Acoustic measurements were performed in a two microphone impedance tube and acoustic theory of Johnson-Champoux-Allard was applied to the fabricated foams to determine micro cellular properties such as tortuosity, viscous and thermal lengths from sound absorption impedance tube

  9. DNA Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    MARINUS, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair functions to correct replication errors in newly synthesized DNA and to prevent recombination between related, but not identical (homeologous), DNA sequences. The mechanism of mismatch repair is best understood in Escherichia coli and is the main focus of this review. The early genetic studies of mismatch repair are described as a basis for the subsequent biochemical characterization of the system. The effects of mismatch repair on homologous and homeologous recombination are described. The relationship of mismatch repair to cell toxicity induced by various drugs is included. The VSP (Very Short Patch) repair system is described in detail. PMID:26442827

  10. Overview of the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    Launch environments, such as lift-off acoustic (LOA) and ignition overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. LOA environments are used directly in the development of vehicle vibro-acoustic environments and IOP is used in the loads assessment. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe for component survivability, reduction of the environment itself is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the Ares I LOA and IOP environments for the vehicle and ground systems including the Mobile Launcher (ML) and tower. An additional objective was to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. ASMAT was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116 (TS 116). The ASMAT program is described in this presentation.

  11. Corrigendum and addendum. Modeling weakly nonlinear acoustic wave propagation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christov, Ivan; Christov, C. I.; Jordan, P. M.

    2014-12-18

    This article presents errors, corrections, and additions to the research outlined in the following citation: Christov, I., Christov, C. I., & Jordan, P. M. (2007). Modeling weakly nonlinear acoustic wave propagation. The Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, 60(4), 473-495.

  12. Acoustic radiation from lined, unflanged ducts: Acoustic source distribution program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckemeyer, R. J.; Sawdy, D. T.

    1971-01-01

    An acoustic radiation analysis was developed to predict the far-field characteristics of fan noise radiated from an acoustically lined unflanged duct. This analysis is comprised of three modular digital computer programs which together provide a capability of accounting for the impedance mismatch at the duct exit plane. Admissible duct configurations include circular or annular, with or without an extended centerbody. This variation in duct configurations provides a capability of modeling inlet and fan duct noise radiation. The computer programs are described in detail.

  13. Passive localization in ocean acoustics: A model-based approach

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Sullivan, E.J.

    1995-09-01

    A model-based approach is developed to solve the passive localization problem in ocean acoustics using the state-space formulation for the first time. It is shown that the inherent structure of the resulting processor consists of a parameter estimator coupled to a nonlinear optimization scheme. The parameter estimator is designed using the model-based approach in which an ocean acoustic propagation model is used in developing the model-based processor required for localization. Recall that model-based signal processing is a well-defined methodology enabling the inclusion of environmental (propagation) models, measurement (sensor arrays) models, and noise (shipping, measurement) models into a sophisticated processing algorithm. Here the parameter estimator is designed, or more appropriately the model-based identifier (MBID) for a propagation model developed from a shallow water ocean experiment. After simulation, it is then applied to a set of experimental data demonstrating the applicability of this approach. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital Acoustical} {ital Society} {ital of} {ital America}.

  14. Impact-acoustics inspection of tile-wall bonding integrity via wavelet transform and hidden Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk, B. L.; Liu, K. P.; Tong, F.; Man, K. F.

    2010-05-01

    The impact-acoustics method utilizes different information contained in the acoustic signals generated by tapping a structure with a small metal object. It offers a convenient and cost-efficient way to inspect the tile-wall bonding integrity. However, the existence of the surface irregularities will cause abnormal multiple bounces in the practical inspection implementations. The spectral characteristics from those bounces can easily be confused with the signals obtained from different bonding qualities. As a result, it will deteriorate the classic feature-based classification methods based on frequency domain. Another crucial difficulty posed by the implementation is the additive noise existing in the practical environments that may also cause feature mismatch and false judgment. In order to solve this problem, the work described in this paper aims to develop a robust inspection method that applies model-based strategy, and utilizes the wavelet domain features with hidden Markov modeling. It derives a bonding integrity recognition approach with enhanced immunity to surface roughness as well as the environmental noise. With the help of the specially designed artificial sample slabs, experiments have been carried out with impact acoustic signals contaminated by real environmental noises acquired under practical inspection background. The results are compared with those using classic method to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Acoustically-coupled flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Daily, David Jesse; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    The flow-induced vibration of synthetic vocal fold models has been previously observed to be acoustically-coupled with upstream flow supply tubes. This phenomenon was investigated using a finite element model that included flow–structure–acoustic interactions. The length of the upstream duct was varied to explore the coupling between model vibration and subglottal acoustics. Incompressible and slightly compressible flow models were tested. The slightly compressible model exhibited acoustic coupling between fluid and solid domains in a manner consistent with experimental observations, whereas the incompressible model did not, showing the slightly compressible approach to be suitable for simulating acoustically-coupled vocal fold model flow-induced vibration. PMID:23585700

  16. Acoustically-coupled flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model.

    PubMed

    Daily, David Jesse; Thomson, Scott L

    2013-01-15

    The flow-induced vibration of synthetic vocal fold models has been previously observed to be acoustically-coupled with upstream flow supply tubes. This phenomenon was investigated using a finite element model that included flow-structure-acoustic interactions. The length of the upstream duct was varied to explore the coupling between model vibration and subglottal acoustics. Incompressible and slightly compressible flow models were tested. The slightly compressible model exhibited acoustic coupling between fluid and solid domains in a manner consistent with experimental observations, whereas the incompressible model did not, showing the slightly compressible approach to be suitable for simulating acoustically-coupled vocal fold model flow-induced vibration. PMID:23585700

  17. Acoustic Propagation Modeling for Marine Hydro-Kinetic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. N.; Johnson, E.

    2014-12-01

    The combination of riverine, tidal, and wave energy have the potential to supply over one third of the United States' annual electricity demand. However, in order to deploy and test prototypes, and commercial installations, marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices must meet strict regulatory guidelines that determine the maximum amount of noise that can be generated and sets particular thresholds for determining disturbance and injury caused by noise. An accurate model for predicting the propagation of a MHK source in a real-life hydro-acoustic environment has been established. This model will help promote the growth and viability of marine, water, and hydrokinetic energy by confidently assuring federal regulations are meet and harmful impacts to marine fish and wildlife are minimal. Paracousti, a finite difference solution to the acoustic equations, was originally developed for sound propagation in atmospheric environments and has been successfully validated for a number of different geophysical activities. The three-dimensional numerical implementation is advantageous over other acoustic propagation techniques for a MHK application where the domains of interest have complex 3D interactions from the seabed, banks, and other shallow water effects. A number of different cases for hydro-acoustic environments have been validated by both analytical and numerical results from canonical and benchmark problems. This includes a variety of hydrodynamic and physical environments that may be present in a potential MHK application including shallow and deep water, sloping, and canyon type bottoms, with varying sound speed and density profiles. With the model successfully validated for hydro-acoustic environments more complex and realistic MHK sources from turbines and/or arrays can be modeled.

  18. DNA Triplet Repeat Expansion and Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Napierala, Marek; Wells, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a conserved antimutagenic pathway that maintains genomic stability through rectification of DNA replication errors and attenuation of chromosomal rearrangements. Paradoxically, mutagenic action of mismatch repair has been implicated as a cause of triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. This mutagenic process requires the mismatch recognition factor MutSβ and the MutLα (and/or possibly MutLγ) endonuclease, and is thought to be triggered by the transient formation of unusual DNA structures within the expanded triplet repeat element. This review summarizes the current knowledge of DNA mismatch repair involvement in triplet repeat expansion, which encompasses in vitro biochemical findings, cellular studies, and various in vivo transgenic animal model experiments. We present current mechanistic hypotheses regarding mismatch repair protein function in mediating triplet repeat expansions and discuss potential therapeutic approaches targeting the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:25580529

  19. Seismo-acoustic ray model benchmarking against experimental tank data.

    PubMed

    Camargo Rodríguez, Orlando; Collis, Jon M; Simpson, Harry J; Ey, Emanuel; Schneiderwind, Joseph; Felisberto, Paulo

    2012-08-01

    Acoustic predictions of the recently developed traceo ray model, which accounts for bottom shear properties, are benchmarked against tank experimental data from the EPEE-1 and EPEE-2 (Elastic Parabolic Equation Experiment) experiments. Both experiments are representative of signal propagation in a Pekeris-like shallow-water waveguide over a non-flat isotropic elastic bottom, where significant interaction of the signal with the bottom can be expected. The benchmarks show, in particular, that the ray model can be as accurate as a parabolic approximation model benchmarked in similar conditions. The results of benchmarking are important, on one side, as a preliminary experimental validation of the model and, on the other side, demonstrates the reliability of the ray approach for seismo-acoustic applications. PMID:22894193

  20. An efficient model for coupling structural vibrations with acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Ting, LU

    1993-01-01

    The scattering of an incident wave by a flexible panel is studied. The panel vibration is governed by the nonlinear plate equations while the loading on the panel, which is the pressure difference across the panel, depends on the reflected and transmitted waves. Two models are used to calculate this structural-acoustic interaction problem. One solves the three dimensional nonlinear Euler equations for the flow-field coupled with the plate equations (the fully coupled model). The second uses the linear wave equation for the acoustic field and expresses the load as a double integral involving the panel oscillation (the decoupled model). The panel oscillation governed by a system of integro-differential equations is solved numerically and the acoustic field is then defined by an explicit formula. Numerical results are obtained using the two models for linear and nonlinear panel vibrations. The predictions given by these two models are in good agreement but the computational time needed for the 'fully coupled model' is 60 times longer than that for 'the decoupled model'.

  1. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    SciTech Connect

    Cuntz, M. Heidelberg Universitaet )

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights. 74 refs.

  2. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights.

  3. Fluid mechanical model of the acoustic impedance of small orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Rogers, T.

    1975-01-01

    A fluid mechanical model of the acoustic behavior of small orifices is presented which predicts orifice impedance as a function of incident sound pressure level, frequency, and orifice geometry. Agreement between predicted and measured values (in both water and air) of orifice impedance is excellent. The model shows that (1) the acoustic flow in the immediate neighborhood of the orifice can be modelled as a locally spherical flow, (2) within this near field, the flow is, to a first approximation, unsteady and incompressible, and (3) at very low sound pressure levels, the orifice viscous resistance is directly related to the effect of boundary-layer displacement along the walls containing the orifice, and the orifice reactance is directly related to the inertia of the oscillating flow in the orifice neighborhood.-

  4. Penumbra detection using PWI/DWI mismatch MRI in a rat stroke model with and without comorbidity: comparison of methods

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Emma; Graham, Delyth; Lopez-Gonzalez, M Rosario; Holmes, William M; Macrae, I Mhairi; McCabe, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Perfusion-diffusion (perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI)/diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)) mismatch is used to identify penumbra in acute stroke. However, limitations in penumbra detection with mismatch are recognized, with a lack of consensus on thresholds, quantification and validation of mismatch. We determined perfusion and diffusion thresholds from final infarct in the clinically relevant spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone (SHRSP) rat and its normotensive control strain, Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and compared three methods for penumbra calculation. After permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) (WKY n=12, SHRSP n=15), diffusion-weighted (DWI) and perfusion-weighted (PWI) images were obtained for 4 hours post stroke and final infarct determined at 24 hours on T2 scans. The PWI/DWI mismatch was calculated from volumetric assessment (perfusion deficit volume minus apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)-defined lesion volume) or spatial assessment of mismatch area on each coronal slice. The ADC-derived lesion growth provided the third, retrospective measure of penumbra. At 1 hour after MCAO, volumetric mismatch detected smaller volumes of penumbra in both strains (SHRSP: 31±50 mm3, WKY: 22±59 mm3, mean±s.d.) compared with spatial assessment (SHRSP: 36±15 mm3, WKY: 43±43 mm3) and ADC lesion expansion (SHRSP: 41±45 mm3, WKY: 65±41 mm3), although these differences were not statistically significant. Spatial assessment appears most informative, using both diffusion and perfusion data, eliminating the influence of negative mismatch and allowing the anatomical location of penumbra to be assessed at given time points after stroke. PMID:22669479

  5. The applicability of acoustic emission method to modeling the endurance of metallic construction elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, S. V.; Rikkonen, S.; Azin, A.; Karavatskiy, A.; Maritskiy, N.; Ponomarev, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Acoustic emission method is the most effective nondestructive inspection technique of construction elements. This paper considers the expanded applicability of acoustic emission method to modeling the damage and the remaining operational life of building structures, including the high-ductile metals. The modeling of damage accumulation was carried out to predict endurance using acoustic emission method.

  6. Prediction of the Acoustic Field Associated with Instability Wave Source Model for a Compressible Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubev, Vladimir; Mankbadi, Reda R.; Dahl, Milo D.; Kiraly, L. James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides preliminary results of the study of the acoustic radiation from the source model representing spatially-growing instability waves in a round jet at high speeds. The source model is briefly discussed first followed by the analysis of the produced acoustic directivity pattern. Two integral surface techniques are discussed and compared for prediction of the jet acoustic radiation field.

  7. Modeling Nonlinear Acoustic Standing Waves in Resonators: Theory and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Li, Xiaofan; Finkbeiner, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    The overall goal of the cooperative research with NASA Glenn is to fundamentally understand, computationally model, and experimentally validate non-linear acoustic waves in enclosures with the ultimate goal of developing a non-contact acoustic seal. The longer term goal is to transition the Glenn acoustic seal innovation to a prototype sealing device. Lucas and coworkers are credited with pioneering work in Resonant Macrosonic Synthesis (RMS). Several Patents and publications have successfully illustrated the concept of Resonant Macrosonic Synthesis. To utilize this concept in practical application one needs to have an understanding of the details of the phenomenon and a predictive tool that can examine the waveforms produced within resonators of complex shapes. With appropriately shaped resonators one can produce un-shocked waveforms of high amplitude that would result in very high pressures in certain regions. Our goal is to control the waveforms and exploit the high pressures to produce an acoustic seal. Note that shock formation critically limits peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes and also causes excessive energy dissipation. Proper shaping of the resonator is thus critical to the use of this innovation.

  8. Collimator optimization and collimator-detector response compensation in myocardial perfusion SPECT using the ideal observer with and without model mismatch and an anthropomorphic model observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaly, Michael; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric C.

    2016-03-01

    The collimator is the primary factor that determines the spatial resolution and noise tradeoff in myocardial perfusion SPECT images. In this paper, the goal was to find the collimator that optimizes the image quality in terms of a perfusion defect detection task. Since the optimal collimator could depend on the level of approximation of the collimator-detector response (CDR) compensation modeled in reconstruction, we performed this optimization for the cases of modeling the full CDR (including geometric, septal penetration and septal scatter responses), the geometric CDR, or no model of the CDR. We evaluated the performance on the detection task using three model observers. Two observers operated on data in the projection domain: the Ideal Observer (IO) and IO with Model-Mismatch (IO-MM). The third observer was an anthropomorphic Channelized Hotelling Observer (CHO), which operated on reconstructed images. The projection-domain observers have the advantage that they are computationally less intensive. The IO has perfect knowledge of the image formation process, i.e. it has a perfect model of the CDR. The IO-MM takes into account the mismatch between the true (complete and accurate) model and an approximate model, e.g. one that might be used in reconstruction. We evaluated the utility of these projection domain observers in optimizing instrumentation parameters. We investigated a family of 8 parallel-hole collimators, spanning a wide range of resolution and sensitivity tradeoffs, using a population of simulated projection (for the IO and IO-MM) and reconstructed (for the CHO) images that included background variability. We simulated anterolateral and inferior perfusion defects with variable extents and severities. The area under the ROC curve was estimated from the IO, IO-MM, and CHO test statistics and served as the figure-of-merit. The optimal collimator for the IO had a resolution of 9-11 mm FWHM at 10 cm, which is poorer resolution than typical collimators

  9. Collimator optimization and collimator-detector response compensation in myocardial perfusion SPECT using the ideal observer with and without model mismatch and an anthropomorphic model observer.

    PubMed

    Ghaly, Michael; Links, Jonathan M; Frey, Eric C

    2016-03-01

    The collimator is the primary factor that determines the spatial resolution and noise tradeoff in myocardial perfusion SPECT images. In this paper, the goal was to find the collimator that optimizes the image quality in terms of a perfusion defect detection task. Since the optimal collimator could depend on the level of approximation of the collimator-detector response (CDR) compensation modeled in reconstruction, we performed this optimization for the cases of modeling the full CDR (including geometric, septal penetration and septal scatter responses), the geometric CDR, or no model of the CDR. We evaluated the performance on the detection task using three model observers. Two observers operated on data in the projection domain: the Ideal Observer (IO) and IO with Model-Mismatch (IO-MM). The third observer was an anthropomorphic Channelized Hotelling Observer (CHO), which operated on reconstructed images. The projection-domain observers have the advantage that they are computationally less intensive. The IO has perfect knowledge of the image formation process, i.e. it has a perfect model of the CDR. The IO-MM takes into account the mismatch between the true (complete and accurate) model and an approximate model, e.g. one that might be used in reconstruction. We evaluated the utility of these projection domain observers in optimizing instrumentation parameters. We investigated a family of 8 parallel-hole collimators, spanning a wide range of resolution and sensitivity tradeoffs, using a population of simulated projection (for the IO and IO-MM) and reconstructed (for the CHO) images that included background variability. We simulated anterolateral and inferior perfusion defects with variable extents and severities. The area under the ROC curve was estimated from the IO, IO-MM, and CHO test statistics and served as the figure-of-merit. The optimal collimator for the IO had a resolution of 9-11 mm FWHM at 10 cm, which is poorer resolution than typical collimators

  10. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Above Deck Water Sound Suppression Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program test matrix was designed to determine the acoustic reduction for the Liftoff acoustics (LOA) environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The scale model test can be used to quantify the effectiveness of the water suppression system as well as optimize the systems necessary for the LOA noise reduction. Several water flow rates were tested to determine which rate provides the greatest acoustic reductions. Preliminary results are presented.

  11. Considerations on the acoustic energy radiated by toothed gears. [model for calculating noise intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popinceanu, N. G.; Kremmer, I.

    1974-01-01

    A mechano-acoustic model is reported for calculating acoustic energy radiated by a working gear. According to this model, a gear is an acoustic coublet formed of the two wheels. The wheel teeth generate cylindrical acoustic waves while the front surfaces of the teeth behave like vibrating pistons. Theoretical results are checked experimentally and good agreement is obtained with open gears. The experiments show that the air noise effect is negligible as compared with the structural noise transmitted to the gear box.

  12. Physically based simulation model for acoustic sensor robot navigation.

    PubMed

    Kuc, R; Siegel, M W

    1987-06-01

    A computer model is described that combines concepts from the fields of acoustics, linear system theory, and digital signal processing to simulate an acoustic sensor navigation system using time-of-flight ranging. By separating the transmitter/receiver into separate components and assuming mirror-like reflectors, closed-form solutions for the reflections from corners, edges, and walls are determined as a function of transducer size, location, and orientation. A floor plan consisting of corners, walls, and edges is efficiently encoded to indicate which of these elements contribute to a particular pulse-echo response. Sonar maps produced by transducers having different resonant frequencies and transmitted pulse waveforms can then be simulated efficiently. Examples of simulated sonar maps of two floor plans illustrate the performance of the model. Actual sonar maps are presented to verify the simulation results. PMID:21869438

  13. Integrated Structural/Acoustic Modeling of Heterogeneous Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett, A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Arnold, Steven, M.; Pennline, James, A.

    2012-01-01

    A model for the dynamic response of heterogeneous media is presented. A given medium is discretized into a number of subvolumes, each of which may contain an elastic anisotropic material, void, or fluid, and time-dependent boundary conditions are applied to simulate impact or incident pressure waves. The full time-dependent displacement and stress response throughout the medium is then determined via an explicit solution procedure. The model is applied to simulate the coupled structural/acoustic response of foam core sandwich panels as well as aluminum panels with foam inserts. Emphasis is placed on the acoustic absorption performance of the panels versus weight and the effects of the arrangement of the materials and incident wave frequency.

  14. Modeling of a Surface Acoustic Wave Strain Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensor technology for harsh environments aimed at aerospace applications. To aid in development of sensors a model of a SAW strain sensor has been developed. The new model extends the modified matrix method to include the response of Orthogonal Frequency Coded (OFC) reflectors and the response of SAW devices to strain. These results show that the model accurately captures the strain response of a SAW sensor on a Langasite substrate. The results of the model of a SAW Strain Sensor on Langasite are presented

  15. Acoustic results of the Boeing model 360 whirl tower test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Michael E.; Jordan, David

    1990-01-01

    An evaluation is presented for whirl tower test results of the Model 360 helicopter's advanced, high-performance four-bladed composite rotor system intended to facilitate over-200-knot flight. During these performance measurements, acoustic data were acquired by seven microphones. A comparison of whirl-tower tests with theory indicate that theoretical prediction accuracies vary with both microphone position and the inclusion of ground reflection. Prediction errors varied from 0 to 40 percent of the measured signal-to-peak amplitude.

  16. Acoustic results of the Boeing model 360 whirl tower test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Michael E.; Jordan, David

    1990-09-01

    An evaluation is presented for whirl tower test results of the Model 360 helicopter's advanced, high-performance four-bladed composite rotor system intended to facilitate over-200-knot flight. During these performance measurements, acoustic data were acquired by seven microphones. A comparison of whirl-tower tests with theory indicate that theoretical prediction accuracies vary with both microphone position and the inclusion of ground reflection. Prediction errors varied from 0 to 40 percent of the measured signal-to-peak amplitude.

  17. Marrow Ablative and Immunosuppressive Effects of I-131-anti-CD45 Antibody in Congenic and H2-Mismatched Murine Transplant Models

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D. C.; Martin, P J.; Nourigat, C.; Appelbaum, F. R.; Fisher, Darrell R. ); Bernstein, I. D.

    1998-12-01

    Targeted hematopoietic irradiation delivered by I-131-anti-CD45 antibody has been combined with conventional marrow transplant preparative regimens in an effort to decrease relapse. Before increasing the proportion of therapy delivered by radiolabeled antibody, the myeloablative and immunosuppressive effects of such low dose rate irradiation must be quantitated. We have examined the ability of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody to facilitate engraftment in Ly5-congenic and H2-mismatched murine marrow transplant models. Recipient B6-Ly5-a mice were treated with 30F11 antibody labeled with 0.1 to 1.5 mCi I-131 and/or total body irradiation (TBI), followed by T-cell-depleted marrow from Ly5-b-congenic (C57BL/6) or H2-mismatched (BALB/c) donors. Engraftment was achieved readily in the Ly5-congenic setting, with greater than 80% donor granulocytes and T cells after 0.5 mCi I-131 (estimated 17 Gy to marrow) or 8 Gy TBI. A higher TBI dose (14 Gy) was required to achieve engraftment of H2-mismatched mar row, and engraftment occurred in only 3 of 11 mice receiving 1.5 mCi I-131 delivered by anti-CD45 antibody. Engraftment of H2-mismatched marrow was achieved in 22 of 23 animals receiving 0.75 mCi I-131 delivered by anti-CD45 antibody combined with 8 Gy TBI. Thus, targeted radiation delivered via I-131-anti-CD45 antibody can enable engraftment of congenic marrow and can partially replace TBI when transplanting T-cell-depleted H2-mismatched marrow.

  18. Acoustic emission source modeling using a data-driven approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadra, J.; Vanniamparambil, P. A.; Servansky, D.; Bartoli, I.; Kontsos, A.

    2015-04-01

    The next generation of acoustics-based non-destructive evaluation for structural health monitoring applications will depend, among other reasons, on the capability to effectively characterize the transient stress wave effects related to acoustic emission (AE) generated due to activation of failure mechanisms in materials and structures. In this context, the forward problem of simulating AE is addressed herein by a combination of experimental, analytical and computational methods, which are used to form a data-driven finite element (FE) model for AE generation and associated transient elastic wave propagation. Acoustic emission is viewed for this purpose as part of the dynamic process of energy release caused by crack initiation. To this aim, full field experimental data obtained from crack initiation monitored by digital image correlation is used to construct a traction-separation law and to define damage initiation parameters. Subsequently, 3D FE simulations based on this law are performed using both a cohesive and an extended finite element modeling approach. To create a realistic computational AE source model, the transition between static and dynamic responses is evaluated. Numerically simulated AE signals from the dynamic response due to the onset of crack growth are analyzed in the context of the inverse problem of source identification and demonstrate the effects of material and geometry in crack-induced wave propagation.

  19. Validation of an Acoustic Impedance Prediction Model for Skewed Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2009-01-01

    An impedance prediction model was validated experimentally to determine the composite impedance of a series of high-aspect ratio slot resonators incorporating channel skew and sharp bends. Such structures are useful for packaging acoustic liners into constrained spaces for turbofan noise control applications. A formulation of the Zwikker-Kosten Transmission Line (ZKTL) model, incorporating the Richards correction for rectangular channels, is used to calculate the composite normalized impedance of a series of six multi-slot resonator arrays with constant channel length. Experimentally, acoustic data was acquired in the NASA Langley Normal Incidence Tube over the frequency range of 500 to 3500 Hz at 120 and 140 dB OASPL. Normalized impedance was reduced using the Two-Microphone Method for the various combinations of channel skew and sharp 90o and 180o bends. Results show that the presence of skew and/or sharp bends does not significantly alter the impedance of a slot resonator as compared to a straight resonator of the same total channel length. ZKTL predicts the impedance of such resonators very well over the frequency range of interest. The model can be used to design arrays of slot resonators that can be packaged into complex geometries heretofore unsuitable for effective acoustic treatment.

  20. Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustic Modeling From Experiments (FRAME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Eric

    2011-01-01

    A new methodology is developed for the construction of helicopter source noise models for use in mission planning tools from experimental measurements of helicopter external noise radiation. The models are constructed by employing a parameter identification method to an assumed analytical model of the rotor harmonic noise sources. This new method allows for the identification of individual rotor harmonic noise sources and allows them to be characterized in terms of their individual non-dimensional governing parameters. The method is applied to both wind tunnel measurements and ground noise measurements of two-bladed rotors. The method is shown to match the parametric trends of main rotor harmonic noise, allowing accurate estimates of the dominant rotorcraft noise sources to be made for operating conditions based on a small number of measurements taken at different operating conditions. The ability of this method to estimate changes in noise radiation due to changes in ambient conditions is also demonstrated.

  1. Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustic Modeling from Experiments (FRAME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Eric, II

    2011-12-01

    A new methodology is developed for the construction of helicopter source noise models for use in mission planning tools from experimental measurements of helicopter external noise radiation. The models are constructed by employing a parameter identification method to an assumed analytical model of the rotor harmonic noise sources. This new method allows for the identification of individual rotor harmonic noise sources and allows them to be characterized in terms of their individual non-dimensional governing parameters. The method is applied to both wind tunnel measurements and ground noise measurements of two-bladed rotors. The method is shown to match the parametric trends of main rotor harmonic noise, allowing accurate estimates of the dominant rotorcraft noise sources to be made for operating conditions based on a small number of measurements taken at different operating conditions. The ability of this method to estimate changes in noise radiation due to changes in ambient conditions is also demonstrated.

  2. 3D modeling of carbonates petro-acoustic heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baden, Dawin; Guglielmi, Yves; Saracco, Ginette; Marié, Lionel; Viseur, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    Characterizing carbonate reservoirs heterogeneity is a challenging issue for Oil & Gas Industry, CO2 sequestration and all kinds of fluid manipulations in natural reservoirs, due to the significant impact of heterogeneities on fluid flow and storage within the reservoir. Although large scale (> meter) heterogeneities such as layers petrophysical contrasts are well addressed by computing facies-based models, low scale (< meter) heterogeneities are often poorly constrained because of the complexity in predicting their spatial arrangement. In this study, we conducted petro-acoustic measurements on cores of different size and diameter (Ø = 1", 1.5" and 5") in order to evaluate anisotropy or heterogeneity in carbonates at different laboratory scales. Different types of heterogeneities which generally occur in carbonate reservoir units (e.g. petrographic, diagenetic, and tectonic related) were sampled. Dry / wet samples were investigated with different ultrasonic apparatus and using different sensors allowing acoustic characterization through a bandwidth varying from 50 to 500 kHz. Comprehensive measurements realized on each samples allowed statistical analyses of petro-acoustic properties such as attenuation, shear and longitudinal wave velocity. The cores properties (geological and acoustic facies) were modeled in 3D using photogrammetry and GOCAD geo-modeler. This method successfully allowed detecting and imaging in three dimensions differential diagenesis effects characterized by the occurrence of decimeter-scale diagenetic horizons in samples assumed to be homogeneous and/or different diagenetic sequences between shells filling and the packing matrix. We then discuss how small interfaces such as cracks, stylolithes and laminations which are also imaged may have guided these differential effects, considering that understanding the processes may be taken as an analogue to actual fluid drainage complexity in deep carbonate reservoir.

  3. Memory-based mismatch response to frequency changes in rats.

    PubMed

    Astikainen, Piia; Stefanics, Gabor; Nokia, Miriam; Lipponen, Arto; Cong, Fengyu; Penttonen, Markku; Ruusuvirta, Timo

    2011-01-01

    Any occasional changes in the acoustic environment are of potential importance for survival. In humans, the preattentive detection of such changes generates the mismatch negativity (MMN) component of event-related brain potentials. MMN is elicited to rare changes ('deviants') in a series of otherwise regularly repeating stimuli ('standards'). Deviant stimuli are detected on the basis of a neural comparison process between the input from the current stimulus and the sensory memory trace of the standard stimuli. It is, however, unclear to what extent animals show a similar comparison process in response to auditory changes. To resolve this issue, epidural potentials were recorded above the primary auditory cortex of urethane-anesthetized rats. In an oddball condition, tone frequency was used to differentiate deviants interspersed randomly among a standard tone. Mismatch responses were observed at 60-100 ms after stimulus onset for frequency increases of 5% and 12.5% but not for similarly descending deviants. The response diminished when the silent inter-stimulus interval was increased from 375 ms to 600 ms for +5% deviants and from 600 ms to 1000 ms for +12.5% deviants. In comparison to the oddball condition the response also diminished in a control condition in which no repetitive standards were presented (equiprobable condition). These findings suggest that the rat mismatch response is similar to the human MMN and indicate that anesthetized rats provide a valuable model for studies of central auditory processing. PMID:21915297

  4. Modelling a nonlinear MTFDE from acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodoro, M. Filomena

    2016-06-01

    The main interest of this work is to compute a approximate solution of equations with equal delay and advance which often appear in models from applied sciences. In this article, we consider a special case of a nonlinear forward-backward which models the vibration of some elastics tissues in physiology, just as the vocal fold mucosa. The oscillation as superficial wave propagating through the tissues in the direction of the flow is described by the considered equation. The approximation of solution is obtained using a non regular mesh instead a regular one as presented in [1] where is adapted an numerical scheme based on algorithms introduced in [2, 3] using collocation, finite element method, method of steps and Newton's method3 are used.

  5. Modeling the acoustic excitation of a resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandre, Shreyas; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayanan

    2007-11-01

    The sounding of a beverage bottle when blown on is a familiar but very little understood phenomenon. A very similar mechanism is used by musical wind instruments, like organ pipes and flutes, for sound production. This phenomenon falls under the general umbrella of flow induced oscillations and is representative of a more generic mechanism. The modeling of this phenomenon essentially involves two components. The first is the resonator, which bears the oscillations and this component is very well understood. The resonator, however, needs an external energy input to sustain the oscillations, which is provided by the jet of air blown. The dynamics of the jet and its interaction with the resonator is the primary focus of this talk. In particular, we provide a linearized model based on first principles to explain the feedback of energy from the jet to the resonator and compare the predictions with experimental results.

  6. Modeling of acoustic emission signal propagation in waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zelenyak, Andreea-Manuela; Hamstad, Marvin A; Sause, Markus G R

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) testing is a widely used nondestructive testing (NDT) method to investigate material failure. When environmental conditions are harmful for the operation of the sensors, waveguides are typically mounted in between the inspected structure and the sensor. Such waveguides can be built from different materials or have different designs in accordance with the experimental needs. All these variations can cause changes in the acoustic emission signals in terms of modal conversion, additional attenuation or shift in frequency content. A finite element method (FEM) was used to model acoustic emission signal propagation in an aluminum plate with an attached waveguide and was validated against experimental data. The geometry of the waveguide is systematically changed by varying the radius and height to investigate the influence on the detected signals. Different waveguide materials were implemented and change of material properties as function of temperature were taken into account. Development of the option of modeling different waveguide options replaces the time consuming and expensive trial and error alternative of experiments. Thus, the aim of this research has important implications for those who use waveguides for AE testing. PMID:26007731

  7. Modeling of Acoustic Emission Signal Propagation in Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Zelenyak, Andreea-Manuela; Hamstad, Marvin A.; Sause, Markus G. R.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) testing is a widely used nondestructive testing (NDT) method to investigate material failure. When environmental conditions are harmful for the operation of the sensors, waveguides are typically mounted in between the inspected structure and the sensor. Such waveguides can be built from different materials or have different designs in accordance with the experimental needs. All these variations can cause changes in the acoustic emission signals in terms of modal conversion, additional attenuation or shift in frequency content. A finite element method (FEM) was used to model acoustic emission signal propagation in an aluminum plate with an attached waveguide and was validated against experimental data. The geometry of the waveguide is systematically changed by varying the radius and height to investigate the influence on the detected signals. Different waveguide materials were implemented and change of material properties as function of temperature were taken into account. Development of the option of modeling different waveguide options replaces the time consuming and expensive trial and error alternative of experiments. Thus, the aim of this research has important implications for those who use waveguides for AE testing. PMID:26007731

  8. Acoustic Characteristics of a Model Isolated Tiltrotor in DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; McCluer, Megan; Tadghighi, Hormoz

    1999-01-01

    An aeroacoustic wind tunnel test was conducted using a scaled isolated tiltrotor model. Acoustic data were acquired using an in-flow microphone wing traversed beneath the model to map the directivity of the near-field acoustic radiation of the rotor for a parametric variation of rotor angle-of-attack, tunnel speed, and rotor thrust. Acoustic metric data were examined to show trends of impulsive noise for the parametric variations. BVISPL maximum noise levels were found to increase with mu for constant alpha and C(sub T), although the maximum BVI levels were found at much higher cc than for a typical helicopter. BVISPL levels were found to increase with mu for constant alpha and C(sub T). BVISPL was found to decrease with increasing C(sub T) for constant alpha and mu, although BVISPL increased with thrust for a constant wake geometry. Metric data were also scaled for M,i, to evaluate how well simple power law scaling could be used to correct metric data for M(sub tip) effects.

  9. Acoustic Characteristics of a Model Isolated Tiltrotor in DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; McCluer, Megan; Tadghighi, Hormoz

    1999-01-01

    An aeroacoustic wind tunnel test was conducted using a scaled isolated tiltrotor model. Acoustic data were acquired using an in-flow microphone wing traversed beneath the model to map the directivity of the near-field acoustic radiation of the rotor for a parametric variation of rotor angle-of-attack, tunnel speed, and rotor thrust. Acoustic metric data were examined to show trends of impulsive noise for the parametric variations. BVISPL maximum noise levels were found to increase with alpha for constant mu and C(sub T), although the maximum BVI levels were found at much higher a than for a typical helicopter. BVISPL levels were found to increase with mu for constant alpha and C(sub T. BVISPL was found to decrease with increasing CT for constant a and m, although BVISPL increased with thrust for a constant wake geometry. Metric data were also scaled for M(sub up) to evaluate how well simple power law scaling could be used to correct metric data for M(sub up) effects.

  10. Rational approximations of viscous losses in vocal tract acoustic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelms-Tricarico, Reiner; McGowan, Richard S.

    2004-06-01

    The modeling of viscous losses in acoustic wave transmission through tubes by a boundary layer approximation is valid if the thickness of the boundary layer is small compared to the hydraulic radius. A method was found to describe the viscous losses that extends the frequency range of the model to very low frequencies and very thin tubes. For higher frequencies, this method includes asymptotically the spectral effects of the boundary layer approximation. The method provides a simplification for the rational approximation of the spectral effects of viscous losses.

  11. Theoretical models for duct acoustic propagation and radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    1991-01-01

    The development of computational methods in acoustics has led to the introduction of analysis and design procedures which model the turbofan inlet as a coupled system, simultaneously modeling propagation and radiation in the presence of realistic internal and external flows. Such models are generally large, require substantial computer speed and capacity, and can be expected to be used in the final design stages, with the simpler models being used in the early design iterations. Emphasis is given to practical modeling methods that have been applied to the acoustical design problem in turbofan engines. The mathematical model is established and the simplest case of propagation in a duct with hard walls is solved to introduce concepts and terminologies. An extensive overview is given of methods for the calculation of attenuation in uniform ducts with uniform flow and with shear flow. Subsequent sections deal with numerical techniques which provide an integrated representation of duct propagation and near- and far-field radiation for realistic geometries and flight conditions.

  12. Artificial mismatch hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Guo, Zhen; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved nucleic acid hybridization process is provided which employs a modified oligonucleotide and improves the ability to discriminate a control nucleic acid target from a variant nucleic acid target containing a sequence variation. The modified probe contains at least one artificial mismatch relative to the control nucleic acid target in addition to any mismatch(es) arising from the sequence variation. The invention has direct and advantageous application to numerous existing hybridization methods, including, applications that employ, for example, the Polymerase Chain Reaction, allele-specific nucleic acid sequencing methods, and diagnostic hybridization methods.

  13. A Comparison of Surface Acoustic Wave Modeling Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. c.; Atkinson, G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, extremely low power and can be used to develop passive wireless sensors. For these reasons, NASA is investigating the use of SAW technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace structures. To facilitate rapid prototyping of passive SAW sensors for aerospace applications, SAW models have been developed. This paper reports on the comparison of three methods of modeling SAWs. The three models are the Impulse Response Method a first order model, and two second order matrix methods; the conventional matrix approach, and a modified matrix approach that is extended to include internal finger reflections. The second order models are based upon matrices that were originally developed for analyzing microwave circuits using transmission line theory. Results from the models are presented with measured data from devices.

  14. Model helicopter rotor high-speed impulsive noise: Measured acoustics and blade pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    A 1/17-scale research model of the AH-1 series helicopter main rotor was tested. Model-rotor acoustic and simultaneous blade pressure data were recorded at high speeds where full-scale helicopter high-speed impulsive noise levels are known to be dominant. Model-rotor measurements of the peak acoustic pressure levels, waveform shapes, and directively patterns are directly compared with full-scale investigations, using an equivalent in-flight technique. Model acoustic data are shown to scale remarkably well in shape and in amplitude with full-scale results. Model rotor-blade pressures are presented for rotor operating conditions both with and without shock-like discontinuities in the radiated acoustic waveform. Acoustically, both model and full-scale measurements support current evidence that above certain high subsonic advancing-tip Mach numbers, local shock waves that exist on the rotor blades ""delocalize'' and radiate to the acoustic far-field.

  15. Model-based ocean acoustic passive localization. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Sullivan, E.J.

    1994-06-01

    A model-based approach is developed (theoretically) to solve the passive localization problem. Here the authors investigate the design of a model-based identifier for a shallow water ocean acoustic problem characterized by a normal-mode model. In this problem they show how the processor can be structured to estimate the vertical wave numbers directly from measured pressure-field and sound speed measurements thereby eliminating the need for synthetic aperture processing or even a propagation model solution. Finally, they investigate various special cases of the source localization problem, designing a model-based localizer for each and evaluating the underlying structure with the expectation of gaining more and more insight into the general problem.

  16. Investigation of pulmonary acoustic simulation: comparing airway model generation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Brian; Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Mansy, Hansen A.; Sandler, Richard H.; Royston, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Alterations in the structure and function of the pulmonary system that occur in disease or injury often give rise to measurable spectral, spatial and/or temporal changes in lung sound production and transmission. These changes, if properly quantified, might provide additional information about the etiology, severity and location of trauma, injury, or pathology. With this in mind, the authors are developing a comprehensive computer simulation model of pulmonary acoustics, known as The Audible Human Project™. Its purpose is to improve our understanding of pulmonary acoustics and to aid in interpreting measurements of sound and vibration in the lungs generated by airway insonification, natural breath sounds, and external stimuli on the chest surface, such as that used in elastography. As a part of this development process, finite element (FE) models were constructed of an excised pig lung that also underwent experimental studies. Within these models, the complex airway structure was created via two methods: x-ray CT image segmentation and through an algorithmic means called Constrained Constructive Optimization (CCO). CCO was implemented to expedite the segmentation process, as airway segments can be grown digitally. These two approaches were used in FE simulations of the surface motion on the lung as a result of sound input into the trachea. Simulation results were compared to experimental measurements. By testing how close these models are to experimental measurements, we are evaluating whether CCO can be used as a means to efficiently construct physiologically relevant airway trees.

  17. Structure of the MutL C-terminal domain: a model of intact MutL and its roles in mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Guarné, Alba; Ramon-Maiques, Santiago; Wolff, Erika M; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Hu, Xiaojian; Miller, Jeffrey H; Yang, Wei

    2004-10-27

    MutL assists the mismatch recognition protein MutS to initiate and coordinate mismatch repair in species ranging from bacteria to humans. The MutL N-terminal ATPase domain is highly conserved, but the C-terminal region shares little sequence similarity among MutL homologs. We report here the crystal structure of the Escherichia coli MutL C-terminal dimerization domain and the likelihood of its conservation among MutL homologs. A 100-residue proline-rich linker between the ATPase and dimerization domains, which generates a large central cavity in MutL dimers, tolerates sequence substitutions and deletions of one-third of its length with no functional consequences in vivo or in vitro. Along the surface of the central cavity, residues essential for DNA binding are located in both the N- and C-terminal domains. Each domain of MutL interacts with UvrD helicase and is required for activating the helicase activity. The DNA-binding capacity of MutL is correlated with the level of UvrD activation. A model of how MutL utilizes its ATPase and DNA-binding activities to mediate mismatch-dependent activation of MutH endonuclease and UvrD helicase is proposed. PMID:15470502

  18. Overexpression of Fibrinogen-Like Protein 2 Promotes Tolerance in a Fully Mismatched Murine Model of Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bartczak, A; Chruscinski, A; Mendicino, M; Liu, H; Zhang, J; He, W; Amir, A Z; Nguyen, A; Khattar, R; Sadozai, H; Lobe, C G; Adeyi, O; Phillips, M J; Zhang, L; Gorczynski, R M; Grant, D; Levy, G A

    2016-06-01

    Fibrinogen-like protein 2 (FGL2) is an immunomodulatory protein that is expressed by regulatory T cells (Tregs). The objective of this study was to determine if recombinant FGL2 (rFGL2) treatment or constitutive FGL2 overexpression could promote transplant tolerance in mice. Although rFGL2 treatment prevented rejection of fully mismatched cardiac allografts, all grafts were rejected after stopping treatment. Next, we generated FGL2 transgenic mice (fgl2(Tg) ) that ubiquitously overexpressed FGL2. These mice developed normally and had no evidence of the autoimmune glomerulonephritis seen in fgl2(-/-) mice. Immune characterization showed fgl2(Tg) T cells were hypoproliferative to stimulation with alloantigens or anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 stimulation, and fgl2(Tg) Tregs had increased immunosuppressive activity compared with fgl2(+/+) Tregs. To determine if FGL2 overexpression can promote tolerance, we transplanted fully mismatched cardiac allografts into fgl2(Tg) recipients. Fifty percent of cardiac grafts were accepted indefinitely in fgl2(Tg) recipients without any immunosuppression. Tolerant fgl2(Tg) grafts had increased numbers and proportions of Tregs and tolerant fgl2(Tg) mice had reduced proliferation to donor but not third party antigens. These data show that tolerance in fgl2(Tg) recipients involves changes in Treg and T cell activity that contribute to a higher intragraft Treg-to-T cell ratio and acceptance of fully mismatched allografts. PMID:26718313

  19. A new model for film bulk acoustic wave resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Jin; Yuan, Xiu-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Based on cavity resonance and sandwich composite plate theory, this paper presents a universal three-dimensional (3D) theoretical model for frequency dispersion characterization and displacement profile shapes of the film bulk acoustic resonator (FBARs). This model provides results of FBAR excited thickness-extensional and flexure modes, and the result of frequency dispersion is proposed in which the thicknesses and impedance of the electrodes and the piezoelectric material are taken into consideration; its further simplification shows good agreement with the modified Butterworth—Van-Dyke (MBVD) model. The displacement profile reflects the vibration stress distribution of electrode shapes and the lateral resonance effect, which depends on the axis ratio of the electrode shapes a/b. The results are consistent with the 3D finite element method modeling and laser interferometry measurement in general.

  20. a Modeling and Measurement Study of Acoustic Horns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, John Theodore

    Although acoustic horns have been in use for thousands of years, formal horn design only began approximately 80 years ago with the pioneering effort of A. G. Webster. In this dissertation, the improvements to Webster's original horn model are reviewed and the lack of analytical progress since Webster is noted. In an attempt to augment the traditional methods of analysis, a semi-analytical technique presented by Rayleigh is extended. Although Rayleigh's method is not based on one-dimensional wave propagation, it is found not to offer significant improvement over Webster's model. In order to be free of the limitations associated with analytical techniques, a numerical method based on boundary elements has been developed. It is suitable for solving radiation problems that can be modeled as a source in an infinite bafffe. The exterior boundary element formulation is exchanged for an interior formulation by placing a hemisphere over the baffled source and using an analytical expansion of the field in the exterior half space. The boundary element method is demonstrated by solving the baffled piston problem, and is then used to obtain the acoustic throat impedance and far-field directivity of axisymmetric horns having exponential and tractrix contours. Experiments are performed to measure the throat impedance and the far-field directivity of two axisymmetric horns mounted in a rigid baffle. An exponential horn and a tractrix horn with equal throat radius (2.54 cm), length (55.9 cm), and mouth radius (27.1 cm) are critically examined. A modern implementation of the "reaction on the source" method is compared with a new implementation of the two-microphone method for measuring acoustic impedance. The modified two-microphone method is found to be extremely simple and accurate, but the "reaction on the source" method has the advantage of in situ measurements. The far-field directivity is measured by a new technique that allows the far-field pressure to be calculated from the

  1. Staggered-grid finite-difference acoustic modeling with the Time-Domain Atmospheric Acoustic Propagation Suite (TDAAPS).

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, David Franklin; Collier, Sandra L.; Marlin, David H.; Ostashev, Vladimir E.; Symons, Neill Phillip; Wilson, D. Keith

    2005-05-01

    This document is intended to serve as a users guide for the time-domain atmospheric acoustic propagation suite (TDAAPS) program developed as part of the Department of Defense High-Performance Modernization Office (HPCMP) Common High-Performance Computing Scalable Software Initiative (CHSSI). TDAAPS performs staggered-grid finite-difference modeling of the acoustic velocity-pressure system with the incorporation of spatially inhomogeneous winds. Wherever practical the control structure of the codes are written in C++ using an object oriented design. Sections of code where a large number of calculations are required are written in C or F77 in order to enable better compiler optimization of these sections. The TDAAPS program conforms to a UNIX style calling interface. Most of the actions of the codes are controlled by adding flags to the invoking command line. This document presents a large number of examples and provides new users with the necessary background to perform acoustic modeling with TDAAPS.

  2. Acoustic Predictions of Manned and Unmanned Rotorcraft Using the Comprehensive Analytical Rotorcraft Model for Acoustics (CARMA) Code System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Burley, Casey L.; Conner, David A.

    2005-01-01

    The Comprehensive Analytical Rotorcraft Model for Acoustics (CARMA) is being developed under the Quiet Aircraft Technology Project within the NASA Vehicle Systems Program. The purpose of CARMA is to provide analysis tools for the design and evaluation of efficient low-noise rotorcraft, as well as support the development of safe, low-noise flight operations. The baseline prediction system of CARMA is presented and current capabilities are illustrated for a model rotor in a wind tunnel, a rotorcraft in flight and for a notional coaxial rotor configuration; however, a complete validation of the CARMA system capabilities with respect to a variety of measured databases is beyond the scope of this work. For the model rotor illustration, predicted rotor airloads and acoustics for a BO-105 model rotor are compared to test data from HART-II. For the flight illustration, acoustic data from an MD-520N helicopter flight test, which was conducted at Eglin Air Force Base in September 2003, are compared with CARMA full vehicle flight predictions. Predicted acoustic metrics at three microphone locations are compared for limited level flight and descent conditions. Initial acoustic predictions using CARMA for a notional coaxial rotor system are made. The effect of increasing the vertical separation between the rotors on the predicted airloads and acoustic results are shown for both aerodynamically non-interacting and aerodynamically interacting rotors. The sensitivity of including the aerodynamic interaction effects of each rotor on the other, especially when the rotors are in close proximity to one another is initially examined. The predicted coaxial rotor noise is compared to that of a conventional single rotor system of equal thrust, where both are of reasonable size for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

  3. Acoustic Modeling for Aqua Ventus I off Monhegan Island, ME

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, Jonathan M.; Hanna, Luke A.; DeChello, Nicole L.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-10-31

    The DeepCwind consortium, led by the University of Maine, was awarded funding under the US Department of Energy’s Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Program to develop two floating offshore wind turbines in the Gulf of Maine equipped with Goldwind 6 MW direct drive turbines, as the Aqua Ventus I project. The Goldwind turbines have a hub height of 100 m. The turbines will be deployed in Maine State waters, approximately 2.9 miles off Monhegan Island; Monhegan Island is located roughly 10 miles off the coast of Maine. In order to site and permit the offshore turbines, the acoustic output must be evaluated to ensure that the sound will not disturb residents on Monhegan Island, nor input sufficient sound levels into the nearby ocean to disturb marine mammals. This initial assessment of the acoustic output focuses on the sound of the turbines in air by modeling the assumed sound source level, applying a sound propagation model, and taking into account the distance from shore.

  4. Learning Speech Variability in Discriminative Acoustic Model Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shoei; Oku, Takahiro; Homma, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Akio; Imai, Toru

    We present a new discriminative method of acoustic model adaptation that deals with a task-dependent speech variability. We have focused on differences of expressions or speaking styles between tasks and set the objective of this method as improving the recognition accuracy of indistinctly pronounced phrases dependent on a speaking style.The adaptation appends subword models for frequently observable variants of subwords in the task. To find the task-dependent variants, low-confidence words are statistically selected from words with higher frequency in the task's adaptation data by using their word lattices. HMM parameters of subword models dependent on the words are discriminatively trained by using linear transforms with a minimum phoneme error (MPE) criterion. For the MPE training, subword accuracy discriminating between the variants and the originals is also investigated. In speech recognition experiments, the proposed adaptation with the subword variants reduced the word error rate by 12.0% relative in a Japanese conversational broadcast task.

  5. Localization by interaural time difference (ITD): Effects of interaural frequency mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Bonham, B.H.; Lewis, E.R.

    1999-07-01

    A commonly accepted physiological model for lateralization of low-frequency sounds by interaural time delay (ITD) stipulates that binaural comparison neurons receive input from frequency-matched channels from each ear. Here, the effects of hypothetical interaural frequency mismatches on this model are reported. For this study, the cat{close_quote}s auditory system peripheral to the binaural comparison neurons was represented by a neurophysiologically derived model, and binaural comparison neurons were represented by cross-correlators. The results of the study indicate that, for binaural comparison neurons receiving input from one cochlear channel from each ear, interaural CF mismatches may serve to either augment or diminish the effective difference in ipsilateral and contralateral axonal time delays from the periphery to the binaural comparison neuron. The magnitude of this increase or decrease in the effective time delay difference can be up to 400 {mu}s for CF mismatches of 0.2 octaves or less for binaural neurons with CFs between 250 Hz and 2.5 kHz. For binaural comparison neurons with nominal CFs near 500 Hz, the 25-{mu}s effective time delay difference caused by a 0.012-octave CF mismatch is equal to the ITD previously shown to be behaviorally sufficient for the cat to lateralize a low-frequency sound source. {copyright} {ital 1999 Acoustical Society of America.}

  6. A comparison of partially specular radiosity and ray tracing for room acoustics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beamer, C. Walter; Muehleisen, Ralph T.

    2005-04-01

    Partially specular (PS) radiosity is an extended form of the general radiosity method. Acoustic radiosity is a form of bulk transfer of radiant acoustic energy. This bulk transfer is accomplished through a system of energy balance equations that relate the bulk energy transfer of each surface in the system to all other surfaces in the system. Until now acoustic radiosity has been limited to modeling only diffuse surface reflection. The new PS acoustic radiosity method can model all real surface types, diffuse, specular and everything in between. PS acoustic radiosity also models all real source types and distributions, not just point sources. The results of the PS acoustic radiosity method are compared to those of well known ray tracing programs. [Work supported by NSF.

  7. Shallow water acoustic response and platform motion modeling via a hierarchical Gaussian mixture model.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Paul J

    2016-04-01

    A hierarchical Gaussian mixture model is proposed to characterize shallow water acoustic response functions that are time-varying and sparse. The mixture model is based on the assumption that acoustic paths can be partitioned into two sets. The first is a relatively coherent set of arrivals that on average exhibit Doppler spreading about a mean Doppler and the remaining set is of multiple surface scattered paths that exhibit a spectrally flat Doppler. The hierarchy establishes constraints on the parameters of each of these Gaussian models such that coherent components of the response are both sparse and in the ensemble obey the Doppler spread profile. This is accomplished with a Bernoulli model that indicates the ensonification state of each element in the bi-frequency representation of the acoustic response function. Estimators of the time-varying acoustic response for the full duration of a broadband transmission are developed and employed to compensate for the shared time-varying dilation process among the coherent arrivals. The approach ameliorates response coherence degradation and can be employed to enhance coherent multi-path combining and is a useful alternative to time recursive estimation. The model is tested with acoustic communication recordings taken in shallow water at low signal-to-noise ratios. PMID:27106339

  8. Ocean acoustic signal processing: A model-based approach

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V. ); Sullivan, E.J. )

    1992-12-01

    A model-based approach is proposed to solve the ocean acoustic signal processing problem that is based on a state-space representation of the normal-mode propagation model. It is shown that this representation can be utilized to spatially propagate both modal (depth) and range functions given the basic parameters (wave numbers, etc.) developed from the solution of the associated boundary value problem. This model is then generalized to the stochastic case where an approximate Gauss--Markov model evolves. The Gauss--Markov representation, in principle, allows the inclusion of stochastic phenomena such as noise and modeling errors in a consistent manner. Based on this framework, investigations are made of model-based solutions to the signal enhancement, detection and related parameter estimation problems. In particular, a modal/pressure field processor is designed that allows {ital in} {ital situ} recursive estimation of the sound velocity profile. Finally, it is shown that the associated residual or so-called innovation sequence that ensues from the recursive nature of this formulation can be employed to monitor the model's fit to the data and also form the basis of a sequential detector.

  9. Yield modeling of acoustic charge transport transversal filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenney, J. S.; May, G. S.; Hunt, W. D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a yield model for acoustic charge transport transversal filters. This model differs from previous IC yield models in that it does not assume that individual failures of the nondestructive sensing taps necessarily cause a device failure. A redundancy in the number of taps included in the design is explained. Poisson statistics are used to describe the tap failures, weighted over a uniform defect density distribution. A representative design example is presented. The minimum number of taps needed to realize the filter is calculated, and tap weights for various numbers of redundant taps are calculated. The critical area for device failure is calculated for each level of redundancy. Yield is predicted for a range of defect densities and redundancies. To verify the model, a Monte Carlo simulation is performed on an equivalent circuit model of the device. The results of the yield model are then compared to the Monte Carlo simulation. Better than 95% agreement was obtained for the Poisson model with redundant taps ranging from 30% to 150% over the minimum.

  10. A model of unsteady subsonic flow with acoustics excluded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorchenko, A. T.

    1997-03-01

    Diverse subsonic initial-boundary-value problems (flows in a closed volume initiated by blowing or suction through permeable walls, flows with continuously distributed sources, viscous flows with substantial heat fluxes, etc.) are considered, to show that they cannot be solved by using the classical theory of incompressible fluid motion which involves the equation div u = 0. Application of the most general theory of compressible fluid flow may not be best in such cases, because then we encounter difficulties in accurately resolving the complex acoustic phenomena as well as in assigning the proper boundary conditions. With this in mind a new non-local mathematical model, where div u [not equal] 0 in the general case, is proposed for the simulation of unsteady subsonic flows in a bounded domain with continuously distributed sources of mass, momentum and entropy, also taking into account the effects of viscosity and heat conductivity when necessary. The exclusion of sound waves is one of the most important features of this model which represents a fundamental extension of the conventional model of incompressible fluid flow. The model has been built up by modifying both the general system of equations for the motion of compressible fluid (viscous or inviscid as required) and the appropriate set of boundary conditions. Some particular cases of this model are discussed. A series of exact time-dependent solutions, one- and two-dimensional, is presented to illustrate the model.

  11. A model for acoustic vaporization of encapsulated droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulouvrat, François; Guédra, Matthieu

    2015-10-01

    This work deals with the theoretical modelling of the acoustic vaporization of a droplet encapsulated with a thin viscoelastic shell. A generalized Rayleigh-Plesset equation describing the radial motion of the particle is derived, which accounts for the evaporation rate at liquid/vapor interface, the surface tension between droplet and outer liquid, and the viscoelasticity of the shell. This equation is coupled to heat equations in the liquid media which rule the temperature field around the bubble and thus the mass flux through the surface. Numerical simulations reveal behaviors of the vapor nucleus which can be substantially different from the case of a vapor bubble in an infinite medium. The results show that the ADV threshold depends on frequency in agreement with experimental observations in literature. The rigidity of the shell also affects the ADV threshold and the dynamics of the vapor expansion.

  12. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Overpressure Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, M. J.; Alvord, D. A.; McDaniels, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    A summary of the overpressure environment from the 5% Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) and the implications to the full-scale Ares I are presented in this Technical Memorandum. These include the scaled environment that would be used for assessing the full-scale Ares I configuration, observations, and team recommendations. The ignition transient is first characterized and described, the overpressure suppression system configuration is then examined, and the final environment characteristics are detailed. The recommendation for Ares I is to keep the space shuttle heritage ignition overpressure (IOP) suppression system (below-deck IOP water in the launch mount and mobile launcher and also the crest water on the main flame deflector) and the water bags.

  13. Structural Properties of Mismatched Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Normand

    The problem of understanding the local structure of disordered alloys has been around for a long time. In this thesis, I look more specifically at the effect of size-mismatch disorder in binary alloys under many forms: metallic and semiconductor alloys, bulk and surfaces, two and three dimensional systems. I have studied the limitations of a central-force model (CFM) and an embedded-atom potential (EAM) in describing the local structure of binary metallic alloys composed of Ag, Au, Cu, Ni, Pd, or Pt. Although an analytical model developed using the CFM explains qualitatively well the experimental and numerical results, in many cases, it is important to add electronic density effects through a more sophisticated potential like EAM in order to agree quantitatively with experiment. I have also looked at amorphous and crystalline silicon-germanium alloys. It turns out that the effect of size-mismatch is the same on a crystalline and an amorphous lattice. In the latter case, it can be seen as a perturbation of the much larger disorder due to the amorphisation process. However, the analytical predictions differ, for both the crystalline and amorphous alloys, from the experimental results. If one is to believe the data, there is only one possible explanation for this inconsistency: large amounts of hydrogen are present in the samples used for the measurements. Since the data analysis of EXAFS results is not always straightforward, I have proposed some experiments that could shed light on this problem. One of these experiments would be to look at the (111) surface of a Si-Ge alloy with a scanning tunneling microscope. I also present in this thesis the theoretical predictions for the height distribution at the surface as well as some more general structural information about the relaxation in the network as one goes away from the surface. Finally, I have studied the effect of size -mismatch in a purely two dimensional lattice, looking for mismatch-driven phase transitions

  14. LES and acoustic analysis of thermo-acoustic instabilities in a partially premixed model combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Ignacio; Staffelbach, Gabriel; Poinsot, Thierry; Román Casado, Juan C.; Kok, Jim B. W.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations were performed using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and acoustic analysis tools to study thermo-acoustic instabilities in a methane/air academic burner installed at the University of Twente (The Netherlands). It operates under fuel-lean partially premixed conditions at atmospheric pressure, and was built to study thermo-acoustic instabilities in conditions representative of gas turbine Lean Premixed systems: gaseous fuel is injected upstream of the combustor and has a limited time to mix with air. Even though the objective is to burn in a premixed mode, the actual regime corresponds to a partially premixed flame where strong equivalence ratio variations are created especially during combustion instabilities. Capturing these modes with LES is a challenge: here, simulations for both stable and unstable regimes are performed. In the unstable case, the limit cycle oscillations (LCO) are characterized and compared to experimental results. Reasonable agreement is found between simulations and experiments.

  15. A Jobs Mismatch. Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marina, Brenda L. H.

    2011-01-01

    In the article "A Jobs Mismatch", Jaschik has compiled the findings of a new report that was released by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. The Georgetown University report claims that there is a severe shortage of college graduates in America, and that this shortage has the United States on a "collision course with…

  16. Mismatch Negativity with Visual-only and Audiovisual Speech

    PubMed Central

    Ponton, Curtis W.; Bernstein, Lynne E.; Auer, Edward T.

    2009-01-01

    The functional organization of cortical speech processing is thought to be hierarchical, increasing in complexity and proceeding from primary sensory areas centrifugally. The current study used the mismatch negativity (MMN) obtained with electrophysiology (EEG) to investigate the early latency period of visual speech processing under both visual-only (VO) and audiovisual (AV) conditions. Current density reconstruction (CDR) methods were used to model the cortical MMN generator locations. MMNs were obtained with VO and AV speech stimuli at early latencies (approximately 82-87 ms peak in time waveforms relative to the acoustic onset) and in regions of the right lateral temporal and parietal cortices. Latencies were consistent with bottom-up processing of the visible stimuli. We suggest that a visual pathway extracts phonetic cues from visible speech, and that previously reported effects of AV speech in classical early auditory areas, given later reported latencies, could be attributable to modulatory feedback from visual phonetic processing. PMID:19404730

  17. Elastic mismatch enhances cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresler, Yony; Palmieri, Benoit; Grant, Martin

    In recent years, the study of physics phenomena in cancer has drawn considerable attention. In cancer metastasis, a soft cancer cell leaves the tumor, and must pass through the endothelium before reaching the bloodstream. Using a phase-field model we have shown that the elasticity mismatch between cells alone is sufficient to enhance the motility of thesofter cancer cell by means of bursty migration, in agreement with experiment. We will present further characterization of these behaviour, as well as new possible applications for this model.

  18. Analytical models for use in fan inflow control structure design. Inflow distortion and acoustic transmission models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedge, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical models were developed to study the effect of flow contraction and screening on inflow distortions to identify qualitative design criteria. Results of the study are that: (1) static testing distortions are due to atmospheric turbulence, nacelle boundary layer, exhaust flow reingestion, flow over stand, ground plane, and engine casing; (2) flow contraction suppresses, initially, turbulent axial velocity distortions and magnifies turbulent transverse velocity distortions; (3) perforated plate and gauze screens suppress axial components of velocity distortions to a degree determined by the screen pressure loss coefficient; (4) honeycomb screen suppress transverse components of velocity distortions to a degree determined by the length to diameter ratio of the honeycomb; (5) acoustic transmission loss of perforated plate is controlled by the reactance of its acoustic impedance; (6) acoustic transmission loss of honeycomb screens is negligible; and (7) a model for the direction change due to a corner between honeycomb panels compares favorably with measured data.

  19. A numerically efficient damping model for acoustic resonances in microfluidic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, P.; Dual, J.

    2015-06-01

    Bulk acoustic wave devices are typically operated in a resonant state to achieve enhanced acoustic amplitudes and high acoustofluidic forces for the manipulation of microparticles. Among other loss mechanisms related to the structural parts of acoustofluidic devices, damping in the fluidic cavity is a crucial factor that limits the attainable acoustic amplitudes. In the analytical part of this study, we quantify all relevant loss mechanisms related to the fluid inside acoustofluidic micro-devices. Subsequently, a numerical analysis of the time-harmonic visco-acoustic and thermo-visco-acoustic equations is carried out to verify the analytical results for 2D and 3D examples. The damping results are fitted into the framework of classical linear acoustics to set up a numerically efficient device model. For this purpose, all damping effects are combined into an acoustofluidic loss factor. Since some components of the acoustofluidic loss factor depend on the acoustic mode shape in the fluid cavity, we propose a two-step simulation procedure. In the first step, the loss factors are deduced from the simulated mode shape. Subsequently, a second simulation is invoked, taking all losses into account. Owing to its computational efficiency, the presented numerical device model is of great relevance for the simulation of acoustofluidic particle manipulation by means of acoustic radiation forces or acoustic streaming. For the first time, accurate 3D simulations of realistic micro-devices for the quantitative prediction of pressure amplitudes and the related acoustofluidic forces become feasible.

  20. A numerically efficient damping model for acoustic resonances in microfluidic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, P. Dual, J.

    2015-06-15

    Bulk acoustic wave devices are typically operated in a resonant state to achieve enhanced acoustic amplitudes and high acoustofluidic forces for the manipulation of microparticles. Among other loss mechanisms related to the structural parts of acoustofluidic devices, damping in the fluidic cavity is a crucial factor that limits the attainable acoustic amplitudes. In the analytical part of this study, we quantify all relevant loss mechanisms related to the fluid inside acoustofluidic micro-devices. Subsequently, a numerical analysis of the time-harmonic visco-acoustic and thermo-visco-acoustic equations is carried out to verify the analytical results for 2D and 3D examples. The damping results are fitted into the framework of classical linear acoustics to set up a numerically efficient device model. For this purpose, all damping effects are combined into an acoustofluidic loss factor. Since some components of the acoustofluidic loss factor depend on the acoustic mode shape in the fluid cavity, we propose a two-step simulation procedure. In the first step, the loss factors are deduced from the simulated mode shape. Subsequently, a second simulation is invoked, taking all losses into account. Owing to its computational efficiency, the presented numerical device model is of great relevance for the simulation of acoustofluidic particle manipulation by means of acoustic radiation forces or acoustic streaming. For the first time, accurate 3D simulations of realistic micro-devices for the quantitative prediction of pressure amplitudes and the related acoustofluidic forces become feasible.

  1. Simplified Finite Element Modelling of Acoustically Treated Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carfagni, M.; Citti, P.; Pierini, M.

    1997-07-01

    The application of non-optimized damping and phono-absorbent materials to automotive systems has not proved fully satisfactory in abating noise and vibration. The objective of this work was to develop a simple finite element modelling procedure that would allow optimizing structures such as a car body-in-white in terms of vibroacoustic behavior from the design stage. A procedure was developed to determine the modifications to be made in the mass, stiffness and damping characteristics in the finite element (FE) modelling of a metal structure meshed with shell elements so that the model would describe the behavior of the acoustically treated structure. To validate the modifications, a numerical-experimental comparison of the velocities on the vibrating surface was carried out, followed by a numerical-experimental comparison of the sound pressures generated by the vibrating plate. In the comparison a simple monopole model was used, in which each area of vibrating surface could be likened to a point source. The simulation and experimental procedures, previously validated for the metal structure, were then applied to multi-layered panels. Good agreement between the experimental and simulated velocities and sound pressures resulted for all the multi-layered panel configurations examined.

  2. Acoustic Performance of Drive Rig Mufflers for Model Scale Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David, B.

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft engine component testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) includes acoustic testing of scale model fans and propellers in the 9- by15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). This testing utilizes air driven turbines to deliver power to the article being studied. These air turbines exhaust directly downstream of the model in the wind tunnel test section and have been found to produce significant unwanted noise that reduces the quality of the acoustic measurements of the engine model being tested. This report describes an acoustic test of a muffler designed to mitigate the extraneous turbine noise. The muffler was found to provide acoustic attenuation of at least 8 dB between 700 Hz and 20 kHz which significantly improves the quality of acoustic measurements in the facility.

  3. A semi-analytic model for localized variable charge dust acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Gougam, Leila Ait; Aoutou, Kamal

    2006-09-15

    A semi-analytic model for nonlinear variable charge dust acoustic waves is outlined. It is shown that rarefactive variable charge dust acoustic solitons involving cusped density humps can exist. The effects of dust dynamics as well as equilibrium dust charge on these nonlinear localized structures are briefly discussed.

  4. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald; Liever, Peter; Nielsen, Tanner

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test, conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center. The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  5. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald K.; Liever, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT), conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  6. Results of acoustic tests of a Prop-Fan model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, F. B.; Brown, P. C.

    1987-06-01

    Results of acoustic tests in a low speed open jet anechoic wind tunnel are presented for a counter rotation Prop-Fan model. The model tested had 5 front and 5 rear rotor blades with swept planform. Noise spectra are presented showing the influence of operating and configuration variables such as: (1) power absorption, (2) tip speed, (3) rotor-rotor spacing, (4) power split between the front and rear blade rows, (5) variation of the RPM ratio between front and rear blade rows, (6) tractor versus pusher (pylon effects), and (7) angle of attack. In addition to model scale results, calculated levels derived from test are presented showing the influence of the above variables on Effective Perceived Noise Level of a 13.1 ft diameter Prop-Fan at a flyover distance of 1500 ft. It was found that the strongest effects are caused by tip speed and power absorption. A significant finding was that there is an optimum operating tip speed for minimum noise for a given power absorption. Effects of other parametric variations are generally small but measurable. In order to minimize noise to meet airplane certification limits, operation at moderate tip speeds and power absorption is shown to be desirable. Accuracy of predicted Effective Perceived Noise Level is shown to be good with the best accuracy in the 590 to 670 ft/sec tip speed range.

  7. Results of acoustic tests of a Prop-Fan model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, F.B.; Brown, P. C.

    1987-01-01

    Results of acoustic tests in a low speed open jet anechoic wind tunnel are presented for a counter rotation Prop-Fan model. The model tested had 5 front and 5 rear rotor blades with swept planform. Noise spectra are presented showing the influence of operating and configuration variables such as: (1) power absorption, (2) tip speed, (3) rotor-rotor spacing, (4) power split between the front and rear blade rows, (5) variation of the RPM ratio between front and rear blade rows, (6) tractor versus pusher (pylon effects), and (7) angle of attack. In addition to model scale results, calculated levels derived from test are presented showing the influence of the above variables on Effective Perceived Noise Level of a 13.1 ft diameter Prop-Fan at a flyover distance of 1500 ft. It was found that the strongest effects are caused by tip speed and power absorption. A significant finding was that there is an optimum operating tip speed for minimum noise for a given power absorption. Effects of other parametric variations are generally small but measurable. In order to minimize noise to meet airplane certification limits, operation at moderate tip speeds and power absorption is shown to be desirable. Accuracy of predicted Effective Perceived Noise Level is shown to be good with the best accuracy in the 590 to 670 ft/sec tip speed range.

  8. A violin shell model: vibrational modes and acoustics.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin E

    2015-03-01

    A generic physical model for the vibro-acoustic modes of the violin is described treating the body shell as a shallow, thin-walled, guitar-shaped, box structure with doubly arched top and back plates. comsol finite element, shell structure, software is used to identify and understand the vibrational modes of a simply modeled violin. This identifies the relationship between the freely supported plate modes when coupled together by the ribs and the modes of the assembled body shell. Such coupling results in a relatively small number of eigenmodes or component shell modes, of which a single volume-changing breathing mode is shown to be responsible for almost all the sound radiated in the monopole signature mode regime below ∼1 kHz for the violin, whether directly or by excitation of the Helmholtz f-hole resonance. The computations describe the influence on such modes of material properties, arching, plate thickness, elastic anisotropy, f-holes cut into the top plate, the bass-bar, coupling to internal air modes, the rigid neck-fingerboard assembly, and, most importantly, the soundpost. Because the shell modes are largely determined by the symmetry of the guitar-shaped body, the model is applicable to all instruments of the violin family. PMID:25786935

  9. A comparison of acoustic predictions with model rotor test data from the NASA 14 x 22 ft wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindt, Christian J.; Fitzgerald, James M.

    A study to correlate the predictions of the NASA-developed ROTONET rotorcraft acoustic prediction code and the Sikorsky in-house rotorcraft acoustic prediction code with model wind tunnel tests is presented. The prediction methodology models thickness, steady and unsteady loading effects, with the unsteady loading derived from forward flight and simple wake models. The predictions have been compared with the acoustic data on the basis of similarity of the acoustic pressure time histories.

  10. Flow-flame interactions causing acoustically coupled heat release fluctuations in a thermo-acoustically unstable gas turbine model combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, A.M.; Boxx, I.; Stoehr, M.; Meier, W.; Carter, C.D.

    2010-12-15

    A detailed analysis of the flow-flame interactions associated with acoustically coupled heat-release rate fluctuations was performed for a 10 kW, CH{sub 4}/air, swirl stabilized flame in a gas turbine model combustor exhibiting self-excited thermo-acoustic oscillations at 308 Hz. High-speed stereoscopic particle image velocimetry, OH planar laser induced fluorescence, and OH* chemiluminescence measurements were performed at a sustained repetition rate of 5 kHz, which was sufficient to resolve the relevant combustor dynamics. Using spatio-temporal proper orthogonal decomposition, it was found that the flow-field contained several simultaneous periodic motions: the reactant flux into the combustion chamber periodically oscillated at the thermo-acoustic frequency (308 Hz), a helical precessing vortex core (PVC) circumscribed the burner nozzle at 515 Hz, and the PVC underwent axial contraction and extension at the thermo-acoustic frequency. The global heat release rate fluctuated at the thermo-acoustic frequency, while the heat release centroid circumscribed the combustor at the difference between the thermo-acoustic and PVC frequencies. Hence, the three-dimensional location of the heat release fluctuations depended on the interaction of the PVC with the flame surface. This motivated the compilation of doubly phase resolved statistics based on the phase of both the acoustic and PVC cycles, which showed highly repeatable periodic flow-flame configurations. These include flames stabilized between the inflow and inner recirculation zone, large-scale flame wrap-up by the PVC, radial deflection of the inflow by the PVC, and combustion in the outer recirculation zones. Large oscillations in the flame surface area were observed at the thermo-accoustic frequency that significantly affected the total heat-release oscillations. By filtering the instantaneous reaction layers at different scales, the importance of the various flow-flame interactions affecting the flame area was

  11. Evaluation of CADD Scores in Curated Mismatch Repair Gene Variants Yields a Model for Clinical Validation and Prioritization

    PubMed Central

    van der Velde, K. Joeri; Kuiper, Joël; Thompson, Bryony A.; Plazzer, John‐Paul; van Valkenhoef, Gert; de Haan, Mark; Jongbloed, Jan D.H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Koning, Tom J.; Abbott, Kristin M.; Sinke, Richard; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Macrae, Finlay; Genuardi, Maurizio; Sijmons, Rolf H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Next‐generation sequencing in clinical diagnostics is providing valuable genomic variant data, which can be used to support healthcare decisions. In silico tools to predict pathogenicity are crucial to assess such variants and we have evaluated a new tool, Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion (CADD), and its classification of gene variants in Lynch syndrome by using a set of 2,210 DNA mismatch repair gene variants. These had already been classified by experts from InSiGHT's Variant Interpretation Committee. Overall, we found CADD scores do predict pathogenicity (Spearman's ρ = 0.595, P < 0.001). However, we discovered 31 major discrepancies between the InSiGHT classification and the CADD scores; these were explained in favor of the expert classification using population allele frequencies, cosegregation analyses, disease association studies, or a second‐tier test. Of 751 variants that could not be clinically classified by InSiGHT, CADD indicated that 47 variants were worth further study to confirm their putative pathogenicity. We demonstrate CADD is valuable in prioritizing variants in clinically relevant genes for further assessment by expert classification teams. PMID:25871441

  12. Finite Element and Plate Theory Modeling of Acoustic Emission Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Hamstad, M. A.; Gary, J.; OGallagher, A.

    1998-01-01

    A comparison was made between two approaches to predict acoustic emission waveforms in thin plates. A normal mode solution method for Mindlin plate theory was used to predict the response of the flexural plate mode to a point source, step-function load, applied on the plate surface. The second approach used a dynamic finite element method to model the problem using equations of motion based on exact linear elasticity. Calculations were made using properties for both isotropic (aluminum) and anisotropic (unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite) materials. For simulations of anisotropic plates, propagation along multiple directions was evaluated. In general, agreement between the two theoretical approaches was good. Discrepancies in the waveforms at longer times were caused by differences in reflections from the lateral plate boundaries. These differences resulted from the fact that the two methods used different boundary conditions. At shorter times in the signals, before reflections, the slight discrepancies in the waveforms were attributed to limitations of Mindlin plate theory, which is an approximate plate theory. The advantages of the finite element method are that it used the exact linear elasticity solutions, and that it can be used to model real source conditions and complicated, finite specimen geometries as well as thick plates. These advantages come at a cost of increased computational difficulty, requiring lengthy calculations on workstations or supercomputers. The Mindlin plate theory solutions, meanwhile, can be quickly generated on personal computers. Specimens with finite geometry can also be modeled. However, only limited simple geometries such as circular or rectangular plates can easily be accommodated with the normal mode solution technique. Likewise, very limited source configurations can be modeled and plate theory is applicable only to thin plates.

  13. A model for acoustic vaporization of encapsulated droplets.

    PubMed

    Guédra, Matthieu; Coulouvrat, François

    2015-12-01

    The use of encapsulated liquid nanoparticles is currently largely investigated for medical applications, mainly because their reduced size allows them to enter targeted areas which cannot be reached by large microbubbles (contrast agents). Low-boiling point perfluorocarbon droplets can be vaporized on-site under the action of the ultrasonic field, in order to turn them into echogeneous-eventually cavitating-microbubbles. This paper presents a theoretical model describing this phenomenon, paying particular attention to the finite size of the droplet and its encapsulation by a thin viscoelastic layer. Numerical simulations are done for droplets of radii 1 and 10 μm and for frequencies of 1-5 MHz. Results reveal that droplet surface tension and shell rigidity are responsible for an increase of the acoustic droplet vaporization threshold. Furthermore, this threshold does not vary monotonically with frequency, and an optimal frequency can be found to minimize it. Finally, the role of some physical properties on the dynamics of the particle is analyzed, such as the contrast of inner and outer liquids densities and the mechanical properties of the shell. PMID:26723321

  14. Acoustic propagation in the Hudson River Estuary: Analysis of experimental measurements and numerical modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Sreeram

    Underwater intrusion detection is an ongoing security concern in port and harbor areas. Of particular interest is to detect SCUBA divers, unmanned underwater vehicles and small boats from their acoustic signature. A thorough understanding of the effects of the shallow water propagating medium on acoustic signals can help develop new technologies and improve the performance of existing acoustic based surveillance systems. The Hudson River Estuary provides us with such a shallow water medium to conduct research and improve our knowledge of shallow water acoustics. Acoustic propagation in the Hudson River Estuary is highly affected by the temporal and spatial variability of salinity and temperature due to tides, freshwater inflows, winds etc. The primary goal of this research is to help develop methodologies to predict the formation of an acoustic field in the realistic environment of the lower Hudson River Estuary. Shallow water high-frequency acoustic propagation experiments were conducted in the Hudson River near Hoboken, New Jersey. Channel Impulse Response (CIR) measurements were carried out in the frequency band from 10 to 100 kHz for distances up to 200 meters in a water depth of 8-10 meters which formed the basis for experimental Transmission Loss (TL). CIR data was also utilized to demonstrate multi-path propagation in shallow water. Acoustic propagation models based on Ray Theory and Parabolic Equation methods were implemented in the frequency band from 10 to 100 kHz and TL was estimated. The sound velocity profiles required as input by acoustic propagation models were calculated from in-situ measurements of temperature, salinity and depth. Surface reflection loss was obtained from CIR data and incorporated into the acoustic propagation models. Experimentally obtained TL was used to validate the acoustic model predictions. An outcome of this research is an operational acoustic transmission loss (TL) forecast system based on the existing, Stevens New York

  15. Study of Two-Dimensional Compressible Non-Acoustic Modeling of Stirling Machine Type Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C., Jr.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2-D) computer code was developed for modeling enclosed volumes of gas with oscillating boundaries, such as Stirling machine components. An existing 2-D incompressible flow computer code, CAST, was used as the starting point for the project. CAST was modified to use the compressible non-acoustic Navier-Stokes equations to model an enclosed volume including an oscillating piston. The devices modeled have low Mach numbers and are sufficiently small that the time required for acoustics to propagate across them is negligible. Therefore, acoustics were excluded to enable more time efficient computation. Background information about the project is presented. The compressible non-acoustic flow assumptions are discussed. The governing equations used in the model are presented in transport equation format. A brief description is given of the numerical methods used. Comparisons of code predictions with experimental data are then discussed.

  16. A Shock-Refracted Acoustic Wave Model for the Prediction of Screech Amplitude in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2007-01-01

    A physical model is proposed for the estimation of the screech amplitude in underexpanded supersonic jets. The model is based on the hypothesis that the interaction of a plane acoustic wave with stationary shock waves provides amplification of the transmitted acoustic wave upon traversing the shock. Powell's discrete source model for screech incorporating a stationary array of acoustic monopoles is extended to accommodate variable source strength. The proposed model reveals that the acoustic sources are of increasing strength with downstream distance. It is shown that the screech amplitude increases with the fuiiy expanded jet Mach number. Comparisons of predicted screech amplitude with available test data show satisfactory agreement. The effect of variable source strength on directivity of the fundamental (first harmonic, lowest frequency mode) and the second harmonic (overtone) is found to be unimportant with regard to the principal lobe (main or major lobe) of considerable relative strength, and is appreciable only in the secondary or minor lobes (of relatively weaker strength

  17. A Shock-Refracted Acoustic Wave Model for Screech Amplitude in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2007-01-01

    A physical model is proposed for the estimation of the screech amplitude in underexpanded supersonic jets. The model is based on the hypothesis that the interaction of a plane acoustic wave with stationary shock waves provides amplification of the transmitted acoustic wave upon traversing the shock. Powell's discrete source model for screech incorporating a stationary array of acoustic monopoles is extended to accommodate variable source strength. The proposed model reveals that the acoustic sources are of increasing strength with downstream distance. It is shown that the screech amplitude increases with the fully expanded jet Mach number. Comparisons of predicted screech amplitude with available test data show satisfactory agreement. The effect of variable source strength on the directivity of the fundamental (first harmonic, lowest frequency mode) and the second harmonic (overtone) is found to be unimportant with regard to the principal lobe (main or major lobe) of considerable relative strength, and is appreciable only in the secondary or minor lobes (of relatively weaker strength).

  18. Predictive Acoustic Modelling Applied to the Control of Intake/exhaust Noise of Internal Combustion Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, P. O. A. L.; Harrison, M. F.

    1997-05-01

    The application of validated acoustic models to intake/exhaust system acoustic design is described with reference to a sequence of specific practical examples. These include large turbocharged diesel generating sets, truck engines and high performance petrol engines. The discussion includes a comparison of frequency domain, time domain and hybrid modelling approaches to design methodology. The calculation of sound emission from open terminations is summarized in an appendix.

  19. Structural acoustics model of the violin radiativity profile.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George

    2008-12-01

    Violin radiativity profiles are dominated by the Helmholtz-like A0 cavity mode ( approximately 280 Hz), first corpus bending modes B1(-) and B1(+) ( approximately 500 Hz), and BH and bridge-filter peaks ( approximately 2.4 kHz and approximately 3.5 kHz, respectively), with falloff above approximately 4 kHz. The B1 modes-dependent on two low-lying free-plate modes--are proposed to excite A0 via coupling to B1-driven in-phase f-hole volume flows. VIOCADEAS data show that A0 radiativity increases primarily as A0-B1(-) frequency difference decreases, consistent with Meinel's 1937 experiment for too-thick/too-thin plate thicknesses, plus sound post removal and violin octet baritone results. The vibration-->acoustic energy filter, F(RAD), computed from shape-material-independent radiation and total damping, peaks at the critical frequency f(crit), estimated from a free-plate mode by analogy to flat-plate bending. Experimentally, f(crit) decreased as this plate mode (and B1(+)) frequency increased. Simulations show that increasing plate thicknesses lowers f(crit), reduces F(RAD), and moves the spectral balance toward lower frequencies. Incorporating string-->corpus filters (including bridge versus bridge-island impedances) provides a model for overall violin radiativity. This model-with B1 and A0-B1 couplings, and f(crit) (computed from a free-plate mode important to B1) strongly affecting the lowest and highest parts of the radiativity profile-substantiates prior empirical B1--sound quality linkages. PMID:19206824

  20. A hybrid SEA/modal technique for modeling structural-acoustic interior noise in rotorcraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayachandran, V.; Bonilha, M. W.

    2003-03-01

    This paper describes a hybrid technique that combines Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) predictions for structural vibration with acoustic modal summation techniques to predict interior noise levels in rotorcraft. The method was applied for predicting the sound field inside a mock-up of the interior panel system of the Sikorsky S-92 helicopter. The vibration amplitudes of the frame and panel systems were predicted using a detailed SEA model and these were used as inputs to the model of the interior acoustic space. The spatial distribution of the vibration field on individual panels, and their coupling to the acoustic space were modeled using stochastic techniques. Leakage and nonresonant transmission components were accounted for using space-averaged values obtained from a SEA model of the complete structural-acoustic system. Since the cabin geometry was quite simple, the modeling of the interior acoustic space was performed using a standard modal summation technique. Sound pressure levels predicted by this approach at specific microphone locations were compared with measured data. Agreement within 3 dB in one-third octave bands above 40 Hz was observed. A large discrepancy in the one-third octave band in which the first acoustic mode is resonant (31.5 Hz) was observed. Reasons for such a discrepancy are discussed in the paper. The developed technique provides a method for modeling helicopter cabin interior noise in the frequency mid-range where neither FEA nor SEA is individually effective or accurate.

  1. A case-study comparison of computer modeling and scale modeling in acoustics consulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamia, Paul T.

    2002-05-01

    As an alternate or compliment to computer models, acoustics consultants often make use of scale models to evaluate the efficacy of architectural designs. The intention of this paper is to compare the two modeling approaches, using one or more case studies, to explore the pros and cons of each. Topics of comparison will include cost, geometric representations, effective bandwidths, propagation phenomena (e.g., diffraction), simulation of material properties, and auralization. Where possible, measured data from existing spaces will be presented to provide a reference for the modeled data.

  2. Mismatch Negativity: Translating the Potential

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Juanita; Harms, Lauren; Schall, Ulrich; Michie, Patricia T.

    2013-01-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) component of the auditory event-related potential has become a valuable tool in cognitive neuroscience. Its reduced size in persons with schizophrenia is of unknown origin but theories proposed include links to problems in experience-dependent plasticity reliant on N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptors. In this review we address the utility of this tool in revealing the nature and time course of problems in perceptual inference in this illness together with its potential for use in translational research testing animal models of schizophrenia-related phenotypes. Specifically, we review the reasons for interest in MMN in schizophrenia, issues pertaining to the measurement of MMN, its use as a vulnerability index for the development of schizophrenia, the pharmacological sensitivity of MMN and the progress in developing animal models of MMN. Within this process we highlight the challenges posed by knowledge gaps pertaining to the tool and the pharmacology of the underlying system. PMID:24391602

  3. A modeling investigation of vowel-to-vowel movement planning in acoustic and muscle spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandipour, Majid

    The primary objective of this research was to explore the coordinate space in which speech movements are planned. A two dimensional biomechanical model of the vocal tract (tongue, lips, jaw, and pharynx) was constructed based on anatomical and physiological data from a subject. The model transforms neural command signals into the actions of muscles. The tongue was modeled by a 221-node finite element mesh. Each of the eight tongue muscles defined within the mesh was controlled by a virtual muscle model. The other vocal-tract components were modeled as simple 2nd-order systems. The model's geometry was adapted to a speaker, using MRI scans of the speaker's vocal tract. The vocal tract model, combined with an adaptive controller that consisted of a forward model (mapping 12-dimensional motor commands to a 64-dimensional acoustic spectrum) and an inverse model (mapping acoustic trajectories to motor command trajectories), was used to simulate and explore the implications of two planning hypotheses: planning in motor space vs. acoustic space. The acoustic, kinematic, and muscle activation (EMG) patterns of vowel-to-vowel sequences generated by the model were compared to data from the speaker whose acoustic, kinematic and EMG were also recorded. The simulation results showed that: (a) modulations of the motor commands effectively accounted for the effects of speaking rate on EMG, kinematic, and acoustic outputs; (b) the movement and acoustic trajectories were influenced by vocal tract biomechanics; and (c) both planning schemes produced similar articulatory movement, EMG, muscle length, force, and acoustic trajectories, which were also comparable to the subject's data under normal speaking conditions. In addition, the effects of a bite-block on measured EMG, kinematics and formants were simulated by the model. Acoustic planning produced successful simulations but motor planning did not. The simulation results suggest that with somatosensory feedback but no auditory

  4. Forward model of thermally-induced acoustic signal specific to intralumenal detection geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sovanlal; Bunting, Charles F.; Piao, Daqing

    2011-03-01

    This work investigates a forward model associated with intra-lumenal detection of acoustic signal originated from transient thermal-expansion of the tissue. The work is specific to intra-lumenal thermo-acoustic tomography (TAT) which detects the contrast of tissue dielectric properties with ultrasonic resolution, but it is also extendable to intralumenal photo-acoustic tomography (PAT) which detects the contrast of light absorption properties of tissue with ultrasound resolution. Exact closed-form frequency-domain or time-domain forward model of thermally-induced acoustic signal have been studied rigorously for planar geometry and two other geometries, including cylindrical and spherical geometries both of which is specific to external-imaging, i.e. breast or brain imaging using an externally-deployed applicator. This work extends the existing studies to the specific geometry of internal or intra-lumenal imaging, i.e., prostate imaging by an endo-rectally deployed applicator. In this intra-lumenal imaging geometry, both the source that excites the transient thermal-expansion of the tissue and the acoustic transducer that acquires the thermally-induced acoustic signal are assumed enclosed by the tissue and on the surface of a long cylindrical applicator. The Green's function of the frequency-domain thermo-acoustic equation in spherical coordinates is expanded to cylindrical coordinates associated with intra-lumenal geometry. Inverse Fourier transform is then applied to obtain a time-domain solution of the thermo-acoustic pressure wave for intra-lumenal geometry. Further employment of the boundary condition to the "convex" applicator-tissue interface would render an exact forward solution toward accurate reconstruction for intra-lumenal thermally-induced acoustic imaging.

  5. Model-based passive acoustic tracking of sperm whale foraging behavior in the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemann, Christopher; Thode, Aaron; Straley, Jan; Folkert, Kendall; O'Connell, Victoria

    2005-09-01

    In 2004, the Southeast Alaska Sperm Whale Avoidance Project (SEASWAP) introduced the use of passive acoustics to help monitor the behavior of sperm whales depredating longline fishing operations. Acoustic data from autonomous recorders mounted on longlines provide the opportunity to demonstrate a tracking algorithm based on acoustic propagation modeling while providing insight into whales' foraging behavior. With knowledge of azimuthally dependent bathymetry, a 3D track of whale motion can be obtained using data from just one hydrophone by exploiting multipath arrival information from recorded sperm whale clicks. The evolution of multipath arrival patterns is matched to range-, depth-, and azimuth-dependent modeled arrival patterns to generate an estimate of whale motion. This technique does not require acoustic ray identification (i.e., direct path, surface reflected, etc.) while still utilizing individual ray arrival information, and it can also account for all waveguide propagation physics such as interaction with range-dependent bathymetry and ray refraction.

  6. Grazing incidence modeling of a metamaterial-inspired dual-resonance acoustic liner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Benjamin S.

    2014-03-01

    To reduce the noise emitted by commercial aircraft turbofan engines, the inlet and aft nacelle ducts are lined with acoustic absorbing structures called acoustic liners. Traditionally, these structures consist of a perforated facesheet bonded on top of a honeycomb core. These traditional perforate over honeycomb core (POHC) liners create an absorption spectra where the maximum absorption occurs at a frequency that is dictated by the depth of the honeycomb core; which acts as a quarter-wave resonator. Recent advances in turbofan engine design have increased the need for thin acoustic liners that are effective at low frequencies. One design that has been developed uses an acoustic metamaterial architecture to improve the low frequency absorption. Specifically, the liner consists of an array of Helmholtz resonators separated by quarter-wave volumes to create a dual-resonance acoustic liner. While previous work investigated the acoustic behavior under normal incidence, this paper outlines the modeling and predicted transmission loss and absorption of a dual-resonance acoustic metamaterial when subjected to grazing incidence sound.

  7. Validation and Simulation of ARES I Scale Model Acoustic Test -1- Pathfinder Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, G. C.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. To take advantage of this data, a digital representation of the ASMAT test setup has been constructed and test firings of the motor have been simulated using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software. Within this first of a series of papers, results from ASMAT simulations with the rocket in a held down configuration and without water suppression have then been compared to acoustic data collected from similar live-fire tests to assess the accuracy of the simulations. Detailed evaluations of the mesh features, mesh length scales relative to acoustic signals, Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy numbers, and spatial residual sources have been performed to support this assessment. Results of acoustic comparisons have shown good correlation with the amplitude and temporal shape of pressure features and reasonable spectral accuracy up to approximately 1000 Hz. Major plume and acoustic features have been well captured including the plume shock structure, the igniter pulse transient, and the ignition overpressure. Finally, acoustic propagation patterns illustrated a previously unconsidered issue of tower placement inline with the high intensity overpressure propagation path.

  8. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  9. A Simplified Model for the Investigation of Acoustically Driven Combustion Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Quinn, D. Dane

    1998-01-01

    A simplified one-dimensional model of reactive flow is presented which captures features of aeropropulsion systems, including acoustically driven combustion instabilities. Although the resulting partial differential equations are one dimensional, they qualitatively describe observed phenomena, including, resonant frequencies and the admission of both steady and unsteady behavior. A number of simulations are shown which exhibit both steady and unsteady behavior, including flame migration and thermo acoustic instabilities. Finally, we present examples of unsteady flow resulting from fuel modulation.

  10. A review and synthesis of late Pleistocene extinction modeling: progress delayed by mismatches between ecological realism, interpretation, and methodological transparency.

    PubMed

    Yule, Jeffrey V; Fournier, Robert J; Jensen, Christopher X J; Yang, Jinyan

    2014-06-01

    Late Pleistocene extinctions occurred globally over a period of about 50,000 years, primarily affecting mammals of > or = 44 kg body mass (i.e., megafauna) first in Australia, continuing in Eurasia and, finally, in the Americas. Polarized debate about the cause(s) of the extinctions centers on the role of climate change and anthropogenic factors (especially hunting). Since the late 1960s, investigators have developed mathematical models to simulate the ecological interactions that might have contributed to the extinctions. Here, we provide an overview of the various methodologies used and conclusions reached in the modeling literature, addressing both the strengths and weaknesses of modeling as an explanatory tool. Although late Pleistocene extinction models now provide a solid foundation for viable future work, we conclude, first, that single models offer less compelling support for their respective explanatory hypotheses than many realize; second, that disparities in methodology (both in terms of model parameterization and design) prevent meaningful comparison between models and, more generally, progress from model to model in increasing our understanding of these extinctions; and third, that recent models have been presented and possibly developed without sufficient regard for the transparency of design that facilitates scientific progress. PMID:24984323

  11. Source Localization with Acoustic Sensor Arrays Using Generative Model Based Fitting with Sparse Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Jose; Pizarro, Daniel; Macias-Guarasa, Javier

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for indoor acoustic source localization using sensor arrays. The proposed solution starts by defining a generative model, designed to explain the acoustic power maps obtained by Steered Response Power (SRP) strategies. An optimization approach is then proposed to fit the model to real input SRP data and estimate the position of the acoustic source. Adequately fitting the model to real SRP data, where noise and other unmodelled effects distort the ideal signal, is the core contribution of the paper. Two basic strategies in the optimization are proposed. First, sparse constraints in the parameters of the model are included, enforcing the number of simultaneous active sources to be limited. Second, subspace analysis is used to filter out portions of the input signal that cannot be explained by the model. Experimental results on a realistic speech database show statistically significant localization error reductions of up to 30% when compared with the SRP-PHAT strategies. PMID:23202021

  12. Modelling acoustic scattering, sound speed, and attenuation in gassy soft marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Mantouka, A; Dogan, H; White, P R; Leighton, T G

    2016-07-01

    A model for nonlinear gas bubble pulsation in marine sediments is presented. This model is then linearized to determine the resonance frequency and the damping terms for linear radial oscillations. The linear model is then used to predict the effects that such bubble pulsations will have on the sound speed and attenuation of acoustic waves propagating in gassy marine sediment. The results are compared for monodisperse populations against the predictions of a model of Anderson and Hampton and, furthermore, the additional abilities of the model introduced in this paper are discussed. These features include the removal of the sign ambiguities in the expressions, the straightforward implementation for acoustic propagation through polydisperse bubble populations, the capability to estimate bubble size distributions through a full acoustic inversion, and the capability to predict nonlinear effects. PMID:27475152

  13. Modeling the acoustical and airflow performance of natural ventilation inlet and outlet units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, David J.; Kang, Jian; Brocklesby, Martin

    2005-04-01

    One aspect of the trend towards designing green buildings has been the increasing use of natural ventilation for buildings which otherwise might have required mechanical ventilation or even full air conditioning. However, the pressure differentials available to drive the natural ventilation process are small and hence relatively large inlets and outlets with low resistance to flow are required. These apertures constitute significant acoustic weak points on building facades and hence need to be treated to reduce noise ingress. Although there are a number of natural ventilation units available they have frequently been designed from the application of simple principles without any attempt to optimise both their airflow and acoustical performance. In this paper the results of a series of computer modeling exercises are described using acoustic FEM and BEM plus Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) which seeks to establish recommendations for the optimum design of natural ventilation inlet and outlet devices for both acoustical and airflow performance.

  14. Investigations of incorporating source directivity into room acoustics computer models to improve auralizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigeant, Michelle C.

    Room acoustics computer modeling and auralizations are useful tools when designing or modifying acoustically sensitive spaces. In this dissertation, the input parameter of source directivity has been studied in great detail to determine first its effect in room acoustics computer models and secondly how to better incorporate the directional source characteristics into these models to improve auralizations. To increase the accuracy of room acoustics computer models, the source directivity of real sources, such as musical instruments, must be included in the models. The traditional method for incorporating source directivity into room acoustics computer models involves inputting the measured static directivity data taken every 10° in a sphere-shaped pattern around the source. This data can be entered into the room acoustics software to create a directivity balloon, which is used in the ray tracing algorithm to simulate the room impulse response. The first study in this dissertation shows that using directional sources over an omni-directional source in room acoustics computer models produces significant differences both in terms of calculated room acoustics parameters and auralizations. The room acoustics computer model was also validated in terms of accurately incorporating the input source directivity. A recently proposed technique for creating auralizations using a multi-channel source representation has been investigated with numerous subjective studies, applied to both solo instruments and an orchestra. The method of multi-channel auralizations involves obtaining multi-channel anechoic recordings of short melodies from various instruments and creating individual channel auralizations. These auralizations are then combined to create a total multi-channel auralization. Through many subjective studies, this process was shown to be effective in terms of improving the realism and source width of the auralizations in a number of cases, and also modeling different

  15. The Mismatch between Students' Mental Models of Acids/Bases and their Sources and their Teacher's Anticipations thereof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jing-Wen; Chiu, Mei-Hung

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the characteristics and sources of students' mental models of acids and bases with a teacher's anticipations and, based on this comparison, to explore some possible explanations why motivated students might fail to learn from a subject-knowledgeable chemistry teacher. The study involves a chemistry teacher and her 38 ninth graders and focuses on the mental models of three high achievers and three low achievers who were interviewed in depth. Four students' mental models of acid and base are identified. The mental models and sources of students' conceptions of acids and bases that influenced the high achievers are compared to those of the low achievers. We find that the teacher in the study made accurate anticipations of her students' mental models in the case of the high achievers but inaccurate anticipations of the low-achievers' mental models and the diverse sources influencing their mental models. In addition, the teacher incorrectly attributed the poor achievement of the low-achieving students to their intuition and underestimated the effects of her teaching on the achievement of these students. As a result, the teacher's instruction reinforced the low-achievers' incorrect mental models. Finally, the different approaches for teaching students with different achievements are emphasized according to the empirical data in this study.

  16. 3D Finite-Difference Modeling of Acoustic Radiation from Seismic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chael, E. P.; Aldridge, D. F.; Jensen, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Shallow seismic events, earthquakes as well as explosions, often generate acoustic waves in the atmosphere observable at local or even regional distances. Recording both the seismic and acoustic signals can provide additional constraints on source parameters such as epicenter coordinates, depth, origin time, moment, and mechanism. Recent advances in finite-difference (FD) modeling methods enable accurate numerical treatment of wave propagation across the ground surface between the (solid) elastic and (fluid) acoustic domains. Using a fourth-order, staggered-grid, velocity-stress FD algorithm, we are investigating the effects of various source parameters on the acoustic (or infrasound) signals transmitted from the solid earth into the atmosphere. Compressional (P), shear (S), and Rayleigh waves all radiate some acoustic energy into the air at the ground surface. These acoustic wavefronts are typically conical in shape, since their phase velocities along the surface exceed the sound speed in air. Another acoustic arrival with a spherical wavefront can be generated from the vicinity of the epicenter of a shallow event, due to the strong vertical ground motions directly above the buried source. Images of acoustic wavefields just above the surface reveal the radiation patterns and relative amplitudes of the various arrivals. In addition, we compare the relative effectiveness of different seismic source mechanisms for generating acoustic energy. For point sources at a fixed depth, double-couples with almost any orientation produce stronger acoustic signals than isotropic explosions, due to higher-amplitude S and Rayleigh waves. Of course, explosions tend to be shallower than most earthquakes, which can offset the differences due to mechanism. Low-velocity material in the shallow subsurface acts to increase vertical seismic motions there, enhancing the coupling to acoustic waves in air. If either type of source breaks the surface (e.g., an earthquake with surface rupture

  17. Experimental aerodynamic and acoustic model testing of the Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) testbed coannular exhaust nozzle system: Comprehensive data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.; Morris, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    The component detail design drawings of the one sixth scale model of the variable cycle engine testbed demonstrator exhaust syatem tested are presented. Also provided are the basic acoustic and aerodynamic data acquired during the experimental model tests. The model drawings, an index to the acoustic data, an index to the aerodynamic data, tabulated and graphical acoustic data, and the tabulated aerodynamic data and graphs are discussed.

  18. Acoustic Measurements of a Large Civil Transport Main Landing Gear Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravetta, Patricio A.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Wisda, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Microphone phased array acoustic measurements of a 26 percent-scale, Boeing 777-200 main landing gear model with and without noise reduction fairings installed were obtained in the anechoic configuration of the Virginia Tech Stability Tunnel. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.17 with the latter speed used as the nominal test condition. The fully and partially dressed gear with the truck angle set at 13 degrees toe-up landing configuration were the two most extensively tested configurations, serving as the baselines for comparison purposes. Acoustic measurements were also acquired for the same two baseline configurations with the truck angle set at 0 degrees. In addition, a previously tested noise reducing, toboggan-shaped fairing was re-evaluated extensively to address some of the lingering questions regarding the extent of acoustic benefit achievable with this device. The integrated spectra generated from the acoustic source maps reconfirm, in general terms, the previously reported noise reduction performance of the toboggan fairing as installed on an isolated gear. With the recent improvements to the Virginia Tech tunnel acoustic quality and microphone array capabilities, the present measurements provide an additional, higher quality database to the acoustic information available for this gear model.

  19. Sequential Model-Based Detection in a Shallow Ocean Acoustic Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V

    2002-03-26

    A model-based detection scheme is developed to passively monitor an ocean acoustic environment along with its associated variations. The technique employs an embedded model-based processor and a reference model in a sequential likelihood detection scheme. The monitor is therefore called a sequential reference detector. The underlying theory for the design is developed and discussed in detail.

  20. Comparison of experimental and analytical predictions of rotor blade-vortex interactions using model scale acoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. M.; Elliott, J. W.; Hoad, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise is studied using a model scale rotor acoustic data base and an analytical rotor wake prediction method. The variation of BVI acoustic levels with vehicle flight conditions (forward speed and disk attitude) is presented. Calculations of probable BVI locations on the rotor disk are made for a range of operating conditions using the measured acoustic signals and an acoustic ray tracing technique. Analytical predictions of possible BVI locations on the rotor disk are made using a generalized distorted wake analysis program. Comparisons of the interaction locations are made with the results of both the analytic approach and the acoustic ray tracing technique.

  1. Power cepstrum technique with application to model helicopter acoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. M.; Burley, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    The application of the power cepstrum to measured helicopter-rotor acoustic data is investigated. A previously applied correction to the reconstructed spectrum is shown to be incorrect. For an exact echoed signal, the amplitude of the cepstrum echo spike at the delay time is linearly related to the echo relative amplitude in the time domain. If the measured spectrum is not entirely from the source signal, the cepstrum will not yield the desired echo characteristics and a cepstral aliasing may occur because of the effective sample rate in the frequency domain. The spectral analysis bandwidth must be less than one-half the echo ripple frequency or cepstral aliasing can occur. The power cepstrum editing technique is a useful tool for removing some of the contamination because of acoustic reflections from measured rotor acoustic spectra. The cepstrum editing yields an improved estimate of the free field spectrum, but the correction process is limited by the lack of accurate knowledge of the echo transfer function. An alternate procedure, which does not require cepstral editing, is proposed which allows the complete correction of a contaminated spectrum through use of both the transfer function and delay time of the echo process.

  2. Modeling of spray combustion in an acoustic field

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, R.K.; McQuay, M.Q.; Carvalho, J.A. Jr.

    1998-07-01

    Combustion characteristics of an ethanol flame in a Rijke-tube, pulse combustor was theoretically studied to analyze the effects of injection velocity, burner location, droplet size distribution, surrounding gas velocity, and droplet phase difference on Sauter-mean diameter. The effects of these parameters were studied at first (80 Hz), second (160 Hz), and third (240 Hz) acoustic modes with steady (no oscillations) case as reference. The sound pressure level was kept constant at 150 decibels for all theoretical simulations. The simulation frequencies and sound pressure level was selected to match the actual conditions inside the rector. For all simulations, actual droplet size and velocity distributions, as experimentally measured using a phase-Doppler particle analyzer, at the injector exit were used. Significant effects on spray size distributions were found when the burning droplets were placed at the locations corresponding to the maximum acoustic velocity amplitude. Also, for both simulations and experimental results, the Sauter-mean diameters were higher for oscillating conditions compared to steady value because small droplets burn faster under an acoustic field and therefore, Sauter-mean diameter, which is biased towards larger droplets, increases.

  3. Does Gene Tree Discordance Explain the Mismatch between Macroevolutionary Models and Empirical Patterns of Tree Shape and Branching Times?

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Tanja; Degnan, James H.; Rosenberg, Noah A.

    2016-01-01

    Classic null models for speciation and extinction give rise to phylogenies that differ in distribution from empirical phylogenies. In particular, empirical phylogenies are less balanced and have branching times closer to the root compared to phylogenies predicted by common null models. This difference might be due to null models of the speciation and extinction process being too simplistic, or due to the empirical datasets not being representative of random phylogenies. A third possibility arises because phylogenetic reconstruction methods often infer gene trees rather than species trees, producing an incongruity between models that predict species tree patterns and empirical analyses that consider gene trees. We investigate the extent to which the difference between gene trees and species trees under a combined birth–death and multispecies coalescent model can explain the difference in empirical trees and birth–death species trees. We simulate gene trees embedded in simulated species trees and investigate their difference with respect to tree balance and branching times. We observe that the gene trees are less balanced and typically have branching times closer to the root than the species trees. Empirical trees from TreeBase are also less balanced than our simulated species trees, and model gene trees can explain an imbalance increase of up to 8% compared to species trees. However, we see a much larger imbalance increase in empirical trees, about 100%, meaning that additional features must also be causing imbalance in empirical trees. This simulation study highlights the necessity of revisiting the assumptions made in phylogenetic analyses, as these assumptions, such as equating the gene tree with the species tree, might lead to a biased conclusion. PMID:26968785

  4. Does Gene Tree Discordance Explain the Mismatch between Macroevolutionary Models and Empirical Patterns of Tree Shape and Branching Times?

    PubMed

    Stadler, Tanja; Degnan, James H; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2016-07-01

    Classic null models for speciation and extinction give rise to phylogenies that differ in distribution from empirical phylogenies. In particular, empirical phylogenies are less balanced and have branching times closer to the root compared to phylogenies predicted by common null models. This difference might be due to null models of the speciation and extinction process being too simplistic, or due to the empirical datasets not being representative of random phylogenies. A third possibility arises because phylogenetic reconstruction methods often infer gene trees rather than species trees, producing an incongruity between models that predict species tree patterns and empirical analyses that consider gene trees. We investigate the extent to which the difference between gene trees and species trees under a combined birth-death and multispecies coalescent model can explain the difference in empirical trees and birth-death species trees. We simulate gene trees embedded in simulated species trees and investigate their difference with respect to tree balance and branching times. We observe that the gene trees are less balanced and typically have branching times closer to the root than the species trees. Empirical trees from TreeBase are also less balanced than our simulated species trees, and model gene trees can explain an imbalance increase of up to 8% compared to species trees. However, we see a much larger imbalance increase in empirical trees, about 100%, meaning that additional features must also be causing imbalance in empirical trees. This simulation study highlights the necessity of revisiting the assumptions made in phylogenetic analyses, as these assumptions, such as equating the gene tree with the species tree, might lead to a biased conclusion. PMID:26968785

  5. Modeling of Structural-Acoustic Interaction Using Coupled FE/BE Method and Control of Interior Acoustic Pressure Using Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Shi, Yacheng

    1997-01-01

    A coupled finite element (FE) and boundary element (BE) approach is presented to model full coupled structural/acoustic/piezoelectric systems. The dual reciprocity boundary element method is used so that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the coupled system can be obtained, and to extend this approach to time dependent problems. The boundary element method is applied to interior acoustic domains, and the results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structural-acoustic problems are then analyzed with the coupled finite element/boundary element method, where the finite element method models the structural domain and the boundary element method models the acoustic domain. Results for a system consisting of an isotropic panel and a cubic cavity are in good agreement with exact solutions and experiment data. The response of a composite panel backed cavity is then obtained. The results show that the mass and stiffness of piezoelectric layers have to be considered. The coupled finite element and boundary element equations are transformed into modal coordinates, which is more convenient for transient excitation. Several transient problems are solved based on this formulation. Two control designs, a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and a feedforward controller, are applied to reduce the acoustic pressure inside the cavity based on the equations in modal coordinates. The results indicate that both controllers can reduce the interior acoustic pressure and the plate deflection.

  6. Modeling of Conversion of Seismic to Acoustic Waves at the Seafloor Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanche, A.; Guennou, C.; Goslin, J.; Dziak, R.

    2007-12-01

    Hydroacoustic waves are generated at the seafloor interface, by conversion of seismic waves and travel in the water column within the SOFAR channel with little attenuation. Recording T-waves with widespread arrays of autonomous hydrophones moored in the SOFAR channel allows to detect and localize many small-magnitude earthquakes in oceanic areas. However, hydroacoustic data cannot be used straightforwardly in seismic interpretations. In particular, because the physics of the seismic to acoustic conversion and the acoustic propagation is not completely understood, no direct information on the event magnitudes, focal mechanisms and focal depths can be directly derived from the hydroacoustic signals. In order to overcome some of these limitations, we have developed a mechanical model of the conversion from seismic to acoustic waves at the seafloor interface. The modelling is achieved through major adaptations of the 2D- finite element code "FLUSOL", which was originally developed to model fluid to solid energy conversion. Velocity displacement module within fluids and solids are derived from the stress and pressure computed for each grid element. We are able to model successfully, over a 10 x 10 km-grid, the seismic to acoustic conversion of waves generated by a source in the crust. Our model shows that a source with a high S-wave content appear to be more efficient in producing T-waves than a simple explosive source that only generates P-waves. Future work include the modelling of the conversion by more realistic seafloor topographies. Finally, we will use the output of SOLFLU as input to standard long-range acoustic propagation codes made available by the marine acoustics community. The modelled T-waves generated by various source mechanisms (tectonic or magmatic) will then be compared with real data to validate our conversion model.

  7. The Mismatch between Students' Mental Models of Acids/Bases and Their Sources and Their Teacher's Anticipations Thereof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jing-Wen; Chiu, Mei-Hung

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the characteristics and sources of students' mental models of acids and bases with a teacher's anticipations and, based on this comparison, to explore some possible explanations why motivated students might fail to learn from a subject-knowledgeable chemistry teacher. The study involves a chemistry teacher and…

  8. Flow-Structure-Acoustic Interaction Computational Modeling of Voice Production inside an Entire Airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weili; Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian

    2015-11-01

    Human voice quality is directly determined by the interplay of dynamic behavior of glottal flow, vibratory characteristics of VFs and acoustic characteristics of upper airway. These multiphysics constituents are tightly coupled together and precisely coordinate to produce understandable sound. Despite many years' research effort, the direct relationships among the detailed flow features, VF vibration and aeroacoustics still remains elusive. This study utilizes a first-principle based, flow-structure-acoustics interaction computational modeling approach to study the process of voice production inside an entire human airway. In the current approach, a sharp interface immersed boundary method based incompressible flow solver is utilized to model the glottal flow; A finite element based solid mechanics solver is utilized to model the vocal vibration; A high-order immersed boundary method based acoustics solver is utilized to directly compute sound. These three solvers are fully coupled to mimic the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. The geometry of airway is reconstructed based on the in-vivo MRI measurement reported by Story et al. (1995) and a three-layer continuum based vocal fold model is taken from Titze and Talkin (1979). Results from these simulations will be presented and further analyzed to get new insight into the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. This study is expected to improve the understanding of fundamental physical mechanism of voice production and to help to build direct cause-effect relationship between biomechanics and voice sound.

  9. Development of Modeling Capabilities for Launch Pad Acoustics and Ignition Transient Environment Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff; Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Putnam, Gabriel C.; Liever, Peter A.; Williams, Brandon R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents development efforts to establish modeling capabilities for launch vehicle liftoff acoustics and ignition transient environment predictions. Peak acoustic loads experienced by the launch vehicle occur during liftoff with strong interaction between the vehicle and the launch facility. Acoustic prediction engineering tools based on empirical models are of limited value in efforts to proactively design and optimize launch vehicles and launch facility configurations for liftoff acoustics. Modeling approaches are needed that capture the important details of the plume flow environment including the ignition transient, identify the noise generation sources, and allow assessment of the effects of launch pad geometric details and acoustic mitigation measures such as water injection. This paper presents a status of the CFD tools developed by the MSFC Fluid Dynamics Branch featuring advanced multi-physics modeling capabilities developed towards this goal. Validation and application examples are presented along with an overview of application in the prediction of liftoff environments and the design of targeted mitigation measures such as launch pad configuration and sound suppression water placement.

  10. Flight Acoustic Testing and Data Acquisition For the Rotor Noise Model (RNM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, David A.; Burley, Casey L.; Smith, Charles D.

    2006-01-01

    Two acoustic flight tests have been conducted on a remote test range at Eglin Air Force Base in the panhandle of Florida. The first was the Acoustics Week flight test conducted in September 2003. The second was the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Acoustics Flight Test conducted in October-November 2005. Benchmark acoustic databases were obtained for a number of rotorcraft and limited fixed wing vehicles for a variety of flight conditions. The databases are important for validation of acoustic prediction programs such as the Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM), as well as for the development of low noise flight procedures and for environmental impact assessments. An overview of RNM capabilities and a detailed description of the RNM/ART (Acoustic Repropagation Technique) process are presented. The RNM/ART process is demonstrated using measured acoustic data for the MD600N. The RNM predictions for a level flyover speed sweep show the highest SEL noise levels on the flight track centerline occurred at the slowest vehicle speeds. At these slower speeds, broadband noise content is elevated compared to noise levels obtained at the higher speeds. A descent angle sweep shows that, in general, ground noise levels increased with increasing descent rates. Vehicle orientation in addition to vehicle position was found to significantly affect the RNM/ART creation of source noise semi-spheres for vehicles with highly directional noise characteristics and only mildly affect those with weak acoustic directionality. Based on these findings, modifications are proposed for RNM/ART to more accurately define vehicle and rotor orientation.

  11. Flight Acoustic Testing and For the Rotorcraft Noise Data Acquisition Model (RNM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Casey L.; Smith, Charles D.; Conner, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Two acoustic flight tests have been conducted on a remote test range at Eglin Air Force Base in the panhandle of Florida. The first was the "Acoustics Week" flight test conducted in September 2003. The second was the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Acoustics Flight Test conducted in October-November 2005. Benchmark acoustic databases were obtained for a number of rotorcraft and limited fixed wing vehicles for a variety of flight conditions. The databases are important for validation of acoustic prediction programs such as the Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM), as well as for the development of low noise flight procedures and for environmental impact assessments. An overview of RNM capabilities and a detailed description of the RNM/ART (Acoustic Repropagation Technique) process are presented. The RNM/ART process is demonstrated using measured acoustic data for the MD600N. The RNM predictions for a level flyover speed sweep show the highest SEL noise levels on the flight track centerline occurred at the slowest vehicle speeds. At these slower speeds, broadband noise content is elevated compared to noise levels obtained at the higher speeds. A descent angle sweep shows that, in general, ground noise levels increased with increasing descent rates. Vehicle orientation in addition to vehicle position was found to significantly affect the RNM/ART creation of source noise semi-spheres for vehicles with highly directional noise characteristics and only mildly affect those with weak acoustic directionality. Based on these findings, modifications are proposed for RNM/ART to more accurately define vehicle and rotor orientation.

  12. Modeling photothermal and acoustical induced microbubble generation and growth.

    PubMed

    Krasovitski, Boris; Kislev, Hanoch; Kimmel, Eitan

    2007-12-01

    Previous experimental studies showed that powerful heating of nanoparticles by a laser pulse using energy density greater than 100 mJ/cm(2), could induce vaporization and generate microbubbles. When ultrasound is introduced at the same time as the laser pulse, much less laser power is required. For therapeutic applications, generation of microbubbles on demand at target locations, e.g. cells or bacteria can be used to induce hyperthermia or to facilitate drug delivery. The objective of this work is to develop a method capable of predicting photothermal and acoustic parameters in terms of laser power and acoustic pressure amplitude that are needed to produce stable microbubbles; and investigate the influence of bubble coalescence on the thresholds when the microbubbles are generated around nanoparticles that appear in clusters. We develop and solve here a combined problem of momentum, heat and mass transfer which is associated with generation and growth of a microbubble, filled with a mixture of non-vaporized gas (air) and water vapor. The microbubble's size and gas content vary as a result of three mechanisms: gas expansion or compression, evaporation or condensation on the bubble boundary, and diffusion of dissolved air in the surrounding water. The simulations predict that when ultrasound is applied relatively low threshold values of laser and ultrasound power are required to obtain a stable microbubble from a single nanoparticle. Even lower power is required when microbubbles are formed by coalescence around a cluster of 10 nanoparticles. Laser pulse energy density of 21 mJ/cm(2) is predicted for instance together with acoustic pressure of 0.1 MPa for a cluster of 10 or 62 mJ/cm(2) for a single nanoparticle. Those values are well within the safety limits, and as such are most appealing for targeted therapeutic purposes. PMID:17910969

  13. Acoustic and Perceptual Effects of Left-Right Laryngeal Asymmetries Based on Computational Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samlan, Robin A.; Story, Brad H.; Lotto, Andrew J.; Bunton, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Computational modeling was used to examine the consequences of 5 different laryngeal asymmetries on acoustic and perceptual measures of vocal function. Method: A kinematic vocal fold model was used to impose 5 laryngeal asymmetries: adduction, edge bulging, nodal point ratio, amplitude of vibration, and starting phase. Thirty /a/ and /?/…

  14. Evaluation of acoustical parameters of a Brazilian popular housing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Jos A. C.; Diniz, Fabiano B.; Ferreira, Andressa M. C.; Zannin, Paulo T.

    2003-10-01

    This article presents the results obtained from the evaluation of the acoustical insulation parameters determined in situ in a popular residence projected to offer an option to combat the housing deficit of the low income Brazilian population. This evaluation has been carried out according to the statements of the standards ISO 140-4 and 140-5, which state about this type of measurement. The results have shown that the surveyed house presents a satisfactory performance if compared to the standard of the Brazilian civil construction, but it is not adequate if compared to the demands of the international standards.

  15. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of a Helmholtz resonator: Discrete vortex model compared to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiwen; Jing, Xiaodong Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-15

    The acoustic resonance in a Helmholtz resonator excited by a low Mach number grazing flow is studied theoretically. The nonlinear numerical model is established by coupling the vortical motion at the cavity opening with the cavity acoustic mode through an explicit force balancing relation between the two sides of the opening. The vortical motion is modeled in the potential flow framework, in which the oscillating motion of the thin shear layer is described by an array of convected point vortices, and the unsteady vortex shedding is determined by the Kutta condition. The cavity acoustic mode is obtained from the one-dimensional acoustic propagation model, the time-domain equivalent of which is given by means of a broadband time-domain impedance model. The acoustic resistances due to radiation and viscous loss at the opening are also taken into account. The physical processes of the self-excited oscillations, at both resonance and off-resonance states, are simulated directly in the time domain. Results show that the shear layer exhibits a weak flapping motion at the off-resonance state, whereas it rolls up into large-scale vortex cores when resonances occur. Single and dual-vortex patterns are observed corresponding to the first and second hydrodynamic modes. The simulation also reveals different trajectories of the two vortices across the opening when the first and second hydrodynamic modes co-exist. The strong modulation of the shed vorticity by the acoustic feedback at the resonance state is demonstrated. The model overestimates the pressure pulsation amplitude by a factor 2, which is expected to be due to the turbulence of the flow which is not taken into account. The model neglects vortex shedding at the downstream and side edges of the cavity. This will also result in an overestimation of the pulsation amplitude.

  16. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of a Helmholtz resonator: Discrete vortex model compared to experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiwen; Jing, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-01

    The acoustic resonance in a Helmholtz resonator excited by a low Mach number grazing flow is studied theoretically. The nonlinear numerical model is established by coupling the vortical motion at the cavity opening with the cavity acoustic mode through an explicit force balancing relation between the two sides of the opening. The vortical motion is modeled in the potential flow framework, in which the oscillating motion of the thin shear layer is described by an array of convected point vortices, and the unsteady vortex shedding is determined by the Kutta condition. The cavity acoustic mode is obtained from the one-dimensional acoustic propagation model, the time-domain equivalent of which is given by means of a broadband time-domain impedance model. The acoustic resistances due to radiation and viscous loss at the opening are also taken into account. The physical processes of the self-excited oscillations, at both resonance and off-resonance states, are simulated directly in the time domain. Results show that the shear layer exhibits a weak flapping motion at the off-resonance state, whereas it rolls up into large-scale vortex cores when resonances occur. Single and dual-vortex patterns are observed corresponding to the first and second hydrodynamic modes. The simulation also reveals different trajectories of the two vortices across the opening when the first and second hydrodynamic modes co-exist. The strong modulation of the shed vorticity by the acoustic feedback at the resonance state is demonstrated. The model overestimates the pressure pulsation amplitude by a factor 2, which is expected to be due to the turbulence of the flow which is not taken into account. The model neglects vortex shedding at the downstream and side edges of the cavity. This will also result in an overestimation of the pulsation amplitude.

  17. Emotional speech acoustic model for Malay: iterative versus isolated unit training.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mumtaz Begum; Ainon, Raja Noor

    2013-10-01

    The ability of speech synthesis system to synthesize emotional speech enhances the user's experience when using this kind of system and its related applications. However, the development of an emotional speech synthesis system is a daunting task in view of the complexity of human emotional speech. The more recent state-of-the-art speech synthesis systems, such as the one based on hidden Markov models, can synthesize emotional speech with acceptable naturalness with the use of a good emotional speech acoustic model. However, building an emotional speech acoustic model requires adequate resources including segment-phonetic labels of emotional speech, which is a problem for many under-resourced languages, including Malay. This research shows how it is possible to build an emotional speech acoustic model for Malay with minimal resources. To achieve this objective, two forms of initialization methods were considered: iterative training using the deterministic annealing expectation maximization algorithm and the isolated unit training. The seed model for the automatic segmentation is a neutral speech acoustic model, which was transformed to target emotion using two transformation techniques: model adaptation and context-dependent boundary refinement. Two forms of evaluation have been performed: an objective evaluation measuring the prosody error and a listening evaluation to measure the naturalness of the synthesized emotional speech. PMID:24116440

  18. Beam halo in mismatched proton beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, Thomas P.,; Allen, C. K.; Chan, D.; Colestock, P. L. ,; Crandall, K. R.; Qiang, J.; Garnett, R. W.; Lysenko, W. P.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Schneider, J. D.; Schulze, M. E.; Sheffield, R. L.; Smith, H. V.

    2002-01-01

    Progress was made during the past decade towards a better understanding of halo formation caused by beam mismatch in high-intensity beams. To test these ideas an experiment was carried out at Los Alamos with proton beams in a 52-quadrupole focusing channel. Rms emittances and beam widths were obtained from measured beam profiles for comparison with the maximum emittance growth predictions of a free-energy model and the maximum haloamplitude predictions of a particle-core model. The experimental results are also compared with multiparticle simulations. In this paper we will present the experimental results and discuss the implications with respect to the validity of both the models and the simulations. Keywords: beam halo, emittance growth, beam profiles, simulations, space charge, mismatch

  19. Frequency-domain methods for modeling a nonlinear acoustic orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egolf, David P.; Murphy, William J.; Franks, John R.; Kirlin, R. Lynn

    2002-11-01

    This presentation describes frequency-domain methods for simulating transmission loss across a single orifice mounted in an acoustic waveguide. The work was a preamble to research involving earplugs containing one or more orifices. Simulation methods included direct Fourier transformation, linearization about an operating point, and Volterra series. They were applied to an electric-circuit analog of the acoustic system containing the orifice. The orifice itself was characterized by an empirical expression for nonlinear impedance obtained by fitting curves to experimental resistance and reactance data reported by other authors. Their data-collection procedures required the impedance expression presented herein to be properly labeled as a describing function, a quantity well known in the nonlinear control systems literature. Results of the computer simulations were compared to experimental transmission-loss data. For a single-tone input sound pressure, the computer code accurately predicted the output fundamental (i.e., without harmonics). For a broadband input, the simulated output was less accurate, but acceptable. Levels of the sound-pressure input ranged from 60 to 160 dB. [Work supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH, through a research associateship granted the first author by the National Research Council.] a)Currently on leave at National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH.

  20. An Acoustic Demonstration Model for CW and Pulsed Spectrosocopy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starck, Torben; Mäder, Heinrich; Trueman, Trevor; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2009-06-01

    High school and undergraduate students have often difficulties if new concepts are introduced in their physics or chemistry lectures. Lecture demonstrations and references to more familiar analogues can be of great help to the students in such situations. We have developed an experimental setup to demonstrate the principles of cw absorption and pulsed excitation - emission spectroscopies, using acoustical analogues. Our radiation source is a speaker and the detector is a microphone, both controlled by a computer sound card. The acoustical setup is housed in a plexiglas box, which serves as a resonator. It turns out that beer glasses are suitable samples; this also helps to keep the students interested! The instrument is controlled by a LabView program. In a cw experiment, the sound frequency is swept through a certain frequency range and the microphone response is recorded simultaneously as function of frequency. A background signal without sample is recorded, and background subtraction yields the beer glass spectrum. In a pulsed experiment, a short sound pulse is generated and the microphone is used to record the resulting emission signal of the beer glass. A Fourier transformation of the time domain signal gives then the spectrum. We will discuss the experimental setup and show videos of the experiments.

  1. Acoustic response modeling of energetics systems in confined spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, David R.; Hixon, Ray; Liou, William W.; Sanford, Matthew

    2007-04-01

    In recent times, warfighting has been taking place not in far-removed areas but within urban environments. As a consequence, the modern warfighter must adapt. Currently, an effort is underway to develop shoulder-mounted rocket launcher rounds suitable with reduced acoustic signatures for use in such environments. Of prime importance is to ensure that these acoustic levels, generated by propellant burning, reflections from enclosures, etc., are at tolerable levels without requiring excessive hearing protection. Presented below is a proof-of-concept approach aimed at developing a computational tool to aid in the design process. Unsteady, perfectly-expanded-jet simulations at two different Mach numbers and one at an elevated temperature ratio were conducted using an existing computational aeroacoustics code. From the solutions, sound pressure levels and frequency spectra were then obtained. The results were compared to sound pressure levels collected from a live-fire test of the weapon. Lastly, an outline of work that is to continue and be completed in the near future will be presented.

  2. Flow-structure-acoustic interaction in a human voice model.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stefan; Kniesburges, Stefan; Müller, Stefan; Delgado, Antonio; Link, Gerhard; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Döllinger, Michael

    2009-03-01

    For the investigation of the physical processes of human phonation, inhomogeneous synthetic vocal folds were developed to represent the full fluid-structure-acoustic coupling. They consisted of polyurethane rubber with a stiffness in the range of human vocal folds and were mounted in a channel, shaped like the vocal tract in the supraglottal region. This test facility permitted extensive observations of flow-induced vocal fold vibrations, the periodic flow field, and the acoustic signals in the far field of the channel. Detailed measurements were performed applying particle-image velocimetry, a laser-scanning vibrometer, a microphone, unsteady pressure sensors, and a hot-wire probe, with the aim of identifying the physical mechanisms in human phonation. The results support the existence of the Coanda effect during phonation, with the flow attaching to one vocal fold and separating from the other. This behavior is not linked to one vocal fold and changes stochastically from cycle to cycle. The oscillating flow field generates a tonal sound. The broadband noise is presumed to be caused by the interaction of the asymmetric flow with the downstream-facing surfaces of the vocal folds, analogous to trailing-edge noise. PMID:19275292

  3. Long-range Acoustic Interactions in Insect Swarms: An Adaptive Gravity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbonos, Dan; Ianconescu, Reuven; Puckett, James G.; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Gov, Nir S.

    The collective motion of groups of animals emerges from the net effect of the interactions between individual members of the group. In many cases, such as birds, fish, or ungulates, these interactions are mediated by sensory stimuli that predominantly arise from nearby neighbors. But not all stimuli in animal groups are short range. Here, we consider mating swarms of midges, which interact primarily via long-range acoustic stimuli. We exploit the similarity in form between the decay of acoustic and gravitational sources to build a model for swarm behavior. By accounting for the adaptive nature of the midges' acoustic sensing, we show that our ``adaptive gravity'' model makes mean-field predictions that agree well with experimental observations of laboratory swarms. Our results highlight the role of sensory mechanisms and interaction range in collective animal behavior. The adaptive interactions that we present here open a new class of equations of motion, which may appear in other biological contexts.

  4. Frequency-Preserved Acoustic Diode Model with High Forward-Power-Transmission Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Du, Zongliang; Sun, Zhi; Gao, Huajian; Guo, Xu

    2015-06-01

    The acoustic diode (AD) can provide brighter and clearer ultrasound images by eliminating acoustic disturbances caused by sound waves traveling in two directions at the same time and interfering with each other. Such an AD could give designers new flexibility in making ultrasonic sources like those used in medical imaging or nondestructive testing. However, current AD designs, based on nonlinear effects, only partially fill this role by converting sound to a new frequency and blocking any backward flow of the original frequency. In this work, an AD model that preserves the frequencies of acoustic waves and has a relatively high forward-power-transmission rate is proposed. Theoretical analysis indicates that the proposed AD has forward, reverse, and breakdown characteristics very similar to electrical diodes. The significant rectifying effect of the proposed AD is verified numerically through a one-dimensional example. Possible schemes for experimental realization of this model as well as more complex and efficient AD designs are also discussed.

  5. The acoustic results of a United Technologies scale model helicopter rotor tested at DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Sandy R.; Marcolini, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    In a major cooperative program between U.S. Government agencies (represented by the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate and NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers) and United Technologies Corp., a 1/6 geometrically and aeroelastically scaled UTC model helicopter rotor was tested in the open-jet anechoic test section of the Duits-Nederlandse Windtunnel in the Netherlands. As the fourth entry under the Aerodynamic and Acoustic Testing of Model Rotors Program, several comprehensive acoustic and aerodynamic databases were obtained relating the important aerodynamic phenomena to both the near- and far-field acoustic radiation. In particular, high speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction are of primary interest. This paper provides an initial summary of the acoustic measurements acquired for some of the different configurations tested. A review of the baseline swept tip rotor acoustic characteristics in the regimes of high speed forward flight, where high speed impulsive noise dominates, and low speed descent, where severe blade vortex interaction noise occurs, is presented. The trends of these primary noise sources are studied as the first step in validating the data for release and application.

  6. Acoustic and Perceptual Effects of Left–Right Laryngeal Asymmetries Based on Computational Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Samlan, Robin A.; Story, Brad H.; Lotto, Andrew J.; Bunton, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Computational modeling was used to examine the consequences of 5 different laryngeal asymmetries on acoustic and perceptual measures of vocal function. Method A kinematic vocal fold model was used to impose 5 laryngeal asymmetries: adduction, edge bulging, nodal point ratio, amplitude of vibration, and starting phase. Thirty /a/ and /I/ vowels were generated for each asymmetry and analyzed acoustically using cepstral peak prominence (CPP), harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR), and 3 measures of spectral slope (H1*-H2*, B0-B1, and B0-B2). Twenty listeners rated voice quality for a subset of the productions. Results Increasingly asymmetric adduction, bulging, and nodal point ratio explained significant variance in perceptual rating (R2 = .05, p < .001). The same factors resulted in generally decreasing CPP, HNR, and B0-B2 and in increasing B0-B1. Of the acoustic measures, only CPP explained significant variance in perceived quality (R2 = .14, p < .001). Increasingly asymmetric amplitude of vibration or starting phase minimally altered vocal function or voice quality. Conclusion Asymmetries of adduction, bulging, and nodal point ratio drove acoustic measures and perception in the current study, whereas asymmetric amplitude of vibration and starting phase demonstrated minimal influence on the acoustic signal or voice quality. PMID:24845730

  7. Characterization of a Multi-element Clinical HIFU System Using Acoustic Holography and Nonlinear Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Yuldashev, Petr V.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Farr, Navid; Partanen, Ari; Bailey, Michael R.; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a treatment modality that relies on the delivery of acoustic energy to remote tissue sites to induce thermal and/or mechanical tissue ablation. To ensure the safety and efficacy of this medical technology, standard approaches are needed for accurately characterizing the acoustic pressures generated by clinical ultrasound sources under operating conditions. Characterization of HIFU fields is complicated by nonlinear wave propagation and the complexity of phased-array transducers. Previous work has described aspects of an approach that combines measurements and modeling, and here we demonstrate this approach for a clinical phased array transducer. First, low-amplitude hydrophone measurements were performed in water over a scan plane between the array and the focus. Second, these measurements were used to holographically reconstruct the surface vibrations of the transducer and to set a boundary condition for a 3-D acoustic propagation model. Finally, nonlinear simulations of the acoustic field were carried out over a range of source power levels. Simulation results were compared to pressure waveforms measured directly by hydrophone at both low and high power levels, demonstrating that details of the acoustic field including shock formation are quantitatively predicted. PMID:25004539

  8. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Sensors: Modeling and Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W; Oppenheim, Irving J

    2013-01-01

    We report finite element simulations of the effect of conductive sensing layers on the surface wave velocity of langasite substrates. The simulations include both the mechanical and electrical influences of the conducting sensing layer. We show that three-dimensional simulations are necessary because of the out-of-plane displacements of the commonly used (0, 138.5, 26.7) Euler angle. Measurements of the transducer input admittance in reflective delay-line devices yield a value for the electromechanical coupling coefficient that is in good agreement with the three-dimensional simulations on bare langasite substrate. The input admittance measurements also show evidence of excitation of an additional wave mode and excess loss due to the finger resistance. The results of these simulations and measurements will be useful in the design of surface acoustic wave gas sensors.

  9. Acoustic Source Modeling for High Speed Air Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2005-01-01

    The far field acoustic spectra at 90deg to the downstream axis of some typical high speed jets are calculated from two different forms of Lilley s equation combined with some recent measurements of the relevant turbulent source function. These measurements, which were limited to a single point in a low Mach number flow, were extended to other conditions with the aid of a highly developed RANS calculation. The results are compared with experimental data over a range of Mach numbers. Both forms of the analogy lead to predictions that are in excellent agreement with the experimental data at subsonic Mach numbers. The agreement is also fairly good at supersonic speeds, but the data appears to be slightly contaminated by shock-associated noise in this case.

  10. Dynamics of beam halo in mismatched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Garnett, R.W.; Gray, E.R.; Ryne, R.D.; Wang, T.S.

    1996-09-01

    High-power proton linacs for nuclear materials transmutation and production, and new accelerator-driven neutron spallation sources must be designed to control beam-halo formation, which leads to beam loss. The study of particle-core models is leading to a better understanding of the causes and characteristics of beam halo produced by space-charge forces in rms mismatched beams. Detailed studies of the models have resulted in predictions of the dependence of the maximum amplitude of halo particles on a mismatch parameter and on the space-charge tune-depression ratio. Scaling formulas have been derived which will provide guidance for choosing the aperture radius to contain the halo without loss.

  11. A Generalized Planetary Acoustic, Ray-tracing Model with Example Application to Bolide Detection on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J.; McEwan, I. J.

    2002-12-01

    Planetary acoustics has been relatively unexplored on planets other than Earth yet has the potential to provide equally convenient remote measurement techniques and to yield equally rich scientific data sets. We present the first generalized planetary acoustic, ray-tracing model which takes into account environmental conditions and viscous, thermal, and molecular relaxation of multi-gas atmospheres. We show a specific Martian application to making use of terrestrial techniques for bolide detection and influx estimates, and introduce concepts for identifying and tracking general sound sources such as dust devils. Meteors penetrating deep into the terrestrial atmosphere are known to generate large well-characterized acoustics signals. Similar explosive events provide acoustic sources in the Martian atmosphere that should be detectable by sensors on the surface. We present an end-to-end comparison between Earth and Mars of a meteor event from the bolide's entry, through detonation and acoustic transmission of the shockwave, to what is heard by ground detectors (this includes intensity, frequency response, and region of detectability). With the use of an array of detectors detonation events can be spatially localized. We place constraints on the practicality of an instrument and compare with equivalent seismic meteor detection. This analysis leads to a measurement method for estimating bolide influx rates in the Martian atmosphere. This rate is currently highly uncertain and significantly affects results of modeled absolute crater retention ages. Pending work includes the application of similar acoustic localization techniques to develop an instruments concept for the detection and tracking of dust devils such as those observed in both Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor images. Further, with minimal reconfiguration, our model and the above analysis can also be applied to Venus and Titan.

  12. A Fusion Model of Seismic and Hydro-Acoustic Propagation for Treaty Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Nimar; Prior, Mark

    2014-05-01

    We present an extension to NET-VISA (Network Processing Vertically Integrated Seismic Analysis), which is a probabilistic generative model of the propagation of seismic waves and their detection on a global scale, to incorporate hydro-acoustic data from the IMS (International Monitoring System) network. The new model includes the coupling of seismic waves into the ocean's SOFAR channel, as well as the propagation of hydro-acoustic waves from underwater explosions. The generative model is described in terms of multiple possible hypotheses -- seismic-to-hydro-acoustic, under-water explosion, other noise sources such as whales singing or icebergs breaking up -- that could lead to signal detections. We decompose each hypothesis into conditional probability distributions that are carefully analyzed and calibrated. These distributions include ones for detection probabilities, blockage in the SOFAR channel (including diffraction, refraction, and reflection around obstacles), energy attenuation, and other features of the resulting waveforms. We present a study of the various features that are extracted from the hydro-acoustic waveforms, and their correlations with each other as well the source of the energy. Additionally, an inference algorithm is presented that concurrently infers the seismic and under-water events, and associates all arrivals (aka triggers), both from seismic and hydro-acoustic stations, to the appropriate event, and labels the path taken by the wave. Finally, our results demonstrate that this fusion of seismic and hydro-acoustic data leads to very good performance. A majority of the under-water events that IDC (International Data Center) analysts built in 2010 are correctly located, and the arrivals that correspond to seismic-to-hydroacoustic coupling, the T phases, are mostly correctly identified. There is no loss in the accuracy of seismic events, in fact, there is a slight overall improvement.

  13. Measurement and modeling of the acoustic field near an underwater vehicle and implications for acoustic source localization.

    PubMed

    Lepper, Paul A; D'Spain, Gerald L

    2007-08-01

    The performance of traditional techniques of passive localization in ocean acoustics such as time-of-arrival (phase differences) and amplitude ratios measured by multiple receivers may be degraded when the receivers are placed on an underwater vehicle due to effects of scattering. However, knowledge of the interference pattern caused by scattering provides a potential enhancement to traditional source localization techniques. Results based on a study using data from a multi-element receiving array mounted on the inner shroud of an autonomous underwater vehicle show that scattering causes the localization ambiguities (side lobes) to decrease in overall level and to move closer to the true source location, thereby improving localization performance, for signals in the frequency band 2-8 kHz. These measurements are compared with numerical modeling results from a two-dimensional time domain finite difference scheme for scattering from two fluid-loaded cylindrical shells. Measured and numerically modeled results are presented for multiple source aspect angles and frequencies. Matched field processing techniques quantify the source localization capabilities for both measurements and numerical modeling output. PMID:17672639

  14. Suppression of harmonics in a model of thermoacoustic refrigerator based on an acoustic metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Ding, Jin; Zhu, Jun-jie; Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Shu-yi; Zhang, Hui; Li, Xiao-juan

    2015-10-01

    A model of thermoacoustic refrigerator on the basis of an acoustic metamaterial is presented, in which an array of side pipes is adopted to suppress harmonic waves in the thermoacoustic resonator. The array of side pipes traps the acoustic waves with Fabry-Perot resonant frequencies and induces narrow forbidden bands of transmission. When the resonant frequency of the thermoacoustic refrigerator is chosen as the operating frequency, the harmonic wave can be exactly located in the forbidden band by properly adapting the structural parameters of the system. Therefore, the component of the harmonic wave in the thermoacoustic resonator can be efficiently suppressed. PMID:26520357

  15. Modeling the effects of wind tunnel wall absorption on the acoustic radiation characteristics of propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.

    1986-01-01

    Finite element theory is used to calculate the acoustic field of a propeller in a soft walled circular wind tunnel and to compare the radiation patterns to the same propeller in free space. Parametric solutions are present for a "Gutin" propeller for a variety of flow Mach numbers, admittance values at the wall, microphone position locations, and propeller to duct radius ratios. Wind tunnel boundary layer is not included in this analysis. For wall admittance nearly equal to the characteristic value of free space, the free field and ducted propeller models agree in pressure level and directionality. In addition, the need for experimentally mapping the acoustic field is discussed.

  16. Modeling and experimental analysis of acoustic cavitation bubbles for Burst Wave Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Kazuki; Colonius, Tim; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam; Cunitz, Bryan; Bailey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A combined modeling and experimental study of acoustic cavitation bubbles that are initiated by focused ultrasound waves is reported. Focused ultrasound waves of frequency 335 kHz and peak negative pressure 8 MPa are generated in a water tank by a piezoelectric transducer to initiate cavitation. The resulting pressure field is obtained by direct numerical simulation (DNS) and used to simulate single bubble oscillation. The characteristics of cavitation bubbles observed by high-speed photography qualitatively agree withs the simulation result. Finally, bubble clouds are captured using acoustic B-mode imaging that works in synchronization with high-speed photography. PMID:27087826

  17. Helicopter blade-vortex interaction locations: Scale-model acoustics and free-wake analysis results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoad, Danny R.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a model rotor acoustic test in the Langley 4by 7-Meter Tunnel are used to evaluate a free-wake analytical technique. An acoustic triangulation technique is used to locate the position in the rotor disk where the blade-vortex interaction noise originates. These locations, along with results of the rotor free-wake analysis, are used to define the geometry of the blade-vortex interaction noise phenomena as well as to determine if the free-wake analysis is a capable diagnostic tool. Data from tests of two teetering rotor systems are used in these analyses.

  18. Modeling the effects of wind tunnel wall absorption on the acoustic radiation characteristics of propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.

    1986-01-01

    Finite element theory is used to calculate the acoustic field of a propeller in a soft walled circular wind tunnel and to compare the radiation patterns to the same propeller in free space. Parametric solutions are present for a 'Gutin' propeller for a variety of flow Mach numbers, admittance values at the wall, microphone position locations, and propeller to duct radius ratios. Wind tunnel boundary layer is not included in this analysis. For wall admittance nearly equal to the characteristic value of free space, the free field and ducted propeller models agree in pressure level and directionality. In addition, the need for experimentally mapping the acoustic field is discussed.

  19. The acoustic results of a United Techologies scale model helicopter rotor tested at DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Sandy R.; Marcolini, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    An initial summary is presented of the acoustic measurements acquired for some of the different configurations of a 1/6 geometrically and aeroelastically scaled UTC model helicopter rotor which was tested in the open-jet anechoic test section of the Duits-Nederlandse Windtunnel in the Netherlands. Of particular interest are high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction. An analysis is provided of baseline swept tip rotor acoustic characteristics in the regimes of high-speed forward flight, where high-speed impulsive noise dominates, and low-speed descent, where severe blade vortex interaction noise occurs. Also discussed are more recent studies of data which involve the animation of the acoustic field upstream of the rotor to evaluate the detailed radiation patters caused by BVI and HSI noise sources. The trends of these primary noise sources are examined as the first step in validating the data for release and application.

  20. Propagation modeling for sperm whale acoustic clicks in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorovskaia, Natalia A.; Udovydchenkov, Ilya A.; Rypina, Irina I.; Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.; Caruthers, Jerald W.; Newcomb, Joal; Fisher, Robert

    2001-05-01

    Simulations of acoustic broadband (500-6000 Hz) pulse propagation in the northern Gulf of Mexico, based on environmental data collected as a part of the Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) experiments in the summers of 2001 and 2002, are presented. The results of the modeling support the hypothesis that consistent spectrogram interference patterns observed in the LADC marine mammal phonation data cannot be explained by the propagation effects for temporal analysis windows corresponding to the duration of an animal click, and may be due to a uniqueness of an individual animal phonation apparatus. The utilization of simulation data for the development of an animal tracking algorithm based on the acoustic recordings of a single bottom-moored hydrophone is discussed. The identification of the bottom and surface reflected clicks from the same animal is attempted. The critical ranges for listening to a deep-water forging animal by a surface receiving system are estimated. [Research supported by ONR.

  1. Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion for the 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jungkyun; Shin, Changsoo; Calandra, Henri

    2016-06-01

    Laplace-domain waveform inversion reconstructs long-wavelength subsurface models by using the zero-frequency component of damped seismic signals. Despite the computational advantages of Laplace-domain waveform inversion over conventional frequency-domain waveform inversion, an acoustic assumption and an iterative matrix solver have been used to invert 3D marine datasets to mitigate the intensive computing cost. In this study, we develop a Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion algorithm for 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media by using a parallel sparse direct solver library (MUltifrontal Massively Parallel Solver, MUMPS). We precisely simulate a real marine environment by coupling the 3D acoustic and elastic wave equations with the proper boundary condition at the fluid-solid interface. In addition, we can extract the elastic properties of the Earth below the sea bottom from the recorded acoustic pressure datasets. As a matrix solver, the parallel sparse direct solver is used to factorize the non-symmetric impedance matrix in a distributed memory architecture and rapidly solve the wave field for a number of shots by using the lower and upper matrix factors. Using both synthetic datasets and real datasets obtained by a 3D wide azimuth survey, the long-wavelength component of the P-wave and S-wave velocity models is reconstructed and the proposed modeling and inversion algorithm are verified. A cluster of 80 CPU cores is used for this study.

  2. Computer programs for forward and inverse modeling of acoustic and electromagnetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    A suite of computer programs was developed by U.S. Geological Survey personnel for forward and inverse modeling of acoustic and electromagnetic data. This report describes the computer resources that are needed to execute the programs, the installation of the programs, the program designs, some tests of their accuracy, and some suggested improvements.

  3. Towards a Comprehensive Model of Jet Noise Using an Acoustic Analogy and Steady RANS Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic analogy is developed to predict the noise from jet flows. It contains two source models that independently predict the noise from turbulence and shock wave shear layer interactions. The acoustic analogy is based on the Euler equations and separates the sources from propagation. Propagation effects are taken into account by calculating the vector Green's function of the linearized Euler equations. The sources are modeled following the work of Tam and Auriault, Morris and Boluriaan, and Morris and Miller. A statistical model of the two-point cross-correlation of the velocity fluctuations is used to describe the turbulence. The acoustic analogy attempts to take into account the correct scaling of the sources for a wide range of nozzle pressure and temperature ratios. It does not make assumptions regarding fine- or large-scale turbulent noise sources, self- or shear-noise, or convective amplification. The acoustic analogy is partially informed by three-dimensional steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solutions that include the nozzle geometry. The predictions are compared with experiments of jets operating subsonically through supersonically and at unheated and heated temperatures. Predictions generally capture the scaling of both mixing noise and BBSAN for the conditions examined, but some discrepancies remain that are due to the accuracy of the steady RANS turbulence model closure, the equivalent sources, and the use of a simplified vector Green's function solver of the linearized Euler equations.

  4. Improving Robustness of Deep Neural Network Acoustic Models via Speech Separation and Joint Adaptive Training

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Arun; Wang, DeLiang

    2015-01-01

    Although deep neural network (DNN) acoustic models are known to be inherently noise robust, especially with matched training and testing data, the use of speech separation as a frontend and for deriving alternative feature representations has been shown to improve performance in challenging environments. We first present a supervised speech separation system that significantly improves automatic speech recognition (ASR) performance in realistic noise conditions. The system performs separation via ratio time-frequency masking; the ideal ratio mask (IRM) is estimated using DNNs. We then propose a framework that unifies separation and acoustic modeling via joint adaptive training. Since the modules for acoustic modeling and speech separation are implemented using DNNs, unification is done by introducing additional hidden layers with fixed weights and appropriate network architecture. On the CHiME-2 medium-large vocabulary ASR task, and with log mel spectral features as input to the acoustic model, an independently trained ratio masking frontend improves word error rates by 10.9% (relative) compared to the noisy baseline. In comparison, the jointly trained system improves performance by 14.4%. We also experiment with alternative feature representations to augment the standard log mel features, like the noise and speech estimates obtained from the separation module, and the standard feature set used for IRM estimation. Our best system obtains a word error rate of 15.4% (absolute), an improvement of 4.6 percentage points over the next best result on this corpus. PMID:26973851

  5. Numerical modeling of undersea acoustics using a partition of unity method with plane waves enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hospital-Bravo, Raúl; Sarrate, Josep; Díez, Pedro

    2016-05-01

    A new 2D numerical model to predict the underwater acoustic propagation is obtained by exploring the potential of the Partition of Unity Method (PUM) enriched with plane waves. The aim of the work is to obtain sound pressure level distributions when multiple operational noise sources are present, in order to assess the acoustic impact over the marine fauna. The model takes advantage of the suitability of the PUM for solving the Helmholtz equation, especially for the practical case of large domains and medium frequencies. The seawater acoustic absorption and the acoustic reflectance of the sea surface and sea bottom are explicitly considered, and perfectly matched layers (PML) are placed at the lateral artificial boundaries to avoid spurious reflexions. The model includes semi-analytical integration rules which are adapted to highly oscillatory integrands with the aim of reducing the computational cost of the integration step. In addition, we develop a novel strategy to mitigate the ill-conditioning of the elemental and global system matrices. Specifically, we compute a low-rank approximation of the local space of solutions, which in turn reduces the number of degrees of freedom, the CPU time and the memory footprint. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the model and to assess its accuracy.

  6. Characterization of Titan 3-D acoustic pressure spectra by least-squares fit to theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnett, E. B.; Carleen, E.

    1980-01-01

    A theoretical model for the acoustic spectra of undeflected rocket plumes is fitted to computed spectra of a Titan III-D at varying times after ignition, by a least-squares method. Tests for the goodness of the fit are made.

  7. Modeling acoustic wave propagation in the Southern Ocean to estimate the acoustic impact of seismic surveys on marine mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitzke, M.; Bohlen, T.

    2007-12-01

    According to the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, adopted 1991, seismic surveys in the Southern Ocean south of 60°S are exclusively dedicated to academic research. The seismic surveys conducted by the Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany during the last 20 years focussed on two areas: The Wedell Sea (60°W - 0°W) and the Amundsen/Bellinghausen Sea (120°W - 60°W). Histograms of the Julian days and water depths covered by these surveys indicate that maximum activities occurred in January and February, and most lines were collected either in shallow waters of 400 - 500 m depth or in deep waters of 2500 - 4500 m depth. To assess the potential risk of future seismic research on marine mammal populations an acoustic wave propagation modeling study is conducted for the Wedell and the Amundsen/ Bellinghausen Sea. A 2.5D finite-difference code is used. It allows to simulate the spherical amplitude decay of point sources correctly, considers P- and S-wave velocities at the sea floor and provides snapshots of the wavefield at any spatial and temporal resolution. As source signals notional signatures of GI-, G- and Bolt guns, computed by the NUCLEUS software (PGS) are used. Based on CTD measurements, sediment core samplings and sediment echosounder recordings two horizontally-layered, range-independent generic models are established for the Wedell and the Amundsen/Bellinghausen Sea, one for shallow (500 m) and one for deep water (3000 m). They indicate that the vertical structure of the water masses is characterized by a 100 m thick, cold, low sound velocity layer (~1440 - 1450 m/s), centered in 100 m depth. In the austral summer it is overlain by a warmer, 50 m thick surface layer with slightly higher sound velocities (~1447 - 1453 m/s). Beneath the low-velocity layer sound velocities increase rapidly to ~1450 - 1460 m/s in 200 m depth, and smoothly to ~1530 m/s in 4700 m depth. The sea floor is mainly

  8. A finite element model for simulating acoustic streaming in cystic breast lesions with experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, K R; Trahey, G E

    2000-01-01

    Streaming detection is an ultrasonic technique that can be used to distinguish fluid-filled lesions, or cysts, from solid lesions. With this technique, high intensity ultrasound pulses are used to induce acoustic streaming in cyst fluid, and this motion is detected using Doppler flow estimation methods. Results from a pilot clinical study were recently published in which acoustic streaming was successfully induced and detected in 14 of 15 simple breast cysts and four of 14 sonographically indeterminate breast lesions in vivo. In the study, the detected velocities were found to vary considerably among cysts and for different pulsing regimes. A finite element model of streaming detection is presented. This model is utilized to investigate methods of increasing induced acoustic streaming velocity while minimizing patient exposure to high intensity ultrasound during streaming detection. Parameters studied include intensity, frequency, acoustic beam shape, cyst-diameter, cyst fluid protein concentration, and cyst fluid viscosity. The model, which provides both transient and steady-state solutions, is shown to predict trends in streaming velocity accurately. Experimental results from studies investigating the potential for nonlinear streaming enhancement in cysts are also provided. PMID:18238532

  9. The Effect of Basepair Mismatch on DNA Strand Displacement.

    PubMed

    Broadwater, D W Bo; Kim, Harold D

    2016-04-12

    DNA strand displacement is a key reaction in DNA homologous recombination and DNA mismatch repair and is also heavily utilized in DNA-based computation and locomotion. Despite its ubiquity in science and engineering, sequence-dependent effects of displacement kinetics have not been extensively characterized. Here, we measured toehold-mediated strand displacement kinetics using single-molecule fluorescence in the presence of a single basepair mismatch. The apparent displacement rate varied significantly when the mismatch was introduced in the invading DNA strand. The rate generally decreased as the mismatch in the invader was encountered earlier in displacement. Our data indicate that a single base pair mismatch in the invader stalls branch migration and displacement occurs via direct dissociation of the destabilized incumbent strand from the substrate strand. We combined both branch migration and direct dissociation into a model, which we term the concurrent displacement model, and used the first passage time approach to quantitatively explain the salient features of the observed relationship. We also introduce the concept of splitting probabilities to justify that the concurrent model can be simplified into a three-step sequential model in the presence of an invader mismatch. We expect our model to become a powerful tool to design DNA-based reaction schemes with broad functionality. PMID:27074674

  10. A partial hearing animal model for chronic electro-acoustic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, S.; Wise, A. K.; Millard, R. E.; Shepherd, R. K.; Fallon, J. B.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Cochlear implants (CIs) have provided some auditory function to hundreds of thousands of people around the world. Although traditionally carried out only in profoundly deaf patients, the eligibility criteria for implantation have recently been relaxed to include many partially-deaf patients with useful levels of hearing. These patients receive both electrical stimulation from their implant and acoustic stimulation via their residual hearing (electro-acoustic stimulation; EAS) and perform very well. It is unclear how EAS improves speech perception over electrical stimulation alone, and little evidence exists about the nature of the interactions between electric and acoustic stimuli. Furthermore, clinical results suggest that some patients that undergo cochlear implantation lose some, if not all, of their residual hearing, reducing the advantages of EAS over electrical stimulation alone. A reliable animal model with clinically-relevant partial deafness combined with clinical CIs is important to enable these issues to be studied. This paper outlines such a model that has been successfully used in our laboratory. Approach. This paper outlines a battery of techniques used in our laboratory to generate, validate and examine an animal model of partial deafness and chronic CI use. Main results. Ototoxic deafening produced bilaterally symmetrical hearing thresholds in neonatal and adult animals. Electrical activation of the auditory system was confirmed, and all animals were chronically stimulated via adapted clinical CIs. Acoustic compound action potentials (CAPs) were obtained from partially-hearing cochleae, using the CI amplifier. Immunohistochemical analysis allows the effects of deafness and electrical stimulation on cell survival to be studied. Significance. This animal model has applications in EAS research, including investigating the functional interactions between electric and acoustic stimulation, and the development of techniques to maintain residual

  11. A partial hearing animal model for chronic electro-acoustic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Irving, S.; Wise, A.K.; Millard, R.E.; Shepherd, R.K.; Fallon, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cochlear implants (CIs) have provided some auditory function to hundreds of thousands of people around the world. Although traditionally carried out only in profoundly deaf patients, the eligibility criteria for implantation have recently been relaxed to include many partially-deaf patients with useful levels of hearing. These patients receive both electrical stimulation from their implant and acoustic stimulation via their residual hearing (electro-acoustic stimulation; EAS) and perform very well. It is unclear how EAS improves speech perception over electrical stimulation alone, and little evidence exists about the nature of the interactions between electric and acoustic stimuli. Furthermore, clinical results suggest that some patients that undergo cochlear implantation lose some, if not all, of their residual hearing, reducing the advantages of EAS over electrical stimulation alone. A reliable animal model with clinically-relevant partial deafness combined with clinical CIs is important to enable these issues to be studied. This manuscript outlines such a model that has been successfully used in our laboratory. Approach This manuscript outlines a battery of techniques used in our laboratory to generate, validate and examine an animal model of partial deafness and chronic CI use. Main Result Ototoxic deafening produced bilaterally symmetrical hearing thresholds in neonatal and adult animals. Electrical activation of the auditory system was confirmed, and all animals were chronically stimulated via adapted clinical CIs. Acoustic compound action potentials (CAPs) were obtained from partially-hearing cochleae, using the CI amplifier. Immunohistochemical analysis allows the effects of deafness and electrical stimulation on cell survival to be studied. Significance This animal model has applications in EAS research, including investigating the functional interactions between electric and acoustic stimulation, and the development of techniques to maintain

  12. Modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation through the atmosphere with spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2014-12-01

    Low-frequency events such as tsunamis generate acoustic and gravity waves which quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Since the atmospheric density decreases exponentially as the altitude increases and from the conservation of the kinetic energy, those waves see their amplitude raise (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), allowing their detection in the upper atmosphere. Various tools have been developed through years to model this propagation, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but none offer a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling.A modeling tool is worthy interest since there are many different phenomena, from quakes to atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool.Starting from the SPECFEM program that already propagate waves in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, this work offers a tool with the ability to model acoustic and gravity waves propagation in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source.Atmospheric attenuation is required in a proper modeling framework since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented due to its ability to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's surface (that vibrates when a surface wave go through it) but also huge atmospheric events.

  13. Numerical modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation in the atmosphere using a spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roland; Brissaud, Quentin; Garcia, Raphael; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    During low-frequency events such as tsunamis, acoustic and gravity waves are generated and quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Due to the exponential decrease of the atmospheric density with the altitude, the conservation of the kinetic energy imposes that the amplitude of those waves increases (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), which allows their detection in the upper atmosphere. This propagation bas been modelled for years with different tools, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling is still crucially needed. A modeling tool is worth of interest since there are many different sources, as earthquakes or atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool. By adding some developments to the SPECFEM package that already models wave propagation in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, we show here that acoustic and gravity waves propagation can now be modelled in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's vibrating surfaces but also huge atmospheric events. Atmospheric attenuation is also introduced since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals.

  14. Modelling of acoustic radiation problems associated with turbomachinery and rotating blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eversman, W.

    Finite element methods developed for computational predictions of turbofan and propeller acoustic radiation are presented. Account is taken of the disparate acoustic and geometric scales, the complex geometry, sound propagation in a nonuniformly flowing medium, the presence of a lining, and definition of bounds for calculations which are carried out in an unbounded domain. Density and pressure perturbations in the turbofan inlet are modeled with a linearized momentum equation. The sound radiation is represented by the Fourier components, i.e., angular modes. The same nacelle geometry is used for propeller noise, which requires inclusion of acoustic volume sources and forces. A forced convected wave equation for harmonic driving is obtained by combining continuity, momentum and state equations linearized for acoustic perturbations. The weak formulations for the two types of noise generation are solved by the Galerkin method modified with a frontal solver to reduce the required computer time. Model predictions show good agreement with experimental data for the directivity and amplitude of sound from the bellmouth inlet of the NASA-Langley Spinning Mode Synthesizer.

  15. Acoustic Modeling and Analysis for the Space Shuttle Main Propulsion System Liner Crack Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, Matthew J.; Zoladz, Tom F.

    2004-01-01

    Cracks were found on bellows flow liners in the liquid hydrogen feedlines of several space shuttle orbiters in 2002. An effort to characterize the fluid environment upstream of the space shuttle main engine low-pressure fuel pump was undertaken to help identify the cause of the cracks and also provide quantitative environments and loads of the region. Part of this effort was to determine the duct acoustics several inches upstream of the low-pressure fuel pump in the region of a bellows joint. A finite element model of the complicated geometry was made using three-dimensional fluid elements. The model was used to describe acoustics in the complex geometry and played an important role in the investigation. Acoustic mode shapes and natural frequencies of the liquid hydrogen in the duct and in the cavity behind the flow liner were determined. Forced response results were generated also by applying an edgetone-like forcing to the liner slots. Studies were conducted for state conditions and also conditions assuming two-phase entrapment in the backing cavity. Highly instrumented single-engine hot fire data confirms the presence of some of the predicted acoustic modes.

  16. Zonal Flow Velocimetry using Acoustic Modes in Experimental Models of a Planetary Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. M.; Mautino, A. R.; Stone, D.; Triana, S. A.; Lekic, V.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Rotating hydromagnetic experiments can serve as models of planetary cores, matching some of the dimensionless parameters relevant to planets. One challenge with such experiments is determining the flows present. The opacity of the fluids used in these experiments (e.g. liquid sodium) prevents direct flow visualization techniques from being employed. One method allowing determination of zonal flows in such experiments is acoustic mode velocimetry. In this technique, the rotational splittings of acoustic mode spectra are used to infer the azimuthal velocity profile of the flow. Here we present the use of this technique to study flows in experimental models of the Earth's core. Most of these results were obtained in a 60 cm diameter spherical Couette device, with a 20 cm diameter inner sphere, and using nitrogen gas as the working fluid. Turbulent flow is driven in the system via differential rotation of the outer shell and inner sphere. Acoustic modes are excited in the fluid volume using a speaker, and microphones are used to measure the frequencies and rotational splittings of the modes. We compare the observed splittings with those predicted by theory as a way of validating the method, and infer mean flows from these observations. We also present some preliminary results of acoustic studies in the 3 m diameter liquid sodium spherical Couette experiment. Finally, we discuss future prospects for this experimental technique.

  17. Relation of perceived breathiness to laryngeal kinematics and acoustic measures based on computational modeling

    PubMed Central

    Samlan, Robin A.; Story, Brad H.; Bunton, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine 1) how specific vocal fold structural and vibratory features relate to breathy voice quality and 2) the relation of perceived breathiness to four acoustic correlates of breathiness. Method A computational, kinematic model of the vocal fold medial surfaces was used to specify features of vocal fold structure and vibration in a manner consistent with breathy voice. Four model parameters were altered: vocal process separation, surface bulging, vibratory nodal point, and epilaryngeal constriction. Twelve naïve listeners rated breathiness of 364 samples relative to a reference. The degree of breathiness was then compared to 1) the underlying kinematic profile and 2) four acoustic measures: cepstral peak prominence (CPP), harmonics-to-noise ratio, and two measures of spectral slope. Results Vocal process separation alone accounted for 61.4% of the variance in perceptual rating. Adding nodal point ratio and bulging to the equation increased the explained variance to 88.7%. The acoustic measure CPP accounted for 86.7% of the variance in perceived breathiness, and explained variance increased to 92.6% with the addition of one spectral slope measure. Conclusions Breathiness ratings were best explained kinematically by the degree of vocal process separation and acoustically by CPP. PMID:23785184

  18. Monitoring the Ocean Acoustic Environment: A Model-Based Detection Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Sullivan, E.J.

    2000-03-13

    A model-based approach is applied in the development of a processor designed to passively monitor an ocean acoustic environment along with its associated variations. The technique employs an adaptive, model-based processor embedded in a sequential likelihood detection scheme. The trade-off between state-based and innovations-based monitor designs is discussed, conceptually. The underlying theory for the innovations-based design is briefly developed and applied to a simulated data set.

  19. Mathematical model of acoustic speech production with mobile walls of the vocal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimov, N. A.; Zakharov, E. V.

    2016-03-01

    A mathematical speech production model is considered that describes acoustic oscillation propagation in a vocal tract with mobile walls. The wave field function satisfies the Helmholtz equation with boundary conditions of the third kind (impedance type). The impedance mode corresponds to a threeparameter pendulum oscillation model. The experimental research demonstrates the nonlinear character of how the mobility of the vocal tract walls influence the spectral envelope of a speech signal.

  20. Analytical and finite element modelling of the acoustic behaviour of exhaust mufflers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denia Guzman, Francisco David

    This Thesis is focused on the development and implementation of efficient methods for the acoustic modelling and design of exhaust mufflers for internal combustion engines, by means of tools based on analytical and numerical solutions of the governing wave equation. First, the finite element method is considered. The acoustic modelling of perforated components inside a muffler, including their interaction with the moving medium, is investigated in detail. The influence of the perforate boundary conditions on the acoustic behaviour of the muffler is also analysed. In addition, an h-adaptive refinement strategy is defined in order to obtain the optimum mesh for a set of natural frequencies and modes shapes when considered simultaneously. The main core of the Thesis deals with the development of analytical techniques, which take into account the modal solution of the wave equation in ducts. The elliptical geometry is quite relevant, since it is widely used in automotive mufflers and relatively few reported studies have been found regarding its acoustic attenuation performance. This justifies a detailed analysis of the modal properties of elliptical ducts, for which polynomial fitting curves are subsequently evaluated to enable the prediction of the cutoff frequencies as a function of muffler eccentricity and dimension. Based on the previous modal information, the formulation of the mode-matching technique is developed in detail for mufflers involving elliptical ducts in order to evaluate their acoustic attenuation performance. Mufflers with arbitrary, but axially uniform, cross-section are also considered by means of the mode-matching method, and combining the analytical and numerical information of the modal properties. Some additional relevant aspects regarding moving medium and perforated components are investigated, by means of a component mode synthesis formulation used to obtain the transverse eigenfunctions of the muffler. Moreover, some important design

  1. Modifying the acoustic impedance of polyurea-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantasetphong, Wiroj; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Jia, Zhanzhan; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2013-04-01

    Acoustic impedance is a material property that depends on mass density and acoustic wave speed. An impedance mismatch between two media leads to the partial reflection of an acoustic wave sent from one medium to another. Active sonar is one example of a useful application of this phenomenon, where reflected and scattered acoustic waves enable the detection of objects. If the impedance of an object is matched to that of the surrounding medium, however, the object may be hidden from observation (at least directly) by sonar. In this study, polyurea composites are developed to facilitate such impedance matching. Polyurea is used due to its excellent blast-mitigating properties, easy casting, corrosion protection, abrasion resistance, and various uses in current military technology. Since pure polyurea has impedance higher than that of water (the current medium of interest), low mass density phenolic microballoon particles are added to create composite materials with reduced effective impedances. The volume fraction of particles is varied to study the effect of filler quantity on the acoustic impedance of the resulting composite. The composites are experimentally characterized via ultrasonic measurements. Computational models based on the method of dilute-randomly-distributed inclusions are developed and compared with the experimental results. These experiments and models will facilitate the design of new elastomeric composites with desirable acoustic impedances.

  2. A prediction of helicopter rotor discrete frequency noise for three scale models using a new acoustics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.

    1987-01-01

    A new computer program which uses Farassat's most advanced subsonic time domain formulation has been written to predict helicopter rotor discrete frequency noise. A brief description of the program, WOPWOP, is followed by a comparison of predicted and experimentally measured acoustic pressure and spectra for a 1/4 scale UH-1 model rotor blade and a 1/7 scale OLS (AH-1G) model rotor blade. The C81 computer program was used to predict the spanwise loading on the rotor for aerodynamic input into the acoustic prediction. Comparisons are made for different flight conditions and microphone locations with good results. In general the acoustic pressure is underpredicted. The acoustic predictions for a tapered rotor blade and predictions for microphones well below the tip path plane show less underprediction. Finally, in-plane motion of the rotor blade is shown to significantly affect the peak-to-peak amplitude of the acoustic pressure for high advancing tip Mach numbers.

  3. A curved piezo-structure model: implications on active structural acoustic control.

    PubMed

    Henry, J K; Clark, R L

    1999-09-01

    Current research in Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) relies heavily upon accurately capturing the application physics associated with the structure being controlled. The application of ASAC to aircraft interior noise requires a greater understanding of the dynamics of the curved panels which compose the skin of an aircraft fuselage. This paper presents a model of a simply supported curved panel with attached piezoelectric transducers. The model is validated by comparison to previous work. Further, experimental results for a simply supported curved panel test structure are presented in support of the model. The curvature is shown to affect substantially the dynamics of the panel, the integration of transducers, and the bandwidth required for structural acoustic control. PMID:10489701

  4. Acoustic Image Models for Obstacle Avoidance with Forward-Looking Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masek, T.; Kölsch, M.

    Long-range forward-looking sonars (FLS) have recently been deployed in autonomous unmanned vehicles (AUV). We present models for various features in acoustic images, with the goal of using this sensor for altitude maintenance, obstacle detection and obstacle avoidance. First, we model the backscatter and FLS noise as pixel-based, spatially-varying intensity distributions. Experiments show that these models predict noise with an accuracy of over 98%. Next, the presence of acoustic noise from two other sources including a modem is reliably detected with a template-based filter and a threshold learned from training data. Lastly, the ocean floor location and orientation is estimated with a gradient-descent method using a site-independent template, yielding sufficiently accurate results in 95% of the frames. Temporal information is expected to further improve the performance.

  5. Single fiber model of particle retention in an acoustically driven porous mesh.

    PubMed

    Grossner, Michael T; Penrod, Alan E; Belovich, Joanne M; Feke, Donald L

    2003-03-01

    A method for the capture of small particles (tens of microns in diameter) from a continuously flowing suspension has recently been reported. This technique relies on a standing acoustic wave resonating in a rectangular chamber filled with a high-porosity mesh. Particles are retained in this chamber via a complex interaction between the acoustic field and the porous mesh. Although the mesh has a pore size two orders of magnitude larger than the particle diameter, collection efficiencies of 90% have been measured. A mathematical model has been developed to understand the experimentally observed phenomena and to be able to predict filtration performance. By examining a small region (a single fiber) of the porous mesh, the model has duplicated several experimental events such as the focusing of particles near an element of the mesh and the levitation of particles within pores. The single-fiber analysis forms the basis of modeling the overall performance of the particle filtration system. PMID:12565069

  6. Wind-tunnel acoustic results of two rotor models with several tip designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. M.; Connor, A. B.

    1986-01-01

    A three-phase research program has been undertaken to study the acoustic signals due to the aerodynamic interaction of rotorcraft main rotors and tail rotors. During the first phase, two different rotor models with several interchangeable tips were tested in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel on the U.S. Army rotor model system. An extensive acoustic data base was acquired, with special emphasis on blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. The details of the experimental procedure, acoustic data acquisition, and reduction are documented. The overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of the high-twist rotor systems is relatively insensitive to flight speed but generally increases with rotor tip-path-plane angle. The OASPL of the high-twist rotors is dominated by acoustic energy in the low-frequency harmonics. The OASPL of the low-twist rotor systems shows more dependence on flight speed than the high-twist rotors, in addition to being quite sensitive to tip-path-plane angle. An integrated band-limited sound pressure level, limited by 500 to 3000 Hz, is a useful metric to quantify the occurrence of BVI noise. The OASPL of the low-twist rotors is strongly influenced by the band-limited sound levels, indicating that the blade-vortex impulsive noise is a dominant noise source for this rotor design. The midfrequency acoustic levels for both rotors show a very strong dependence on rotor tip-path-plane angle. The tip-path-plane angle at which the maximum midfrequency sound level occurs consistently decreases with increasing flight speed. The maximum midfrequency sound level measured at a given location is constant regardless of the flight speed.

  7. Testing and verification of a scale-model acoustic propagation system.

    PubMed

    Sagers, Jason D; Ballard, Megan S

    2015-12-01

    This paper discusses the design and operation of a measurement apparatus used to conduct scale-model underwater acoustic propagation experiments, presents experimental results for an idealized waveguide, and compares the measured results to data generated by two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical models. The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of the apparatus for a simple waveguide that primarily exhibits 2D acoustic propagation. The apparatus contains a computer-controlled positioning system that accurately moves a receiving transducer in the water layer above a scale-model bathymetry while a stationary source transducer emits broadband pulsed waveforms. Experimental results are shown for a 2.133 m × 1.219 m bathymetric part possessing a flat-bottom bathymetry with a translationally invariant wedge of 10° slope along one edge. Beamformed results from a synthetic horizontal line array indicate the presence of strong in-plane arrivals along with weaker diffracted and horizontally refracted arrivals. A simulated annealing inversion method is applied to infer values for five waveguide parameters with the largest measurement uncertainty. The inferred values are then used in a 2D method of images model and a 3D adiabatic normal-mode model to simulate the measured acoustic data. PMID:26723314

  8. Acoustic scattering from a water-filled cylindrical shell: measurements, modeling, and interpretation.

    PubMed

    España, Aubrey L; Williams, Kevin L; Plotnick, Daniel S; Marston, Philip L

    2014-07-01

    Understanding the physics governing the interaction of sound with targets in an underwater environment is essential to improving existing target detection and classification algorithms. To illustrate techniques for identifying the key physics, an examination is made of the acoustic scattering from a water-filled cylindrical shell. Experiments were conducted that measured the acoustic scattering from a water-filled cylindrical shell in the free field, as well as proud on a sand-water interface. Two modeling techniques are employed to examine these acoustic scattering measurements. The first is a hybrid 2-D/3-D finite element (FE) model, whereby the scattering in close proximity to the target is handled via a 2-D axisymmetric FE model, and the subsequent 3-D propagation to the far field is determined via a Helmholtz integral. This model is characterized by the decomposition of the fluid pressure and its derivative in a series of azimuthal Fourier modes. The second is an analytical solution for an infinitely long cylindrical shell, coupled with a simple approximation that converts the results to an analogous finite length form function. Examining these model results on a mode-by-mode basis offers easy visualization of the mode dynamics and helps distinguish the different physics driving the target response. PMID:24993199

  9. One-dimensional pressure transfer models for acoustic-electric transmission channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilt, K. R.; Lawry, T. J.; Scarton, H. A.; Saulnier, G. J.

    2015-09-01

    A method for modeling piezoelectric-based ultrasonic acoustic-electric power and data transmission channels is presented. These channels employ piezoelectric disk transducers to convey signals across a series of physical layers using ultrasonic waves. This model decomposes the mechanical pathway of the signal into individual ultrasonic propagation layers which are generally independent of the layer's adjacent domains. Each layer is represented by a two-by-two traveling pressure wave transfer matrix which relates the forward and reverse pressure waves on one side of the layer to the pressure waves on the opposite face, where each face is assumed to be in contact with a domain of arbitrary reference acoustic impedance. A rigorous implementation of ultrasonic beam spreading is introduced and implemented within applicable domains. Compatible pressure-wave models for piezoelectric transducers are given, which relate the electric voltage and current interface of the transducer to the pressure waves on one mechanical interface while also allowing for passive acoustic loading of the secondary mechanical interface. It is also shown that the piezoelectric model's electrical interface is compatible with transmission line parameters (ABCD-parameters), allowing for connection of electronic components and networks. The model is shown to be capable of reproducing the behavior of realistic physical channels.

  10. A practical acoustical absorption analysis of coir fiber based on rigid frame modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, Md.; Nor, Mohd Jailani Mohd; Fouladi, Mohammad Hosseini; Zulkifli, Rozli; Amin, Nowshad

    2012-03-01

    An analytical study based on rigid frame model is demonstrated to evaluate the acoustic absorption of coir fiber. Effects of different conditions such as combination of air gap and perforated plate (PP) are studied in this work. Materials used here are treated as rigid rather than elastic, since the flow resistivity of coir fiber is very low. The well-known rigid frame Johnson-Allard equivalent-fluid model is applied to obtain the acoustic impedance of single layer coir fiber. Atalla and Sgard model is employed to estimate the surface impedance of PP. Acoustic transmission approach (ATA) is utilized for adding various consecutive layers in multilayer structure. Models are examined in different conditions such as single layer coir fiber, coir fiber backed with air gap, single layer PP in combination with coir fiber and air gap. Experiments are conducted in impedance tube on normal incidence sound absorption to validate the results. Results from the measurement are found to be in well agreement with the theoretical absorption coefficients. The performance of the rigid frame modeling method is checked more specifically in all conditions, by the mean prediction error rate of normal incidence sound absorption coefficients. Comparison between the measured absorption coefficients and predicted by rigid frame method shows discrepancy lower than 20 and 15% for most of the conditions in the frequency range of 0.2-1.5 and 1.5-5 kHz, respectively. Moreover, acoustic absorption of various single and multilayer structures is compared with the simpler empirical methods such as Delany-Bazley and Miki model; and complicated method such as Biot-Allard Model and Allard Transfer Function (TF) method. Comparisons show that the presented method offers a better accuracy of the results than the empirical models. Subsequently, it can provide almost same absorption plot with Biot-Allard model (single layer combination) and TF method (multilayer combination) proving it to be a

  11. Uncertain Acoustic Field Modeling and Robust Source Localization in Shallow Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hangfang; Gong, Xianyi; Yu, Zibin

    2010-09-01

    Oceanic environmental uncertainty can cause significant performance degradation of the SONAR system. Understanding and modeling the uncertainty propagating from environment to acoustic field and then to steering vector is necessary for SONAR design and operation to mitigate the uncertainty effect and provide robust detection and location of targets. The statistical property of uncertainty can be described by the probability density functions or second-order moments of environmental parameters and acoustic fields. Based on the probability description, a stochastic response surface method is used to propagate the uncertainty from environment to acoustic field by polynomial chaos expansion. Then covariance matrix and associated ellipsoidal neighboring space are used to describe the uncertainty set of acoustic field and steering vector for sonar signal processing. Finally, a robust Minimum Variance (MV) matched-field processing method is derived by extending the constrained optimization of MV from single point to an uncertainty steering vector ellipsoid. We apply sea test data collected by a vertical array in shallow water to source localization.

  12. Acoustic and Aero-Mixing Experimental Results for Fluid Shield Scale Model Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Mengle, V. G.; Shin, H. W.; Majjigi, R. K.

    2005-01-01

    The principle objectives of this investigation are to evaluate the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of fluid shield nozzle concept and to assess Far 36, Stage 3 potential for fluid shield nozzle with Flade Cycle. Acoustic data for nine scale model nozzle configurations are obtained. The effects of simulated flight and geometric and aerothermodynamic flow variables on the acoustic behavior of the fluid shield are determined. The acoustic tests are aimed at studying the effect of: (1) shield thickness, (2) wrap angle, (3) mass flow and velocity ratios between shield and core streams at constant cycle specific thrust (i.e., mixed velocity), (4) porous plug, and (5) subsonic shield. Shadowgraphs of six nozzle configurations are obtained to understand the plume flowfield features. Static pressure data on suppressor chutes in the core stream (shielded and unshielded) sides and on plug surface are acquired to determine the impact of fluid shield on base drag of the 36-chute suppressor nozzle and the thrust augmentation due to the plug, respectively.

  13. Deriving content-specific measures of room acoustic perception using a binaural, nonlinear auditory model.

    PubMed

    van Dorp Schuitman, Jasper; de Vries, Diemer; Lindau, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Acousticians generally assess the acoustic qualities of a concert hall or any other room using impulse response-based measures such as the reverberation time, clarity index, and others. These parameters are used to predict perceptual attributes related to the acoustic qualities of the room. Various studies show that these physical measures are not able to predict the related perceptual attributes sufficiently well under all circumstances. In particular, it has been shown that physical measures are dependent on the state of occupation, are prone to exaggerated spatial fluctuation, and suffer from lacking discrimination regarding the kind of acoustic stimulus being presented. Accordingly, this paper proposes a method for the derivation of signal-based measures aiming at predicting aspects of room acoustic perception from content specific signal representations produced by a binaural, nonlinear model of the human auditory system. Listening tests were performed to test the proposed auditory parameters for both speech and music. The results look promising; the parameters correlate with their corresponding perceptual attributes in most cases. PMID:23464027

  14. Estimation of acoustical streaming: theoretical model, Doppler measurements and optical visualisation.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, A; Kowalewski, T; Secomski, W; Wójcik, J

    1998-02-01

    An approximate solution for the streaming velocity generated by flat and weakly focused transducers was derived by directly solving the Dirichlet boundary conditions for the Poisson equation, the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for the axial components of the streaming velocity. The theoretical model was verified experimentally using a 32 MHz pulsed Doppler unit. The experimental acoustical fields were produced by three different 4 mm diameter flat and focused transducers driven by the transmitter generating the average acoustic power within the range from 1 microW to 6 mW. The streaming velocity was measured along the ultrasonic beam from 0 to 2 cm. Streaming was induced in a solution of water and corn starch. The experimental results showed that for a given acoustic power the streaming velocity was independent of the starch density in water, changed from 0.3 to 40 grams of starch in 1 l of distilled water. For applied acoustic powers, the streaming velocity changed linearly from 0.2 to 40 mm/s. Both, the theoretical solutions for plane and focused waves and the experimental results were in good agreement. The streaming velocity field was also visualised using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) and two different evaluation methods. The first based on the FFT-based cross-correlation analysis between small sections for each pair of images and the second employing the algorithm of searching for local displacements between several images. PMID:9614292

  15. Implosion of an underwater spark-generated bubble and acoustic energy evaluation using the Rayleigh model.

    PubMed

    Buogo, Silvano; Cannelli, Giovanni B

    2002-06-01

    The growth, collapse, and rebound of a vapor bubble generated by an underwater spark is studied by means of high-speed cinematography, simultaneously acquiring the emitted acoustic signature. Video recordings show that the growth and collapse phases are nearly symmetrical during the first two or three cycles, the bubble shape being approximately spherical. After 2-3 cycles the bubble behavior changes from a collapsing/rebounding regime with sound-emitting implosions to a pulsating regime with no implosions. The motion of the bubble wall during the first collapses was found to be consistent with the Rayleigh model of a cavity in an incompressible liquid, with the inclusion of a vapor pressure term at constant temperature within each bubble cycle. An estimate of the pressure inside the bubble is obtained measuring the collapse time and maximum radius, and the amount of energy converted into acoustical energy upon each implosion is deduced. The resulting value of acoustic efficiency was found to be in agreement with measurements based on the emitted acoustic pulse. PMID:12083190

  16. A model of the interaction of bubbles and solid particles under acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Todd Allen

    The Lagrangian formalism utilized by Ilinskii, Hamilton and Zabolotskaya [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 121, 786-795 (2007)] to derive equations for the radial and translational motion of interacting bubbles is extended here to obtain a model for the dynamics of interacting bubbles and elastic particles. The bubbles and particles are assumed to be spherical but are otherwise free to pulsate and translate. The model is accurate to fifth order in terms of a nondimensional expansion parameter R/d, where R is a characteristic radius and d is a characteristic distance between neighboring bubbles or particles. The bubbles and particles may be of nonuniform size, the particles elastic or rigid, and external acoustic sources are included to an order consistent with the accuracy of the model. Although the liquid is assumed initially to be incompressible, corrections accounting for finite liquid compressibility are developed to first order in the acoustic Mach number for a cluster of bubbles and particles, and to second order in the acoustic Mach number for a single bubble. For a bubble-particle pair consideration is also given to truncation of the model at fifth order in R/d via automated derivation of the model equations to arbitrary order. Numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effects of key parameters such as particle density and size, liquid compressibility, particle elasticity and model order on the dynamics of single bubbles, pairs of bubbles, bubble-particle pairs and clusters of bubbles and particles under both free response conditions and sinusoidal or shock wave excitation.

  17. Finite-element modeling of an acoustic cloak for three-dimensional flexible shells with structural excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, M.; Akl, W.; Elnady, T.; Elsabbagh, A.

    2011-06-01

    A finite-element model for three-dimensional acoustic cloaks in both cylindrical and spherical coordinates is presented. The model is developed through time-harmonic analysis to study pressure and velocity field distributions as well as the cloak's performance. The model developed accounts for the fluid-structure interaction of thin fluid-loaded shells. A plane strain model is used for the thin shell. Mechanical harmonic excitation is applied to the fluid-loaded shell to investigate the effect of mechanical oscillation of the shell on the performance of the acoustic cloak. In developing this model, a deeper insight into the acoustic cloak phenomena presented by Cummer and Shurig in 2007 is presented. Different nonlinear coordinate transformations are presented to study their effect on the acoustic cloak performance.

  18. Three-Dimensional Acoustic Tissue Model: A Computational Tissue Phantom for Image Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, J.; Oelze, M. L.; O'Brien, W. D.; Zachary, J. F.

    A novel methodology to obtain three-dimensional (3D) acoustic tissue models (3DATMs) is introduced. 3DATMs can be used as computational tools for ultrasonic imaging algorithm development and analysis. In particular, 3D models of biological structures can provide great benefit to better understand fundamentally how ultrasonic waves interact with biological materials. As an example, such models were used to generate ultrasonic images that characterize tumor tissue microstructures. 3DATMs can be used to evaluate a variety of tissue types. Typically, excised tissue is fixed, embedded, serially sectioned, and stained. The stained sections are digitally imaged (24-bit bitmap) with light microscopy. Contrast of each stained section is equalized and an automated registration algorithm aligns consecutive sections. The normalized mutual information is used as a similarity measure, and simplex optimization is conducted to find the best alignment. Both rigid and non-rigid registrations are performed. During tissue preparation, some sections are generally lost; thus, interpolation prior to 3D reconstruction is performed. Interpolation is conducted after registration using cubic Hermite polynoms. The registered (with interpolated) sections yield a 3D histologic volume (3DHV). Acoustic properties are then assigned to each tissue constituent of the 3DHV to obtain the 3DATMs. As an example, a 3D acoustic impedance tissue model (3DZM) was obtained for a solid breast tumor (EHS mouse sarcoma) and used to estimate ultrasonic scatterer size. The 3DZM results yielded an effective scatterer size of 32.9 (±6.1) μm. Ultrasonic backscatter measurements conducted on the same tumor tissue in vivo yielded an effective scatterer size of 33 (±8) μm. This good agreement shows that 3DATMs may be a powerful modeling tool for acoustic imaging applications

  19. Acoustical transmission-line model of the middle-ear cavities and mastoid air cells

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustical transmission line model of the middle-ear cavities and mastoid air cell system (MACS) was constructed for the adult human middle ear with normal function. The air-filled cavities comprised the tympanic cavity, aditus, antrum, and MACS. A binary symmetrical airway branching model of the MACS was constructed using an optimization procedure to match the average total volume and surface area of human temporal bones. The acoustical input impedance of the MACS was calculated using a recursive procedure, and used to predict the input impedance of the middle-ear cavities at the location of the tympanic membrane. The model also calculated the ratio of the acoustical pressure in the antrum to the pressure in the middle-ear cavities at the location of the tympanic membrane. The predicted responses were sensitive to the magnitude of the viscothermal losses within the MACS. These predicted input impedance and pressure ratio functions explained the presence of multiple resonances reported in published data, which were not explained by existing MACS models. PMID:25920840

  20. Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic plasmas using double adiabatic model and gyro-kinetic equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun; Cao, Jintao

    2014-12-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic tokamak plasmas is theoretically analyzed by using double adiabatic model and gyro-kinetic equation. The bi-Maxwellian distribution function for guiding-center ions is assumed to obtain a self-consistent form, yielding pressures satisfying the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) anisotropic equilibrium condition. The double adiabatic model gives the dispersion relation of geodesic acoustic mode (GAM), which agrees well with the one derived from gyro-kinetic equation. The GAM frequency increases with the ratio of pressures, p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}, and the Landau damping rate is dramatically decreased by p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}. MHD result shows a low-frequency zonal flow existing for all p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}, while according to the kinetic dispersion relation, no low-frequency branch exists for p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}≳ 2.

  1. An eighth-scale speech source for subjective assessments in acoustic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlowski, R. J.

    1981-08-01

    The design of a source is described which is suitable for making speech recordings in eighth-scale acoustic models of auditoria. An attempt was made to match the directionality of the source with the directionality of the human voice using data reported in the literature. A narrow aperture was required for the design which was provided by mounting an inverted conical horn over the diaphragm of a high frequency loudspeaker. Resonance problems were encountered with the use of a horn and a description is given of the electronic techniques adopted to minimize the effect of these resonances. Subjective and objective assessments on the completed speech source have proved satisfactory. It has been used in a modelling exercise concerned with the acoustic design of a theatre with a thrust-type stage.

  2. Review and analysis of the DNW/Model 360 rotor acoustic data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinner, R. A.; Boxwell, D. A.; Spencer, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    A comprehensive model rotor aeroacoustic data base was collected in a large anechoic wind tunnel in 1986. Twenty-six microphones were positioned around the azimuth to collect acoustic data for approximately 150 different test conditions. A dynamically scaled, blade-pressure-instrumented model of the forward rotor of the BH360 helicopter simultaneously provided blade pressures for correlation with the acoustic data. High-speed impulsive noise, blade-vortex interaction noise, low-frequency noise, and broadband noise were all captured in this extensive data base. Trends are presentes for each noise source, with important parametric variations. The purpose of this paper is to introduce this data base and illustrate its potential for predictive code validation.

  3. Modelling of wind tunnel wall effects on the radiation characteristics of acoustic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, W.; Baumeister, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that the relatively high fuel economy available from propeller-driven aircraft has renewed interest in high speed, highly loaded multiple blade turboprop propulsion systems. Undesirable features related to community noise and the high intensity cabin noise have stimulated new research on the acoustic characteristics of turboprops. The present investigation has the objective to develop a mathematical model of the essential features of the radiation of acoustic disturbances from propellers in a duct and in free space in order to quantify the success with which duct testing can be expected to approximate free field conditions. In connection with the importance of source directionality, a detailed model is considered which consists of a finite element representation of the Gutin propeller theory valid in both the near and far field.

  4. Electromagnetic Launch Vehicle Fairing and Acoustic Blanket Model of Received Power Using FEKO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trout, Dawn H.; Stanley, James E.; Wahid, Parveen F.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the impact of radio frequency transmission in vehicle fairings is important to sensitive spacecraft. This paper employees the Multilevel Fast Multipole Method (MLFMM) feature of a commercial electromagnetic tool to model the fairing electromagnetic environment in the presence of an internal transmitter. This work is an extension of the perfect electric conductor model that was used to represent the bare aluminum internal fairing cavity. This fairing model includes typical acoustic blanketing commonly used in vehicle fairings. Representative material models within FEKO were successfully used to simulate the test case.

  5. Source signature and acoustic field of seismic physical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Q.; Jackson, C.; Tang, G.; Burbach, G.

    2004-12-01

    As an important tool of seismic research and exploration, seismic physical modeling simulates the real world data acquisition by scaling the model, acquisition parameters, and some features of the source generated by a transducer. Unlike the numerical simulation where a point source is easily satisfied, the transducer can't be made small enough for approximating the point source in physical modeling, therefore yield different source signature than the sources applied in the field data acquisition. To better understand the physical modeling data, characterizing the wave field generated by ultrasonic transducers is desirable and helpful. In this study, we explode several aspects of source characterization; including their radiation pattern, directivity, sensitivity and frequency response. We also try to figure out how to improve the acquired data quality, such as minimize ambient noise, use encoded chirp to prevent ringing, apply deterministic deconvolution to enhance data resolution and t-P filtering to remove linear events. We found that the transducer and their wave field, the modeling system performance, as well as material properties of the model and their coupling conditions all play roles in the physical modeling data acquisition.

  6. Characterization and modeling of the stress and pore-fluid dependent acoustic properties of fractured porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almrabat, Abdulhadi M.

    The thesis presents the results of a study of the characterization and modeling of the stress and pore-fluid dependent acoustic properties of fractured porous rocks. A new laboratory High Pressure and High Temperature (HPHT) triaxial testing system was developed to characterize the seismic properties of sandstone under different levels of effective stress confinement and changes in pore-fluid composition. An intact and fractured of Berea sandstones core samples were used in the experimental studies. The laboratory test results were used to develop analytical models for stress-level and pore-fluid dependent seismic velocity of sandstones. Models for stress-dependent P and S-wave seismic velocities of sandstone were then developed based on the assumption that stress-dependencies come from the nonlinear elastic response of micro-fractures contained in the sample under normal and shear loading. The contact shear stiffness was assumed to increase linearly with the normal stress across a micro-fracture, while the contact normal stiffness was assumed to vary as a power law with the micro-fracture normal stress. Both nonlinear fracture normal and shear contact models were validated by experimental data available in the literature. To test the dependency of seismic velocity of sandstone on changes in pore-fluid composition, another series of tests were conducted where P and S-wave velocities were monitored during injection of supercritical CO 2 in samples of Berea sandstone initially saturated with saline water and under constant confining stress. Changes in seismic wave velocity were measured at different levels of supercritical CO2 saturation as the initial saline water as pore-fluid was displaced by supercritical CO 2. It was found that the P- iv wave velocity significantly decreased while the S-wave velocity remained almost constant as the sample supercritical CO2 saturation increased. The dependency of the seismic velocity on changes on pore fluid composition during

  7. Characterization and modeling of the stress and pore-fluid dependent acoustic properties of fractured porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almrabat, Abdulhadi M.

    The thesis presents the results of a study of the characterization and modeling of the stress and pore-fluid dependent acoustic properties of fractured porous rocks. A new laboratory High Pressure and High Temperature (HPHT) triaxial testing system was developed to characterize the seismic properties of sandstone under different levels of effective stress confinement and changes in pore-fluid composition. An intact and fractured of Berea sandstones core samples were used in the experimental studies. The laboratory test results were used to develop analytical models for stress-level and pore-fluid dependent seismic velocity of sandstones. Models for stress-dependent P and S-wave seismic velocities of sandstone were then developed based on the assumption that stress-dependencies come from the nonlinear elastic response of micro-fractures contained in the sample under normal and shear loading. The contact shear stiffness was assumed to increase linearly with the normal stress across a micro-fracture, while the contact normal stiffness was assumed to vary as a power law with the micro-fracture normal stress. Both nonlinear fracture normal and shear contact models were validated by experimental data available in the literature. To test the dependency of seismic velocity of sandstone on changes in pore-fluid composition, another series of tests were conducted where P and S-wave velocities were monitored during injection of supercritical CO 2 in samples of Berea sandstone initially saturated with saline water and under constant confining stress. Changes in seismic wave velocity were measured at different levels of supercritical CO2 saturation as the initial saline water as pore-fluid was displaced by supercritical CO 2. It was found that the P- iv wave velocity significantly decreased while the S-wave velocity remained almost constant as the sample supercritical CO2 saturation increased. The dependency of the seismic velocity on changes on pore fluid composition during

  8. Aerodynamic and acoustic investigation of inverted velocity profile coannular exhaust nozzle models and development of aerodynamic and acoustic prediction procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. S.; Nelson, D. P.; Stevens, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Five co-annular nozzle models, covering a systematic variation of nozzle geometry, were tested statically over a range of exhaust conditions including inverted velocity profile (IVP) (fan to primary stream velocity ratio 1) and non IVP profiles. Fan nozzle pressure ratio (FNPR) was varied from 1.3 to 4.1 at primary nozzle pressure ratios (PNPR) of 1.53 and 2.0. Fan stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R) and 1089 K(1960 deg R) were tested with primary stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R), 811 K (1460 deg R), and 1089 K (1960 deg R). At fan and primary stream velocities of 610 and 427 m/sec (2000 and 1400 ft/sec), respectively, increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced peak perceived noise level (PNL) 3 dB, and an increase in primary radius ratio from 0 to 0.81 (fan radius ratio constant at 0.83) reduced peak PNL an additional 1.0 dB. There were no noise reductions at a fan stream velocity of 853 m/sec (2800 ft/sec). Increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced nozzle thrust coefficient 1.2 to 1.5% at a PNPR of 1.53, and 1.7 to 2.0% at a PNPR of 2.0. The developed acoustic prediction procedure collapsed the existing data with standard deviation varying from + or - 8 dB to + or - 7 dB. The aerodynamic performance prediction procedure collapsed thrust coefficient measurements to within + or - .004 at a FNPR of 4.0 and a PNPR of 2.0.

  9. Segment-based acoustic models for continuous speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostendorf, Mari; Rohlicek, J. R.

    1993-07-01

    This research aims to develop new and more accurate stochastic models for speaker-independent continuous speech recognition, by extending previous work in segment-based modeling and by introducing a new hierarchical approach to representing intra-utterance statistical dependencies. These techniques, which are more costly than traditional approaches because of the large search space associated with higher order models, are made feasible through rescoring a set of HMM-generated N-best sentence hypotheses. We expect these different modeling techniques to result in improved recognition performance over that achieved by current systems, which handle only frame-based observations and assume that these observations are independent given an underlying state sequence. In the fourth quarter of the project, we have completed the following: (1) ported our recognition system to the Wall Street Journal task, a standard task in the ARPA community; (2) developed an initial dependency-tree model of intra-utterance observation correlation; and (3) implemented baseline language model estimation software. Our initial results on the Wall Street Journal task are quite good and represent significantly improved performance over most HMM systems reporting on the Nov. 1992 5k vocabulary test set.

  10. Granular Shear Zone Formation: Acoustic Emission Measurements and Fiber-bundle Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Or, Dani

    2013-04-01

    We couple the acoustic emissions method with conceptual models of granular material behavior for investigation of granular shear zone formation and to assess eminence of landslide hazard. When granular materials are mechanically loaded or sheared, they tend to produce discrete events of force network restructuring, and frictional interaction at grain contacts. Such abrupt perturbations within the granular lattice release part of the elastic energy stored in the strained material. Elastic waves generated by such events can be measured as acoustic emissions (AE) and may be used as surrogates for intermittent structural transitions associated with shear zone formation. To experimentally investigate the connection between granular shearing and acoustic signals we performed an array of strain-controlled shear-frame tests using glass beads. AE were measured with two different systems operating at two frequency ranges. High temporal resolution measurements of the shear stresses revealed the presence of small fluctuations typically associated with low-frequency (< 20 kHz) acoustic bursts. Shear stress jumps and linked acoustic signals give account of discrete events of grain network rearrangements and obey characteristic exponential frequency-size distributions. We found that statistical features of force jumps and AE events depend on mechanical boundary conditions and evolve during the straining process. Activity characteristics of high-frequency (> 30 kHz) AE events is linked to friction between grains. To interpret failure associated AE signals, we adapted a conceptual fiber-bundle model (FBM) that describes some of the salient statistical features of failure and associated energy production. Using FBMs for the abrupt mechanical response of the granular medium and an associated grain and force chain AE generation model provides us with a full description of the mechanical-acoustical granular shearing process. Highly resolved AE may serve as a diagnostic tool not only

  11. Interaction between Mismatch Repair and Genetic Recombination in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Alani, E.; Reenan, RAG.; Kolodner, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a set of genes that show strong amino acid sequence similarity to MutS and MutL, proteins required for mismatch repair in Escherichia coli. We examined the role of MSH2 and PMS1, yeast homologs of mutS and mutL, respectively, in the repair of base pair mismatches formed during meiotic recombination. By using specifically marked HIS4 and ARG4 alleles, we showed that msh2 mutants displayed a severe defect in the repair of all base pair mismatches as well as 1-, 2- and 4-bp insertion/deletion mispairs. The msh2 and pms1 phenotypes were indistinguishable, suggesting that the wild-type gene products act in the same repair pathway. A comparison of gene conversion events in wild-type and msh2 mutants indicated that mismatch repair plays an important role in genetic recombination. (1) Tetrad analysis at five different loci revealed that, in msh2 mutants, the majority of aberrant segregants displayed a sectored phenotype, consistent with a failure to repair mismatches created during heteroduplex formation. In wild type, base pair mismatches were almost exclusively repaired toward conversion rather than restoration. (2) In msh2 strains 10-19% of the aberrant tetrads were Ab4:4. (3) Polarity gradients at HIS4 and ARG4 were nearly abolished in msh2 mutants. The frequency of gene conversion at the 3' end of these genes was increased and was nearly the frequency observed at the 5' end. (4) Co-conversion studies were consistent with mismatch repair acting to regulate heteroduplex DNA tract length. We favor a model proposing that recombination events occur through the formation and resolution of heteroduplex intermediates and that mismatch repair proteins specifically interact with recombination enzymes to regulate the length of symmetric heteroduplex DNA. PMID:8056309

  12. Effective Acoustic Modeling for Pronunciation Quality Scoring of Strongly Accented Mandarin Speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Fengpei; Liu, Changliang; Shao, Jian; Pan, Fuping; Dong, Bin; Yan, Yonghong

    In this paper we present our investigation into improving the performance of our computer-assisted language learning (CALL) system through exploiting the acoustic model and features within the speech recognition framework. First, to alleviate channel distortion, speaker-dependent cepstrum mean normalization (CMN) is adopted and the average correlation coefficient (average CC) between machine and expert scores is improved from 78.00% to 84.14%. Second, heteroscedastic linear discriminant analysis (HLDA) is adopted to enhance the discriminability of the acoustic model, which successfully increases the average CC from 84.14% to 84.62%. Additionally, HLDA causes the scoring accuracy to be more stable at various pronunciation proficiency levels, and thus leads to an increase in the speaker correct-rank rate from 85.59% to 90.99%. Finally, we use maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation to tune the acoustic model to fit strongly accented test speech. As a result, the average CC is improved from 84.62% to 86.57%. These three novel techniques improve the accuracy of evaluating pronunciation quality.

  13. Numerical comparison of acoustic wedge models, with application to ultrasonic telemetry.

    PubMed

    Lü, B; Darmon, M; Fradkin, L; Potel, C

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic telemetry imaging systems are used to monitor such immersed structures as main vessels of nuclear reactors. The interaction between acoustic beams and targets involves scattering phenomena, mainly specular reflection and tip diffraction. In order to assist in the design of imaging systems, a simulation tool is required for the accurate modeling of such phenomena. Relevant high-frequency scattering models have been developed in electromagnetic applications, in particular, the geometrical optics (GO), Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) and its uniform corrections (UAT and UTD), Kirchhoff approximation (KA) and Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD). Before adopting any of them for simulation of scattering of acoustic waves by edged immersed rigid bodies, it is important to realize that in acoustics the characteristic dimension to the wave length ratio is usually considerably smaller than in electromagnetics and a further study is required to identify models' advantages, disadvantages and regions of applicability. In this paper their numerical comparison is carried out. As the result, the most suitable algorithm is identified for simulating ultrasonic telemetry of immersed rigid structures. PMID:26476465

  14. Acoustic multipole source model for volcanic explosions and inversion for source parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Keehoon; Lees, Jonathan M.; Ruiz, Mario

    2012-12-01

    Volcanic explosions are accompanied by strong acoustic pressure disturbances in the atmosphere. With a proper source model, these acoustic signals provide invaluable information about volcanic explosion dynamics. Far-field solutions to volcanic infrasound radiation have been derived above a rigid half-space boundary, and a simple inversion method was developed based on the half-space model. Acoustic monopole and dipole sources were estimated simultaneously from infrasound waveforms. Stability of the inversion procedure was assessed in terms of variances of source parameters, and the procedure was reliable with at least three stations around the infrasound source. Application of this method to infrasound observations recorded at Tungurahua volcano in Ecuador successfully produced a reasonable range of source parameters with acceptable variances. Observed strong directivity of infrasound radiation from explosions at Tungurahua are successfully explained by the directivity of a dipole source model. The resultant dipole axis, in turn, shows good agreement with the opening direction of the vent at Tungurahua, which is considered to be the origin of the dipole source. The method is general and can be utilized to study any monopole, dipole or combined sources generated by explosions.

  15. Modelling the effect of acoustic waves on nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haqshenas, S. R.; Ford, I. J.; Saffari, N.

    2016-07-01

    A phase transformation in a metastable phase can be affected when it is subjected to a high intensity ultrasound wave. In this study we determined the effect of oscillation in pressure and temperature on a phase transformation using the Gibbs droplet model in a generic format. The developed model is valid for both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters formed through a stationary or non-stationary process. We validated the underlying model by comparing the predicted kinetics of water droplet formation from the gas phase against experimental data in the absence of ultrasound. Our results demonstrated better agreement with experimental data in comparison with classical nucleation theory. Then, we determined the thermodynamics and kinetics of nucleation and the early stage of growth of clusters in an isothermal sonocrystallisation process. This new contribution shows that the effect of pressure on the kinetics of nucleation is cluster size-dependent in contrast to classical nucleation theory.

  16. Flap Side-Edge Noise: Acoustic Analysis of Sen's Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.; Martin, James E.

    1996-01-01

    The two-dimensional flap side-edge flow model developed by Sen is analyzed to reveal the noise production potential of the proposed mechanism. The model assumes that a vortex will form at the equilibrium position off the side edge of the flap. The vortex is then perturbed away from the equilibrium position by incoming turbulence causing it to oscillate and thus radiate sound. The noise field is calculated three-dimensionally by taking the flap to have a finite chord. Spectra and directivity of the farfield sound are presented. In addition, the effect of retarded time differences is evaluated. The parameters in the model are related to typical aircraft parameters and noise reduction possibilities are proposed.

  17. Modelling the effect of acoustic waves on nucleation.

    PubMed

    Haqshenas, S R; Ford, I J; Saffari, N

    2016-07-14

    A phase transformation in a metastable phase can be affected when it is subjected to a high intensity ultrasound wave. In this study we determined the effect of oscillation in pressure and temperature on a phase transformation using the Gibbs droplet model in a generic format. The developed model is valid for both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters formed through a stationary or non-stationary process. We validated the underlying model by comparing the predicted kinetics of water droplet formation from the gas phase against experimental data in the absence of ultrasound. Our results demonstrated better agreement with experimental data in comparison with classical nucleation theory. Then, we determined the thermodynamics and kinetics of nucleation and the early stage of growth of clusters in an isothermal sonocrystallisation process. This new contribution shows that the effect of pressure on the kinetics of nucleation is cluster size-dependent in contrast to classical nucleation theory. PMID:27421413

  18. Refined acoustic modeling and analysis of shotgun microphones.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Lo, Yi-Yang

    2013-04-01

    A shotgun microphone is a highly directional pickup device widely used in noisy environments. The key element that leads to its superior directivity is a tube with multiple slot openings along its length. One traditional way to model the directional response of a shotgun is to assume plane waves traveling in the tube as if it is in the free field. However, the frequency response and directivity predicted by this traveling wave model can differ drastically from practical measurements. In this paper, an in-depth electroacoustic analysis was conducted to examine the problem by considering the standing waves inside the tube with an analogous circuit containing phased pressure sources and T-networks of tube segments. A further refinement is to model the housing diffraction effect with the aid of the equivalent source method (ESM). The on-axis frequency response and directivity pattern predicted by the proposed model are in close agreement with the measurements. From the results, a peculiar bifurcation phenomenon of directivity pattern at the Helmholtz frequency was also noted. While the shotgun behaves like an endfire array above the Helmholtz frequency, it becomes a broadside array below the Helmholtz frequency. The standing wave effect can be mitigated by covering the slot openings with mesh screen, which was found to alter the shotgun response to be closer to that of the traveling wave model above a critical frequency predicted by the half-wavelength rule. A mode-switching model was developed to predict the directional responses of mesh-treated shotguns. PMID:23556574

  19. Electro-thermo-mechanical model for bulk acoustic wave resonators.

    PubMed

    Rocas, Eduard; Collado, Carlos; Mateu, Jordi; Orloff, Nathan D; Aigner, Robert; Booth, James C

    2013-11-01

    We present the electro-thermo-mechanical constitutive relations, expanded up to the third order, for a BAW resonator. The relations obtained are implemented into a circuit model, which is validated with extensive linear and nonlinear measurements. The mathematical analysis, along with the modeling, allows us to identify the dominant terms, which are the material temperature derivatives and two intrinsic nonlinear terms, and explain, for the first time, all observable effects in a BAW resonator by use of a unified physical description. Moreover, the terms that are responsible for the second-harmonic generation and the frequency shift with dc voltage are shown to be the same. PMID:24158294

  20. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  1. Hydrodynamic, Heat and Acoustic Processes Modelling in Tranport of Rheologically Complex Viscous Media Technology in Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamov, Sergey N.; Kudelin, Nikita S.; Dedeyev, Pavel O.

    2014-08-01

    The paper describes the results of mathematical modelling of acoustic processes, hydrodynamics and heat exchange in case of oil products transportation in pipelines with constant and variable cross-section. The turbulence model features of RANS approach and intensification of heat exchange in substances with anomalous rheology are reviewed. It is shown that statistic second order models are appropriate to use for forecasting details of the pulsating flows. The paper states the numerical integration features of determining equations. The properties of vibratory effect influence are determined. Vortex and heat perturbations, rheological changes impact on resistance regularities and intensity of heat exchange are analyzed.

  2. A new acoustic lens material for large area detectors in photoacoustic breast tomography☆

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wenfeng; Piras, Daniele; van Hespen, Johan C.G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We introduce a new acoustic lens material for photoacoustic tomography (PAT) to improve lateral resolution while possessing excellent acoustic acoustic impedance matching with tissue to minimize lens induced image artifacts. Background A large surface area detector due to its high sensitivity is preferable to detect weak signals in photoacoustic mammography. The lateral resolution is then limited by the narrow acceptance angle of such detectors. Acoustic lenses made of acrylic plastic (PMMA) have been used to enlarge the acceptance angle of such detectors and improve lateral resolution. However, such PMMA lenses introduce image artifacts due to internal reflections of ultrasound within the lenses, the result of acoustic impedance mismatch with the coupling medium or tissue. Methods A new lens is proposed based on the 2-component resin Stycast 1090SI. We characterized the acoustic properties of the proposed lens material in comparison with commonly used PMMA, inspecting the speed of sound, acoustic attenuation and density. We fabricated acoustic lenses based on the new material and PMMA, and studied the effect of the acoustic lenses on detector performance comparing finite element (FEM) simulations and measurements of directional sensitivity, pulse-echo response and frequency response. We further investigated the effect of using the acoustic lenses on the image quality of a photoacoustic breast tomography system using k-Wave simulations and experiments. Results Our acoustic characterization shows that Stycast 1090SI has tissue-like acoustic impedance, high speed of sound and low acoustic attenuation. These acoustic properties ensure an excellent acoustic lens material to minimize the acoustic insertion loss. Both acoustic lenses show significant enlargement of detector acceptance angle and lateral resolution improvement from modeling and experiments. However, the image artifacts induced by the presence of an acoustic lens are reduced using the proposed

  3. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang's optimised finite difference scheme. PMID:27491333

  4. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang’s optimised finite difference scheme.

  5. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang’s optimised finite difference scheme. PMID:27491333

  6. Development of acoustic sniper localization methods and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasing, David; Ellwood, Benjamin

    2010-04-01

    A novel examination of a method capable of providing situational awareness of sniper fire from small arms fire is presented. Situational Awareness (SA) information is extracted by exploiting two distinct sounds created by small arms discharge: the muzzle blast (created when the bullet leaves the barrel of the gun) and the shockwave (sound created by a supersonic bullet). The direction of arrival associated with the muzzle blast will always point in the direction of the shooter. Range can be estimated from the muzzle blast alone, however at greater distances geometric dilution of precision will make obtaining accurate range estimates difficult. To address this issue, additional information obtained from the shockwave is utilized in order to estimate range to shooter. The focus of the paper is the development of a shockwave propagation model, the development of ballistics models (based off empirical measurements), and the subsequent application towards methods of determining shooter position. Knowledge of the rounds ballistics is required to estimate range to shooter. Many existing methods rely on extracting information from the shockwave in an attempt to identify the round type and thus the ballistic model to use ([1]). It has been our experience that this information becomes unreliable at greater distances or in high noise environments. Our method differs from existing solutions in that classification of the round type is not required, thus making the proposed solution more robust. Additionally, we demonstrate that sufficient accuracy can be achieved without the need to classify the round.

  7. Educational Mismatch and Self-Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Keith A.; Roche, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Previous research on educational mismatch concentrates on estimating its labor market consequences but with a focus on wage and salary workers. This paper examines the far less studied influence of mismatch on the self-employed. Using a sample of workers in science and engineering fields, results show larger earnings penalties for mismatch among…

  8. Artificial cochlea and acoustic black hole travelling waves observation: Model and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucaud, Simon; Michon, Guilhem; Gourinat, Yves; Pelat, Adrien; Gautier, François

    2014-07-01

    An inhomogeneous fluid structure waveguide reproducing passive behaviour of the inner ear is modelled with the help of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method. A physical setup is designed and built. Experimental results are compared with a good correlation to theoretical ones. The experimental setup is a varying width plate immersed in fluid and terminated with an acoustic black hole. The varying width plate provides a spatial repartition of the vibration depending on the excitation frequency. The acoustic black hole is made by decreasing the plate's thickness with a quadratic profile and by covering this region with a thin film of viscoelastic material. Such a termination attenuates the flexural wave reflection at the end of the waveguide, turning standing waves into travelling waves.

  9. Accounting for false-positive acoustic detections of bats using occupancy models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clement, Matthew J.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.; Ormsbee, Patricia C.; Szewczak, Joseph M.; Nichols, James D.

    2014-01-01

    4. Synthesis and applications. Our results suggest that false positives sufficient to affect inferences may be common in acoustic surveys for bats. We demonstrate an approach that can estimate occupancy, regardless of the false-positive rate, when acoustic surveys are paired with capture surveys. Applications of this approach include monitoring the spread of White-Nose Syndrome, estimating the impact of climate change and informing conservation listing decisions. We calculate a site-specific probability of occupancy, conditional on survey results, which could inform local permitting decisions, such as for wind energy projects. More generally, the magnitude of false positives suggests that false-positive occupancy models can improve accuracy in research and monitoring of bats and provide wildlife managers with more reliable information.

  10. Aeroacoustic flowfield and acoustics of a model helicopter tail rotor at high advance ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenoy, Rajarama K.

    1989-01-01

    Some results, relevant to rotorcraft noise generation process at high advance ratio, are presented in this paper from schlieren flow visualization and acoustic tests of a model tail rotor. The measured in-plane noise trends are consistent with the growth of the tip supersonic region seen in the schlieren visuals. Schlieren flow visuals reveal a propagating pressure wave in the second quadrant. Simultaneously measured acoustic data and the results of two-dimensional transonic Blade-Vortex Interaction analysis code ATRAN-2 indicate that this pressure wave is attributable to BVI activity in the first quadrant. This paper establishes that the transonic Blade-Vortex Interactions contribute to noise at high advance ratio level flight conditions.

  11. Analytical model of nonlinear thermo-acoustic effects in a matrix burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckl, Maria A.

    2013-08-01

    This paper considers a fundamental thermo-acoustic test rig developed by Noiray (Linear and Nonlinear Analysis of Combustion Instabilities, Application to Multipoint Injection Systems and Control Strategies", Ph.D. Thesis, École Centrale Paris, 2007) and models it with an entirely analytical approach. The measured flame describing function is represented by a surprisingly simple time-lag law, which is then used to derive the governing equation for a single acoustic mode in the test rig. This equation turns out to be that of a harmonic oscillator with a damping/amplification coefficient that depends on the velocity amplitude. On this basis we find analytically the pattern of the oscillation regimes in parameter space, in particular the frequency and amplitude of limit cycles at various tube lengths. There is good qualitative agreement with some, but not all, features of Noiray's observations.

  12. Suspended particles in wastewater: their optical, sedimentation and acoustical characterization and modeling.

    PubMed

    Pallarès, A; François, P; Pons, M-N; Schmitt, P

    2011-01-01

    Wastewater regulation and treatment is still a major concern in planetary pollution management. Some pollutants, referred to as particulate matter, consist of very small particles just suspended in the water. Various techniques are used for the suspended particles survey. Few of them are able to provide real-time data. The development of new, real time instruments needs the confrontation with real wastewater. Due its instability, the modeling of wastewater in terms of suspended solids was explored. Knowing the description of real wastewater, we tried to produce a synthetic mixture made of basic organic ingredients. A good agreement in terms of turbidity and settling velocity was observed between the artificial wastewater matrix and the real one. The investigation of the individual contribution of the different compounds to the acoustical signal showed a more complex dependence. Thus the modeling of wastewater with reference to turbidity and settling velocity is not sufficient to describe it acoustically. Further studies should lead to a good comparison of the acoustical and turbidity behavior of wastewater. PMID:21252426

  13. Unmasking the acoustic effects of vowel-to-vowel coarticulation: A statistical modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Jennifer; Linebaugh, Gary; Munson, Cheyenne; McMurray, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Coarticulation is a source of acoustic variability for vowels, but how large is this effect relative to other sources of variance? We investigate acoustic effects of anticipatory V-to-V coarticulation relative to variation due to the following C and individual speaker. We examine F1 and F2 from V1 in 48 V1-C#V2 contexts produced by 10 speakers of American English. ANOVA reveals significant effects of both V2 and C on F1 and F2 measures of V1. The influence of V2 and C on acoustic variability relative to that of speaker and target vowel identity is evaluated using hierarchical linear regression. Speaker and target vowel account for roughly 80% of the total variance in F1 and F2, but when this variance is partialed out C and V2 account for another 18% (F1) and 63% (F2) of the remaining target vowel variability. Multinomial logistic regression (MLR) models are constructed to test the power of target vowel F1 and F2 for predicting C and V2 of the upcoming context. Prediction accuracy is 58% for C-Place, 76% for C-Voicing and 54% for V2, but only when variance due to other sources is factored out. MLR is discussed as a model of the parsing mechanism in speech perception. PMID:21173864

  14. Finite element modelling for the investigation of edge effect in acoustic micro imaging of microelectronic packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen Lee, Chean; Zhang, Guang-Ming; Harvey, David M.; Ma, Hong-Wei; Braden, Derek R.

    2016-02-01

    In acoustic micro imaging of microelectronic packages, edge effect is often presented as artifacts of C-scan images, which may potentially obscure the detection of defects such as cracks and voids in the solder joints. The cause of edge effect is debatable. In this paper, a 2D finite element model is developed on the basis of acoustic micro imaging of a flip-chip package using a 230 MHz focused transducer to investigate acoustic propagation inside the package in attempt to elucidate the fundamental mechanism that causes the edge effect. A virtual transducer is designed in the finite element model to reduce the coupling fluid domain, and its performance is characterised against the physical transducer specification. The numerical results showed that the under bump metallization (UBM) structure inside the package has a significant impact on the edge effect. Simulated wavefields also showed that the edge effect is mainly attributed to the horizontal scatter, which is observed in the interface of silicon die-to-the outer radius of solder bump. The horizontal scatter occurs even for a flip-chip package without the UBM structure.

  15. Long-range acoustic interactions in insect swarms: an adaptive gravity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbonos, Dan; Ianconescu, Reuven; Puckett, James G.; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Gov, Nir S.

    2016-07-01

    The collective motion of groups of animals emerges from the net effect of the interactions between individual members of the group. In many cases, such as birds, fish, or ungulates, these interactions are mediated by sensory stimuli that predominantly arise from nearby neighbors. But not all stimuli in animal groups are short range. Here, we consider mating swarms of midges, which are thought to interact primarily via long-range acoustic stimuli. We exploit the similarity in form between the decay of acoustic and gravitational sources to build a model for swarm behavior. By accounting for the adaptive nature of the midges’ acoustic sensing, we show that our ‘adaptive gravity’ model makes mean-field predictions that agree well with experimental observations of laboratory swarms. Our results highlight the role of sensory mechanisms and interaction range in collective animal behavior. Additionally, the adaptive interactions that we present here open a new class of equations of motion, which may appear in other biological contexts.

  16. Acoustic Wave Propagation in Snow Based on a Biot-Type Porous Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidler, R.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the fact that acoustic methods are inexpensive, robust and simple, the application of seismic waves to snow has been sparse. This might be due to the strong attenuation inherent to snow that prevents large scale seismic applications or due to the somewhat counterintuitive acoustic behavior of snow as a porous material. Such materials support a second kind of compressional wave that can be measured in fresh snow and which has a decreasing wave velocity with increasing density of snow. To investigate wave propagation in snow we construct a Biot-type porous model of snow as a function of porosity based on the assumptions that the solid frame is build of ice, the pore space is filled with a mix of air, or air and water, and empirical relationships for the tortuosity, the permeability, the bulk, and the shear modulus.We use this reduced model to investigate compressional and shear wave velocities of snow as a function of porosity and to asses the consequences of liquid water in the snowpack on acoustic wave propagation by solving Biot's differential equations with plain wave solutions. We find that the fast compressional wave velocity increases significantly with increasing density, but also that the fast compressional wave velocity might be even lower than the slow compressional wave velocity for very light snow. By using compressional and shear strength criteria and solving Biot's differential equations with a pseudo-spectral approach we evaluate snow failure due to acoustic waves in a heterogeneous snowpack, which we think is an important mechanism in triggering avalanches by explosives as well as by skiers. Finally, we developed a low cost seismic acquisition device to assess the theoretically obtained wave velocities in the field and to explore the possibility of an inexpensive tool to remotely gather snow water equivalent.

  17. Transcranial Assessment and Visualization of Acoustic Cavitation: Modeling and Experimental Validation

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Gregory T.; McDannold, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of ultrasonically-controlled microbubble oscillations (acoustic cavitation) with tissues and biological media has been shown to induce a wide range of bioeffects that may have significant impact to therapy and diagnosis of central nervous system diseases and disorders. However, the inherently non-linear microbubble oscillations combined with the micrometer and microsecond scales involved in these interactions and the limited methods to assess and visualize them transcranially hinder both their optimal use and translation to the clinics. To overcome these challenges, we present a noninvasive and clinically relevant framework that combines numerical simulations with multimodality imaging to assess and visualize the microbubble oscillations transcranially. In the present work, acoustic cavitation was studied with an integrated US and MR imaging guided clinical FUS system in non-human primates. This multimodality imaging system allowed us to concurrently induce and visualize acoustic cavitation transcranially. A high-resolution brain CT-scan that allowed us to determine the head acoustic properties (density, speed of sound, and absorption) was also co-registered to the US and MR images. The derived acoustic properties and the location of the targets that were determined by the 3D-CT scans and the post sonication MRI respectively were then used as inputs to two-and three-dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain (2D, 3D-FDTD) simulations that matched the experimental conditions and geometry. At the experimentally-determined target locations, synthetic point sources with pressure amplitude traces derived by either a Gaussian function or the output of a microbubble dynamics model were numerically excited and propagated through the skull towards a virtual US imaging array. Then, using passive acoustic mapping that was refined to incorporate variable speed of sound, we assessed the losses and aberrations induced by the skull as a function of the acoustic

  18. Acoustical analysis and modeling of reciprocating compressors, noise produced by gas pulsation, using four-pole method. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herfat, Ali T.; Seel, Robert V.

    2003-04-01

    Presented in Paper II is the noise analysis of reciprocating compressors (such as air conditioning and refrigeration reciprocating compressors) using the four-pole method. The gas pulsation noise inside compressor head cavities, mufflers, and through-valves can be analyzed by applying the FPM. This method formulates the characteristics of acoustic elements by establishing a relationship between their input and output gas pressures and volume flow rates. When the acoustic elements in the system (compressor) are connected at points between them, the FPM allows an easy assembly of element equations to obtain system acoustical model.

  19. Comparisons among ten models of acoustic backscattering used in aquatic ecosystem research.

    PubMed

    Jech, J Michael; Horne, John K; Chu, Dezhang; Demer, David A; Francis, David T I; Gorska, Natalia; Jones, Benjamin; Lavery, Andone C; Stanton, Timothy K; Macaulay, Gavin J; Reeder, D Benjamin; Sawada, Kouichi

    2015-12-01

    Analytical and numerical scattering models with accompanying digital representations are used increasingly to predict acoustic backscatter by fish and zooplankton in research and ecosystem monitoring applications. Ten such models were applied to targets with simple geometric shapes and parameterized (e.g., size and material properties) to represent biological organisms such as zooplankton and fish, and their predictions of acoustic backscatter were compared to those from exact or approximate analytical models, i.e., benchmarks. These comparisons were made for a sphere, spherical shell, prolate spheroid, and finite cylinder, each with homogeneous composition. For each shape, four target boundary conditions were considered: rigid-fixed, pressure-release, gas-filled, and weakly scattering. Target strength (dB re 1 m(2)) was calculated as a function of insonifying frequency (f = 12 to 400 kHz) and angle of incidence (θ = 0° to 90°). In general, the numerical models (i.e., boundary- and finite-element) matched the benchmarks over the full range of simulation parameters. While inherent errors associated with the approximate analytical models were illustrated, so were the advantages as they are computationally efficient and in certain cases, outperformed the numerical models under conditions where the numerical models did not converge. PMID:26723330

  20. Using numerical models and volume rendering to interpret acoustic imaging of hydrothermal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Bennett, K.; Takle, J.; Rona, P. A.; Silver, D.

    2009-12-01

    Our acoustic imaging system will be installed onto the Neptune Canada observatory at the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge, which is a Ridge 2000 Integrated Study Site. Thereafter, 16-30 Gb of acoustic imaging data will be collected daily. We are developing a numerical model of merging plumes that will be used to guide expectations and volume rendering software that transforms volumetric acoustic data into photo-like images. Hydrothermal flow is modeled as a combination of merged point sources which can be configured in any geometry. The model stipulates the dissipation or dilution of the flow and uses potential fields and complex analysis to combine the entrainment fields produced by each source. The strengths of this model are (a) the ability to handle a variety of scales especially the small scale as the potential fields can be specified with an effectively infinite boundary condition, (b) the ability to handle line, circle and areal source configurations, and (c) the ability to handle both high temperature focused flow and low temperature diffuse flow. This model predicts the vertical and horizontal velocities and the spatial distribution of effluent from combined sources of variable strength in a steady ambient velocity field. To verify the accuracy of the model’s results, we compare the model predictions of plume centerlines for the merging of two relatively strong point sources with the acoustic imaging data collected at Clam Acres, Southwest Vent Field, EPR 21°N in 1990. The two chimneys are 3.5 m apart and the plumes emanating from their tops merge approximately 18 mab. The model is able to predict the height of merging and the bending of the centerlines. Merging is implicitly observed at Grotto Vent, Main Endeavour Field, in our VIP 2000 data from July 2000: although there are at least 5 vigorous black smokers only a single plume is discernable in the acoustic imaging data. Furthermore, the observed Doppler velocity data increases with height

  1. Modeling and experimental analysis of acoustic cavitation bubbles for Burst Wave Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Kazuki; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam; Cunitz, Bryan; Colonius, Tim; Bailey, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation bubbles initiated by focused ultrasound waves are investigated through experiments and modeling. Pulses of focused ultrasound with a frequency of 335 kHz and a peak negative pressure of 8 MPa is generated in a water tank by a piezoelectric transducer to initiate cavitation. The pressure field is modeled by solving the Euler equations and used to simulate single bubble oscillation. The characteristics of cavitation bubbles observed by highspeed photography qualitatively agree with the simulation results. Finally, bubble clouds are captured using acoustic B-mode imaging that works synchronized with high-speed photography.

  2. A comparison of the acoustic and aerodynamic measurements of a model rotor tested in two anechoic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Lewy, S.

    1986-01-01

    Two aeroacoustic facilities - the CEPRA 19 in France and the DNW in the Netherlands - are compared. The two facilities have unique acoustic characteristics that make them appropriate for acoustic testing of model-scale helicopter rotors. An identical pressure-instrumented model-scale rotor was tested in each facility and acoustic test results are compared with full-scale-rotor test results. Blade surface pressures measured in both tunnels were used to correlated nominal rotor operating conditions in each tunnel, and also used to assess the steadiness of the rotor in each tunnel's flow. In-the-flow rotor acoustic signatures at moderate forward speeds (35-50 m/sec) are presented for each facility and discussed in relation to the differences in tunnel geometries and aeroacoustic characteristics. Both reports are presented in appendices to this paper.

  3. A comparison of the acoustic and aerodynamic measurements of a model rotor tested in two anechoic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Lewy, S.; Caplot, M.

    1986-01-01

    Two aeroacoustic facilities--the CEPRA 19 in France and the DNW in the Netherlands--are compared. The two facilities have unique acoustic characteristics that make them appropriate for acoustic testing of model-scale helicopter rotors. An identical pressure-instrumented model-scale rotor was tested in each facility and acoustic test results are compared with full-scale-rotor test results. Blade surface pressures measured in both tunnels were used to correlated nominal rotor operating conditions in each tunnel, and also used to assess the steadiness of the rotor in each tunnel's flow. In-the-flow rotor acoustic signatures at moderate forward speeds (35-50 m/sec) are presented for each facility and discussed in relation to the differences in tunnel geometries and aeroacoustic characteristics. Both reports are presented in appendices to this paper. ;.);

  4. Acoustic Performance of an Advanced Model Turbofan in Three Aeroacoustic Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2012-01-01

    A model advanced turbofan was acoustically tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot-Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT), and in two other aeroacoustic facilities. The Universal Propulsion Simulator (UPS) fan was designed and manufactured by the General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE) Company, and featured active core, as well as bypass, flow paths. The reference test configurations were with the metal, M4, rotor with hardwall and treated bypass flow ducts. The UPS fan was tested within an airflow at a Mach number of 0.20 (limited flow data were also acquired at a Mach number of 0.25) which is representative of aircraft takeoff and approach conditions. Comparisons were made between data acquired within the airflow (9x15 LSWT and German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW)) and outside of a free jet (Boeing Low Speed Aero acoustic Facility (LSAF) and DNW). Sideline data were acquired on an 89-in. (nominal 4 fan diameters) sideline using the same microphone assembly and holder in the 9x15 LSWT and DNW facilities. These data showed good agreement for similar UPS operating conditions and configurations. Distortion of fan spectra tonal content through a free jet shear layer was documented, suggesting that in-flow acoustic measurements are required for comprehensive fan noise diagnostics. However, there was good agreement for overall sound power level (PWL) fan noise measurements made both within and outside of the test facility airflow.

  5. A generalized hydrodynamic model for acoustic mode stability in viscoelastic plasma fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, B.; Haloi, A.; Karmakar, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model to investigate acoustic-mode excitation and stability in simplified strongly coupled bi-component plasma is proposed. The goal is centered in seeing the viscoelasticity-influences on the instability properties. The dispersive and nondispersive features are methodologically explored followed by numerical illustrations. It is seen that, unlike usual plasma acoustic mode, here the mode stability is drastically modified due to the considered viscoelastic effects contributed from both the electronic and ionic fluids. For example, it is found that there exists an excitation threshold value on angular wavenumber, K ≈3 in the K-space on the Debye scale, beyond which only dispersive characteristic features prevail. Further, it is demonstrated that the viscoelastic relaxation time plays a stabilizing influential role on the wave dynamics. In contrast, it is just opposite for the effective viscoelastic relaxation effect. Consistency with the usual viscoelasticity-free situations, with and without plasma approximation taken into account, is also established and explained. It is identified and conjectured that the plasma fluid viscoelasticity acts as unavoidable dispersive agency in attributing several new characteristics to acoustic wave excitation and propagation. The analysis is also exploited to derive a quantitative glimpse on the various basic properties and dimensionless numbers of the viscoelastic plasma. Finally, extended implications of our results tentative to different cosmic, space and astrophysical situations, amid the entailed facts and faults, are highlighted together with indicated future directions.

  6. Finite Difference Numerical Modeling of Gravito-Acoustic Wave Propagation in a Windy and Attenuating Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic and gravity waves propagating in the planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena (tectonic events, explosions) or as contributors to the atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physic behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modeled in an attenuating and windy 3D atmosphere from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, In order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or the global scale a high order finite difference time domain (FDTD) approach is proposed that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations (Landau 1959) with non constant physical parameters (density, viscosities and speed of sound) and background velocities (wind). One significant benefit from this code is its versatility. Indeed, it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation that enables one to observe correlations between the two. Simulations will also be performed on 2D/3D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere and gravity-wave generation through atmospheric explosions. Computations are validated by comparison to well-known analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases (atmospheric explosion and bottom displacement forcing).

  7. Acoustically induced streaming flows near a model cod otolith and their potential implications for fish hearing.

    PubMed

    Kotas, Charlotte W; Rogers, Peter H; Yoda, Minami

    2011-08-01

    The ears of fishes are remarkable sensors for the small acoustic disturbances associated with underwater sound. For example, each ear of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) has three dense bony bodies (otoliths) surrounded by fluid and tissue, and detects sounds at frequencies from 30 to 500 Hz. Atlantic cod have also been shown to localize sounds. However, how their ears perform these functions is not fully understood. Steady streaming, or time-independent, flows near a 350% scale model Atlantic cod otolith immersed in a viscous fluid were studied to determine if these fluid flows contain acoustically relevant information that could be detected by the ear's sensory hair cells. The otolith was oscillated sinusoidally at various orientations at frequencies of 8-24 Hz, corresponding to an actual frequency range of 280-830 Hz. Phase-locked particle pathline visualizations of the resulting flows give velocity, vorticity, and rate of strain fields over a single plane of this mainly two-dimensional flow. Although the streaming flows contain acoustically relevant information, the displacements due to these flows are likely too small to explain Atlantic cod hearing abilities near threshold. The results, however, may suggest a possible mechanism for detection of ultrasound in some fish species. PMID:21877817

  8. Acoustical model and theory for predicting effects of environmental noise on people.

    PubMed

    Kryter, Karl D

    2009-06-01

    The Schultz [(1978). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 64, 377-405]; Fidell et al. [(1991). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 89, 221-233] and Finegold et al. [(1994). Noise Control Eng. 42, 25-30] curves present misleading research information regarding DENL/DENL levels of environmental noises from transportation vehicles and the impact of annoyance and associated adverse effects on people living in residential areas. The reasons are shown to be jointly due to (a) interpretations of early research data, (b) plotting of annoyance data for noise exposure from different types of transportation vehicles on a single set of coordinates, and (c) the assumption that the effective, as heard, levels of noise from different sources are proportional to day, night level (DNL)/day, evening night level (DENL) levels measured at a common-point outdoors. The subtraction of on-site attenuations from the measured outdoor levels of environmental noises used in the calculation of DNL/DENL provides new metrics, labeled EDNL/EDENL, for the calculation of the effective exposure levels of noises perceived as equaling annoying. Predictions of judged annoyance in residential areas from the noises of transportation vehicles are made with predicted errors of <1 dB EDNL/EDENL, compared to errors ranging from approximately 6 to approximately 14 dB by DNL/DENL. A joint neurological, physiological, and psychological theory, and an effective acoustical model for the prediction of public annoyance and related effects from exposures to environment noises are presented. PMID:19507953

  9. Acoustic waves generated by pulsed microwaves in viscoelastic rods: modeling and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Bacon, C; Guilliorit, E; Hosten, B; Chimenti, D E

    2001-09-01

    The acoustic wave generation in a specimen irradiated by a pulsed microwave is predicted theoretically. The specimen is a viscoelastic rod inserted into a wave guide. The model is based on Maxwell's equations, heat equation and thermoviscoelasticity theory. Computations show the presence of temperature oscillations due to the electromagnetic interferences in the irradiated rod if its electromagnetic absorption is low. An experimental method to infer indirectly the detailed behavior of microwave-generated acoustic waves in polymer rods, including the influence of electromagnetic wave reflection at the rod ends, is presented. The method consists of measuring the oscillations in the particle acceleration detected at the end of the rod that are induced by variations in the polymer rod length. The oscillations are caused by changing electromagnetic standing-wave conditions within the rod. It is found that these oscillations are in agreement in period, amplitude, and phase, with independent values of the complex dielectric constant and complex acoustic slowness of the polyvinyl chloride samples used in the study. PMID:11572350

  10. Acoustically Induced Streaming Flows near a Model Cod Otolith and their Potential Implications for Fish Hearing

    SciTech Connect

    Kotas, Charlotte W; Rogers, Peter; Yoda, Minami

    2011-01-01

    The ears of fishes are remarkable sensors for the small acoustic disturbances associated with underwater sound. For example, each ear of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) has three dense bony bodies (otoliths) surrounded by fluid and tissue, and detects sounds at frequencies from 30 to 500 Hz. Atlantic cod have also been shown to localize sounds. However, how their ears perform these functions is not fully understood. Steady streaming, or time-independent, flows near a 350% scale model Atlantic cod otolith immersed in a viscous fluid were studied to determine if these fluid flows contain acoustically relevant information that could be detected by the ear s sensory hair cells. The otolith was oscillated sinusoidally at various orientations at frequencies of 8 24 Hz, corresponding to an actual frequency range of 280 830 Hz. Phaselocked particle pathline visualizations of the resulting flows give velocity, vorticity, and rate of strain fields over a single plane of this mainly two-dimensional flow. Although the streaming flows contain acoustically relevant information, the displacements due to these flows are likely too small to explain Atlantic cod hearing abilities near threshold. The results, however, may suggest a possible mechanism for detection of ultrasound in some fish species.

  11. Influence of acoustic loading on an effective single mass model of the vocal folds.

    PubMed

    Zañartu, Matías; Mongeau, Luc; Wodicka, George R

    2007-02-01

    Three-way interactions between sound waves in the subglottal and supraglottal tracts, the vibrations of the vocal folds, and laryngeal flow were investigated. Sound wave propagation was modeled using a wave reflection analog method. An effective single-degree-of-freedom model was designed to model vocal-fold vibrations. The effects of orifice geometry changes on the flow were considered by enforcing a time-varying discharge coefficient within a Bernoulli flow model. The resulting single-degree-of-freedom model allowed for energy transfer from flow to structural vibrations, an essential feature usually incorporated through the use of higher order models. The relative importance of acoustic loading and the time-varying flow resistance for fluid-structure energy transfer was established for various configurations. The results showed that acoustic loading contributed more significantly to the net energy transfer than the time-varying flow resistance, especially for less inertive supraglottal loads. The contribution of supraglottal loading was found to be more significant than that of subglottal loading. Subglottal loading was found to reduce the net energy transfer to the vocal-fold oscillation during phonation, balancing the effects of the supraglottal load. PMID:17348533

  12. Investigation of acoustically coupled enclosures using a diffusion-equation model.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ning; Jing, Yun; Bockman, Alexander C

    2009-09-01

    Recent application of coupled-room systems in performing arts spaces has prompted active research on sound fields in these complex geometries. This paper applies a diffusion-equation model to the study of acoustics in coupled-rooms. Acoustical measurements are conducted on a scale-model of two coupled-rooms. Using the diffusion model and the experimental results the current work conducts in-depth investigations on sound pressure level distributions, providing further evidence supporting the valid application of the diffusion-equation model. Analysis of the results within the Bayesian framework allows for quantification of the double-slope characteristics of sound-energy decays obtained from the diffusion-equation numerical modeling and the experimental measurements. In particular, Bayesian decay analysis confirms sound-energy flux modeling predictions that time-dependent sound-energy flows in coupled-room systems experience feedback in the form of energy flow-direction change across the aperture connecting the two rooms in cases where the dependent room is more reverberant than the source room. PMID:19739732

  13. A hardware model of the auditory periphery to transduce acoustic signals into neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Tateno, Takashi; Nishikawa, Jun; Tsuchioka, Nobuyoshi; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2013-01-01

    To improve the performance of cochlear implants, we have integrated a microdevice into a model of the auditory periphery with the goal of creating a microprocessor. We constructed an artificial peripheral auditory system using a hybrid model in which polyvinylidene difluoride was used as a piezoelectric sensor to convert mechanical stimuli into electric signals. To produce frequency selectivity, the slit on a stainless steel base plate was designed such that the local resonance frequency of the membrane over the slit reflected the transfer function. In the acoustic sensor, electric signals were generated based on the piezoelectric effect from local stress in the membrane. The electrodes on the resonating plate produced relatively large electric output signals. The signals were fed into a computer model that mimicked some functions of inner hair cells, inner hair cell–auditory nerve synapses, and auditory nerve fibers. In general, the responses of the model to pure-tone burst and complex stimuli accurately represented the discharge rates of high-spontaneous-rate auditory nerve fibers across a range of frequencies greater than 1 kHz and middle to high sound pressure levels. Thus, the model provides a tool to understand information processing in the peripheral auditory system and a basic design for connecting artificial acoustic sensors to the peripheral auditory nervous system. Finally, we discuss the need for stimulus control with an appropriate model of the auditory periphery based on auditory brainstem responses that were electrically evoked by different temporal pulse patterns with the same pulse number. PMID:24324432

  14. The structural impact of DNA mismatches.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Giulia; Dans, Pablo D; Gomez-Pinto, Irene; Ivani, Ivan; Gonzalez, Carlos; Orozco, Modesto

    2015-04-30

    The structure and dynamics of all the transversion and transition mismatches in three different DNA environments have been characterized by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy. We found that the presence of mismatches produced significant local structural alterations, especially in the case of purine transversions. Mismatched pairs often show promiscuous hydrogen bonding patterns, which interchange among each other in the nanosecond time scale. This therefore defines flexible base pairs, where breathing is frequent, and where distortions in helical parameters are strong, resulting in significant alterations in groove dimension. Even if the DNA structure is plastic enough to absorb the structural impact of the mismatch, local structural changes can be propagated far from the mismatch site, following the expected through-backbone and a previously unknown through-space mechanism. The structural changes related to the presence of mismatches help to understand the different susceptibility of mismatches to the action of repairing proteins. PMID:25820425

  15. The structural impact of DNA mismatches

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Giulia; Dans, Pablo D.; Gomez-Pinto, Irene; Ivani, Ivan; Gonzalez, Carlos; Orozco, Modesto

    2015-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of all the transversion and transition mismatches in three different DNA environments have been characterized by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy. We found that the presence of mismatches produced significant local structural alterations, especially in the case of purine transversions. Mismatched pairs often show promiscuous hydrogen bonding patterns, which interchange among each other in the nanosecond time scale. This therefore defines flexible base pairs, where breathing is frequent, and where distortions in helical parameters are strong, resulting in significant alterations in groove dimension. Even if the DNA structure is plastic enough to absorb the structural impact of the mismatch, local structural changes can be propagated far from the mismatch site, following the expected through-backbone and a previously unknown through-space mechanism. The structural changes related to the presence of mismatches help to understand the different susceptibility of mismatches to the action of repairing proteins. PMID:25820425

  16. Acoustic streaming induced elimination of nonspecifically bound proteins from a surface acoustic wave biosensor: Mechanism prediction using fluid-structure interaction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Singh, Reetu; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R.

    2010-11-01

    Biosensors typically operate in liquid media for detection of biomarkers and suffer from fouling resulting from nonspecific binding of protein molecules to the device surface. In the current work, using a coupled field finite element fluid-structure interaction simulation, we have identified that fluid motion induced by high intensity sound waves, such as those propagating in these sensors, can lead to the efficient removal of the nonspecifically bound proteins thereby eliminating sensor fouling. We present a computational analysis of the acoustic-streaming phenomenon induced biofouling elimination by surface acoustic-waves (SAWs) propagating on a lithium niobate piezoelectric crystal. The transient solutions generated from the developed coupled field fluid solid interaction model are utilized to predict trends in acoustic-streaming induced forces for varying design parameters such as voltage intensity, device frequency, fluid viscosity, and density. We utilize these model predictions to compute the various interaction forces involved and thereby identify the possible mechanisms for removal of nonspecifically-bound proteins. For the range of sensor operating conditions simulated, our study indicates that the SAW motion acts as a body force to overcome the adhesive forces of the fouling proteins to the device surface whereas the acoustic-streaming induced hydrodynamic forces prevent their reattachment. The streaming velocity fields computed using the finite element models in conjunction with the proposed particle removal mechanism were used to identify the optimum conditions that lead to improved removal efficiency. We show that it is possible to tune operational parameters such as device frequency and input voltage to achieve effective elimination of biofouling proteins in typical biosensing media. Our simulation results agree well with previously reported experimental observations. The findings of this work have significant implications in designing reusable

  17. HLA-C expression levels define permissible mismatches in hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Petersdorf, Effie W; Gooley, Theodore A; Malkki, Mari; Bacigalupo, Andrea P; Cesbron, Anne; Du Toit, Ernette; Ehninger, Gerhard; Egeland, Torstein; Fischer, Gottfried F; Gervais, Thibaut; Haagenson, Michael D; Horowitz, Mary M; Hsu, Katharine; Jindra, Pavel; Madrigal, Alejandro; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Ringdén, Olle; Schroeder, Marlis L; Spellman, Stephen R; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Velardi, Andrea; Witt, Campbell S; O'Huigin, Colm; Apps, Richard; Carrington, Mary

    2014-12-18

    Life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) limits the use of HLA-C-mismatched unrelated donors in transplantation. Clinicians lack criteria for donor selection when HLA-C-mismatched donors are a patient's only option for cure. We examined the role for HLA-C expression levels to identify permissible HLA-C mismatches. The median fluorescence intensity, a proxy of HLA-C expression, was assigned to each HLA-C allotype in 1975 patients and their HLA-C-mismatched unrelated transplant donors. The association of outcome with the level of expression of patients' and donors' HLA-C allotypes was evaluated in multivariable models. Increasing expression level of the patient's mismatched HLA-C allotype was associated with increased risks of grades III to IV acute GVHD, nonrelapse mortality, and mortality. Increasing expression level among HLA-C mismatches with residue 116 or residue 77/80 mismatching was associated with increased nonrelapse mortality. The immunogenicity of HLA-C mismatches in unrelated donor transplantation is influenced by the expression level of the patient's mismatched HLA-C allotype. HLA-C expression levels provide new information on mismatches that should be avoided and extend understanding of HLA-C-mediated immune responses in human disease. PMID:25323824

  18. HLA-C expression levels define permissible mismatches in hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gooley, Theodore A.; Malkki, Mari; Bacigalupo, Andrea P.; Cesbron, Anne; Du Toit, Ernette; Ehninger, Gerhard; Egeland, Torstein; Fischer, Gottfried F.; Gervais, Thibaut; Haagenson, Michael D.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Hsu, Katharine; Jindra, Pavel; Madrigal, Alejandro; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Ringdén, Olle; Schroeder, Marlis L.; Spellman, Stephen R.; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Velardi, Andrea; Witt, Campbell S.; O’Huigin, Colm; Apps, Richard; Carrington, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) limits the use of HLA-C-mismatched unrelated donors in transplantation. Clinicians lack criteria for donor selection when HLA-C-mismatched donors are a patient’s only option for cure. We examined the role for HLA-C expression levels to identify permissible HLA-C mismatches. The median fluorescence intensity, a proxy of HLA-C expression, was assigned to each HLA-C allotype in 1975 patients and their HLA-C-mismatched unrelated transplant donors. The association of outcome with the level of expression of patients’ and donors’ HLA-C allotypes was evaluated in multivariable models. Increasing expression level of the patient’s mismatched HLA-C allotype was associated with increased risks of grades III to IV acute GVHD, nonrelapse mortality, and mortality. Increasing expression level among HLA-C mismatches with residue 116 or residue 77/80 mismatching was associated with increased nonrelapse mortality. The immunogenicity of HLA-C mismatches in unrelated donor transplantation is influenced by the expression level of the patient’s mismatched HLA-C allotype. HLA-C expression levels provide new information on mismatches that should be avoided and extend understanding of HLA-C-mediated immune responses in human disease. PMID:25323824

  19. Estimates of the prevalence of anomalous signal losses in the Yellow Sea derived from acoustic and oceanographic computer model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin-Bing, Stanley A.; King, David B.; Warn-Varnas, Alex C.; Lamb, Kevin G.; Hawkins, James A.; Teixeira, Marvi

    2002-05-01

    The results from collocated oceanographic and acoustic simulations in a region of the Yellow Sea near the Shandong peninsula have been presented [Chin-Bing et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 2577 (2000)]. In that work, the tidal flow near the peninsula was used to initialize a 2.5-dimensional ocean model [K. G. Lamb, J. Geophys. Res. 99, 843-864 (1994)] that subsequently generated internal solitary waves (solitons). The validity of these soliton simulations was established by matching satellite imagery taken over the region. Acoustic propagation simulations through this soliton field produced results similar to the anomalous signal loss measured by Zhou, Zhang, and Rogers [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 90, 2042-2054 (1991)]. Analysis of the acoustic interactions with the solitons also confirmed the hypothesis that the loss mechanism involved acoustic mode coupling. Recently we have attempted to estimate the prevalence of these anomalous signal losses in this region. These estimates were made from simulating acoustic effects over an 80 hour space-time evolution of soliton packets. Examples will be presented that suggest the conditions necessary for anomalous signal loss may be more prevalent than previously thought. [Work supported by ONR/NRL and by a High Performance Computing DoD grant.

  20. An auditory-periphery model of the effects of acoustic trauma on auditory nerve responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, Ian C.; Sachs, Murray B.; Young, Eric D.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic trauma degrades the auditory nerve's tonotopic representation of acoustic stimuli. Recent physiological studies have quantified the degradation in responses to the vowel eh and have investigated amplification schemes designed to restore a more correct tonotopic representation than is achieved with conventional hearing aids. However, it is difficult from the data to quantify how much different aspects of the cochlear pathology contribute to the impaired responses. Furthermore, extensive experimental testing of potential hearing aids is infeasible. Here, both of these concerns are addressed by developing models of the normal and impaired auditory peripheries that are tested against a wide range of physiological data. The effects of both outer and inner hair cell status on model predictions of the vowel data were investigated. The modeling results indicate that impairment of both outer and inner hair cells contribute to degradation in the tonotopic representation of the formant frequencies in the auditory nerve. Additionally, the model is able to predict the effects of frequency-shaping amplification on auditory nerve responses, indicating the model's potential suitability for more rapid development and testing of hearing aid schemes.

  1. Structural and Acoustic Numerical Modeling of a Curved Composite Honeycomb Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Robinson, Jay H.

    2001-01-01

    The finite and boundary element modeling of the curved section of a composite honeycomb aircraft fuselage sidewall was validated for both structural response and acoustic radiation. The curved panel was modeled in the pre-processor MSC/PATRAN. Geometry models of the curved panel were constructed based on the physical dimensions of the test article. Material properties were obtained from the panel manufacturer. Finite element models were developed to predict the modal parameters for free and supported panel boundary conditions up to a frequency of 600 Hz. Free boundary conditions were simulated by providing soft foam support under the four comers of the panel or by suspending the panel from elastic bands. Supported boundary conditions were obtained by clamping the panel between plastic tubing seated in grooves along the perimeter of a stiff and heavy frame. The frame was installed in the transmission loss window of the Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The structural response of the curved panel due to point force excitation was predicted using MSC/NASTRAN and the radiated sound was computed with COMET/Acoustics. The predictions were compared with the results from experimental modal surveys and forced response tests on the fuselage panel. The finite element models were refined and updated to provide optimum comparison with the measured modal data. Excellent agreement was obtained between the numerical and experimental modal data for the free as well as for the supported boundary conditions. Frequency response functions (FRF) were computed relating the input force excitation at one panel location to the surface acceleration response at five panel locations. Frequency response functions were measured at the same locations on the test specimen and were compared with the calculated FRF values. Good agreement was obtained for the real and imaginary parts of the transfer functions when modal participation was

  2. Model of propagation of acoustic pulses caused by underground nuclear explosion and theirs influence on the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, V.; Drobzheva, Y.

    2003-04-01

    To describe the propagation of an acoustic pulse through the inhomogeneity atmosphere we developed new equation and correspondent computer simulation code. The equation takes into account nonlinear effects, inhomogeneities of the atmosphere, absorption, expansion of a wave acoustic front, etc. The model includes subroutine of vertical movement of earth surface during an underground nuclear explosion (we use an empirical model), subroutine of acoustic pulse generation by a spall zone, subroutine of propagation of acoustic pulse up to the ionospheric height, subroutine of acoustic wave influence on the ionospheric plasma, subroutine of ionospheric perturbation influence on Doppler frequency of a radio wave. All calculations take into account geomagnetic field and neutral wind. The data measurement of acoustic pulses at heights of the ionosphere with helping Doppler radio sounding were used to test the model. We used data of Doppler shift records which were obtained during 9 underground nuclear explosion for 16 traces of radio sounding of the ionoshphere. Coefficients correlation between calculated and experimental forms is 0.7-0.94.

  3. The Effect of Codon Mismatch on the Protein Translation System

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Liaoran; Li, Guohui; Cheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Incorrect protein translation, caused by codon mismatch, is an important problem of living cells. In this work, a computational model was introduced to quantify the effects of codon mismatch and the model was used to study the protein translation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. According to simulation results, the probability of codon mismatch will increase when the supply of amino acids is unbalanced, and the longer is the codon sequence, the larger is the probability for incorrect translation to occur, making the synthesis of long peptide chain difficult. By comparing to simulation results without codon mismatch effects taken into account, the fraction of mRNAs with bound ribosome decrease faster along the mRNAs, making the 5’ ramp phenomenon more obvious. It was also found in our work that the premature mechanism resulted from codon mismatch can reduce the proportion of incorrect translation when the amino acid supply is extremely unbalanced, which is one possible source of high fidelity protein synthesis after peptidyl transfer. PMID:26840415

  4. Mismatch-mediated error prone repair at the Immunoglobulin genes

    PubMed Central

    Chahwan, Richard; Edelmann, Winfried; Scharff, Matthew D; Roa, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    The generation of effective antibodies depends upon somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of antibody genes by activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and the subsequent recruitment of error prone base excision and mismatch repair. While AID initiates and is required for SHM, more than half of the base changes that accumulate in V regions are not due to the direct deamination of dC to dU by AID, but rather arise through the recruitment of the mismatch repair complex (MMR) to the U:G mismatch created by AID and the subsequent perversion of mismatch repair from a high fidelity process to one that is very error prone. In addition, the generation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) is essential during CSR, and the resolution of AID-generated mismatches by MMR to promote such DSBs is critical for the efficiency of the process. While a great deal has been learned about how AID and MMR cause hypermutations and DSBs, it is still unclear how the error prone aspect of these processes is largely restricted to antibody genes. The use of knockout models and mice expressing mismatch repair proteins with separation-of-function point mutations have been decisive in gaining a better understanding of the roles of each of the major MMR proteins and providing further insight into how mutation and repair are coordinated. Here, we review the cascade of MMR factors and repair signals that are diverted from their canonical error free role and hijacked by B cells to promote genetic diversification of the Ig locus. This error prone process involves AID as the inducer of enzymatically-mediated DNA mismatches, and a plethora of downstream MMR factors acting as sensors, adaptors and effectors of a complex and tightly regulated process from much of which is not yet well understood. PMID:22100214

  5. Information-theoretic analysis of iterated Bayesian acoustic source localization in a static ocean waveguide.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Thomas J

    2015-05-01

    Fundamental constructs of information theory are applied to quantify the performance of iterated (sequential) Bayesian localization of a time-harmonic source in a range- and time-invariant acoustic waveguide using the segmented Fourier transforms of the received pressure time series. The nonlinear relation, defined by acoustic propagation, between the source location and the received narrowband spectral components is treated as a nonlinear communication channel. The performance analysis includes mismatch between the acoustic channel and the model channel on which the Bayesian inference is based. Source location uncertainty is quantified by the posterior probability density of source location, by the posterior entropy and associated uncertainty area, by the information gain (relative entropy) at each iteration, and by large-ensemble limits of these quantities. A computational example for a vertical receiver array in a shallow-water waveguide is presented with acoustic propagation represented by normal modes and ambient noise represented by a Kuperman-Ingenito model. Performance degradation due to noise-model mismatch is quantified in an example. Potential extensions to uncertain and stochastic environments are discussed. PMID:25994704

  6. Ocean seismo-acoustics. Low-frequency underwater acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Akal, T.; berkson, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on seismo-acoustic propagation in seawater and sea beds that includes theoretical developments, modelling and experiments, and fluctuations. Boundary scatteiring, seismo-acoustic waves and seismo-acoustic noise are discussed. Technology and new approaches in seismo-acoustic measurements are presented.

  7. C, N and P stoichiometric mismatch between resources and consumers influence the dynamics of a marine microbial food web model and its response to atmospheric N and P inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pondaven, P.; Pivière, P.; Ridame, C.; Guien, C.

    2014-02-01

    Results from the DUNE experiments reported in this issue have shown that nutrient input from dust deposition in large mesocosms deployed in the western Mediterranean induced a response of the microbial food web, with an increase of primary production rates (PP), bacterial respiration rates (BR), as well as autotrophic and heterotrophic biomasses. Additionally, it was found that nutrient inputs strengthened the net heterotrophy of the system, with NPP : BR ratios < 1. In this study we used a simple microbial food web model, inspired from previous modelling studies, to explore how C, N and P stoichiometric mismatch between producers and consumers along the food chain can influence the dynamics and the trophic status of the ecosystem. Attention was paid to the mechanisms involved in the balance between net autotrophy vs. net heterotrophy. Although the model was kept simple, predicted changes in biomass and PP were qualitatively consistent with observations from DUNE experiments. Additionally, the model shed light on how ecological stoichiometric mismatch between producers and consumers can control food web dynamics and drive the system toward net heterotrophy. In the model, net heterotrophy was notably driven by the parameterisation of the production and excretion of extra DOC from phytoplankton under nutrient-limited conditions. This mechanism yielded to high C : P and C : N ratios of the DOM pool, and subsequent postabsorptive respiration of C by bacteria. The model also predicted that nutrient inputs from dust strengthened the net heterotrophy of the system; a pattern also observed during two of the three DUNE experiments (P and Q). However, the model was not able to account for the low NPP : BR ratios (down to 0.1) recorded during the DUNE experiments. Possible mechanisms involved in this discrepancy were discussed.

  8. Electromagnetic Launch Vehicle Fairing and Acoustic Blanket Model of Received Power Using FEKO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trout, Dawn H.; Stanley, James E.; Wahid, Parveen F.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the impact of radio frequency transmission in vehicle fairings is important to electromagnetically sensitive spacecraft. This study employs the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM) from a commercial electromagnetic tool, FEKO, to model the fairing electromagnetic environment in the presence of an internal transmitter with improved accuracy over industry applied techniques. This fairing model includes material properties representative of acoustic blanketing commonly used in vehicles. Equivalent surface material models within FEKO were successfully applied to simulate the test case. Finally, a simplified model is presented using Nicholson Ross Weir derived blanket material properties. These properties are implemented with the coated metal option to reduce the model to one layer within the accuracy of the original three layer simulation.

  9. Validation of an approximate model for the thermal behavior in acoustically driven bubbles.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Laura; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-11-01

    The chemical production of radicals inside acoustically driven bubbles is determined by the local temperature inside the bubbles. Therefore, modeling of chemical reaction rates in bubbles requires an accurate evaluation of the temperature field and the heat exchange with the liquid. The aim of the present work is to compare a detailed partial differential equation model in which the temperature field is spatially resolved with an ordinary differential equation model in which the bubble contents are assumed to have a uniform average temperature and the heat exchanges are modeled by means of a boundary layer approximation. The two models show good agreement in the range of pressure amplitudes in which the bubble is spherically stable. PMID:22087996

  10. Measurement and modelling of the reflection coefficient of an Acoustic Black Hole termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, V.; Gautier, F.; Pelat, A.; Poittevin, J.

    2015-08-01

    The flexural waves propagating in a beam can be efficiently absorbed if one extremity is tapered with a power law profile and covered by a thin layer of additional damping material. Such a termination induces the so-called "Acoustic Black Hole effect" (ABH): if the thickness decreases locally, flexural waves slow down and the amplitude of the displacement field increases, leading to efficient energy dissipation if an absorbing layer is placed where the thickness is minimum. This paper presents a specific study of the reflection coefficient of ABH beam terminations. A Kundt-like measurement method of the reflection coefficient of a beam termination is proposed. The method is validated using theoretical results in the case of a beam free end. Results for several ABH extremities show a clear decrease of the modulus of the reflection coefficient R. The phase of R due to the decreasing thickness profile is also investigated and is interpreted by defining a correction length for the tapered termination. These experimental results are compared with several models: geometrical acoustics based model, beam waveguide model and plate model.

  11. Modeling the Behavior of an Underwater Acoustic Relative Positioning System Based on Complementary Set of Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Joaquín; Jiménez, Ana; Álvarez, Fernando J.; Ureña, Jesús; De Marziani, Carlos; Diego, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The great variability usually found in underwater media makes modeling a challenging task, but helpful for better understanding or predicting the performance of future deployed systems. In this work, an underwater acoustic propagation model is presented. This model obtains the multipath structure by means of the ray tracing technique. Using this model, the behavior of a relative positioning system is presented. One of the main advantages of relative positioning systems is that only the distances between all the buoys are needed to obtain their positions. In order to obtain the distances, the propagation times of acoustic signals coded by Complementary Set of Sequences (CSS) are used. In this case, the arrival instants are obtained by means of correlation processes. The distances are then used to obtain the position of the buoys by means of the Multidimensional Scaling Technique (MDS). As an early example of an application using this relative positioning system, a tracking of the position of the buoys at different times is performed. With this tracking, the surface current of a particular region could be studied. The performance of the system is evaluated in terms of the distance from the real position to the estimated one. PMID:22247661

  12. Statistical Modeling of Large-Scale Signal Path Loss in Underwater Acoustic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Llor, Jesús; Malumbres, Manuel Perez

    2013-01-01

    In an underwater acoustic channel, the propagation conditions are known to vary in time, causing the deviation of the received signal strength from the nominal value predicted by a deterministic propagation model. To facilitate a large-scale system design in such conditions (e.g., power allocation), we have developed a statistical propagation model in which the transmission loss is treated as a random variable. By applying repetitive computation to the acoustic field, using ray tracing for a set of varying environmental conditions (surface height, wave activity, small node displacements around nominal locations, etc.), an ensemble of transmission losses is compiled and later used to infer the statistical model parameters. A reasonable agreement is found with log-normal distribution, whose mean obeys a log-distance increases, and whose variance appears to be constant for a certain range of inter-node distances in a given deployment location. The statistical model is deemed useful for higher-level system planning, where simulation is needed to assess the performance of candidate network protocols under various resource allocation policies, i.e., to determine the transmit power and bandwidth allocation necessary to achieve a desired level of performance (connectivity, throughput, reliability, etc.). PMID:23396190

  13. Modeling the behavior of an underwater acoustic relative positioning system based on complementary set of sequences.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Joaquín; Jiménez, Ana; Alvarez, Fernando J; Ureña, Jesús; De Marziani, Carlos; Diego, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The great variability usually found in underwater media makes modeling a challenging task, but helpful for better understanding or predicting the performance of future deployed systems. In this work, an underwater acoustic propagation model is presented. This model obtains the multipath structure by means of the ray tracing technique. Using this model, the behavior of a relative positioning system is presented. One of the main advantages of relative positioning systems is that only the distances between all the buoys are needed to obtain their positions. In order to obtain the distances, the propagation times of acoustic signals coded by Complementary Set of Sequences (CSS) are used. In this case, the arrival instants are obtained by means of correlation processes. The distances are then used to obtain the position of the buoys by means of the Multidimensional Scaling Technique (MDS). As an early example of an application using this relative positioning system, a tracking of the position of the buoys at different times is performed. With this tracking, the surface current of a particular region could be studied. The performance of the system is evaluated in terms of the distance from the real position to the estimated one. PMID:22247661

  14. Statistical modeling of large-scale signal path loss in underwater acoustic networks.

    PubMed

    Llor, Jesús; Malumbres, Manuel Perez

    2013-01-01

    In an underwater acoustic channel, the propagation conditions are known to vary in time, causing the deviation of the received signal strength from the nominal value predicted by a deterministic propagation model. To facilitate a large-scale system design in such conditions (e.g., power allocation), we have developed a statistical propagation model in which the transmission loss is treated as a random variable. By applying repetitive computation to the acoustic field, using ray tracing for a set of varying environmental conditions (surface height, wave activity, small node displacements around nominal locations, etc.), an ensemble of transmission losses is compiled and later used to infer the statistical model parameters. A reasonable agreement is found with log-normal distribution, whose mean obeys a log-distance increases, and whose variance appears to be constant for a certain range of inter-node distances in a given deployment location. The statistical model is deemed useful for higher-level system planning, where simulation is needed to assess the performance of candidate network protocols under various resource allocation policies, i.e., to determine the transmit power and bandwidth allocation necessary to achieve a desired level of performance (connectivity, throughput, reliability, etc.). PMID:23396190

  15. Analysis of acoustic damping in duct terminated by porous absorption materials based on analytical models and finite element simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan Qiming

    Acoustic absorption materials are widely used today to dampen and attenuate the noises which exist almost everywhere and have adverse impact upon daily life of human beings. In order to evaluate the absorption performance of such materials, it is necessary to experimentally determine acoustic properties of absorption materials. Two experimental methods, one is Standing Wave Ratio Method and the other is Transfer-Function Method, which also totally called as Impedance Tube Method, are based on two analytical models people have used to evaluate and validate the data obtained from acoustic impedance analyzers. This thesis first reviews the existing analytical models of previous two experimental methods in the literature by looking at their analytical models, respectively. Then a new analytical model is developed is developed based on One-Microphone Method and Three-Microphone Method, which are two novel experimental approaches. Comparisons are made among these analytical models, and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  16. Imagery mismatch negativity in musicians.

    PubMed

    Herholz, Sibylle C; Lappe, Claudia; Knief, Arne; Pantev, Christo

    2009-07-01

    The present study investigated musical imagery in musicians and nonmusicians by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG). We used a new paradigm in which subjects had to continue familiar melodies in their mind and then judged if a further presented tone was a correct continuation of the melody. Incorrect tones elicited an imagery mismatch negativity (iMMN) in musicians but not in nonmusicians. This finding suggests that the MMN component can be based on an imagined instead of a sensory memory trace and that imagery of music is modulated by musical expertise. PMID:19673775

  17. Ultrasonic power transfer from a spherical acoustic wave source to a free-free piezoelectric receiver: Modeling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-03-01

    Contactless powering of small electronic components has lately received growing attention for wireless applications in which battery replacement or tethered charging is undesired or simply impossible, and ambient energy harvesting is not a viable solution. As an alternative to well-studied methods of contactless energy transfer, such as the inductive coupling method, the use of ultrasonic waves transmitted and received by piezoelectric devices enables larger power transmission distances, which is critical especially for deep-implanted electronic devices. Moreover, energy transfer by means of acoustic waves is well suited in situations where no electromagnetic fields are allowed. The limited literature of ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer is mainly centered on proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this method, lacking experimentally validated modeling efforts for the resulting multiphysics problem that couples the source and receiver dynamics with domain acoustics. In this work, we present fully coupled analytical, numerical, and experimental multiphysics investigations for ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer from a spherical wave source to a piezoelectric receiver bar that operates in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity. The fluid-loaded piezoelectric receiver under free-free mechanical boundary conditions is shunted to an electrical load for quantifying the electrical power output for a given acoustic source strength of the transmitter. The analytical acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling framework is validated experimentally, and the effects of system parameters are reported along with optimal electrical loading and frequency conditions of the receiver.

  18. Ultrasonic power transfer from a spherical acoustic wave source to a free-free piezoelectric receiver: Modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-03-14

    Contactless powering of small electronic components has lately received growing attention for wireless applications in which battery replacement or tethered charging is undesired or simply impossible, and ambient energy harvesting is not a viable solution. As an alternative to well-studied methods of contactless energy transfer, such as the inductive coupling method, the use of ultrasonic waves transmitted and received by piezoelectric devices enables larger power transmission distances, which is critical especially for deep-implanted electronic devices. Moreover, energy transfer by means of acoustic waves is well suited in situations where no electromagnetic fields are allowed. The limited literature of ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer is mainly centered on proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this method, lacking experimentally validated modeling efforts for the resulting multiphysics problem that couples the source and receiver dynamics with domain acoustics. In this work, we present fully coupled analytical, numerical, and experimental multiphysics investigations for ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer from a spherical wave source to a piezoelectric receiver bar that operates in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity. The fluid-loaded piezoelectric receiver under free-free mechanical boundary conditions is shunted to an electrical load for quantifying the electrical power output for a given acoustic source strength of the transmitter. The analytical acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling framework is validated experimentally, and the effects of system parameters are reported along with optimal electrical loading and frequency conditions of the receiver.

  19. Advances in edge-diffraction modeling for virtual-acoustic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamia, Paul Thomas

    In recent years there has been growing interest in modeling sound propagation in complex, three-dimensional (3D) virtual environments. With diverse applications for the military, the gaming industry, psychoacoustics researchers, architectural acousticians, and others, advances in computing power and 3D audio-rendering techniques have driven research and development aimed at closing the gap between the auralization and visualization of virtual spaces. To this end, this thesis focuses on improving the physical and perceptual realism of sound-field simulations in virtual environments through advances in edge-diffraction modeling. To model sound propagation in virtual environments, acoustical simulation tools commonly rely on geometrical-acoustics (GA) techniques that assume asymptotically high frequencies, large flat surfaces, and infinitely thin ray-like propagation paths. Such techniques can be augmented with diffraction modeling to compensate for the effect of surface size on the strength and directivity of a reflection, to allow for propagation around obstacles and into shadow zones, and to maintain soundfield continuity across reflection and shadow boundaries. Using a time-domain, line-integral formulation of the Biot-Tolstoy-Medwin (BTM) diffraction expression, this thesis explores various aspects of diffraction calculations for virtual-acoustic simulations. Specifically, we first analyze the periodic singularity of the BTM integrand and describe the relationship between the singularities and higher-order reflections within wedges with open angle less than 180°. Coupled with analytical approximations for the BTM expression, this analysis allows for accurate numerical computations and a continuous sound field in the vicinity of an arbitrary wedge geometry insonified by a point source. Second, we describe an edge-subdivision strategy that allows for fast diffraction calculations with low error relative to a numerically more accurate solution. Third, to address

  20. Time reverse modeling of acoustic emissions in a reinforced concrete beam.

    PubMed

    Kocur, Georg Karl; Saenger, Erik H; Grosse, Christian U; Vogel, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The time reverse modeling (TRM) is applied for signal-based acoustic emission (AE) analysis of reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. TRM uses signals obtained from physical experiments as input. The signals are re-emitted numerically into a structure in a time-reversed manner, where the wavefronts interfere and appear as dominant concentrations of energy at the origin of the AE. The experimental and numerical results presented for selected AE signals confirm that TRM is capable of localizing AE activity in RC caused by concrete cracking. The accuracy of the TRM results is corroborated by three-dimensional crack distributions obtained from X-ray computed tomography images. PMID:26518525

  1. Flute-model acoustic metamaterials with simultaneously negative bulk modulus and mass density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hong-Cheng; Luo, Chun-Rong; Chen, Huai-Jun; Zhai, Shi-Long; Ding, Chang-Lin; Zhao, Xiao-Peng

    2013-11-01

    We experimentally constructed a three-dimensional flute-model meta-molecule structure acoustic metamaterial (AM) from a periodic array of perforated hollow steel tubes (PHSTs) and investigated its transmission and reflection behaviors in an impedance tube system. The AM exhibited a peak and dip, and an inverse phase, thus exhibiting the local resonance of the PHSTs. Based on the homogeneous media theory, the effective bulk modulus and mass density of the AM were calculated to be simultaneously negative; the refractive index was also negative. PHST AM slab focusing experiments showed that the medium with a resonant structure exhibited a distinct metamaterial property.

  2. Mismatch removal via coherent spatial relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Ma, Jiayi; Yang, Changcai; Tian, Jinwen

    2014-07-01

    We propose a method for removing mismatches from the given putative point correspondences in image pairs based on "coherent spatial relations." Under the Bayesian framework, we formulate our approach as a maximum likelihood problem and solve a coherent spatial relation between the putative point correspondences using an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. Our approach associates each point correspondence with a latent variable indicating it as being either an inlier or an outlier, and alternatively estimates the inlier set and recovers the coherent spatial relation. It can handle not only the case of image pairs with rigid motions but also the case of image pairs with nonrigid motions. To parameterize the coherent spatial relation, we choose two-view geometry and thin-plate spline as models for rigid and nonrigid cases, respectively. The mismatches could be successfully removed via the coherent spatial relations after the EM algorithm converges. The quantitative results on various experimental data demonstrate that our method outperforms many state-of-the-art methods, it is not affected by low initial correct match percentages, and is robust to most geometric transformations including a large viewing angle, image rotation, and affine transformation.

  3. Enhanced entrainability of genetic oscillators by period mismatch

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko; Arita, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    Biological oscillators coordinate individual cellular components so that they function coherently and collectively. They are typically composed of multiple feedback loops, and period mismatch is unavoidable in biological implementations. We investigated the advantageous effect of this period mismatch in terms of a synchronization response to external stimuli. Specifically, we considered two fundamental models of genetic circuits: smooth and relaxation oscillators. Using phase reduction and Floquet multipliers, we numerically analysed their entrainability under different coupling strengths and period ratios. We found that a period mismatch induces better entrainment in both types of oscillator; the enhancement occurs in the vicinity of the bifurcation on their limit cycles. In the smooth oscillator, the optimal period ratio for the enhancement coincides with the experimentally observed ratio, which suggests biological exploitation of the period mismatch. Although the origin of multiple feedback loops is often explained as a passive mechanism to ensure robustness against perturbation, we study the active benefits of the period mismatch, which include increasing the efficiency of the genetic oscillators. Our findings show a qualitatively different perspective for both the inherent advantages of multiple loops and their essentiality. PMID:23389900

  4. Modeling the receptivity of an air jet to transverse acoustic disturbance with application to musical instruments.

    PubMed

    Blanc, F; François, V; Fabre, B; de la Cuadra, P; Lagrée, P-Y

    2014-06-01

    A simple analytical model for the interaction between a plane jet issued from a flue and a transverse acoustic disturbance is developed in this paper. The model is inspired by direct flow simulation results confronted to experimental data. The interaction is expected to take place in the vicinity of the separation points of the jet. The influence of the detailed geometry of the channel end on the jet receptivity is discussed, and more specifically the chamfer geometries found in flute-like musical instruments. The simplified model explains quite well the difference between the jet response of a flue with square edges compared to a chamfered flue exit. The effect of rounded, lip-like flue exit is not well captured by the model. PMID:24907787

  5. Thin plate model for transverse mode analysis of surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gongbin; Han, Tao; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Benfeng; Omori, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a physical model for the analysis of transverse modes in surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. It is mostly equivalent to the scalar potential (SP) theory, but sufficiently flexible to include various effects such as anisotropy, coupling between multiple modes, etc. First, fundamentals of the proposed model are established and procedures for determining the model parameters are given in detailed. Then the model is implemented in the partial differential equation mode of the commercial finite element analysis software COMSOL. The analysis is carried out for an infinitely long interdigital transducer on the 128°YX-LiNbO3 substrate. As a demonstration, it is shown how the energy leakage changes with the frequency and the device design.

  6. A 3-D elasticity theory based model for acoustic radiation from multilayered anisotropic plates.

    PubMed

    Shen, C; Xin, F X; Lu, T J

    2014-05-01

    A theoretical model built upon three-dimensional elasticity theory is developed to investigate the acoustic radiation from multilayered anisotropic plates subjected to a harmonic point force excitation. Fourier transform technique and stationary phase method are combined to predict the far-field radiated sound pressure of one-side water immersed plate. Compared to equivalent single-layer plate models, the present model based on elasticity theory can differentiate radiated sound pressure between dry-side and wet-side excited cases, as well as discrepancies induced by different layer sequences for multilayered anisotropic plates. These results highlight the superiority of the present theoretical model especially for handling multilayered anisotropic structures. PMID:24815294

  7. A Bayesian view on acoustic model-based techniques for robust speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Roland; Huemmer, Christian; Sehr, Armin; Kellermann, Walter

    2015-12-01

    This article provides a unifying Bayesian view on various approaches for acoustic model adaptation, missing feature, and uncertainty decoding that are well-known in the literature of robust automatic speech recognition. The representatives of these classes can often be deduced from a Bayesian network that extends the conventional hidden Markov models used in speech recognition. These extensions, in turn, can in many cases be motivated from an underlying observation model that relates clean and distorted feature vectors. By identifying and converting the observation models into a Bayesian network representation, we formulate the corresponding compensation rules. We thus summarize the various approaches as approximations or modifications of the same Bayesian decoding rule leading to a unified view on known derivations as well as to new formulations for certain approaches.

  8. Semi-analytical modeling of acoustic beam divergence in homogeneous anisotropic half-spaces.

    PubMed

    Kono, Naoyuki; Hirose, Sohichi

    2016-02-01

    Beam divergences of acoustical fields in semi-infinite homogeneous anisotropic media are calculated based on a semi-analytical model. The model for a plane source in a semi-infinite homogeneous anisotropic medium is proposed as an extended model for a point source in an infinite medium. Beam divergences propagating along crystallographic axes 〈100〉, 〈110〉, and 〈111〉 in a cubic crystal, a single crystalline Ni-based alloy, are measured and compared to calculation results for verifying the model. The contribution of beam divergence attenuation to the total attenuation for propagating in anisotropic polycrystalline materials is quantitatively evaluated in isolation from scattering attenuation effects. PMID:26508085

  9. Acoustic field characterization of the Duolith: measurements and modeling of a clinical shock wave therapy device.

    PubMed

    Perez, Camilo; Chen, Hong; Matula, Thomas J; Karzova, Maria; Khokhlova, Vera A

    2013-08-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) uses acoustic pulses to treat certain musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper the acoustic field of a clinical portable ESWT device (Duolith SD1) was characterized. Field mapping was performed in water for two different standoffs of the electromagnetic head (15 or 30 mm) using a fiber optic probe hydrophone. Peak positive pressures at the focus ranged from 2 to 45 MPa, while peak negative pressures ranged from -2 to -11 MPa. Pulse rise times ranged from 8 to 500 ns; shock formation did not occur for any machine settings. The maximum standard deviation in peak pressure at the focus was 1.2%, indicating that the Duolith SD1 generates stable pulses. The results compare qualitatively, but not quantitatively with manufacturer specifications. Simulations were carried out for the short standoff by matching a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetzov equation to the measured field at a plane near the source, and then propagating the wave outward. The results of modeling agree well with experimental data. The model was used to analyze the spatial structure of the peak pressures. Predictions from the model suggest that a true shock wave could be obtained in water if the initial pressure output of the device were doubled. PMID:23927207

  10. Acoustic field characterization of the Duolith: Measurements and modeling of a clinical shock wave therapy device

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Camilo; Chen, Hong; Matula, Thomas J.; Karzova, Maria; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) uses acoustic pulses to treat certain musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper the acoustic field of a clinical portable ESWT device (Duolith SD1) was characterized. Field mapping was performed in water for two different standoffs of the electromagnetic head (15 or 30 mm) using a fiber optic probe hydrophone. Peak positive pressures at the focus ranged from 2 to 45 MPa, while peak negative pressures ranged from −2 to −11 MPa. Pulse rise times ranged from 8 to 500 ns; shock formation did not occur for any machine settings. The maximum standard deviation in peak pressure at the focus was 1.2%, indicating that the Duolith SD1 generates stable pulses. The results compare qualitatively, but not quantitatively with manufacturer specifications. Simulations were carried out for the short standoff by matching a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetzov equation to the measured field at a plane near the source, and then propagating the wave outward. The results of modeling agree well with experimental data. The model was used to analyze the spatial structure of the peak pressures. Predictions from the model suggest that a true shock wave could be obtained in water if the initial pressure output of the device were doubled. PMID:23927207

  11. Analytic band Monte Carlo model for electron transport in Si including acoustic and optical phonon dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Eric; Dutton, Robert W.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2004-11-01

    We describe the implementation of a Monte Carlo model for electron transport in silicon. The model uses analytic, nonparabolic electron energy bands, which are computationally efficient and sufficiently accurate for future low-voltage (<1V) nanoscale device applications. The electron-lattice scattering is incorporated using an isotropic, analytic phonon-dispersion model, which distinguishes between the optical/acoustic and the longitudinal/transverse phonon branches. We show that this approach avoids introducing unphysical thresholds in the electron distribution function, and that it has further applications in computing detailed phonon generation spectra from Joule heating. A set of deformation potentials for electron-phonon scattering is introduced and shown to yield accurate transport simulations in bulk silicon across a wide range of electric fields and temperatures. The shear deformation potential is empirically determined at Ξu=6.8eV, and consequently, the isotropically averaged scattering potentials with longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons are DLA=6.39eV and DTA=3.01eV, respectively, in reasonable agreement with previous studies. The room-temperature electron mobility in strained silicon is also computed and shown to be in better agreement with the most recent phonon-limited data available. As a result, we find that electron coupling with g-type phonons is about 40% lower, and the coupling with f-type phonons is almost twice as strong as previously reported.

  12. Change of Acoustic Properties of Soils During Physical Modeling of Unstable Slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Yury; Emanov, Aleksandr

    2010-05-01

    Investigations of the acoustic properties of moist soils during its shear deformation were carried out. Experiments were performed on the samples of sand, clay and loamy soil. The experimental technique has allowed to model a slope processes with continuous acoustic measurements in the investigated soils. For slope process simulation the shear box with the soil was placed slantwise on the fixed base and its top part was influenced by the vertical load. As a result the shear stress appeared in the median part of the sample, whereas the normal component of the load didn't impress directly to sample, but it blocked possible dilatant expansion of soil owing to shear deformation. Ultrasonic source was located on the box bottom and ultrasonic receiver was placed on its cover. Such design allowed to measure soil acoustic properties along the perpendicular to shear plane direction. For all the samples we observed accelerating displacement of the top part of shear box relative to its bottom part during quasi-linear increasing of load with time up to shear failure of the soil. At the same time acoustic properties of clay and loamy soil on the one hand and sand on the other hand have changed with the growth of shear stresses in different ways. In plastic clay and loamy soil P-wave amplitude and velocity decreased with shear stresses increasing. In contrast to more plastic materials velocity and amplitude of P-waves in the sand increased with the growth of shear stresses. In all cases, the most dramatic changes took place directly before failure. Anomalous changes of sand acoustic properties can be associated with its dilatant hardening during shear deformation - in cramped shear deforming conditions the sand tends to increase its volume, but the normal component of the load blocks this process. In addition, thin water films are squeezed from sand particles surfaces making its contacts harder. An argument in support of such mechanism is that when the sand is deforming in not

  13. Forecasting photovoltaic array power production subject to mismatch losses

    SciTech Connect

    Picault, D.; Raison, B.; Bacha, S.; de la Casa, J.; Aguilera, J.

    2010-07-15

    The development of photovoltaic (PV) energy throughout the world this last decade has brought to light the presence of module mismatch losses in most PV applications. Such power losses, mainly occasioned by partial shading of arrays and differences in PV modules, can be reduced by changing module interconnections of a solar array. This paper presents a novel method to forecast existing PV array production in diverse environmental conditions. In this approach, field measurement data is used to identify module parameters once and for all. The proposed method simulates PV arrays with adaptable module interconnection schemes in order to reduce mismatch losses. The model has been validated by experimental results taken on a 2.2 kW{sub p} plant, with three different interconnection schemes, which show reliable power production forecast precision in both partially shaded and normal operating conditions. Field measurements show interest in using alternative plant configurations in PV systems for decreasing module mismatch losses. (author)

  14. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein–protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes. PMID:25635869

  15. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  16. Thermal expansion mismatch and oxidation in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, G. C.; Phucharoen, W.; Miller, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) for advanced gas turbine blades have been under intensive development during the last several years. This investigation is intended to achieve a clearer understanding of the mechanical behavior of plasma sprayed zirconia-yttria TBCs, involving a nickle-chromium-aluminum bond coat. The near term objectives are to study the stress states in a relatively simple model TBC subjected to steady state thermal loading. The resulting thermal expansion mismatch and oxidation have been primary targets for the study. The finite element approach and the effects of thermal mismatch and oxidation are described. A proposed mechanism for oxidation induced coating failure is also presented.

  17. Results From a Parametric Acoustic Liner Experiment Using P and W GEN1 HSR Mixer/Ejector Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Kathleen C.; Wolter, John D.

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results of an acoustic liner test performed using a Gen 1 HSR mixer/ejector model installed on the Jet Exit Rig in the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig in the Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory or NASA Glenn Research Center. Acoustic liner effectiveness and single-component thrust performance results are discussed. Results from 26 different types of single-degree-of-freedom and bulk material liners are compared with each other and against a hardwall baseline. Design parameters involving all aspects of the facesheet, the backing cavity, and the type of bulk material were varied in order to study the effects of these design features on the acoustic impedance, acoustic effectiveness and on nozzle thrust performance. Overall, the bulk absorber liners are more effective at reducing the jet noise than the single-degree-of-freedom liners. Many of the design parameters had little effect on acoustic effectiveness, such as facesheeet hole diameter and honeycomb cell size. A relatively large variation in the impedance of the bulk absorber in a bulk liner is required to have a significant impact on the noise reduction. The thrust results exhibit a number of consistent trends, supporting the validity of this new addition to the facility. In general, the thrust results indicate that thrust performance benefits from increased facesheet thickness and decreased facesheet porosity.

  18. a Psycholinguistic Model for Simultaneous Translation, and Proficiency Assessment by Automated Acoustic Analysis of Discourse.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghi, Hussein M.

    Two separate but related issues are addressed: how simultaneous translation (ST) works on a cognitive level and how such translation can be objectively assessed. Both of these issues are discussed in the light of qualitative and quantitative analyses of a large corpus of recordings of ST and shadowing. The proposed ST model utilises knowledge derived from a discourse analysis of the data, many accepted facts in the psychology tradition, and evidence from controlled experiments that are carried out here. This model has three advantages: (i) it is based on analyses of extended spontaneous speech rather than word-, syllable-, or clause -bound stimuli; (ii) it draws equally on linguistic and psychological knowledge; and (iii) it adopts a non-traditional view of language called 'the linguistic construction of reality'. The discourse-based knowledge is also used to develop three computerised systems for the assessment of simultaneous translation: one is a semi-automated system that treats the content of the translation; and two are fully automated, one of which is based on the time structure of the acoustic signals whilst the other is based on their cross-correlation. For each system, several parameters of performance are identified, and they are correlated with assessments rendered by the traditional, subjective, qualitative method. Using signal processing techniques, the acoustic analysis of discourse leads to the conclusion that quality in simultaneous translation can be assessed quantitatively with varying degrees of automation. It identifies as measures of performance (i) three content-based standards; (ii) four time management parameters that reflect the influence of the source on the target language time structure; and (iii) two types of acoustical signal coherence. Proficiency in ST is shown to be directly related to coherence and speech rate but inversely related to omission and delay. High proficiency is associated with a high degree of simultaneity and

  19. Acoustic waves in the solar atmosphere. VII - Non-grey, non-LTE H(-) models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F.; Ulmschneider, P.; Kalkofen, W.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation and shock formation of radiatively damped acoustic waves in the solar chromosphere are studied under the assumption that H(-) is the only absorber; the opacity is non-grey. Deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) are permitted. The results of numerical simulations show the depth dependence of the heating by the acoustic waves to be insensitive to the mean state of the atmosphere. After the waves have developed into shocks, their energy flux decays exponentially with a constant damping length of about 1.4 times the pressure scale height, independent of initial flux and wave period. Departures from LTE have a strong influence on the mean temperature structure in dynamical chromosphere models; this is even more pronounced in models with reduced particle density - simulating conditions in magnetic flux tubes - which show significantly increased temperatures in response to mechanical heating. When the energy dissipation of the waves is sufficiently large to dissociate most of the H(-) ions, a strong temperature rise is found that is reminiscent of the temperature structure in the transition zone between chromosphere and corona; the energy flux remaining in the waves then drives mass motions.

  20. Assessing the Impact of Data Assimilation on Acoustic Predictions in Operational Global Ocean Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, C. N.; Townsend, T. L.; Smedstad, L. F.; Helber, R. W.; Dastugue, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Since accurate representation of sound speed is a major objective for operational naval ocean models, metrics focusing on acoustically relevant properties are used to evaluate potential changes to the systems. In particular, planned upgrades to the U.S. navy's operational Global Ocean Forecast System (GOFS) addressed aspects of the water column significant for predictions of acoustic propagation: mixed-layer depth (MLD), sonic-layer depth (SLD), and below-layer gradient. These properties were only indirectly considered in prior approaches focused on minimizing expected errors in temperature and salinity. The latest global capability, GOFS 2.6, introduces use of MLD-modified synthetic profiles based on vertical projection of satellite sea surface height and temperature as a background for Navy Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation (NCODA) analyses of in-situ data. Evaluation relative to unassimilated in situ observations reveals the continuing progress of successive operational systems. Because of these demonstrated improvements over prior capabilities, forecasts from the Navy Coastal Ocean Model in GOFS 2.6 and higher resolution regional NCOM implementations were announced as the new standard for U.S. Navy Operational Sound Speed Prediction (NOSSP) on 21 Aug. 2008.

  1. An experimentally validated contactless acoustic energy transfer model with resistive-reactive electrical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigates analytical modeling and experimental validation of Ultrasonic Acoustic Energy Transfer (UAET) for low-power electricity transfer to exploit in wireless applications ranging from medical implants to underwater sensor systems. A piezoelectric receiver bar is excited by incident acoustic waves originating from a source of known strength located at a specific distance from the receiver. The receiver is a free-free piezoelectric cylinder operating in the 33- mode of piezoelectricity with a fundamental resonance frequency above the audible frequency range. In order to extract the electrical power output, the piezoelectric receiver bar is shunted to a generalized resistive-reactive circuit. The goal is to quantify the electrical power delivered to the load (connected to the receiver) in terms of the source strength. Experimental validations are presented along with parameter optimization studies. Sensitivity of the electrical power output to the excitation frequency in the neighborhood of the receiver's underwater resonance frequency, source-to-receiver distance, and source-strength level are reported. Resistive and resistive-reactive electrical loading cases are discussed for performance enhancement and frequency-wise robustness. Simulations and experiments reveal that the presented multiphysics analytical model for UAET can be used to predict the coupled system dynamics with very good accuracy.

  2. A Finite Element Model of a MEMS-based Surface Acoustic Wave Hydrogen Sensor

    PubMed Central

    EL Gowini, Mohamed M.; Moussa, Walied A.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen plays a significant role in various industrial applications, but careful handling and continuous monitoring are crucial since it is explosive when mixed with air. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors provide desirable characteristics for hydrogen detection due to their small size, low fabrication cost, ease of integration and high sensitivity. In this paper a finite element model of a Surface Acoustic Wave sensor is developed using ANSYS12© and tested for hydrogen detection. The sensor consists of a YZ-lithium niobate substrate with interdigital electrodes (IDT) patterned on the surface. A thin palladium (Pd) film is added on the surface of the sensor due to its high affinity for hydrogen. With increased hydrogen absorption the palladium hydride structure undergoes a phase change due to the formation of the β-phase, which deteriorates the crystal structure. Therefore with increasing hydrogen concentration the stiffness and the density are significantly reduced. The values of the modulus of elasticity and the density at different hydrogen concentrations in palladium are utilized in the finite element model to determine the corresponding SAW sensor response. Results indicate that with increasing the hydrogen concentration the wave velocity decreases and the attenuation of the wave is reduced. PMID:22205865

  3. The Impact of Model Uncertainty on Spatial Compensation in Structural Acoustic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    Turbulent boundary layer (TBL) noise is considered a primary contribution to the interior noise present in commercial airliners. There are numerous investigations of interior noise control devoted to aircraft panels; however, practical realization is a potential challenge since physical boundary conditions are uncertain at best. In most prior studies, pinned or clamped boundary conditions were assumed; however, realistic panels likely display a range of boundary conditions between these two limits. Uncertainty in boundary conditions is a challenge for control system designers, both in terms of the compensator implemented and the location of transducers required to achieve the desired control. The impact of model uncertainties, specifically uncertain boundaries, on the selection of transducer locations for structural acoustic control is considered herein. The final goal of this work is the design of an aircraft panel structure that can reduce TBL noise transmission through the use of a completely adaptive, single-input, single-output control system. The feasibility of this goal is demonstrated through the creation of a detailed analytical solution, followed by the implementation of a test model in a transmission loss apparatus. Successfully realizing a control system robust to variations in boundary conditions can lead to the design and implementation of practical adaptive structures that could be used to control the transmission of sound to the interior of aircraft. Results from this research effort indicate it is possible to optimize the design of actuator and sensor location and aperture, minimizing the impact of boundary conditions on the desired structural acoustic control.

  4. Model parameter extraction for obliquely propagating surface acoustic waves in infinitely long grating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gongbin; Han, Tao; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Benfeng; Omori, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose the use of the “longitudinal resonance condition” for the characterization of the two-dimensional propagation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in periodic grating structures, and also show a procedure for extracting parameters required in the behavior model from the full-wave analysis. The condition is given by β xp = π, where p is the grating period and β x is the wavenumber of the grating mode in the longitudinal direction (x). This is based on the fact that in conventional SAW resonators, acoustic resonances including transverse ones occur when β x is real but the longitudinal resonance condition is mostly satisfied. The longitudinal resonance condition is applied to a simple model, and the wavenumber β y in the lateral direction (y) is expressed as a simple function of the angular frequency ω. The full-wave analysis is applied for SAWs propagating in an infinite grating on a 128°YX-LiNbO3 substrate, and the anisotropy parameter γ is extracted by the fitting with the derived equation. The fitted result agrees well with the original numerical result. It is also indicated that γ estimated by this technique is significantly different from the value estimated without taking the effects of the grating structure into account.

  5. Efficient modeling of flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments for vibroacoustic finite element analysis. Direct field formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimonti, L.; Atalla, N.

    2016-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a simplified model for noise control treatments to speed up finite element analysis in vibroacoustic applications. The methodology relies on the assumption that the acoustic treatment is flat and homogeneous. Moreover, its finite lateral extent is neglected. This hypothesis is justified by short wavelength and large dissipation, which suggest that the reflected field emanating from the acoustic treatment lateral boundaries does not substantially affect its dynamic response. Under these circumstances, the response of the noise control treatment can be formally obtained by means of convolution integrals involving simple analytical kernels (i.e. Green functions). Such fundamental solutions can be computed efficiently by the transfer matrix method. However, some arbitrariness arises in the formulation of the mathematical model, resulting in different baffling conditions at the two ends of the treatment to be considered. Thus, the paper investigates the possibility of different formulations (i.e. baffling conditions) within the same hybrid finite element-transfer matrix framework, seeking for the best strategy in terms of tradeoff between efficiency and accuracy. Numerical examples are provided to show strengths and limitations of the proposed methodology.

  6. A nonlinear model for the layer between plates in acoustic noncontact transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin; Cao, Wenwu; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-12-01

    To more accurately describe the noncontact transport behavior of traveling acoustic waves, a nonlinear model is presented in this paper for the squeeze gas film with consideration of gas inertia in the case of a large amplitude motion and low viscosity of the gas. A closed form solution is derived for the vertical and horizontal forces of the film from this model. Our results have shown that the gas inertia has a significant influence on the pressure distribution in the squeeze film, and the inertial force is higher than the viscous force. The predicted levitation and horizontal driving forces are found to be in good agreement with our experimental measurements. Our inertia model provides a powerful tool for the force estimation and its potential benefits could be far reaching. The accurate prediction of these forces is useful to design the system for levitating and transporting planar objects, such as MEMS devices, glass substrates, and IC chips

  7. Educational Mismatch and Spatial Flexibility in Italian Local Labour Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croce, Giuseppe; Ghignoni, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    According to recent literature, this paper highlights the relevance of spatial mobility as an explanatory factor of the individual risk of job-education mismatch. To investigate this causal link, we use individual information about daily home-to-work commuting time and choices to relocate in a different local area to get a job. Our model takes…

  8. Vibro-acoustic modelling of aircraft double-walls with structural links using Statistical Energy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campolina, Bruno L.

    The prediction of aircraft interior noise involves the vibroacoustic modelling of the fuselage with noise control treatments. This structure is composed of a stiffened metallic or composite panel, lined with a thermal and acoustic insulation layer (glass wool), and structurally connected via vibration isolators to a commercial lining panel (trim). The goal of this work aims at tailoring the noise control treatments taking design constraints such as weight and space optimization into account. For this purpose, a representative aircraft double-wall is modelled using the Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) method. Laboratory excitations such as diffuse acoustic field and point force are addressed and trends are derived for applications under in-flight conditions, considering turbulent boundary layer excitation. The effect of the porous layer compression is firstly addressed. In aeronautical applications, compression can result from the installation of equipment and cables. It is studied analytically and experimentally, using a single panel and a fibrous uniformly compressed over 100% of its surface. When compression increases, a degradation of the transmission loss up to 5 dB for a 50% compression of the porous thickness is observed mainly in the mid-frequency range (around 800 Hz). However, for realistic cases, the effect should be reduced since the compression rate is lower and compression occurs locally. Then the transmission through structural connections between panels is addressed using a four-pole approach that links the force-velocity pair at each side of the connection. The modelling integrates experimental dynamic stiffness of isolators, derived using an adapted test rig. The structural transmission is then experimentally validated and included in the double-wall SEA model as an equivalent coupling loss factor (CLF) between panels. The tested structures being flat, only axial transmission is addressed. Finally, the dominant sound transmission paths are

  9. Efficient electromechanical network model for wireless acoustic-electric feed-throughs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu

    2005-05-01

    There are numerous engineering design problems where the use of wires to transfer power and communicate data thru the walls of a structure is prohibitive or significantly difficult that it may require a complex design. Such systems may be concerned with the leakage of chemicals or gasses, loss of pressure or vacuum, as well as difficulties in providing adequate thermal or electrical insulation. Moreover, feeding wires thru a wall of a structure reduces the strength of the structure and makes the structure susceptibility to cracking due to fatigue that can result from cyclic loading. Two areas have already been identified to require a wireless alternative capability and they include (a) the container of the Mars Sample Return Mission will need the use of wireless sensors to sense pressure leak and to avoid potential contamination; and (b) the Navy is seeking the capability to communicate with the crew or the instrumentation inside marine structures without the use of wires that will weaken the structure. The idea of using elastic or acoustic waves to transfer power was suggested recently by Y. Hu, et al.1. However, the disclosed model was developed directly from the wave equation and the linear equations of piezoelectricity. This model restricted by an inability to incorporate head and tail mass and account for loss in all the mechanisms. In addition there is no mechanism for connecting the model to actual power processing circuitry (diode bridge, capacitors, rectifiers etc.). An alternative approach which is to be presented is a network equivalent circuit that can easily be modified to account for additional acoustic elements and connected directly to other networks or circuits. All the possible loss mechanisms of the disclosed solution can be accounted for and introduced into the model. The circuit model allows for both power and data transmission in the forward and reverse directions through acoustic signals at the harmonic and higher order resonances. This

  10. Mapping Reef Fish and the Seascape: Using Acoustics and Spatial Modeling to Guide Coastal Management

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Bryan; Taylor, J. Christopher; Kracker, Laura; Battista, Tim; Pittman, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Reef fish distributions are patchy in time and space with some coral reef habitats supporting higher densities (i.e., aggregations) of fish than others. Identifying and quantifying fish aggregations (particularly during spawning events) are often top priorities for coastal managers. However, the rapid mapping of these aggregations using conventional survey methods (e.g., non-technical SCUBA diving and remotely operated cameras) are limited by depth, visibility and time. Acoustic sensors (i.e., splitbeam and multibeam echosounders) are not constrained by these same limitations, and were used to concurrently map and quantify the location, density and size of reef fish along with seafloor structure in two, separate locations in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Reef fish aggregations were documented along the shelf edge, an ecologically important ecotone in the region. Fish were grouped into three classes according to body size, and relationships with the benthic seascape were modeled in one area using Boosted Regression Trees. These models were validated in a second area to test their predictive performance in locations where fish have not been mapped. Models predicting the density of large fish (≥29 cm) performed well (i.e., AUC = 0.77). Water depth and standard deviation of depth were the most influential predictors at two spatial scales (100 and 300 m). Models of small (≤11 cm) and medium (12–28 cm) fish performed poorly (i.e., AUC = 0.49 to 0.68) due to the high prevalence (45–79%) of smaller fish in both locations, and the unequal prevalence of smaller fish in the training and validation areas. Integrating acoustic sensors with spatial modeling offers a new and reliable approach to rapidly identify fish aggregations and to predict the density large fish in un-surveyed locations. This integrative approach will help coastal managers to prioritize sites, and focus their limited resources on areas that may be of higher conservation value. PMID:24454886

  11. Substructuring and model reduction of pipe components interacting with acoustic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maess, Matthias; Gaul, Lothar

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a model reduction and substructure technique for reduced dynamical models of fluid-filled pipe components. Both linear acoustical domain and structural domain are modelled by finite elements (FE), and they are fully coupled by a fluid-structure interface. The discretised dynamic FE-equations, which use the acoustic pressure as field variable in the fluid, render both non-symmetric mass and stiffness matrices due to the FSI-coupling. Since the partial solutions to the eigenproblem of the coupled system are of special interest, either numerical preconditioning or non-dimensionalisation of the physical quantities is performed to improve the condition and to accelerate the numerical computation. An iterative subspace solver is adopted to generate a sufficient approximate of the low-frequency eigenspace of the constrained problem. Model reduction for component mode synthesis uses constraint modes together with the computed eigenspace. Single-point constraints for the nodal degrees of freedom hold at the interface between substructures. The null space resulting from a QR-decomposition of the single-point constraints at the interface is used as explicit coupling matrix to prevent the deterioration of the conditioning. Partitioning of the reduction space and coupling matrices leads to a structure of the coupled global system matrices, which is similar to the original system structure in physical quantities. Therefore, the iterative subspace eigensolver is used again for numerical modal analysis. Modal analysis is performed for a pipe segment assembled by fully coupled two-field substructures. The results are compared to the results obtained from the full model and to experimentally determined mode shapes.

  12. Mapping reef fish and the seascape: using acoustics and spatial modeling to guide coastal management.

    PubMed

    Costa, Bryan; Taylor, J Christopher; Kracker, Laura; Battista, Tim; Pittman, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Reef fish distributions are patchy in time and space with some coral reef habitats supporting higher densities (i.e., aggregations) of fish than others. Identifying and quantifying fish aggregations (particularly during spawning events) are often top priorities for coastal managers. However, the rapid mapping of these aggregations using conventional survey methods (e.g., non-technical SCUBA diving and remotely operated cameras) are limited by depth, visibility and time. Acoustic sensors (i.e., splitbeam and multibeam echosounders) are not constrained by these same limitations, and were used to concurrently map and quantify the location, density and size of reef fish along with seafloor structure in two, separate locations in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Reef fish aggregations were documented along the shelf edge, an ecologically important ecotone in the region. Fish were grouped into three classes according to body size, and relationships with the benthic seascape were modeled in one area using Boosted Regression Trees. These models were validated in a second area to test their predictive performance in locations where fish have not been mapped. Models predicting the density of large fish (≥ 29 cm) performed well (i.e., AUC = 0.77). Water depth and standard deviation of depth were the most influential predictors at two spatial scales (100 and 300 m). Models of small (≤ 11 cm) and medium (12-28 cm) fish performed poorly (i.e., AUC = 0.49 to 0.68) due to the high prevalence (45-79%) of smaller fish in both locations, and the unequal prevalence of smaller fish in the training and validation areas. Integrating acoustic sensors with spatial modeling offers a new and reliable approach to rapidly identify fish aggregations and to predict the density large fish in un-surveyed locations. This integrative approach will help coastal managers to prioritize sites, and focus their limited resources on areas that may be of higher conservation value. PMID:24454886

  13. A Spinal Cord Window Chamber Model for In Vivo Longitudinal Multimodal Optical and Acoustic Imaging in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Azusa; Conroy, Leigh; McMullen, Jesse D.; Silver, Jason I.; Stapleton, Shawn; Vitkin, Alex; Lindsay, Patricia; Burrell, Kelly; Zadeh, Gelareh; Fehlings, Michael G.; DaCosta, Ralph S.

    2013-01-01

    In vivo and direct imaging of the murine spinal cord and its vasculature using multimodal (optical and acoustic) imaging techniques could significantly advance preclinical studies of the spinal cord. Such intrinsically high resolution and complementary imaging technologies could provide a powerful means of quantitatively monitoring changes in anatomy, structure, physiology and function of the living cord over time after traumatic injury, onset of disease, or therapeutic intervention. However, longitudinal in vivo imaging of the intact spinal cord in rodent models has been challenging, requiring repeated surgeries to expose the cord for imaging or sacrifice of animals at various time points for ex vivo tissue analysis. To address these limitations, we have developed an implantable spinal cord window chamber (SCWC) device and procedures in mice for repeated multimodal intravital microscopic imaging of the cord and its vasculature in situ. We present methodology for using our SCWC to achieve spatially co-registered optical-acoustic imaging performed serially for up to four weeks, without damaging the cord or induction of locomotor deficits in implanted animals. To demonstrate the feasibility, we used the SCWC model to study the response of the normal spinal cord vasculature to ionizing radiation over time using white light and fluorescence microscopy combined with optical coherence tomography (OCT) in vivo. In vivo power Doppler ultrasound and photoacoustics were used to directly visualize the cord and vascular structures and to measure hemoglobin oxygen saturation through the complete spinal cord, respectively. The model was also used for intravital imaging of spinal micrometastases resulting from primary brain tumor using fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging. Our SCWC model overcomes previous in vivo imaging challenges, and our data provide evidence of the broader utility of hybridized optical-acoustic imaging methods for obtaining multiparametric and rich

  14. Model-based processor design for a shallow water ocean acoustic experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V. ); Sullivan, E.J. )

    1994-04-01

    Model-based signal processing is a well-defined methodology enabling the inclusion of environmental (propagation) models, measurement (sensor arrays) models, and noise (shipping, measurement) models into a sophisticated processing algorithm. Depending on the class of model developed from the mathematical representation of the physical phenomenology, various processors can evolve. Here the design of a space-varying, nonstationary, model-based processor (MBP) is investigated and applied to the data from a well-controlled shallow water experiment performed at Hudson Canyon. This particular experiment is very attractive for the inaugural application of the MBP because it was performed in shallow water at low frequency requiring a small number of modes. In essence, the Hudson Canyon represents a well-known ocean environment, making it ideal for this investigation. In this shallow water application, a state-space representation of the normal-mode propagation model is used. The processor is designed such that it allows [ital in] [ital situ] recursive estimation of both the pressure-field and modal functions. It is shown that the MBP can be effectively utilized to validate'' the performance of the model on noisy ocean acoustic data. In fact, a set of processors is designed, one for each source range and the results are quite good---implying that the propagation model with measured parameters adequately represents the data.

  15. A Frame-Based Context-Dependent Acoustic Modeling for Speech Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Ryuta; Zen, Heiga; Nankaku, Yoshihiko; Tokuda, Keiichi

    We propose a novel acoustic model for speech recognition, named FCD (Frame-based Context Dependent) model. It can obtain a probability distribution by using a top-down clustering technique to simultaneously consider the local frame position in phoneme, phoneme duration, and phoneme context. The model topology is derived from connecting left-to-right HMM models without self-loop transition for each phoneme duration. Because the FCD model can change the probability distribution into a sequence corresponding with one phoneme duration, it can has the ability to generate a smooth trajectory of speech feature vector. We also performed an experiment to evaluate the performance of speech recognition for the model. In the experiment, 132 questions for frame position, 66 questions for phoneme duration and 134 questions for phoneme context were used to train the sub-phoneme FCD model. In order to compare the performance, left-to-right HMM and two types of HSMM models with almost same number of states were also trained. As a result, 18% of relative improvement of tri-phone accuracy was achieved by the FCD model.

  16. Time domain computational modeling of viscothermal acoustic propagation in catalytic converter substrates with porous walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, N. S.; Selamet, A.; Miazgowicz, K. D.; Tallio, K. V.; Parks, S. J.

    2005-08-01

    Models for viscothermal effects in catalytic converter substrates are developed for time domain computational methods. The models are suitable for use in one-dimensional approaches for the prediction of exhaust system performance (engine tuning characteristics) and radiated sound levels. Starting with the ``low reduced frequency'' equations for viscothermal acoustic propagation in capillary tubes, time domain submodels are developed for the frequency-dependent wall friction, frequency-dependent wall heat transfer, and porous wall effects exhibited by catalytic converter substrates. Results from a time domain computational approach employing these submodels are compared to available analytical solutions for the low reduced frequency equations. The computational results are shown to agree well with the analytical solutions for capillary geometries representative of automotive catalytic converter substrates.

  17. Experimental validation of a two-dimensional shear-flow model for determining acoustic impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Tests were conducted to validate a two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determining the acoustic impedance of a liner test specimen in a grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment. The tests were limited to a test specimen chosen to exhibit minimal effects of grazing flow so that the results obtained by using the shear-flow analytical model would be expected to match those obtained from normal-incidence impedance measurements. Impedances for both downstream and upstream sound propagation were generally consistent with those from normal-incidence measurements. However, sensitivity of the grazing-incidence impedance to small measurement or systematic errors in propagation constant varied dramatically over the range of test frequencies.

  18. Absorption of acoustic waves by sunspots. II - Resonance absorption in axisymmetric fibril models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, C. S.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical calculations of acoustic waves scattered by sunspots which concentrate on the absorption at the magnetohydrodynamic Alfven resonance are extended to the case of a flux-tube embedded in a uniform atmosphere. The model is based on a flux-tubes of varying radius that are highly structured, translationally invariant, and axisymmetric. The absorbed fractional energy is determined for different flux-densities and subphotospheric locations with attention given to the effects of twist. When the flux is highly concentrated into annuli efficient absorption is possible even when the mean magnetic flux density is low. The model demonstrates low absorption at low azimuthal orders even in the presence of twist which generally increases the range of wave numbers over which efficient absorption can occur. Resonance absorption is concluded to be an efficient mechanism in monolithic sunspots, fibril sunspots, and plage fields.

  19. Modeling and experimental study on near-field acoustic levitation by flexural mode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pinkuan; Li, Jin; Ding, Han; Cao, Wenwu

    2009-12-01

    Near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL) has been used in noncontact handling and transportation of small objects to avoid contamination. We have performed a theoretical analysis based on nonuniform vibrating surface to quantify the levitation force produced by the air film and also conducted experimental tests to verify our model. Modal analysis was performed using ANSYS on the flexural plate radiator to obtain its natural frequency of desired mode, which is used to design the measurement system. Then, the levitation force was calculated as a function of levitation distance based on squeeze gas film theory using measured amplitude and phase distributions on the vibrator surface. Compared with previous fluid-structural analyses using a uniform piston motion, our model based on the nonuniform radiating surface of the vibrator is more realistic and fits better with experimentally measured levitation force. PMID:20040404

  20. Streaming flow from ultrasound contrast agents by acoustic waves in a blood vessel model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunjin; Chung, Sang Kug; Rhee, Kyehan

    2015-09-01

    To elucidate the effects of streaming flow on ultrasound contrast agent (UCA)-assisted drug delivery, streaming velocity fields from sonicated UCA microbubbles were measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) in a blood vessel model. At the beginning of ultrasound sonication, the UCA bubbles formed clusters and translated in the direction of the ultrasound field. Bubble cluster formation and translation were faster with 2.25MHz sonication, a frequency close to the resonance frequency of the UCA. Translation of bubble clusters induced streaming jet flow that impinged on the vessel wall, forming symmetric vortices. The maximum streaming velocity was about 60mm/s at 2.25MHz and decreased to 15mm/s at 1.0MHz for the same acoustic pressure amplitude. The effect of the ultrasound frequency on wall shear stress was more noticeable. Maximum wall shear stress decreased from 0.84 to 0.1Pa as the ultrasound frequency decreased from 2.25 to 1.0MHz. The maximum spatial gradient of the wall shear stress also decreased from 1.0 to 0.1Pa/mm. This study showed that streaming flow was induced by bubble cluster formation and translation and was stronger upon sonication by an acoustic wave with a frequency near the UCA resonance frequency. Therefore, the secondary radiant force, which is much stronger at the resonance frequency, should play an important role in UCA-assisted drug delivery. PMID:26025507

  1. The Impact of Model Uncertainty on Spatial Compensation in Active Structural Acoustic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Gibbs, Gary P.; Sprofera, Joseph D.; Clark, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Turbulent boundary layer (TBL) noise is considered a primary factor in the interior noise experienced by passengers aboard commercial airliners. There have been numerous investigations of interior noise control devoted to aircraft panels; however, practical realization is a challenge since the physical boundary conditions are uncertain at best. In most prior studies, pinned or clamped boundary conditions have been assumed; however, realistic panels likely display a range of varying boundary conditions between these two limits. Uncertainty in boundary conditions is a challenge for control system designers, both in terms of the compensator implemented and the location of actuators and sensors required to achieve the desired control. The impact of model uncertainties, uncertain boundary conditions in particular, on the selection of actuator and sensor locations for structural acoustic control are considered herein. Results from this research effort indicate that it is possible to optimize the design of actuator and sensor location and aperture, which minimizes the impact of boundary conditions on the desired structural acoustic control.

  2. Localization of marine mammals near Hawaii using an acoustic propagation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemann, Christopher O.; Porter, Michael B.; Frazer, L. Neil

    2004-06-01

    Humpback whale songs were recorded on six widely spaced receivers of the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) hydrophone network near Hawaii during March of 2001. These recordings were used to test a new approach to localizing the whales that exploits the time-difference of arrival (time lag) of their calls as measured between receiver pairs in the PMRF network. The usual technique for estimating source position uses the intersection of hyperbolic curves of constant time lag, but a drawback of this approach is its assumption of a constant wave speed and straight-line propagation to associate acoustic travel time with range. In contrast to hyperbolic fixing, the algorithm described here uses an acoustic propagation model to account for waveguide and multipath effects when estimating travel time from hypothesized source positions. A comparison between predicted and measured time lags forms an ambiguity surface, or visual representation of the most probable whale position in a horizontal plane around the array. This is an important benefit because it allows for automated peak extraction to provide a location estimate. Examples of whale localizations using real and simulated data in algorithms of increasing complexity are provided.

  3. Producing ion waves from acoustic pressure waves in pulsed ICP: Modeling vs. Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despiau-Pujo, Emilie; Cunge, Gilles; Darnon, Maxime; Sadeghi, Nader; Braithwaite, Nicholas

    2015-09-01

    Neutral depletion is an important phenomenon in CW high-density plasmas, mostly caused by gas heating - with a small contribution due to electron pressure Pe - under typical material processing conditions. In pulsed ICP, neutral depletion plays an important role on radical transport in the afterglow. At the beginning of the afterglow, Pe drops rapidly (10 μs) by electron cooling and the gas cools down as well. It generates a neutral pressure gradient between the plasma bulk and the reactor walls, which in turn forces the cold surrounding gas to move rapidly towards the center, thus launching an acoustic wave in the reactor. Fast gas displacement is evidenced by measuring Al atoms drift velocity in the early afterglow of a Cl2/Ar discharge by time-resolved LIF, the acoustic wave in the chamber being observed by mass spectrometry. 2D fluid simulations of Cl2 pulsed ICP predict similar results. These phenomena are further studied during both the plasma ignition and afterglow using modeling and experiments. Strong oscillations are observed both on the Cl2 neutral densities and on the ion flux. As neutrals are pushed towards (or outwards) the chamber walls by the pressure gradient, ions are also pushed in that direction through collisions, as well captured by our ion flux probe.

  4. Equation-free Modeling of Ion Acoustic Wave with Particle Trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantchev, George

    2005-10-01

    Recently, Shay et al.[1] have successfully implemented equation-free projective integraion methods to simulate the propagation and steepening of a 1D ion acoustic wave. For the forward extrapolation step they have been using only a small number of lower moments of the probability density function (PDF) based on the assumption that the distribution would remain Maxwellian at all times. This however is no longer valid in many interesting situations, in particular for the case of particle trapping. To solve this problem we propose a generalization of Shay's algorithm to allow for tracking of an arbitrary PDF. We estimate the PDF at each micro-time step using statistical wavelet analysis. The resulting vectors of wavelet coefficents are used for forward extrapolation in time to obtain a multi-scale representation of the projected PDF after a coarse time step. An optimal wavelet basis is selected through adaptive refinement at the beginning of each microscopic simulation sequence. We discuss the application of this technique to the 1D acoustic wave problem with particle trapping. [1] M. Shay, J. Drake, W. Dorland, Multiscale modeling of plasmas via equation-free projective integration, in preparation

  5. Acoustic characteristics of a large scale wind-tunnel model of a jet flap aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falarski, M. D.; Aiken, T. N.; Aoyagi, K.

    1975-01-01

    The expanding-duct jet flap (EJF) concept is studied to determine STOL performance in turbofan-powered aircraft. The EJF is used to solve the problem of ducting the required volume of air into the wing by providing an expanding cavity between the upper and lower surfaces of the flap. The results are presented of an investigation of the acoustic characteristics of the EJF concept on a large-scale aircraft model powered by JT15D engines. The noise of the EJF is generated by acoustic dipoles as shown by the sixth power dependence of the noise on jet velocity. These sources result from the interaction of the flow turbulence with flap of internal and external surfaces and the trailing edges. Increasing the trailing edge jet from 70 percent span to 100 percent span increased the noise 2 db for the equivalent nozzle area. Blowing at the knee of the flap rather than the trailing edge reduced the noise 5 to 10 db by displacing the jet from the trailing edge and providing shielding from high-frequency noise. Deflecting the flap and varying the angle of attack modified the directivity of the underwing noise but did not affect the peak noise. A forward speed of 33.5 m/sec (110 ft/sec) reduced the dipole noise less than 1 db.

  6. Detection of Acoustic Temporal Fine Structure by Cochlear Implant Listeners: Behavioral Results and Computational Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Imennov, Nikita S.; Won, Jong Ho; Drennan, Ward R.; Jameyson, Elyse; Rubinstein, Jay T.

    2013-01-01

    A test of within-channel detection of acoustic temporal fine structure (aTFS) cues is presented. Eight cochlear implant listeners (CI) were asked to discriminate between two Schroeder-phase (SP) complexes using a two-alternative, forced-choice task. Because differences between the acoustic stimuli are primarily constrained to their aTFS, successful discrimination reflects a combination of the subjects’ perception of and the strategy’s ability to deliver aTFS cues. Subjects were mapped with single-channel Continuous Interleaved Sampling (CIS) and Simultaneous Analog Stimulation (SAS) strategies. To compare within- and across- channel delivery of aTFS cues, a 16-channel clinical HiRes strategy was also fitted. Throughout testing, SAS consistently outperformed the CIS strategy (p ≤ 0.002). For SP stimuli with F0 =50 Hz, the highest discrimination scores were achieved with the HiRes encoding, followed by scores with the SAS and the CIS strategies, respectively. At 200 Hz, single-channel SAS performed better than HiRes (p = 0.022), demonstrating that under a more challenging testing condition, discrimination performance with a single-channel analog encoding can exceed that of a 16-channel pulsatile strategy. To better understand the intermediate steps of discrimination, a biophysical model was used to examine the neural discharges evoked by the SP stimuli. Discrimination estimates calculated from simulated neural responses successfully tracked the behavioral performance trends of single-channel CI listeners. PMID:23333260

  7. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  8. Contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless systems: acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling and performance enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, S.; Erturk, A.

    2014-12-01

    There are several applications of wireless electronic components with little or no ambient energy available to harvest, yet wireless battery charging for such systems is still of great interest. Example applications range from biomedical implants to sensors located in hazardous environments. Energy transfer based on the propagation of acoustic waves at ultrasonic frequencies is a recently explored alternative that offers increased transmitter-receiver distance, reduced loss and the elimination of electromagnetic fields. As this research area receives growing attention, there is an increased need for fully coupled model development to quantify the energy transfer characteristics, with a focus on the transmitter, receiver, medium, geometric and material parameters. We present multiphysics modeling and case studies of the contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless electronic components submerged in fluid. The source is a pulsating sphere, and the receiver is a piezoelectric bar operating in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity with a fundamental resonance frequency above the audible frequency range. The goal is to quantify the electrical power delivered to the load (connected to the receiver) in terms of the source strength. Both the analytical and finite element models have been developed for the resulting acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction problem. Resistive and resistive-inductive electrical loading cases are presented, and optimality conditions are discussed. Broadband power transfer is achieved by optimal resistive-reactive load tuning for performance enhancement and frequency-wise robustness. Significant enhancement of the power output is reported due to the use of a hard piezoelectric receiver (PZT-8) instead of a soft counterpart (PZT-5H) as a result of reduced material damping. The analytical multiphysics modeling approach given in this work can be used to predict and optimize the coupled system dynamics with very good accuracy and dramatically

  9. Velocity dispersion and attenuation in granular marine sediments: comparison of measurements with predictions using acoustic models.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masao

    2011-06-01

    The large velocity dispersion recently reported could be explained by a gap stiffness model incorporated into the Biot model (the BIMGS model) proposed by the author. However, at high frequencies, some measured results have been reported for negative velocity dispersion and attenuation proportional to the first to fourth power of frequency. In this study, first, it is shown that the results of velocity dispersion and attenuation calculated using the BIMGS model are consistent with the results measured in two kinds of water-saturated sands with different grain sizes, except in the high-frequency range. Then, the velocity dispersion and attenuation in six kinds of water-saturated glass beads and four kinds of water-saturated silica sands with different grain sizes are measured in the frequency ranges of 80-140 and 300-700 kHz. The measured results are compared with those calculated using the BIMGS model plus some acoustic models. It is shown that the velocity dispersion and attenuation are well predicted by using the BIMGS model in the range of kd ≤ 0.5 (k: wavenumber in water, d: grain diameter) and by using the BIMGS model plus multiple scattering effects in the range of kd ≥ 0.5 in which negative velocity dispersion appears. PMID:21682381

  10. Spatial Mismatch: A Third Generation Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagan, J. Vincent

    1999-01-01

    The spatial mismatch argument hypothesizes that racial discrimination in the housing market, together with the suburbanization of low skilled jobs, contributes significantly to the high unemployment and/or low wages of inner city minority workers. Surveys recent spatial mismatch literature and discusses policy alternatives, focusing on areas…

  11. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Vibro-acoustic model of a piezoelectric-based stethoscope for chest sound measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, G.; Rajamani, R.; Erdman, A.

    2015-09-01

    This article focuses on the influence of noise and vibration on chest sound measurements with a piezoelectric stethoscope. Two types of vibrations, namely inputs through the patient chest and disturbances from the physician, influence the acoustic measurement. The goal of this work is to develop a model to understand the propagation of these vibrational noises through the stethoscope and to the piezoelectric sensing element. Using the model, methods to reduce the influence of disturbances acting on the stethoscope from the physician handling the device are explored. A multi-DOF rigid body vibration model consisting of discrete connected components is developed for the piezoelectric stethoscope. Using a two-port lumped parameter model, the mechanical vibrations are related to the resulting electrical signal. The parameterized state space model is experimentally validated and its parameters are identified by using a thorax simulator and vibration shaker. Based on predictions from the model, the introduction of vibration isolation to reduce the influence of physician noise on the transducer is then pursued. It is shown that direct vibration isolation between the transducer and the rest of the stethoscope structure leads to a reduction in coupling with the patient’s chest. However, if isolation is instead introduced between the transducer housing and the rest of the stethoscope, then vibration isolation from the physician is achieved with far less reduction in patient coupling. Experimental results are presented to study the influence of the proposed design changes and confirm the predicted model behavior.

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study on the Effects of RATO Timing on the Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Tanner; Williams, B.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The SLS lift off configuration consists of four RS-25 liquid thrusters on the core stage, with two solid boosters connected to each side. Past experience with scale model testing at MSFC (in ER42), has shown that there is a delay in the ignition of the Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motor, which is used as the 5% scale analog of the solid boosters, after the signal to ignite is given. This delay can range from 0 to 16.5ms. While this small of a delay maybe insignificant in the case of the full scale SLS, it can significantly alter the data obtained during the SMAT due to the much smaller geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs during full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is much smaller allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust duct, through the trench, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. To better understand the effect of the RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT IOP test data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed using the Loci/CHEM CFD software program. Five different timing offsets, based on RATO ignition delay statistics, were simulated. A variety of results and comparisons will be given, assessing the overall effect of RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT overpressure environment.

  14. Characterization of the Scale Model Acoustic Test Overpressure Environment using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Tanner; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The pressure waves that propagate from the mobile launcher (ML) exhaust hole are defined as the ignition overpressure (IOP), while the portion of the pressure waves that exit the duct or trench are the duct overpressure (DOP). Distinguishing the IOP and DOP in scale model test data has been difficult in past experiences and in early SMAT results, due to the effects of scaling the geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs in full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is twenty times smaller, allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust hole, through the trench and duct, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. The DOP waves impact portions of the vehicle at the same time as the IOP waves, making it difficult to distinguish the different waves and fully understand the data. To better understand the SMAT data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed with a fictitious geometry that isolates the IOP and DOP. The upper and lower portions of the domain were segregated to accomplish the isolation in such a way that the flow physics were not significantly altered. The Loci/CHEM CFD software program was used to perform this analysis.

  15. Coded aperture design in mismatched compressive spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Galvis, Laura; Arguello, Henry; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2015-11-20

    Compressive spectral imaging (CSI) senses a scene by using two-dimensional coded projections such that the number of measurements is far less than that used in spectral scanning-type instruments. An architecture that efficiently implements CSI is the coded aperture snapshot spectral imager (CASSI). A physical limitation of the CASSI is the system resolution, which is determined by the lowest resolution element used in the detector and the coded aperture. Although the final resolution of the system is usually given by the detector, in the CASSI, for instance, the use of a low resolution coded aperture implemented using a digital micromirror device (DMD), which induces the grouping of pixels in superpixels in the detector, is decisive to the final resolution. The mismatch occurs by the differences in the pitch size of the DMD mirrors and focal plane array (FPA) pixels. A traditional solution to this mismatch consists of grouping several pixels in square features, which subutilizes the DMD and the detector resolution and, therefore, reduces the spatial and spectral resolution of the reconstructed spectral images. This paper presents a model for CASSI which admits the mismatch and permits exploiting the maximum resolution of the coding element and the FPA sensor. A super-resolution algorithm and a synthetic coded aperture are developed in order to solve the mismatch. The mathematical models are verified using a real implementation of CASSI. The results of the experiments show a significant gain in spatial and spectral imaging quality over the traditional grouping pixel technique. PMID:26836551

  16. Metamer mismatching in practice versus theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiandou; Funt, Brian; Mirzaei, Hamidreza

    2016-03-01

    Metamer mismatching (the phenomenon that two objects matching in color under one illuminant may not match under a different illuminant) potentially has important consequences for color perception. Logvinenko et al. [PLoS ONE10, e0135029 (2015)] show that in theory the extent of metamer mismatching can be very significant. This paper examines metamer mismatching in practice by computing the volumes of the empirical metamer mismatch bodies and comparing them to the volumes of the theoretical mismatch bodies. A set of more than 25 million unique reflectance spectra is assembled using datasets from several sources. For a given color signal (e.g., CIE XYZ) recorded under a given first illuminant, its empirical metamer mismatch body for a change to a second illuminant is computed as follows: the reflectances having the same color signal when lit by the first illuminant (i.e., reflect metameric light) are computationally relit by the second illuminant, and the convex hull of the resulting color signals then defines the empirical metamer mismatch body. The volume of these bodies is shown to vary systematically with Munsell value and chroma. The empirical mismatch bodies are compared to the theoretical mismatch bodies computed using the algorithm of Logvinenko et al. [IEEE Trans. Image Process.23, 34 (2014)]. There are three key findings: (1) the empirical bodies are found to be substantially smaller than the theoretical ones; (2) the sizes of both the empirical and theoretical bodies show a systematic variation with Munsell value and chroma; and (3) applied to the problem of color-signal prediction, the centroid of the empirical metamer mismatch body is shown to be a better predictor of what a given color signal might become under a specified illuminant than state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26974929

  17. Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks: How Do Acoustic Propagation Models Impact the Performance of Higher-Level Protocols?

    PubMed Central

    Llor, Jesús; Malumbres, Manuel P.

    2012-01-01

    Several Medium Access Control (MAC) and routing protocols have been developed in the last years for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs). One of the main difficulties to compare and validate the performance of different proposals is the lack of a common standard to model the acoustic propagation in the underwater environment. In this paper we analyze the evolution of underwater acoustic prediction models from a simple approach to more detailed and accurate models. Then, different high layer network protocols are tested with different acoustic propagation models in order to determine the influence of environmental parameters on the obtained results. After several experiments, we can conclude that higher-level protocols are sensitive to both: (a) physical layer parameters related to the network scenario and (b) the acoustic propagation model. Conditions like ocean surface activity, scenario location, bathymetry or floor sediment composition, may change the signal propagation behavior. So, when designing network architectures for UWSNs, the role of the physical layer should be seriously taken into account in order to assert that the obtained simulation results will be close to the ones obtained in real network scenarios. PMID:22438712

  18. Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks: how do acoustic propagation models impact the performance of higher-level protocols?

    PubMed

    Llor, Jesús; Malumbres, Manuel P

    2012-01-01

    Several Medium Access Control (MAC) and routing protocols have been developed in the last years for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs). One of the main difficulties to compare and validate the performance of different proposals is the lack of a common standard to model the acoustic propagation in the underwater environment. In this paper we analyze the evolution of underwater acoustic prediction models from a simple approach to more detailed and accurate models. Then, different high layer network protocols are tested with different acoustic propagation models in order to determine the influence of environmental parameters on the obtained results. After several experiments, we can conclude that higher-level protocols are sensitive to both: (a) physical layer parameters related to the network scenario and (b) the acoustic propagation model. Conditions like ocean surface activity, scenario location, bathymetry or floor sediment composition, may change the signal propagation behavior. So, when designing network architectures for UWSNs, the role of the physical layer should be seriously taken into account in order to assert that the obtained simulation results will be close to the ones obtained in real network scenarios. PMID:22438712

  19. Current state of acoustic wave propagation modelling and its use in the estimation of impact on marine mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racca, R.; Hannay, D.; Carr, S.

    2006-05-01

    Underwater acoustic wave propagation modelling has matured into a sophisticated and reliable forecasting tool for predicting the acoustic noise footprints of geophysical exploration activities. Computational methods such as Parabolic Equation solutions of the wave function can account for all aspects of acoustic propagation including diffraction, mode stripping, and compressional and shear wave transmission in the seabed substrate. Given sufficient knowledge of the acousto-physical properties of the water column and the seabed, it is possible to estimate the acoustic transmission loss for individual sound frequencies and hence the overall attenuation of a spectrally described source at any range. In combination with numerical models that provide reliable estimates of the acoustic pulse properties and spatial pattern of the sound emission from any design of airgun array, wave propagation modelling provides the means to fully characterize the ensonification of an area without need for experimental measurement, allowing the potential impact on the marine environment of a planned operation to be studied in advance of physical deployment of the equipment. In this presentation we provide an overview of the current state of acoustic propagation modelling methods with particular emphasis on full noise footprint estimation, whereby the acoustic propagation model is automatically run along multiple traverses to cover the region of interest to a desired spatial resolution. The prediction of sound level footprints, however, is only a step in the process of estimating the acoustic impact on sea life and especially marine mammals. The interaction between the sound and the subject is also influenced by the subject's frequency-dependent auditory sensitivity relative to the frequency content of the sounds to which it is exposed. Much experimental work has been performed recently to measure frequency- dependent auditory thresholds (audiograms) for many marine mammal species. The

  20. A Subject-Specific Acoustic Model of the Upper Airway for Snoring Sounds Generation

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Shumit; Bradley, T. Douglas; Taheri, Mahsa; Moussavi, Zahra; Yadollahi, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring variations in the upper airway narrowing during sleep is invasive and expensive. Since snoring sounds are generated by air turbulence and vibrations of the upper airway due to its narrowing; snoring sounds may be used as a non-invasive technique to assess upper airway narrowing. Our goal was to develop a subject-specific acoustic model of the upper airway to investigate the impacts of upper airway anatomy, e.g. length, wall thickness and cross-sectional area, on snoring sounds features. To have a subject-specific model for snoring generation, we used measurements of the upper airway length, cross-sectional area and wall thickness from every individual to develop the model. To validate the proposed model, in 20 male individuals, intensity and resonant frequencies of modeled snoring sounds were compared with those measured from recorded snoring sounds during sleep. Based on both modeled and measured results, we found the only factor that may positively and significantly contribute to snoring intensity was narrowing in the upper airway. Furthermore, measured resonant frequencies of snoring were inversely correlated with the upper airway length, which is a risk factor for upper airway collapsibility. These results encourage the use of snoring sounds analysis to assess the upper airway anatomy during sleep. PMID:27210576

  1. A Subject-Specific Acoustic Model of the Upper Airway for Snoring Sounds Generation.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shumit; Bradley, T Douglas; Taheri, Mahsa; Moussavi, Zahra; Yadollahi, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring variations in the upper airway narrowing during sleep is invasive and expensive. Since snoring sounds are generated by air turbulence and vibrations of the upper airway due to its narrowing; snoring sounds may be used as a non-invasive technique to assess upper airway narrowing. Our goal was to develop a subject-specific acoustic model of the upper airway to investigate the impacts of upper airway anatomy, e.g. length, wall thickness and cross-sectional area, on snoring sounds features. To have a subject-specific model for snoring generation, we used measurements of the upper airway length, cross-sectional area and wall thickness from every individual to develop the model. To validate the proposed model, in 20 male individuals, intensity and resonant frequencies of modeled snoring sounds were compared with those measured from recorded snoring sounds during sleep. Based on both modeled and measured results, we found the only factor that may positively and significantly contribute to snoring intensity was narrowing in the upper airway. Furthermore, measured resonant frequencies of snoring were inversely correlated with the upper airway length, which is a risk factor for upper airway collapsibility. These results encourage the use of snoring sounds analysis to assess the upper airway anatomy during sleep. PMID:27210576

  2. Baryon acoustic oscillations in 2D: Modeling redshift-space power spectrum from perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Taruya, Atsushi; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Saito, Shun

    2010-09-15

    We present an improved prescription for the matter power spectrum in redshift space taking proper account of both nonlinear gravitational clustering and redshift distortion, which are of particular importance for accurately modeling baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs). Contrary to the models of redshift distortion phenomenologically introduced but frequently used in the literature, the new model includes the corrections arising from the nonlinear coupling between the density and velocity fields associated with two competitive effects of redshift distortion, i.e., Kaiser and Finger-of-God effects. Based on the improved treatment of perturbation theory for gravitational clustering, we compare our model predictions with the monopole and quadrupole power spectra of N-body simulations, and an excellent agreement is achieved over the scales of BAOs. Potential impacts on constraining dark energy and modified gravity from the redshift-space power spectrum are also investigated based on the Fisher-matrix formalism, particularly focusing on the measurements of the Hubble parameter, angular diameter distance, and growth rate for structure formation. We find that the existing phenomenological models of redshift distortion produce a systematic error on measurements of the angular diameter distance and Hubble parameter by 1%-2%, and the growth-rate parameter by {approx}5%, which would become non-negligible for future galaxy surveys. Correctly modeling redshift distortion is thus essential, and the new prescription for the redshift-space power spectrum including the nonlinear corrections can be used as an accurate theoretical template for anisotropic BAOs.

  3. Analytical modeling of a sandwiched plate piezoelectric transformer-based acoustic-electric transmission channel.

    PubMed

    Lawry, Tristan J; Wilt, Kyle R; Scarton, Henry A; Saulnier, Gary J

    2012-11-01

    The linear propagation of electromagnetic and dilatational waves through a sandwiched plate piezoelectric transformer (SPPT)-based acoustic-electric transmission channel is modeled using the transfer matrix method with mixed-domain two-port ABCD parameters. This SPPT structure is of great interest because it has been explored in recent years as a mechanism for wireless transmission of electrical signals through solid metallic barriers using ultrasound. The model we present is developed to allow for accurate channel performance prediction while greatly reducing the computational complexity associated with 2- and 3-dimensional finite element analysis. As a result, the model primarily considers 1-dimensional wave propagation; however, approximate solutions for higher-dimensional phenomena (e.g., diffraction in the SPPT's metallic core layer) are also incorporated. The model is then assessed by comparing it to the measured wideband frequency response of a physical SPPT-based channel from our previous work. Very strong agreement between the modeled and measured data is observed, confirming the accuracy and utility of the presented model. PMID:23192811

  4. Experimental study of noise sources and acoustic propagation in a turbofan model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewy, S.; Canard-Caruana, S.; Julliard, J.

    1990-10-01

    Experimental studies of the acoustic radiation of subsonic fans mainly due to blade and vane presure fluctuations were performed in the SNECMA 5C2 compressor anechoic facility. A brief description of the test rig is presented noting that the CA5 turbojet engine model fan has a diameter of 47 cm, 48 blades, and a nominal rotation speed of 12,600 rpm. The two chief experiments discussed are the measurement of blade and vane pressure fluctuations by thin-film transducers and the spinning mode analysis of the sound field propagating in the intake duct. Several examples of applications are discussed, and it is shown that an inflow control device, as expected, reduces the aerodynamic disturbances by about 10 dB. Rotor-stator interaction tones are determined by the modal analysis, and it is found that a duct lining with a length of one duct radius could give an insertion loss up to 20 dB in flight.

  5. Acoustic predictions using measured pressures from a model rotor in the DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visintainer, Joseph A.; Burley, Casey L.; Marcolini, Michael A.; Liu, Sandy R.

    1991-01-01

    A contemporary design, 4-bladed United Technologies model rotor with pressure-instrumented blades was tested in the Duits-Nederslandse Windtunnel. Simultaneous acoustic and pressure measurements were made for a wide range of operating conditions. Microphones were optimally positioned at a number of locations in the flow forward of the rotor to measure rotor thickness noise, high-speed impulsive noise (both in the rotor plane), and blade-vortex interaction noise (forward and 25 deg below the rotor plane). The blade surface pressure data are used as aerodynamic input to WOPWOP, which is a state-of-the-art rotor noise prediction program that predicts rotor thickness and loading noise. The predicted results using WOPWOP are compared to the measured noise levels for cases where either thickness noise, blade-vortex interaction noise, or high-speed impulsive noise is the dominant noise mechanism. The comparisons show regions of good agreement, as well as areas where further improvement is necessary.

  6. Weakly nonlinear ion-acoustic excitations in a relativistic model for dense quantum plasma.

    PubMed

    Behery, E E; Haas, F; Kourakis, I

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of linear and nonlinear ionic-scale electrostatic excitations propagating in a magnetized relativistic quantum plasma is studied. A quantum-hydrodynamic model is adopted and degenerate statistics for the electrons is taken into account. The dispersion properties of linear ion acoustic waves are examined in detail. A modified characteristic charge screening length and "sound speed" are introduced, for relativistic quantum plasmas. By employing the reductive perturbation technique, a Zakharov-Kuznetzov-type equation is derived. Using the small-k expansion method, the stability profile of weakly nonlinear slightly supersonic electrostatic pulses is also discussed. The effect of electron degeneracy on the basic characteristics of electrostatic excitations is investigated. The entire analysis is valid in a three-dimensional as well as in two-dimensional geometry. A brief discussion of possible applications in laboratory and space plasmas is included. PMID:26986431

  7. Ocean climate change: comparison of acoustic tomography, satellite altimetry, and modeling

    PubMed

    TAC

    1998-08-28

    Comparisons of gyre-scale acoustic and direct thermal measurements of heat content in the Pacific Ocean, satellite altimeter measurements of sea surface height, and results from a general circulation model show that only about half of the seasonal and year-to-year changes in sea level are attributable to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore complicated. The annual cycle of heat flux is 150 +/- 25 watts per square meter (peak-to-peak, corresponding to a 0.2 degreesC vertically averaged temperature cycle); an interannual change of similar magnitude is also detected. Meteorological estimates of surface heat flux, if accurate, require a large seasonal cycle in the advective heat flux. PMID:9721093

  8. Ion-acoustic shocks with reflected ions: modelling and particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liseykina, T. V.; Dudnikova, G. I.; Vshivkov, V. A.; Malkov, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    > Non-relativistic collisionless shock waves are widespread in space and astrophysical plasmas and are known as efficient particle accelerators. However, our understanding of collisionless shocks, including their structure and the mechanisms whereby they accelerate particles, remains incomplete. We present here the results of numerical modelling of an ion-acoustic collisionless shock based on the one-dimensional kinetic approximation for both electrons and ions with a real mass ratio. Special emphasis is paid to the shock-reflected ions as the main driver of shock dissipation. The reflection efficiency, the velocity distribution of reflected particles and the shock electrostatic structure are studied in terms of the shock parameters. Applications to particle acceleration in geophysical and astrophysical shocks are discussed.

  9. Original coupled FEM/BIE numerical model for analyzing infinite periodic surface acoustic wave transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Frédéric; Ventura, Pascal; Dufilié, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical coupled Finite Element Method/Boundary Integral Equations (FEM/BIE) technique which allows the 2D physical simulation of Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs) transducers infinitely periodic in one direction. This new technique could be generalized to various periodic acoustic 2D simulations. This new method uses an original Variational Formulation (VF) which formally includes harmonic periodic boundary conditions, and, efficient boundary integral formulations allowing to account for the semi-infinite dielectric and piezoelectric spaces. In the case of the piezoelectric semi-space, the Green's functions are efficiently computed using Fahmy-Adler's method [8]. Only periodic boundary conditions are needed, which greatly simplifies the code implementation. This numerical model has been developed to analyze an Inter-Digital Transducer (IDT) with complex electrode shape (unburied, buried or raised electrodes). The use of buried electrodes in SAW transducer designs on quartz has important advantages when compared with unburied metal electrodes on the surface. One important property is the suppression of transverse waveguide modes in transducers. A second advantage is the ability to use thicker metal thereby reducing the resistive losses. Buried electrodes have also been shown to increase the quality factor of Surface Transverse Wave (STW) resonators [15]. This numerical model is a very useful tool for optimizing the electrode geometry. Analysis of raised electrodes is useful for predicting the effects of Reactive Ion Etch (RIE) on the SAW or STW electrical filter characteristics. RIE is commonly used as a frequency trimming technique for SAW or STW filters on Quartz. The first part of the paper presents the theory, and, the second part is devoted to numerical validations and numerical results.

  10. Dynamic Properties of Tympanic Membrane in a Chinchilla Otitis Media Model Measured With Acoustic Loading.

    PubMed

    Yokell, Zachary; Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z

    2015-08-01

    Otitis media is the most common infectious disease in young children, which results in changes in the thickness and mechanical properties of the tympanic membrane (TM) and induces hearing loss. However, there are no published data for the dynamic properties of the TM in otitis media ears, and it is unclear how the mechanical property changes are related to TM thickness variation. This paper reports a study of the measurement of the dynamic properties of the TM in a chinchilla acute otitis media (AOM) model using acoustic loading and laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). AOM was created through transbullar injection of Haemophilus influenzae into the middle ear, and AOM samples were prepared 4 days after inoculation. Vibration of the TM specimen induced by acoustic loading was measured via LDV over a frequency range of 0.1-8 kHz. The experiment was then simulated in a finite element (FE) model, and the inverse-problem solving method was used to determine the complex modulus in the frequency domain. Results from 12 ears (six control and six AOM) show that the storage modulus of the TM from AOM ears was on average 53% higher than that of control ears, while the loss factor was 17.3% higher in control ears than in AOM ears at low-frequency (f < 1 kHz). At high-frequency (e.g., 8000 Hz), there was a mean 40% increase in storage modulus of the TM from AOM compared to control samples. At peak frequency (e.g., 3 kHz), there was a 19.5% increase in loss factor in control samples compared to AOM samples. These findings quantify the changes induced by AOM in the chinchilla TM, namely, a significant increase in both the storage and loss moduli. PMID:25902287

  11. Analyzing Students' Learning Progressions throughout a Teaching Sequence on Acoustic Properties of Materials with a Model-Based Inquiry Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernández, María Isabel; Couso, Digna; Pintó, Roser

    2015-01-01

    The study we have carried out aims to characterize 15-to 16-year-old students' learning progressions throughout the implementation of a teaching-learning sequence on the acoustic properties of materials. Our purpose is to better understand students' modeling processes about this topic and to identify how the instructional design and actual…

  12. Combining COMSOL modeling with acoustic pressure maps to design sono-reactors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zongsu; Weavers, Linda K

    2016-07-01

    Scaled-up and economically viable sonochemical systems are critical for increased use of ultrasound in environmental and chemical processing applications. In this study, computational simulations and acoustic pressure maps were used to design a larger-scale sono-reactor containing a multi-stepped ultrasonic horn. Simulations in COMSOL Multiphysics showed ultrasonic waves emitted from the horn neck and tip, generating multiple regions of high acoustic pressure. The volume of these regions surrounding the horn neck were larger compared with those below the horn tip. The simulated acoustic field was verified by acoustic pressure contour maps generated from hydrophone measurements in a plexiglass box filled with water. These acoustic pressure contour maps revealed an asymmetric and discrete distribution of acoustic pressure due to acoustic cavitation, wave interaction, and water movement by ultrasonic irradiation. The acoustic pressure contour maps were consistent with simulation results in terms of the effective scale of cavitation zones (∼ 10 cm and <5 cm above and below horn tip, respectively). With the mapped acoustic field and identified cavitation location, a cylindrically-shaped sono-reactor with a conical bottom was designed to evaluate the treatment capacity (∼ 5 L) for the multi-stepped horn using COMSOL simulations. In this study, verification of simulation results with experiments demonstrates that coupling of COMSOL simulations with hydrophone measurements is a simple, effective and reliable scientific method to evaluate reactor designs of ultrasonic systems. PMID:26964976

  13. Vibroacoustics of the piano soundboard: Reduced models, mobility synthesis, and acoustical radiation regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutillon, Xavier; Ege, Kerem

    2013-09-01

    In string musical instruments, the sound is radiated by the soundboard, subject to the strings excitation. This vibration of this rather complex structure is described here with models which need only a small number of parameters. Predictions of the models are compared with the results of experiments that have been presented in Ege et al. [Vibroacoustics of the piano soundboard: (non)linearity and modal properties in the low- and mid-frequency ranges, Journal of Sound and Vibration 332 (5) (2013) 1288-1305]. The apparent modal density of the soundboard of an upright piano in playing condition, as seen from various points of the structure, exhibits two well-separated regimes, below and above a frequency flim that is determined by the wood characteristics and by the distance between ribs. Above flim, most modes appear to be localised, presumably due to the irregularity of the spacing and height of the ribs. The low-frequency regime is predicted by a model which consists of coupled sub-structures: the two ribbed areas split by the main bridge and, in most cases, one or two so-called cut-off corners. In order to assess the dynamical properties of each of the subplates (considered here as homogeneous plates), we propose a derivation of the (low-frequency) modal density of an orthotropic homogeneous plate which accounts for the boundary conditions on an arbitrary geometry. Above flim, the soundboard, as seen from a given excitation point, is modelled as a set of three structural wave-guides, namely the three inter-rib spacings surrounding the excitation point. Based on these low- and high-frequency models, computations of the point-mobility and of the apparent modal densities seen at several excitation points match published measurements. The dispersion curve of the wave-guide model displays an acoustical radiation scheme which differs significantly from that of a thin homogeneous plate. It appears that piano dimensioning is such that the subsonic regime of acoustical

  14. Propagation of finite amplitude sound through turbulence: modeling with geometrical acoustics and the parabolic approximation.

    PubMed

    Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Lipkens, Bart; Dallois, Laurent; Hamilton, Mark F; Blackstock, David T

    2002-01-01

    Sonic boom propagation can be affected by atmospheric turbulence. It has been shown that turbulence affects the perceived loudness of sonic booms, mainly by changing its peak pressure and rise time. The models reported here describe the nonlinear propagation of sound through turbulence. Turbulence is modeled as a set of individual realizations of a random temperature or velocity field. In the first model, linear geometrical acoustics is used to trace rays through each realization of the turbulent field. A nonlinear transport equation is then derived along each eigenray connecting the source and receiver. The transport equation is solved by a Pestorius algorithm. In the second model, the KZK equation is modified to account for the effect of a random temperature field and it is then solved numerically. Results from numerical experiments that simulate the propagation of spark-produced N waves through turbulence are presented. It is observed that turbulence decreases, on average, the peak pressure of the N waves and increases the rise time. Nonlinear distortion is less when turbulence is present than without it. The effects of random vector fields are stronger than those of random temperature fields. The location of the caustics and the deformation of the wave front are also presented. These observations confirm the results from the model experiment in which spark-produced N waves are used to simulate sonic boom propagation through a turbulent atmosphere. PMID:11837954

  15. Ultrasonically assisted drilling: A finite-element model incorporating acoustic softening effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadnis, V. A.; Roy, A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasonically assisted drilling (UAD) is a novel machining technique suitable for drilling in hard-to-machine quasi-brittle materials such as carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites (CFRP). UAD has been shown to possess several advantages compared to conventional drilling (CD), including reduced thrust forces, diminished burr formation at drill exit and an overall improvement in roundness and surface finish of the drilled hole. Recently, our in-house experiments of UAD in CFRP composites demonstrated remarkable reductions in thrust-force and torque measurements (average force reductions in excess of 80%) when compared to CD with the same machining parameters. In this study, a 3D finite-element model of drilling in CFRP is developed. In order to model acoustic (ultrasonic) softening effects, a phenomenological model, which accounts for ultrasonically induced plastic strain, was implemented in ABAQUS/Explicit. The model also accounts for dynamic frictional effects, which also contribute to the overall improved machining characteristics in UAD. The model is validated with experimental findings, where an excellent correlation between the reduced thrust force and torque magnitude was achieved.

  16. On the time-mean state of ocean models and the properties of long range acoustic propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dushaw, B. D.; Worcester, P. F.; Dzieciuch, M. A.; Menemenlis, D.

    2013-09-01

    Receptions on three vertical hydrophone arrays from basin-scale acoustic transmissions in the North Pacific during 1996 and 1998 are used to test the time-mean sound-speed properties of the World Ocean Atlas 2005 (WOA05), of an eddying unconstrained simulation of the Parallel Ocean Program (POP), and of three data-constrained solutions provided by the estimating the circulation and climate of the ocean (ECCO) project: a solution based on an approximate Kalman filter from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (ECCO-JPL), a solution based on the adjoint method from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (ECCO-MIT), and an eddying solution based on a Green's function approach from ECCO, Phase II (ECCO2). Predictions for arrival patterns using annual average WOA05 fields match observations to within small travel time offsets (0.3-1.0 s). Predictions for arrival patterns from the models differ substantially from the measured arrival patterns, from the WOA05 climatology, and from each other, both in terms of travel time and in the structure of the arrival patterns. The acoustic arrival patterns are sensitive to the vertical gradients of sound speed that govern acoustic propagation. Basin-scale acoustic transmissions, therefore, provide stringent tests of the vertical temperature structure of ocean state estimates. This structure ultimately influences the mixing between the surface waters and the ocean interior. The relatively good agreement of the acoustic data with the more recent ECCO solutions indicates that numerical ocean models have reached a level of accuracy where the acoustic data can provide useful additional constraints for ocean state estimation.

  17. 3D frequency-domain finite-difference modeling of acoustic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present a 3D frequency-domain finite-difference method for acoustic wave propagation modeling. This method is developed as a tool to perform 3D frequency-domain full-waveform inversion of wide-angle seismic data. For wide-angle data, frequency-domain full-waveform inversion can be applied only to few discrete frequencies to develop reliable velocity model. Frequency-domain finite-difference (FD) modeling of wave propagation requires resolution of a huge sparse system of linear equations. If this system can be solved with a direct method, solutions for multiple sources can be computed efficiently once the underlying matrix has been factorized. The drawback of the direct method is the memory requirement resulting from the fill-in of the matrix during factorization. We assess in this study whether representative problems can be addressed in 3D geometry with such approach. We start from the velocity-stress formulation of the 3D acoustic wave equation. The spatial derivatives are discretized with second-order accurate staggered-grid stencil on different coordinate systems such that the axis span over as many directions as possible. Once the discrete equations were developed on each coordinate system, the particle velocity fields are eliminated from the first-order hyperbolic system (following the so-called parsimonious staggered-grid method) leading to second-order elliptic wave equations in pressure. The second-order wave equations discretized on each coordinate system are combined linearly to mitigate the numerical anisotropy. Secondly, grid dispersion is minimized by replacing the mass term at the collocation point by its weighted averaging over all the grid points of the stencil. Use of second-order accurate staggered- grid stencil allows to reduce the bandwidth of the matrix to be factorized. The final stencil incorporates 27 points. Absorbing conditions are PML. The system is solved using the parallel direct solver MUMPS developed for distributed

  18. Analytical modelling of acoustic emission from buried or surface-breaking cracks under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Khalifa, W.; Jezzine, K.; Hello, G.; Grondel, S.

    2012-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a non-destructive testing method used in various industries (aerospace, petrochemical and pressure-vessel industries in general, power generation, civil engineering, mechanical engineering, etc...) for the examination of large structures subjected to various stresses (e.g. mechanical loading).The energy released by a defect under stress (the AE phenomenon) can propagate as guided waves in thin structures or as surface Rayleigh waves in thick ones. Sensors (possibly permanently) are positioned at various locations on the structure under examination and are assumed to be sensitive to these waves. Then, post-processing tools typically based on signal processing and triangulation algorithms can be used to inverse these data, allowing one to estimate the position of the defect from which emanates the waves measured. The French Atomic Energy Commission is engaged in the development of tools for simulating AE examinations. These tools are based on specific models for the AE sources, for the propagation of guided or Rayleigh waves and for the behaviour of AE sensors. Here, the coupling of a fracture mechanics based model for AE source and surface/guided wave propagation models is achieved through an integral formulation relying on the elastodynamic reciprocity principle. As a first approximation, a simple piston-like model is used to predict the sensitivity of AE sensors. Predictions computed by our simulation tool are compared to results from the literature for validation purpose.

  19. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 2; Advanced Treatment Impedance Models for High Frequency Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.; Kwan, H. W.

    1999-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to develop improved models for the acoustic impedance of treatment panels at high frequencies, for application to subscale treatment designs. Effects that cause significant deviation of the impedance from simple geometric scaling are examined in detail, an improved high-frequency impedance model is developed, and the improved model is correlated with high-frequency impedance measurements. Only single-degree-of-freedom honeycomb sandwich resonator panels with either perforated sheet or "linear" wiremesh faceplates are considered. The objective is to understand those effects that cause the simple single-degree-of- freedom resonator panels to deviate at the higher-scaled frequency from the impedance that would be obtained at the corresponding full-scale frequency. This will allow the subscale panel to be designed to achieve a specified impedance spectrum over at least a limited range of frequencies. An advanced impedance prediction model has been developed that accounts for some of the known effects at high frequency that have previously been ignored as a small source of error for full-scale frequency ranges.

  20. Open-circuit sensitivity model based on empirical parameters for a capacitive-type MEMS acoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaewoo; Jeon, J. H.; Je, C. H.; Lee, S. Q.; Yang, W. S.; Lee, S.-G.

    2016-03-01

    An empirical-based open-circuit sensitivity model for a capacitive-type MEMS acoustic sensor is presented. To intuitively evaluate the characteristic of the open-circuit sensitivity, the empirical-based model is proposed and analysed by using a lumped spring-mass model and a pad test sample without a parallel plate capacitor for the parasitic capacitance. The model is composed of three different parameter groups: empirical, theoretical, and mixed data. The empirical residual stress from the measured pull-in voltage of 16.7 V and the measured surface topology of the diaphragm were extracted as +13 MPa, resulting in the effective spring constant of 110.9 N/m. The parasitic capacitance for two probing pads including the substrate part was 0.25 pF. Furthermore, to verify the proposed model, the modelled open-circuit sensitivity was compared with the measured value. The MEMS acoustic sensor had an open- circuit sensitivity of -43.0 dBV/Pa at 1 kHz with a bias of 10 V, while the modelled open- circuit sensitivity was -42.9 dBV/Pa, which showed good agreement in the range from 100 Hz to 18 kHz. This validates the empirical-based open-circuit sensitivity model for designing capacitive-type MEMS acoustic sensors.

  1. Development and validation of a combined phased acoustical radiosity and image source model for predicting sound fields in rooms.

    PubMed

    Marbjerg, Gerd; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Nilsson, Erling

    2015-09-01

    A model, combining acoustical radiosity and the image source method, including phase shifts on reflection, has been developed. The model is denoted Phased Acoustical Radiosity and Image Source Method (PARISM), and it has been developed in order to be able to model both specular and diffuse reflections with complex-valued and angle-dependent boundary conditions. This paper mainly describes the combination of the two models and the implementation of the angle-dependent boundary conditions. It furthermore describes how a pressure impulse response is obtained from the energy-based acoustical radiosity by regarding the model as being stochastic. Three methods of implementation are proposed and investigated, and finally, recommendations are made for their use. Validation of the image source method is done by comparison with finite element simulations of a rectangular room with a porous absorber ceiling. Results from the full model are compared with results from other simulation tools and with measurements. The comparisons of the full model are done for real-valued and angle-independent surface properties. The proposed model agrees well with both the measured results and the alternative theories, and furthermore shows a more realistic spatial variation than energy-based methods due to the fact that interference is considered. PMID:26428783

  2. Effect of Model-dependent Covariance Matrix for Studying Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labatie, A.; Starck, J. L.; Lachièze-Rey, M.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale structures in the universe are a powerful tool to test cosmological models and constrain cosmological parameters. A particular feature of interest comes from baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), which are sound waves traveling in the hot plasma of the early universe that stopped at the recombination time. This feature can be observed as a localized bump in the correlation function at the scale of the sound horizon rs . As such, it provides a standard ruler and a lot of constraining power in the correlation function analysis of galaxy surveys. Moreover, the detection of BAOs at the expected scale gives strong support to cosmological models. Both of these studies (BAO detection and parameter constraints) rely on a statistical modeling of the measured correlation function \\hat{\\xi }. Usually \\hat{\\xi } is assumed to be Gaussian, with a mean ξθ depending on the cosmological model and a covariance matrix C generally approximated as a constant (i.e., independent of the model). In this article, we study whether a realistic model-dependent C θ changes the results of cosmological parameter constraints compared to the approximation of a constant covariance matrix C. For this purpose, we use a new procedure to generate lognormal realizations of the luminous red galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to obtain a model-dependent C θ in a reasonable time. The approximation of C θ as a constant creates small changes in the cosmological parameter constraints on our sample. We quantify this modeling error using a lot of simulations and find that it only has a marginal influence on cosmological parameter constraints for current and next-generation galaxy surveys. It can be approximately taken into account by extending the 1σ intervals by a factor ≈1.3.

  3. EFFECT OF MODEL-DEPENDENT COVARIANCE MATRIX FOR STUDYING BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Labatie, A.; Starck, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale structures in the universe are a powerful tool to test cosmological models and constrain cosmological parameters. A particular feature of interest comes from baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), which are sound waves traveling in the hot plasma of the early universe that stopped at the recombination time. This feature can be observed as a localized bump in the correlation function at the scale of the sound horizon r{sub s} . As such, it provides a standard ruler and a lot of constraining power in the correlation function analysis of galaxy surveys. Moreover, the detection of BAOs at the expected scale gives strong support to cosmological models. Both of these studies (BAO detection and parameter constraints) rely on a statistical modeling of the measured correlation function {xi}-circumflex. Usually {xi}-circumflex is assumed to be Gaussian, with a mean {xi}{sub {theta}} depending on the cosmological model and a covariance matrix C generally approximated as a constant (i.e., independent of the model). In this article, we study whether a realistic model-dependent C {sub {theta}} changes the results of cosmological parameter constraints compared to the approximation of a constant covariance matrix C. For this purpose, we use a new procedure to generate lognormal realizations of the luminous red galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to obtain a model-dependent C {sub {theta}} in a reasonable time. The approximation of C {sub {theta}} as a constant creates small changes in the cosmological parameter constraints on our sample. We quantify this modeling error using a lot of simulations and find that it only has a marginal influence on cosmological parameter constraints for current and next-generation galaxy surveys. It can be approximately taken into account by extending the 1{sigma} intervals by a factor Almost-Equal-To 1.3.

  4. Localized acoustic surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  5. Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling: Spectral element modeling of the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbuch, Gil; Price, Colin

    2015-04-01

    Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling: Spectral element modeling of the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source. G. Averbuch, C. Price Department of Geosciences, Tel Aviv University, Israel Infrasound is one of the four Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty technologies for monitoring nuclear explosions. This technology measures the acoustic waves generated by the explosions followed by their propagation through the atmosphere. There are also natural phenomena that can act as an infrasound sources like sprites, volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. The infrasound waves generated from theses phenomena can also be detected by the infrasound arrays. In order to study the behavior of these waves, i.e. the physics of wave propagation in the atmosphere, their evolution and their trajectories, numerical methods are required. This presentation will deal with the evolution of acoustic waves generated by underground sources (earthquakes and underground explosions). A 2D Spectral elements formulation for lithosphere-atmosphere coupling will be presented. The formulation includes the elastic wave equation for the seismic waves and the momentum, mass and state equations for the acoustic waves in a moving stratified atmosphere. The coupling of the two media is made by boundary conditions that ensures the continuity of traction and velocity (displacement) in the normal component to the interface. This work has several objectives. The first is to study the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source. The second is to derive transmission coefficients for the energy flux with respect to the seismic magnitude and earth density. The third will be the generation of seismic waves from acoustic waves in the atmosphere. Is it possible?

  6. Mismatched quantum filtering and entropic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Mankei

    2014-03-01

    Quantum filtering is a signal processing technique that estimates the posterior state of a quantum system under continuous measurements and has become a standard tool in quantum information processing, with applications in quantum state preparation, quantum metrology, and quantum control. If the filter assumes a wrong model due to assumptions or approximations, however, the estimation accuracy is bound to suffer. In this talk I shall present formulas that relate the error penalty caused by quantum filter mismatch to the relative entropy between the true model and the nominal model, with one formula for Gaussian measurements, such as homodyne detection, and another for Poissonian measurements, such as photon counting. These formulas generalize recent seminal results in classical information theory and provide new operational meanings to relative entropy, mutual information, and channel capacity in the context of quantum experiments. See http://arxiv.org/abs/1310.0291 for details. This work is supported by the Singapore National Research Foundation under NRF Grant No. NRF-NRFF2011-07.

  7. A numerical model for ocean ultra-low frequency noise: wave-generated acoustic-gravity and Rayleigh modes.

    PubMed

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Lavanant, Thibaut; Obrebski, Mathias; Marié, Louis; Royer, Jean-Yves; d'Eu, Jean-François; Howe, Bruce M; Lukas, Roger; Aucan, Jerome

    2013-10-01

    The generation of ultra-low frequency acoustic noise (0.1 to 1 Hz) by the nonlinear interaction of ocean surface gravity waves is well established. More controversial are the quantitative theories that attempt to predict the recorded noise levels and their variability. Here a single theoretical framework is used to predict the noise level associated with propagating pseudo-Rayleigh modes and evanescent acoustic-gravity modes. The latter are dominant only within 200 m from the sea surface, in shallow or deep water. At depths larger than 500 m, the comparison of a numerical noise model with hydrophone records from two open-ocean sites near Hawaii and the Kerguelen islands reveal: (a) Deep ocean acoustic noise at frequencies 0.1 to 1 Hz is consistent with the Rayleigh wave theory, in which the presence of the ocean bottom amplifies the noise by 10 to 20 dB; (b) in agreement with previous results, the local maxima in the noise spectrum support the theoretical prediction for the vertical structure of acoustic modes; and (c) noise level and variability are well predicted for frequencies up to 0.4 Hz. Above 0.6 Hz, the model results are less accurate, probably due to the poor estimation of the directional properties of wind-waves with frequencies higher than 0.3 Hz. PMID:24116520

  8. Small scale model static acoustic investigation of hybrid high lift systems combining upper surface blowing with the internally blown flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, T. W.; Rathburn, E. A.

    1974-01-01

    A static acoustic and propulsion test of a small radius Jacobs-Hurkamp and a large radius Flex Flap combined with four upper surface blowing (USB) nozzles was performed. Nozzle force and flow data, flap trailing edge total pressure survey data, and acoustic data were obtained. Jacobs-Hurkamp flap surface pressure data, flow visualization photographs, and spoiler acoustic data from the limited mid-year tests are reported. A pressure ratio range of 1.2 to 1.5 was investigated for the USB nozzles and for the auxiliary blowing slots. The acoustic data were scaled to a four-engine STOL airplane of roughly 110,000 kilograms or 50,000 pounds gross weight, corresponding to a model scale of approximately 0.2 for the nozzles without deflector. The model nozzle scale is actually reduced to about .17 with deflector although all results in this report assume 0.2 scale factor. Trailing edge pressure surveys indicated that poor flow attachment was obtained even at large flow impingement angles unless a nozzle deflector plate was used. Good attachment was obtained with the aspect ratio four nozzle with deflector, confirming the small scale wind tunnel tests.

  9. Optimality criteria-based topology optimization of a bi-material model for acoustic-structural coupled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Linyuan; Zhao, Guozhong

    2016-06-01

    This article investigates topology optimization of a bi-material model for acoustic-structural coupled systems. The design variables are volume fractions of inclusion material in a bi-material model constructed by the microstructure-based design domain method (MDDM). The design objective is the minimization of sound pressure level (SPL) in an interior acoustic medium. Sensitivities of SPL with respect to topological design variables are derived concretely by the adjoint method. A relaxed form of optimality criteria (OC) is developed for solving the acoustic-structural coupled optimization problem to find the optimum bi-material distribution. Based on OC and the adjoint method, a topology optimization method to deal with large calculations in acoustic-structural coupled problems is proposed. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the applications of topology optimization for a bi-material plate under a low single-frequency excitation and an aerospace structure under a low frequency-band excitation, and to prove the efficiency of the adjoint method and the relaxed form of OC.

  10. Acoustic Surveys of a Scaled-Model CESTOL Transport Aircraft in Static and Forward Speed Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, Nathan; Horne, Clifton

    2012-01-01

    An 11% scale-model of a Cruise-Efficient Short Take-off and Landing (CESTOL) scalemodel test was recently completed. The test was conducted in the AEDC National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The model included two over-wing pod-mounted turbine propulsion simulators (TPS). The hybrid blended wing-body used a circulation control wing (CCW) with leadingand trailing-edge blowing. The bulk of the test matrix included three forward velocities (40 kts, 60 kts, and 100kts), angle-of-attack variation between -5 and 25 , and CCW mass flow variation. Seven strut-mounted microphones outboard of the left wing provided source directivity. A phased microphone array was mounted outboard of the right wing for source location. The goal of this paper is to provide a preliminary look at the acoustic data acquired during the Advanced Model for Extreme Lift and Improved Aeroacoustics (AMELIA) test for 0 angle-of-attack and 0 sideslip conditions. Data presented provides a good overview of the test conditions and the signal-to-noise quality of the data. TPS height variation showed a difference of 2 dB to 3 dB due to wing shielding. Variation of slot mass flow showed increases of 12 dB to 26 dB above the airframe noise and the TPS increased the overall levels an additional 5 dB to 10 dB.

  11. Investigation of Systolic Heart Murmurs with Computational Hemo-Acoustic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Hee; Mittal, Rajat; Abraham, Theodore

    2011-11-01

    Detection and analysis of heart murmurs generated by abnormal blood flows can be used as a low cost, non-invasive routine screening for the heart disease. Phonocardiography is an approach which combines electronic sound detection with automated signal analysis for detecting abnormal heart murmurs but the current approach relies primarily on empirical statistical correlations and ignores the underlying physics of flow-induced sound generation and propagation. In the present study, we investigate the characteristics and generation mechanism of systolic heart murmurs associated with the obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HOCM) using the computational fluid dynamics and acoustics modelings. The hemodynamic flow field in left ventricle outflow tract is simulated with the immersed boundary, incompressible Navier-Stokes solver, and the sound generated by the blood flow is modeled by the linearized perturbed compressible equations. The propagation of the sound through the surrounding tissues is also modeled by the linear structural wave equations. The simulated murmurs are analyzed for the timing, frequency, and intensity and the correlation with the hemodynamics is closely investigated to identify the source mechanisms.

  12. Viscoelastic characterization of thin tissues using acoustic radiation force and model-based inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzina, Bojan B.; Tuleubekov, Kairat; Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2009-07-01

    By means of the viscoelastodynamic model for a two-layer solid-fluid system and a detailed account of the locally induced acoustic radiation force, a rational analytical and computational framework is established for the viscoelastic characterization of thin tissues from high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) measurements. For practical applications, the back-analysis is set up to interpret the frequency response function, signifying the tissue's axial displacement (captured by the imaging transducer) per squared voltage driving the 'pushing' transducer, as experimental input. On parametrizing the tissue's viscoelastic behavior in terms of the standard linear model, the proposed methodology is applied to a set of measurements performed on tissue-mimicking phantom constructs with thicknesses ranging from 0.5 to 4 mm. The results demonstrate that the model-based inversion, which carefully mimics the local boundary conditions and applied ultrasound excitation, yields viscoelastic properties for the phantom that are virtually invariant over the range of specimen thicknesses tested. Beyond its immediate application to in vitro viscoelastic characterization of thin excised tissues and tissue constructs, the proposed methodology may also find use in the characterization of skin or skin lesions over bone in vivo.

  13. Modeling the measurement of ultrasonic beams transmitted through a penetrable acoustic cone.

    PubMed

    Huthwaite, Peter; Simonetti, Francesco

    2012-10-01

    The interaction of ultrasonic beams with conical scatterers is governed by a combination of diffraction effects occurring at the aperture of the acoustic source/receiver and refraction through the cone. Accordingly, the outcome of a transmission experiment is dependent upon the many physical parameters characterizing the transducers and the cone. We develop a simplified model which describes the deflection caused by refraction through the cone using ray theory, then uses Huygens' summation to calculate the transducer response from this deflection. The model's accuracy is verified by comparison to simulated data. The model shows that transmission occurs in two different regimes, depending on the parameters of the particular problem. In the first regime, the cone alters the spatial phase distribution of the incident field along the receiver's aperture, whereas its amplitude remains almost unchanged. Because the receiver integrates the field over the aperture, the phasing affects the measurements via constructive and destructive interference. In the second regime, the phase alteration is accompanied by large amplitude variations around an average value that is significantly smaller than the amplitude observed in the first regime. The approximation will aid the design of ultrasound tomography arrays, such as those being developed for breast cancer detection. PMID:23143578

  14. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields: A combined measurement and modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Canney, Michael S.; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields is important both for the accurate prediction of ultrasound induced bioeffects in tissues and for the development of regulatory standards for clinical HIFU devices. In this paper, a method to determine HIFU field parameters at and around the focus is proposed. Nonlinear pressure waveforms were measured and modeled in water and in a tissue-mimicking gel phantom for a 2 MHz transducer with an aperture and focal length of 4.4 cm. Measurements were performed with a fiber optic probe hydrophone at intensity levels up to 24 000 W∕cm2. The inputs to a Khokhlov–Zabolotskaya–Kuznetsov-type numerical model were determined based on experimental low amplitude beam plots. Strongly asymmetric waveforms with peak positive pressures up to 80 MPa and peak negative pressures up to 15 MPa were obtained both numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements agreed well; however, when steep shocks were present in the waveform at focal intensity levels higher than 6000 W∕cm2, lower values of the peak positive pressure were observed in the measured waveforms. This underrepresentation was attributed mainly to the limited hydrophone bandwidth of 100 MHz. It is shown that a combination of measurements and modeling is necessary to enable accurate characterization of HIFU fields. PMID:19062878

  15. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio, low tip speed fan (QEP fan B scale model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Minzner, W. R.; Paas, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A scale model (0.484 scale factor) of a single stage fan designed for a 1.5 pressure ratio and 1160 ft/sec tip speed was tested to determine its noise characteristics. The fan had 26 blades and 60 outlet guide vanes, with vanes spaced two rotor blade aerodynamic chords from the blades. The effects of speed, exhaust nozzle area and fan frame acoustic treatment on the scale model's noise characteristics were investigated.

  16. How Tolerant are Membrane Simulations with Mismatch in Area per Lipid between Leaflets?

    PubMed

    Park, Soohyung; Beaven, Andrew H; Klauda, Jeffery B; Im, Wonpil

    2015-07-14

    Difficulties in estimating the correct number of lipids in each leaflet of complex bilayer membrane simulation systems make it inevitable to introduce a mismatch in lipid packing (i.e., area per lipid) and thus alter the lateral pressure of each leaflet. To investigate potential impacts of such mismatch on simulation results, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of saturated and monounsaturated lipid bilayers with and without gramicidin A or WALP23 at various mismatches by adjusting the number of lipids in the lower leaflet from no mismatch to a 25% reduction compared to that in the upper leaflet. All simulations were stable under the constant pressure barostat, but the mismatch induces asymmetric lipid packing between the leaflets, so that the upper leaflet becomes more ordered, and the lower leaflet becomes less ordered. The mismatch impacts on various bilayer properties are mild up to 5-10% mismatch, and bilayers with fully saturated chains appear to be more prone to these impacts than those with unsaturated tails. The nonvanishing leaflet surface tensions and the free energy derivatives with respect to the bilayer curvature indicate that the bilayer would be energetically unstable in the presence of mismatch. We propose a quantitative criterion for allowable mismatch based on the energetics derived from a continuum elastic model, which grows as a square root of the number of the lipids in the system. On the basis of this criterion, we infer that the area per lipid mismatch up to 5% would be tolerable in various membrane simulations of reasonable all-atom system sizes (40-160 lipids per leaflet). PMID:26575780

  17. Enhanced densification of metal powders by transformation-mismatch plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Schuh, C.; Noel, P.; Dunand, D.C.

    2000-05-11

    The densification of titanium powders is investigated in uniaxial die pressing experiments carried out isothermally at 980 C (in the {beta}-field of titanium) and during thermal cycling between 860 and 980 C (about the {alpha}/{beta} phase transformation of titanium). Thermal cycling is found to enhance densification kinetics through the emergence of transformation-mismatch plasticity (the mechanism responsible for transformation superplasticity) as a densification mechanism. The isothermal hot-pressing data compare favorably with existing models of powder densification, and these models are successfully adapted to the case of transformation-mismatch plasticity during thermal cycling. Similar conclusions are reached for the densification of titanium powders containing 1, 5, or 10 vol.% ZrO{sub 2} particles. However, the addition of ZrO{sub 2} hinders densification by dissolving in the titanium matrix during the hot-pressing procedure.

  18. Acoustical modeling study of the open test section of the NASA Langley V/STOL wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ver, I. L.; Andersen, D. W.; Bliss, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    An acoustic model study was carried out to identify effective sound absorbing treatment of strategically located surfaces in an open wind tunnel test section. Also an aerodynamic study done concurrently, sought to find measures to control low frequency jet pulsations which occur when the tunnel is operated in its open test section configuration. The acoustical modeling study indicated that lining of the raised ceiling and the test section floor immediately below it, results in a substantial improvement. The aerodynamic model study indicated that: (1) the low frequency jet pulsations are most likely caused or maintained by coupling of aerodynamic and aeroacoustic phenomena in the closed tunnel circuit, (2) replacing the hard collector cowl with a geometrically identical but porous fiber metal surface of 100 mks rayls flow resistance does not result in any noticable reduction of the test section noise caused by the impingement of the turbulent flow on the cowl.

  19. Fast algorithm for nonlinear acoustics and high-intensity focused ultrasound modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curra, Francesco P.; Kargl, Steven G.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2001-05-01

    The inhomogeneous characteristics of biological media and the nonlinear nature of sound propagation at high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) regimes make accurate modeling of real HIFU applications a challenging task in terms of computational time and resources. A fast, dynamically adaptive time-domain method that drastically reduces these pitfalls is presented for the solution of multidimensional HIFU problems in complex geometries. The model, based on lifted interpolating second-generation wavelets in a collocation approach, consists of the coupled solution of the full-wave nonlinear equation of sound with the bioheat equation for temperature computation. It accounts for nonlinear acoustic propagation, arbitrary frequency power law for attenuation, multiple reflections, and backscattered fields. The characteristic localization of wavelets in both space and wave number domains allows for accurate simulations of strong material inhomogeneities and steep nonlinear processes at a reduced number of collocation points, while the natural multiresolution analysis of wavelets decomposition introduces automatic grid refinement in regions where localized structures are present. Compared to standard finite-difference or spectral schemes on uniform fine grids, this method shows significant savings in computational time and memory requirements proportional with the dimensionality of the problem. [Work supported by U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity through the University.

  20. Monitoring acoustic emission (AE) energy in slurry impingement using a new model for particle impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droubi, M. G.; Reuben, R. L.; White, G.

    2015-10-01

    A series of systematic impact tests have been carried out to investigate the influence of particle size, free stream velocity, particle impact angle, and nominal particle concentration on the amount of energy dissipated in a carbon steel target using a slurry impingement erosion test rig, as indicated by the acoustic emission (AE) recorded by a sensor mounted on the back of the target. Silica sand particles of mean particle size 152.5, 231, and 362.5 μm were used for impingement on the target at angles varying between 30° and 90° while the free stream velocity was changed between 4.2 and 12.7 m/s. In previous work by the authors, it was demonstrated that the AE time series associated with particle-laden air striking a carbon steel target could be described as the cumulation of individual particle arrival events each drawn from a statistical distribution model. The high arrival rate involved in a slurry jet poses challenges in resolving individual particle impact signatures in the AE record, and so the model has been extended in this paper to account for different particle carrier-fluids and to situations where arrivals cannot necessarily be resolved.

  1. Array model interpolation and subband iterative adaptive filters applied to beamforming-based acoustic echo cancellation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Chi, Li-Wen; Liang, Li-Huang; Lo, Yi-Yang

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, an evolutionary exposition is given in regard to the enhancing strategies for acoustic echo cancellers (AECs). A fixed beamformer (FBF) is utilized to focus on the near-end speaker while suppressing the echo from the far end. In reality, the array steering vector could differ considerably from the ideal freefield plane wave model. Therefore, an experimental procedure is developed to interpolate a practical array model from the measured frequency responses. Subband (SB) filtering with polyphase implementation is exploited to accelerate the cancellation process. Generalized sidelobe canceller (GSC) composed of an FBF and an adaptive blocking module is combined with AEC to maximize cancellation performance. Another enhancement is an internal iteration (IIT) procedure that enables efficient convergence in the adaptive SB filters within a sample time. Objective tests in terms of echo return loss enhancement (ERLE), perceptual evaluation of speech quality (PESQ), word recognition rate for automatic speech recognition (ASR), and subjective listening tests are conducted to validate the proposed AEC approaches. The results show that the GSC-SB-AEC-IIT approach has attained the highest ERLE without speech quality degradation, even in double-talk scenarios. PMID:26936567

  2. Acoustic test and analysis of a counterrotating prop-fan model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magliozzi, Bernard; Brown, Paul; Parzych, David

    1987-01-01

    Results of acoustic tests of a 62.2 cm (24.5 in) diameter model counterrotating Prop-Fan are presented. The model was tested as a tractor and a pusher downstream of a pylon, both at 0 degrees and at 4 degrees angle-of-attack. The effects on noise of spacing between rotors and between the pylons and the rotors were also measured. Effects of rotor spacing were found to cause small changes in noise over the range of spacings tested. The presence of the pylon resulted in a 2 to 3 EPNdB increase in noise. Angle-of-attack effects showed an increase of 3 to 4 EPNdB for the tractor and only about 1 EPNdB for the pusher configuration. Speed was found to be the strongest parameter in minimizing noise. However, the decrease in noise with tip speeds below 200 m/sec (650 ft/sec) became significantly smaller than at higher tip speeds. Comparison of noise spectra between single rotation and counterrotating Prop-Fans showed that the counterrotating Prop-Fan has significantly higher levels of higher frequency noise which radiates in the forward direction. Correlations between measurement and prediction are discussed. Predictions are made of far-field noise during takeoff and near-field noise during cruise.

  3. Spatio-temporal source modeling of evoked potentials to acoustic and cochlear implant stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ponton, C W; Don, M; Waring, M D; Eggermont, J J; Masuda, A

    1993-01-01

    Spatio-temporal source modeling (STSM) of event-related potentials was used to estimate the loci and characteristics of cortical activity evoked by acoustic stimulation in normal hearing subjects and by electrical stimulation in cochlear implant (CI) subjects. In both groups of subjects, source solutions obtained for the N1/P2 complex were located in the superior half of the temporal lobe in the head model. Results indicate that it may be possible to determine whether stimulation of different implant channels activates different regions of cochleotopically organized auditory cortex. Auditory system activation can be assessed further by examining the characteristics of the source wave forms. For example, subjects whose cochlear implants provided auditory sensations and normal hearing subjects had similar source activity. In contrast, a subject in whom implant activation evoked eyelid movements exhibited different source wave forms. STSM analysis may provide an electrophysiological technique for guiding rehabilitation programs based on the capabilities of the individual implant user and for disentangling the complex response patterns to electrical stimulation of the brain. PMID:7694834

  4. A finite element propagation model for extracting normal incidence impedance in nonprogressive acoustic wave fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Tanner, Sharon E.; Parrott, Tony L.

    1995-01-01

    A propagation model method for extracting the normal incidence impedance of an acoustic material installed as a finite length segment in a wall of a duct carrying a nonprogressive wave field is presented. The method recasts the determination of the unknown impedance as the minimization of the normalized wall pressure error function. A finite element propagation model is combined with a coarse/fine grid impedance plane search technique to extract the impedance of the material. Results are presented for three different materials for which the impedance is known. For each material, the input data required for the prediction scheme was computed from modal theory and then contaminated by random error. The finite element method reproduces the known impedance of each material almost exactly for random errors typical of those found in many measurement environments. Thus, the method developed here provides a means for determining the impedance of materials in a nonprogressirve wave environment such as that usually encountered in a commercial aircraft engine and most laboratory settings.

  5. Acoustic test and analysis of a counterrotating prop-fan model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliozzi, Bernard; Brown, Paul; Parzych, David

    1987-10-01

    Results of acoustic tests of a 62.2 cm (24.5 in) diameter model counterrotating Prop-Fan are presented. The model was tested as a tractor and a pusher downstream of a pylon, both at 0 degrees and at 4 degrees angle-of-attack. The effects on noise of spacing between rotors and between the pylons and the rotors were also measured. Effects of rotor spacing were found to cause small changes in noise over the range of spacings tested. The presence of the pylon resulted in a 2 to 3 EPNdB increase in noise. Angle-of-attack effects showed an increase of 3 to 4 EPNdB for the tractor and only about 1 EPNdB for the pusher configuration. Speed was found to be the strongest parameter in minimizing noise. However, the decrease in noise with tip speeds below 200 m/sec (650 ft/sec) became significantly smaller than at higher tip speeds. Comparison of noise spectra between single rotation and counterrotating Prop-Fans showed that the counterrotating Prop-Fan has significantly higher levels of higher frequency noise which radiates in the forward direction. Correlations between measurement and prediction are discussed. Predictions are made of far-field noise during takeoff and near-field noise during cruise.

  6. Model-independent Evidence for Dark Energy Evolution from Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, V.; Shafieloo, A.; Starobinsky, A. A.

    2014-10-01

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) allow us to determine the expansion history of the universe, thereby shedding light on the nature of dark energy. Recent observations of BAOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR9 and DR11 have provided us with statistically independent measurements of H(z) at redshifts of 0.57 and 2.34, respectively. We show that these measurements can be used to test the cosmological constant hypothesis in a model-independent manner by means of an improved version of the Om diagnostic. Our results indicate that the SDSS DR11 measurement of H(z) = 222 ± 7 km s-1 Mpc-1 at z = 2.34, when taken in tandem with measurements of H(z) at lower redshifts, imply considerable tension with the standard ΛCDM model. Our estimation of the new diagnostic Omh 2 from SDSS DR9 and DR11 data, namely, Omh 2 ≈ 0.122 ± 0.01, which is equivalent to Ω0m h 2 for the spatially flat ΛCDM model, is in tension with the value Ω0m h 2 = 0.1426 ± 0.0025 determined for ΛCDM from Planck+WP. This tension is alleviated in models in which the cosmological constant was dynamically screened (compensated) in the past. Such evolving dark energy models display a pole in the effective equation of state of dark energy at high redshifts, which emerges as a smoking gun test for these theories.

  7. MODEL-INDEPENDENT EVIDENCE FOR DARK ENERGY EVOLUTION FROM BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sahni, V.; Shafieloo, A.; Starobinsky, A. A. E-mail: arman@apctp.org

    2014-10-01

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) allow us to determine the expansion history of the universe, thereby shedding light on the nature of dark energy. Recent observations of BAOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR9 and DR11 have provided us with statistically independent measurements of H(z) at redshifts of 0.57 and 2.34, respectively. We show that these measurements can be used to test the cosmological constant hypothesis in a model-independent manner by means of an improved version of the Om diagnostic. Our results indicate that the SDSS DR11 measurement of H(z) = 222 ± 7 km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1} at z = 2.34, when taken in tandem with measurements of H(z) at lower redshifts, imply considerable tension with the standard ΛCDM model. Our estimation of the new diagnostic Omh {sup 2} from SDSS DR9 and DR11 data, namely, Omh {sup 2} ≈ 0.122 ± 0.01, which is equivalent to Ω{sub 0m} h {sup 2} for the spatially flat ΛCDM model, is in tension with the value Ω{sub 0m} h {sup 2} = 0.1426 ± 0.0025 determined for ΛCDM from Planck+WP. This tension is alleviated in models in which the cosmological constant was dynamically screened (compensated) in the past. Such evolving dark energy models display a pole in the effective equation of state of dark energy at high redshifts, which emerges as a smoking gun test for these theories.

  8. A model of acoustic interspeaker variability based on the concept of formant-cavity affiliation.

    PubMed

    Apostol, Lian; Perrier, Pascal; Bailly, Gérard

    2004-01-01

    A method is proposed to model the interspeaker variability of formant patterns for oral vowels. It is assumed that this variability originates in the differences existing among speakers in the respective lengths of their front and back vocal-tract cavities. In order to characterize, from the spectral description of the acoustic speech signal, these vocal-tract differences between speakers, each formant is interpreted, according to the concept of formant-cavity affiliation, as a resonance of a specific vocal-tract cavity. Its frequency can thus be directly related to the corresponding cavity length, and a transformation model can be proposed from a speaker A to a speaker B on the basis of the frequency ratios of the formants corresponding to the same resonances. In order to minimize the number of sounds to be recorded for each speaker in order to carry out this speaker transformation, the frequency ratios are exactly computed only for the three extreme cardinal vowels [i, a, u] and they are approximated for the remaining vowels through an interpolation function. The method is evaluated through its capacity to transform the (F1,F2) formant patterns of eight oral vowels pronounced by five male speakers into the (F1,F2) patterns of the corresponding vowels generated by an articulatory model of the vocal tract. The resulting formant patterns are compared to those provided by normalization techniques published in the literature. The proposed method is found to be efficient, but a number of limitations are also observed and discussed. These limitations can be associated with the formant-cavity affiliation model itself or with a possible influence of speaker-specific vocal-tract geometry in the cross-sectional direction, which the model might not have taken into account. PMID:14759026

  9. A model of acoustic interspeaker variability based on the concept of formant-cavity affiliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, Lian; Perrier, Pascal; Bailly, Gérard

    2004-01-01

    A method is proposed to model the interspeaker variability of formant patterns for oral vowels. It is assumed that this variability originates in the differences existing among speakers in the respective lengths of their front and back vocal-tract cavities. In order to characterize, from the spectral description of the acoustic speech signal, these vocal-tract differences between speakers, each formant is interpreted, according to the concept of formant-cavity affiliation, as a resonance of a specific vocal-tract cavity. Its frequency can thus be directly related to the corresponding cavity length, and a transformation model can be proposed from a speaker A to a speaker B on the basis of the frequency ratios of the formants corresponding to the same resonances. In order to minimize the number of sounds to be recorded for each speaker in order to carry out this speaker transformation, the frequency ratios are exactly computed only for the three extreme cardinal vowels [eye, aye, you] and they are approximated for the remaining vowels through an interpolation function. The method is evaluated through its capacity to transform the (F1,F2) formant patterns of eight oral vowels pronounced by five male speakers into the (F1,F2) patterns of the corresponding vowels generated by an articulatory model of the vocal tract. The resulting formant patterns are compared to those provided by normalization techniques published in the literature. The proposed method is found to be efficient, but a number of limitations are also observed and discussed. These limitations can be associated with the formant-cavity affiliation model itself or with a possible influence of speaker-specific vocal-tract geometry in the cross-sectional direction, which the model might not have taken into account.

  10. Acoustofluidics 9: Modelling and applications of planar resonant devices for acoustic particle manipulation.

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, Peter; Boltryk, Rosemary J; Hill, Martyn

    2012-04-21

    This article introduces the design, construction and applications of planar resonant devices for particle and cell manipulation. These systems rely on the pistonic action of a piezoelectric layer to generate a one dimensional axial variation in acoustic pressure through a system of acoustically tuned layers. The resulting acoustic standing wave is dominated by planar variations in pressure causing particles to migrate to planar pressure nodes (or antinodes depending on particle and fluid properties). The consequences of lateral variations in the fields are discussed, and rules for designing resonators with high energy density within the appropriate layer for a given drive voltage presented. PMID:22402608

  11. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex drives hippocampal theta oscillations induced by mismatch computations.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Marta I; Barnes, Gareth R; Kumaran, Dharshan; Maguire, Eleanor A; Dolan, Raymond J

    2015-10-15

    Detecting environmental change is fundamental for adaptive behavior in an uncertain world. Previous work indicates the hippocampus supports the generation of novelty signals via implementation of a match-mismatch detector that signals when an incoming sensory input violates expectations based on past experience. While existing work has emphasized the particular contribution of the hippocampus, here we ask which other brain structures also contribute to match-mismatch detection. Furthermore, we leverage the fine-grained temporal resolution of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate whether mismatch computations are spectrally confined to the theta range, based on the prominence of this range of oscillations in models of hippocampal function. By recording MEG activity while human subjects perform a task that incorporates conditions of match-mismatch novelty we show that mismatch signals are confined to the theta band and are expressed in both the hippocampus and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Effective connectivity analyses (dynamic causal modeling) show that the hippocampus and vmPFC work as a functional circuit during mismatch detection. Surprisingly, our results suggest that the vmPFC drives the hippocampus during the generation and processing of mismatch signals. Our findings provide new evidence that the hippocampal-vmPFC circuit is engaged during novelty processing, which has implications for emerging theories regarding the role of vmPFC in memory. PMID:26187453

  12. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex drives hippocampal theta oscillations induced by mismatch computations

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Marta I.; Barnes, Gareth R.; Kumaran, Dharshan; Maguire, Eleanor A.; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Detecting environmental change is fundamental for adaptive behavior in an uncertain world. Previous work indicates the hippocampus supports the generation of novelty signals via implementation of a match–mismatch detector that signals when an incoming sensory input violates expectations based on past experience. While existing work has emphasized the particular contribution of the hippocampus, here we ask which other brain structures also contribute to match–mismatch detection. Furthermore, we leverage the fine-grained temporal resolution of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate whether mismatch computations are spectrally confined to the theta range, based on the prominence of this range of oscillations in models of hippocampal function. By recording MEG activity while human subjects perform a task that incorporates conditions of match–mismatch novelty we show that mismatch signals are confined to the theta band and are expressed in both the hippocampus and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Effective connectivity analyses (dynamic causal modeling) show that the hippocampus and vmPFC work as a functional circuit during mismatch detection. Surprisingly, our results suggest that the vmPFC drives the hippocampus during the generation and processing of mismatch signals. Our findings provide new evidence that the hippocampal–vmPFC circuit is engaged during novelty processing, which has implications for emerging theories regarding the role of vmPFC in memory. PMID:26187453

  13. Tone and Broadband Noise Separation from Acoustic Data of a Scale-Model Contra-Rotating Open Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, Dave; Stephens, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Renewed interest in contra-rotating open rotor technology for aircraft propulsion application has prompted the development of advanced diagnostic tools for better design and improved acoustical performance. In particular, the determination of tonal and broadband components of open rotor acoustic spectra is essential for properly assessing the noise control parameters and also for validating the open rotor noise simulation codes. The technique of phase averaging has been employed to separate the tone and broadband components from a single rotor, but this method does not work for the two-shaft contra-rotating open rotor. A new signal processing technique was recently developed to process the contra-rotating open rotor acoustic data. The technique was first tested using acoustic data taken of a hobby aircraft open rotor propeller, and reported previously. The intent of the present work is to verify and validate the applicability of the new technique to a realistic one-fifth scale open rotor model which has 12 forward and 10 aft contra-rotating blades operating at realistic forward flight Mach numbers and tip speeds. The results and discussions of that study are presented in this paper.

  14. Tone and Broadband Noise Separation from Acoustic Data of a Scale-Model Counter-Rotating Open Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, David; Stephens, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Renewed interest in contra-rotating open rotor technology for aircraft propulsion application has prompted the development of advanced diagnostic tools for better design and improved acoustical performance. In particular, the determination of tonal and broadband components of open rotor acoustic spectra is essential for properly assessing the noise control parameters and also for validating the open rotor noise simulation codes. The technique of phase averaging has been employed to separate the tone and broadband components from a single rotor, but this method does not work for the two-shaft contra-rotating open rotor. A new signal processing technique was recently developed to process the contra-rotating open rotor acoustic data. The technique was first tested using acoustic data taken of a hobby aircraft open rotor propeller, and reported previously. The intent of the present work is to verify and validate the applicability of the new technique to a realistic one-fifth scale open rotor model which has 12 forward and 10 aft contra-rotating blades operating at realistic forward flight Mach numbers and tip speeds. The results and discussions of that study are presented in this paper.

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of inhomogeneous mismatched charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, R. P.; Rizzato, F. B.

    2012-08-13

    This work analyzes the transversal dynamics of an inhomogeneous and mismatched charged particle beam. The beam is azimuthally symmetric, initially cold, and evolves in a linear channel permeated by an external constant magnetic field. Based on a Lagrangian approach, a low-dimensional model for the description of the beam dynamics has been obtained. The small set of nonlinear dynamical equations provided results that are in reasonable agreement with that ones observed in full self-consistent N-particle beam numerical simulations.

  16. Acoustic loading in straight pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.

    1980-01-01

    Based on linear one-dimensional acoustics, a geometrically perfect elastic waveguide would respond to an oscillatory internal pressure only in the presence of path deflectors (elbows and branches). In practice, a significant elasto-acoustic interaction results even in straight conduits as a result of manufacturing tolerances. A theoretical model of the linear acoustic loading in straight pipes is developed that considers the acoustic wave distortion due to perimeter, axial, and wall thickness nonuniformities.

  17. Finite Difference Modeling of Wave Progpagation in Acoustic TiltedTI Media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Linbin; Rector III, James W.; Hoversten, G. Michael

    2005-03-21

    Based on an acoustic assumption (shear wave velocity is zero) and a dispersion relation, we derive an acoustic wave equation for P-waves in tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media (transversely isotropic media with a tilted symmetry axis). This equation has fewer parameters than an elastic wave equation in TTI media and yields an accurate description of P-wave traveltimes and spreading-related attenuation. Our TTI acoustic wave equation is a fourth-order equation in time and space. We demonstrate that the acoustic approximation allows the presence of shear waves in the solution. The substantial differences in traveltime and amplitude between data created using VTI and TTI assumptions is illustrated in examples.

  18. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  19. Mammalian cells defective in DNA mismatch correction

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, P.; Aquilina, G.; Hess, P.

    1994-12-31

    Mammalian cells counteract the cytotoxicity of methylating agents, including some used in antitumor chemotherapy, by removing the methylated base, O{sup 6}-methylguanine (O{sup 6}-meG) from their DNA. This removal is normally effected by a specific DNA repair enzyme (O{sup 6}-meG-DNA methyltransferase) that is expressed constitutively. In addition, an alternative type of resistance to methylating agents can be acquired after exposure of cells to the drug. This acquired resistance is highly specific for O{sup 6}-meG and is unusual in that alkylation of DNA is normal and there is no increase in the rate of repair of O{sup 6}-meG or any other damaged base. Instead, the cell is able to tolerate the presence of the usually cytotoxic O{sup 6}-meG and to replicate its DNA normally. The ambiguity of base pairing by O{sup 6}-meG and the observation that tolerant cells are also cross-resistant to the structurally similar 6-thioguanine in DNA has led to the suggestion that the cytotoxicity of O{sup 6}-meG (and 6-thioguanine) arises from ineffective attempts at DNA mismatch correction. This model postulates that tolerance arises as a consequence of loss of this important pathway.

  20. A modal-based reduction method for sound absorbing porous materials in poro-acoustic finite element models.

    PubMed

    Rumpler, Romain; Deü, Jean-François; Göransson, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Structural-acoustic finite element models including three-dimensional (3D) modeling of porous media are generally computationally costly. While being the most commonly used predictive tool in the context of noise reduction applications, efficient solution strategies are required. In this work, an original modal reduction technique, involving real-valued modes computed from a classical eigenvalue solver is proposed to reduce the size of the problem associated with the porous media. In the form presented in this contribution, the method is suited for homogeneous porous layers. It is validated on a 1D poro-acoustic academic problem and tested for its performance on a 3D application, using a subdomain decomposition strategy. The performance of the proposed method is estimated in terms of degrees of freedom downsizing, computational time enhancement, as well as matrix sparsity of the reduced system. PMID:23145601

  1. Self-Characterization of Commercial Ultrasound Probes in Transmission Acoustic Inverse Scattering: Transducer Model and Volume Integral Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Mark; Verweij, Sacha A. M.; Moghaddam, Mahta; Carson, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    A self-contained source characterization method for commercial ultrasound probes in transmission acoustic inverse scattering is derived and experimentally tested. The method is based on modified scattered field volume integral equations that are linked to the source-scattering transducer model. The source-scattering parameters are estimated via pair-wise transducer measurements and the nonlinear inversion of an acoustic propagation model that is derived. This combination creates a formal link between the transducer characterization and the inverse scattering algorithm. The method is tested with two commercial ultrasound probes in a transmission geometry including provisions for estimating the probe locations and aligning a robotic rotator. The transducer characterization results show that the nonlinear inversion fit the measured data well. The transducer calibration and inverse scattering algorithm are tested on simple targets. Initial images show that the recovered contrasts are physically consistent with expected values. PMID:24569251

  2. Well-posedness of a model for structural acoustic coupling in a cavity enclosed by a thin cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    A fully coupled mathematical model describing the interactions between a vibrating thin cylindrical shell and enclosed acoustic field is presented. Because the model will ultimately be used in control applications involving piezoceramic actuators, the loads and material contributions resulting from piezoceramic patches bonded to the shell are included in the discussion. Theoretical and computational issues lead to the consideration of a weak form of the modeling set of partial differential equations (PDE's) and through the use of a semigroup formulation, well-posedness results for the system model are obtained.

  3. An immersed boundary computational model for acoustic scattering problems with complex geometries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Yongsong; Liang, An; Jing, Xiaodong

    2012-11-01

    An immersed boundary computational model is presented in order to deal with the acoustic scattering problem by complex geometries, in which the wall boundary condition is treated as a direct body force determined by satisfying the non-penetrating boundary condition. Two distinct discretized grids are used to discrete the fluid domain and immersed boundary, respectively. The immersed boundaries are represented by Lagrangian points and the direct body force determined on these points is applied on the neighboring Eulerian points. The coupling between the Lagrangian points and Euler points is linked by a discrete delta function. The linearized Euler equations are spatially discretized with a fourth-order dispersion-relation-preserving scheme and temporal integrated with a low-dissipation and low-dispersion Runge-Kutta scheme. A perfectly matched layer technique is applied to absorb out-going waves and in-going waves in the immersed bodies. Several benchmark problems for computational aeroacoustic solvers are performed to validate the present method. PMID:23145603

  4. Model-independent dark energy equation of state from unanchored baryon acoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evslin, Jarah

    2016-09-01

    Ratios of line of sight baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peaks at two redshifts only depend upon the average dark energy equation of states between those redshifts, as the dependence on anchors such as the BAO scale or the Hubble constant is canceled in a ratio. As a result, BAO ratios provide a probe of dark energy which is independent of both the cosmic distance ladder and the early evolution of universe. In this note, we use ratios to demonstrate that the known tension between the Lyman alpha forest BAO measurement and other probes arises entirely from recent (0.57 < z < 2.34) cosmological expansion. Using ratios of the line of sight Lyman alpha forest and BOSS CMASS BAO scales, we show that there is already more than 3 σ tension with the standard ΛCDM cosmological model which implies that either (i) The BOSS Lyman alpha forest measurement of the Hubble parameter was too low as a result of a statistical fluctuation or systematic error or else (ii) the dark energy equation of state falls steeply at high redshift.

  5. Theoretical Analysis of Transcranial Magneto-Acoustical Stimulation with Hodgkin-Huxley Neuron Model.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yi; Chen, Yudong; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial magneto-acoustical stimulation (TMAS) is a novel stimulation technology in which an ultrasonic wave within a magnetostatic field generates an electric current in an area of interest in the brain to modulate neuronal activities. As a key part of the neural network, neurons transmit information in the nervous system. However, the effect of TMAS on the neuronal firing pattern remains unknown. To address this problem, we investigated the stimulatory mechanism of TMAS on neurons, by using a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. The simulation results indicated that the magnetostatic field intensity and ultrasonic power affect the amplitude and interspike interval of neuronal action potential under a continuous wave ultrasound. The simulation results also showed that the ultrasonic power, duty cycle and repetition frequency can alter the firing pattern of neural action potential under pulsed wave ultrasound. This study may help to reveal and explain the biological mechanism of TMAS and to provide a theoretical basis for TMAS in the treatment or rehabilitation of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27148032

  6. A simple model for coupled acoustic-structure resonance in Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Jerry H.

    2005-04-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a joint project of NASA and the Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt that has mounted a 2.5 m, 20 000 kg infrared telescope on a bulkhead of a specially modified Boeing 747-SP. A large sliding door will expose the observation bay to the exterior flow field at Mach 0.85 and 13 km altitude. In the open configuration the interaction of turbulence vortices generated at the leading and trailing edges of the opening has the possibility of inducing a strong acoustic signal. A concern has been raised that the peak frequencies of such a signal might coincide with the cavity resonances. The present work examines the transfer function for a known source in order to identify the cavity resonances. Simplistic reasoning argues that the worst case would occur if the cavity resonant frequencies are close to structural resonances. However, the structure's impedance is very low at its resonances, which means that the cavity resonant frequencies are shifted from their nominal values. The present work uses a simple one-dimensional waveguide model, in which one end is terminated by a damped single-degree-of-freedom oscillator, to explain the coupled-fluid structure resonance. The characteristic equation and formulas for the pressure and displacement transfer functions are derived. Analysis of these results leads to some surprising insights regarding the role of a structure's stiffness and mass. [Work supported by the NASA.

  7. Mandarin Chinese Tone Identification in Cochlear Implants: Predictions from Acoustic Models

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Kenneth D.; Torrione, Peter A.; Throckmorton, Chandra S.; Collins, Leslie M.

    2015-01-01

    It has been established that current cochlear implants do not supply adequate spectral information for perception of tonal languages. Comprehension of a tonal language, such as Mandarin Chinese, requires recognition of lexical tones. New strategies of cochlear stimulation such as variable stimulation rate and current steering may provide the means of delivering more spectral information and thus may provide the auditory fine structure required for tone recognition. Several cochlear implant signal processing strategies are examined in this study, the continuous interleaved sampling (CIS) algorithm, the frequency amplitude modulation encoding (FAME) algorithm, and the multiple carrier frequency algorithm (MCFA). These strategies provide different types and amounts of spectral information. Pattern recognition techniques can be applied to data from Mandarin Chinese tone recognition tasks using acoustic models as a means of testing the abilities of these algorithms to transmit the changes in fundamental frequency indicative of the four lexical tones. The ability of processed Mandarin Chinese tones to be correctly classified may predict trends in the effectiveness of different signal processing algorithms in cochlear implants. The proposed techniques can predict trends in performance of the signal processing techniques in quiet conditions but fail to do so in noise. PMID:18706497

  8. Gaussian mixture modeling of acoustic emissions for structural health monitoring of reinforced concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhidzadeh, Alireza; Dehghan-Niri, Ehsan; Salamone, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    Reinforced Concrete (RC) has been widely used in construction of infrastructures for many decades. The cracking behavior in concrete is crucial due to the harmful effects on structural performance such as serviceability and durability requirements. In general, in loading such structures until failure, tensile cracks develop at the initial stages of loading, while shear cracks dominate later. Therefore, monitoring the cracking modes is of paramount importance as it can lead to the prediction of the structural performance. In the past two decades, significant efforts have been made toward the development of automated structural health monitoring (SHM) systems. Among them, a technique that shows promises for monitoring RC structures is the acoustic emission (AE). This paper introduces a novel probabilistic approach based on Gaussian Mixture Modeling (GMM) to classify AE signals related to each crack mode. The system provides an early warning by recognizing nucleation of numerous critical shear cracks. The algorithm is validated through an experimental study on a full-scale reinforced concrete shear wall subjected to a reversed cyclic loading. A modified conventional classification scheme and a new criterion for crack classification are also proposed.

  9. GPU performance analysis of a nodal discontinuous Galerkin method for acoustic and elastic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modave, A.; St-Cyr, A.; Warburton, T.

    2016-06-01

    Finite element schemes based on discontinuous Galerkin methods possess features amenable to massively parallel computing accelerated with general purpose graphics processing units (GPUs). However, the computational performance of such schemes strongly depends on their implementation. In the past, several implementation strategies have been proposed. They are based exclusively on specialized compute kernels tuned for each operation, or they can leverage BLAS libraries that provide optimized routines for basic linear algebra operations. In this paper, we present and analyze up-to-date performance results for different implementations, tested in a unified framework on a single NVIDIA GTX980 GPU. We show that specialized kernels written with a one-node-per-thread strategy are competitive for polynomial bases up to the fifth and seventh degrees for acoustic and elastic models, respectively. For higher degrees, a strategy that makes use of the NVIDIA cuBLAS library provides better results, able to reach a net arithmetic throughput 35.7% of the theoretical peak value.

  10. Acoustic and aerodynamic testing of a scale model variable pitch fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutras, R. R.; Kazin, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    A fully reversible pitch scale model fan with variable pitch rotor blades was tested to determine its aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics. The single-stage fan has a design tip speed of 1160 ft/sec (353.568 m/sec) at a bypass pressure ratio of 1.5. Three operating lines were investigated. Test results show that the blade pitch for minimum noise also resulted in the highest efficiency for all three operating lines at all thrust levels. The minimum perceived noise on a 200-ft (60.96 m) sideline was obtained with the nominal nozzle. At 44% of takeoff thrust, the PNL reduction between blade pitch and minimum noise blade pitch is 1.8 PNdB for the nominal nozzle and decreases with increasing thrust. The small nozzle (6% undersized) has the highest efficiency at all part thrust conditions for the minimum noise blade pitch setting; although, the noise is about 1.0 PNdB higher for the small nozzle at the minimum noise blade pitch position.

  11. Measurements and modeling of acoustic scattering from partially and completely buried spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesei, A.; Maguer, A.; Fox, W. L. J.; Lim, R.; Schmidt, H.

    2002-11-01

    The use of low-frequency sonars (2-15 kHz) is explored to better exploit scattering features of buried targets that can contribute to their detection and classification. Compared to conventional mine countermeasure sonars, sound penetrates better into the sediment at these frequencies, and the excitation of structural waves in the targets is enhanced. The main contributions to target echo are the specular reflection, geometric diffraction effects, and the structural response, with the latter being particularly important for man-made elastic objects possessing particular symmetries such as bodies of revolution. The resonance response derives from elastic periodic phenomena such as surface circumferential waves revolving around the target. The GOATS'98 experiment, conducted jointly by SACLANTCEN and MIT off the island of Elba, involved controlled monostatic measurements of scattering by spherical shells which were partially and completely buried in sand, and suspended in the water column. The analysis mainly addresses a study of the effect of burial on the dynamics of backscattered elastic waves, which can be clearly identified in the target responses, and is based on the comparison of measurements with appropriate scattering models. Data interpretation results are in good agreement with theory. This positive result demonstrates the applicability of low-frequency methodologies based on resonance analysis to the classification of buried objects. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  12. Using passive acoustics to model blue whale habitat off the Western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Širović, Ana; Hildebrand, John A.

    2011-07-01

    Habitat preferences of calling blue whales were investigated using data from two multidisciplinary oceanographic cruises conducted off the Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) during the austral falls of 2001 and 2002. Data were collected on depth, temperature, salinity, chlorophyll a (Chl- a) concentration, krill biomass, zooplankton abundance, and blue whale call presence. In 2001, the study area was sea ice free, high Chl- a concentrations occurred over a small area, krill biomass and zooplankton abundance were high, and few blue whale calls were detected. In 2002 the sea ice covered the southern part of the survey area, Chl- a was high over a large area, krill and zooplankton were low, and there were more blue whale calls. Logistic regression analysis revealed blue whale calls were positively correlated with depth and SST, and negatively correlated with the mean zooplankton abundance from 101 to 300 m and the mean krill biomass in the top 100 m. The negative correlation between blue whale calls and zooplankton could occur if feeding animals do not produce calls. Our survey area did not cover the full range of blue whale habitat off the WAP, as blue whales probably follow the melting and freezing ice edge through this region. Passive acoustics can provide insight to mesoscale habitat use by blue whales in the Southern Ocean where visual sightings are rare, but the ability to localize on the calling animals would greatly improve the ability to model at a finer scale.

  13. Vibro-acoustic modelling of the outer and middle ear using the finite-element method.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, P J; Ferris, P; Rice, H J; Blayney, A W

    1999-01-01

    In this study, a computer-based method called finite-element analysis is used to predict the forced-frequency response of the ear, with and without an ossicular replacement prosthesis (PORP 0362, Xomed Surgical Products). The method allows visualisation of the dynamical behaviour of the tympanic membrane (TM) and of the ossicles. The finite-element model is fully three-dimensional and includes both ligaments and muscles, and accounts for damping caused by the TM, ligaments, incudostapedial joint and the fluids of the inner ear. For validation, comparison is made with experimental measurements of umbo displacement taken from the literature. The translation and rotation (both anterior-posterior and inferior-superior) of the stapedial footplate are investigated. It is predicted that the translatory motion of the footplate decreases with increasing frequency, except when the frequency of the acoustic signal matches the natural frequencies of the ossicular chain or outer ear canal. The tilting motion of the stapedial footplate is also predicted to depend on frequency of excitation. The presence of a prosthesis changes the dynamical response considerably by shifting the natural frequencies of the ossicular chain. Ratios of stapes motion with and without the prostheses are plotted as a function of frequency allowing this effect to be clearly observed. PMID:10187928

  14. Acoustic and aerodynamic study of a pusher-propeller aircraft model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Horne, W. Clifton

    1990-01-01

    An aerodynamic and acoustic study was made of a pusher-propeller aircraft model in the NASA-Ames 7 x 10 ft Wind Tunnel. The test section was changed to operate as an open jet. The 591 mm diameter unswept propeller was operated alone and in the wake of three empennages: an I tail, Y tail, and a V tail. The radiated noise and detailed wake properties were measured. Results indicate that the unsteady blade loading caused by the blade interactions with the wake mean velocity distribution had a strong effect on the harmonics of blade passage noise. The blade passage harmonics above the first were substantially increased in all horizontal directions by the empennage/propeller interaction. Directivity in the plane of the propeller was maximum perpendicular to the blade surface. Increasing the tail loading caused the propeller harmonics to increase 3 to 5 dB for an empennage/propeller spacing of 0.38 mean empennage chords. The interaction noise became weak as empennage propeller spacing was increased beyond 1.0 mean empennage chord lengths. Unlike the mean wake deficit, the wake turbulence had only a small effect on the propeller noise, that effect being a small increase in the broadband noise.

  15. Time-domain damping models in structural acoustics using digital filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parret-Fréaud, Augustin; Cotté, Benjamin; Chaigne, Antoine

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes a new approach in order to formulate well-posed time-domain damping models able to represent various frequency domain profiles of damping properties. The novelty of this approach is to represent the behavior law of a given material directly in a discrete-time framework as a digital filter, which is synthesized for each material from a discrete set of frequency-domain data such as complex modulus through an optimization process. A key point is the addition of specific constraints to this process in order to guarantee stability, causality and verification of thermodynamics second law when transposing the resulting discrete-time behavior law into the time domain. Thus, this method offers a framework which is particularly suitable for time-domain simulations in structural dynamics and acoustics for a wide range of materials (polymers, wood, foam, etc.), allowing to control and even reduce the distortion effects induced by time-discretization schemes on the frequency response of continuous-time behavior laws.

  16. Theoretical Analysis of Transcranial Magneto-Acoustical Stimulation with Hodgkin-Huxley Neuron Model

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yi; Chen, Yudong; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial magneto-acoustical stimulation (TMAS) is a novel stimulation technology in which an ultrasonic wave within a magnetostatic field generates an electric current in an area of interest in the brain to modulate neuronal activities. As a key part of the neural network, neurons transmit information in the nervous system. However, the effect of TMAS on the neuronal firing pattern remains unknown. To address this problem, we investigated the stimulatory mechanism of TMAS on neurons, by using a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. The simulation results indicated that the magnetostatic field intensity and ultrasonic power affect the amplitude and interspike interval of neuronal action potential under a continuous wave ultrasound. The simulation results also showed that the ultrasonic power, duty cycle and repetition frequency can alter the firing pattern of neural action potential under pulsed wave ultrasound. This study may help to reveal and explain the biological mechanism of TMAS and to provide a theoretical basis for TMAS in the treatment or rehabilitation of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27148032

  17. On the Value of Effective Parameters Obtained Under Reduced Spatial Scale Mismatch to Represent Soil Moisture - Evapotranspiration Interactions in Land Surface Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolem, R.; Iwema, J.; Blyth, E.; Wagener, T.; Rahman, A. S. M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture - evapotranspiration interactions have been studied in several regions characterized by distinct soil properties, land cover types, and climate. Such interactions are usually assessed with measurements representing different spatial footprint. For example, soil moisture measurements obtained from point-scale sensors or with remote sensing products are typically compared with evapotranspiration measurements obtained with eddy covariance systems. With efforts to develop hydrometeorological models capable of simulating processes at hyper-resolution (i.e., 1 sq-km), novel approaches for intermediate-scale soil moisture measurements give us new opportunities to evaluate the representation of soil moisture and evapotranspiration processes at similar spatial scales. Here, we evaluate the performance of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) in which key parameters are determined effectively based on both soil moisture and evapotranspiration measurements obtained with similar horizontal footprint. We use soil moisture data from selected sites in the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS) network in combination with co-located Ameriflux eddy covariance towers to constrain key parameters in JULES assuming their similar horizontal footprint of hundreds of meters. The COSMOS-Ameriflux sites are characterized by distinct soils, land cover types, and climate. In addition, point-scale soil moisture at each site is also used in combination with eddy covariance measurements to constrain JULES parameters, while recognizing its much smaller support volume. Each individual site is ranked based on differences in soil moisture dynamics from both point-scale and intermediate-scale measurements. Model calibration is carried out by optimizing JULES performance against (1) point-scale soil moisture only, (2) cosmic-ray soil moisture only, (3) point-scale soil moisture and surface fluxes, and (4) cosmic-ray soil moisture and surface fluxes. We then evaluate

  18. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  19. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  20. Neuroplasticity in the processing of pitch dimensions: A multidimensional scaling analysis of the mismatch negativity

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Gandour, Jackson T.; Krishnan, Ananthanarayan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose An auditory electrophysiological study was conducted to explore the influence of language experience on the saliency of dimensions underlying cortical pitch processing. Methods Mismatch negativity (MMN) responses to Mandarin tones were recorded in Chinese and English participants (n = 10 per group) using a passive oddball paradigm. Stimuli consisted of three tones (T1: high level; T2: high rising; T3: low falling-rising). There were three oddball conditions (standard/deviant): T1/T2, T1/T3, T2/T3. In the T1/T2 and T1/T3 conditions, each tonal pair represented a contrast between a level and a contour tone; the T2/T3 condition, a contrast between two contour tones. Twenty dissimilarity matrices were created using the MMN mean amplitude measured from the Fz location for each condition per participant, and analyzed by an individual differences multidimensional scaling model. Results Two pitch dimensions were revealed, interpretively labeled as ‘height’ and ‘contour’. The latter was found to be more important for Chinese than English subjects. Using individual weights on the contour dimension, a discriminant function showed that 17 out of 20 participants were correctly classified into their respective language groups. Conclusions The MMN can serve as an index of pitch features that are differentially weighted depending on a listener’s experience with lexical tones and their acoustic correlates within a particular tone space. PMID:17942999