Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic modeling techniques

  1. Overview of geometrical room acoustic modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Savioja, Lauri; Svensson, U Peter

    2015-08-01

    Computerized room acoustics modeling has been practiced for almost 50 years up to date. These modeling techniques play an important role in room acoustic design nowadays, often including auralization, but can also help in the construction of virtual environments for such applications as computer games, cognitive research, and training. This overview describes the main principles, landmarks in the development, and state-of-the-art for techniques that are based on geometrical acoustics principles. A focus is given to their capabilities to model the different aspects of sound propagation: specular vs diffuse reflections, and diffraction.

  2. Power cepstrum technique with application to model helicopter acoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. M.; Burley, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    The application of the power cepstrum to measured helicopter-rotor acoustic data is investigated. A previously applied correction to the reconstructed spectrum is shown to be incorrect. For an exact echoed signal, the amplitude of the cepstrum echo spike at the delay time is linearly related to the echo relative amplitude in the time domain. If the measured spectrum is not entirely from the source signal, the cepstrum will not yield the desired echo characteristics and a cepstral aliasing may occur because of the effective sample rate in the frequency domain. The spectral analysis bandwidth must be less than one-half the echo ripple frequency or cepstral aliasing can occur. The power cepstrum editing technique is a useful tool for removing some of the contamination because of acoustic reflections from measured rotor acoustic spectra. The cepstrum editing yields an improved estimate of the free field spectrum, but the correction process is limited by the lack of accurate knowledge of the echo transfer function. An alternate procedure, which does not require cepstral editing, is proposed which allows the complete correction of a contaminated spectrum through use of both the transfer function and delay time of the echo process.

  3. Investigation of pulmonary acoustic simulation: comparing airway model generation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Brian; Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Mansy, Hansen A.; Sandler, Richard H.; Royston, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Alterations in the structure and function of the pulmonary system that occur in disease or injury often give rise to measurable spectral, spatial and/or temporal changes in lung sound production and transmission. These changes, if properly quantified, might provide additional information about the etiology, severity and location of trauma, injury, or pathology. With this in mind, the authors are developing a comprehensive computer simulation model of pulmonary acoustics, known as The Audible Human Project™. Its purpose is to improve our understanding of pulmonary acoustics and to aid in interpreting measurements of sound and vibration in the lungs generated by airway insonification, natural breath sounds, and external stimuli on the chest surface, such as that used in elastography. As a part of this development process, finite element (FE) models were constructed of an excised pig lung that also underwent experimental studies. Within these models, the complex airway structure was created via two methods: x-ray CT image segmentation and through an algorithmic means called Constrained Constructive Optimization (CCO). CCO was implemented to expedite the segmentation process, as airway segments can be grown digitally. These two approaches were used in FE simulations of the surface motion on the lung as a result of sound input into the trachea. Simulation results were compared to experimental measurements. By testing how close these models are to experimental measurements, we are evaluating whether CCO can be used as a means to efficiently construct physiologically relevant airway trees.

  4. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  5. Nondestructive Acoustic Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Volker

    Acoustic imaging techniques are used in the field of nondestructive testing of technical components to measure defects such as lack of side wall fusion or cracks in welded joints. Data acquisition is performed by a remote-controlled manipulator and a PC for the mass storage of the high-frequency time-of-flight data at each probe position. The quality of the acoustic images and the interpretation relies on the proper understanding of the transmitted wave fronts and the arrangement of the probes in pulse-echo mode or in pitch-and-catch arrangement. The use of the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique allows the depth-dependent resolution to be replaced by a depth-independent resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio to be improved. Examples with surface-connected cracks are shown to demonstrate the improved features. The localization accuracy could be improved by entering 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional reconstructed data into the environment of a 3-dimensional CAD drawing. The propagation of ultrasonic waves through austenitic welds is disturbed by the anisotropic and inhomogeneous structure of the material. The effect is more or less severe depending upon the longitudinal or shear wave modes. To optimize the performance of an inspection software tool, a 3-dimensional CAD-Ray program has been implemented, where the shape of the inhomogeneous part of a weld can be simulated together with the grain structure based on the elastic constants. Ray-tracing results are depicted for embedded and for surface-connected defects.

  6. Acoustic tomography. Laboratory technique Implementation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvis, Jorge; Carvajal, Jenny

    2010-05-01

    From geomechanical tests carried out on rocks it is possible to determine its physico-mechanical properties, which relate the strain and applied stress; even so, conventional tests do not allow to identify how stress is distributed and how it has affected porous media. Today, techniques like acoustic tomography widely used in medicine, geophysics and others sciences, generates images by sections of the interior of a body. Acoustic tomography allows inferring the stress state within porous media; since wave velocities are closely related to media density, if a stress is applied to a rock, it will generate grains compaction and this will be showed by an increase of wave velocity. Implementation was conducted on rock plugs under diverse stress fields, simultaneously recording P-wave velocities (Compressional) on perpendicular planes to sample vertical axis. Transmission and reception of acoustic waves through porous media were done by piezoelectric crystals (PZT) used as sensors. A transmitting crystal excited by a voltage pulse causes a mechanical vibration, which travels across media; this is known as inverse piezoelectric effect. This vibration is recorded by a receiving crystal in which the direct piezoelectric effect appears; which dictates that if a piezoelectric is disturbed mechanically, an electrical signal between its terminals will appear. This electrical signal is used to obtain the wave velocity. Nevertheless, acoustic tomography corresponds to one of those called inverse Problems that arise when from observed data the model parameters must be obtained; in this way, tomography involves iterative reconstruction techniques (ART or SIRT) which are projections of observed data and its later inversion. Obtained results are cross-sectional images of velocity within the rock. In these images it is possible to identify where stress has a greater concentration observing the color map generated; thus, a greater velocity density area corresponding to a greater

  7. Image processing techniques for acoustic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Brian P.

    1991-06-01

    The primary goal of this research is to test the effectiveness of various image processing techniques applied to acoustic images generated in MATLAB. The simulated acoustic images have the same characteristics as those generated by a computer model of a high resolution imaging sonar. Edge detection and segmentation are the two image processing techniques discussed in this study. The two methods tested are a modified version of the Kalman filtering and median filtering.

  8. Air Coupled Acoustic Thermography (acat) Inspection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Yost, W. T.

    2008-02-01

    The scope of this effort is to determine the viability of a new heating technique using a noncontact acoustic excitation source. Because of low coupling between air and the structure, a synchronous detection method is employed. Any reduction in the out of plane stiffness improves the acoustic coupling efficiency and as a result, defective areas have an increase in temperature relative to the surrounding area. Hence a new measurement system, based on air-coupled acoustic energy and synchronous detection is presented. An analytical model of a clamped circular plate is given, experimentally tested, and verified. Repeatability confirms the technique with a measurement uncertainty of +/-6.2 percent. The range of frequencies used was 800-2,000 Hertz. Acoustic excitation and consequent thermal detection of flaws in a helicopter blade is examined and results indicate that air coupled acoustic excitation enables the detection of core damage in sandwich honeycomb structures.

  9. Air Coupled Acoustic Thermography (ACAT) Inspection Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph; Winfree, William P.; Yost, William T.

    2007-01-01

    The scope of this effort is to determine the viability of a new heating technique using a noncontact acoustic excitation source. Because of low coupling between air and the structure, a synchronous detection method is employed. Any reduction in the out of plane stiffness improves the acoustic coupling efficiency and as a result, defective areas have an increase in temperature relative to the surrounding area. Hence a new measurement system, based on air-coupled acoustic energy and synchronous detection is presented. An analytical model of a clamped circular plate is given, experimentally tested, and verified. Repeatability confirms the technique with a measurement uncertainty of plus or minus 6.2 percent. The range of frequencies used was 800-2,000 Hertz. Acoustic excitation and consequent thermal detection of flaws in a helicopter blade is examined and results indicate that air coupled acoustic excitation enables the detection of core damage in sandwich honeycomb structures.

  10. Acoustic techniques in nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, C.T.; Sinha, D.N.

    1995-07-01

    Acoustic techniques can be employed to address many questions relevant to current nuclear technology needs. These include establishing and monitoring intrinsic tags and seals, locating holdup in areas where conventional radiation-based measurements have limited capability, process monitoring, monitoring containers for corrosion or changes in pressure, and facility design verification. These acoustics applications are in their infancy with respect to safeguards and nuclear material management, but proof-of-principle has been demonstrated in many of the areas listed.

  11. Acoustic mode measurements in the inlet of a model turbofan using a continuously rotating rake: Data collection/analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David G.; Heidelberg, Laurence; Konno, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The rotating microphone measurement technique and data analysis procedures are documented which are used to determine circumferential and radial acoustic mode content in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) model. Circumferential acoustic mode levels were measured at a series of radial locations using the Doppler frequency shift produced by a rotating inlet microphone probe. Radial mode content was then computed using a least squares curve fit with the measured radial distribution for each circumferential mode. The rotating microphone technique is superior to fixed-probe techniques because it results in minimal interference with the acoustic modes generated by rotor-stator interaction. This effort represents the first experimental implementation of a measuring technique developed by T. G. Sofrin. Testing was performed in the NASA Lewis Low Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff condition of Mach 0.2. The design is included of the data analysis software and the performance of the rotating rake apparatus. The effect of experiment errors is also discussed.

  12. Acoustic mode measurements in the inlet of a model turbofan using a continuously rotating rake - Data collection/analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David G.; Heidelberg, Laurence; Konno, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The rotating microphone measurement technique and data analysis procedures are documented which are used to determine circumferential and radial acoustic mode content in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) model. Circumferential acoustic mode levels were measured at a series of radial locations using the Doppler frequency shift produced by a rotating inlet microphone probe. Radial mode content was then computed using a least squares curve fit with the measured radial distribution for each circumferential mode. The rotating microphone technique is superior to fixed-probe techniques because it results in minimal interference with the acoustic modes generated by rotor-stator interaction. This effort represents the first experimental implementation of a measuring technique developed by T. G. Sofrin. Testing was performed in the NASA Lewis Low Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff condition of Mach 0.2. The design is included of the data analysis software and the performance of the rotating rake apparatus. The effect of experiment errors is also discussed.

  13. A Bayesian view on acoustic model-based techniques for robust speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Roland; Huemmer, Christian; Sehr, Armin; Kellermann, Walter

    2015-12-01

    This article provides a unifying Bayesian view on various approaches for acoustic model adaptation, missing feature, and uncertainty decoding that are well-known in the literature of robust automatic speech recognition. The representatives of these classes can often be deduced from a Bayesian network that extends the conventional hidden Markov models used in speech recognition. These extensions, in turn, can in many cases be motivated from an underlying observation model that relates clean and distorted feature vectors. By identifying and converting the observation models into a Bayesian network representation, we formulate the corresponding compensation rules. We thus summarize the various approaches as approximations or modifications of the same Bayesian decoding rule leading to a unified view on known derivations as well as to new formulations for certain approaches.

  14. A Dry Membrane Protection Technique to Allow Surface Acoustic Wave Biosensor Measurements of Biological Model Membrane Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Reder-Christ, Katrin; Schmitz, Patrick; Bota, Marian; Gerber, Ursula; Falkenstein-Paul, Hildegard; Fuss, Christian; Enachescu, Marius; Bendas, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Model membrane approaches have attracted much attention in biomedical sciences to investigate and simulate biological processes. The application of model membrane systems for biosensor measurements is partly restricted by the fact that the integrity of membranes critically depends on the maintenance of an aqueous surrounding, while various biosensors require a preconditioning of dry sensors. This is for example true for the well-established surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor SAM®5 blue. Here, a simple drying procedure of sensor-supported model membranes is introduced using the protective disaccharide trehalose. Highly reproducible model membranes were prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, transferred to SAW sensors and supplemented with a trehalose solution. Membrane rehydration after dry incorporation into the SAW device becomes immediately evident by phase changes. Reconstituted model membranes maintain their full functionality, as indicated by biotin/avidin binding experiments. Atomic force microscopy confirmed the morphological invariability of dried and rehydrated membranes. Approximating to more physiological recognition phenomena, the site-directed immobilization of the integrin VLA-4 into the reconstituted model membrane and subsequent VCAM-1 ligand binding with nanomolar affinity were illustrated. This simple drying procedure is a novel way to combine the model membrane generation by Langmuir-Blodgett technique with SAW biosensor measurements, which extends the applicability of SAM®5 blue in biomedical sciences. PMID:24064603

  15. Development of Acoustic Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction Technique for Thick-Concrete Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Almansouri, Hani; Clayton, Dwight A; Kisner, Roger A; Polsky, Yarom; Bouman, Charlie; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound signals have been used extensively for non-destructive evaluation (NDE). However, typical reconstruction techniques, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), are limited to quasi-homogenous thin media. New ultrasonic systems and reconstruction algorithms are in need for one-sided NDE of non-homogenous thick objects. An application example space is imaging of reinforced concrete structures for commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). These structures provide important foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Identification and management of aging and degradation of concrete structures is fundamental to the proposed long-term operation of NPPs. Another example is geothermal and oil/gas production wells. These multi-layered structures are composed of steel, cement, and several types of soil and rocks. Ultrasound systems with greater penetration range and image quality will allow for better monitoring of the well s health and prediction of high-pressure hydraulic fracturing of the rock. These application challenges need to be addressed with an integrated imaging approach, where the application, hardware, and reconstruction software are highly integrated and optimized. Therefore, we are developing an ultrasonic system with Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) as the image reconstruction backbone. As the first implementation of MBIR for ultrasonic signals, this paper document the first implementation of the algorithm and show reconstruction results for synthetically generated data.

  16. Development of Acoustic Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction Technique for Thick-Concrete Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Almansouri, Hani; Clayton, Dwight A; Kisner, Roger A; Polsky, Yarom; Bouman, Charlie; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound signals have been used extensively for non-destructive evaluation (NDE). However, typical reconstruction techniques, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), are limited to quasi-homogenous thin media. New ultrasonic systems and reconstruction algorithms are in need for one-sided NDE of non-homogenous thick objects. An application example space is imaging of reinforced concrete structures for commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). These structures provide important foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Identification and management of aging and degradation of concrete structures is fundamental to the proposed long-term operation of NPPs. Another example is geothermal and oil/gas production wells. These multi-layered structures are composed of steel, cement, and several types of soil and rocks. Ultrasound systems with greater penetration range and image quality will allow for better monitoring of the well's health and prediction of high-pressure hydraulic fracturing of the rock. These application challenges need to be addressed with an integrated imaging approach, where the application, hardware, and reconstruction software are highly integrated and optimized. Therefore, we are developing an ultrasonic system with Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) as the image reconstruction backbone. As the first implementation of MBIR for ultrasonic signals, this paper document the first implementation of the algorithm and show reconstruction results for synthetically generated data.

  17. Development of acoustic model-based iterative reconstruction technique for thick-concrete imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almansouri, Hani; Clayton, Dwight; Kisner, Roger; Polsky, Yarom; Bouman, Charles; Santos-Villalobos, Hector

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound signals have been used extensively for non-destructive evaluation (NDE). However, typical reconstruction techniques, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), are limited to quasi-homogenous thin media. New ultrasonic systems and reconstruction algorithms are in need for one-sided NDE of non-homogenous thick objects. An application example space is imaging of reinforced concrete structures for commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). These structures provide important foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Identification and management of aging and degradation of concrete structures is fundamental to the proposed long-term operation of NPPs. Another example is geothermal and oil/gas production wells. These multi-layered structures are composed of steel, cement, and several types of soil and rocks. Ultrasound systems with greater penetration range and image quality will allow for better monitoring of the well's health and prediction of high-pressure hydraulic fracturing of the rock. These application challenges need to be addressed with an integrated imaging approach, where the application, hardware, and reconstruction software are highly integrated and optimized. Therefore, we are developing an ultrasonic system with Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) as the image reconstruction backbone. As the first implementation of MBIR for ultrasonic signals, this paper document the first implementation of the algorithm and show reconstruction results for synthetically generated data.1

  18. Acoustic Modifications of the Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel and Test Techniques for High-Speed Research Model Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NFAC 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames is being refurbished with a new, deep acoustic lining in the test section which will make the facility nearly anechoic over a large frequency range. The modification history, key elements, and schedule will be discussed. Design features and expected performance gains will be described. Background noise reductions will be summarized. Improvements in aeroacoustic research techniques have been developed and used recently at NFAC on several wind tunnel tests of High Speed Research models. Research on quiet inflow microphones and struts will be described. The Acoustic Survey Apparatus in the 40x80 will be illustrated. A special intensity probe was tested for source localization. Multi-channel, high speed digital data acquisition is now used for acoustics. And most important, phased microphone arrays have been developed and tested which have proven to be very powerful for source identification and increased signal-to-noise ratio. Use of these tools for the HEAT model will be illustrated. In addition, an acoustically absorbent symmetry plane was built to satisfy the HEAT semispan aerodynamic and acoustic requirements. Acoustic performance of that symmetry plane will be shown.

  19. Flight Acoustics Measurement Techniques and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preisser, J. S.; Marcolini, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    Careful consideration must be given to data acquisition and analysis techniques in the design of experiments for the measurement of noise generated by flight vehicles. Although noise measurement locations and data reduction procedures are specified for aircraft certification by FAA and ICAO directives, for example, there are virtually no established procedures for aircraft noise measurement for other purposes. To optimize the quality and quantity of information obtained in a flight acoustics experiment, microphone layout, data acquisition, and analysis must be tailored to the specific test objective. This paper will review flight acoustics technology at NASA Langley Research Center developed over the past decade. In particular, the paper will focus on flight experiments performed for three diverse objectives: (1) research applications, such as noise prediction code validation, (2) noise impact modeling, and (3) noise abatement flight procedures. To best achieve these diverse objectives, different deployments of microphone systems on the ground are required, and different data analysis techniques are needed. In all cases, accurate positioning of the aircraft synchronized in time with the data recording is necessary. However, there are some restrictions on flight operations unique to each case for the methods to properly work.

  20. Uniform and Multi-Grid Modeling of Acoustic Wave Propagation With Cellular Automaton Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    J. Acoustique, vol. 43, no. 30, pp. 223–287, 1992. [8] B. A., “Von Neumann’s self-reproducing automata ,” In Essays on Cellular Automata , pp. 3–64...1970. [9] A. Ilachinski, “ Cellular automata ,” in Cellular Automata A Discrete Universe, New Jersey, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd...2001, p. 5. [10] L. Villar and A. Souza, “ Cellular automata models for general traffic conditions on a line,” Physica A, vol. 211, pp. 84–92, 1994

  1. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher; Chu, S. Reynold

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles to ensure compliance with acoustic requirements and thus provide a safe and habitable acoustic environment for the crews, and to validate developed models via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements.

  2. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, S. Reynold; Allen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles. The use of such a model will help ensure compliance with acoustic requirements. Also, this project includes modeling validation and development feedback via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements to compare with the predictions.

  3. Data Management Techniques for Acoustical Planetary Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, Hans; Prattes, Gustav; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Tokano, T.; Jernej, I.; Stachel, Manfred; Besser, B. P.; Aydogar, Oe.

    We discuss data management techniques for acoustical data obtained from future atmospheric planetary in-situ probes with the aim of event oriented scientific analysis. The immediate objec-tive is the localisation (acoustic wave telescope) and characterisation of acoustic phenomena of atmospheres and surfaces, e.g. in the frame of the proposed NASA/ESA Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) with the Acoustic Sensor Package (ACU) multi-microphone array. Contrary to huge amounts of source data obtained through the electromagnetic windows, acoustical sig-nals are seldom recorded and few files exist. One example is pressure sensor data from the instrument HASI/PWA during Huygens descent, mission Cassini-Huygens. Nevertheless, a lot of acoustic point and noise sources, e.g. caused by rain, drizzle or wind abound in Titan's atmosphere. In almost all cases, due to limitations in telemetry rate, a careful strategy for onboard event handling and data reduction -the first step in data management -has to be selected, e.g. sampling rates in kHz range or averaging in the frequency domain. This pre-processing together with complementary investigations at the space segment directly influences the scientific data return in terms of long-term continuous or short-term event based studies. The database at the ground segment with science data and metadata entries after final calibra-tion has to support the combined investigations with other instruments. This second step in data management fully explores the acoustic environment of planetary atmospheres in terms of background noise and spacecraft generated disturbances, location and characterisation of source regions and correlation between the experiments. Currently we're running databases for magnetic field data from various ground-based and satellite related experiments, historical balloon data included. Comparisons of data between experiments are possible. This framework based on dependability considerations with several different

  4. Uncertainty quantification of acoustic emission filtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zárate, Boris A.; Caicedo, Juan M.; Ziehl, Paul

    2012-04-01

    This paper compares six different filtering protocols used in Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring of fatigue crack growth. The filtering protocols are combination of three different filtering techniques which are based on Swansong-like filters and load filters. The filters are compared deterministically and probabilistically. The deterministic comparison is based on the coefficient of determination of the resulting AE data, while the probabilistic comparison is based on the quantification of the uncertainty of the different filtering protocols. The uncertainty of the filtering protocols is quantified by calculating the entropy of the probability distribution of some AE and fracture mechanics parameters for the given filtering protocol. The methodology is useful in cases where several filtering protocols are available and there is no reason to choose one over the others. Acoustic Emission data from a compact tension specimen tested under cyclic load is used for the comparison.

  5. A survey of underwater-acoustic ray tracing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. M.

    1983-06-01

    A survey of techniques and features available in underwater acoustic ray tracing computer programs is presented. The survey includes methods for constructing raypath trajectories, construction eigenrays, ray-intensity calculations, and ray theory corrections. The survey also includes models for sound speed (including interpolation methods), ocean bottom (including both bathymetry and reflection coefficient), ocean surface reflection coefficient, dissipation, temperature, salinity, and ocean current. In addition, methods for displaying models and methods for presenting ray tracing results are surveyed.

  6. Acoustic Techniques for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankenstein, B.; Augustin, J.; Hentschel, D.; Schubert, F.; Köhler, B.; Meyendorf, N.

    2008-02-01

    Future safety and maintenance strategies for industrial components and vehicles are based on combinations of monitoring systems that are permanently attached to or embedded in the structure, and periodic inspections. The latter belongs to conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and can be enhanced or partially replaced by structural health monitoring systems. However, the main benefit of this technology for the future will consist of systems that can be differently designed based on improved safety philosophies, including continuous monitoring. This approach will increase the efficiency of inspection procedures at reduced inspection times. The Fraunhofer IZFP Dresden Branch has developed network nodes, miniaturized transmitter and receiver systems for active and passive acoustical techniques and sensor systems that can be attached to or embedded into components or structures. These systems have been used to demonstrate intelligent sensor networks for the monitoring of aerospace structures, railway systems, wind energy generators, piping system and other components. Material discontinuities and flaws have been detected and monitored during full scale fatigue testing. This paper will discuss opportunities and future trends in nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring based on new sensor principles and advanced microelectronics. It will outline various application examples of monitoring systems based on acoustic techniques and will indicate further needs for research and development.

  7. Utilizing computer models for optimizing classroom acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckley, Jennifer M.; Rosenberg, Carl J.

    2002-05-01

    The acoustical conditions in a classroom play an integral role in establishing an ideal learning environment. Speech intelligibility is dependent on many factors, including speech loudness, room finishes, and background noise levels. The goal of this investigation was to use computer modeling techniques to study the effect of acoustical conditions on speech intelligibility in a classroom. This study focused on a simulated classroom which was generated using the CATT-acoustic computer modeling program. The computer was utilized as an analytical tool in an effort to optimize speech intelligibility in a typical classroom environment. The factors that were focused on were reverberation time, location of absorptive materials, and background noise levels. Speech intelligibility was measured with the Rapid Speech Transmission Index (RASTI) method.

  8. A three-microphone acoustic reflection technique using transmitted acoustic waves in the airway.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yuki; Huang, Jyongsu; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Kato, Ryo; Higashino, Mari; Shinomiya, Shohei; Kitadate, Shoko; Takahara, Yutaka; Yamaya, Atsuyo; Saito, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Makoto; Kojima, Koji; Oikawa, Taku; Nakagawa, Ken; Tsuchihara, Katsuma; Iguchi, Masaharu; Takahashi, Masakatsu; Mizuno, Shiro; Osanai, Kazuhiro; Toga, Hirohisa

    2013-10-15

    The acoustic reflection technique noninvasively measures airway cross-sectional area vs. distance functions and uses a wave tube with a constant cross-sectional area to separate incidental and reflected waves introduced into the mouth or nostril. The accuracy of estimated cross-sectional areas gets worse in the deeper distances due to the nature of marching algorithms, i.e., errors of the estimated areas in the closer distances accumulate to those in the further distances. Here we present a new technique of acoustic reflection from measuring transmitted acoustic waves in the airway with three microphones and without employing a wave tube. Using miniaturized microphones mounted on a catheter, we estimated reflection coefficients among the microphones and separated incidental and reflected waves. A model study showed that the estimated cross-sectional area vs. distance function was coincident with the conventional two-microphone method, and it did not change with altered cross-sectional areas at the microphone position, although the estimated cross-sectional areas are relative values to that at the microphone position. The pharyngeal cross-sectional areas including retropalatal and retroglossal regions and the closing site during sleep was visualized in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The method can be applicable to larger or smaller bronchi to evaluate the airspace and function in these localized airways.

  9. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Vargas, Magda B.

    2013-01-01

    Subscale rocket acoustic data is used to predict acoustic environments for full scale rockets. Over the last several years acoustic data has been collected during horizontal tests of solid rocket motors. Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) was designed to evaluate the acoustics of the SLS vehicle including the liquid engines and solid rocket boosters. SMAT is comprised of liquid thrusters scalable to the Space Shuttle Main engines (SSME) and Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motors scalable to the 5-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSTMV). Horizontal testing of the liquid thrusters provided an opportunity to collect acoustic data from liquid thrusters to characterize the acoustic environments. Acoustic data was collected during the horizontal firings of a single thruster and a 4-thruster (Quad) configuration. Presentation scope. Discuss the results of the single and 4-thruster acoustic measurements. Compare the measured acoustic levels of the liquid thrusters to the Solid Rocket Test Motor V - Nozzle 2 (SRTMV-N2).

  10. Computational acoustic modeling of cetacean vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Michael Dixon

    A framework for computational acoustic modeling of hypothetical vocal production mechanisms in cetaceans is presented. As a specific example, a model of a proposed source in the larynx of odontocetes is developed. Whales and dolphins generate a broad range of vocal sounds, but the exact mechanisms they use are not conclusively understood. In the fifty years since it has become widely accepted that whales can and do make sound, how they do so has remained particularly confounding. Cetaceans' highly divergent respiratory anatomy, along with the difficulty of internal observation during vocalization have contributed to this uncertainty. A variety of acoustical, morphological, ethological and physiological evidence has led to conflicting and often disputed theories of the locations and mechanisms of cetaceans' sound sources. Computational acoustic modeling has been used to create real-time parametric models of musical instruments and the human voice. These techniques can be applied to cetacean vocalizations to help better understand the nature and function of these sounds. Extensive studies of odontocete laryngeal morphology have revealed vocal folds that are consistently similar to a known but poorly understood acoustic source, the ribbon reed. A parametric computational model of the ribbon reed is developed, based on simplified geometrical, mechanical and fluid models drawn from the human voice literature. The physical parameters of the ribbon reed model are then adapted to those of the odontocete larynx. With reasonable estimates of real physical parameters, both the ribbon reed and odontocete larynx models produce sounds that are perceptually similar to their real-world counterparts, and both respond realistically under varying control conditions. Comparisons of acoustic features of the real-world and synthetic systems show a number of consistencies. While this does not on its own prove that either model is conclusively an accurate description of the source, it

  11. Acoustical Characteristics of Mastication Sounds: Application of Speech Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochetti, Denise

    Food scientists have used acoustical methods to study characteristics of mastication sounds in relation to food texture. However, a model for analysis of the sounds has not been identified, and reliability of the methods has not been reported. Therefore, speech analysis techniques were applied to mastication sounds, and variation in measures of the sounds was examined. To meet these objectives, two experiments were conducted. In the first experiment, a digital sound spectrograph generated waveforms and wideband spectrograms of sounds by 3 adult subjects (1 male, 2 females) for initial chews of food samples differing in hardness and fracturability. Acoustical characteristics were described and compared. For all sounds, formants appeared in the spectrograms, and energy occurred across a 0 to 8000-Hz range of frequencies. Bursts characterized waveforms for peanut, almond, raw carrot, ginger snap, and hard candy. Duration and amplitude of the sounds varied with the subjects. In the second experiment, the spectrograph was used to measure the duration, amplitude, and formants of sounds for the initial 2 chews of cylindrical food samples (raw carrot, teething toast) differing in diameter (1.27, 1.90, 2.54 cm). Six adult subjects (3 males, 3 females) having normal occlusions and temporomandibular joints chewed the samples between the molar teeth and with the mouth open. Ten repetitions per subject were examined for each food sample. Analysis of estimates of variation indicated an inconsistent intrasubject variation in the acoustical measures. Food type and sample diameter also affected the estimates, indicating the variable nature of mastication. Generally, intrasubject variation was greater than intersubject variation. Analysis of ranks of the data indicated that the effect of sample diameter on the acoustical measures was inconsistent and depended on the subject and type of food. If inferences are to be made concerning food texture from acoustical measures of mastication

  12. Ecological Insights from Pelagic Habitats Acquired Using Active Acoustic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.; Lawson, Gareth L.

    2016-01-01

    Marine pelagic ecosystems present fascinating opportunities for ecological investigation but pose important methodological challenges for sampling. Active acoustic techniques involve producing sound and receiving signals from organisms and other water column sources, offering the benefit of high spatial and temporal resolution and, via integration into different platforms, the ability to make measurements spanning a range of spatial and temporal scales. As a consequence, a variety of questions concerning the ecology of pelagic systems lend themselves to active acoustics, ranging from organism-level investigations and physiological responses to the environment to ecosystem-level studies and climate. As technologies and data analysis methods have matured, the use of acoustics in ecological studies has grown rapidly. We explore the continued role of active acoustics in addressing questions concerning life in the ocean, highlight creative applications to key ecological themes ranging from physiology and behavior to biogeography and climate, and discuss emerging avenues where acoustics can help determine how pelagic ecosystems function.

  13. Ecological Insights from Pelagic Habitats Acquired Using Active Acoustic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; Lawson, Gareth L

    2016-01-01

    Marine pelagic ecosystems present fascinating opportunities for ecological investigation but pose important methodological challenges for sampling. Active acoustic techniques involve producing sound and receiving signals from organisms and other water column sources, offering the benefit of high spatial and temporal resolution and, via integration into different platforms, the ability to make measurements spanning a range of spatial and temporal scales. As a consequence, a variety of questions concerning the ecology of pelagic systems lend themselves to active acoustics, ranging from organism-level investigations and physiological responses to the environment to ecosystem-level studies and climate. As technologies and data analysis methods have matured, the use of acoustics in ecological studies has grown rapidly. We explore the continued role of active acoustics in addressing questions concerning life in the ocean, highlight creative applications to key ecological themes ranging from physiology and behavior to biogeography and climate, and discuss emerging avenues where acoustics can help determine how pelagic ecosystems function.

  14. Acoustic measuring techniques for suspended sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, P.; Felix, D.; Storti, G.; Lattuada, M.; Fleckenstein, P.; Deschwanden, F.

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic signals can be used in various ways for suspended sediment monitoring. One possibility which lends itself particularly well in the context of hydropower plants (HPPs), is to use installations for acoustic discharge measurement (ADM). Such installations already exist at waterways of many HPPs. Similar to certain turbidimeters, the attenuation of the forward scattered signal travelling through the water-sediment mixture is correlated with suspended sediment concentration (SSC). This correlation can be based on reference SSCs, e.g. from gravimetric analyses of bottle samples. Without the need of additional sensors and practically maintenance-free, this method is used successfully in the HPP Fieschertal to warn the HPP operator of high SSC to prevent excessive turbine abrasion. Acoustic methods and systems that allow for estimating both SSC and particle size distribution (PSD) are under development. The simultaneous determination of SSC and PSD is not possible using a single frequency. Therefore, multi-frequency approaches are investigated for generally scattered signals. When backscattered signals are used, a stronger frequency dependency can be exploited. However, the reliable simultaneous determination of particle size (and distribution) and concentration is still a major challenge due to a low signal-to-noise ratio and an ill- posed problem of estimating concentration and size from recorded signals. The optimal setup configuration (angles, frequencies) for such a system is not unique and further investigations are recommended.

  15. Development of hydroacoustical techniques for the monitoring and classification of benthic habitats in Puck Bay: Modeling of acoustic waves scattering by seagrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raczkowska, A.; Gorska, N.

    2012-12-01

    Puck Bay is an area of high species biodiversity belonging to the Coastal Landscape Park of Baltic Sea Protected Areas (BSPA) and is also included in the list of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and covered by the protection program "Natura 2000". The underwater meadows of the Puck Bay are important for Europe's natural habitats due to their role in enhancing the productivity of marine ecosystems and providing shelter and optimal feeding conditions for many marine organisms. One of the dominant species comprising the underwater meadows of the Southern Baltic Sea is the seagrass Zostera marina. The spatial extent of underwater seagrass meadows is altered by pollution and eutrophication; therefore, to properly manage the area one must monitor its ecological state. Remote acoustic methods are useful tools for the monitoring of benthic habitats in many marine areas because they are non-invasive and allow researchers to obtain data from a large area in a short period of time. Currently there is a need to apply these methods in the Baltic Sea. Here we present an analysis of the mechanism of scattering of acoustic waves on seagrass in the Southern Baltic Sea based on the numerical modeling of acoustic wave scattering by the biological tissues of plants. The study was conducted by adapting a model developed on the basis of DWBA (Distorted Wave Born Approximation) developed by Stanton and Chu (2005) for fluid-like objects, including the characteristics of the Southern Baltic seagrass. Input data for the model, including the morphometry of seagrass leaves, their angle of inclination and the density plant cover, was obtained through the analysis of biological materials collected in the Puck Bay in the framework of a research project financed by the Polish Government (Development of hydroacoustic methods for studies of underwater meadows of Puck Bay, 6P04E 051 20). On the basis of the developed model, we have analyzed the dependence of the target strength of a single

  16. Acoustic technique to monitor the kinetics of porous development phenomena in viscoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, G.; Skaf, A.; Saad, N.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the potential of a low frequency acoustic technique for the study and characterisation of viscoelastic porous media is investigated. This work was based on the limits of ultrasonic applications in highly absorbent porous media. In this context, fermenting dough was used as a model propagation medium. This type of product has a very complex matrix in terms of texture, openings and moisture. The basic theory of sound in such matter is recalled, especially the effects of the scattering of sound energy in matrices like that of the product under investigation. Depending on the properties of the openings, acoustic velocity and intensity of sound were chosen to represent the state of evolution of the matter. A tap-test acoustic technique was employed and allowed a quality indicator to be obtained. The results of the validation step using various technological parameters indicate that a high degree of sensitivity can be reached with non-destructive acoustic techniques.

  17. The acoustic spectrophonometer: a novel bioanalytical technique based on multifrequency acoustic devices.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, A C; Araya-Kleinsteuber, B; Sethi, R S; Mehta, H M; Lowe, C R

    2003-10-01

    A measurement technique similar to optical absorption spectroscopy but based on evanescent acoustic waves is described in this paper. This format employs a planar spiral coil to vibrate a single crystal of quartz from 6 to 400 MHz, in order to measure multifrequency acoustic spectra. Consistency with the defined Sauerbrey and Kanazawa terms K1 and K2 when applied to multiple frequencies was found for these specific operating conditions in terms of a significant fit between the measured and calculated values: For an IgG surface density of 13.5 ng mm(-2) the measured value of K1 is 22.5 x 10(-6) and the calculated value is 20.4 x 10(-6), whilst for glycerol viscous loadings of 5.131 cP the measured value of K2 is 0.47 and the calculated value is 0.54. Thus for these specific surface loadings the multifrequency data fits to the predictions of the Sauerbrey model to within 10% and to Kanazawa model within 13%. However collective frequency shifts for 5.131 cP solutions of sucrose, dextran and glucose were found to exhibit an unanticipated additional variability (R2 < 0.4) with frequency, but retained a square root of frequency dependency within a factor 2 of the interpolated K2 values. The response to the 5.131 cP dextran solution was found to be significantly below the other isoviscous solutions, with a substantially reduced frequency shift and K2 value than would be expected from its bulk viscosity. In comparison with these viscous solutions, IgG protein films consistently produced linear frequency shifts with little scatter (R2 > 0.96) that were proportional to the operating frequency, and fully consistent with the Sauerbrey model under these specific conditions. A t-test value of 14.52 was calculated from the variance and mean of the two groups, and demonstrates that the acoustic spectrophonometer can be used to distinguish between the acoustic impedance characteristics of two chemical systems that are not clearly differentiable at a single operating frequency.

  18. Nonlinear acoustic techniques for landmine detection.

    PubMed

    Korman, Murray S; Sabatier, James M

    2004-12-01

    Measurements of the top surface vibration of a buried (inert) VS 2.2 anti-tank plastic landmine reveal significant resonances in the frequency range between 80 and 650 Hz. Resonances from measurements of the normal component of the acoustically induced soil surface particle velocity (due to sufficient acoustic-to-seismic coupling) have been used in detection schemes. Since the interface between the top plate and the soil responds nonlinearly to pressure fluctuations, characteristics of landmines, the soil, and the interface are rich in nonlinear physics and allow for a method of buried landmine detection not previously exploited. Tuning curve experiments (revealing "softening" and a back-bone curve linear in particle velocity amplitude versus frequency) help characterize the nonlinear resonant behavior of the soil-landmine oscillator. The results appear to exhibit the characteristics of nonlinear mesoscopic elastic behavior, which is explored. When two primary waves f1 and f2 drive the soil over the mine near resonance, a rich spectrum of nonlinearly generated tones is measured with a geophone on the surface over the buried landmine in agreement with Donskoy [SPIE Proc. 3392, 221-217 (1998); 3710, 239-246 (1999)]. In profiling, particular nonlinear tonals can improve the contrast ratio compared to using either primary tone in the spectrum.

  19. Prediction of the Acoustic Field Associated with Instability Wave Source Model for a Compressible Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubev, Vladimir; Mankbadi, Reda R.; Dahl, Milo D.; Kiraly, L. James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides preliminary results of the study of the acoustic radiation from the source model representing spatially-growing instability waves in a round jet at high speeds. The source model is briefly discussed first followed by the analysis of the produced acoustic directivity pattern. Two integral surface techniques are discussed and compared for prediction of the jet acoustic radiation field.

  20. Modern Techniques in Acoustical Signal and Image Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V

    2002-04-04

    Acoustical signal processing problems can lead to some complex and intricate techniques to extract the desired information from noisy, sometimes inadequate, measurements. The challenge is to formulate a meaningful strategy that is aimed at performing the processing required even in the face of uncertainties. This strategy can be as simple as a transformation of the measured data to another domain for analysis or as complex as embedding a full-scale propagation model into the processor. The aims of both approaches are the same--to extract the desired information and reject the extraneous, that is, develop a signal processing scheme to achieve this goal. In this paper, we briefly discuss this underlying philosophy from a ''bottom-up'' approach enabling the problem to dictate the solution rather than visa-versa.

  1. Computational ocean acoustics: Advances in 3D ocean acoustic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Henrik; Jensen, Finn B.

    2012-11-01

    The numerical model of ocean acoustic propagation developed in the 1980's are still in widespread use today, and the field of computational ocean acoustics is often considered a mature field. However, the explosive increase in computational power available to the community has created opportunities for modeling phenomena that earlier were beyond reach. Most notably, three-dimensional propagation and scattering problems have been prohibitive computationally, but are now addressed routinely using brute force numerical approaches such as the Finite Element Method, in particular for target scattering problems, where they are being combined with the traditional wave theory propagation models in hybrid modeling frameworks. Also, recent years has seen the development of hybrid approaches coupling oceanographic circulation models with acoustic propagation models, enabling the forecasting of sonar performance uncertainty in dynamic ocean environments. These and other advances made over the last couple of decades support the notion that the field of computational ocean acoustics is far from being mature. [Work supported by the Office of Naval Research, Code 321OA].

  2. NEW NONLINEAR ACOUSTIC TECHNIQUES FOR NDE

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. TENCATE

    2000-09-01

    Acoustic nonlinearity in a medium may occur as a result of a variety of mechanisms. Some of the more common nonlinear effects may come from: (1) one or several cracks, volumetrically distributed due to age or fatigue or single disbonds or delamination; (2) imperfect grain-to-grain contacts, e.g., materials like concretes that are cemented together and have less than perfect bonds; (3) hard parts in a soft matrix, e.g., extreme duty materials like tungsten/copper alloys; or (4) atomic-scale nonlinearities. Nonlinear effects that arise from the first two mechanisms are considerably larger than the last two; thus, we have focused considerable attention on these. The most pervasive nonlinear measure of damage today is a second harmonic measurement. We show that for many cases of interest to NDE, a second harmonic measurement may not be the best choice. We examine the manifestations of nonlinearity in (nonlinear) materials with cracks and/or imperfect bonds and illustrate their applicability to NDE. For example, nonlinear resonance frequency shifts measured at increasing drive levels correlate strongly with the amount of ASR (alkali-silica reaction) damage of concrete cores. Memory effects (slow dynamics) also seem to correlate with the amount of damage.

  3. Modeling ground vehicle acoustic signatures for analysis and synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, G.; Stanfield, R.

    1995-07-01

    Security and weapon systems use acoustic sensor signals to classify and identify moving ground vehicles. Developing robust signal processing algorithms for this is expensive, particularly in presence of acoustic clutter or countermeasures. This paper proposes a parametric ground vehicle acoustic signature model to aid the system designer in understanding which signature features are important, developing corresponding feature extraction algorithms and generating low-cost, high-fidelity synthetic signatures for testing. The authors have proposed computer-generated acoustic signatures of armored, tracked ground vehicles to deceive acoustic-sensored smart munitions. They have developed quantitative measures of how accurately a synthetic acoustic signature matches those produced by actual vehicles. This paper describes parameters of the model used to generate these synthetic signatures and suggests methods for extracting these parameters from signatures of valid vehicle encounters. The model incorporates wide-bandwidth and narrow- bandwidth components that are modulated in a pseudo-random fashion to mimic the time dynamics of valid vehicle signatures. Narrow- bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate frequency, amplitude and phase information contained in a single set of narrow frequency- band harmonics. Wide-bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate parameters of a correlated-noise-floor model. Finally, the authors propose a method of modeling the time dynamics of the harmonic amplitudes as a means adding necessary time-varying features to the narrow-bandwidth signal components. The authors present results of applying this modeling technique to acoustic signatures recorded during encounters with one armored, tracked vehicle. Similar modeling techniques can be applied to security systems.

  4. Applications of swept-frequency acoustic interferometry technique in chemical diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.; Springer, K.; Lizon, D.; Hasse, R.

    1996-09-01

    Swept-Frequency Acoustic Interferometry (SFAI) is a noninvasive fluid characterization technique currently being developed for chemical weapons treaty verification. The SFAI technique determines sound speed and sound attenuation in a fluid over a wide frequency range completely noninvasively from outside a container (e.g., pipe, tank, reactor vessel, etc.,). These acoustic parameters, along with their frequency-dependence, can be used to identify various chemicals. This technique can be adapted for a range of chemical diagnostic applications, particularly, in process control where monitoring of acoustic properties of chemicals may provide appropriate feedback information. Both experimental data and theoretical modeling are presented. Examples of several novel applications of the SFAI technique are discussed.

  5. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, SShao-sheng R.; Allen, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic modeling can be used to identify key noise sources, determine/analyze sub-allocated requirements, keep track of the accumulation of minor noise sources, and to predict vehicle noise levels at various stages in vehicle development, first with estimates of noise sources, later with experimental data. In FY09, the physical mockup developed in FY08, with interior geometric shape similar to Orion CM (Crew Module) IML (Interior Mode Line), was used to validate SEA (Statistical Energy Analysis) acoustic model development with realistic ventilation fan sources. The sound power levels of these sources were unknown a priori, as opposed to previous studies that RSS (Reference Sound Source) with known sound power level was used. The modeling results were evaluated based on comparisons to measurements of sound pressure levels over a wide frequency range, including the frequency range where SEA gives good results. Sound intensity measurement was performed over a rectangular-shaped grid system enclosing the ventilation fan source. Sound intensities were measured at the top, front, back, right, and left surfaces of the and system. Sound intensity at the bottom surface was not measured, but sound blocking material was placed tinder the bottom surface to reflect most of the incident sound energy back to the remaining measured surfaces. Integrating measured sound intensities over measured surfaces renders estimated sound power of the source. The reverberation time T6o of the mockup interior had been modified to match reverberation levels of ISS US Lab interior for speech frequency bands, i.e., 0.5k, 1k, 2k, 4 kHz, by attaching appropriately sized Thinsulate sound absorption material to the interior wall of the mockup. Sound absorption of Thinsulate was modeled in three methods: Sabine equation with measured mockup interior reverberation time T60, layup model based on past impedance tube testing, and layup model plus air absorption correction. The evaluation/validation was

  6. Acoustic Scattering Models of Zooplankton and Microstructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-30

    Acoustic Scattering Models of Zooplankton and Microstructure Timothy K. Stanton Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Woods Hole...understand the acoustic reverberation properties of zooplankton and microstructure. The results will lead to improved capability in 1) predicting sonar...performance and 2) use of sonars in the mapping of the zooplankton and microstructure. OBJECTIVES To understand the physics of the scattering by

  7. Acoustic Scattering Models of Zooplankton and Microstructure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-30

    Acoustic Scattering Models of Zooplankton and Microstructure Timothy K. Stanton Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Woods Hole...understand the acoustic reverberation properties of zooplankton and microstructure. The results will lead to improved capability in 1) predicting sonar...performance and 2) use of sonars in the mapping of the zooplankton and microstructure. OBJECTIVES To understand the physics of the scattering by

  8. An Acoustic Communication Technique of Nanorobot Swarms for Nanomedicine Applications.

    PubMed

    Loscrí, Valeria; Vegni, Anna Maria

    2015-09-01

    In this contribution, we present a communication paradigm among nanodevices, based on acoustic vibrations for medical applications. We consider a swarm of nanorobots able to communicate in a distributed and decentralized fashion, propelled in a biological environment (i.e., the human brain). Each nanorobot is intended to i) recognize a cancer cell, ii) destroy it, and then iii) forward information about the presence of cancer formation to other nanorobots, through acoustic signals. The choice of acoustic waves as communication mean is related to the application context, where it is not advisable either to use indiscriminate chemical substances or electromagnetic waves. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is assessed in terms of achievement of the objective (i.e., to destroy the majority of tumor cells), and the velocity of detection and destruction of cancer cells, through a comparison with other related techniques.

  9. Real-time vehicle noise cancellation techniques for gunshot acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Antonio L. L.; Holm, Sverre; Gudvangen, Sigmund; Otterlei, Ragnvald

    2012-06-01

    Acoustical sniper positioning systems rely on the detection and direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation of the shockwave and the muzzle blast in order to provide an estimate of a potential snipers location. Field tests have shown that detecting and estimating the DOA of the muzzle blast is a rather difficult task in the presence of background noise sources, e.g., vehicle noise, especially in long range detection and absorbing terrains. In our previous work presented in the 2011 edition of this conference we highlight the importance of improving the SNR of the gunshot signals prior to the detection and recognition stages, aiming at lowering the false alarm and miss-detection rates and, thereby, increasing the reliability of the system. This paper reports on real-time noise cancellation techniques, like Spectral Subtraction and Adaptive Filtering, applied to gunshot signals. Our model assumes the background noise as being short-time stationary and uncorrelated to the impulsive gunshot signals. In practice, relatively long periods without signal occur and can be used to estimate the noise spectrum and its first and second order statistics as required in the spectral subtraction and adaptive filtering techniques, respectively. The results presented in this work are supported with extensive simulations based on real data.

  10. In-flight acoustic testing techniques using the YO-3A Acoustic Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. L.; Watts, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    This report discusses the flight testing techniques and equipment employed during air-to-air acoustic testing of helicopters at Ames Research Center. The in flight measurement technique used enables acoustic data to be obtained without the limitations of anechoic chambers or the multitude of variables encountered in ground based flyover testing. The air-to-air testing is made possible by the NASA YO-3A Acoustic Research Aircraft. This "Quiet Aircraft' is an acoustically instrumented version of a quiet observation aircraft manufactured for the military. To date, tests with the following aircraft have been conducted: YO-3A background noise; Hughes 500D; Hughes AH-64; Bell AH-1S; Bell AH-1G. Several system upgrades are being designed and implemented to improve the quality of data. This report will discuss not only the equipment involved and aircraft tested, but also the techniques used in these tests. In particular, formation flying position locations, and the test matrices will be discussed. Examples of data taken will also be presented.

  11. In-flight acoustic testing techniques using the YO-3A acoustic research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. L.; Watts, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    This report discusses the flight testing techniques and equipment employed during air-to-air acoustic testing of helicopters at Ames Research Center. The in-flight measurement technique used enables acoustic data to be obtained without the limitations of anechoic chambers or the multitude of variables encountered in ground based flyover testing. The air-to-air testing is made possible by the NASA YO-3A Acoustic Research Aircraft. This 'Quiet Aircraft' is an acoustically instrumented version of a quiet observation aircraft manufactured for the military. To date, tests with the following aircraft have been conducted: YO-3A background noise; Hughes 500D; Hughes AH-64; Bell AH-1S; Bell AH-1G. Several system upgrades are being designed and implemented to improve the quality of data. This report will discuss not only the equipment involved and aircraft tested, but also the techniques used in these tests. In particular, formation flying, position locations, and the test matrices will be discussed. Examples of data taken will also be presented.

  12. An improved theoretical model of acoustic agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Song, L. ); Koopmann, G.H. . Center for Acoustics and Vibration); Hoffmann, T.L. )

    1994-04-01

    An improved theoretical model is developed to describe the acoustic agglomeration of particles entrained in a gas medium. The improvements to the present theories are twofold: first, wave scattering is included in the orthokinetic interaction of particles and second, hydrodynamic interaction, shown to be an important agglomeration mechanism for certain operation conditions, is incorporated into the model. The influence of orthokinetic and hydrodynamic interactions introduce associated convergent velocities that cause particles to approach each other and collide. The convergent velocities are related with an acoustic agglomeration frequency function (AAFF) through a semi-statistical method. This function is the key parameter for the theoretical simulation of acoustic agglomeration.

  13. Advanced Concepts for Underwater Acoustic Channel Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etter, P. C.; Haas, C. H.; Ramani, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines nearshore underwater-acoustic channel modeling concepts and compares channel-state information requirements against existing modeling capabilities. This process defines a subset of candidate acoustic models suitable for simulating signal propagation in underwater communications. Underwater-acoustic communications find many practical applications in coastal oceanography, and networking is the enabling technology for these applications. Such networks can be formed by establishing two-way acoustic links between autonomous underwater vehicles and moored oceanographic sensors. These networks can be connected to a surface unit for further data transfer to ships, satellites, or shore stations via a radio-frequency link. This configuration establishes an interactive environment in which researchers can extract real-time data from multiple, but distant, underwater instruments. After evaluating the obtained data, control messages can be sent back to individual instruments to adapt the networks to changing situations. Underwater networks can also be used to increase the operating ranges of autonomous underwater vehicles by hopping the control and data messages through networks that cover large areas. A model of the ocean medium between acoustic sources and receivers is called a channel model. In an oceanic channel, characteristics of the acoustic signals change as they travel from transmitters to receivers. These characteristics depend upon the acoustic frequency, the distances between sources and receivers, the paths followed by the signals, and the prevailing ocean environment in the vicinity of the paths. Properties of the received signals can be derived from those of the transmitted signals using these channel models. This study concludes that ray-theory models are best suited to the simulation of acoustic signal propagation in oceanic channels and identifies 33 such models that are eligible candidates.

  14. Imaging of contact acoustic nonlinearity using synthetic aperture technique.

    PubMed

    Yun, Dongseok; Kim, Jongbeom; Jhang, Kyung-Young

    2013-09-01

    The angle beam incidence and reflection technique for the evaluation of contact acoustic nonlinearity (CAN) at solid-solid contact interfaces (e.g., closed cracks) has recently been developed to overcome the disadvantage of accessing both the inner and outer surfaces of structures for attaching pulsing and receiving transducers in the through-transmission of normal incidence technique. This paper proposes a technique for B-mode imaging of CAN based on the above reflection technique, which uses the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) and short-time Fourier transform (STFT) to visualize the distribution of the CAN-induced second harmonic magnitude as well as the nonlinear parameter. In order to verify the usefulness of the proposed method, a solid-solid contact interface was tested and the change of the contact acoustic nonlinearity according to the increasing contact pressure was visualized in images of the second harmonic magnitude and the relative nonlinear parameter. The experimental results showed good agreement with the previously developed theory identifying the dependence of the scattered second harmonics on the contact pressure. This technique can be used for the detection and improvement of the sizing accuracy of closed cracks that are difficult to detect using the conventional linear ultrasonic technique.

  15. Classifying multi-frequency fisheries acoustic data using a robust probabilistic classification technique.

    PubMed

    Anderson, C I H; Horne, J K; Boyle, J

    2007-06-01

    A robust probabilistic classification technique, using expectation maximization of finite mixture models, is used to analyze multi-frequency fisheries acoustic data. The number of clusters is chosen using the Bayesian Information Criterion. Probabilities of membership to clusters are used to classify each sample. The utility of the technique is demonstrated using two examples: the Gulf of Alaska representing a low-diversity, well-known system; and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, a species-rich, relatively unknown system.

  16. Acoustic Scattering Models of Zooplankton and Microstructure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    Acoustic Scattering Models of Zooplankton and Microstructure Timothy K. Stanton Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Woods Hole...LONG-TERM GOALS To understand the acoustic reverberation properties of zooplankton and microstructure. The results will lead to improved capability...in 1) predicting sonar performance and 2) use of sonars in the mapping of the zooplankton and microstructure. OBJECTIVES To understand the physics of

  17. The use of a hybrid model to compute the nonlinear acoustic performance of silencers for the finite amplitude acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daehwan; Cheong, Cheolung; Jeong, Weui Bong

    2010-05-01

    In the present study, a hybrid method is proposed for predicting the acoustic performance of a silencer for a nonlinear wave. This method is developed by combining two models: (i) a frequency-domain model for the computation of sound attenuation due to a silencer in a linear regime and (ii) a wavenumber space model for the prediction of the nonlinear time-evolution of finite amplitudes of the acoustic wave in a uniform duct of the same length as the silencer. The present method is proposed under the observation that the physical process of the nonlinear sound attenuation phenomenon of a silencer may be decoupled into two distinct mechanisms: (a) a linear acoustic energy loss that owes to the mismatch in the acoustic impedance between reactive elements and/or the sound absorption of acoustic liners in a silencer; (b) a nonlinear acoustic energy loss that is due to the energy-cascade phenomenon that arises from the nonlinear interaction between components of different frequencies. To establish the validity of the present model for predicting the acoustic performance of silencers, two model problems are considered. First, the performance of simple expansion mufflers with nonlinear incident waves has been predicted. Second, proposed method is applied for computing nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in the NASA Langley impedance duct configuration with ceramic tubular liner (CT57). Both results obtained from the hybrid models are compared with those from computational aero-acoustic techniques in a time-space domain that utilize a high-order finite-difference method. Through these comparisons, it is shown that there are good agreements between the two predictions. The main advantage of the present method is that it can effectively compute the nonlinear acoustic performance of silencers in nonlinear regimes without time-space domain calculations that generally entail a greater computational burden.

  18. Arctic Acoustics Ultrasonic Modeling Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    shear wave velocity and a large acoustic impedance relative to the water ("hard...results, the real part of the leaky Rayleigh wave root equals the shear wave velocity of the acrylic at 9.2*C. Above this temperature the leaky Rayleigh... wave can exist, and below this temperature it violates the theoretical existence condition by exceeding the shear wave velocity . Figure 4.12(b) shows

  19. Damage Detection and Analysis in CFRPs Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Travis Laron

    Real time monitoring of damage is an important aspect of life management of critical structures. Acoustic emission (AE) techniques allow for measurement and assessment of damage in real time. Acoustic emission parameters such as signal amplitude and duration were monitored during the loading sequences. Criteria that can indicate the onset of critical damage to the structure were developed. Tracking the damage as it happens gives a better analysis of the failure evolution that will allow for a more accurate determination of structural life. The main challenge is distinguishing between legitimate damage signals and "false positives" which are unrelated to damage growth. Such false positives can be related to electrical noise, friction, or mechanical vibrations. This research focuses on monitoring signals of damage growth in carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) and separating the relevant signals from the false ones. In this Dissertation, acoustic emission signals from CFRP specimens were experimentally recorded and analyzed. The objectives of this work are: (1) perform static and fatigue loading of CFRP composite specimens and measure the associated AE signals, (2) accurately determine the AE parameters (energy, frequency, duration, etc.) of signals generated during failure of such specimens, (3) use fiber optic sensors to monitor the strain distribution of the damage zone and relate these changes in strain measurements to AE data.

  20. Comparison of multi-microphone transfer matrix measurements with acoustic network models of swirl burners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, A.; Hirsch, C.; Sattelmayer, T.

    2006-11-01

    Utilizing the close analogy between electronic circuits and ducted acoustic systems, mathematical methods originally developed for the characterization of electronic networks are applied to the experimental acoustic plane wave characterization of swirl burners with complex geometries. The experiments presented in the paper show that the acoustic behavior of swirl generators can be quantitatively evaluated treating them as acoustic two-ports. Such acoustic two-ports are presented in forms of transfer-, scattering- and mobility matrices of the element. In the acoustic burner study dynamic pressure measurements were made at several locations of a tubular combustor test rig for two acoustically independent states, which were generated by forcing with sirens at the opposite ends of the setup. The technique for the experimental evaluation of acoustic transfer matrices of complex geometries on the basis of these dynamic pressure measurements is illustrated. As an alternative to the experiment, the evaluation of the acoustic behavior of acoustic systems is assessed using acoustic networks consisting of simple acoustic elements like ducts, bends, junctions and sudden area changes with transfer matrices, which are derived from first principles. In the paper, a network model representing the transfer characteristics of swirl burners is presented and compared with the previously measured transfer matrices. Although the burner geometry is rather complex, its acoustic behavior can be successfully mapped to a network consisting of a serial connection of nine elements with only minor adjustment of one parameter.

  1. Model helicopter rotor high-speed impulsive noise: Measured acoustics and blade pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    A 1/17-scale research model of the AH-1 series helicopter main rotor was tested. Model-rotor acoustic and simultaneous blade pressure data were recorded at high speeds where full-scale helicopter high-speed impulsive noise levels are known to be dominant. Model-rotor measurements of the peak acoustic pressure levels, waveform shapes, and directively patterns are directly compared with full-scale investigations, using an equivalent in-flight technique. Model acoustic data are shown to scale remarkably well in shape and in amplitude with full-scale results. Model rotor-blade pressures are presented for rotor operating conditions both with and without shock-like discontinuities in the radiated acoustic waveform. Acoustically, both model and full-scale measurements support current evidence that above certain high subsonic advancing-tip Mach numbers, local shock waves that exist on the rotor blades ""delocalize'' and radiate to the acoustic far-field.

  2. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas; Houston, Janice

    2012-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I liftoff acoustic environments and to determine the acoustic reduction gained by using an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and Mobile Launcher with tower. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by over 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to Ares I-X flight data.

  3. Acoustic Propagation Modeling Using MATLAB

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    M1 Oatoq~wv.$~e 204.*’liqi.VA22202-43. andto %be 0##cejf~d q94o’.et~e *Ad6.aet. Vawe’-ok Aedwg1enPr.o,KtO04i4IS8I. .,a,..qto. DC 2010 ) 1. AGENCY USE...media," in Acoustical Imaging, Volume 14, (A, Berkhout , J. Ridder, and L. van der Wal, eds.), pp. 521-531, New York: Plenum Press, 1985. (16] MATLAB

  4. Numerical and experimental investigation of a low-frequency measurement technique: differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hanjun; Zhao, Jianguo; Tang, Genyang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Wang, Shangxu

    2016-06-01

    Differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy (DARS) has been developed to determine the elastic properties of saturated rocks within the kHz frequency range. This laboratory technique is based on considerations from perturbation theory, wherein the resonance frequencies of the resonant cavity with and without a perturbation sample are used to estimate the acoustic properties of the test sample. In order to better understand the operating mechanism of DARS and therefore optimize the procedure, it is important to develop an accurate and efficient numerical model. Accordingly, this study presents a new multiphysics model by coupling together considerations from acoustics, solid mechanics, and electrostatics. The numerical results reveal that the newly developed model can successfully simulate the acoustic pressure field at different resonance modes, and that it can accurately reflect the measurement process. Based on the understanding of the DARS system afforded by the numerical simulation, we refine the system configuration by utilizing cavities of different lengths and appropriate radii to broaden the frequency bandwidth and ensure testing accuracy. Four synthetic samples are measured to test the performance of the optimized DARS system, in conjunction with ultrasonic and static measurements. For nonporous samples, the estimated bulk moduli are shown to be independent of the different measurement methods (i.e. DARS or ultrasonic techniques). In contrast, for sealed porous samples, the differences in bulk moduli between the low- and high-frequency techniques can be clearly observed; this discrepancy is attributed to frequency dispersion. In summary, the optimized DARS system with an extended frequency range of 500-2000 Hz demonstrates considerable utility in investigating the frequency dependence of the acoustic properties of reservoir rocks.

  5. Advances in Geometric Acoustic Propagation Modeling Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, P. S.; Arrowsmith, S.

    2013-12-01

    Geometric acoustics provides an efficient numerical method to model propagation effects. At leading order, one can identify ensonified regions and calculate celerities of the predicted arrivals. Beyond leading order, the solution of the transport equation provides a means to estimate the amplitude of individual acoustic phases. The auxiliary parameters introduced in solving the transport equation have been found to provide a means of identifying ray paths connecting source and receiver, or eigenrays, for non-planar propagation. A detailed explanation of the eigenray method will be presented as well as an application to predicting azimuth deviations for infrasonic data recorded during the Humming Roadrunner experiment of 2012.

  6. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale representation of the SLS vehicle, mobile launcher, tower, and launch pad trench. The SLS launch propulsion system will be comprised of the Rocket Assisted Take-Off (RATO) motors representing the solid boosters and 4 Gas Hydrogen (GH2) thrusters representing the core engines. The GH2 thrusters were tested in a horizontal configuration in order to characterize their performance. In Phase 1, a single thruster was fired to determine the engine performance parameters necessary for scaling a single engine. A cluster configuration, consisting of the 4 thrusters, was tested in Phase 2 to integrate the system and determine their combined performance. Acoustic and overpressure data was collected during both test phases in order to characterize the system's acoustic performance. The results from the single thruster and 4- thuster system are discussed and compared.

  7. a Numerical Model for Subsonic Acoustic Choking.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkington, Noel John

    In aircraft turbofan inlets, fan generated noise is observed experimentally to be significantly attenuated at high subsonic inlet Mach numbers. This phenomenon cannot be predicted by linear acoustic theory. In order to study the physical process by which this may occur, a numerical algorithm has been developed to solve a related nonlinear problem in one dimensional gas dynamics. The nonlinear solution admits the possibility of wave steepening and shock waves. Approximate solutions are obtained using several finite difference schemes. The boundary conditions required to model an acoustic source and an anechoic termination are developed. The numerical solutions agree closely with those obtained using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. Solutions involving shock waves exhibit a large reduction in the ratio of transmitted to incident power. This offers an explanation for acoustic choking. The results indicate that more power is dissipated as the Mach number, sound amplitude and frequency are increased. These observations are in agreement with those observed experimentally.

  8. A new multichannel spatial diversity technique for long-range acoustic communications in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaujean, Pierre-Philippe J.; Bernault, Emmanuel P.

    2002-11-01

    A new multichannel spatial diversity technique has been developed for underwater acoustic communications in very shallow waters. This technique combines a novel synchronization method with maximum-likelihood symbol estimation. It was tested with a multichannel Mills-Cross receiver using various numbers of elements. The FAU general purpose acoustic modem source transmitted messages using four types of frequency-hopped multiple-frequency-chirp-keying (FH-MFSK) modulation: 4 hops at 221 coded bits per second (cps), 2 hops at 442 cps, or no hopping at 1172 cps. These types of modulation allowed for robust data transmission in adverse environment. The modem operated between 16 and 32 kHz at 192-dB source level, at ranges from 1 to 5 km in 40 ft of water. Using only four channels of the Mills-Cross receiver array, messages coded at 1172 cps were received with a frame error rate (FER) of 0% at a range of 3 km. In the same four-channel configuration, messages coded at 221 cps were received with no frame error at 5 km. The experimental results matched the performance predictions from the Crepeaus model. This reliable and computation-efficient method can be implemented on new generations of embedded acoustic modems, such as the four-channel FAU acoustic modem, and can provide significant improvements in communication performance.

  9. Parabolic equation modeling of high frequency acoustic transmission with an evolving sea surface.

    PubMed

    Senne, J; Song, A; Badiey, M; Smith, K B

    2012-09-01

    The present paper examines the temporal evolution of acoustic fields by modeling forward propagation subject to sea surface dynamics with time scales of less than a second to tens of seconds. A time-evolving rough sea surface model is combined with a rough surface formulation of a parabolic equation model for predicting time-varying acoustic fields. Surface waves are generated from surface wave spectra, and stepped in time using a Runge-Kutta integration technique applied to linear evolution equations. This evolving, range-dependent surface information is combined with other environmental parameters and input to the acoustic model, giving an approximation of the time-varying acoustic field. The wide-angle parabolic equation model manages the rough sea surfaces by molding them into the boundary conditions for calculations of the near-surface acoustic field. This merged acoustic model is validated using concurrently-collected acoustic and environmental information, including surface wave spectra. Data to model comparisons demonstrate that the model is able to approximate the ensemble-averaged acoustic intensity at ranges of about a kilometer for acoustic signals of around 15 kHz. Furthermore, the model is shown to capture variations due to surface fluctuations occurring over time scales of less than a second to tens of seconds.

  10. Detection of cavitation vortex in hydraulic turbines using acoustic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candel, I.; Bunea, F.; Dunca, G.; Bucur, D. M.; Ioana, C.; Reeb, B.; Ciocan, G. D.

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation phenomena are known for their destructive capacity in hydraulic machineries and are caused by the pressure decrease followed by an implosion when the cavitation bubbles find an adverse pressure gradient. A helical vortex appears in the turbine diffuser cone at partial flow rate operation and can be cavitating in its core. Cavity volumes and vortex frequencies vary with the under-pressure level. If the vortex frequency comes close to one of the eigen frequencies of the turbine, a resonance phenomenon may occur, the unsteady fluctuations can be amplified and lead to important turbine and hydraulic circuit damage. Conventional cavitation vortex detection techniques are based on passive devices (pressure sensors or accelerometers). Limited sensor bandwidths and low frequency response limit the vortex detection and characterization information provided by the passive techniques. In order to go beyond these techniques and develop a new active one that will remove these drawbacks, previous work in the field has shown that techniques based on acoustic signals using adapted signal content to a particular hydraulic situation, can be more robust and accurate. The cavitation vortex effects in the water flow profile downstream hydraulic turbines runner are responsible for signal content modifications. Basic signal techniques use narrow band signals traveling inside the flow from an emitting transducer to a receiving one (active sensors). Emissions of wide band signals in the flow during the apparition and development of the vortex embeds changes in the received signals. Signal processing methods are used to estimate the cavitation apparition and evolution. Tests done in a reduced scale facility showed that due to the increasing flow rate, the signal -- vortex interaction is seen as modifications on the received signal's high order statistics and bandwidth. Wide band acoustic transducers have a higher dynamic range over mechanical elements; the system's reaction time

  11. Design, characterization and modeling of biobased acoustic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari Mosanenzadeh, Shahrzad

    measurements using an inverse technique. As the next step towards in depth understanding of the relation between cell morphology and sound absorption of open cell foams, a semi-analytical model was developed to account for the effect of micro cellular properties such as cell wall thickness and reticulation rate on overall macroscopic and structural properties. Developed model provides the tools to optimize the porous structure and enhance sound absorption capability.

  12. Modern acoustic emission technique and its application in aviation industry.

    PubMed

    Geng, Rongsheng

    2006-12-22

    This paper proposes the concept of modern acoustic emission (MAE) technique and describes its application in aviation industry. Modern AE is characterized by the combination of AE parameter and waveform analysis based on the understanding of AE source mechanism, the property of sound wave propagation and the interaction between sound wave and the medium in which the sound wave is propagating. Another feature of MAE is characterized by the application of so-called fully digital AE apparatus with low noise, high speed of data transmission and accurate AE source locating capability. MAE is merely an imagination without the realization of the advanced fully digital AE instrument. The application of MAE in monitoring the conditions of aircraft structures during a fatigue test was taken as an example for showing the important role played by AE. Roles of AE in the evaluation of (environment-related) corrosion damage of aircraft were also presented.

  13. Theoretical detection threshold of the proton-acoustic range verification technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Moiz; Yousefi, Siavash; Xing, Lei; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Range verification in proton therapy using the proton-acoustic signal induced in the Bragg peak was investigated for typical clinical scenarios. The signal generation and detection processes were simulated in order to determine the signal-to-noise limits. Methods: An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distribution and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. In this method, the acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were generated by the general 3D pressure wave equation implemented using a finite element method. Various beam pulse widths (0.1–10 μs) were simulated by convolving the acoustic waves with Gaussian kernels. A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth bandpass filter with consideration of random noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio on a per-proton basis was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons required to generate a detectable pulse. The maximum spatial resolution of the proton-acoustic imaging modality was also estimated from the signal spectrum. Results: The calculated noise in the transducer was 12–28 mPa, depending on the transducer central frequency (70–380 kHz). The minimum number of protons detectable by the technique was on the order of 3–30 × 10{sup 6} per pulse, with 30–800 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak. Wider pulses produced signal with lower acoustic frequencies, with 10 μs pulses producing signals with frequency less than 100 kHz. Conclusions: The proton-acoustic process was simulated using a realistic model and the minimal detection limit was established for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a single large detector with no losses and detector thermal noise as the sensitivity limiting factor. Our study indicated practical proton-acoustic

  14. Theoretical detection threshold of the proton-acoustic range verification technique

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Moiz; Xiang, Liangzhong; Yousefi, Siavash; Xing, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Range verification in proton therapy using the proton-acoustic signal induced in the Bragg peak was investigated for typical clinical scenarios. The signal generation and detection processes were simulated in order to determine the signal-to-noise limits. Methods: An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distribution and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. In this method, the acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were generated by the general 3D pressure wave equation implemented using a finite element method. Various beam pulse widths (0.1–10 μs) were simulated by convolving the acoustic waves with Gaussian kernels. A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth bandpass filter with consideration of random noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio on a per-proton basis was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons required to generate a detectable pulse. The maximum spatial resolution of the proton-acoustic imaging modality was also estimated from the signal spectrum. Results: The calculated noise in the transducer was 12–28 mPa, depending on the transducer central frequency (70–380 kHz). The minimum number of protons detectable by the technique was on the order of 3–30 × 106 per pulse, with 30–800 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak. Wider pulses produced signal with lower acoustic frequencies, with 10 μs pulses producing signals with frequency less than 100 kHz. Conclusions: The proton-acoustic process was simulated using a realistic model and the minimal detection limit was established for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a single large detector with no losses and detector thermal noise as the sensitivity limiting factor. Our study indicated practical proton-acoustic range

  15. Acoustic Techniques for Studying Soil-surface Seals and Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, C. J.; Leary, D.; Dicarlo, D. A.

    2007-05-01

    The impact of raindrops on a soil surface during a rainstorm may cause soil-surface sealing and crusting. Soil- surface sealing is a result of the clogging in interaggregate pores by smaller suspended particles in the water, which reduces the infiltration capacity of soils. Soil-surface crusting refers to the increase in soil strength or mechanical stiffness associated with near surface compaction or densification. The formation of soil-surface seals and crusts have a profound influence on the erodability of soils, with the consensus being that the reduced hydraulic conductivity due to sealing is the more important factor. However, studies note that measured values of seal hydraulic conductivity are few. The reason so few measurements may be because the thickness of the altered surface layer is on the order of millimeters. For example Lee (2006) states that a soil-surface seal consist of two parts: a 0.1mm thick upper skin seal attributed to compaction by the rain drop impact and a deeper 1.5 mm "washed in" zone with decreased porosity due to the accumulation of particles. Bulk density profiles measured using X-radiography show maximum changes in the top 5 mm of the soil. The surface of the ground (soil) has an influence on the propagation of sound outdoors. The porosity, air flow- resistivity, and tortuosity of the ground are the properties, which characterize the influence of the ground on the airborne sound. The air flow-resistivity of a dry soil is equivalent to the hydraulic conductivity of a water-saturated soil. In this presentation we discuss two acoustic techniques, one with sensitivity to changes in hydraulic properties (sealing) and the other to changes in mechanical stiffness (crusting). These non-contact techniques excite the soil using a suspended loudspeaker to impinge acoustic energy from the air (sound) onto the sample. The response of the soil is quantified using a microphone to measure the total pressure above the soil surface and a laser Doppler

  16. The application of acoustic emission technique to fatigue crack measurement. [in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission technique to measure fatigue cracks in aluminum alloy specimens was investigated. There are several variables, such as the metallurgical and the physical treatment of the specimen, that can affect the level of acoustic activity of a fatigue specimen. It is therefore recommended that the acoustic emission technique be supplemented by other nondestructive evaluation methods to obtain quantitative data on crack growth.

  17. Evaluation of acoustic emission technique for crack growth measurement in aeronautical structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted concerning the possibility to use the acoustic emission technique for the measurement of fatigue crack growth in aluminum alloy specimens. Two types of aluminum alloys were tested in the investigation. It was found that the acoustic emission technique provides a reliable indication of changes in the crack dimensions over relatively short periods of time. The level of acoustic activity serves as an indicator of the size of the cracks.

  18. Computational and experimental techniques for coupled acoustic/structure interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumali, Anton Hartono; Pierson, Kendall Hugh; Walsh, Timothy Francis; Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn; Reese, Garth M.; Day, David Minot

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results obtained during a one-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative aimed at investigating coupled structural acoustic interactions by means of algorithm development and experiment. Finite element acoustic formulations have been developed based on fluid velocity potential and fluid displacement. Domain decomposition and diagonal scaling preconditioners were investigated for parallel implementation. A formulation that includes fluid viscosity and that can simulate both pressure and shear waves in fluid was developed. An acoustic wave tube was built, tested, and shown to be an effective means of testing acoustic loading on simple test structures. The tube is capable of creating a semi-infinite acoustic field due to nonreflecting acoustic termination at one end. In addition, a micro-torsional disk was created and tested for the purposes of investigating acoustic shear wave damping in microstructures, and the slip boundary conditions that occur along the wet interface when the Knudsen number becomes sufficiently large.

  19. An asymptotic model in acoustics: acoustic drift equations.

    PubMed

    Vladimirov, Vladimir A; Ilin, Konstantin

    2013-11-01

    A rigorous asymptotic procedure with the Mach number as a small parameter is used to derive the equations of mean flows which coexist and are affected by the background acoustic waves in the limit of very high Reynolds number.

  20. SLS Scale Model Acoustic Test Liftoff Results and Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, Douglas; Giacomoni, Clothilde

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible design phase test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments.

  1. Acoustic Models of Optical Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, V. V.; Varaksina, E. I.

    2014-01-01

    Students form a more exact idea of the action of optical mirrors if they can observe the wave field being formed during reflection. For this purpose it is possible to organize model experiments with flexural waves propagating in thin elastic plates. The direct and round edges of the plates are used as models of plane, convex and concave mirrors.…

  2. An acoustic method of automatically evaluating patient inhaler technique.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Martin S; D'Arcy, Shona; Costello, Richard W; Reilly, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affect millions of people worldwide. Inhalers are devices utilized to deliver medication in small doses directly to the airways in the treatment of asthma and COPD. Despite the proven effectiveness of inhaler medication in controlling symptoms, many patients suffer from technique errors leading to decreased levels of medication efficacy. This study employs a recording device attached to a commonly used dry powder inhaler (DPI) to obtain the acoustic signals of patients taking their inhaler medication. The audio files provide information on how a patient uses their inhaler over a period of one month. Manually listening to such a large quantity of audio files would be a time consuming and monotonous process and therefore an algorithm that could automatically carry out this task would be of great benefit. An algorithm was thus designed and developed to detect inhalation, exhalation and blister events in the audio signals, analyze the quantity of each event, the order in which the events took place and finally provide a score on the overall performance. The algorithm was tested on a dataset of 185 audio files obtained from five community dwelling asthmatic patients in real world environments. Evaluation of the algorithm on this dataset revealed that it had an accuracy of 92.8% in deciding the correct technique score compared to manual detection methods.

  3. Structural health condition monitoring of rails using acoustic emission techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmazer, Pinar

    In-service rails can develop several types of structural defects due to fatigue and wear caused by rolling stock passing over them. Most rail defects will develop gradually over time thus permitting inspection engineers to detect them in time before final failure occurs. In the UK, certain types of severe rail defects such as tache ovales, require the fitting of emergency clamps and the imposing of an Emergency Speed Restriction (ESR) until the defects are removed. Acoustic emission (AE) techniques can be applied for the detection and continuous monitoring of defect growth therefore removing the need of imposing strict ESRs. The work reported herewith aims to develop a sound methodology for the application of AE in order to detect and subsequently monitor damage evolution in rails. To validate the potential of the AE technique, tests have been carried out under laboratory conditions on three and four-point bending samples manufactured from 260 grade rail steel. Further tests, simulating the background noise conditions caused by passing rolling stock have been carried out using special experimental setups. The crack growth events have been simulated using a pencil tip break..

  4. Remote temperature profiling in the troposphere and stratosphere by the radio-acoustic sounding technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matuura, N.; Masuda, Y.; Inuki, H.

    1986-01-01

    Radar application of the radio-acoustic sounding technique uses the Doppler frequency shift of radar echoes returning from the atmospheric wave structure, in association with a traveling acoustic pulse transmitted from the ground, to determine the speed of sound, and hence the atmospheric temperature, as a function of altitude. Temperature measurement in the troposphere and stratosphere were determined using the radio-acoustic sounding technique with the Radio-Acoustic Sounding System (RASS). Successful experiments were performed in March 1985, and in August 1985.

  5. Comparison of an integral equation on energy and the ray-tracing technique in room acoustics.

    PubMed

    Le Bot, A; Bocquillet, A

    2000-10-01

    This paper deals with a comparison of two room acoustic models. The first one is an integral formulation stemming from power balance and the second is the ray-tracing technique with a perfectly diffuse reflection law. The common assumptions to both models are the uncorrelated wave hypothesis and the perfectly diffuse reflection law. The latter allows the use of these methods for nondiffuse fields beyond the validity domain of Sabine's formula. Comparisons of numerical simulations performed with the softwares RAYON and CeReS point out that these results are close to each other and finally, a formal proof is proposed showing that both methods are actually equivalent.

  6. Acoustic Biometric System Based on Preprocessing Techniques and Linear Support Vector Machines

    PubMed Central

    del Val, Lara; Izquierdo-Fuente, Alberto; Villacorta, Juan J.; Raboso, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on the results of an acoustic biometric system based on a MSE classifier, a new biometric system has been implemented. This new system preprocesses acoustic images, extracts several parameters and finally classifies them, based on Support Vector Machine (SVM). The preprocessing techniques used are spatial filtering, segmentation—based on a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) to separate the person from the background, masking—to reduce the dimensions of images—and binarization—to reduce the size of each image. An analysis of classification error and a study of the sensitivity of the error versus the computational burden of each implemented algorithm are presented. This allows the selection of the most relevant algorithms, according to the benefits required by the system. A significant improvement of the biometric system has been achieved by reducing the classification error, the computational burden and the storage requirements. PMID:26091392

  7. Acoustic Biometric System Based on Preprocessing Techniques and Linear Support Vector Machines.

    PubMed

    del Val, Lara; Izquierdo-Fuente, Alberto; Villacorta, Juan J; Raboso, Mariano

    2015-06-17

    Drawing on the results of an acoustic biometric system based on a MSE classifier, a new biometric system has been implemented. This new system preprocesses acoustic images, extracts several parameters and finally classifies them, based on Support Vector Machine (SVM). The preprocessing techniques used are spatial filtering, segmentation-based on a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) to separate the person from the background, masking-to reduce the dimensions of images-and binarization-to reduce the size of each image. An analysis of classification error and a study of the sensitivity of the error versus the computational burden of each implemented algorithm are presented. This allows the selection of the most relevant algorithms, according to the benefits required by the system. A significant improvement of the biometric system has been achieved by reducing the classification error, the computational burden and the storage requirements.

  8. Measurement of transmission loss characteristics using acoustic intensity techniques at the KU-FRL Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.

    1983-01-01

    The transmission loss characteristics of panels using the acoustic intensity technique is presented. The theoretical formulation, installation of hardware, modifications to the test facility, and development of computer programs and test procedures are described. A listing of all the programs is also provided. The initial test results indicate that the acoustic intensity technique is easily adapted to measure transmission loss characteristics of panels. Use of this method will give average transmission loss values. The fixtures developed to position the microphones along the grid points are very useful in plotting the intensity maps of vibrating panels.

  9. Acoustic signature recognition technique for Human-Object Interactions (HOI) in persistent surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkilani, Amjad; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2013-05-01

    Handling, manipulation, and placement of objects, hereon called Human-Object Interaction (HOI), in the environment generate sounds. Such sounds are readily identifiable by the human hearing. However, in the presence of background environment noises, recognition of minute HOI sounds is challenging, though vital for improvement of multi-modality sensor data fusion in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS). Identification of HOI sound signatures can be used as precursors to detection of pertinent threats that otherwise other sensor modalities may miss to detect. In this paper, we present a robust method for detection and classification of HOI events via clustering of extracted features from training of HOI acoustic sound waves. In this approach, salient sound events are preliminary identified and segmented from background via a sound energy tracking method. Upon this segmentation, frequency spectral pattern of each sound event is modeled and its features are extracted to form a feature vector for training. To reduce dimensionality of training feature space, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique is employed to expedite fast classification of test feature vectors, a kd-tree and Random Forest classifiers are trained for rapid classification of training sound waves. Each classifiers employs different similarity distance matching technique for classification. Performance evaluations of classifiers are compared for classification of a batch of training HOI acoustic signatures. Furthermore, to facilitate semantic annotation of acoustic sound events, a scheme based on Transducer Mockup Language (TML) is proposed. The results demonstrate the proposed approach is both reliable and effective, and can be extended to future PSS applications.

  10. Monitoring corrosion in prestressed concrete beams using acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElBatanouny, Mohamed K.; Mangual, Jesé; Vélez, William; Ziehl, Paul H.; Matta, Fabio; González, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Early detection of corrosion can help reduce the cost of maintenance and extend the service life of structures. Acoustic emission (AE) sensing has proven to be a promising method for early detection of corrosion in reinforced concrete members. A test program is presented composed of four medium-scale prestressed concrete T-beams. Three of the beams have a length of 16 ft. 4 in. (4.98 m), and one is 9 ft. 8 in. (2.95 m). In order to corrode the specimens a 3% NaCl solution was prepared, which is representative of sea salt concentration. The beams were subjected to wet-dry cycles to accelerate the corrosion process. Two of the specimens were pre-cracked prior to conditioning in order to examine the effect of crack presence. AE data was recorded continuously while half-cell potential measurements and corrosion rate by Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) were measured daily. Corrosion current was also being acquired constantly to monitor any change in the concrete resistivity. Results indicate that the onset of corrosion may be identified using AE features, and were corroborated with measurements obtained from electrochemical techniques. Corroded areas were located using source triangulation. The results indicate that cracked specimens showed corrosion activity prior to un-cracked specimens and experienced higher corrosion rates. The level of corrosion was determined using corrosion rate results. Intensity analysis was used to link the corrosion rate and level to AE data.

  11. Low order models for uncertainty quantification in acoustic propagation problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    Long-range sound propagation problems are characterized by both a large number of length scales and a large number of normal modes. In the atmosphere, these modes are confined within waveguides causing the sound to propagate through multiple paths to the receiver. For uncertain atmospheres, the modes are described as random variables. Concise mathematical models and analysis reveal fundamental limitations in classical projection techniques due to different manifestations of the fact that modes that carry small variance can have important effects on the large variance modes. In the present study, we propose a systematic strategy for obtaining statistically accurate low order models. The normal modes are sorted in decreasing Sobol indices using asymptotic expansions, and the relevant modes are extracted using a modified iterative Krylov-based method. The statistics of acoustic signals are computed by decomposing the original pulse into a truncated sum of modal pulses that can be described by a stationary phase method. As the low-order acoustic model preserves the overall structure of waveforms under perturbations of the atmosphere, it can be applied to uncertainty quantification. The result of this study is a new algorithm which applies on the entire phase space of acoustic fields.

  12. Acoustic emission strand burning technique for motor burning rate prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, W. N.

    1978-01-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) method is being used to measure the burning rate of solid propellant strands. This method has a precision of 0.5% and excellent burning rate correlation with both subscale and large rocket motors. The AE procedure burns the sample under water and measures the burning rate from the acoustic output. The acoustic signal provides a continuous readout during testing, which allows complete data analysis rather than the start-stop clockwires used by the conventional method. The AE method helps eliminate such problems as inhibiting the sample, pressure increase and temperature rise, during testing.

  13. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and tower mounted on the Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments located throughout the test article. There were four primary ASMAT instrument suites: ignition overpressure (IOP), lift-off acoustics (LOA), ground acoustics (GA), and spatial correlation (SC). Each instrumentation suite incorporated different sensor models which were selected based upon measurement requirements. These requirements included the type of measurement, exposure to the environment, instrumentation check-outs and data acquisition. The sensors were attached to the test article using different mounts and brackets dependent upon the location of the sensor. This presentation addresses the observed effect of the sensors and mounts on the acoustic and pressure measurements.

  14. Continuous Surveillance Technique for Flow Accelerated Corrosion of Pipe Wall Using Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, F.; Kosaka, D.; Umetani, K.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a on-line monitoring technique using electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT). In the series of laboratory experiments, carbon steel pipes were used and each sample was fabricated to simulate FAC. Electromagnetic acoustic resonance method (EMAR) is successfully tested for pipe wall thickness measurements. The validity and the feasibility of our method are also demonstrated through the laboratory experiments.

  15. On determining the acoustic properties of main helicopter rotor models on an open test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kop'ev, V. F.; Zaitsev, M. Yu.; Ostrikov, N. N.; Denisov, S. L.; Makashov, S. Yu.; Anikin, V. A.; Gromov, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental studies on developing a technique to determine the acoustic properties of models of main helicopter rotors on an open test bench. The method of maximum length sequences is used to choose the optimum arrangement of microphones for an open test bench that would minimize the influence of parasitic echo. The results of processing the data of an acoustic experiment with a model rotor are detailed.

  16. Noninvasive Measurement of Acoustic Properties of Fluids Using Ultrasonic Interferometry Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Han, W.; Sinha, D.N.; Springer, K.N.; Lizon, D.C.

    1997-06-15

    A swept-frequency ultrasonic interferometry technique is used for noninvasively determining acoustic properties of fluids inside containers. Measurements over a frequency range 1-15 MHz on six liquid chemicals are presented. Measurements were made with the liquid inside standard rectangular optical glass cells and stainless steel cylindrical shells. A theoretical model based on one-dimensional planar acoustic wave propagation through multi-layered media is employed for the interpretation of the observed resonance (interference) spectrum. Two analytical methods, derived from the transmission model are used for determination of sound speed, sound attenuation coefficient, and density of liquids from the relative amplitude and half-power peak width of the observed resonance peaks. Effects of the container material and geometrical properties, path-length, wall thickness are also studied. This study shows that the interferometry technique and the experimental method developed are capable of accurate determination of sound speed, sound attenuation, and density in fluids completely noninvasively. It is a capable and versatile fluid characterization technique and has many potential NDE applications.

  17. Improving Acoustic Models by Watching Television

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witbrock, Michael J.; Hauptmann, Alexander G.

    1998-01-01

    Obtaining sufficient labelled training data is a persistent difficulty for speech recognition research. Although well transcribed data is expensive to produce, there is a constant stream of challenging speech data and poor transcription broadcast as closed-captioned television. We describe a reliable unsupervised method for identifying accurately transcribed sections of these broadcasts, and show how these segments can be used to train a recognition system. Starting from acoustic models trained on the Wall Street Journal database, a single iteration of our training method reduced the word error rate on an independent broadcast television news test set from 62.2% to 59.5%.

  18. Comparison of Acoustic Impedance Eduction Techniques for Locally-Reacting Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Parrott, T. L.; Watson, W. R.

    2003-01-01

    Typical acoustic liners used in current aircraft inlets and aft-fan ducts consist of some type of perforated facesheet bonded to a honeycomb core. A number of techniques for determining the acoustic impedance of these locallyreacting liners have been developed over the last five decades. In addition, a number of models have been developed to predict the acoustic impedance of locallyreacting liners in the presence of grazing flow, and to use that information together with aeroacoustic propagation codes to assess the noise absorption provided by these liners. These prediction models have incorporated the results from databases acquired with specific impedance eduction techniques. Thus, while these prediction models are acceptable for liners that are similar to those tested in these databases, their application to new liner configurations must be viewed with caution. The primary purpose of this paper is to provide a comparison of impedance eduction techniques that have been implemented at various aerospace research laboratories in the United States (NASA Langley Research Center, General Electric Aircraft Engines, B. F. Goodrich and Boeing). A secondary purpose is to provide data for liner configurations that extend the porosity range beyond that which has been previously used in common aircraft engine nacelles. Two sets of liners were designed to study the effects of three parameters: perforate hole diameter, facesheet thickness and porosity. These two sets of liners were constructed for testing in each of the laboratories listed above. The first set of liners was designed to fit into the NASA Langley and Boeing test facilities. The second set was designed to fit into the General Electric Aircraft Engines and B. F. Goodrich test facilities. By using the same parent material, both sets of liners were identical to within the limits of material and fabrication variability. Baseline data were obtained in the normal incidence impedance tubes at NASA Langley and B. F

  19. Classical Acoustic Echoes in Model Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Justin; Nagel, Sidney

    2013-03-01

    For the last 40 years, the low-temperature excitations in glasses have traditionally been explained in terms of a distribution of dilute, two-level quantum states that are created by clusters of particles tunneling between two nearly degenerate ground states. Strong evidence for this model has come from ultrasonic saturation effects and acoustic echoes observed in experiments. Recently, a classical analysis of vibrational modes in model glasses has shown that at low frequencies, the modes are quasi-localized and highly anharmonic. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that this anharmonicity can produce an acoustic echo due to the shift in the mode frequency with increasing amplitude. We observe this both in jammed packings of spherical particles with finite-range, Hertzian repulsions, and in model glasses interacting with a Lennard-Jones potential. In contrast to pulse echoes in two-level systems, a distinguishing feature of these ``anharmonic echoes'' is the appearance of multiple echoes after two excitation pulses, a feature also observed in experiments.

  20. Full acoustic and thermal characterization of HIFU field in the presence of a ribcage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Rui; Le, Nhan; Nabi, Ghulam; Huang, Zhihong

    2017-03-01

    In the treatment of abdominal organs using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), the patient's ribs are in the pathway of the HIFU beams which could result in acoustic distortion, occasional skin burns and insufficient energy delivered to the target organs. To provide full characterization of HIFU field with the influence of ribcage, the ribcage phantom reconstructed from a patient's CT images was created by tissue mimicking materials and its effect on acoustic field was characterized. The effect of the ribcage on acoustic field has been provided in acoustic pressure distribution, acoustic power and focal temperature. Measurement result shows focus splitting with one main focus and two secondary intensity maxima. With the presence of ribcage phantom, the acoustic pressure was reduced by 48.3% and another two peak values were observed near the main focus, reduced by 65.0% and 71.7% respectively. The acoustic power was decreased by 47.5% to 52.5%. With these characterization results, the form of the focus, the acoustic power, acoustic pressure and temperature rise are provided before the transcostal HIFU treatment, which are significant to determine the energy delivery dose. In conclusion, this ribcage model and characterization technique will be useful for the further study in the abdominal HIFU treatment.

  1. Comparison of two underwater acoustic communications techniques for multi-user access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hursky, Paul; Siderius, T. Martin; Kauaiex Group

    2004-05-01

    Frequency hopped frequency shift keying (FHFSK) and code division multiple access (CDMA) are two different modulation techniques for multiple users to communicate with a single receiver simultaneously. In July 2003, these two techniques were tested alongside each other in a shallow water coastal environment off the coast of Kauai. A variety of instruments were used to measure the prevailing oceanography, enabling detailed modeling of the channel. The channel was acoustically probed using LFM waveforms and m-sequences as well. We will present the results of demodulating the FHFSK and CDMA waveforms and discuss modeling the channel for the purpose of predicting multi-user communications performance. a)Michael B. Porter, Paul Hursky, Martin Siderius (SAIC), Mohsen Badiey (UD), Jerald Caruthers (USM), William S. Hodgkiss, Kaustubha Raghukumar (SIO), Dan Rouseff, Warren Fox (APL-UW), Christian de Moustier, Brian Calder, Barbara J. Kraft (UNH), Keyko McDonald (SPAWARSSC), Peter Stein, James K. Lewis, and Subramaniam Rajan (SSI).

  2. Comparison of two underwater acoustic communications techniques for multi-user access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hursky, Paul; Siderius, T. Martin; Kauaiex Group

    2001-05-01

    Frequency hopped frequency shift keying (FHFSK) and code division multiple access (CDMA) are two different modulation techniques for multiple users to communicate with a single receiver simultaneously. In July 2003, these two techniques were tested alongside each other in a shallow water coastal environment off the coast of Kauai. A variety of instruments were used to measure the prevailing oceanography, enabling detailed modeling of the channel. The channel was acoustically probed using LFM waveforms and m-sequences as well. We will present the results of demodulating the FHFSK and CDMA waveforms and discuss modeling the channel for the purpose of predicting multi-user communications performance. a)Michael B. Porter, Paul Hursky, Martin Siderius (SAIC), Mohsen Badiey (UD), Jerald Caruthers (USM), William S. Hodgkiss, Kaustubha Raghukumar (SIO), Dan Rouseff, Warren Fox (APL-UW), Christian de Moustier, Brian Calder, Barbara J. Kraft (UNH), Keyko McDonald (SPAWARSSC), Peter Stein, James K. Lewis, and Subramaniam Rajan (SSI).

  3. Acoustics in nanotechnology: Manipulation, device application and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchine, Brent Alan

    Advancing the field of nanotechnology to incorporate the unique properties observed at the nanoscale into functional devices has become a major scientific thrust of the 21st century. New fabrication tools and assembly techniques are required to design and manufacture devices based on one-dimensional nanostructures. Three techniques for manipulating nanomaterials post-synthesis have been developed. Two of them involve direct contact manipulation through the utilization of a physical probe. The third uses optically generated surface acoustic waves to reproducibly control and assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into desired locations. The nature of the third technique is non-contact and limits contamination and defects from being introduced into a device by manipulation. While the effective manipulation of individual nanostructures into device components is important for building functional nanosystems, commercialization is limited by this one-device-at-a-time process. A new approach to nanostructure synthesis was also developed to site-specifically nucleate and grow nanowires between two electrodes. Integrating synthesis directly with prefabricated device architectures leads to the possible mass production of NEMS, MEMS and CMOS systems based upon one-dimensional nanomaterials. The above processes have been pursued to utilize piezoelectric ZnO nanobelts for applications in high frequency electronic filtering as well as biological and chemical sensing. The high quality, single crystal, faceted nature of these materials make them ideal candidates for studying their properties through the designs of a bulk acoustic resonator. The first ever piezoelectric bulk acoustic resonator based on bottom-up synthesized belts will be demonstrated. Initial results are promising and new designs are implemented to scale the device to sub-micron dimensions. Multiple models will be developed to assist with design and testing. Some of models presented will help verify experimental

  4. Theoretical models for duct acoustic propagation and radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    1991-01-01

    The development of computational methods in acoustics has led to the introduction of analysis and design procedures which model the turbofan inlet as a coupled system, simultaneously modeling propagation and radiation in the presence of realistic internal and external flows. Such models are generally large, require substantial computer speed and capacity, and can be expected to be used in the final design stages, with the simpler models being used in the early design iterations. Emphasis is given to practical modeling methods that have been applied to the acoustical design problem in turbofan engines. The mathematical model is established and the simplest case of propagation in a duct with hard walls is solved to introduce concepts and terminologies. An extensive overview is given of methods for the calculation of attenuation in uniform ducts with uniform flow and with shear flow. Subsequent sections deal with numerical techniques which provide an integrated representation of duct propagation and near- and far-field radiation for realistic geometries and flight conditions.

  5. Validation and demonstration of an isolated acoustic recording technique to estimate spontaneous swallow frequency.

    PubMed

    Crary, Michael A; Sura, Livia; Carnaby, Giselle

    2013-03-01

    Spontaneous swallowing is considered a reflexive, pharyngeal clearance mechanism. Reductions in spontaneous swallow frequency may be a sensitive index for dysphagia and related morbidities. This study evaluated an acoustic recording technique as a measure to estimate spontaneous swallow frequency. Initially, a multichannel physiologic (surface electromyography, swallow apnea, cervical auscultation) recording technique was validated and subsequently compared to an isolated acoustic (microphone) recording technique on a sample of younger (25 ± 2.8 years) and older (68 ± 5.3 years) healthy adult participants. Sensitivity (94 %), specificity (99 %), and classification accuracy (98 %) were high for swallow identification from the multichannel physiologic recording technique. Interjudge reliability was high (k = 0.94, 95 % CI = 0.92-0.96). No significant differences in spontaneous swallow frequency were observed between the multichannel physiologic recordings and the acoustic recordings (0.85 vs. 0.81 swallows per minute). Furthermore, these two techniques were highly correlated (r = 0.95). Interjudge reliability for swallow identification via acoustic recordings was high (k = 0.96, 95 % CI = 0.94-0.99). Preliminary evaluation of the temporal stability of spontaneous swallow frequency measured from acoustic recordings indicated that time samples as short as 5 min produce viable results. Age differences were identified in spontaneous swallow frequency rates, with older participants swallowing less frequently than younger participants (0.47 vs. 1.02 swallows per minute). Collectively, these results indicate that an isolated acoustic recording technique is a valid approach to estimate spontaneous swallow frequency.

  6. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  7. A robust calibration technique for acoustic emission systems based on momentum transfer from a ball drop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Lockner, David A.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a technique to estimate the seismic moment of acoustic emissions and other extremely small seismic events. Unlike previous calibration techniques, it does not require modeling of the wave propagation, sensor response, or signal conditioning. Rather, this technique calibrates the recording system as a whole and uses a ball impact as a reference source or empirical Green’s function. To correctly apply this technique, we develop mathematical expressions that link the seismic moment $M_{0}$ of internal seismic sources (i.e., earthquakes and acoustic emissions) to the impulse, or change in momentum $\\Delta p $, of externally applied seismic sources (i.e., meteor impacts or, in this case, ball impact). We find that, at low frequencies, moment and impulse are linked by a constant, which we call the force‐moment‐rate scale factor $C_{F\\dot{M}} = M_{0}/\\Delta p$. This constant is equal to twice the speed of sound in the material from which the seismic sources were generated. Next, we demonstrate the calibration technique on two different experimental rock mechanics facilities. The first example is a saw‐cut cylindrical granite sample that is loaded in a triaxial apparatus at 40 MPa confining pressure. The second example is a 2 m long fault cut in a granite sample and deformed in a large biaxial apparatus at lower stress levels. Using the empirical calibration technique, we are able to determine absolute source parameters including the seismic moment, corner frequency, stress drop, and radiated energy of these magnitude −2.5 to −7 seismic events.

  8. Reduced-Order Models for Acoustic Response Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    acoustic and thermal loading. These methods reduce a finite element model to a reduced-order system of nonlinear modal equations. A short...magnitude reductions in computational cost over full-order finite element analysis. 15. SUBJECT TERMS sonic fatigue, reduced-order models, acoustic...4.4.3 Vacuum Shaker Test ...........................................................................................93 4.4.4 Finite element

  9. Coupled vibro-acoustic model updating using frequency response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehete, D. V.; Modak, S. V.; Gupta, K.

    2016-03-01

    Interior noise in cavities of motorized vehicles is of increasing significance due to the lightweight design of these structures. Accurate coupled vibro-acoustic FE models of such cavities are required so as to allow a reliable design and analysis. It is, however, experienced that the vibro-acoustic predictions using these models do not often correlate acceptably well with the experimental measurements and hence require model updating. Both the structural and the acoustic parameters addressing the stiffness as well as the damping modeling inaccuracies need to be considered simultaneously in the model updating framework in order to obtain an accurate estimate of these parameters. It is also noted that the acoustic absorption properties are generally frequency dependent. This makes use of modal data based methods for updating vibro-acoustic FE models difficult. In view of this, the present paper proposes a method based on vibro-acoustic frequency response functions that allow updating of a coupled FE model by considering simultaneously the parameters associated with both the structural as well as the acoustic model of the cavity. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical studies on a 3D rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate. Updating parameters related to the material property, stiffness of joints between the plate and the rectangular cavity and the properties of absorbing surfaces of the acoustic cavity are considered. The robustness of the method under presence of noise is also studied.

  10. Sequential Model-Based Detection in a Shallow Ocean Acoustic Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V

    2002-03-26

    A model-based detection scheme is developed to passively monitor an ocean acoustic environment along with its associated variations. The technique employs an embedded model-based processor and a reference model in a sequential likelihood detection scheme. The monitor is therefore called a sequential reference detector. The underlying theory for the design is developed and discussed in detail.

  11. A survey on acoustic signature recognition and classification techniques for persistent surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirkhodaie, Amir; Alkilani, Amjad

    2012-06-01

    Application of acoustic sensors in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS) has received considerable attention over the last two decades because they can be rapidly deployed and have low cost. Conventional utilization of acoustic sensors in PSS spans a wide range of applications including: vehicle classification, target tracking, activity understanding, speech recognition, shooter detection, etc. This paper presents a current survey of physics-based acoustic signature classification techniques for outdoor sounds recognition and understanding. Particularly, this paper focuses on taxonomy and ontology of acoustic signatures resulted from group activities. The taxonomy and supportive ontology considered include: humanvehicle, human-objects, and human-human interactions. This paper, in particular, exploits applicability of several spectral analysis techniques as a means to maximize likelihood of correct acoustic source detection, recognition, and discrimination. Spectral analysis techniques based on Fast Fourier Transform, Discrete Wavelet Transform, and Short Time Fourier Transform are considered for extraction of features from acoustic sources. In addition, comprehensive overviews of most current research activities related to scope of this work are presented with their applications. Furthermore, future potential direction of research in this area is discussed for improvement of acoustic signature recognition and classification technology suitable for PSS applications.

  12. Hybrid CFD/CAA Modeling for Liftoff Acoustic Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Liever, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents development efforts at the NASA Marshall Space flight Center to establish a hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) simulation system for launch vehicle liftoff acoustics environment analysis. Acoustic prediction engineering tools based on empirical jet acoustic strength and directivity models or scaled historical measurements are of limited value in efforts to proactively design and optimize launch vehicles and launch facility configurations for liftoff acoustics. CFD based modeling approaches are now able to capture the important details of vehicle specific plume flow environment, identifY the noise generation sources, and allow assessment of the influence of launch pad geometric details and sound mitigation measures such as water injection. However, CFD methodologies are numerically too dissipative to accurately capture the propagation of the acoustic waves in the large CFD models. The hybrid CFD/CAA approach combines the high-fidelity CFD analysis capable of identifYing the acoustic sources with a fast and efficient Boundary Element Method (BEM) that accurately propagates the acoustic field from the source locations. The BEM approach was chosen for its ability to properly account for reflections and scattering of acoustic waves from launch pad structures. The paper will present an overview of the technology components of the CFD/CAA framework and discuss plans for demonstration and validation against test data.

  13. Prediction of the acoustic form function by neural network techniques for immersed tubes.

    PubMed

    Dariouchy, A; Aassif, E; Maze, G; Décultot, D; Moudden, A

    2008-08-01

    A new approach is used to predict the acoustic form function (FF) for an infinite length cylindrical shell excited perpendicularly to its axis using the artificial neural network (ANN) techniques. The Wigner-Ville distribution is used like a comparison tool between the FF calculated by the analytical method and that predicted by the ANN techniques for a stainless steel tube. During the development of the network, several configurations are evaluated for various radius ratios ba (a: outer radius: b: inner radius of the tube). The optimal model is a network with one hidden layer. It is able to predict the FF with a mean relative error about 1.61% for the cases studied in this paper.

  14. Acoustic characteristics of 1/20-scale model helicopter rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenoy, Rajarama K.; Kohlhepp, Fred W.; Leighton, Kenneth P.

    1986-01-01

    A wind tunnel test to study the effects of geometric scale on acoustics and to investigate the applicability of very small scale models for the study of acoustic characteristics of helicopter rotors was conducted in the United Technologies Research Center Acoustic Research Tunnel. The results show that the Reynolds number effects significantly alter the Blade-Vortex-Interaction (BVI) Noise characteristics by enhancing the lower frequency content and suppressing the higher frequency content. In the time domain this is observed as an inverted thickness noise impulse rather than the typical positive-negative impulse of BVI noise. At higher advance ratio conditions, in the absence of BVI, the 1/20 scale model acoustic trends with Mach number follow those of larger scale models. However, the 1/20 scale model acoustic trends appear to indicate stall at higher thrust and advance ratio conditions.

  15. Autonomous Acoustic Receiver Deployment and Mooring Techniques for Use in Large Rivers and Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Titzler, P. Scott; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Carter, Jessica A.

    2010-08-01

    Autonomous acoustic receivers are often deployed across a range of aquatic habitats to study aquatic species. The Juvenile Salmon Telemetry System autonomous acoustic receiver packages we deployed in the Columbia River and its estuary were comprised of an acoustic receiver, acoustic release, and mooring line sections and were deployed directly on the river bottom. Detection ranges and reception data from past optimization deployments helped determine acoustic receiver spacing in order to achieve acceptable detection probabilities for juvenile salmon survival estimation. Methods used in 2005, which resulted in a high equipment loss rate, were modified and used between 2006 and 2008 to increase crew safety and optimize receiver deployment and recovery operations in a large river system. By eliminating surface buoys and taglines (for anchor recovery), we experienced a recovery success rate greater than previous acoustic receiver deployment techniques used in the Columbia River and elsewhere. This autonomous acoustic receiver system has optimized deployment, recovery, and servicing efficiency to successfully detect acoustic-tagged salmonids in a variety of river environments.

  16. Adaptive Noise Reduction Techniques for Airborne Acoustic Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    25 4.3 Super Kraft Monocoupe 90A RC airplane. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 4.4 Access panel for fuselage of...begin clipping. This is an important consideration for airborne acoustic sensing, as the sound level aboard a UAV must not cause saturation of the...specifications of the Monocoupe used for this experiment are in Table 4.3. 26 Figure 4.3: Super Kraft Monocoupe 90A RC airplane. Figure 4.4: Access panel for

  17. Comparison of Channel Equalization Filtering Techniques in Underwater Acoustic Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    Navigation Aid Demonstration Broad Area Anouncement (BAA) Informational Paper. The threshold bit error rate criteria is 10-2, and the objective bit error...Computational Ocean Acoustics. New York: American Institute of Physics Press , 1994. [7] L. Freitag, M. Johnson, and M. Stojanovic, "Efficient Equalizer Update...Halsted Press , 1989. [28] B. Sklar, Digital Communications, 2nd ed. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall PTR, 2001. [29] H. L. Van

  18. Acoustic temperature profile measurement technique for large combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateshan, S. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of times of flight of sound waves can be used to determine temperatures in a gas. This paper describes a system, based on this principle, that is capable of giving the temperature profile in a nonisothermal gas volume, for example, prevalent in a large furnace. The apparatus is simple, rugged, accurate, and capable of being automated for process control applications. It is basically an acoustic waveguide where the outside temperature profile is transferred to a chosen gas contained inside the guide.

  19. Utilizing numerical techniques in turbofan inlet acoustic suppressor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical theories in conjunction with previously published analytical results are used to augment current analytical theories in the acoustic design of a turbofan inlet nacelle. In particular, a finite element-integral theory is used to study the effect of the inlet lip radius on the far field radiation pattern and to determine the optimum impedance in an actual engine environment. For some single mode JT15D data, the numerical theory and experiment are found to be in a good agreement.

  20. On Modeling Eavesdropping Attacks in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks †

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiu; Dai, Hong-Ning; Li, Xuran; Wang, Hao; Xiao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The security and privacy of underwater acoustic sensor networks has received extensive attention recently due to the proliferation of underwater activities. This paper proposes an analytical model to investigate the eavesdropping attacks in underwater acoustic sensor networks. Our analytical framework considers the impacts of various underwater acoustic channel conditions (such as the acoustic signal frequency, spreading factor and wind speed) and different hydrophones (isotropic hydrophones and array hydrophones) in terms of network nodes and eavesdroppers. We also conduct extensive simulations to evaluate the effectiveness and the accuracy of our proposed model. Empirical results show that our proposed model is quite accurate. In addition, our results also imply that the eavesdropping probability heavily depends on both the underwater acoustic channel conditions and the features of hydrophones. PMID:27213379

  1. On Modeling Eavesdropping Attacks in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiu; Dai, Hong-Ning; Li, Xuran; Wang, Hao; Xiao, Hong

    2016-05-18

    The security and privacy of underwater acoustic sensor networks has received extensive attention recently due to the proliferation of underwater activities. This paper proposes an analytical model to investigate the eavesdropping attacks in underwater acoustic sensor networks. Our analytical framework considers the impacts of various underwater acoustic channel conditions (such as the acoustic signal frequency, spreading factor and wind speed) and different hydrophones (isotropic hydrophones and array hydrophones) in terms of network nodes and eavesdroppers. We also conduct extensive simulations to evaluate the effectiveness and the accuracy of our proposed model. Empirical results show that our proposed model is quite accurate. In addition, our results also imply that the eavesdropping probability heavily depends on both the underwater acoustic channel conditions and the features of hydrophones.

  2. Data flow modeling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavi, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    There have been a number of simulation packages developed for the purpose of designing, testing and validating computer systems, digital systems and software systems. Complex analytical tools based on Markov and semi-Markov processes have been designed to estimate the reliability and performance of simulated systems. Petri nets have received wide acceptance for modeling complex and highly parallel computers. In this research data flow models for computer systems are investigated. Data flow models can be used to simulate both software and hardware in a uniform manner. Data flow simulation techniques provide the computer systems designer with a CAD environment which enables highly parallel complex systems to be defined, evaluated at all levels and finally implemented in either hardware or software. Inherent in data flow concept is the hierarchical handling of complex systems. In this paper we will describe how data flow can be used to model computer system.

  3. Tests Of Shear-Flow Model For Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrot, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1992-01-01

    Tests described in report conducted to validate two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determination of acoustic impedance of acoustic liner in grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment by use of infinite-waveguide method. Tests successful for both upstream and downstream propagations. Work has potential for utility in testing of engine ducts in commercial aircraft.

  4. Model-based passive acoustic tracking of sperm whale foraging behavior in the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemann, Christopher; Thode, Aaron; Straley, Jan; Folkert, Kendall; O'Connell, Victoria

    2005-09-01

    In 2004, the Southeast Alaska Sperm Whale Avoidance Project (SEASWAP) introduced the use of passive acoustics to help monitor the behavior of sperm whales depredating longline fishing operations. Acoustic data from autonomous recorders mounted on longlines provide the opportunity to demonstrate a tracking algorithm based on acoustic propagation modeling while providing insight into whales' foraging behavior. With knowledge of azimuthally dependent bathymetry, a 3D track of whale motion can be obtained using data from just one hydrophone by exploiting multipath arrival information from recorded sperm whale clicks. The evolution of multipath arrival patterns is matched to range-, depth-, and azimuth-dependent modeled arrival patterns to generate an estimate of whale motion. This technique does not require acoustic ray identification (i.e., direct path, surface reflected, etc.) while still utilizing individual ray arrival information, and it can also account for all waveguide propagation physics such as interaction with range-dependent bathymetry and ray refraction.

  5. High-spatial-resolution sub-surface imaging using a laser-based acoustic microscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Balogun, Oluwaseyi; Cole, Garrett D; Huber, Robert; Chinn, Diane; Murray, Todd W; Spicer, James B

    2011-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy techniques operating at frequencies in the gigahertz range are suitable for the elastic characterization and interior imaging of solid media with micrometer-scale spatial resolution. Acoustic wave propagation at these frequencies is strongly limited by energy losses, particularly from attenuation in the coupling media used to transmit ultrasound to a specimen, leading to a decrease in the depth in a specimen that can be interrogated. In this work, a laser-based acoustic microscopy technique is presented that uses a pulsed laser source for the generation of broadband acoustic waves and an optical interferometer for detection. The use of a 900-ps microchip pulsed laser facilitates the generation of acoustic waves with frequencies extending up to 1 GHz which allows for the resolution of micrometer-scale features in a specimen. Furthermore, the combination of optical generation and detection approaches eliminates the use of an ultrasonic coupling medium, and allows for elastic characterization and interior imaging at penetration depths on the order of several hundred micrometers. Experimental results illustrating the use of the laser-based acoustic microscopy technique for imaging micrometer-scale subsurface geometrical features in a 70-μm-thick single-crystal silicon wafer with a (100) orientation are presented.

  6. Numerical modeling of the acoustic guitar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine; Derveaux, Grégoire; Joly, Patrick; Bécache, Eliane

    2003-10-01

    An interactive DVD has been created, based on a numerical model of the acoustic guitar. In a first chapter, the retained physical model is described and illustrated, from the pluck to the 3D radiation field. The second chapter is devoted to the presentation of the numerical tools used for solving the equations of the model. Numerical simulations of plate vibrations and radiated sound pressure are shown in the third chapter. A number of simulated sounds are presented and analyzed in the fourth chapter. In addition, the DVD includes a discussion between a guitar maker, an acoustician, a guitar player and a mathematician. This discussion is entitled ``towards a common language.'' Its aim is to show the interest of simulations with respect to complementary professional approaches of the instrument. This DVD received the Henri Poincaré Prize from the 8th Research Film Festival of Nancy (June 2003), sponsored by the CNRS, in the category ``Documents for the scientific community and illustrations of the research for teaching purpose.''

  7. a Rayleigh Wave Technique to Measure the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shui, G.; Jacobs, L. J.; Qu, J.; Wang, Y. S.; Kim, J.-Y.

    2008-02-01

    Nonlinear ultrasonic techniques have shown great potential for evaluating accumulated damage early in the fatigue life, and ultimately for predicting remaining lifetime of a structural component. The acoustic nonlinearity parameter, a direct measure of the accumulated fatigue damage, is determined from the second harmonic amplitude in finite amplitude sinusoidal ultrasonic waves transmitted through the material. An absolute determination of the acoustic nonlinear parameter is notoriously difficult for several reasons. In this paper, a new experimental technique based on Rayleigh surface waves is presented for determining the absolute acoustic nonlinearity parameter of a relatively thin material specimen. Rayleigh waves are efficiently generated in a specimen by exciting at its edge, and the surface normal velocity of the propagating Rayleigh waves is measured with a laser interferometer system. The high efficiency of the excitation method allows us to drive the transmitting piezoelectric transducer as low as 60 Vpp, and thus to avoid the inherent harmonic distortion from the transducer. The absolute acoustic nonlinearity parameter is then determined from the measured magnitudes of the fundamental and second harmonic surface normal velocities. This technique is applied to determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameters of aluminum alloys 2024 and 6061; the results are compared with those available in the literature. The present technique is especially well-suited for relatively thin components, and much simpler and efficient than the traditional longitudinal wave technique.

  8. A surface acoustic wave technique for monitoring the growth behavior of small surface fatigue cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Resch, M.T.; Nelson, D.V.; Ramvsat, G.F.; Yuce, H.H.

    1985-03-01

    The theory of Kino and Auld which relates the reflection coefficient of acoustic waves from a crack to its size is summarized. A scattering model is evaluated from this theory concerning the reflection of surface acoustic waves (SAW) from a small surface fatigue crack at a frequency such that the crack depth is much smaller than the acoustic wavelength. Acoustic predictions of crack depth are compared to postfracture measurements of depth for small surface cracks in Pyrex glass, 7075-T651 aluminum, and 4340 steel. Additionally, the minimum detectable crack depth as limited by the acoustic noise level is determined for several typical aluminum and steel alloys. The utility of SAW reflection coefficient measurements for inferring crack depth, crack growth, and crack opening behavior in situ during fatigue cycling is discussed.

  9. A fractional calculus model of anomalous dispersion of acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Wharmby, Andrew W

    2016-09-01

    An empirical formula based on viscoelastic analysis techniques that employs concepts from the fractional calculus that was used to model the dielectric behavior of materials exposed to oscillating electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency, terahertz, and infrared bands. This work adapts and applies the formula to model viscoelastic behavior of materials that show an apparent increase of phase velocity of vibration with an increase in frequency, otherwise known as anomalous dispersion. A fractional order wave equation is derived through the application of the classic elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle whose analytical solution is used to describe absorption and dispersion of acoustic waves in the viscoelastic material displaying anomalous dispersion in a specific frequency range. A brief discussion and comparison of an alternative fractional order wave equation recently formulated is also included.

  10. Refinement and application of acoustic impulse technique to study nozzle transmission characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Brown, W. H.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Tanna, H. K.

    1983-01-01

    An improved acoustic impulse technique was developed and was used to study the transmission characteristics of duct/nozzle systems. To accomplish the above objective, various problems associated with the existing spark-discharge impulse technique were first studied. These included (1) the nonlinear behavior of high intensity pulses, (2) the contamination of the signal with flow noise, (3) low signal-to-noise ratio at high exhaust velocities, and (4) the inability to control or shape the signal generated by the source, specially when multiple spark points were used as the source. The first step to resolve these problems was the replacement of the spark-discharge source with electroacoustic driver(s). These included (1) synthesizing on acoustic impulse with acoustic driver(s) to control and shape the output signal, (2) time domain signal averaging to remove flow noise from the contaminated signal, (3) signal editing to remove unwanted portions of the time history, (4) spectral averaging, and (5) numerical smoothing. The acoustic power measurement technique was improved by taking multiple induct measurements and by a modal decomposition process to account for the contribution of higher order modes in the power computation. The improved acoustic impulse technique was then validated by comparing the results derived by an impedance tube method. The mechanism of acoustic power loss, that occurs when sound is transmitted through nozzle terminations, was investigated. Finally, the refined impulse technique was applied to obtain more accurate results for the acoustic transmission characteristics of a conical nozzle and a multi-lobe multi-tube supressor nozzle.

  11. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Allison; de Bever, Josh; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  12. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Allison; Bever, Josh de; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  13. Identification of vibration excitations from acoustic measurements using near field acoustic holography and the force analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pézerat, C.; Leclère, Q.; Totaro, N.; Pachebat, M.

    2009-10-01

    This study presents a method of using acoustic holography and the force analysis technique to identify vibration sources from radiated noise measurements. The structure studied is a plate excited by a shaker on which three measurements were performed: the first is a reference measurement of plate velocity obtained by scanning laser vibrometry, the second is based on sound pressure measurements in the near field of the structure, and the third is the measurement of normal acoustic velocities by using a p-U probe recently developed by Microflown Technologies. This was followed by the application of classical NAH, known as pressure-to-velocity holography and velocity-to-velocity holography to predict the plate velocity field from acoustic measurements at distances of 1 and 5 cm. Afterwards, the force analysis technique, also known as the RIFF technique, is applied with these five data sets. The principle is to inject the displacement field of the structure into its equation of motion and extract the resulting force distribution. This technique requires regularization done by a low-pass filter in the wavenumber domain. Apart from pressure-to-velocity holography at 5 cm, the reconstructed force distribution allows localizing the excitation point in the measurement area. FAT regularization is also shown to improve results as its cutoff wavenumber is optimized with the natural wavenumber of the plate. Lastly, quantitative force values are extracted from force distributions at all frequencies of the band 0-4 kHz studied and compared with the force spectrum measured directly by a piezoelectric sensor.

  14. A combined microphone and camera calibration technique with application to acoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Legg, Mathew; Bradley, Stuart

    2013-10-01

    We present a calibration technique for an acoustic imaging microphone array, combined with a digital camera. Computer vision and acoustic time of arrival data are used to obtain microphone coordinates in the camera reference frame. Our new method allows acoustic maps to be plotted onto the camera images without the need for additional camera alignment or calibration. Microphones and cameras may be placed in an ad-hoc arrangement and, after calibration, the coordinates of the microphones are known in the reference frame of a camera in the array. No prior knowledge of microphone positions, inter-microphone spacings, or air temperature is required. This technique is applied to a spherical microphone array and a mean difference of 3 mm was obtained between the coordinates obtained with this calibration technique and those measured using a precision mechanical method.

  15. A Stratified Acoustic Model Accounting for Phase Shifts for Underwater Acoustic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Zhang, Lin; Li, Victor O. K.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate acoustic channel models are critical for the study of underwater acoustic networks. Existing models include physics-based models and empirical approximation models. The former enjoy good accuracy, but incur heavy computational load, rendering them impractical in large networks. On the other hand, the latter are computationally inexpensive but inaccurate since they do not account for the complex effects of boundary reflection losses, the multi-path phenomenon and ray bending in the stratified ocean medium. In this paper, we propose a Stratified Acoustic Model (SAM) based on frequency-independent geometrical ray tracing, accounting for each ray's phase shift during the propagation. It is a feasible channel model for large scale underwater acoustic network simulation, allowing us to predict the transmission loss with much lower computational complexity than the traditional physics-based models. The accuracy of the model is validated via comparisons with the experimental measurements in two different oceans. Satisfactory agreements with the measurements and with other computationally intensive classical physics-based models are demonstrated. PMID:23669708

  16. Acoustic tests of augmentor wing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic data were obtained for a full-scale section of an augmentor wing. Features of the design included a single-row, multielement nozzle array and acoustically tuned panels placed on the interior surfaces of the augmentor. When the data were extrapolated to a 91,000-kilogram aircraft, the calculated sideline perceived noise levels were approximately the same for either the takeoff or approach condition.

  17. Leakage detection and quantification techniques using various methods of nearfield acoustic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelliah, Kanthasamy

    This thesis proposes an acoustic technique to detect and relatively quantify leakages in buildings and enclosures using various methods of nearfield acoustic holography (NAH). This laboratory study was performed on a scaled, wooden building model. Known leakages can be created in the wooden model and the acoustic method was tested to localize and relatively quantify these known leakage areas. An acoustic source was placed inside the building model and a planar hologram measurement was performed near the surface of the building model. Various methods of NAH were applied on the hologram data to reconstruct the sound pressure field on the wall of the building model. The detection and quantification capabilities of four different NAH methods, namely, discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based NAH, equivalent source model (ESM) based NAH, boundary element method (BEM) based NAH and statistically optimized NAH (SONAH), were compared in this study. It was shown that the NAH methods were able to successfully locate and relatively quantify the area of the leakages using the reconstructions. Although all the four algorithms produced comparable results in the very nearfield, at larger hologram distances, ESM and SONAH reconstructions were more accurate than the reconstructions using the other methods. Although, ESM and SONAH produced similar results for most of the cases, ESM is more preferable due to its simplicity in implementation and less computational time requirements. Lower frequency reconstructions were found to be more accurate and advantageous in the context of leakage detection and quantification. When the hologram distance was increased more than a particular limit, all the four algorithms arrive at inaccurate reconstructions due to the very ill-conditioned propagation matrices. New filtering methods to alleviate these larger reconstruction errors were introduced and the results were demonstrated. Effects of large sensor phase mismatch were also studied. It was

  18. Acoustic field distribution of sawtooth wave with nonlinear SBE model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaozhou Zhang, Lue; Wang, Xiangda; Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    For precise prediction of the acoustic field distribution of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with an ellipsoid transducer, the nonlinear spheroidal beam equations (SBE) are employed to model acoustic wave propagation in medium. To solve the SBE model with frequency domain algorithm, boundary conditions are obtained for monochromatic and sawtooth waves based on the phase compensation. In numerical analysis, the influence of sinusoidal wave and sawtooth wave on axial pressure distributions are investigated.

  19. Acoustic test and analyses of three advanced turboprop models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, B. M.; Metzger, F. B.

    1980-01-01

    Results of acoustic tests of three 62.2 cm (24.5 inch) diameter models of the prop-fan (a small diameter, highly loaded. Multi-bladed variable pitch advanced turboprop) are presented. Results show that there is little difference in the noise produced by unswept and slightly swept designs. However, the model designed for noise reduction produces substantially less noise at test conditions simulating 0.8 Mach number cruise speed or at conditions simulating takeoff and landing. In the near field at cruise conditions the acoustically designed. In the far field at takeoff and landing conditions the acoustically designed model is 5 db quieter than unswept or slightly swept designs. Correlation between noise measurement and theoretical predictions as well as comparisons between measured and predicted acoustic pressure pulses generated by the prop-fan blades are discussed. The general characteristics of the pulses are predicted. Shadowgraph measurements were obtained which showed the location of bow and trailing waves.

  20. Selected Logistics Models and Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    Programmable Calculator LCC...Program 27 TI-59 Programmable Calculator LCC Model 30 Unmanned Spacecraft Cost Model 31 iv I: TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONT’D) (Subject Index) LOGISTICS...34"" - % - "° > - " ° .° - " .’ > -% > ]*° - LOGISTICS ANALYSIS MODEL/TECHNIQUE DATA MODEL/TECHNIQUE NAME: TI-59 Programmable Calculator LCC Model TYPE MODEL: Cost Estimating DEVELOPED BY:

  1. An acoustic-array based structural health monitoring technique for wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kai; Poozesh, Peyman; Niezrecki, Christopher; Baqersad, Javad; Inalpolat, Murat; Heilmann, Gunnar

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes a non-contact measurement technique for health monitoring of wind turbine blades using acoustic beamforming techniques. The technique works by mounting an audio speaker inside a wind turbine blade and observing the sound radiated from the blade to identify damage within the structure. The main hypothesis for the structural damage detection is that the structural damage (cracks, edge splits, holes etc.) on the surface of a composite wind turbine blade results in changes in the sound radiation characteristics of the structure. Preliminary measurements were carried out on two separate test specimens, namely a composite box and a section of a wind turbine blade to validate the methodology. The rectangular shaped composite box and the turbine blade contained holes with different dimensions and line cracks. An acoustic microphone array with 62 microphones was used to measure the sound radiation from both structures when the speaker was located inside the box and also inside the blade segment. A phased array beamforming technique and CLEAN-based subtraction of point spread function from a reference (CLSPR) were employed to locate the different damage types on both the composite box and the wind turbine blade. The same experiment was repeated by using a commercially available 48-channel acoustic ring array to compare the test results. It was shown that both the acoustic beamforming and the CLSPR techniques can be used to identify the damage in the test structures with sufficiently high fidelity.

  2. Application of finite element techniques in predicting the acoustic properties of turbofan inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majjigi, R. K.; Sigman, R. K.; Zinn, B. T.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical technique was developed for predicting the acoustic performance of turbofan inlets carrying a subsonic axisymmetric steady flow. The finite element method combined with the method of weighted residuals is used in predicting the acoustic properties of variable area, annular ducts with or without acoustic treatments along their walls. An approximate solution for the steady inviscid flow field is obtained using an integral method for calculating the incompressible potential flow field in the inlet with a correction to account for compressibility effects. The accuracy of the finite element technique was assessed by comparison with available analytical solutions for the problems of plane and spinning wave propagation through a hard walled annular cylinder with a constant mean flow.

  3. Acoustic Logging Modeling by Refined Biot's Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyushchenkov, Boris D.; Turchaninov, Victor I.

    An explicit uniform completely conservative finite difference scheme for the refined Biot's equations is proposed. This system is modified according to the modern theory of dynamic permeability and tortuosity in a fluid-saturated elastic porous media. The approximate local boundary transparency conditions are constructed. The acoustic logging device is simulated by the choice of appropriate boundary conditions on its external surface. This scheme and these conditions are satisfactory for exploring borehole acoustic problems in permeable formations in a real axial-symmetrical situation. The developed approach can be adapted for a nonsymmetric case also.

  4. Modeling and validation of polyurethane based passive underwater acoustic absorber.

    PubMed

    Jayakumari, V G; Shamsudeen, Rahna K; Ramesh, R; Mukundan, T

    2011-08-01

    The acoustic behavior of an acoustically transparent polyurethane and an interpenetrating polymer network of polyurethane with polydimethyl siloxane were studied using dynamic mechanical analysis, finite element modeling, and experimental evaluation of acoustic properties in a water-filled pulse tube setup. Dynamic mechanical measurements in the temperature range -50 °C to +70 °C were carried out, and the data were used for time temperature superposition to generate material behavior at high frequencies. These inputs were used for modeling the acoustic behavior of these materials using ATILA, which is a commercial finite element code, capable of computing transmission and reflection characteristics of materials. From this data, absorption characteristics were computed. The results were compared with the experimental results obtained using a water-filled pulse tube facility.

  5. Resonant-type MEMS transducers excited by two acoustic emission simulation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozevin, Didem; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Pessiki, Stephen

    2004-07-01

    Acoustic emission testing is a passive nondestructive testing technique used to identify the onset and characteristics of damage through the detection and analysis of transient stress waves. Successful detection and implementation of acoustic emission requires good coupling, high transducer sensitivity and ability to discriminate noise from real signals. We report here detection of simulated acoustic emission signals using a MEMS chip fabricated in the multi-user polysilicon surface micromachining (MUMPs) process. The chip includes 18 different transducers with 10 different resonant frequencies in the range of 100 kHz to 1 MHz. It was excited by two different source simulation techniques; pencil lead break and impact loading. The former simulation was accomplished by breaking 0.5 mm lead on the ceramic package. Four transducer outputs were collected simultaneously using a multi-channel oscilloscope. The impact loading was repeated for five different diameter ball bearings. Traditional acoustic emission waveform analysis methods were applied to both data sets to illustrate the identification of different source mechanisms. In addition, a sliding window Fourier transform was performed to differentiate frequencies in time-frequency-amplitude domain. The arrival and energy contents of each resonant frequency were investigated in time-magnitude plots. The advantages of the simultaneous excitation of resonant transducers on one chip are discussed and compared with broadband acoustic emission transducers.

  6. Perfectly matched layer for an elastic parabolic equation model in ocean acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chuanxiu; Zhang, Haigang; Piao, Shengchun; Yang, Shi'e.; Sun, Sipeng; Tang, Jun

    2017-02-01

    The perfectly matched layer (PML) is an effective technique for truncating unbounded domains with minimal spurious reflections. A fluid parabolic equation (PE) model applying PML technique was previously used to analyze the sound propagation problem in a range-dependent waveguide (Lu and Zhu, 2007). However, Lu and Zhu only considered a standard fluid PE to demonstrate the capability of the PML and did not take improved one-way models into consideration. They applied a [1/1] Padé approximant to the parabolic equation. The higher-order PEs are more accurate than standard ones when a very large angle propagation is considered. As for range-dependent problems, the techniques to handle the vertical interface between adjacent regions are mainly energy conserving and single-scattering. In this paper, the PML technique is generalized to the higher order elastic PE, as is to the higher order fluid PE. The correction of energy conserving is used in range-dependent waveguides. Simulation is made in both acoustic cases and seismo-acoustic cases. Range-independent and range-dependent waveguides are both adopted to test the accuracy and efficiency of this method. The numerical results illustrate that a PML is much more effective than an artificial absorbing layer (ABL) both in acoustic and seismo-acoustic sound propagation modeling.

  7. Modeling Nonlinear Acoustical Blast Waves Outdoors: A Research Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Porous Surfaces. 5 David Gottlieb and Eli Turkel, "Dissipative Two-Four Methods for Time Dependent Problems," Mathematical Comnputation, No. 30 (1976...or structure factor, which Attenborough relates to the tortuosity. The local reaction assumption is inhereptly built into this model of the porous...k Waves in the Atmosphere," Journal of the Acoustical Socidy of America, No. 74 (1983). pp 1514-1517. David T. Blackstone., "Nonlinear Acoustics

  8. Structural FE model updating of cavity systems incorporating vibro-acoustic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehete, D. V.; Modak, S. V.; Gupta, K.

    2015-01-01

    Finite element model updating techniques are used to update the finite element model of a structure in order to improve its correlation with the experimental dynamic test data. These techniques are well developed and extensively studied for the case of purely structural dynamic systems. However, the cavities encountered in automotive, aerospace and other transportation applications represent a class of structures in which an elastic structure encloses an acoustic medium. In such systems the dynamic characteristics of the structure are influenced by the acoustic loading due to the acoustic response in the cavity. The existing structural FE model updating approaches assume the structure to be under in-vacuo condition and hence if used for updating cavity structural FE models would not allow taking into account the effect of acoustic loading on the structural dynamic characteristics. This may adversely affect the effectiveness of updating in yielding an accurate updated FE model. This paper addresses the above issue and presents a structural FE model updating method, called 'coupled inverse eigen-sensitivity method', which takes into account the acoustic loading on the structure. The method uses the experimentally identified coupled modal data on the structure as the reference data. A numerical case study of a 3D rectangular cavity backed by a flexible plate is presented to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach to obtain an accurate structural FE model. Updating is also carried out using the existing (uncoupled) inverse eigen-sensitivity method to study the influence of acoustic loading on the updating process and to study the accuracy with which the updating parameters are identified. The results obtained are also compared with those obtained by the proposed coupled inverse eigen-sensitivity method.

  9. Integrated Model for the Acoustics of Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    Eng. 27, 3, 413-428, (2002). 2. R. D. Stoll. "Velocity dispersion in water- saturated granular sediment," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 2, 785-793, (2002...Goff, B. J. Kraft , L. A. Mayer, S. G. Schock, C. K. Sommerfield, H. C. Olson, S. P. S. Gulick, and S. Nordfjord. "Seabed characterization on the New

  10. Modelling of acoustic emission generated in involute spur gear pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ram Bihari; Parey, Anand; Tandon, Naresh

    2017-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is an important technique for the condition monitoring and diagnostics of various mechanical system components like gear, bearing, macahine tool etc. Several researchers have found experimentally that gear operating parameters such as speed, load, specific film thickness, temperature etc. influence the energy of AE generated during meshing of the gears. But there is lack of mathematical model to comprehend the actual physical mechanism in the gear for the same. In this study, a theoretical model has been developed to establish a rapport between gear operating parameters and energy of AE on the bases of asperity contact and friction between involute surfaces of gear using Hertzian contact approach, statistical concepts, and varying sliding velocity of gear tooth mechanism. The effects of load sharing, lubrication, and dynamic load condition during the gear mesh cycle are also considered in the developed model. An experimental study has been performed for validation of developed theoretical model. A satisfactory validation has been perceived between the AE rms (root mean square) predicted by the developed theoretical model and obtained experimental results.

  11. Acoustic angiography: a new high frequency contrast ultrasound technique for biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Sarah E.; Lindsey, Brooks D.; Gessner, Ryan; Lee, Yueh; Aylward, Stephen; Lee, Hyunggyun; Cherin, Emmanuel; Foster, F. Stuart; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic Angiography is a new approach to high-resolution contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging enabled by ultra-broadband transducer designs. The high frequency imaging technique provides signal separation from tissue which does not produce significant harmonics in the same frequency range, as well as high resolution. This approach enables imaging of microvasculature in-vivo with high resolution and signal to noise, producing images that resemble x-ray angiography. Data shows that acoustic angiography can provide important information about the presence of disease based on vascular patterns, and may enable a new paradigm in medical imaging.

  12. Numerical techniques in linear duct acoustics, 1980-81 update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    A review is presented covering finite element and finite difference analysis of small amplitude (linear) sound propagation in straight and variable area ducts. This review stresses the new work performed during the 1980-1981 time frame, although a brief discussion of earlier work is also included. Emphasis is placed on the latest state of the art in numerical techniques.

  13. Laser and acoustic Doppler techniques for the measurement of fluid velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of current laser and acoustic Doppler techniques is presented. Results obtained by Doppler anemometry and conventional sensors are compared. Comparisons include simultaneous velocity measurements by hot wire and a three-dimensional laser anemometer made in a gaseous pipe flow as well as direct comparisons of atmospheric velocities measured with propeller and cup anemometry. Scanning techniques are also discussed. Conclusions and recommendations for future work are presented.

  14. Employment of Adaptive Learning Techniques for the Discrimination of Acoustic Emissions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    8D-1Ai38 142 EMPLOYMENT OP ADAPTIVE LEARNING TECHNIQUES FOR THE I DISCRIMINATION OF ACOU..(U) GENERAL ELECTRIC CORPORATE U Ch, RESEARCH AND...OFSTNDRD-96- 1.5%. 111 11 :%____ 111. %I1~.~ 11 1 - 111 -- k. -Jr -. P. -L -. b. EMPLOYMENT OF ADAPTIVE LEARNING TECHNIQUESEli FOR THE DISCRIMINATION OF...8217Include Security Claaaaficatiano Employment of Adaptive * Learning Techniques for the Discrimination Of Acoustic Emissions (Unclassified) 12.’ PE SNAU.R S

  15. Drive Rig Mufflers for Model Scale Engine Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David

    2010-01-01

    Testing of air breathing propulsion systems in the 9x15 foot wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center depends on compressed air turbines for power. The drive rig turbines exhaust directly to the wind tunnel test section, and have been found to produce significant unwanted noise that reduces the quality of the acoustic measurements of the model being tested. In order to mitigate this acoustic contamination, a muffler can be attached downstream of the drive rig turbine. The modern engine designs currently being tested produce much less noise than traditional engines, and consequently a lower noise floor is required of the facility. An acoustic test of a muffler designed to mitigate this extraneous noise is presented, and a noise reduction of 8 dB between 700 Hz and 20 kHz was documented, significantly improving the quality of acoustic measurements in the facility.

  16. Developing general acoustic model for noise sources and parameters estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madoliat, Reza; Nouri, Nowrouz Mohammad; Rahrovi, Ali

    2017-02-01

    Noise measured at various points around the environment can be evaluated by a series of acoustic sources. Acoustic sources with wide surface can be broken down in fluid environment using some smaller acoustic sources. The aim of this study is to make a model to indicate the type, number, direction, position and strength of these sources in a way that the main sound and the sound of equivalent sources match together in an acceptable way. When position and direction of the source is given, the strength of the source can be found using inverse method. On the other hand, considering the non-uniqueness of solution in inverse method, a different acoustic strength is obtained for the sources if different positions are selected. Selecting an arrangement of general source and using the optimization algorithm, the least possible mismatch between the main sound and the sound of equivalent sources can be achieved.

  17. Modeling the near acoustic field of a rocket during launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauritzen, David W.

    1989-01-01

    The design of launch pad structures is critically dependent upon the stresses imposed by the acoustical pressure field generated by the rocket engines during launch. The purpose of this effort is to better describe the acoustical field in the immediate launch area. Since the problem is not analytically tractable, empirical modeling will be employed so that useful results may be obtained for structural design purposes. The plume of the rocket is considered to be a volumetric acoustic source, and is broken down into incremental contributing volumes. A computer program has been written to sum all the contributions to find the total sound pressure level at an arbitrary point. A constant density source is initially assumed and the acoustic field evaluated for several cases to verify the correct operation of the program.

  18. Zonal Flow Velocimetry using Acoustic Modes in Experimental Models of a Planetary Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. M.; Mautino, A. R.; Stone, D.; Triana, S. A.; Lekic, V.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Rotating hydromagnetic experiments can serve as models of planetary cores, matching some of the dimensionless parameters relevant to planets. One challenge with such experiments is determining the flows present. The opacity of the fluids used in these experiments (e.g. liquid sodium) prevents direct flow visualization techniques from being employed. One method allowing determination of zonal flows in such experiments is acoustic mode velocimetry. In this technique, the rotational splittings of acoustic mode spectra are used to infer the azimuthal velocity profile of the flow. Here we present the use of this technique to study flows in experimental models of the Earth's core. Most of these results were obtained in a 60 cm diameter spherical Couette device, with a 20 cm diameter inner sphere, and using nitrogen gas as the working fluid. Turbulent flow is driven in the system via differential rotation of the outer shell and inner sphere. Acoustic modes are excited in the fluid volume using a speaker, and microphones are used to measure the frequencies and rotational splittings of the modes. We compare the observed splittings with those predicted by theory as a way of validating the method, and infer mean flows from these observations. We also present some preliminary results of acoustic studies in the 3 m diameter liquid sodium spherical Couette experiment. Finally, we discuss future prospects for this experimental technique.

  19. Acoustic intensity calculations for axisymmetrically modeled fluid regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambric, Stephen A.; Everstine, Gordon C.

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for calculating acoustic intensities from a time harmonic pressure field in an axisymmetric fluid region is presented. Acoustic pressures are computed in a mesh of NASTRAN triangular finite elements of revolution (TRIAAX) using an analogy between the scalar wave equation and elasticity equations. Acoustic intensities are then calculated from pressures and pressure derivatives taken over the mesh of TRIAAX elements. Intensities are displayed as vectors indicating the directions and magnitudes of energy flow at all mesh points in the acoustic field. A prolate spheroidal shell is modeled with axisymmetric shell elements (CONEAX) and submerged in a fluid region of TRIAAX elements. The model is analyzed to illustrate the acoustic intensity method and the usefulness of energy flow paths in the understanding of the response of fluid-structure interaction problems. The structural-acoustic analogy used is summarized for completeness. This study uncovered a NASTRAN limitation involving numerical precision issues in the CONEAX stiffness calculation causing large errors in the system matrices for nearly cylindrical cones.

  20. Approaches to Adaptive Active Acoustic Noise Control at a Point Using Feedforward Techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulch, Peter A.

    Active acoustic noise control systems have been of interest since their birth in the 1930's. The principle is to superimpose on an unwanted noise wave shape its inverse with the intention of destructive interference. This work presents two approaches to this idea. The first approach uses a direct design method to develop a controller using an auto-regressive moving-average (ARMA) model that will be used to condition the primary noise to produce the required anti-noise for cancellation. The development of this approach has shown that the stability of the controller relies heavily on a non-minimum phase model of the secondary noise path. For this reason, a second approach, using a controller consisting of two parts was developed. The first part of the controller is designed to cancel broadband noise and the second part is an adaptive controller designed to cancel periodic noise. A simple technique for identifying the parameters of the broadband controller is developed. An ARMA model is used, and it is shown that its stability is improved by prefiltering the test signal with a minimum-phase inverse of the secondary noise channel. The periodic controller uses an estimate of the fundamental frequency to cancel the first few harmonics of periodic noise. A computationally efficient adaptive technique based on least squares is developed for updating the harmonic controller gains at each time step. Experimental results are included for the broadband controller, the harmonic controller, and the combination of the two algorithms. The advantages of using both techniques in conjunction are shown using test cases involving both broadband noise and periodic noise.

  1. On the control of propagating acoustic waves in sonic crystals: analytical, numerical and optimization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, D. Vincent Romero

    The control of the acoustical properties of the sonic crystals (SC) needs the study of both the distribution of the scatterers in the structure and the intrinsic acoustical properties of the scatterers. In this work an exhaustive analysis of the distribution of the scatterers as well as the improvement of the acoustical properties of the SC made of scatterers with absorbent and/or resonant properties is presented. Both procedures, working together or independently, provide real possibilities to control the propagation of acoustic waves through SC. From the theoretical point of view, the wave propagation through periodic and quasiperiodic structures has been analysed by means of the multiple scattering theory, the plane wave expansion and the finite elements method. A novel extension of the plane wave expansion allowing the complex relation dispersion for SC is presented in this work. This technique complements the provided information using the classical methods and it allows us to analyse the evanescent behaviour of the modes inside of the band gaps as well as the evanescent behaviour of localized modes around the point defects in SC. The necessity of accurate measurements of the acoustical properties of the SC has motivated the development of a novel three-dimensional acquisition system that synchronises the motion of the receiver and acquisition of the temporal signals. A good agreement between the theoretical and experimental data is shown in this work. The joint work between the optimized structures of scatterers and the intrinsic properties of the scatterers themselves is applied to generate devices that present wide ranges of attenuated frequencies. These systems are presented as an alternative to the classic acoustic barrier where the propagation of waves through SC can be controlled. The results help to correctly understand the behaviour of SC for the localization of sound and for the design of both wave guides and acoustic filters.

  2. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  3. Applied topology optimization of vibro-acoustic hearing instrument models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Søndergaard, Morten Birkmose; Pedersen, Claus B. W.

    2014-02-01

    Designing hearing instruments remains an acoustic challenge as users request small designs for comfortable wear and cosmetic appeal and at the same time require sufficient amplification from the device. First, to ensure proper amplification in the device, a critical design challenge in the hearing instrument is to minimize the feedback between the outputs (generated sound and vibrations) from the receiver looping back into the microphones. Secondly, the feedback signal is minimized using time consuming trial-and-error design procedures for physical prototypes and virtual models using finite element analysis. In the present work it is demonstrated that structural topology optimization of vibro-acoustic finite element models can be used to both sufficiently minimize the feedback signal and to reduce the time consuming trial-and-error design approach. The structural topology optimization of a vibro-acoustic finite element model is shown for an industrial full scale model hearing instrument.

  4. Integrated Model for the Acoustics of Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    acoustic interaction with the ocean floor including penetration, reflection and scattering in support of MCM and ASW needs. OBJECTIVES The...and smoothly transition from one type of sediment into another. This is necessary because it has been observed that ocean sediments are often...often too slow to be efficiently coupled to compressional waves in ocean sediments, and thereofore viewed as less important in sonar applications

  5. Acoustic Noise Removal by Combining Wiener and Wavelet Filtering Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    Noise 7 B. TRANSMISSION LOSS AND WATER MASS CHARACTERISTICS 8 C. NOISE MODEL 8 m. WIENER FILTERING 11 A. MODEL DESCRIPTION 11 B. FIR WIENER...measurements in this band in deep, quiet open ocean water appear to have been made until now. 2. Self Noise Self noise includes all noise created by...all- water direct path, all- water back scattered path from volume scatterers, and all- water bottom reflected path [2]. Machinery noise occurs

  6. Flight Acoustic Testing and Data Acquisition For the Rotor Noise Model (RNM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, David A.; Burley, Casey L.; Smith, Charles D.

    2006-01-01

    Two acoustic flight tests have been conducted on a remote test range at Eglin Air Force Base in the panhandle of Florida. The first was the Acoustics Week flight test conducted in September 2003. The second was the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Acoustics Flight Test conducted in October-November 2005. Benchmark acoustic databases were obtained for a number of rotorcraft and limited fixed wing vehicles for a variety of flight conditions. The databases are important for validation of acoustic prediction programs such as the Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM), as well as for the development of low noise flight procedures and for environmental impact assessments. An overview of RNM capabilities and a detailed description of the RNM/ART (Acoustic Repropagation Technique) process are presented. The RNM/ART process is demonstrated using measured acoustic data for the MD600N. The RNM predictions for a level flyover speed sweep show the highest SEL noise levels on the flight track centerline occurred at the slowest vehicle speeds. At these slower speeds, broadband noise content is elevated compared to noise levels obtained at the higher speeds. A descent angle sweep shows that, in general, ground noise levels increased with increasing descent rates. Vehicle orientation in addition to vehicle position was found to significantly affect the RNM/ART creation of source noise semi-spheres for vehicles with highly directional noise characteristics and only mildly affect those with weak acoustic directionality. Based on these findings, modifications are proposed for RNM/ART to more accurately define vehicle and rotor orientation.

  7. Flight Acoustic Testing and For the Rotorcraft Noise Data Acquisition Model (RNM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Casey L.; Smith, Charles D.; Conner, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Two acoustic flight tests have been conducted on a remote test range at Eglin Air Force Base in the panhandle of Florida. The first was the "Acoustics Week" flight test conducted in September 2003. The second was the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Acoustics Flight Test conducted in October-November 2005. Benchmark acoustic databases were obtained for a number of rotorcraft and limited fixed wing vehicles for a variety of flight conditions. The databases are important for validation of acoustic prediction programs such as the Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM), as well as for the development of low noise flight procedures and for environmental impact assessments. An overview of RNM capabilities and a detailed description of the RNM/ART (Acoustic Repropagation Technique) process are presented. The RNM/ART process is demonstrated using measured acoustic data for the MD600N. The RNM predictions for a level flyover speed sweep show the highest SEL noise levels on the flight track centerline occurred at the slowest vehicle speeds. At these slower speeds, broadband noise content is elevated compared to noise levels obtained at the higher speeds. A descent angle sweep shows that, in general, ground noise levels increased with increasing descent rates. Vehicle orientation in addition to vehicle position was found to significantly affect the RNM/ART creation of source noise semi-spheres for vehicles with highly directional noise characteristics and only mildly affect those with weak acoustic directionality. Based on these findings, modifications are proposed for RNM/ART to more accurately define vehicle and rotor orientation.

  8. Theoretical vibro-acoustic modeling of acoustic noise transmission through aircraft windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloufi, Badr; Behdinan, Kamran; Zu, Jean

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a fully vibro-acoustic model for sound transmission across a multi-pane aircraft window is developed. The proposed model is efficiently applied for a set of window models to perform extensive theoretical parametric studies. The studied window configurations generally simulate the passenger window designs of modern aircraft classes which have an exterior multi-Plexiglas pane, an interior single acrylic glass pane and a dimmable glass ("smart" glass), all separated by thin air cavities. The sound transmission loss (STL) characteristics of three different models, triple-, quadruple- and quintuple-paned windows identical in size and surface density, are analyzed for improving the acoustic insulation performances. Typical results describing the influence of several system parameters, such as the thicknesses, number and spacing of the window panes, on the transmission loss are then investigated. In addition, a comparison study is carried out to evaluate the acoustic reduction capability of each window model. The STL results show that the higher frequencies sound transmission loss performance can be improved by increasing the number of window panels, however, the low frequency performance is decreased, particularly at the mass-spring resonances.

  9. Fluid mechanical model of the acoustic impedance of small orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Rogers, T.

    1976-01-01

    A fluid mechanical model of the acoustic behavior of small orifices is presented which predicts orifice resistance and reactance as a function of incident sound pressure level, frequency, and orifice geometry. Agreement between predicted and measured values is excellent. The model shows the following: (1) The acoustic flow in immediate neighborhood of the orifice can be modeled as a locally spherical flow. Within this near field, the flow is, to a first approximation, unsteady and incompressible. (2) At very low sound pressure levels, the orifice viscous resistance is directly related to the effect of boundary-layer displacement along the walls containing the orifice, and the orifice reactance is directly related to the inertia of the oscillating flow in the neighborhood of the orifice. (3) For large values of the incident acoustic pressure, the impedance is dominated by nonlinear jet-like effects. (4) For low values of the pressure, the resistance and reactance are roughly equal.

  10. Study of acoustic shadow moire for imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaqoub, Mahmoud

    This research is to utilize ultrasound waves and moire phenomena to establish a new imaging technology for industrial and medical applications. The theory and mathematical description is presented in this work. Numerical simulation is performed to prove the concept; COMSOL simulation, which uses finite difference technique, is used. The results are compared with experimental results done by a researcher from NIU at Santec Systems Inc., Wheeling, IL. The diffraction of the ultrasound waves is dependent on the wavelength. Because the sound wave length is large, a diffraction grating of wider pitch is used. Therefore, using ultrasound in shadow moire imaging will be limited by the size of pitch of the diffraction grating. Talbot image of the grating was studied using numerical simulation. The simulation results were found to be in agreement with experimental results. This is an evidence that ultrasound shadow moire has the same characteristics as light shadow moire. This work simulates the imaging of an inclined specimen with two different angles, 20 and 25 degrees. The distance between the first 2-moire fringes is found to be close to 5.5 mm. This means that the second fringe is a locus of constant out-of-plane elevation of 4.2mm with respect to the first fringe. This simulation provides an error compared with the experimental and theoretical results of 17.7%. This difference can be attributed to the fact that the experiments conditions are not ideal, and the use of paraxial and Fresnel approximation used in the analytical equations.

  11. Laser photoacoustic technique for ultrasonic surface acoustic wave velocity evaluation on porcelain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, K.; Tu, S. J.; Gao, L.; Xu, J.; Li, S. D.; Yu, W. C.; Liao, H. H.

    2016-10-01

    A laser photoacoustic technique has been developed to evaluate the surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity of porcelain. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm was focused by a cylindrical lens to initiate broadband SAW impulses, which were detected by an optical fiber interferometer with high spatial resolution. Multiple near-field surface acoustic waves were observed on the sample surface at various locations along the axis perpendicular to the laser line source as the detector moved away from the source in the same increments. The frequency spectrum and dispersion curves were obtained by operating on the recorded waveforms with cross-correlation and FFT. The SAW phase velocities of the porcelain of the same source are similar while they are different from those of different sources. The marked differences of Rayleigh phase velocities in our experiment suggest that this technique has the potential for porcelain identification.

  12. Acoustic modelling and testing of diesel particulate filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, Sabry; Åbom, Mats

    2005-11-01

    The use of Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) on automobiles to reduce the harmful effects of diesel exhaust gases is becoming a standard in many countries. Although the main purpose of a DPF is to reduce harmful emission of soot particles it also affects the acoustic emission. This paper presents a first attempt to describe the acoustic behavior of DPFs and to present models which allow the acoustic two-port to be calculated. The simplest model neglects wave propagation and treats the filter as an equivalent acoustic resistance modeled via a lumped impedance element. This simple model gives a constant frequency-independent transmission loss and agrees within 1 dB with measured data on a typical filter (length 250 mm) up to 200-300 Hz (at 20 °C). In the second model, the ceramic filter monolith is described as a system of coupled porous channels carrying plane waves. The coupling between the channels through the porous walls is described via Darcy's law. This model gives a frequency-dependent transmission loss and agrees well with measured data in the entire plane wave range.

  13. International Congress on Acoustic Intensity Measurement: Measurement Techniques and Applications, 2nd, Senlis, France, September 23-26, 1985, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recent developments in acoustic-intensity measurement are discussed in reviews and reports of theoretical and experimental investigations. Instrumentation, vector acoustics, sound radiation, intensity in the presence of flow, intensity in structures, sound power, source localization, impedance, absorption, and transmission are the fields covered by the contributions. Specific topics addressed include microphone configurations for intensity probes, the rotational structure of intensity fields, acoustic intensity and numerical simulation, sound-power measurement in the presence of background noise, and techniques for measuring the absorption coefficient of acoustic materials. Graphs, drawings, diagrams, tables of numerical data, and photographs of test setups are provided.

  14. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    deVries type wave evolution equations and 2D NHP numerical models. 3. Improved 4D deterministic and stochastic acoustic modeling. Improvements to time...Specifically, an analog of the rotation-neglecting Taylor-Goldstein equation was solved , after making reasonable simplifying assumptions. The...positions and sizes than the full NHP model (task 1), but may sacrifice detail and accuracy. Candidate models include those based on Korteweg

  15. The acoustic-modeling problem in automatic speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter F.

    1987-12-01

    This thesis examines the acoustic-modeling problem in automatic speech recognition from an information-theoretic point of view. This problem is to design a speech-recognition system which can extract from the speech waveform as much information as possible about the corresponding word sequence. The information extraction process is broken down into two steps: a signal processing step which converts a speech waveform into a sequence of information bearing acoustic feature vectors, and a step which models such a sequence. This thesis is primarily concerned with the use of hidden Markov models to model sequences of feature vectors which lie in a continuous space such as R sub N. It explores the trade-off between packing a lot of information into such sequences and being able to model them accurately. The difficulty of developing accurate models of continuous parameter sequences is addressed by investigating a method of parameter estimation which is specifically designed to cope with inaccurate modeling assumptions.

  16. Comparison of Transmission Line Methods for Surface Acoustic Wave Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William; Atkinson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, extremely low power and can be used to develop passive wireless sensors. For these reasons, NASA is investigating the use of SAW technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace structures. To facilitate rapid prototyping of passive SAW sensors for aerospace applications, SAW models have been developed. This paper reports on the comparison of three methods of modeling SAWs. The three models are the Impulse Response Method (a first order model), and two second order matrix methods; the conventional matrix approach, and a modified matrix approach that is extended to include internal finger reflections. The second order models are based upon matrices that were originally developed for analyzing microwave circuits using transmission line theory. Results from the models are presented with measured data from devices. Keywords: Surface Acoustic Wave, SAW, transmission line models, Impulse Response Method.

  17. Overview of the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    Launch environments, such as lift-off acoustic (LOA) and ignition overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. LOA environments are used directly in the development of vehicle vibro-acoustic environments and IOP is used in the loads assessment. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe for component survivability, reduction of the environment itself is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the Ares I LOA and IOP environments for the vehicle and ground systems including the Mobile Launcher (ML) and tower. An additional objective was to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. ASMAT was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116 (TS 116). The ASMAT program is described in this presentation.

  18. Acoustic Gravity Wave Chemistry Model for the RAYTRACE Code.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    AU)-AI56 850 ACOlUSTIC GRAVITY WAVE CHEMISTRY MODEL FOR THE IAYTRACE I/~ CODE(U) MISSION RESEARCH CORP SANTA BARBIARA CA T E OLD Of MAN 84 MC-N-SlS...DNA-TN-S4-127 ONAOOI-BO-C-0022 UNLSSIFIlED F/O 20/14 NL 1-0 2-8 1111 po 312.2 1--I 11111* i •. AD-A 156 850 DNA-TR-84-127 ACOUSTIC GRAVITY WAVE...Hicih Frequency Radio Propaoation Acoustic Gravity Waves 20. ABSTRACT (Continue en reveree mide if tteceeemr and Identify by block number) This

  19. An optoacoustic point source for acoustic scale model measurements.

    PubMed

    Bolaños, Javier Gómez; Pulkki, Ville; Karppinen, Pasi; Hæggström, Edward

    2013-04-01

    A massless acoustic source is proposed for scale model work. This source is generated by focusing a pulsed laser beam to rapidly heat the air at the focal point. This produces an expanding small plasma ball which generates a sonic impulse that may be used as an acoustic point source. Repeatability, frequency response, and directivity of the source were measured to show that it can serve as a massless point source. The impulse response of a rectangular space was determined using this type of source. A good match was found between the predicted and the measured impulse responses of the space.

  20. PREDICTIVE MODELING OF ACOUSTIC SIGNALS FROM THERMOACOUSTIC POWER SENSORS (TAPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Dumm, Christopher M.; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    2016-06-30

    Thermoacoustic Power Sensor (TAPS) technology offers the potential for self-powered, wireless measurement of nuclear reactor core operating conditions. TAPS are based on thermoacoustic engines, which harness thermal energy from fission reactions to generate acoustic waves by virtue of gas motion through a porous stack of thermally nonconductive material. TAPS can be placed in the core, where they generate acoustic waves whose frequency and amplitude are proportional to the local temperature and radiation flux, respectively. TAPS acoustic signals are not measured directly at the TAPS; rather, they propagate wirelessly from an individual TAPS through the reactor, and ultimately to a low-power receiver network on the vessel’s exterior. In order to rely on TAPS as primary instrumentation, reactor-specific models which account for geometric/acoustic complexities in the signal propagation environment must be used to predict the amplitude and frequency of TAPS signals at receiver locations. The reactor state may then be derived by comparing receiver signals to the reference levels established by predictive modeling. In this paper, we develop and experimentally benchmark a methodology for predictive modeling of the signals generated by a TAPS system, with the intent of subsequently extending these efforts to modeling of TAPS in a liquid sodium environmen

  1. Corrigendum and addendum. Modeling weakly nonlinear acoustic wave propagation

    DOE PAGES

    Christov, Ivan; Christov, C. I.; Jordan, P. M.

    2014-12-18

    This article presents errors, corrections, and additions to the research outlined in the following citation: Christov, I., Christov, C. I., & Jordan, P. M. (2007). Modeling weakly nonlinear acoustic wave propagation. The Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, 60(4), 473-495.

  2. Swept frequency acoustic interferometry technique for chemical weapons verification and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.; Anthony, B.W.; Lizon, D.C.

    1995-03-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are important for rapid on-site verification and monitoring of chemical munitions, such as artillery shells and bulk containers. Present NDE techniques provide only limited characterizations of such munitions. This paper describes the development of a novel noninvasive technique, swept-frequency acoustic interferometry (SFAI), that significantly enhances the capability of munitions characterizations. The SFAI technique allows very accurate and simultaneous determination of sound velocity and attenuation of chemical agents over a large frequency range inside artillery shells, in addition to determining agent density. The frequency-dependent sound velocity and attenuation can, in principle, provide molecular relaxation properties of the chemical agent. The same instrument also enables a direct fill-level measurement in bulk containers. Industrial and other applications of this general-purpose technique are also discussed.

  3. Comparison of two techniques for measured iodine release as an indicator of acoustic cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaravino, V.; Miller, M.W.

    1983-12-01

    A spectrophotometric and a radioactive-label technique were used to assess for acoustically induced iodine release from sodium iodide. Both techniques demonstrated a dose-dependent relationship between the percentage of iodine released and the ultrasound intensity (1 MHz, I/sub sp/ to 30 W/cm/sup 2/, continuous wave for 1 min). Iodine release decreased with increased atmospheric pressure or increased concentrations of the radical scavenger cysteamine, thus confirming that the release was related to cavitational processes. 14 references, 5 figures.

  4. A partial hearing animal model for chronic electro-acoustic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, S.; Wise, A. K.; Millard, R. E.; Shepherd, R. K.; Fallon, J. B.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Cochlear implants (CIs) have provided some auditory function to hundreds of thousands of people around the world. Although traditionally carried out only in profoundly deaf patients, the eligibility criteria for implantation have recently been relaxed to include many partially-deaf patients with useful levels of hearing. These patients receive both electrical stimulation from their implant and acoustic stimulation via their residual hearing (electro-acoustic stimulation; EAS) and perform very well. It is unclear how EAS improves speech perception over electrical stimulation alone, and little evidence exists about the nature of the interactions between electric and acoustic stimuli. Furthermore, clinical results suggest that some patients that undergo cochlear implantation lose some, if not all, of their residual hearing, reducing the advantages of EAS over electrical stimulation alone. A reliable animal model with clinically-relevant partial deafness combined with clinical CIs is important to enable these issues to be studied. This paper outlines such a model that has been successfully used in our laboratory. Approach. This paper outlines a battery of techniques used in our laboratory to generate, validate and examine an animal model of partial deafness and chronic CI use. Main results. Ototoxic deafening produced bilaterally symmetrical hearing thresholds in neonatal and adult animals. Electrical activation of the auditory system was confirmed, and all animals were chronically stimulated via adapted clinical CIs. Acoustic compound action potentials (CAPs) were obtained from partially-hearing cochleae, using the CI amplifier. Immunohistochemical analysis allows the effects of deafness and electrical stimulation on cell survival to be studied. Significance. This animal model has applications in EAS research, including investigating the functional interactions between electric and acoustic stimulation, and the development of techniques to maintain residual

  5. A partial hearing animal model for chronic electro-acoustic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Irving, S.; Wise, A.K.; Millard, R.E.; Shepherd, R.K.; Fallon, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cochlear implants (CIs) have provided some auditory function to hundreds of thousands of people around the world. Although traditionally carried out only in profoundly deaf patients, the eligibility criteria for implantation have recently been relaxed to include many partially-deaf patients with useful levels of hearing. These patients receive both electrical stimulation from their implant and acoustic stimulation via their residual hearing (electro-acoustic stimulation; EAS) and perform very well. It is unclear how EAS improves speech perception over electrical stimulation alone, and little evidence exists about the nature of the interactions between electric and acoustic stimuli. Furthermore, clinical results suggest that some patients that undergo cochlear implantation lose some, if not all, of their residual hearing, reducing the advantages of EAS over electrical stimulation alone. A reliable animal model with clinically-relevant partial deafness combined with clinical CIs is important to enable these issues to be studied. This manuscript outlines such a model that has been successfully used in our laboratory. Approach This manuscript outlines a battery of techniques used in our laboratory to generate, validate and examine an animal model of partial deafness and chronic CI use. Main Result Ototoxic deafening produced bilaterally symmetrical hearing thresholds in neonatal and adult animals. Electrical activation of the auditory system was confirmed, and all animals were chronically stimulated via adapted clinical CIs. Acoustic compound action potentials (CAPs) were obtained from partially-hearing cochleae, using the CI amplifier. Immunohistochemical analysis allows the effects of deafness and electrical stimulation on cell survival to be studied. Significance This animal model has applications in EAS research, including investigating the functional interactions between electric and acoustic stimulation, and the development of techniques to maintain

  6. Finite Element and Plate Theory Modeling of Acoustic Emission Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Hamstad, M. A.; Gary, J.; OGallagher, A.

    1998-01-01

    A comparison was made between two approaches to predict acoustic emission waveforms in thin plates. A normal mode solution method for Mindlin plate theory was used to predict the response of the flexural plate mode to a point source, step-function load, applied on the plate surface. The second approach used a dynamic finite element method to model the problem using equations of motion based on exact linear elasticity. Calculations were made using properties for both isotropic (aluminum) and anisotropic (unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite) materials. For simulations of anisotropic plates, propagation along multiple directions was evaluated. In general, agreement between the two theoretical approaches was good. Discrepancies in the waveforms at longer times were caused by differences in reflections from the lateral plate boundaries. These differences resulted from the fact that the two methods used different boundary conditions. At shorter times in the signals, before reflections, the slight discrepancies in the waveforms were attributed to limitations of Mindlin plate theory, which is an approximate plate theory. The advantages of the finite element method are that it used the exact linear elasticity solutions, and that it can be used to model real source conditions and complicated, finite specimen geometries as well as thick plates. These advantages come at a cost of increased computational difficulty, requiring lengthy calculations on workstations or supercomputers. The Mindlin plate theory solutions, meanwhile, can be quickly generated on personal computers. Specimens with finite geometry can also be modeled. However, only limited simple geometries such as circular or rectangular plates can easily be accommodated with the normal mode solution technique. Likewise, very limited source configurations can be modeled and plate theory is applicable only to thin plates.

  7. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Liu, Tian-Shu

    2001-01-01

    The theory, methods, and applications of the videogrammetric model deformation (VMD) measurement technique used at NASA for wind tunnel testing are presented. The VMD technique, based on non-topographic photogrammetry, can determine static and dynamic aeroelastic deformation and attitude of a wind-tunnel model. Hardware of the system includes a video-rate CCD camera, a computer with an image acquisition frame grabber board, illumination lights, and retroreflective or painted targets on a wind tunnel model. Custom software includes routines for image acquisition, target-tracking/identification, target centroid calculation, camera calibration, and deformation calculations. Applications of the VMD technique at five large NASA wind tunnels are discussed.

  8. Fabrication of capacitive acoustic resonators combining 3D printing and 2D inkjet printing techniques.

    PubMed

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-10-14

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency.

  9. Fabrication of Capacitive Acoustic Resonators Combining 3D Printing and 2D Inkjet Printing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency. PMID:26473878

  10. Acoustic levitation technique for containerless processing at high temperatures in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rey, Charles A.; Merkley, Dennis R.; Hammarlund, Gregory R.; Danley, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    High temperature processing of a small specimen without a container has been demonstrated in a set of experiments using an acoustic levitation furnace in the microgravity of space. This processing technique includes the positioning, heating, melting, cooling, and solidification of a material supported without physical contact with container or other surface. The specimen is supported in a potential energy well, created by an acoustic field, which is sufficiently strong to position the specimen in the microgravity environment of space. This containerless processing apparatus has been successfully tested on the Space Shuttle during the STS-61A mission. In that experiment, three samples wer successfully levitated and processed at temperatures from 600 to 1500 C. Experiment data and results are presented.

  11. New acoustic techniques for leak detection in fossil fuel plant components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parini, G.; Possa, G.

    Two on-line acoustic monitoring techniques for leak detection in feedwater preheaters and boilers of fossil fuel power plants are presented. The leak detection is based on the acoustic noise produced by the turbulent leak outflow. The primary sensors are piezoelectric pressure transducers, installed near the feedwater preheater inlets, in direct contact with the water, or mounted on boiler observation windows. The frequency band of the auscultation ranges from a few kHz, to 10 to 15 kHz. The signals are characterized by their rms value, continuously recorded by means of potentiometric strip chart recorders. The leak occurrence is signalled by the signal rms overcoming predetermined threshold levels. Sensitivity, reliability, acceptance in plant control practice, and costs-benefits balance are satisfactory.

  12. Monitoring fatigue damage in carbon fiber composites using an acoustic impact technique

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, A.; Raju, P.K.

    1998-06-01

    The acoustic impact technique (AIT) of nondestructive testing (NDT) has been used to identify the damage that results from the compressive and tension-compression cycle loading around a circular notch of quasiisotropic carbon-fiber composites. This method involves applying a low velocity impact to the test specimen and evaluating the resulting localized acoustic response. Results indicate that AIT can be applied for identification of both compressive and fatigue damage in composite laminates. The gross area of compressive and fatigue damage is detected through an increase in the pulse width, and a decrease in the amplitude, of the force-time signal. The response obtained in AIT is sensitive to the frequency of the impactor and the amplitude of the impact force and requires careful monitoring of these values to achieve repeatability of results.

  13. Video and acoustic camera techniques for studying fish under ice: a review and comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Robert P.; Brown, Richard S.; Hop, Haakon H.; Moulton, Larry

    2006-09-05

    Researchers attempting to study the presence, abundance, size, and behavior of fish species in northern and arctic climates during winter face many challenges, including the presence of thick ice cover, snow cover, and, sometimes, extremely low temperatures. This paper describes and compares the use of video and acoustic cameras for determining fish presence and behavior in lakes, rivers, and streams with ice cover. Methods are provided for determining fish density and size, identifying species, and measuring swimming speed and successful applications of previous surveys of fish under the ice are described. These include drilling ice holes, selecting batteries and generators, deploying pan and tilt cameras, and using paired colored lasers to determine fish size and habitat associations. We also discuss use of infrared and white light to enhance image-capturing capabilities, deployment of digital recording systems and time-lapse techniques, and the use of imaging software. Data are presented from initial surveys with video and acoustic cameras in the Sagavanirktok River Delta, Alaska, during late winter 2004. These surveys represent the first known successful application of a dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) acoustic camera under the ice that achieved fish detection and sizing at camera ranges up to 16 m. Feasibility tests of video and acoustic cameras for determining fish size and density at various turbidity levels are also presented. Comparisons are made of the different techniques in terms of suitability for achieving various fisheries research objectives. This information is intended to assist researchers in choosing the equipment that best meets their study needs.

  14. Seismo-acoustic ray model benchmarking against experimental tank data.

    PubMed

    Camargo Rodríguez, Orlando; Collis, Jon M; Simpson, Harry J; Ey, Emanuel; Schneiderwind, Joseph; Felisberto, Paulo

    2012-08-01

    Acoustic predictions of the recently developed traceo ray model, which accounts for bottom shear properties, are benchmarked against tank experimental data from the EPEE-1 and EPEE-2 (Elastic Parabolic Equation Experiment) experiments. Both experiments are representative of signal propagation in a Pekeris-like shallow-water waveguide over a non-flat isotropic elastic bottom, where significant interaction of the signal with the bottom can be expected. The benchmarks show, in particular, that the ray model can be as accurate as a parabolic approximation model benchmarked in similar conditions. The results of benchmarking are important, on one side, as a preliminary experimental validation of the model and, on the other side, demonstrates the reliability of the ray approach for seismo-acoustic applications.

  15. Acoustic FMRI noise: linear time-invariant system model.

    PubMed

    Rizzo Sierra, Carlos V; Versluis, Maarten J; Hoogduin, Johannes M; Duifhuis, Hendrikus Diek

    2008-09-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For auditory system studies, however, the acoustic noise generated by the scanner tends to interfere with the assessments of this activation. Understanding and modeling fMRI acoustic noise is a useful step to its reduction. To study acoustic noise, the MR scanner is modeled as a linear electroacoustical system generating sound pressure signals proportional to the time derivative of the input gradient currents. The transfer function of one MR scanner is determined for two different input specifications: 1) by using the gradient waveform calculated by the scanner software and 2) by using a recording of the gradient current. Up to 4 kHz, the first method is shown as reliable as the second one, and its use is encouraged when direct measurements of gradient currents are not possible. Additionally, the linear order and average damping properties of the gradient coil system are determined by impulse response analysis. Since fMRI is often based on echo planar imaging (EPI) sequences, a useful validation of the transfer function prediction ability can be obtained by calculating the acoustic output for the EPI sequence. We found a predicted sound pressure level (SPL) for the EPI sequence of 104 dB SPL compared to a measured value of 102 dB SPL. As yet, the predicted EPI pressure waveform shows similarity as well as some differences with the directly measured EPI pressure waveform.

  16. An efficient model for coupling structural vibrations with acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Ting, LU

    1993-01-01

    The scattering of an incident wave by a flexible panel is studied. The panel vibration is governed by the nonlinear plate equations while the loading on the panel, which is the pressure difference across the panel, depends on the reflected and transmitted waves. Two models are used to calculate this structural-acoustic interaction problem. One solves the three dimensional nonlinear Euler equations for the flow-field coupled with the plate equations (the fully coupled model). The second uses the linear wave equation for the acoustic field and expresses the load as a double integral involving the panel oscillation (the decoupled model). The panel oscillation governed by a system of integro-differential equations is solved numerically and the acoustic field is then defined by an explicit formula. Numerical results are obtained using the two models for linear and nonlinear panel vibrations. The predictions given by these two models are in good agreement but the computational time needed for the 'fully coupled model' is 60 times longer than that for 'the decoupled model'.

  17. Acoustic absorption modeling of porous concrete considering the gradation and shape of aggregates and void ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. K.; Lee, H. K.

    2010-03-01

    The results of acoustic absorption modeling of porous concrete considering the gradation and shape of aggregates and void ratio are presented. To model the void texture of porous concrete, the multi-layered micro-perforated rigid panel model considering air gaps [1,2] is adopted. The parameters used in this acoustic absorption modeling are determined by a geometrical and experimental approach considering the gradation and shape of aggregates and void ratio. The predicted acoustic absorption spectra are compared with experimental results to verify the proposed acoustic absorption modeling approach. Finally, a parametric study is conducted to investigate the influence of design factors on the acoustic absorption properties of porous concrete.

  18. Investigation of the Acoustic Source Characteristics of High Energy Laser Pulses: Models and Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    consistent with the expected approximately 1/r relationship for pressure amplitudes under 100MPa. The modeling effort employed AUTODYN , a finite...agreed with Vogel’s measured values. The efficiency, pulse length, pulse shape, and variation of pressure amplitude with range achieved with AUTODYN ...Nonlinear Acoustics, AUTODYN , Acoustic Modeling, Shock Acoustics 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY

  19. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, Manfred

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights.

  20. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    SciTech Connect

    Cuntz, M. Heidelberg Universitaet )

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights. 74 refs.

  1. Acoustic and non-acoustic factors in modeling listener-specific performance of sagittal-plane sound localization

    PubMed Central

    Majdak, Piotr; Baumgartner, Robert; Laback, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The ability of sound-source localization in sagittal planes (along the top-down and front-back dimension) varies considerably across listeners. The directional acoustic spectral features, described by head-related transfer functions (HRTFs), also vary considerably across listeners, a consequence of the listener-specific shape of the ears. It is not clear whether the differences in localization ability result from differences in the encoding of directional information provided by the HRTFs, i.e., an acoustic factor, or from differences in auditory processing of those cues (e.g., spectral-shape sensitivity), i.e., non-acoustic factors. We addressed this issue by analyzing the listener-specific localization ability in terms of localization performance. Directional responses to spatially distributed broadband stimuli from 18 listeners were used. A model of sagittal-plane localization was fit individually for each listener by considering the actual localization performance, the listener-specific HRTFs representing the acoustic factor, and an uncertainty parameter representing the non-acoustic factors. The model was configured to simulate the condition of complete calibration of the listener to the tested HRTFs. Listener-specifically calibrated model predictions yielded correlations of, on average, 0.93 with the actual localization performance. Then, the model parameters representing the acoustic and non-acoustic factors were systematically permuted across the listener group. While the permutation of HRTFs affected the localization performance, the permutation of listener-specific uncertainty had a substantially larger impact. Our findings suggest that across-listener variability in sagittal-plane localization ability is only marginally determined by the acoustic factor, i.e., the quality of directional cues found in typical human HRTFs. Rather, the non-acoustic factors, supposed to represent the listeners' efficiency in processing directional cues, appear to be

  2. (A new time of flight) Acoustic flow meter using wide band signals and adaptive beamforming techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgan, I.; Ioana, C.; Candel, I.; Anghel, A.; Ballester, J. L.; Reeb, B.; Combes, G.

    2016-11-01

    facility showed an increase in acoustic time of flight estimation, accuracy of 50% with respect to the existing measurements techniques based only on signal correlation.

  3. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Above Deck Water Sound Suppression Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program test matrix was designed to determine the acoustic reduction for the Liftoff acoustics (LOA) environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The scale model test can be used to quantify the effectiveness of the water suppression system as well as optimize the systems necessary for the LOA noise reduction. Several water flow rates were tested to determine which rate provides the greatest acoustic reductions. Preliminary results are presented.

  4. Considerations on the acoustic energy radiated by toothed gears. [model for calculating noise intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popinceanu, N. G.; Kremmer, I.

    1974-01-01

    A mechano-acoustic model is reported for calculating acoustic energy radiated by a working gear. According to this model, a gear is an acoustic coublet formed of the two wheels. The wheel teeth generate cylindrical acoustic waves while the front surfaces of the teeth behave like vibrating pistons. Theoretical results are checked experimentally and good agreement is obtained with open gears. The experiments show that the air noise effect is negligible as compared with the structural noise transmitted to the gear box.

  5. Acoustic source localization using a polyhedral microphone array and an improved generalized cross-correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padois, Thomas; Sgard, Franck; Doutres, Olivier; Berry, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Millions of workers are exposed to excessive noise levels each day. Acoustic solutions have to be developed to protect workers from hearing loss. The first step of an acoustic diagnosis is the source localization which can be performed with a microphone array. Spherical microphone arrays can be used to detect the acoustic source positions in a workplace. In this study, a spherical microphone array, with polyhedral discretization, is proposed and compared with a spherical array with a slightly different geometry. The generalized cross-correlation technique is used to detect the source positions. Moreover, two criteria are introduced to improve the noise source map. The first is based on the geometric properties of the microphone array and the scan zone whereas the second is based on the energy of the spatial likelihood function. Numerical data are used to provide a systematic comparison of both geometries and criteria. Finally, experiments in a reverberant room reveal that the polyhedral microphone array associated with both criteria provides the best noise source map.

  6. Techniques to assess acoustic-structure interaction in liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. Benjamin

    Acoustoelasticity is the study of the dynamic interaction between elastic structures and acoustic enclosures. In this dissertation, acoustoelasticity is considered in the context of liquid rocket engine design. The techniques presented here can be used to determine which forcing frequencies are important in acoustoelastic systems. With a knowledge of these frequencies, an analyst can either find ways to attenuate the excitation at these frequencies or alter the system in such a way that the prescribed excitations do result in a resonant condition. The end result is a structural component that is less susceptible to failure. The research scope is divided into three parts. In the first part, the dynamics of cylindrical shells submerged in liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) are considered. The shells are bounded by rigid outer cylinders. This configuration gives rise to two fluid-filled cavities---an inner cylindrical cavity and an outer annular cavity. Such geometries are common in rocket engine design. The natural frequencies and modes of the fluid-structure system are computed by combining the rigid wall acoustic cavity modes and the in vacuo structural modes into a system of coupled ordinary differential equations. Eigenvalue veering is observed near the intersections of the curves representing natural frequencies of the rigid wall acoustic and the in vacuo structural modes. In the case of a shell submerged in LH2, system frequencies near these intersections are as much as 30% lower than the corresponding in vacuo structural frequencies. Due to its high density, the frequency reductions in the presence of LOX are even more dramatic. The forced responses of a shell submerged in LH2 and LOX while subject to a harmonic point excitation are also presented. The responses in the presence of fluid are found to be quite distinct from those of the structure in vacuo. In the second part, coupled mode theory is used to explore the fundamental features of

  7. Model-based optical coherence elastography using acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglyamov, Salavat; Wang, Shang; Karpiouk, Andrei; Li, Jiasong; Emelianov, Stanislav; Larin, Kirill V.

    2014-02-01

    Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) stimulation is actively used in ultrasound elastography to estimate mechanical properties of tissue. Compared with ultrasound imaging, OCT provides advantage in both spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, a combination of ARF and OCT technologies can provide a unique opportunity to measure viscoelastic properties of tissue, especially when the use of high intensity radiation pressure is limited for safety reasons. In this presentation we discuss a newly developed theoretical model of the deformation of a layered viscoelastic medium in response to an acoustic radiation force of short duration. An acoustic impulse was considered as an axisymmetric force generated on the upper surface of the medium. An analytical solution of this problem was obtained using the Hankel transform in frequency domain. It was demonstrated that layers at different depths introduce different frequency responses. To verify the developed model, experiments were performed using tissue-simulating, inhomogeneous phantoms of varying mechanical properties. The Young's modulus of the phantoms was varied from 5 to 50 kPa. A single-element focused ultrasound transducer (3.5 MHz) was used to apply the radiation force with various durations on the surface of phantoms. Displacements on the phantom surface were measured using a phase-sensitive OCT at 25 kHz repetition frequency. The experimental results were in good agreement with the modeling results. Therefore, the proposed theoretical model can be used to reconstruct the mechanical properties of tissue based on ARF/OCT measurements.

  8. Automatic computational models of acoustical category features: Talking versus singing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, David

    2003-10-01

    The automatic discrimination between acoustical categories has been an increasingly interesting problem in the fields of computer listening, multimedia databases, and music information retrieval. A system is presented which automatically generates classification models, given a set of destination classes and a set of a priori labeled acoustic events. Computational models are created using comparative probability density estimations. For the specific example presented, the destination classes are talking and singing. Individual feature models are evaluated using two measures: The Kologorov-Smirnov distance measures feature separation, and accuracy is measured using absolute and relative metrics. The system automatically segments the event set into a user-defined number (n) of development subsets, and runs a development cycle for each set, generating n separate systems, each of which is evaluated using the above metrics to improve overall system accuracy and to reduce inherent data skew from any one development subset. Multiple features for the same acoustical categories are then compared for underlying feature overlap using cross-correlation. Advantages of automated computational models include improved system development and testing, shortened development cycle, and automation of common system evaluation tasks. Numerical results are presented relating to the talking/singing classification problem.

  9. Study of fracture mechanisms of short fiber reinforced AS composite by acoustic emission technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kida, Sotoaki; Suzuki, Megumu

    1995-11-01

    The fracture mechanisms of short fiber reinforced AS composites are studied by acoustic emission technique for examining the effects of fiber contents. The loads P{sub b} and P{sub c} which the damage mechanisms change are obtained at the inflection points of the total AE energy curve the energy gradient method. The damages are generated by fiber breaking at the load point of P{sub b} and P{sub c} in B material, and by the fiber breaking and the debonding between resin and fiber at the load points of P{sub b} and P{sub c} in C material.

  10. Pattern recognition techniques applied to acoustic detection of liquid-metal fast breeder reactor cooling defects

    SciTech Connect

    Brunet, M.; Dubuisson, B.

    1983-08-01

    In the event of a partial or total blockage of a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor core subassembly, a boiling zone may be created. Acoustic signals from such a zone could provide a means of early detection of accident conditions. A three-step method, based on pattern recognition techniques, is described and used to analyze data from three experiments that simulate core cooling fault conditions. This method is shown to be capable of detecting the abnormal situation in each of the experiments analyzed.

  11. Evaluating Acoustic Emission Signals as an in situ process monitoring technique for Selective Laser Melting (SLM)

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Karl A.; Candy, Jim V.; Guss, Gabe; Mathews, M. J.

    2016-10-14

    In situ real-time monitoring of the Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process has significant implications for the AM community. The ability to adjust the SLM process parameters during a build (in real-time) can save time, money and eliminate expensive material waste. Having a feedback loop in the process would allow the system to potentially ‘fix’ problem regions before a next powder layer is added. In this study we have investigated acoustic emission (AE) phenomena generated during the SLM process, and evaluated the results in terms of a single process parameter, of an in situ process monitoring technique.

  12. Integrated Structural/Acoustic Modeling of Heterogeneous Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett, A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Arnold, Steven, M.; Pennline, James, A.

    2012-01-01

    A model for the dynamic response of heterogeneous media is presented. A given medium is discretized into a number of subvolumes, each of which may contain an elastic anisotropic material, void, or fluid, and time-dependent boundary conditions are applied to simulate impact or incident pressure waves. The full time-dependent displacement and stress response throughout the medium is then determined via an explicit solution procedure. The model is applied to simulate the coupled structural/acoustic response of foam core sandwich panels as well as aluminum panels with foam inserts. Emphasis is placed on the acoustic absorption performance of the panels versus weight and the effects of the arrangement of the materials and incident wave frequency.

  13. Modeling of a Surface Acoustic Wave Strain Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensor technology for harsh environments aimed at aerospace applications. To aid in development of sensors a model of a SAW strain sensor has been developed. The new model extends the modified matrix method to include the response of Orthogonal Frequency Coded (OFC) reflectors and the response of SAW devices to strain. These results show that the model accurately captures the strain response of a SAW sensor on a Langasite substrate. The results of the model of a SAW Strain Sensor on Langasite are presented

  14. Numerical modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation in the atmosphere using a spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roland; Brissaud, Quentin; Garcia, Raphael; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    During low-frequency events such as tsunamis, acoustic and gravity waves are generated and quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Due to the exponential decrease of the atmospheric density with the altitude, the conservation of the kinetic energy imposes that the amplitude of those waves increases (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), which allows their detection in the upper atmosphere. This propagation bas been modelled for years with different tools, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling is still crucially needed. A modeling tool is worth of interest since there are many different sources, as earthquakes or atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool. By adding some developments to the SPECFEM package that already models wave propagation in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, we show here that acoustic and gravity waves propagation can now be modelled in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's vibrating surfaces but also huge atmospheric events. Atmospheric attenuation is also introduced since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals.

  15. Modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation through the atmosphere with spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2014-12-01

    Low-frequency events such as tsunamis generate acoustic and gravity waves which quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Since the atmospheric density decreases exponentially as the altitude increases and from the conservation of the kinetic energy, those waves see their amplitude raise (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), allowing their detection in the upper atmosphere. Various tools have been developed through years to model this propagation, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but none offer a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling.A modeling tool is worthy interest since there are many different phenomena, from quakes to atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool.Starting from the SPECFEM program that already propagate waves in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, this work offers a tool with the ability to model acoustic and gravity waves propagation in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source.Atmospheric attenuation is required in a proper modeling framework since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented due to its ability to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's surface (that vibrates when a surface wave go through it) but also huge atmospheric events.

  16. Acoustic results of the Boeing model 360 whirl tower test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Michael E.; Jordan, David

    1990-01-01

    An evaluation is presented for whirl tower test results of the Model 360 helicopter's advanced, high-performance four-bladed composite rotor system intended to facilitate over-200-knot flight. During these performance measurements, acoustic data were acquired by seven microphones. A comparison of whirl-tower tests with theory indicate that theoretical prediction accuracies vary with both microphone position and the inclusion of ground reflection. Prediction errors varied from 0 to 40 percent of the measured signal-to-peak amplitude.

  17. Acoustic Propagation Modeling in Shallow Water Using Ray Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westwood, Evan Kruse

    A ray method is developed for modeling acoustic propagation in low-frequency, shallow water ocean environments. The theoretical foundation is laid by studying the reflected and transmitted fields due to a point source in the presence of a plane, penetrable interface. Each field is expressed as a plane wave integral. The approach for solving the integral is based on the classical method of steepest descent, but the plane wave reflection and transmission coefficients are allowed to influence the location of the saddle points and their steepest descent paths. As a consequence, saddle points are, in general, complex, and complicated processes such as the reflected lateral wave field and the transmitted evanescent field are incorporated in the saddle point formulation. The saddle point criterion may be expressed in terms of eigenrays and their characteristics, providing physical insight into the paths and mechanisms of propagation. The method developed for solving the single interface problem is then applied to two simple models for shallow water ocean environments: the flat, isovelocity waveguide (the Pekeris model) and the sloping-bottom, isovelocity waveguide (the penetrable wedge). For the flat waveguide, near perfect agreement is found between the ray model and a model whose algorithm solves the wave equation numerically (the SAFARI fast field model). The ray method proves to be accurate even when the water depth is only half of the acoustic wavelength. For the sloping-bottom waveguide, ray model solutions to benchmark problems proposed by the Acoustical Society of America are compared to solutions from a model based on two-way coupled mode theory. For cases of upslope propagation in shallow-water penetrable wedges, agreement between the two independent models is excellent, both in the water and in the bottom. The ray method for the three-dimensional wedge problem is discussed, and the method is also extended to model directional sources by placing a point source

  18. Validation of an Acoustic Impedance Prediction Model for Skewed Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2009-01-01

    An impedance prediction model was validated experimentally to determine the composite impedance of a series of high-aspect ratio slot resonators incorporating channel skew and sharp bends. Such structures are useful for packaging acoustic liners into constrained spaces for turbofan noise control applications. A formulation of the Zwikker-Kosten Transmission Line (ZKTL) model, incorporating the Richards correction for rectangular channels, is used to calculate the composite normalized impedance of a series of six multi-slot resonator arrays with constant channel length. Experimentally, acoustic data was acquired in the NASA Langley Normal Incidence Tube over the frequency range of 500 to 3500 Hz at 120 and 140 dB OASPL. Normalized impedance was reduced using the Two-Microphone Method for the various combinations of channel skew and sharp 90o and 180o bends. Results show that the presence of skew and/or sharp bends does not significantly alter the impedance of a slot resonator as compared to a straight resonator of the same total channel length. ZKTL predicts the impedance of such resonators very well over the frequency range of interest. The model can be used to design arrays of slot resonators that can be packaged into complex geometries heretofore unsuitable for effective acoustic treatment.

  19. An eighth-scale speech source for subjective assessments in acoustic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlowski, R. J.

    1981-08-01

    The design of a source is described which is suitable for making speech recordings in eighth-scale acoustic models of auditoria. An attempt was made to match the directionality of the source with the directionality of the human voice using data reported in the literature. A narrow aperture was required for the design which was provided by mounting an inverted conical horn over the diaphragm of a high frequency loudspeaker. Resonance problems were encountered with the use of a horn and a description is given of the electronic techniques adopted to minimize the effect of these resonances. Subjective and objective assessments on the completed speech source have proved satisfactory. It has been used in a modelling exercise concerned with the acoustic design of a theatre with a thrust-type stage.

  20. A comparison of model-based and hyperbolic localization techniques as applied to marine mammal calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemann, Christopher O.; Porter, Michael B.

    2003-10-01

    A common technique for the passive acoustic localization of singing marine mammals is that of hyperbolic fixing. This technique assumes straight-line, constant wave speed acoustic propagation to associate travel time with range, but in some geometries, these assumptions can lead to localization errors. A new localization algorithm based on acoustic propagation models can account for waveguide and multipath effects, and it has successfully been tested against real acoustic data from three different environments (Hawaii, California, and Bahamas) and three different species (humpback, blue, and sperm whales). Accuracy of the model-based approach has been difficult to verify given the absence of concurrent visual and acoustic observations of the same animal. However, the model-based algorithm was recently exercised against a controlled source of known position broadcasting recorded whale sounds, and location estimates were then compared to hyperbolic techniques and true source position. In geometries where direct acoustic paths exist, both model-based and hyperbolic techniques perform equally well. However, in geometries where bathymetric and refractive effects are important, such as at long range, the model-based approach shows improved accuracy.

  1. Optimal Suturing Technique and Number of Sutures for Surgical Implantation of Acoustic Transmitters in Juvenile Salmonids

    SciTech Connect

    Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Boyd, James W.; Eppard, M. B.; Seaburg, Adam

    2012-01-02

    The size reduction of acoustic transmitters has led to a reduction in the length of incision needed to implant a transmitter. Smaller suture knot profiles and fewer sutures may be adequate for closing an incision used to surgically implant an acoustic microtransmitter. As a result, faster surgery times and reduced tissue trauma could lead to increased survival and decreased infection for implanted fish. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of five suturing techniques on mortality, tag and suture retention, incision openness, ulceration, and redness in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha implanted with acoustic microtransmitters. Suturing was performed by three surgeons, and study fish were held at two water temperatures (12°C and 17°C). Mortality was low and tag retention was high for all treatments on all examination days (7, 14, 21, and 28 days post-surgery). Because there was surgeon variation in suture retention among treatments, further analyses included only the one surgeon who received feedback training in all suturing techniques. Incision openness and tissue redness did not differ among treatments. The only difference observed among treatments was in tissue ulceration. Incisions closed with a horizontal mattress pattern had more ulceration than other treatments among fish held for 28 days at 17°C. Results from this study suggest that one simple interrupted 1 × 1 × 1 × 1 suture is adequate for closing incisions on fish under most circumstances. However, in dynamic environments, two simple interrupted 1 × 1 × 1 × 1 sutures should provide adequate incision closure. Reducing bias in survival and behavior tagging studies is important when making comparisons to the migrating salmon population. Therefore, by minimizing the effects of tagging on juvenile salmon (reduced tissue trauma and reduced surgery time), researchers can more accurately estimate survival and behavior.

  2. Acoustic emission technique for monitoring the pyrolysis of composites for process control.

    PubMed

    Tittmann, B R; Yen, C E

    2008-11-01

    Carbonization is the first step in the heat and pressure treatment (pyrolysis) of composites in preparing carbon-carbon parts. These find many uses, including aircraft brakes, rocket nozzles and medical implants. This paper describes the acoustic emissions (AE) from various stages of the manufacturing process of carbon-carbon composites. This process involves carbonization at a high temperature and this results in both thermal expansion and volume change (due to pyrolysis in which a sacrificial polymer matrix is converted to carbon). Importantly the resultant matrix is porous and has a network of small intra-lamina cracks. The formation of these microcracks produces AE and this paper describes how this observation can be used to monitor (and eventually control) the manufacturing process. The aim is to speed up manufacture, which is currently time-consuming. The first section of the paper describes the design of unimodal waveguides to enable the AE to propagate to a cool environment where a transducer can be located. The second part of the paper describes various experimental observations of AE under a range of process conditions. In particular, this paper presents a technique based on detecting acoustic emissions and (1) uses wire waveguides to monitor parts within the autoclave to 800 degrees C, (2) monitors microcracking during pyrolysis, (3) uses a four-level threshold to distinguish between low- and high-amplitude cracking events, (4) recognizes the occurrence of harmful delaminations, and (5) guides the control of the heating rate for optimum efficiency of the pyrolysis process. In addition, supporting data are presented of in situ measurements of porosity, weight loss, cross-ply shrinkage, and mass spectroscopy of gases emitted. The process evolution is illustrated by the use of interrupted manufacturing cycle micrographs obtained by optical, scanning acoustic (SAM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy. The technique promotes in-process monitoring and

  3. Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustic Modeling From Experiments (FRAME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Eric

    2011-01-01

    A new methodology is developed for the construction of helicopter source noise models for use in mission planning tools from experimental measurements of helicopter external noise radiation. The models are constructed by employing a parameter identification method to an assumed analytical model of the rotor harmonic noise sources. This new method allows for the identification of individual rotor harmonic noise sources and allows them to be characterized in terms of their individual non-dimensional governing parameters. The method is applied to both wind tunnel measurements and ground noise measurements of two-bladed rotors. The method is shown to match the parametric trends of main rotor harmonic noise, allowing accurate estimates of the dominant rotorcraft noise sources to be made for operating conditions based on a small number of measurements taken at different operating conditions. The ability of this method to estimate changes in noise radiation due to changes in ambient conditions is also demonstrated.

  4. Modeling of Acoustic Emission Signal Propagation in Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Zelenyak, Andreea-Manuela; Hamstad, Marvin A.; Sause, Markus G. R.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) testing is a widely used nondestructive testing (NDT) method to investigate material failure. When environmental conditions are harmful for the operation of the sensors, waveguides are typically mounted in between the inspected structure and the sensor. Such waveguides can be built from different materials or have different designs in accordance with the experimental needs. All these variations can cause changes in the acoustic emission signals in terms of modal conversion, additional attenuation or shift in frequency content. A finite element method (FEM) was used to model acoustic emission signal propagation in an aluminum plate with an attached waveguide and was validated against experimental data. The geometry of the waveguide is systematically changed by varying the radius and height to investigate the influence on the detected signals. Different waveguide materials were implemented and change of material properties as function of temperature were taken into account. Development of the option of modeling different waveguide options replaces the time consuming and expensive trial and error alternative of experiments. Thus, the aim of this research has important implications for those who use waveguides for AE testing. PMID:26007731

  5. Acoustic Characteristics of a Model Isolated Tiltrotor in DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; McCluer, Megan; Tadghighi, Hormoz

    1999-01-01

    An aeroacoustic wind tunnel test was conducted using a scaled isolated tiltrotor model. Acoustic data were acquired using an in-flow microphone wing traversed beneath the model to map the directivity of the near-field acoustic radiation of the rotor for a parametric variation of rotor angle-of-attack, tunnel speed, and rotor thrust. Acoustic metric data were examined to show trends of impulsive noise for the parametric variations. BVISPL maximum noise levels were found to increase with alpha for constant mu and C(sub T), although the maximum BVI levels were found at much higher a than for a typical helicopter. BVISPL levels were found to increase with mu for constant alpha and C(sub T. BVISPL was found to decrease with increasing CT for constant a and m, although BVISPL increased with thrust for a constant wake geometry. Metric data were also scaled for M(sub up) to evaluate how well simple power law scaling could be used to correct metric data for M(sub up) effects.

  6. Using Complementary Acoustic and Optical Techniques for Quantitative Monitoring of Biomolecular Adsorption at Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Konradi, Rupert; Textor, Marcus; Reimhult, Erik

    2012-01-01

    The great wealth of different surface sensitive techniques used in biosensing, most of which claim to measure adsorbed mass, can at first glance look unnecessary. However, with each technique relying on a different transducer principle there is something to be gained from a comparison. In this tutorial review, different optical and acoustic evanescent techniques are used to illustrate how an understanding of the transducer principle of each technique can be exploited for further interpretation of hydrated and extended polymer and biological films. Some of the most commonly used surface sensitive biosensor techniques (quartz crystal microbalance, optical waveguide spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance) are briefly described and five case studies are presented to illustrate how different biosensing techniques can and often should be combined. The case studies deal with representative examples of adsorption of protein films, polymer brushes and lipid membranes, and describe e.g., how to deal with strongly vs. weakly hydrated films, large conformational changes and ordered layers of biomolecules. The presented systems and methods are compared to other representative examples from the increasing literature on the subject. PMID:25586027

  7. Modeling the acoustic excitation of a resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandre, Shreyas; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayanan

    2007-11-01

    The sounding of a beverage bottle when blown on is a familiar but very little understood phenomenon. A very similar mechanism is used by musical wind instruments, like organ pipes and flutes, for sound production. This phenomenon falls under the general umbrella of flow induced oscillations and is representative of a more generic mechanism. The modeling of this phenomenon essentially involves two components. The first is the resonator, which bears the oscillations and this component is very well understood. The resonator, however, needs an external energy input to sustain the oscillations, which is provided by the jet of air blown. The dynamics of the jet and its interaction with the resonator is the primary focus of this talk. In particular, we provide a linearized model based on first principles to explain the feedback of energy from the jet to the resonator and compare the predictions with experimental results.

  8. Model building techniques for analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Walther, Howard P.; McDaniel, Karen Lynn; Keener, Donald; Cordova, Theresa Elena; Henry, Ronald C.; Brooks, Sean; Martin, Wilbur D.

    2009-09-01

    The practice of mechanical engineering for product development has evolved into a complex activity that requires a team of specialists for success. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has product engineers, mechanical designers, design engineers, manufacturing engineers, mechanical analysts and experimentalists, qualification engineers, and others that contribute through product realization teams to develop new mechanical hardware. The goal of SNL's Design Group is to change product development by enabling design teams to collaborate within a virtual model-based environment whereby analysis is used to guide design decisions. Computer-aided design (CAD) models using PTC's Pro/ENGINEER software tools are heavily relied upon in the product definition stage of parts and assemblies at SNL. The three-dimensional CAD solid model acts as the design solid model that is filled with all of the detailed design definition needed to manufacture the parts. Analysis is an important part of the product development process. The CAD design solid model (DSM) is the foundation for the creation of the analysis solid model (ASM). Creating an ASM from the DSM currently is a time-consuming effort; the turnaround time for results of a design needs to be decreased to have an impact on the overall product development. This effort can be decreased immensely through simple Pro/ENGINEER modeling techniques that summarize to the method features are created in a part model. This document contains recommended modeling techniques that increase the efficiency of the creation of the ASM from the DSM.

  9. Modelling techniques for jet impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.; Herling, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    A technique for testing scale models for the determination of fluctuating pressure loads due to jet impingement has been investigated using a quarter-scale model of a boilerplate test facility in which a JT-15D engine with a rectangular outer nozzle blows over a small curved airfoil representing the upper-surface of a wing. When model and full-scale spectra of fluctuating surface pressures are reduced to plots of pressure coefficient power-spectral density vs Strouhal number, moderate agreement is obtained, but a shift of spectral peaks is noted. However, when a correction for the ratio of average jet to ambient temperature is applied, the spectral peaks agree.

  10. Experimental evaluation on the effectiveness of acoustic-laser technique towards the FRP-bonded concrete system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Qiwen; Lau, Denvid

    2015-04-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is essential for the detection of defects in the externally bonded fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) concrete, especially such bonded system can be readily found in strengthened and retrofitted structures nowadays. Among all the current NDE methods, acoustic-laser technique is a non-contact methodology with a high applicability to detect near-surface defect in composite structures, which is very suitable to be used for detecting defect in FRP retrofitted and strengthened concrete structures. The methodology is based on the acoustic excitation on the target surface and the measurement of its vibration using laser beam. To our best knowledge, no comprehensive study has been conducted to examine how the acoustic location and other related parameters affect the measurement sensitivity. In fact, several operational parameters affecting the performance of the test system are discussed here including (i) distance between the acoustic source and the object, (ii) sound pressure level (SPL), (iii) angle of the laser beam incidence and (iv) angle of the acoustic incidence. Here, we perform a series of parametric studies against these four operational parameters. Based on our experimental measurements, all parameters show significant effects on the measurement sensitivity of the acoustic-laser technique. Recommendations on an optimal range of each concerned parameter are provided.

  11. Moho Modeling Using FFT Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenjin; Tenzer, Robert

    2017-03-01

    To improve the numerical efficiency, the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) technique was facilitated in Parker-Oldenburg's method for a regional gravimetric Moho recovery, which assumes the Earth's planar approximation. In this study, we extend this definition for global applications while assuming a spherical approximation of the Earth. In particular, we utilize the FFT technique for a global Moho recovery, which is practically realized in two numerical steps. The gravimetric forward modeling is first applied, based on methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of the global gravity and lithospheric structure models, to compute the refined gravity field, which comprises mainly the gravitational signature of the Moho geometry. The gravimetric inverse problem is then solved iteratively in order to determine the Moho depth. The application of FFT technique to both numerical steps reduces the computation time to a fraction of that required without applying this fast algorithm. The developed numerical producers are used to estimate the Moho depth globally, and the gravimetric result is validated using the global (CRUST1.0) and regional (ESC) seismic Moho models. The comparison reveals a relatively good agreement between the gravimetric and seismic models, with the RMS of differences (of 4-5 km) at the level of expected uncertainties of used input datasets, while without the presence of significant systematic bias.

  12. A Comparison of Surface Acoustic Wave Modeling Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. c.; Atkinson, G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, extremely low power and can be used to develop passive wireless sensors. For these reasons, NASA is investigating the use of SAW technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace structures. To facilitate rapid prototyping of passive SAW sensors for aerospace applications, SAW models have been developed. This paper reports on the comparison of three methods of modeling SAWs. The three models are the Impulse Response Method a first order model, and two second order matrix methods; the conventional matrix approach, and a modified matrix approach that is extended to include internal finger reflections. The second order models are based upon matrices that were originally developed for analyzing microwave circuits using transmission line theory. Results from the models are presented with measured data from devices.

  13. Effective Acoustic Modeling for Pronunciation Quality Scoring of Strongly Accented Mandarin Speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Fengpei; Liu, Changliang; Shao, Jian; Pan, Fuping; Dong, Bin; Yan, Yonghong

    In this paper we present our investigation into improving the performance of our computer-assisted language learning (CALL) system through exploiting the acoustic model and features within the speech recognition framework. First, to alleviate channel distortion, speaker-dependent cepstrum mean normalization (CMN) is adopted and the average correlation coefficient (average CC) between machine and expert scores is improved from 78.00% to 84.14%. Second, heteroscedastic linear discriminant analysis (HLDA) is adopted to enhance the discriminability of the acoustic model, which successfully increases the average CC from 84.14% to 84.62%. Additionally, HLDA causes the scoring accuracy to be more stable at various pronunciation proficiency levels, and thus leads to an increase in the speaker correct-rank rate from 85.59% to 90.99%. Finally, we use maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation to tune the acoustic model to fit strongly accented test speech. As a result, the average CC is improved from 84.62% to 86.57%. These three novel techniques improve the accuracy of evaluating pronunciation quality.

  14. Prospects and Techniques for Eddy-Resolving Acoustic Tomography in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruthers, J. W.; Nechaev, D.; Roman, D. A.; Sidorovskaia, N. A.; Ioup, G. E.; Ioup, J.; Yaremchuk, M.

    2007-05-01

    For several decades monitoring and modeling the dynamics and physical structure of the Gulf of Mexico have been major efforts undertaken by oceanographers of the United States and other American countries. There are very interesting physical oceanographic features in the Gulf, not the least of which are the Gulf Loop Current and the eddies it spawns. Satellite sensing of IR and altimeter imagery has been a major input to modeling those features. Such efforts are very important to the economy and well being of much of the United States and Mexico, including fisheries, mineral economies, hurricane strengths and paths in the summer, and severe snow storms in the eastern US in the winter. A major shortcoming of the present monitoring of the Gulf is the lack of subsurface input to the dynamic models of the Gulf. Acoustic tomography is a viable means of providing that missing input. Several universities have come together to investigate the prospects for establishing a Gulf Eddy Monitoring System (GEMS) for the deep eastern half of the Gulf using acoustic tomography. The group has conducted several acoustics experiments and propagation studies to determine the feasibility of long-range propagation in the eastern Gulf and the mitigation of adverse effects on marine mammal populations in that region under the Office of Naval Research project entitled the Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC). The group has also convened an invited session for the 9th World Multiconference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics (WMSCI 2005) Orlando, FL, July 2005. This paper discusses prospects for establishing the GEMS tomographic system, its technical characteristics, and its contributions to advancing the knowledge of the dynamics of the Gulf. This presentation will concentrate on the characteristics of a single-slice tomographic system, called GEMS Phase I, across the approaches to the DeSoto Canyon in the northeastern Gulf and its prospect for monitoring the movements of

  15. Comprehensive Fuel Spray Modeling and Impacts on Chamber Acoustics in Combustion Dynamics Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Acoustics in Combustion Dynamics Simulations 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Yoon, C...spray modeling and its effects on chamber acoustics in combustion dynamics simulations. The fuel spray is modeled using an Eulerian-Lagrangian...limitations in describing secondary atomization. In addition, effects of fuel spray modeling on chamber acoustics are studied using combustion dynamics

  16. Novel cable coupling technique for improved shallow distributed acoustic sensor VSPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munn, Jonathan D.; Coleman, Thomas I.; Parker, Beth L.; Mondanos, Michael J.; Chalari, Athena

    2017-03-01

    Vertical seismic profiles (VSPs) collected using fiber optic distributed acoustic sensors (DAS) are becoming increasingly common; yet, ensuring good cable coupling with the borehole wall remains a persistent challenge. Traditional cable deployment techniques used in the petroleum industry are either not possible or do not provide data of sufficient quality for shallow applications. Additionally, no direct field comparison of coupling techniques in the same borehole exists to determine the impacts of poor coupling on DAS VSP data quality. This paper addresses these issues by: (1) presenting a novel cable coupling solution using a removable and relatively inexpensive FLUTe™ flexible borehole liner; and (2) presenting field examples of DAS VSPs under different coupling conditions. The proposed coupling technique is analogous to a fully cemented deployment in that the cable is continuously coupled directly to the formation. Field experiments conducted to assess and validate the technique demonstrate a marked improvement in VSP data quality when the cable is coupled with a flexible borehole liner. Without the liner, seismic profiles are dominated by a high-amplitude cable wave and the p-wave arrival is not observed; however, with cable coupling provided by a borehole liner inflated using hydrostatic pressure, the cable wave is suppressed and clear p-wave arrivals are visible. Additional tests examining the influence of fiber optic cable structure on seismic responses demonstrate that tight buffered fibers are more sensitive to dynamic strain than loose tube fibers making them potentially better suited for certain DAS applications.

  17. Nondestructive evaluation of neutron irradiation embrittlement for reactor vessel steel by magnetomechanical acoustic emission technique

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Noriyoshi; Yamaguchi, Atsunori; Saito, Kiyoshi; Hirasawa, Taiji; Komura, Ichiroh; Chujou, Noriyuki

    1999-10-01

    A modified magnetomechanical acoustic emission (MAE) technique denoted Pulse MAE, in which the magnetizing current has a rectangular wave form, was developed as an NDE technique. Its applicability to the radiation damage for reactor pressure vessel steel was evaluated. The reactor pressure vessel steel A533B base metal and weld metal were irradiated to the two fluence levels: 5 {times} 10{sup 22} and 3 {times} 10{sup 23} n/m{sup 2} at 288 C. One side of the specimen was electropolished after irradiation. Pulse MAE signals were measured with a 350 kHz resonance frequency AE sensor at the moment when the magnetizing voltage is applied from zero to the set-up value abruptly. The AE signals were analyzed and the peak voltage Vp was determined for the measuring parameter. The peak voltage Vp showed the tendency to increase monotonically with increasing neutron fluence. The relationship between the Vp and mechanical properties such as yield stress, tensile strength and Charpy transition temperature were also obtained. The Pulse MAE technique proved to have the possibility to detect and evaluate the neutron irradiation embrittlement. The potential of the Pulse MAE as an effective NDE technique and applicability to the actual components are discussed.

  18. Nondestructive evaluation of fatigue damage on low alloy steel by magnetomechanical acoustic emission technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraasawa, T.; Saito, K.; Komura, I.

    1995-08-01

    A modified magnetomechanical acoustic emission (MAE) technique, denoted Pulse-MAE, in which the magnetization by current pulse was adopted, was newly developed and its applicability was assessed for the nondestructive detection and evaluation of fatigue damage in reactor pressure vessel steel SFVV2 and SA508 class2. MAE signals were measured with both conventional MAE and Pulse-MAE technique for fatigue damaged specimens having several damage fractions, and peak voltage ratio Vp/Vo, where Vp and Vo were the peak voltage for damaged and undamaged specimen respectively, was chosen as a measure. Vp/Vo was found to increase monotonously at the early stage of fatigue process and the rate of increase in Vp/Vo during the fatigue process was larger in Pulse-MAE than conventional MAE. Therefore, Pulse-MAE technique proved to have higher sensitivity for the detection of fatigue damage compared with the conventional MAE and to have the potential of a practical technique for nondestructive detection and evaluation of fatigue damage in actual components.

  19. Acoustic emission source location in complex structures using full automatic delta T mapping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jumaili, Safaa Kh.; Pearson, Matthew R.; Holford, Karen M.; Eaton, Mark J.; Pullin, Rhys

    2016-05-01

    An easy to use, fast to apply, cost-effective, and very accurate non-destructive testing (NDT) technique for damage localisation in complex structures is key for the uptake of structural health monitoring systems (SHM). Acoustic emission (AE) is a viable technique that can be used for SHM and one of the most attractive features is the ability to locate AE sources. The time of arrival (TOA) technique is traditionally used to locate AE sources, and relies on the assumption of constant wave speed within the material and uninterrupted propagation path between the source and the sensor. In complex structural geometries and complex materials such as composites, this assumption is no longer valid. Delta T mapping was developed in Cardiff in order to overcome these limitations; this technique uses artificial sources on an area of interest to create training maps. These are used to locate subsequent AE sources. However operator expertise is required to select the best data from the training maps and to choose the correct parameter to locate the sources, which can be a time consuming process. This paper presents a new and improved fully automatic delta T mapping technique where a clustering algorithm is used to automatically identify and select the highly correlated events at each grid point whilst the "Minimum Difference" approach is used to determine the source location. This removes the requirement for operator expertise, saving time and preventing human errors. A thorough assessment is conducted to evaluate the performance and the robustness of the new technique. In the initial test, the results showed excellent reduction in running time as well as improved accuracy of locating AE sources, as a result of the automatic selection of the training data. Furthermore, because the process is performed automatically, this is now a very simple and reliable technique due to the prevention of the potential source of error related to manual manipulation.

  20. Vibro-Acoustic Model of a Disk Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ming-Ran; Singh, Rajendra

    A new mathematical model of the vibro-acoustic characteristics of a computer hard-disk drive is presented in this paper. In particular, a mobility transfer function is defined that links sound radiated by a stationary or rotating disk to electromagnetic torque pulsations and structural dynamics. A simplified disk-drive system consisting of a brushless d.c. motor driving a single disk-spindle assembly, which is mounted on a flexible casing, is considered as the example case. Parametric studies illustrate the roles of bearing stiffness and disk geometry on the vibration and radiated sound.

  1. Accumulated damage process of thermal sprayed coating under rolling contact by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Piao, Zhong-yu

    2016-09-01

    The accumulated damage process of rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of plasma-sprayed coatings was investigated. The influences of surface roughness, loading condition, and stress cycle frequency on the accumulated damage status of the coatings were discussed. A ball-ondisc machine was employed to conduct RCF experiments. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced to monitor the RCF process of the coatings. AE signal characteristics were investigated to reveal the accumulated damage process. Result showed that the polished coating would resist the asperity contact and remit accumulated damage. The RCF lifetime would then extend. Heavy load would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce surface fracture. Wear became the main failure mode that reduced the RCF lifetime. Frequent stress cycle would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce interface fracture. Fatigue then became the main failure mode that also reduced the RCF lifetime.

  2. Jitter reduction technique for acoustic radiation force impulse microscopy via photoacoustic detection

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Bong Jin; Yoon, Changhan; Man Park, Jin; Hwang, Jae Youn; Shung, K. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a jitter noise reduction technique for acoustic radiation force impulse microscopy via photoacoustic detection (PA-ARFI), which promises to be capable of measuring cell mechanics. To reduce the jitter noise induced by Q-switched pulsed laser operated at high repetition frequency, photoacoustic signals from the surface of an ultrasound transducer are aligned by cross-correlation and peak-to-peak detection, respectively. Each method is then employed to measure the displacements of a target sample in an agar phantom and a breast cancer cell due to ARFI application, followed by the quantitative comparison between their performances. The suggested methods for PA-ARFI significantly reduce jitter noises, thus allowing us to measure displacements of a target cell due to ARFI application by less than 3 μm. PMID:26367579

  3. Comparison of sonochemiluminescence images using image analysis techniques and identification of acoustic pressure fields via simulation.

    PubMed

    Tiong, T Joyce; Chandesa, Tissa; Yap, Yeow Hong

    2017-05-01

    One common method to determine the existence of cavitational activity in power ultrasonics systems is by capturing images of sonoluminescence (SL) or sonochemiluminescence (SCL) in a dark environment. Conventionally, the light emitted from SL or SCL was detected based on the number of photons. Though this method is effective, it could not identify the sonochemical zones of an ultrasonic systems. SL/SCL images, on the other hand, enable identification of 'active' sonochemical zones. However, these images often provide just qualitative data as the harvesting of light intensity data from the images is tedious and require high resolution images. In this work, we propose a new image analysis technique using pseudo-colouring images to quantify the SCL zones based on the intensities of the SCL images and followed by comparison of the active SCL zones with COMSOL simulated acoustic pressure zones.

  4. Ultrasonic characterization of three animal mammary tumors from three-dimensional acoustic tissue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Jonathan M.

    This dissertation investigated how three-dimensional (3D) tissue models can be used to improve ultrasonic tissue characterization (UTC) techniques. Anatomic sites in tissue responsible for ultrasonic scattering are unknown, which limits the potential applications of ultrasound for tumor diagnosis. Accurate 3D models of tumor tissues may help identify the scattering sites. Three mammary tumors were investigated: a rat fibroadenoma, a mouse carcinoma, and a mouse sarcoma. A 3D acoustic tissue model, termed 3D impedance map (3DZM), was carefully constructed from consecutive histologic sections for each tumor. Spectral estimates (scatterer size and acoustic concentration) were obtained from the 3DZMs and compared to the same estimates obtained with ultrasound. Scatterer size estimates for three tumors were found to be similar (within 10%). The 3DZMs were also used to extract tissue-specific scattering models. The scattering models were found to allow clear distinction between the three tumors. This distinction demonstrated that UTC techniques may be helpful for noninvasive clinical tumor diagnosis.

  5. A Hybrid Acoustic and Pronunciation Model Adaptation Approach for Non-native Speech Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Yoo Rhee; Kim, Hong Kook

    In this paper, we propose a hybrid model adaptation approach in which pronunciation and acoustic models are adapted by incorporating the pronunciation and acoustic variabilities of non-native speech in order to improve the performance of non-native automatic speech recognition (ASR). Specifically, the proposed hybrid model adaptation can be performed at either the state-tying or triphone-modeling level, depending at which acoustic model adaptation is performed. In both methods, we first analyze the pronunciation variant rules of non-native speakers and then classify each rule as either a pronunciation variant or an acoustic variant. The state-tying level hybrid method then adapts pronunciation models and acoustic models by accommodating the pronunciation variants in the pronunciation dictionary and by clustering the states of triphone acoustic models using the acoustic variants, respectively. On the other hand, the triphone-modeling level hybrid method initially adapts pronunciation models in the same way as in the state-tying level hybrid method; however, for the acoustic model adaptation, the triphone acoustic models are then re-estimated based on the adapted pronunciation models and the states of the re-estimated triphone acoustic models are clustered using the acoustic variants. From the Korean-spoken English speech recognition experiments, it is shown that ASR systems employing the state-tying and triphone-modeling level adaptation methods can relatively reduce the average word error rates (WERs) by 17.1% and 22.1% for non-native speech, respectively, when compared to a baseline ASR system.

  6. Staggered-grid finite-difference acoustic modeling with the Time-Domain Atmospheric Acoustic Propagation Suite (TDAAPS).

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, David Franklin; Collier, Sandra L.; Marlin, David H.; Ostashev, Vladimir E.; Symons, Neill Phillip; Wilson, D. Keith

    2005-05-01

    This document is intended to serve as a users guide for the time-domain atmospheric acoustic propagation suite (TDAAPS) program developed as part of the Department of Defense High-Performance Modernization Office (HPCMP) Common High-Performance Computing Scalable Software Initiative (CHSSI). TDAAPS performs staggered-grid finite-difference modeling of the acoustic velocity-pressure system with the incorporation of spatially inhomogeneous winds. Wherever practical the control structure of the codes are written in C++ using an object oriented design. Sections of code where a large number of calculations are required are written in C or F77 in order to enable better compiler optimization of these sections. The TDAAPS program conforms to a UNIX style calling interface. Most of the actions of the codes are controlled by adding flags to the invoking command line. This document presents a large number of examples and provides new users with the necessary background to perform acoustic modeling with TDAAPS.

  7. The Development of Automated Detection Techniques for Passive Acoustic Monitoring as a Tool for Studying Beaked Whale Distribution and Habitat Preferences in the California Current Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yack, Tina M.

    California Bight (SCB). The preliminary measurement of the visually validated Baird's beaked whale echolocation signals recorded from the ship-based towed array were used as a basis for identifying Baird's signals in the seafloor-mounted autonomous recorder data. The passive acoustic detection algorithms for beaked whales developed using data from Chapters 2 and 3 were field tested during a three year period to test the reliability of acoustic beaked whale monitoring techniques and to use these methods to describe beaked whale habitat in the SCB. In 2009 and 2010, PAM methods using towed hydrophone arrays were tested. These methods proved highly effective for real-time detection of beaked whales in the SCB and were subsequently implemented in 2011 to successfully detect and track beaked whales during the ongoing Southern California Behavioral Response Study (SOCAL-BRS). The final step in this research was to utilize the passive acoustic detection techniques developed herin to predictively model beaked whale habitat use and preferences in the CCE. This chapter uses a multifaceted approach to model beaked whale encounter rates in the CCE. Beaked whale acoustic encounters are utilized to inform Generalized Additive Models (GAMs) of encounter rate for beaked whales in the CCE and compare these to visual based models. Acoustic and visual based models were independently developed for a small beaked whale group and Baird's beaked whales. Two models were evaluated for visual and acoustic encounters, one that also included Beaufort sea state as a predictor variable in addition to those listed and one that did not include Beaufort sea state. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  8. Acoustic Predictions of Manned and Unmanned Rotorcraft Using the Comprehensive Analytical Rotorcraft Model for Acoustics (CARMA) Code System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Burley, Casey L.; Conner, David A.

    2005-01-01

    The Comprehensive Analytical Rotorcraft Model for Acoustics (CARMA) is being developed under the Quiet Aircraft Technology Project within the NASA Vehicle Systems Program. The purpose of CARMA is to provide analysis tools for the design and evaluation of efficient low-noise rotorcraft, as well as support the development of safe, low-noise flight operations. The baseline prediction system of CARMA is presented and current capabilities are illustrated for a model rotor in a wind tunnel, a rotorcraft in flight and for a notional coaxial rotor configuration; however, a complete validation of the CARMA system capabilities with respect to a variety of measured databases is beyond the scope of this work. For the model rotor illustration, predicted rotor airloads and acoustics for a BO-105 model rotor are compared to test data from HART-II. For the flight illustration, acoustic data from an MD-520N helicopter flight test, which was conducted at Eglin Air Force Base in September 2003, are compared with CARMA full vehicle flight predictions. Predicted acoustic metrics at three microphone locations are compared for limited level flight and descent conditions. Initial acoustic predictions using CARMA for a notional coaxial rotor system are made. The effect of increasing the vertical separation between the rotors on the predicted airloads and acoustic results are shown for both aerodynamically non-interacting and aerodynamically interacting rotors. The sensitivity of including the aerodynamic interaction effects of each rotor on the other, especially when the rotors are in close proximity to one another is initially examined. The predicted coaxial rotor noise is compared to that of a conventional single rotor system of equal thrust, where both are of reasonable size for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

  9. Modeling the Behavior of an Underwater Acoustic Relative Positioning System Based on Complementary Set of Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Joaquín; Jiménez, Ana; Álvarez, Fernando J.; Ureña, Jesús; De Marziani, Carlos; Diego, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The great variability usually found in underwater media makes modeling a challenging task, but helpful for better understanding or predicting the performance of future deployed systems. In this work, an underwater acoustic propagation model is presented. This model obtains the multipath structure by means of the ray tracing technique. Using this model, the behavior of a relative positioning system is presented. One of the main advantages of relative positioning systems is that only the distances between all the buoys are needed to obtain their positions. In order to obtain the distances, the propagation times of acoustic signals coded by Complementary Set of Sequences (CSS) are used. In this case, the arrival instants are obtained by means of correlation processes. The distances are then used to obtain the position of the buoys by means of the Multidimensional Scaling Technique (MDS). As an early example of an application using this relative positioning system, a tracking of the position of the buoys at different times is performed. With this tracking, the surface current of a particular region could be studied. The performance of the system is evaluated in terms of the distance from the real position to the estimated one. PMID:22247661

  10. Modeling and Measuring Acoustic Backscatter from Fish Aggregations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    of the abundance, spatial distribution, schooling behaviour and acoustic backscatter of the Namibian pilchard. Cruise Report 99-4, Dr. Fridtjof ... Nansen . 103 pp. Rudstam, L, Horne, J., Fleischer, G. Report from the Great Lakes Acoustic Workshop III: Translation of acoustic data to fish abundance

  11. Acoustic Modeling for Aqua Ventus I off Monhegan Island, ME

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, Jonathan M.; Hanna, Luke A.; DeChello, Nicole L.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-10-31

    The DeepCwind consortium, led by the University of Maine, was awarded funding under the US Department of Energy’s Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Program to develop two floating offshore wind turbines in the Gulf of Maine equipped with Goldwind 6 MW direct drive turbines, as the Aqua Ventus I project. The Goldwind turbines have a hub height of 100 m. The turbines will be deployed in Maine State waters, approximately 2.9 miles off Monhegan Island; Monhegan Island is located roughly 10 miles off the coast of Maine. In order to site and permit the offshore turbines, the acoustic output must be evaluated to ensure that the sound will not disturb residents on Monhegan Island, nor input sufficient sound levels into the nearby ocean to disturb marine mammals. This initial assessment of the acoustic output focuses on the sound of the turbines in air by modeling the assumed sound source level, applying a sound propagation model, and taking into account the distance from shore.

  12. Estimation of spatiotemporal variation of acoustic velocity in ocean and its modeling for GPS/Acoustic seafloor positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, S.; Tadokoro, K.; Ikuta, R.; Watanabe, T.; Okuda, T.; Sayanagi, K.; Miyata, K.; Nagao, T.

    2009-12-01

    We have been developing an observation system with the GPS/Acoustic combination technique for monitoring of seafloor crustal deformation. We installed two sets of triangular array of acoustic transponders as geodetic reference sites on the Suruga trough, central Japan, where the Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath the Eurasian plate at a rate of 2 cm/yr. In our campaign observation, we measured ranges to acoustic transponders from an on-board acoustic transducer whose position was determined by kinematic GPS. Repeated our campaign observations can reveal directly seafloor crustal deformation in focal area of subduction zone. Present analysis method simultaneously estimates temporal variation of acoustic velocity and positions of acoustic transponders assuming the horizontally-layered structure of acoustic velocity. However, actual structure might have stable spatial variation due to oceanic current and internal wave. The stable spatial variation causes bias error on the positioning. For reduction of the bias error and shortening observation time, we should measure and/or estimate the spatial variation of acoustic velocity. In this presentation, for an investigation of horizontal scales of the spatial variation of acoustic velocity, we estimated spectrum of oceanic internal wave using by continuous measurements of temperature and pressure in ocean. In addition, we evaluate a new seafloor positioning method which simultaneously estimates spatiotemporal variation of acoustic velocity through numerical experiments. The continuous measurements in parallel with acoustic ranging were conducted by mooring temperature and pressure sensors attached rope with an interval of 50 m. The continuous measurements were made for five hours with a sampling interval of three seconds in each day in August and October 2008. For reduction of measurement noise, we carried out two-dimensional B-spline fitting of temperature and pressure with ABIC minimization. By the fitting, we

  13. Tone and Broadband Noise Separation from Acoustic Data of a Scale-Model Counter-Rotating Open Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, David; Stephens, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Renewed interest in contra-rotating open rotor technology for aircraft propulsion application has prompted the development of advanced diagnostic tools for better design and improved acoustical performance. In particular, the determination of tonal and broadband components of open rotor acoustic spectra is essential for properly assessing the noise control parameters and also for validating the open rotor noise simulation codes. The technique of phase averaging has been employed to separate the tone and broadband components from a single rotor, but this method does not work for the two-shaft contra-rotating open rotor. A new signal processing technique was recently developed to process the contra-rotating open rotor acoustic data. The technique was first tested using acoustic data taken of a hobby aircraft open rotor propeller, and reported previously. The intent of the present work is to verify and validate the applicability of the new technique to a realistic one-fifth scale open rotor model which has 12 forward and 10 aft contra-rotating blades operating at realistic forward flight Mach numbers and tip speeds. The results and discussions of that study are presented in this paper.

  14. Tone and Broadband Noise Separation from Acoustic Data of a Scale-Model Contra-Rotating Open Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, Dave; Stephens, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Renewed interest in contra-rotating open rotor technology for aircraft propulsion application has prompted the development of advanced diagnostic tools for better design and improved acoustical performance. In particular, the determination of tonal and broadband components of open rotor acoustic spectra is essential for properly assessing the noise control parameters and also for validating the open rotor noise simulation codes. The technique of phase averaging has been employed to separate the tone and broadband components from a single rotor, but this method does not work for the two-shaft contra-rotating open rotor. A new signal processing technique was recently developed to process the contra-rotating open rotor acoustic data. The technique was first tested using acoustic data taken of a hobby aircraft open rotor propeller, and reported previously. The intent of the present work is to verify and validate the applicability of the new technique to a realistic one-fifth scale open rotor model which has 12 forward and 10 aft contra-rotating blades operating at realistic forward flight Mach numbers and tip speeds. The results and discussions of that study are presented in this paper.

  15. Model-based acoustic characterization and classification of irregular-shaped targets: Application to fisheries and zooplankton acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Dezhang; Stanton, Timothy K.; Wiebe, Peter H.

    2002-11-01

    Acoustic scattering by fish and zooplankton is a complicated function of the geometrical and physical properties of the targets, as well as the environmental and sonar system parameters. The shape and anatomy of zooplankton vary significantly from taxa to taxa and their dominant scattering mechanisms can be completely different. As a result, the acoustic classification of such targets is extremely difficult and often nonunique. To reduce the ambiguity and nonuniqueness, a number of model-based methods are presented. These methods use the temporal, spatial, spectral, and statistical signatures of acoustical scattering signals and can be applied to a variety of acoustic systems, including narrow-band, broadband, and multifrequency systems. The methods also depend strongly on whether or not the targets are resolved. Individual targets with different shapes and material properties have their unique characteristics and can be classified acoustically in terms of their size, orientation, scattering mechanisms, as well as their material properties. Results of applying these methods to the laboratory and field data will be presented and analyzed. [Work supported by ONR, NSF, and the Comer Science and Education Foundation.

  16. Electromagnetic Launch Vehicle Fairing and Acoustic Blanket Model of Received Power Using FEKO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trout, Dawn H.; Stanley, James E.; Wahid, Parveen F.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the impact of radio frequency transmission in vehicle fairings is important to electromagnetically sensitive spacecraft. This study employs the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM) from a commercial electromagnetic tool, FEKO, to model the fairing electromagnetic environment in the presence of an internal transmitter with improved accuracy over industry applied techniques. This fairing model includes material properties representative of acoustic blanketing commonly used in vehicles. Equivalent surface material models within FEKO were successfully applied to simulate the test case. Finally, a simplified model is presented using Nicholson Ross Weir derived blanket material properties. These properties are implemented with the coated metal option to reduce the model to one layer within the accuracy of the original three layer simulation.

  17. Diagnostics of glass fiber reinforced polymers and comparative analysis of their fabrication techniques with the use of acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkov, O. V.; Bryansky, A. A.; Panin, S. V.; Zaikov, V. I.

    2016-11-01

    Strength properties of the glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP) fabricated by vacuum and vacuum autoclave molding techniques were analyzed. Measurements of porosity of the GFRP parts manufactured by various molding techniques were conducted with the help of optical microscopy. On the basis of experimental data obtained by means of acoustic emission hardware/software setup, the technique for running diagnostics and forecasting the bearing capacity of polymeric composite materials based on the result of three-point bending tests has been developed. The operation principle of the technique is underlined by the evaluation of the power function index change which takes place on the dependence of the total acoustic emission counts versus the loading stress.

  18. Nondestructive Evaluation of Adhesively Bonded Joints by Acousto-Ultrasonic Technique and Acoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid; Rossettos, J. N.

    1997-01-01

    Reliable applications of adhesively bonded joints require an effective nondestructive evaluation technique for their bond strength prediction. To properly evaluate factors affecting bond strength, effects of defects such as voids and disbonds on stress distribution in the overlap region must be understood. At the same time, in order to use acousto-ultrasonic (AU) technique to evaluate bond quality, the effect of these defects on dynamic response of single lap joints must be clear. The stress distribution in a single lap joint with and without defects (void or disbond) is analyzed. A bar-Theta parameter which contains adherend and adhesive thickness and properties is introduced. It is shown for bonded joints with bar-Theta greater than 10, that a symmetric void or disbond in the middle of overlap up to the 70 percent of overlap length has negligible effect on bond strength. In contrast frequency response analyses by a finite element technique showed that the dynamic response is affected significantly by the presence of voids or disbonds. These results have direct implication in the interpretations of AU results. Through transmission attenuation and a number of AU parameters for various specimens with and without defects are evaluated. It is found that although void and disbond have similar effects on bond strength (stress distribution), they have completely different effects on wave propagation characteristics. For steel-adhesive-steel specimens with voids, the attenuation changes are related to the bond strength. However, the attenuation changes for specimens with disbond are fairly constant over a disbond range. In order to incorporate the location of defects in AU parameters, a weighting function is introduced. Using an immersion system with focused transducers, a number of AU parameters are evaluated. It is found that by incorporating weighting functions in these parameters better sensitivities (AU parameters vs. bond strength) are achieved. Acoustic emission

  19. Design and fabrication of an augmentor wing model for acoustic tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J.; Schedin, R. W.; Campbell, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a full-scale section of an augmentor wing to be used for acoustic testing at the Lewis Research Center are discussed. This hardware will be used primarily to investigate scaling effects of acoustic data obtained during the Boeing-run model tests. Typical model test data is shown in the report, together with predictions on both performance and acoustics that can be expected from the full-scale section to be built. Areas covered include: the aerodynamic and acoustic criteria of the flap system and nozzles, detailed discussion of the hardware, test system operation procedure, and stress analysis of the entire test system.

  20. Use of acoustic velocity methodology and remote sensing techniques to measure unsteady flow on the lower Yazoo River in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, D. Phil; Cooper, Lance M.; Davis, Angela A.

    1998-01-01

    Methodologies have been developed for computing continuous discharge during varied, non-uniform low and medium flows on the Yazoo River at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgage below Steele Bayou near Long Lake, Mississippi, using acoustic signal processing and conventional streamgaging techniques. Procedures were also developed to compute locations of discharges during future high flow events when the stream reach is subject to hi-directional and reverse flow caused by rising stages on the Mississippi River using a combination of acoustic equipment and remote sensing technology. A description of the study area is presented. Selected results of these methods are presented for the period from March through September 1997.

  1. Acoustic response of cemented granular sedimentary rocks: molecular dynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    García, Xavier; Medina, Ernesto

    2007-06-01

    The effect of cementation processes on the acoustical properties of sands is studied via molecular dynamics simulation methods. We propose numerical methods where the initial uncemented sand is built by simulating the settling process of sediments. Uncemented samples of different porosity are considered by emulating natural mechanical compaction of sediments due to overburden. Cementation is considered through a particle-based model that captures the underlying physics behind the process. In our simulations, we consider samples with different degrees of compaction and cementing materials with distinct elastic properties. The microstructure of cemented sands is taken into account while adding cement at specific locations within the pores, such as grain-to-grain contacts. Results show that the acoustical properties of cemented sands are strongly dependent on the amount of cement, its stiffness relative to the hosting medium, and its location within the pores. Simulation results are in good correspondence with available experimental data and compare favorably with some theoretical predictions for the sound velocity within a range of cement saturation, porosity, and confining pressure.

  2. A Comparative of business process modelling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangkawarow, I. R. H. T.; Waworuntu, J.

    2016-04-01

    In this era, there is a lot of business process modeling techniques. This article is the research about differences of business process modeling techniques. For each technique will explain about the definition and the structure. This paper presents a comparative analysis of some popular business process modelling techniques. The comparative framework is based on 2 criteria: notation and how it works when implemented in Somerleyton Animal Park. Each technique will end with the advantages and disadvantages. The final conclusion will give recommend of business process modeling techniques that easy to use and serve the basis for evaluating further modelling techniques.

  3. Doppler acoustic sounding: observational inputs to pollutant-dispersion models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    MacCready, P.; Worden, J.

    1982-01-01

    To accurately model the dilution of pollutants, as in the form of plumes from large power plants, actual observations of atmospheric characteristics aloft are needed. The goal of this program was to find out whether a portable, multi-beam, monostatic Doppler acoustic system (DAS) can provide the measurements of conditions aloft that are required as inputs to dispersion models suitable for routine applications. Evaluation of what the Doppler system can measure and the related accuracy of that measurement was based on a comparison of its observations with those from a nearby instrumented 300-m tower in Colorado (supplemented by instrumented airplane ascents above tower height), and also based on considerations of continuity in vertical profiles of Doppler system outputs. Input data requirements for dispersion models were then assessed. It is apparent that the Doppler system can provide all the approximate mean flow and turbulence factors used by the models, usually to altitudes beyond 600 m. There is also a need in the models for an input which is related to temperature stability, both for plume rise calculations, and for predicting vertical diffusion versus observed vertical turbulence. It is expected that a stability factor can be derived objectively from the Doppler acoustic signals; various candidate methods are discussed, but complete development of the technique is in the future.

  4. Yield modeling of acoustic charge transport transversal filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenney, J. S.; May, G. S.; Hunt, W. D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a yield model for acoustic charge transport transversal filters. This model differs from previous IC yield models in that it does not assume that individual failures of the nondestructive sensing taps necessarily cause a device failure. A redundancy in the number of taps included in the design is explained. Poisson statistics are used to describe the tap failures, weighted over a uniform defect density distribution. A representative design example is presented. The minimum number of taps needed to realize the filter is calculated, and tap weights for various numbers of redundant taps are calculated. The critical area for device failure is calculated for each level of redundancy. Yield is predicted for a range of defect densities and redundancies. To verify the model, a Monte Carlo simulation is performed on an equivalent circuit model of the device. The results of the yield model are then compared to the Monte Carlo simulation. Better than 95% agreement was obtained for the Poisson model with redundant taps ranging from 30% to 150% over the minimum.

  5. Deep diving odontocetes foraging strategies and their prey field as determined by acoustic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorli, Giacomo

    Deep diving odontocetes, like sperm whales, beaked whales, Risso's dolphins, and pilot whales are known to forage at deep depths in the ocean on squid and fish. These marine mammal species are top predators and for this reason are very important for the ecosystems they live in, since they can affect prey populations and control food web dynamics through top-down effects. The studies presented in this thesis investigate deep diving odontocetes. foraging strategies, and the density and size of their potential prey in the deep ocean using passive and active acoustic techniques. Ecological Acoustic Recorders (EAR) were used to monitor the foraging activity of deep diving odontocetes at three locations around the world: the Josephine Seamount High Sea Marine Protected Area (JHSMPA), the Ligurian Sea, and along the Kona coast of the island of Hawaii. In the JHSMPA, sperm whales. and beaked whales. foraging rates do not differ between night-time and day-time. However, in the Ligurian Sea, sperm whales switch to night-time foraging as the winter approaches, while beaked whales alternate between hunting mainly at night, and both at night and at day. Spatial differences were found in deep diving odontocetes. foraging activity in Hawaii where they forage most in areas with higher chlorophyll concentrations. Pilot whales (and false killer whales, clustered together in the category "blackfishes") and Risso's dolphins forage mainly at night at all locations. These two species adjust their foraging activity with the length of the night. The density and size of animals living in deep sea scattering layers was studied using a DIDSON imaging sonar at multiple stations along the Kona coast of Hawaii. The density of animals was affected by location, depth, month, and the time of day. The size of animals was influenced by station and month. The DIDSON proved to be a successful, non-invasive technique to study density and size of animals in the deep sea. Densities were found to be an

  6. Effects and modeling of phonetic and acoustic confusions in accented speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Pascale; Liu, Yi

    2005-11-01

    Accented speech recognition is more challenging than standard speech recognition due to the effects of phonetic and acoustic confusions. Phonetic confusion in accented speech occurs when an expected phone is pronounced as a different one, which leads to erroneous recognition. Acoustic confusion occurs when the pronounced phone is found to lie acoustically between two baseform models and can be equally recognized as either one. We propose that it is necessary to analyze and model these confusions separately in order to improve accented speech recognition without degrading standard speech recognition. Since low phonetic confusion units in accented speech do not give rise to automatic speech recognition errors, we focus on analyzing and reducing phonetic and acoustic confusability under high phonetic confusion conditions. We propose using likelihood ratio test to measure phonetic confusion, and asymmetric acoustic distance to measure acoustic confusion. Only accent-specific phonetic units with low acoustic confusion are used in an augmented pronunciation dictionary, while phonetic units with high acoustic confusion are reconstructed using decision tree merging. Experimental results show that our approach is effective and superior to methods modeling phonetic confusion or acoustic confusion alone in accented speech, with a significant 5.7% absolute WER reduction, without degrading standard speech recognition.

  7. Extending acoustic data measured with small-scale supersonic model jets to practical aircraft exhaust jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ching-Wen

    2010-06-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable geometry nozzles to provide optimum thrust in different operating conditions within the flight envelope. However, the acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometry of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at The Pennsylvania State University and the NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with GE Aviation, is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles. An equally important objective is to develop a scaling methodology for using data obtained from small- and moderate-scale experiments which exhibits the independence of the jet sizes to the measured noise levels. The experimental results presented in this thesis have shown reasonable agreement between small-scale and moderate-scale jet acoustic data, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones. As the scaling methodology is validated, it will be extended to using acoustic data measured with small-scale supersonic model jets to the prediction of the most important components of full-scale engine noise. When comparing the measured acoustic spectra with a microphone array set at different radial locations, the characteristics of the jet noise source distribution may induce subtle inaccuracies, depending on the conditions of jet operation. A close look is taken at the details of the noise generation region in order to better understand the mismatch between spectra measured at various acoustic field radial locations. A processing methodology was developed to correct the effect of the noise source distribution and efficiently compare near-field and far-field spectra with unprecedented accuracy. This technique then demonstrates that the measured noise levels in the physically restricted space of an anechoic chamber can be appropriately

  8. A model for acoustic vaporization of encapsulated droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulouvrat, François; Guédra, Matthieu

    2015-10-01

    This work deals with the theoretical modelling of the acoustic vaporization of a droplet encapsulated with a thin viscoelastic shell. A generalized Rayleigh-Plesset equation describing the radial motion of the particle is derived, which accounts for the evaporation rate at liquid/vapor interface, the surface tension between droplet and outer liquid, and the viscoelasticity of the shell. This equation is coupled to heat equations in the liquid media which rule the temperature field around the bubble and thus the mass flux through the surface. Numerical simulations reveal behaviors of the vapor nucleus which can be substantially different from the case of a vapor bubble in an infinite medium. The results show that the ADV threshold depends on frequency in agreement with experimental observations in literature. The rigidity of the shell also affects the ADV threshold and the dynamics of the vapor expansion.

  9. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Overpressure Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, M. J.; Alvord, D. A.; McDaniels, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    A summary of the overpressure environment from the 5% Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) and the implications to the full-scale Ares I are presented in this Technical Memorandum. These include the scaled environment that would be used for assessing the full-scale Ares I configuration, observations, and team recommendations. The ignition transient is first characterized and described, the overpressure suppression system configuration is then examined, and the final environment characteristics are detailed. The recommendation for Ares I is to keep the space shuttle heritage ignition overpressure (IOP) suppression system (below-deck IOP water in the launch mount and mobile launcher and also the crest water on the main flame deflector) and the water bags.

  10. Equivalent beam modeling using numerical reduction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, J. M.; Shaw, F. H.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical procedures that can accomplish model reductions for space trusses were developed. Three techniques are presented that can be implemented using current capabilities within NASTRAN. The proposed techniques accomplish their model reductions numerically through use of NASTRAN structural analyses and as such are termed numerical in contrast to the previously developed analytical techniques. Numerical procedures are developed that permit reductions of large truss models containing full modeling detail of the truss and its joints. Three techniques are presented that accomplish these model reductions with various levels of structural accuracy. These numerical techniques are designated as equivalent beam, truss element reduction, and post-assembly reduction methods. These techniques are discussed in detail.

  11. Analytical models for use in fan inflow control structure design. Inflow distortion and acoustic transmission models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedge, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical models were developed to study the effect of flow contraction and screening on inflow distortions to identify qualitative design criteria. Results of the study are that: (1) static testing distortions are due to atmospheric turbulence, nacelle boundary layer, exhaust flow reingestion, flow over stand, ground plane, and engine casing; (2) flow contraction suppresses, initially, turbulent axial velocity distortions and magnifies turbulent transverse velocity distortions; (3) perforated plate and gauze screens suppress axial components of velocity distortions to a degree determined by the screen pressure loss coefficient; (4) honeycomb screen suppress transverse components of velocity distortions to a degree determined by the length to diameter ratio of the honeycomb; (5) acoustic transmission loss of perforated plate is controlled by the reactance of its acoustic impedance; (6) acoustic transmission loss of honeycomb screens is negligible; and (7) a model for the direction change due to a corner between honeycomb panels compares favorably with measured data.

  12. Acoustic Response of Underwater Munitions near a Sediment Interface: Measurement Model Comparisons and Classification Schemes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-23

    FINAL REPORT Acoustic Response of Underwater Munitions near a Sediment Interface: Measurement Model Comparisons and Classification Schemes SERDP...6 Figure 2. Effect of fish on acoustic color templates during GULFEX12 …………… 8 Figure 3. Selection of targets deployed during TREX13 and BAYEX14...deployed during TREX13 and BAYEX14 …… 29 Figure 16. Ray diagrams for the acoustic ray model …………………………… 29 Figure 17. Model-model and data-model

  13. Multiobjective muffler shape optimization with hybrid acoustics modeling.

    PubMed

    Airaksinen, Tuomas; Heikkola, Erkki

    2011-09-01

    This paper considers the combined use of a hybrid numerical method for the modeling of acoustic mufflers and a genetic algorithm for multiobjective optimization. The hybrid numerical method provides accurate modeling of sound propagation in uniform waveguides with non-uniform obstructions. It is based on coupling a wave based modal solution in the uniform sections of the waveguide to a finite element solution in the non-uniform component. Finite element method provides flexible modeling of complicated geometries, varying material parameters, and boundary conditions, while the wave based solution leads to accurate treatment of non-reflecting boundaries and straightforward computation of the transmission loss (TL) of the muffler. The goal of optimization is to maximize TL at multiple frequency ranges simultaneously by adjusting chosen shape parameters of the muffler. This task is formulated as a multiobjective optimization problem with the objectives depending on the solution of the simulation model. NSGA-II genetic algorithm is used for solving the multiobjective optimization problem. Genetic algorithms can be easily combined with different simulation methods, and they are not sensitive to the smoothness properties of the objective functions. Numerical experiments demonstrate the accuracy and feasibility of the model-based optimization method in muffler design.

  14. A numerically efficient damping model for acoustic resonances in microfluidic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, P. Dual, J.

    2015-06-15

    Bulk acoustic wave devices are typically operated in a resonant state to achieve enhanced acoustic amplitudes and high acoustofluidic forces for the manipulation of microparticles. Among other loss mechanisms related to the structural parts of acoustofluidic devices, damping in the fluidic cavity is a crucial factor that limits the attainable acoustic amplitudes. In the analytical part of this study, we quantify all relevant loss mechanisms related to the fluid inside acoustofluidic micro-devices. Subsequently, a numerical analysis of the time-harmonic visco-acoustic and thermo-visco-acoustic equations is carried out to verify the analytical results for 2D and 3D examples. The damping results are fitted into the framework of classical linear acoustics to set up a numerically efficient device model. For this purpose, all damping effects are combined into an acoustofluidic loss factor. Since some components of the acoustofluidic loss factor depend on the acoustic mode shape in the fluid cavity, we propose a two-step simulation procedure. In the first step, the loss factors are deduced from the simulated mode shape. Subsequently, a second simulation is invoked, taking all losses into account. Owing to its computational efficiency, the presented numerical device model is of great relevance for the simulation of acoustofluidic particle manipulation by means of acoustic radiation forces or acoustic streaming. For the first time, accurate 3D simulations of realistic micro-devices for the quantitative prediction of pressure amplitudes and the related acoustofluidic forces become feasible.

  15. Calibration techniques and sampling resolution requirements for groundtruthing multibeam acoustic backscatter (EM3000) and QTC VIEW™ classification technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, T. F.; Galloway, J.; Loschiavo, R.; Levings, C. D.; Hare, R.

    2007-12-01

    Both acoustic and sediment surveys were carried out in the Broughton Archipelago, British Columbia, in order to map a former aquaculture site and calibrate acoustic surveys with georeferenced sediment properties. The acoustic surveys included EM3000 Multibeam (including backscatter) and QTC VIEW™ (Series IV) technologies, while the geotechnical survey entailed Van Veen grab sampling of surface sediments and associated analyses. The two acoustic technologies were consistent in their ability to identify distinct regions of seafloor characterized by rock outcrops, consolidated substrates, or gel-mud depositional fields. Both multibeam backscatter data and QTC VIEW™ number-coded classifications were extracted across a range of circular areas located at each georeferenced sampling station (radii: 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 12, 16, 20 m). Statistical correlations were observed between backscatter and certain geotechnical properties, such as sediment porosity, sediment grain size fractions (<2 μm, silt content), and particulate sulfur concentration. The areal resolution of backscatter extraction was explored in terms of determining a sensitive calibration technique between backscatter and sediment properties. In general the highest r2 values between backscatter and sediment variables were observed across extraction radii between 8 and 20 m. Such groundtruthing techniques could be used to interpolate seafloor characteristics between sampling stations and provide a steering tool for sampling designs associated with benthic monitoring programs.

  16. A novel acoustic method for gas flow measurement using correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuuttila, Matti Tapani

    The study demonstrates a new kind of acoustic method for gas flow measurement. The method uses upstream and downstream propagating low frequency plane wave and correlation techniques for volume flow rate determination. The theory of propagating low frequency plane waves in the pipe is introduced and is proved empirically to be applicable for flow measurement. The flow profile dependence of the method is verified and found to be negligible at least in the region of moderate perturbations. The physical principles of the method were applied in practice in the form of a flowmeter with new design concepts. The developed prototype meters were verified against the reference standard of NMI (Nederlands Meetinstituut), which showed that a wide dynamic range of 1:80 is achievable with total expanded uncertainty below 0.3%. Also the requirements used for turbine meters of linearity, weighted mean error and stability were shown to be well fulfilled. A brief comparison with other flowmeter types shows the new flowmeter to be competitive. The advantages it offers are a small pressure drop over the meter, no blockage of flow in possible malfunction, no pulsation to flow, essentially no moving parts, and the possibility for bidirectional measurements. The introduced flowmeter is also capable of using the introduced flowmeter is also capable of using the telephone network or a radio-modem to read the consumption of gas and report its operation to the user.

  17. A study of aluminum-lithium alloy solidification using acoustic emission techniques. Ph.D. Thesis, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henkel, Daniel P.

    1992-01-01

    Physical phenomena associated with the solidification of an aluminum lithium alloy was characterized using acoustic emission (AE) techniques. It is shown that repeatable patterns of AE activity may be correlated to microstructural changes that occur during solidification. The influence of the experimental system on generated signals was examined in the time and frequency domains. The analysis was used to show how an AE signal from solidifying aluminum is changed by each component in the detection system to produce a complex waveform. Conventional AE analysis has shown that a period of high AE activity occurs in pure aluminum, an Al-Cu alloy, and the Al-Li alloy, as the last fraction of solid forms. A model attributes this to the internal stresses of grain boundary formation. An additional period of activity occurs as the last fraction of solid forms, but only in the two alloys. A model attributes this to the formation of interdendritic porosity which was not present in the pure aluminum. The AE waveforms were dominated by resonant effects of the waveguide and the transducer.

  18. Acoustic Performance of Drive Rig Mufflers for Model Scale Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David, B.

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft engine component testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) includes acoustic testing of scale model fans and propellers in the 9- by15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). This testing utilizes air driven turbines to deliver power to the article being studied. These air turbines exhaust directly downstream of the model in the wind tunnel test section and have been found to produce significant unwanted noise that reduces the quality of the acoustic measurements of the engine model being tested. This report describes an acoustic test of a muffler designed to mitigate the extraneous turbine noise. The muffler was found to provide acoustic attenuation of at least 8 dB between 700 Hz and 20 kHz which significantly improves the quality of acoustic measurements in the facility.

  19. Modelling of ion-acoustic shocks with reflected ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanusch, Adrian; Liseykina, Tatyana

    2016-10-01

    In the studies of electrostatic shocks a distinction is made between electrons, that freely pass the shock structure and those that get trapped into the shock potential. If the width of the trapping region in velocity space is bigger than the change of the electron velocity by collisions over the evolution time of the trapping potential, the captured electrons are better described by the adiabatic trapping model. In the opposite case electrons remain Maxwellian. Which model is suitable in the real situation depends on how the shock is generated: adiabatic trapping is used for the shock generated in the piston tube, while Boltzmannian - in the shock tube. Recently the self-regulated ion reflection and acceleration in ion-acoustic shocks for both electron models was studied analytically. Here we present the numerical study of electrostatic shocks generated by reflection of a high-speed plasma off a conducting wall and by the decay of plasma density discontinuity. Different assumptions for the electron distribution are compared to the fully kinetic simulations. Special attention is given to the shock reflected ions. The finite ion temperature effect on the shock electrostatic structure and ion reflection efficiency is analyzed. The work was supported by DFG Grant Number 278305671 ``Plasma hybrid modelling of supernova remnants shock precursors''.

  20. Sediment Acoustics: Wideband Model, Reflection Loss and Ambient Noise Inversion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    grain contact in water- saturated sand," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., vol. 124, pp. EL296-301, (2008). N. P. Chotiros, and M. J. Isakson. "Shear and...34Frame bulk modulus of porous granular marine sediments," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120, 699-710, (2006). B. J. Kraft and C. P. de Moustier, "Detailed

  1. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald K.; Liever, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT), conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  2. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald; Liever, Peter; Nielsen, Tanner

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test, conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center. The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  3. A violin shell model: vibrational modes and acoustics.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin E

    2015-03-01

    A generic physical model for the vibro-acoustic modes of the violin is described treating the body shell as a shallow, thin-walled, guitar-shaped, box structure with doubly arched top and back plates. comsol finite element, shell structure, software is used to identify and understand the vibrational modes of a simply modeled violin. This identifies the relationship between the freely supported plate modes when coupled together by the ribs and the modes of the assembled body shell. Such coupling results in a relatively small number of eigenmodes or component shell modes, of which a single volume-changing breathing mode is shown to be responsible for almost all the sound radiated in the monopole signature mode regime below ∼1 kHz for the violin, whether directly or by excitation of the Helmholtz f-hole resonance. The computations describe the influence on such modes of material properties, arching, plate thickness, elastic anisotropy, f-holes cut into the top plate, the bass-bar, coupling to internal air modes, the rigid neck-fingerboard assembly, and, most importantly, the soundpost. Because the shell modes are largely determined by the symmetry of the guitar-shaped body, the model is applicable to all instruments of the violin family.

  4. Exploring the Components of Dynamic Modeling Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnitsa, Charles Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Upon defining the terms modeling and simulation, it becomes apparent that there is a wide variety of different models, using different techniques, appropriate for different levels of representation for any one system to be modeled. Selecting an appropriate conceptual modeling technique from those available is an open question for the practitioner.…

  5. Surface acoustic wave technique for the characterization of porous properties of microporous silicate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, Susan Leslie

    1997-12-01

    Features of gas adsorption onto sol-gel derived microporous silicate thin films, for characterization of porous properties, are detailed using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) technique. Mass uptake and film effective modulus changes calculated from the SAW data are investigated in detail. The effects of stress and surface tension on the SAW sensor are calculated and found to be negligible in these experiments. Transient behavior recorded during nitrogen adsorption at 77 K is discussed in the context of mass uptake and effective modulus contributions. The time constant associated with the effective modulus calculation is consistent with that of diffusivity of nitrogen into a 5A zeolite. Further calculations indicate that the transient behavior is not due to thermal effects. A unique dual sensor SAW experiment to decouple the mass and effective modulus contributions to the frequency response was performed in conjunction with a Silicon beam-bending experiment. The beam-bending experiment results in a calculation of stress induced during adsorption of methanol on a microporous silicate thin film. The decoupled mass and effective modulus calculated from the SAW data have similar shaped isotherms, and are quite different from that of the stress developed in the Silicon beam. The total effective modulus change calculated from the SAW data is consistent with that calculated using Gassmann's equation. The SAW system developed for this work included unique electronics and customized hardware which is suitable for work under vacuum and at temperatures from 77K to 473K. This unique setup is suitable for running thin film samples on a Micromeritics ASAP 2000 Gas Adsorption unit in automatic mode. This setup is also general enough to be compatible with a custom gas adsorption unit and the beam bending apparatus, both using standard vacuum assemblies.

  6. A Spinal Cord Window Chamber Model for In Vivo Longitudinal Multimodal Optical and Acoustic Imaging in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Azusa; Conroy, Leigh; McMullen, Jesse D.; Silver, Jason I.; Stapleton, Shawn; Vitkin, Alex; Lindsay, Patricia; Burrell, Kelly; Zadeh, Gelareh; Fehlings, Michael G.; DaCosta, Ralph S.

    2013-01-01

    In vivo and direct imaging of the murine spinal cord and its vasculature using multimodal (optical and acoustic) imaging techniques could significantly advance preclinical studies of the spinal cord. Such intrinsically high resolution and complementary imaging technologies could provide a powerful means of quantitatively monitoring changes in anatomy, structure, physiology and function of the living cord over time after traumatic injury, onset of disease, or therapeutic intervention. However, longitudinal in vivo imaging of the intact spinal cord in rodent models has been challenging, requiring repeated surgeries to expose the cord for imaging or sacrifice of animals at various time points for ex vivo tissue analysis. To address these limitations, we have developed an implantable spinal cord window chamber (SCWC) device and procedures in mice for repeated multimodal intravital microscopic imaging of the cord and its vasculature in situ. We present methodology for using our SCWC to achieve spatially co-registered optical-acoustic imaging performed serially for up to four weeks, without damaging the cord or induction of locomotor deficits in implanted animals. To demonstrate the feasibility, we used the SCWC model to study the response of the normal spinal cord vasculature to ionizing radiation over time using white light and fluorescence microscopy combined with optical coherence tomography (OCT) in vivo. In vivo power Doppler ultrasound and photoacoustics were used to directly visualize the cord and vascular structures and to measure hemoglobin oxygen saturation through the complete spinal cord, respectively. The model was also used for intravital imaging of spinal micrometastases resulting from primary brain tumor using fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging. Our SCWC model overcomes previous in vivo imaging challenges, and our data provide evidence of the broader utility of hybridized optical-acoustic imaging methods for obtaining multiparametric and rich

  7. Comparison of acoustic and conventional flow measurement techniques at the Raccoon Mountain Pumped-Storage Plant: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    March, P.A.; Missimer, J.R.; Voss, A.; Pearson, H.S.

    1987-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiated a research project to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of using the acoustic method of flow measurement in hydroelectric power plant efficiency tests. As a portion of this program, the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Raccoon Mountain Pumped-Storage Plant was chosen as one of the sites to be tested. The primary objective of the TVA test was to compare the measurements of the Ocean Research Engineering (ORE), acoustic flowmeter installed on Unit 1 to the Volumetric and Winter-Kennedy Techniques for flow measurement. The Winter-Kennedy Technique is the standard flow measurement technique used in the plant. The Volumetric Technique consisted of accurate measurement of the upper reservoir volume over specified time increments. For calibration, the upper reservoir was initially drained and as it was being filled, aerial photographs were taken to obtain contour lines which were correlated with simultaneous stage measurements. The photographs were used to compute the differential volume of the reservoir associated with a change in stage. Six performance tests were conducted on Unit 1. During the tests no other units were operated. Five tests were conducted in the generating mode and one test was conducted in the pumping mode. The uncertainty in the measurements using the Volumetric Technique is of the order of 0.5 percent for changes of stage elevation in excess of two feet. The flowrate measured by the ORE acoustic flowmeter was consistently of the order of 1.5 percent lower than the flowrate determined from the Volumetric Technique in both the generating and pumping modes. 3 refs., 32 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. Acoustic puncture assist device™ versus conventional loss of resistance technique for thoracic paravertebral space identification: Clinical and ultrasound evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Monaz Abdulrahman; Abdellatif, Ashraf Abualhasan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acoustic puncture assist device (APAD™) is a pressure measurement combined with a related acoustic signal that has been successfully used to facilitate epidural punctures. The principal of loss of resistance (LOR) is similar when performing paravertebral block (PVB). We investigated the usefulness of APAD™ by comparing it with the conventional LOR techniques for identifying paravertebral space (PVS). Subjects and Methods: A total of 100 women who were scheduled for elective breast surgery under general anesthesia with PVB were randomized into two equal groups. The first group (APAD group) was scheduled for PVB using APAD™. The second group (C group) was scheduled for PVB using conventional LOR technique. We recorded the success rate assessed by clinical and ultrasound findings, the time required to identify the PVS, the depth of the PVS and the number of attempts. The attending anesthesiologist was also questioned about the usefulness of the acoustic signal for detection of the PVS. Results: The incidence of successful PVB was (49) in APAD group compared to (42) in C group P < 0.05. The time required to do PVB was significantly shorter in APAD group than in C group (3.5 ± 1.35 vs. 4.1 ± 1.42) minutes. Two patients in APAD group needed two or more attempts compared to four patients in C group. The attending anesthesiologist found the acoustic signal valuable in all patients in APAD group. Conclusion: Using APAD™ compared to the conventional LOR technique showed a lower failure rate and a shorter time to identify the PVS. PMID:28217050

  9. Acoustic reconstruction of the velocity field in a furnace using a characteristic flow model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanqin; Zhou, Huaichun; Chen, Shiying; Zhang, Yindi; Wei, Xinli; Zhao, Jinhui

    2012-06-01

    An acoustic method can provide a noninvasive, efficient and full-field reconstruction of aerodynamic fields in a furnace. A simple yet reasonable model is devised for reconstruction of a velocity field in a cross section of a tangential furnace from acoustic measurements based on typical physical characteristics of the field. The solenoidal component of the velocity field is modeled by a curved surface, derived by rotating a curve of Gaussian distribution, determined by six characteristic parameters, while the nonrotational component is governed by a priori knowledge. Thus the inverse problem is translated into determination of the characteristic parameters using a set of acoustic projection data. First numerical experiments were undertaken to simulate the acoustic measurement, so as to preliminarily validate the effectiveness of the model. Based on this, physical experiments under different operating conditions were performed in a pilot-scale setup to provide a further test. Hot-wire anemometry and strip floating were applied to compare with acoustic measurements. The acoustic measurements provided satisfactory consistency with both of these approaches. Nevertheless, for a field with a relatively large magnitude of air velocities, the acoustic measurement can give more reliable reconstructions. Extension of the model to measurements of hot tangential furnaces is also discussed.

  10. Acoustic model of micro-pressure wave emission from a high-speed train tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyachi, T.

    2017-03-01

    The micro-pressure wave (MPW) radiated from a tunnel portal can, if audible, cause serious problems around tunnel portals in high-speed railways. This has created a need to develop an acoustic model that considers the topography around a radiation portal in order to predict MPWs more accurately and allow for higher speed railways in the future. An acoustic model of MPWs based on linear acoustic theory is developed in this study. First, the directivity of sound sources and the acoustical effect of topography are investigated using a train launcher facility around a portal on infinitely flat ground and with an infinite vertical baffle plate. The validity of linear acoustic theory is then discussed through a comparison of numerical results obtained using the finite difference method (FDM) and experimental results. Finally, an acoustic model is derived that considers sound sources up to the second order and Green's function to represent the directivity and effect of topography, respectively. The results predicted by this acoustic model are shown to be in good agreement with both numerical and experimental results.

  11. Aerodynamic and acoustic test of a United Technologies model scale rotor at DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Liu, Sandy R.; Jordan, Dave E.; Landgrebe, Anton J.; Lorber, Peter F.; Pollack, Michael J.; Martin, Ruth M.

    1990-01-01

    The UTC model scale rotors, the DNW wind tunnel, the AFDD rotary wing test stand, the UTRC and AFDD aerodynamic and acoustic data acquisition systems, and the scope of test matrices are discussed and an introduction to the test results is provided. It is pointed out that a comprehensive aero/acoustic database of several configurations of the UTC scaled model rotor has been created. The data is expected to improve understanding of rotor aerodynamics, acoustics, and dynamics, and lead to enhanced analytical methodology and design capabilities for the next generation of rotorcraft.

  12. Dislocation unpinning model of acoustic emission from alkali halide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, B. P.; Gour, Anubha S.; Chandra, Vivek K.; Patil, Yuvraj

    2004-06-01

    The present paper reports the dislocation unpinning model of acoustic emis- sion (AE) from alkali halide crystals. Equations are derived for the strain dependence of the transient AE pulse rate, peak value of the AE pulse rate and the total number of AE pulse emitted. It is found that the AE pulse rate should be maximum for a particular strain of the crystals. The peak value of the AE pulse rate should depend on the volume and strain rate of the crystals, and also on the pinning time of dislocations. Since the pinning time of dislocations decreases with increasing strain rate, the AE pulse rate should be weakly dependent on the strain rate of the crystals. The total number of AE should increase linearly with deformation and then it should attain a saturation value for the large deformation. By measuring the strain dependence of the AE pulse rate at a fixed strain rate, the time constant tau_{s} for surface annihilation of dislocations and the pinning time tau_{p} of the dislocations can be determined. A good agreement is found between the theoretical and experimental results related to the AE from alkali halide crystals.

  13. Design of broadband time-domain impedance boundary conditions using the oscillatory-diffusive representation of acoustical models.

    PubMed

    Monteghetti, Florian; Matignon, Denis; Piot, Estelle; Pascal, Lucas

    2016-09-01

    A methodology to design broadband time-domain impedance boundary conditions (TDIBCs) from the analysis of acoustical models is presented. The derived TDIBCs are recast exclusively as first-order differential equations, well-suited for high-order numerical simulations. Broadband approximations are yielded from an elementary linear least squares optimization that is, for most models, independent of the absorbing material geometry. This methodology relies on a mathematical technique referred to as the oscillatory-diffusive (or poles and cuts) representation, and is applied to a wide range of acoustical models, drawn from duct acoustics and outdoor sound propagation, which covers perforates, semi-infinite ground layers, as well as cavities filled with a porous medium. It is shown that each of these impedance models leads to a different TDIBC. Comparison with existing numerical models, such as multi-pole or extended Helmholtz resonator, provides insights into their suitability. Additionally, the broadly-applicable fractional polynomial impedance models are analyzed using fractional calculus.

  14. A Shock-Refracted Acoustic Wave Model for the Prediction of Screech Amplitude in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2007-01-01

    A physical model is proposed for the estimation of the screech amplitude in underexpanded supersonic jets. The model is based on the hypothesis that the interaction of a plane acoustic wave with stationary shock waves provides amplification of the transmitted acoustic wave upon traversing the shock. Powell's discrete source model for screech incorporating a stationary array of acoustic monopoles is extended to accommodate variable source strength. The proposed model reveals that the acoustic sources are of increasing strength with downstream distance. It is shown that the screech amplitude increases with the fuiiy expanded jet Mach number. Comparisons of predicted screech amplitude with available test data show satisfactory agreement. The effect of variable source strength on directivity of the fundamental (first harmonic, lowest frequency mode) and the second harmonic (overtone) is found to be unimportant with regard to the principal lobe (main or major lobe) of considerable relative strength, and is appreciable only in the secondary or minor lobes (of relatively weaker strength

  15. A Shock-Refracted Acoustic Wave Model for Screech Amplitude in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2007-01-01

    A physical model is proposed for the estimation of the screech amplitude in underexpanded supersonic jets. The model is based on the hypothesis that the interaction of a plane acoustic wave with stationary shock waves provides amplification of the transmitted acoustic wave upon traversing the shock. Powell's discrete source model for screech incorporating a stationary array of acoustic monopoles is extended to accommodate variable source strength. The proposed model reveals that the acoustic sources are of increasing strength with downstream distance. It is shown that the screech amplitude increases with the fully expanded jet Mach number. Comparisons of predicted screech amplitude with available test data show satisfactory agreement. The effect of variable source strength on the directivity of the fundamental (first harmonic, lowest frequency mode) and the second harmonic (overtone) is found to be unimportant with regard to the principal lobe (main or major lobe) of considerable relative strength, and is appreciable only in the secondary or minor lobes (of relatively weaker strength).

  16. Study of Two-Dimensional Compressible Non-Acoustic Modeling of Stirling Machine Type Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C., Jr.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2-D) computer code was developed for modeling enclosed volumes of gas with oscillating boundaries, such as Stirling machine components. An existing 2-D incompressible flow computer code, CAST, was used as the starting point for the project. CAST was modified to use the compressible non-acoustic Navier-Stokes equations to model an enclosed volume including an oscillating piston. The devices modeled have low Mach numbers and are sufficiently small that the time required for acoustics to propagate across them is negligible. Therefore, acoustics were excluded to enable more time efficient computation. Background information about the project is presented. The compressible non-acoustic flow assumptions are discussed. The governing equations used in the model are presented in transport equation format. A brief description is given of the numerical methods used. Comparisons of code predictions with experimental data are then discussed.

  17. A Frame-Based Context-Dependent Acoustic Modeling for Speech Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Ryuta; Zen, Heiga; Nankaku, Yoshihiko; Tokuda, Keiichi

    We propose a novel acoustic model for speech recognition, named FCD (Frame-based Context Dependent) model. It can obtain a probability distribution by using a top-down clustering technique to simultaneously consider the local frame position in phoneme, phoneme duration, and phoneme context. The model topology is derived from connecting left-to-right HMM models without self-loop transition for each phoneme duration. Because the FCD model can change the probability distribution into a sequence corresponding with one phoneme duration, it can has the ability to generate a smooth trajectory of speech feature vector. We also performed an experiment to evaluate the performance of speech recognition for the model. In the experiment, 132 questions for frame position, 66 questions for phoneme duration and 134 questions for phoneme context were used to train the sub-phoneme FCD model. In order to compare the performance, left-to-right HMM and two types of HSMM models with almost same number of states were also trained. As a result, 18% of relative improvement of tri-phone accuracy was achieved by the FCD model.

  18. a Psycholinguistic Model for Simultaneous Translation, and Proficiency Assessment by Automated Acoustic Analysis of Discourse.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghi, Hussein M.

    Two separate but related issues are addressed: how simultaneous translation (ST) works on a cognitive level and how such translation can be objectively assessed. Both of these issues are discussed in the light of qualitative and quantitative analyses of a large corpus of recordings of ST and shadowing. The proposed ST model utilises knowledge derived from a discourse analysis of the data, many accepted facts in the psychology tradition, and evidence from controlled experiments that are carried out here. This model has three advantages: (i) it is based on analyses of extended spontaneous speech rather than word-, syllable-, or clause -bound stimuli; (ii) it draws equally on linguistic and psychological knowledge; and (iii) it adopts a non-traditional view of language called 'the linguistic construction of reality'. The discourse-based knowledge is also used to develop three computerised systems for the assessment of simultaneous translation: one is a semi-automated system that treats the content of the translation; and two are fully automated, one of which is based on the time structure of the acoustic signals whilst the other is based on their cross-correlation. For each system, several parameters of performance are identified, and they are correlated with assessments rendered by the traditional, subjective, qualitative method. Using signal processing techniques, the acoustic analysis of discourse leads to the conclusion that quality in simultaneous translation can be assessed quantitatively with varying degrees of automation. It identifies as measures of performance (i) three content-based standards; (ii) four time management parameters that reflect the influence of the source on the target language time structure; and (iii) two types of acoustical signal coherence. Proficiency in ST is shown to be directly related to coherence and speech rate but inversely related to omission and delay. High proficiency is associated with a high degree of simultaneity and

  19. A modal-based reduction method for sound absorbing porous materials in poro-acoustic finite element models.

    PubMed

    Rumpler, Romain; Deü, Jean-François; Göransson, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Structural-acoustic finite element models including three-dimensional (3D) modeling of porous media are generally computationally costly. While being the most commonly used predictive tool in the context of noise reduction applications, efficient solution strategies are required. In this work, an original modal reduction technique, involving real-valued modes computed from a classical eigenvalue solver is proposed to reduce the size of the problem associated with the porous media. In the form presented in this contribution, the method is suited for homogeneous porous layers. It is validated on a 1D poro-acoustic academic problem and tested for its performance on a 3D application, using a subdomain decomposition strategy. The performance of the proposed method is estimated in terms of degrees of freedom downsizing, computational time enhancement, as well as matrix sparsity of the reduced system.

  20. Studies on the measurement of subsurface fractures and geostress using acoustic emission technique for deep coalbed development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Masahiro; Utagawa, Manabu; Katsuyama, Kunihisa; Kiyama, Tamotsu; Narita, Takashi; Kono, Makoto

    1993-06-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) technique was applied to the estimation of fractures and geostress using three kinds of AE measuring systems. One is for measuring AE parameters, other one is for measuring AE waves, and another is for measuring AE parameters in combination with two dimensional source location. The results of the study on the following subjects are as follows: (1) AE measuring systems and experimental consideration on the AE behavior of coal under the compressive stress; (2) experimental considerations on the propagation of hydrofracture in the discontinuous rocks, the propagation of hydrofracture in the coal measure rock, the mechanism of the Kaiser effect of AE, and the effect of elapsed time on the Kaiser effect; and (3) the practical application of the new suggested method to the estimation of geostress using cored rocks. It was confirmed that the new method for estimating geostress using acoustic emission was applicable to the estimation of geostress from cored rocks.

  1. Detection of stress corrosion cracking of high-strength steel used in prestressed concrete structures by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, S.; Gaillet, L.; Tessier, C.; Idrissi, H.

    2008-02-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of high-strength steel used in prestressed concrete structures was studied by acoustic emission technique (AE). A simulated concrete pore (SCP) solution at high-alkaline (pH ≈ 12) contaminated by sulphate, chloride, and thiocyanate ions was used. The evolution of the acoustic activity recorded during the tests shows the presence of several stages related respectively to cracks initiation due to the local corrosion imposed by corrosives species, cracks propagation and steel failure. Microscopic examinations pointed out that the wires exhibited a brittle fracture mode. The cracking was found to propagate in the transgranular mode. The role of corrosives species and hydrogen in the rupture mechanism of high-strength steel was also investigated. This study shows promising results for an potential use in situ of AE for real-time health monitoring of eutectoid steel cables used in prestressed concrete structures.

  2. Predictive Acoustic Modelling Applied to the Control of Intake/exhaust Noise of Internal Combustion Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, P. O. A. L.; Harrison, M. F.

    1997-05-01

    The application of validated acoustic models to intake/exhaust system acoustic design is described with reference to a sequence of specific practical examples. These include large turbocharged diesel generating sets, truck engines and high performance petrol engines. The discussion includes a comparison of frequency domain, time domain and hybrid modelling approaches to design methodology. The calculation of sound emission from open terminations is summarized in an appendix.

  3. Acoustic Measurement and Model Predictions for the Aural Nondetectability of Two Night-Vision Goggles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    Acoustic Measurement and Model Predictions for the Aural Nondetectability of Two Night - Vision Goggles by Jeremy Gaston, Tim Mermagen, and...SUBTITLE Acoustic Measurement and Model Predictions for the Aural Nondetectability of Two Night - Vision Goggles 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This study evaluates two different night - vision goggles (NVGs) to determine if the devices meet level II

  4. Acoustic emission non-destructive testing of structures using source location techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, Alan G.

    2013-09-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) testing has been advanced and used at Sandia for the past 40 years. AE has been used on structures including pressure vessels, fire bottles, wind turbines, gas wells, nuclear weapons, and solar collectors. This monograph begins with background topics in acoustics and instrumentation and then focuses on current acoustic emission technology. It covers the overall design and system setups for a test, with a wind turbine blade as the object. Test analysis is discussed with an emphasis on source location. Three test examples are presented, two on experimental wind turbine blades and one on aircraft fire extinguisher bottles. Finally, the code for a FORTRAN source location program is given as an example of a working analysis program. Throughout the document, the stress is on actual testing of real structures, not on laboratory experiments.

  5. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Integrated with a Surface Acoustic Wave Technique for Detection of Sulfamethizole.

    PubMed

    Ayankojo, Akinrinade George; Tretjakov, Aleksei; Reut, Jekaterina; Boroznjak, Roman; Öpik, Andres; Rappich, Jörg; Furchner, Andreas; Hinrichs, Karsten; Syritski, Vitali

    2016-01-19

    The synergistic effect of combining molecular imprinting and surface acoustic wave (SAW) technologies for the selective and label-free detection of sulfamethizole as a model antibiotic in aqueous environment was demonstrated. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for sulfamethizole (SMZ) selective recognition was prepared in the form of a homogeneous thin film on the sensing surfaces of SAW chip by oxidative electropolymerization of m-phenylenediamine (mPD) in the presence of SMZ, acting as a template. Special attention was paid to the rational selection of the functional monomer using computational and spectroscopic approaches. SMZ template incorporation and its subsequent release from the polymer was supported by IR microscopic measurements. Precise control of the thicknesses of the SMZ-MIP and respective nonimprinted reference films (NIP) was achieved by correlating the electrical charge dosage during electrodeposition with spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements in order to ensure accurate interpretation of label-free responses originating from the MIP modified sensor. The fabricated SMZ-MIP films were characterized in terms of their binding affinity and selectivity toward the target by analyzing the binding kinetics recorded using the SAW system. The SMZ-MIPs had SMZ binding capacity approximately more than eight times higher than the respective NIP and were able to discriminate among structurally similar molecules, i.e., sulfanilamide and sulfadimethoxine. The presented approach for the facile integration of a sulfonamide antibiotic-sensing layer with SAW technology allowed observing the real-time binding events of the target molecule at nanomolar concentration levels and could be potentially suitable for cost-effective fabrication of a multianalyte chemosensor for analysis of hazardous pollutants in an aqueous environment.

  6. Weakly nonlinear ion-acoustic excitations in a relativistic model for dense quantum plasma.

    PubMed

    Behery, E E; Haas, F; Kourakis, I

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of linear and nonlinear ionic-scale electrostatic excitations propagating in a magnetized relativistic quantum plasma is studied. A quantum-hydrodynamic model is adopted and degenerate statistics for the electrons is taken into account. The dispersion properties of linear ion acoustic waves are examined in detail. A modified characteristic charge screening length and "sound speed" are introduced, for relativistic quantum plasmas. By employing the reductive perturbation technique, a Zakharov-Kuznetzov-type equation is derived. Using the small-k expansion method, the stability profile of weakly nonlinear slightly supersonic electrostatic pulses is also discussed. The effect of electron degeneracy on the basic characteristics of electrostatic excitations is investigated. The entire analysis is valid in a three-dimensional as well as in two-dimensional geometry. A brief discussion of possible applications in laboratory and space plasmas is included.

  7. A synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography technique applied to an acoustic streaming flow

    PubMed Central

    Sou, In Mei; Layman, Christopher N.; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2013-01-01

    Subsurface coherent structures and surface temperatures are investigated using simultaneous measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and infrared (IR) thermography. Results for coherent structures from acoustic streaming and associated heating transfer in a rectangular tank with an acoustic horn mounted horizontally at the sidewall are presented. An observed vortex pair develops and propagates in the direction along the centerline of the horn. From the PIV velocity field data, distinct kinematic regions are found with the Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) method. The implications of this analysis with respect to heat transfer and related sonochemical applications are discussed. PMID:24347810

  8. Detection of rolling contact sub-surface fatigue cracks using acoustic emission technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshioka, T. )

    1993-04-01

    A method of locating the position of acoustic emission sources has been developed to analyze the mechanism of rolling contact fatigue. Using this method, sub-surface fatigue cracks were found at positions corresponding to the actual source positions of acoustic emissions. When fatigue tests were run under maximum stresses of 5.75 GPa and lubricant film parameters of 0.19, the cracks propagated parallel to the surface, had a maximum length of approximately 200 microns in the rolling direction of balls, and were distributed between 50 microns and 200 microns below the surface. Although the lubricant film parameter was small, no cracks from the surface were found. 12 refs.

  9. Automatic 3D acoustic tissue models from histologic tissue sections and application to ex vivo tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Oelze, Michael L.; O'Brien, William D.; Zachary, James F.

    2005-04-01

    Three-dimensional acoustic tissue models (3DATMs) can be used as computational tools for ultrasonic imaging algorithm development and analysis. 3DATMs are automatically constructed from digitized light microscope images of consecutive H&E-stained histologic tissue sections. Construction necessitated contrast equalization, registration, and interpolation of missing sections. The registered (with interpolated) sections yield a 3D histologic volume (3DHV). Acoustic properties are then assigned to each tissue constituent of the 3DHV to obtain the 3DATM. A tissue characterization technique was developed to obtain scatterer parameter estimates (size and acoustic concentration) from a 3D impedance map (3DZM) deduced from a 3DHV by assigning acoustic impedance values. 3DZMs were constructed for a rat fibroadenoma (FA), a mouse mammary tumor (MMT) and a mouse sarcoma (EHS). From these 3 3DZMs estimates, effective scatterer diameters of 91 μm, 31.5 μm, and 34.5 μm, respectively, were determined. Independent ultrasonic measurements yielded average scatterer diameters of 105 μm, 30 μm, and 33 μm, respectively. The 3DZM estimation scheme showed results similar to those obtained by the ultrasonic measurements. 3DATMs may therefore be a useful tool for quantifying ultrasonic tissue properties. [Work supported by the University of Illinois Research Board.

  10. Structural acoustics model of the violin radiativity profile.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George

    2008-12-01

    Violin radiativity profiles are dominated by the Helmholtz-like A0 cavity mode ( approximately 280 Hz), first corpus bending modes B1(-) and B1(+) ( approximately 500 Hz), and BH and bridge-filter peaks ( approximately 2.4 kHz and approximately 3.5 kHz, respectively), with falloff above approximately 4 kHz. The B1 modes-dependent on two low-lying free-plate modes--are proposed to excite A0 via coupling to B1-driven in-phase f-hole volume flows. VIOCADEAS data show that A0 radiativity increases primarily as A0-B1(-) frequency difference decreases, consistent with Meinel's 1937 experiment for too-thick/too-thin plate thicknesses, plus sound post removal and violin octet baritone results. The vibration-->acoustic energy filter, F(RAD), computed from shape-material-independent radiation and total damping, peaks at the critical frequency f(crit), estimated from a free-plate mode by analogy to flat-plate bending. Experimentally, f(crit) decreased as this plate mode (and B1(+)) frequency increased. Simulations show that increasing plate thicknesses lowers f(crit), reduces F(RAD), and moves the spectral balance toward lower frequencies. Incorporating string-->corpus filters (including bridge versus bridge-island impedances) provides a model for overall violin radiativity. This model-with B1 and A0-B1 couplings, and f(crit) (computed from a free-plate mode important to B1) strongly affecting the lowest and highest parts of the radiativity profile-substantiates prior empirical B1--sound quality linkages.

  11. Mathematical Modeling of Space-Time Variations in Acoustic Transmission and Scattering from Schools of Swim Bladder Fish

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1996 (Ref. 1), based upon the harmonic solution of sets of coupled differential equations, each describing scattering from one fish. The Love swim...side of the empty core, thus reducing the acoustic interactions between them. REFERENCES (1) C. Feuillade, R. W. Nero and R. H. Love , "A low...frequency acoustic scattering model for small schools offish," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 99, 196-208 (1996). (2) R. H. Love , "Resonant acoustic scattering by

  12. Estimating steatosis and fibrosis: Comparison of acoustic structure quantification with established techniques

    PubMed Central

    Karlas, Thomas; Berger, Joachim; Garnov, Nikita; Lindner, Franziska; Busse, Harald; Linder, Nicolas; Schaudinn, Alexander; Relke, Bettina; Chakaroun, Rima; Tröltzsch, Michael; Wiegand, Johannes; Keim, Volker

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare ultrasound-based acoustic structure quantification (ASQ) with established non-invasive techniques for grading and staging fatty liver disease. METHODS: Type 2 diabetic patients at risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (n = 50) and healthy volunteers (n = 20) were evaluated using laboratory analysis and anthropometric measurements, transient elastography (TE), controlled attenuation parameter (CAP), proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS; only available for the diabetic cohort), and ASQ. ASQ parameters mode, average and focal disturbance (FD) ratio were compared with: (1) the extent of liver fibrosis estimated from TE and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) fibrosis scores; and (2) the amount of steatosis, which was classified according to CAP values. RESULTS: Forty-seven diabetic patients (age 67.0 ± 8.6 years; body mass index 29.4 ± 4.5 kg/m²) with reliable CAP measurements and all controls (age 26.5 ± 3.2 years; body mass index 22.0 ± 2.7 kg/m²) were included in the analysis. All ASQ parameters showed differences between healthy controls and diabetic patients (P < 0.001, respectively). The ASQ FD ratio (logarithmic) correlated with the CAP (r = -0.81, P < 0.001) and 1H-MRS (r = -0.43, P = 0.004) results. The FD ratio [CAP < 250 dB/m: 107 (102-109), CAP between 250 and 300 dB/m: 106 (102-114); CAP between 300 and 350 dB/m: 105 (100-112), CAP ≥ 350 dB/m: 102 (99-108)] as well as mode and average parameters, were reduced in cases with advanced steatosis (ANOVA P < 0.05). However, none of the ASQ parameters showed a significant difference in patients with advanced fibrosis, as determined by TE and the NAFLD fibrosis score (P > 0.08, respectively). CONCLUSION: ASQ parameters correlate with steatosis, but not with fibrosis in fatty liver disease. Steatosis estimation with ASQ should be further evaluated in biopsy-controlled studies. PMID:25945002

  13. Validation and verification of the acoustic emission technique for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagar, Daniel Omatsola

    The performance of the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique was investigated to establish its reliability in detecting and locating fatigue crack damage as well as distinguishing between different AE sources in potential SHM applications. Experiments were conducted to monitor the AE signals generated during fatigue crack growth in coupon 2014 T6 aluminium. The influence of stress ratio, stress range, sample geometry and whether or not the load spectrum was of constant or variable amplitude were all investigated. AE signals detected were correlated with values of applied cyclic load throughout the tests. Measurements of time difference of arrival were taken for assessment of errors in location estimates obtained using time of flight algorithms with a 1D location setup. At the onset of crack growth high AE Hit rates were observed for the first few millimetres after which they rapidly declined to minimal values for an extended period of crack growth. Another peak and then decline in AE Hit rates was observed for subsequent crack growth before yet another increase as the sample approached final failure.. AE signals were seen to occur in the lower two-thirds of the maximum load in the first few millimetres of crack growth before occurring at progressively smaller values as the crack length increased. A separate set of AE signals were observed close to the maximum cyclic stress throughout the entire crack growth process. At the failure crack length AE signals were generated across the entire loading range. Novel metrics were developed to statistically characterise variability of AE generation with crack growth and at particular crack lengths across different samples. A novel approach for fatigue crack length estimation was developed based on monitoring applied loads to the sample corresponding with generated AE signals. An acousto-ultrasonic method was used to calibrate the AE wave velocity in a representative wing-box structure which was used to successfully locate the

  14. Acoustic characteristics of large-scale STOL models at forward speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falarski, M. D.; Aoyagi, K.; Koenig, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    Wind-tunnel investigations of the acoustic characteristics of the externally blown jet flap (EBF) and augmentor wing STOL concepts are discussed. The large-scale EBF model was equipped with a triple-slotted flap blown by four JT15D turbofan engines with circular, coannular exhaust nozzles. The large-scale augmentor wing model was equipped with an unlined augmentor blown by a slot primary nozzle. The effects of airspeed and angle of attack on the acoustics of the EBF were small. Flap deflection had a greater effect on the acoustics of the augmentor wing than did airspeed. The total sound power was also significantly higher for landing indicating that turning in the augmentor generated acoustic energy. Airspeed produced a small aft shift in acoustic directivity with no significant change in the peak perceived noise levels or sound power levels. Small-scale research of the acoustics for the augmentor wing has shown that by blowing an acoustically treated augmentor with a lobed primary nozzle, the 95-PNdb noise level goal can be achieved or surpassed.

  15. Generalization of von Neumann analysis for a model of two discrete halfspaces : the acoustic case.

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, Matthew M.

    2006-12-01

    Evaluating the performance of finite-difference algorithms typically uses a technique known as von Neumann analysis. For a given algorithm, application of the technique yields both a dispersion relation valid for the discrete time-space grid and a mathematical condition for stability. In practice, a major shortcoming of conventional von Neumann analysis is that it can be applied only to an idealized numerical model - that of an infinite, homogeneous whole space. Experience has shown that numerical instabilities often arise in finite-difference simulations of wave propagation at interfaces with strong material contrasts. These interface instabilities occur even though the conventional von Neumann stability criterion may be satisfied at each point of the numerical model. To address this issue, I generalize von Neumann analysis for a model of two half-spaces. I perform the analysis for the case of acoustic wave propagation using a standard staggered-grid finite-difference numerical scheme. By deriving expressions for the discrete reflection and transmission coefficients, I study under what conditions the discrete reflection and transmission coefficients become unbounded. I find that instabilities encountered in numerical modeling near interfaces with strong material contrasts are linked to these cases and develop a modified stability criterion that takes into account the resulting instabilities. I test and verify the stability criterion by executing a finite-difference algorithm under conditions predicted to be stable and unstable.

  16. A case-study comparison of computer modeling and scale modeling in acoustics consulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamia, Paul T.

    2002-05-01

    As an alternate or compliment to computer models, acoustics consultants often make use of scale models to evaluate the efficacy of architectural designs. The intention of this paper is to compare the two modeling approaches, using one or more case studies, to explore the pros and cons of each. Topics of comparison will include cost, geometric representations, effective bandwidths, propagation phenomena (e.g., diffraction), simulation of material properties, and auralization. Where possible, measured data from existing spaces will be presented to provide a reference for the modeled data.

  17. Effects of different analysis techniques and recording duty cycles on passive acoustic monitoring of killer whales.

    PubMed

    Riera, Amalis; Ford, John K; Ross Chapman, N

    2013-09-01

    Killer whales in British Columbia are at risk, and little is known about their winter distribution. Passive acoustic monitoring of their year-round habitat is a valuable supplemental method to traditional visual and photographic surveys. However, long-term acoustic studies of odontocetes have some limitations, including the generation of large amounts of data that require highly time-consuming processing. There is a need to develop tools and protocols to maximize the efficiency of such studies. Here, two types of analysis, real-time and long term spectral averages, were compared to assess their performance at detecting killer whale calls in long-term acoustic recordings. In addition, two different duty cycles, 1/3 and 2/3, were tested. Both the use of long term spectral averages and a lower duty cycle resulted in a decrease in call detection and positive pod identification, leading to underestimations of the amount of time the whales were present. The impact of these limitations should be considered in future killer whale acoustic surveys. A compromise between a lower resolution data processing method and a higher duty cycle is suggested for maximum methodological efficiency.

  18. ACOUSTIC TECHNIQUES FOR THE MAPPING OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of the last 30 years of analytical research into the acoustic properties of harbor marine sediments has allowed the extension of the original work of Hamilton (1970) into a production system for classifying the density and bulk physical properties of standard marine s...

  19. Investigation of fatigue crack growth in acrylic bone cement using the acoustic emission technique.

    PubMed

    Roques, A; Browne, M; Thompson, J; Rowland, C; Taylor, A

    2004-02-01

    Failure of the bone cement mantle has been implicated in the loosening process of cemented hip stems. Current methods of investigating degradation of the cement mantle in vitro often require sectioning of the sample to confirm failure paths. The present research investigates acoustic emission as a passive experimental method for the assessment of bone cement failure. Damage in bone cement was monitored during four point bending fatigue tests through an analysis of the peak amplitude, duration, rise time (RT) and energy of the events emitted from the damage sections. A difference in AE trends was observed during failure for specimens aged and tested in (i) air and (ii) Ringer's solution at 37 degrees C. It was noted that the acoustic behaviour varied according to applied load level; events of higher duration and RT were emitted during fatigue at lower stresses. A good correlation was observed between crack location and source of acoustic emission, and the nature of the acoustic parameters that were most suited to bone cement failure characterisation was identified. The methodology employed in this study could potentially be used as a pre-clinical assessment tool for the integrity of cemented load bearing implants.

  20. Network Model of a Thermo-Acoustic Heat Engine Assisted with Unsteady CFD and System Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selimefendigil, F.

    2011-09-01

    A thermo-acoustic stack with a linear temperature gradient has been identified with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in response to forcing with acoustic velocity and pressure fluctuations at the inlet and outlet of the stack, respectively. Linear transfer matrix of the multiple input, multiple output system (MIMO) has been determined. This transfer matrix is then integrated into a network model of the full thermo-acoustic heat engine. Results for the eigenvalues have been compared between the analytically developed stack and identified stack assisted with CFD and system identification.

  1. Measured acoustic characteristics of ducted supersonic jets at different model scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. R., III; Ahuja, K. K.; Tam, Christopher K. W.; Abdelwahab, M.

    1993-01-01

    A large-scale (about a 25x enlargement) model of the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) hardware was installed and tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory of the NASA Lewis Research Center. Acoustic measurements made in these two facilities are compared and the similarity in acoustic behavior over the scale range under consideration is highlighted. The study provide the acoustic data over a relatively large-scale range which may be used to demonstrate the validity of scaling methods employed in the investigation of this phenomena.

  2. Modeling Steady Acoustic Fields Bounded in Cavities with Geometrical Imperfections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albo, P. A. Giuliano; Gavioso, R. M.; Benedetto, G.

    2010-07-01

    A mathematical method is derived within the framework of classical Lagrangian field theory, which is suitable for the determination of the eigenstates of acoustic resonators of nearly spherical shape. The method is based on the expansion of the Helmholtz differential operator and the boundary condition in a power series of a small geometrical perturbation parameter {ɛ} . The method extends to orders higher than {ɛ^2} the calculation of the perturbed acoustic eigenvalues, which was previously limited by the use of variational formalism and the methods of Morse and Ingard. A specific example is worked out for radial modes of a prolate spheroid, with the frequency perturbation calculated to order {ɛ^3} . A possible strategy to tackle the problem of calculating the acoustic eigenvalues for cavities presenting non-smooth geometrical imperfections is also described.

  3. A modeling investigation of vowel-to-vowel movement planning in acoustic and muscle spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandipour, Majid

    The primary objective of this research was to explore the coordinate space in which speech movements are planned. A two dimensional biomechanical model of the vocal tract (tongue, lips, jaw, and pharynx) was constructed based on anatomical and physiological data from a subject. The model transforms neural command signals into the actions of muscles. The tongue was modeled by a 221-node finite element mesh. Each of the eight tongue muscles defined within the mesh was controlled by a virtual muscle model. The other vocal-tract components were modeled as simple 2nd-order systems. The model's geometry was adapted to a speaker, using MRI scans of the speaker's vocal tract. The vocal tract model, combined with an adaptive controller that consisted of a forward model (mapping 12-dimensional motor commands to a 64-dimensional acoustic spectrum) and an inverse model (mapping acoustic trajectories to motor command trajectories), was used to simulate and explore the implications of two planning hypotheses: planning in motor space vs. acoustic space. The acoustic, kinematic, and muscle activation (EMG) patterns of vowel-to-vowel sequences generated by the model were compared to data from the speaker whose acoustic, kinematic and EMG were also recorded. The simulation results showed that: (a) modulations of the motor commands effectively accounted for the effects of speaking rate on EMG, kinematic, and acoustic outputs; (b) the movement and acoustic trajectories were influenced by vocal tract biomechanics; and (c) both planning schemes produced similar articulatory movement, EMG, muscle length, force, and acoustic trajectories, which were also comparable to the subject's data under normal speaking conditions. In addition, the effects of a bite-block on measured EMG, kinematics and formants were simulated by the model. Acoustic planning produced successful simulations but motor planning did not. The simulation results suggest that with somatosensory feedback but no auditory

  4. Segment-based acoustic models for continuous speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostendorf, Mari; Rohlicek, J. R.

    1993-07-01

    This research aims to develop new and more accurate stochastic models for speaker-independent continuous speech recognition, by extending previous work in segment-based modeling and by introducing a new hierarchical approach to representing intra-utterance statistical dependencies. These techniques, which are more costly than traditional approaches because of the large search space associated with higher order models, are made feasible through rescoring a set of HMM-generated N-best sentence hypotheses. We expect these different modeling techniques to result in improved recognition performance over that achieved by current systems, which handle only frame-based observations and assume that these observations are independent given an underlying state sequence. In the fourth quarter of the project, we have completed the following: (1) ported our recognition system to the Wall Street Journal task, a standard task in the ARPA community; (2) developed an initial dependency-tree model of intra-utterance observation correlation; and (3) implemented baseline language model estimation software. Our initial results on the Wall Street Journal task are quite good and represent significantly improved performance over most HMM systems reporting on the Nov. 1992 5k vocabulary test set.

  5. Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustic Measurements in a Highly Back-Pressured Scramjet Isolator Model: A Research Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Troy F.; Balla, Robert J.; Baurle, Robert A.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2008-01-01

    Under the Propulsion Discipline of NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program s Hypersonics Project, a test apparatus, for testing a scramjet isolator model, is being constructed at NASA's Langley Research Center. The test apparatus will incorporate a 1-inch by 2-inch by 15-inch-long scramjet isolator model supplied with 2.1 lbm/sec of unheated dry air through a Mach 2.5 converging-diverging nozzle. The planned research will incorporate progressively more challenging measurement techniques to characterize the flow field within the isolator, concluding with the application of the Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustic (LITA) measurement technique. The primary goal of this research is to use the data acquired to validate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models employed to characterize the complex flow field of a scramjet isolator. This paper describes the test apparatus being constructed, pre-test CFD simulations, and the LITA measurement technique.

  6. Prediction of ultrasound-mediated disruption of cell membranes using machine learning techniques and statistical analysis of acoustic spectra.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eva K; Gallagher, Richard J; Campbell, Ann Melissa; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2004-01-01

    Although biological effects of ultrasound must be avoided for safe diagnostic applications, ultrasound's ability to disrupt cell membranes has attracted interest as a method to facilitate drug and gene delivery. This paper seeks to develop "prediction rules" for predicting the degree of cell membrane disruption based on specified ultrasound parameters and measured acoustic signals. Three techniques for generating prediction rules (regression analysis, classification trees and discriminant analysis) are applied to data obtained from a sequence of experiments on bovine red blood cells. For each experiment, the data consist of four ultrasound parameters, acoustic measurements at 400 frequencies, and a measure of cell membrane disruption. To avoid over-training, various combinations of the 404 predictor variables are used when applying the rule generation methods. The results indicate that the variable combination consisting of ultrasound exposure time and acoustic signals measured at the driving frequency and its higher harmonics yields the best rule for all three rule generation methods. The methods used for deriving the prediction rules are broadly applicable, and could be used to develop prediciton rules in other scenarios involving different cell types or tissues. These rules and the methods used to derive them could be used for real-time feedback about ultrasound's biological effects.

  7. Validation and Simulation of ARES I Scale Model Acoustic Test -1- Pathfinder Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, G. C.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. To take advantage of this data, a digital representation of the ASMAT test setup has been constructed and test firings of the motor have been simulated using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software. Within this first of a series of papers, results from ASMAT simulations with the rocket in a held down configuration and without water suppression have then been compared to acoustic data collected from similar live-fire tests to assess the accuracy of the simulations. Detailed evaluations of the mesh features, mesh length scales relative to acoustic signals, Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy numbers, and spatial residual sources have been performed to support this assessment. Results of acoustic comparisons have shown good correlation with the amplitude and temporal shape of pressure features and reasonable spectral accuracy up to approximately 1000 Hz. Major plume and acoustic features have been well captured including the plume shock structure, the igniter pulse transient, and the ignition overpressure. Finally, acoustic propagation patterns illustrated a previously unconsidered issue of tower placement inline with the high intensity overpressure propagation path.

  8. A Subject-Specific Acoustic Model of the Upper Airway for Snoring Sounds Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Shumit; Bradley, T. Douglas; Taheri, Mahsa; Moussavi, Zahra; Yadollahi, Azadeh

    2016-05-01

    Monitoring variations in the upper airway narrowing during sleep is invasive and expensive. Since snoring sounds are generated by air turbulence and vibrations of the upper airway due to its narrowing; snoring sounds may be used as a non-invasive technique to assess upper airway narrowing. Our goal was to develop a subject-specific acoustic model of the upper airway to investigate the impacts of upper airway anatomy, e.g. length, wall thickness and cross-sectional area, on snoring sounds features. To have a subject-specific model for snoring generation, we used measurements of the upper airway length, cross-sectional area and wall thickness from every individual to develop the model. To validate the proposed model, in 20 male individuals, intensity and resonant frequencies of modeled snoring sounds were compared with those measured from recorded snoring sounds during sleep. Based on both modeled and measured results, we found the only factor that may positively and significantly contribute to snoring intensity was narrowing in the upper airway. Furthermore, measured resonant frequencies of snoring were inversely correlated with the upper airway length, which is a risk factor for upper airway collapsibility. These results encourage the use of snoring sounds analysis to assess the upper airway anatomy during sleep.

  9. A Subject-Specific Acoustic Model of the Upper Airway for Snoring Sounds Generation

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Shumit; Bradley, T. Douglas; Taheri, Mahsa; Moussavi, Zahra; Yadollahi, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring variations in the upper airway narrowing during sleep is invasive and expensive. Since snoring sounds are generated by air turbulence and vibrations of the upper airway due to its narrowing; snoring sounds may be used as a non-invasive technique to assess upper airway narrowing. Our goal was to develop a subject-specific acoustic model of the upper airway to investigate the impacts of upper airway anatomy, e.g. length, wall thickness and cross-sectional area, on snoring sounds features. To have a subject-specific model for snoring generation, we used measurements of the upper airway length, cross-sectional area and wall thickness from every individual to develop the model. To validate the proposed model, in 20 male individuals, intensity and resonant frequencies of modeled snoring sounds were compared with those measured from recorded snoring sounds during sleep. Based on both modeled and measured results, we found the only factor that may positively and significantly contribute to snoring intensity was narrowing in the upper airway. Furthermore, measured resonant frequencies of snoring were inversely correlated with the upper airway length, which is a risk factor for upper airway collapsibility. These results encourage the use of snoring sounds analysis to assess the upper airway anatomy during sleep. PMID:27210576

  10. A Simplified Model for the Investigation of Acoustically Driven Combustion Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Quinn, D. Dane

    1998-01-01

    A simplified one-dimensional model of reactive flow is presented which captures features of aeropropulsion systems, including acoustically driven combustion instabilities. Although the resulting partial differential equations are one dimensional, they qualitatively describe observed phenomena, including, resonant frequencies and the admission of both steady and unsteady behavior. A number of simulations are shown which exhibit both steady and unsteady behavior, including flame migration and thermo acoustic instabilities. Finally, we present examples of unsteady flow resulting from fuel modulation.

  11. Basin Acoustic Seamount Scattering Experiment (BASSEX) Data Analysis and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Kauai source at various ranges and bearings . OBJECTIVES The primary objective of this work is to measure aspects of acoustic propagation that...horizontal plane, arriving at the array from a different bearing . Further analysis will include processing all of the BASSEX KNPAL receptions and

  12. Fish Acoustics: Physics-Based Modeling and Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    physical scattering mechanisms. To demonstrate this point, the target strength of a canonical gas-filled sphere is computed using a standard...high-frequency sound scattering by swimbladdered fish,” Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 78, pp. 688-700 (1985). 9. Gauss , R. C

  13. Mandarin Chinese tone identification in cochlear implants: predictions from acoustic models.

    PubMed

    Morton, Kenneth D; Torrione, Peter A; Throckmorton, Chandra S; Collins, Leslie M

    2008-10-01

    It has been established that current cochlear implants do not supply adequate spectral information for perception of tonal languages. Comprehension of a tonal language, such as Mandarin Chinese, requires recognition of lexical tones. New strategies of cochlear stimulation such as variable stimulation rate and current steering may provide the means of delivering more spectral information and thus may provide the auditory fine-structure required for tone recognition. Several cochlear implant signal processing strategies are examined in this study, the continuous interleaved sampling (CIS) algorithm, the frequency amplitude modulation encoding (FAME) algorithm, and the multiple carrier frequency algorithm (MCFA). These strategies provide different types and amounts of spectral information. Pattern recognition techniques can be applied to data from Mandarin Chinese tone recognition tasks using acoustic models as a means of testing the abilities of these algorithms to transmit the changes in fundamental frequency indicative of the four lexical tones. The ability of processed Mandarin Chinese tones to be correctly classified may predict trends in the effectiveness of different signal processing algorithms in cochlear implants. The proposed techniques can predict trends in performance of the signal processing techniques in quiet conditions but fail to do so in noise.

  14. An Acoustic Levitation Technique for the Study of Nonlinear Oscillations of Gas Bubbles in Liquids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-15

    alcohol and a mixture of glycerine and water (33-1/3% glycerine by volume) were the two liquids used in this research. Bubbles were levitated near the...bubble can be trapped over a - -range of positions near a pressure antinode as a result of the balancing of these two forces. * The acoustic...then used to investigate the nonlinear oscillations of the bubble over a range of sizes. The bubbles were studied in two liq- uids: isopropyl alcohol

  15. Application of Acoustic Signal Processing Techniques for Improved Underwater Source Detection and Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-31

    Systems Center, San Diego; the Electric Boat Division of General ambiguities in the beam patterns, provided the bearmforming is done with Dynamics. ] the...Am. Suppl. 1. Vol. 60. Fall 1986 112th Meeting: Acoustical Socity of America A wearable multichannel signal processor for stimulation of single... electrical dynamic range 1Hi4 & Channel interaction measured by forward-masked "pla of the patient. Several processor configurations with different resonator

  16. Analysis of and Techniques for Adaptive Equalization for Underwater Acoustic Communication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Keyed QAM Quadrature Amplitude Modulation QPSK Quadrature Phase Shift Keyed 19 continued from last page. . . Acronym Definition RF Radio Frequency...rate was 2400 samples per second and the data packet was 60000 4- QAM modulated symbols. The results again confirm that the proposed method outperforms...communication is quickly becoming a necessity for applications in ocean science, defense, and homeland security. Acoustics remains the only prac- tical means

  17. A hybrid numerical technique for predicting the aerodynamic and acoustic fields of advanced turboprops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homicz, G. F.; Moselle, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    A hybrid numerical procedure is presented for the prediction of the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of advanced turboprops. A hybrid scheme is proposed which in principle leads to a consistent simultaneous prediction of both fields. In the inner flow a finite difference method, the Approximate-Factorization Alternating-Direction-Implicit (ADI) scheme, is used to solve the nonlinear Euler equations. In the outer flow the linearized acoustic equations are solved via a Boundary-Integral Equation (BIE) method. The two solutions are iteratively matched across a fictitious interface in the flow so as to maintain continuity. At convergence the resulting aerodynamic load prediction will automatically satisfy the appropriate free-field boundary conditions at the edge of the finite difference grid, while the acoustic predictions will reflect the back-reaction of the radiated field on the magnitude of the loading source terms, as well as refractive effects in the inner flow. The equations and logic needed to match the two solutions are developed and the computer program implementing the procedure is described. Unfortunately, no converged solutions were obtained, due to unexpectedly large running times. The reasons for this are discussed and several means to alleviate the situation are suggested.

  18. Performance evaluation of an acoustic indoor localization system based on a fingerprinting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloui, Nadia; Raoof, Kosai; Bouallegue, Ammar; Letourneur, Stephane; Zaibi, Sonia

    2014-12-01

    We present an acoustic location system that adopts the time of arrival of the path of maximum amplitude as a signature and estimates the target position through nonparametric kernel regression. The system was evaluated in experiments for two main configurations: a privacy-oriented configuration with code division multiple access operation and a centralized configuration with time division multiple access operation. The effects of the number and positions of sources on the performance of the privacy-oriented system was studied. Moreover, the effect of the number of fingerprint positions on the performance of both systems was investigated. Results showed that our privacy-oriented scheme provides an accuracy of 8.5 cm with 87% precision, whereas our centralized system provides an accuracy of 2.7 cm for 93% of measurements. A comparison between our privacy-oriented system and another acoustic location system based on code division multiple access operation and lateration was conducted on our test bench and revealed that the cumulative error distribution function of the fingerprint-based system is better than that of the lateration-based system. This result is similar to that found for Wi-Fi radio-based localization. However, our experiments are the first to demonstrate the detrimental effect that reverberation has on naive acoustic localization approaches.

  19. Evaluation of Mesoscale Model Phenomenological Verification Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred

    2006-01-01

    Forecasters at the Spaceflight Meteorology Group, 45th Weather Squadron, and National Weather Service in Melbourne, FL use mesoscale numerical weather prediction model output in creating their operational forecasts. These models aid in forecasting weather phenomena that could compromise the safety of launch, landing, and daily ground operations and must produce reasonable weather forecasts in order for their output to be useful in operations. Considering the importance of model forecasts to operations, their accuracy in forecasting critical weather phenomena must be verified to determine their usefulness. The currently-used traditional verification techniques involve an objective point-by-point comparison of model output and observations valid at the same time and location. The resulting statistics can unfairly penalize high-resolution models that make realistic forecasts of a certain phenomena, but are offset from the observations in small time and/or space increments. Manual subjective verification can provide a more valid representation of model performance, but is time-consuming and prone to personal biases. An objective technique that verifies specific meteorological phenomena, much in the way a human would in a subjective evaluation, would likely produce a more realistic assessment of model performance. Such techniques are being developed in the research community. The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) was tasked to conduct a literature search to identify phenomenological verification techniques being developed, determine if any are ready to use operationally, and outline the steps needed to implement any operationally-ready techniques into the Advanced Weather Information Processing System (AWIPS). The AMU conducted a search of all literature on the topic of phenomenological-based mesoscale model verification techniques and found 10 different techniques in various stages of development. Six of the techniques were developed to verify precipitation forecasts, one

  20. Ultrasonically assisted drilling: A finite-element model incorporating acoustic softening effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadnis, V. A.; Roy, A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasonically assisted drilling (UAD) is a novel machining technique suitable for drilling in hard-to-machine quasi-brittle materials such as carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites (CFRP). UAD has been shown to possess several advantages compared to conventional drilling (CD), including reduced thrust forces, diminished burr formation at drill exit and an overall improvement in roundness and surface finish of the drilled hole. Recently, our in-house experiments of UAD in CFRP composites demonstrated remarkable reductions in thrust-force and torque measurements (average force reductions in excess of 80%) when compared to CD with the same machining parameters. In this study, a 3D finite-element model of drilling in CFRP is developed. In order to model acoustic (ultrasonic) softening effects, a phenomenological model, which accounts for ultrasonically induced plastic strain, was implemented in ABAQUS/Explicit. The model also accounts for dynamic frictional effects, which also contribute to the overall improved machining characteristics in UAD. The model is validated with experimental findings, where an excellent correlation between the reduced thrust force and torque magnitude was achieved.

  1. Experimental aerodynamic and acoustic model testing of the Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) testbed coannular exhaust nozzle system: Comprehensive data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.; Morris, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    The component detail design drawings of the one sixth scale model of the variable cycle engine testbed demonstrator exhaust syatem tested are presented. Also provided are the basic acoustic and aerodynamic data acquired during the experimental model tests. The model drawings, an index to the acoustic data, an index to the aerodynamic data, tabulated and graphical acoustic data, and the tabulated aerodynamic data and graphs are discussed.

  2. An experimental modeling and acoustic emission monitoring of abrasive wear in a steel/diabase pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korchuganov, M. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Podgornyh, O. A.; Shamarin, N. N.; Filippova, E. O.

    2016-11-01

    The earthmoving of permafrost soil is a critical task for excavation of minerals and construction on new territories. Failure by abrasive wear is the main reason for excavation parts of earthmoving and soil cutting machines. Therefore investigation of this type of wear is a challenge for developing efficient and wear resistant working parts. This paper is focused on conducting tribological experiments with sliding the steel samples over the surface of diabase stone sample where abrasive wear conditions of soil cutting are modeled experimentally. The worn surfaces of all samples have been examined and transfer of metal and stone particles revealed. The acoustic emission (AE) signals have been recorded and related to the results of worn surface analysis. he acoustic emission (AE) signals have been recorded and related to the results of worn surface analysis. As shown the wear intensity correlates to that of acoustic emission. Both acoustic emission signal median frequency and energy are found to be sensitive to the wear mode.

  3. Temperature elevation of biological tissue model exposed by focused ultrasound with acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Naotaka; Kudo, Nobuki; Akiyama, Iwaki

    2012-09-01

    Focused ultrasound with acoustic radiation force (ARF) is beginning to be used for imaging and measuring tissue elasticity. On the other hand, it was suggested that the temperature elevation near bone at focus may be significant within the limits of acoustic output regulation in diagnostic ultrasound devices (Herman; 2002). In this study, with the aim of obtaining the relationships between temperature elevations and parameters of ultrasound exposure with ARF, temperature elevations in two kinds of tissue models with or without bone were numerically evaluated. The results showed that the temperature elevation at focus on the surface of bone may exceed an allowable temperature elevation which WFUMB guideline recommends, even though the acoustic intensity is within the limits of acoustic output regulation in diagnostic ultrasound devices.

  4. Source localization with acoustic sensor arrays using generative model based fitting with sparse constraints.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Jose; Pizarro, Daniel; Macias-Guarasa, Javier

    2012-10-15

    This paper presents a novel approach for indoor acoustic source localization using sensor arrays. The proposed solution starts by defining a generative model, designed to explain the acoustic power maps obtained by Steered Response Power (SRP) strategies. An optimization approach is then proposed to fit the model to real input SRP data and estimate the position of the acoustic source. Adequately fitting the model to real SRP data, where noise and other unmodelled effects distort the ideal signal, is the core contribution of the paper. Two basic strategies in the optimization are proposed. First, sparse constraints in the parameters of the model are included, enforcing the number of simultaneous active sources to be limited. Second, subspace analysis is used to filter out portions of the input signal that cannot be explained by the model. Experimental results on a realistic speech database show statistically significant localization error reductions of up to 30% when compared with the SRP-PHAT strategies.

  5. Source Localization with Acoustic Sensor Arrays Using Generative Model Based Fitting with Sparse Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Jose; Pizarro, Daniel; Macias-Guarasa, Javier

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for indoor acoustic source localization using sensor arrays. The proposed solution starts by defining a generative model, designed to explain the acoustic power maps obtained by Steered Response Power (SRP) strategies. An optimization approach is then proposed to fit the model to real input SRP data and estimate the position of the acoustic source. Adequately fitting the model to real SRP data, where noise and other unmodelled effects distort the ideal signal, is the core contribution of the paper. Two basic strategies in the optimization are proposed. First, sparse constraints in the parameters of the model are included, enforcing the number of simultaneous active sources to be limited. Second, subspace analysis is used to filter out portions of the input signal that cannot be explained by the model. Experimental results on a realistic speech database show statistically significant localization error reductions of up to 30% when compared with the SRP-PHAT strategies. PMID:23202021

  6. Determination of elastic coefficients of bone and composite materials by acoustic immersion technique.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Tomás; Seiner, Hanus; Landa, Michal

    2006-01-01

    Elastic properties of single parts of a human skeleton are necessary to know for modelling bone tissue-implants interactions as well as for diagnostic purposes. This paper contributes to the methodology of the evaluation of elastic properties of bones by the ultrasonic wave inversion. The method was developed on composite structures such as plates and cylindrical shells. Final results are then demonstrated on the bovine cortical bone specimen. Properties are supposed to exhibit an orthotropic or a transversally isotropic symmetry. Quasi-longitudinal and quasi-transversal waves are generated from the wave diffraction on the liquid/specimen interface. Wave velocity fields obtained by the ultrasonic scanning technique are used as an input to the inversion procedure for all elastic constants determination. Experimental results are confronted with the numerical modelling of the wave propagation and the stability of resulting data is evaluated by the statistical method based on the Monte-Carlo simulation. The suggested approach has a potential for the qualify of such measurements performed on fresh bones and also for improvement in-situ ultrasonic techniques.

  7. Acoustic Measurements of a Large Civil Transport Main Landing Gear Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravetta, Patricio A.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Wisda, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Microphone phased array acoustic measurements of a 26 percent-scale, Boeing 777-200 main landing gear model with and without noise reduction fairings installed were obtained in the anechoic configuration of the Virginia Tech Stability Tunnel. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.17 with the latter speed used as the nominal test condition. The fully and partially dressed gear with the truck angle set at 13 degrees toe-up landing configuration were the two most extensively tested configurations, serving as the baselines for comparison purposes. Acoustic measurements were also acquired for the same two baseline configurations with the truck angle set at 0 degrees. In addition, a previously tested noise reducing, toboggan-shaped fairing was re-evaluated extensively to address some of the lingering questions regarding the extent of acoustic benefit achievable with this device. The integrated spectra generated from the acoustic source maps reconfirm, in general terms, the previously reported noise reduction performance of the toboggan fairing as installed on an isolated gear. With the recent improvements to the Virginia Tech tunnel acoustic quality and microphone array capabilities, the present measurements provide an additional, higher quality database to the acoustic information available for this gear model.

  8. Analytical Model of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever Tip-Sample Surface Interactions for Various Acoustic-Atomic Force Microscopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model of the interaction of the cantilever tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is developed that accounts for the nonlinearity of the tip-surface interaction force. The interaction is modeled as a nonlinear spring coupled at opposite ends to linear springs representing cantilever and sample surface oscillators. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a standard iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and the commonly used intermittent contact mode (TappingMode) generally available on AFMs. The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample for the amplitude and phase images generated by the A-AFM techniques. Application of the model to RDF-AFUM and intermittent soft contact phase images of LaRC-cp2 polyimide polymer is discussed. The model predicts variations in the Young modulus of the material of 24 percent from the RDF-AFUM image and 18 percent from the intermittent soft contact image. Both predictions are in good agreement with the literature value of 21 percent obtained from independent, macroscopic measurements of sheet polymer material.

  9. A Method to Test Model Calibration Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, Ron; Polly, Ben; Neymark, Joel

    2016-08-26

    This paper describes a method for testing model calibration techniques. Calibration is commonly used in conjunction with energy retrofit audit models. An audit is conducted to gather information about the building needed to assemble an input file for a building energy modeling tool. A calibration technique is used to reconcile model predictions with utility data, and then the 'calibrated model' is used to predict energy savings from a variety of retrofit measures and combinations thereof. Current standards and guidelines such as BPI-2400 and ASHRAE-14 set criteria for 'goodness of fit' and assume that if the criteria are met, then the calibration technique is acceptable. While it is logical to use the actual performance data of the building to tune the model, it is not certain that a good fit will result in a model that better predicts post-retrofit energy savings. Therefore, the basic idea here is that the simulation program (intended for use with the calibration technique) is used to generate surrogate utility bill data and retrofit energy savings data against which the calibration technique can be tested. This provides three figures of merit for testing a calibration technique, 1) accuracy of the post-retrofit energy savings prediction, 2) closure on the 'true' input parameter values, and 3) goodness of fit to the utility bill data. The paper will also discuss the pros and cons of using this synthetic surrogate data approach versus trying to use real data sets of actual buildings.

  10. A Finite-Element Method Model of Soft Tissue Response to Impulsive Acoustic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Palmeri, Mark L.; Sharma, Amy C.; Bouchard, Richard R.; Nightingale, Roger W.; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2010-01-01

    Several groups are studying acoustic radiation force and its ability to image the mechanical properties of tissue. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is one modality using standard diagnostic ultrasound scanners to generate localized, impulsive, acoustic radiation forces in tissue. The dynamic response of tissue is measured via conventional ultrasonic speckle-tracking methods and provides information about the mechanical properties of tissue. A finite-element method (FEM) model has been developed that simulates the dynamic response of tissues, with and without spherical inclusions, to an impulsive acoustic radiation force excitation from a linear array transducer. These FEM models were validated with calibrated phantoms. Shear wave speed, and therefore elasticity, dictates tissue relaxation following ARFI excitation, but Poisson’s ratio and density do not significantly alter tissue relaxation rates. Increased acoustic attenuation in tissue increases the relative amount of tissue displacement in the near field compared with the focal depth, but relaxation rates are not altered. Applications of this model include improving image quality, and distilling material and structural information from tissue’s dynamic response to ARFI excitation. Future work on these models includes incorporation of viscous material properties and modeling the ultrasonic tracking of displaced scatterers. PMID:16382621

  11. A novel imaging technique based on the spatial coherence of backscattered waves: demonstration in the presence of acoustical clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Jeremy J.; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Lediju, Muyinatu; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2011-03-01

    In the last 20 years, the number of suboptimal and inadequate ultrasound exams has increased. This trend has been linked to the increasing population of overweight and obese individuals. The primary causes of image degradation in these individuals are often attributed to phase aberration and clutter. Phase aberration degrades image quality by distorting the transmitted and received pressure waves, while clutter degrades image quality by introducing incoherent acoustical interference into the received pressure wavefront. Although significant research efforts have pursued the correction of image degradation due to phase aberration, few efforts have characterized or corrected image degradation due to clutter. We have developed a novel imaging technique that is capable of differentiating ultrasonic signals corrupted by acoustical interference. The technique, named short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) imaging, is based on the spatial coherence of the received ultrasonic wavefront at small spatial distances across the transducer aperture. We demonstrate comparative B-mode and SLSC images using full-wave simulations that include the effects of clutter and show that SLSC imaging generates contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) that are significantly better than B-mode imaging under noise-free conditions. In the presence of noise, SLSC imaging significantly outperforms conventional B-mode imaging in all image quality metrics. We demonstrate the use of SLSC imaging in vivo and compare B-mode and SLSC images of human thyroid and liver.

  12. Dislodgement and removal of dust-particles from a surface by a technique combining acoustic standing wave and airflow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Wu, Junru

    2010-01-01

    It is known that there are many fine particles on the moon and Mars. Their existence may cause risk for the success of a long-term project for NASA, i.e., exploration and habitation of the moon and Mars. These dust-particles might cover the solar panels, making them fail to generate electricity, and they might also penetrate through seals on space suits, hatches, and vehicle wheels causing many incidents. The fine particles would be hazardous to human health if they were inhaled. Development of robust dust mitigation technology is urgently needed for the viable long-term exploration and habilitation of either the moon or Mars. A feasibility study to develop a dust removal technique, which may be used in space-stations or other enclosures for habitation, is reported. It is shown experimentally that the acoustic radiation force produced by a 13.8 kHz 128 dB sound-level standing wave between a 3 cm-aperture tweeter and a reflector separated by 9 cm is strong enough to overcome the van der Waals adhesive force between the dust-particles and the reflector-surface. Thus the majority of fine particles (>2 microm diameter) on a reflector-surface can be dislodged and removed by a technique combining acoustic levitation and airflow methods. The removal efficiency deteriorates for particles of less than 2 microm in size.

  13. Localization of quenches and mechanical disturbances in the Mu2e transport solenoid prototype using acoustic emission technique

    DOE PAGES

    Marchevsky, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Lamm, M.; ...

    2016-02-12

    Acoustic emission (AE) detection is a noninvasive technique allowing the localization of the mechanical events and quenches in superconducting magnets. Application of the AE technique is especially advantageous in situations where magnet integrity can be jeopardized by the use of voltage taps or inductive pickup coils. As the prototype module of the transport solenoid (TS) for the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab represents such a special case, we have developed a dedicated six-channel AE detection system and accompanying software aimed at localizing mechanical events during the coil cold testing. The AE sensors based on transversely polarized piezoceramic washers combined with cryogenicmore » preamplifiers were mounted at the outer surface of the solenoid aluminum shell, with a 60° angular step around the circumference. Acoustic signals were simultaneously acquired at a rate of 500 kS/s, prefiltered and sorted based on their arrival time. Next, based on the arrival timing, angular and axial coordinates of the AE sources within the magnet structure were calculated. Furthermore, we present AE measurement results obtained during cooldown, spot heater firing, and spontaneous quenching of the Mu2e TS module prototype and discuss their relevance for mechanical stability assessment and quench localization.« less

  14. Localization of quenches and mechanical disturbances in the Mu2e transport solenoid prototype using acoustic emission technique

    SciTech Connect

    Marchevsky, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Lamm, M.; Tartaglia, M. A.; Lopes, M. L.

    2016-02-12

    Acoustic emission (AE) detection is a noninvasive technique allowing the localization of the mechanical events and quenches in superconducting magnets. Application of the AE technique is especially advantageous in situations where magnet integrity can be jeopardized by the use of voltage taps or inductive pickup coils. As the prototype module of the transport solenoid (TS) for the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab represents such a special case, we have developed a dedicated six-channel AE detection system and accompanying software aimed at localizing mechanical events during the coil cold testing. The AE sensors based on transversely polarized piezoceramic washers combined with cryogenic preamplifiers were mounted at the outer surface of the solenoid aluminum shell, with a 60° angular step around the circumference. Acoustic signals were simultaneously acquired at a rate of 500 kS/s, prefiltered and sorted based on their arrival time. Next, based on the arrival timing, angular and axial coordinates of the AE sources within the magnet structure were calculated. Furthermore, we present AE measurement results obtained during cooldown, spot heater firing, and spontaneous quenching of the Mu2e TS module prototype and discuss their relevance for mechanical stability assessment and quench localization.

  15. Study on the interfacial adhesion property of low-k thin film by the surface acoustic waves with cohesive zone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xia; Qi, Haiyang; Tao, Ye; Kikkawa, Takamaro

    2016-12-01

    The cohesive zone model being increasingly used in discrete fracture processes simulation is adopted to study the interfacial adhesion property of low dielectric constant film deposited on the silicon substrate in this work. The two parameters, maximum normal traction and normal interface characteristic length in cohesive zone model, are taken into account to calculate the theoretical surface acoustic wave dispersion curves. Broadband surface acoustic wave signals with effective frequency up to 200 MHz are generated by short pulse ultraviolet laser source and detected by a piezoelectric transducer. The interfacial adhesion properties of dense and porous films determined accurately by matching the experimental dispersion curves with the calculated theoretical dispersion curves are 10.7 PPa/m and 2.8 PPa/m, respectively. The results show that the adhesion quality of dense low dielectric constant film is better than that of the porous. The study exhibits that the adhesion properties determined by improved laser-generated surface acoustic wave technique have the same trends with the test results of the nanoscratch technique, which indicates that the surface acoustic wave technique with cohesive zone model is a promising and nondestructive method for determining interfacial adhesion properties between low dielectric constant film and substrate.

  16. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes Timothy F. Duda Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, MS 11 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods... Hole , MA 02543 phone: (508) 289-2495 fax: (508) 457-2194 email: tduda@whoi.edu James F. Lynch Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering...Department, MS 11 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole , MA 02543 phone: (508) 289-2230 fax: (508) 457-2194 email: jlynch@whoi.edu Ying

  17. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    in the abyssal oceans , where typically SIW/Stopo > 1 for tall seamounts and ridges , the entire bottom topography contributes to the generation of...internal waves. In contrast, for (a) (b) 18 moderate ocean depths (say less than 4 km), where typically SIW/Stopo < 1 for seamounts and ridges , the...Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes Timothy F. Duda Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, MS 11 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods

  18. Modeling of Structural-Acoustic Interaction Using Coupled FE/BE Method and Control of Interior Acoustic Pressure Using Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Shi, Yacheng

    1997-01-01

    A coupled finite element (FE) and boundary element (BE) approach is presented to model full coupled structural/acoustic/piezoelectric systems. The dual reciprocity boundary element method is used so that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the coupled system can be obtained, and to extend this approach to time dependent problems. The boundary element method is applied to interior acoustic domains, and the results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structural-acoustic problems are then analyzed with the coupled finite element/boundary element method, where the finite element method models the structural domain and the boundary element method models the acoustic domain. Results for a system consisting of an isotropic panel and a cubic cavity are in good agreement with exact solutions and experiment data. The response of a composite panel backed cavity is then obtained. The results show that the mass and stiffness of piezoelectric layers have to be considered. The coupled finite element and boundary element equations are transformed into modal coordinates, which is more convenient for transient excitation. Several transient problems are solved based on this formulation. Two control designs, a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and a feedforward controller, are applied to reduce the acoustic pressure inside the cavity based on the equations in modal coordinates. The results indicate that both controllers can reduce the interior acoustic pressure and the plate deflection.

  19. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-08-05

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang's optimised finite difference scheme.

  20. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang’s optimised finite difference scheme. PMID:27491333

  1. A new technique and application for nonlinear acoustic fatigue of stiffened composite panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferman, M. A.; Jacobs, J. H.

    A new solution for the prediction of nonlinear acoustic fatigue of aircraft panels is presented, emphasizing both bidirectionally and unidirectionally stiffened panels. The response of integrally stiffened panels has been studied and a prediction methodology for nonlinear bay response and its relation to overall panel response for unimodal systems is developed. Test results indicate the accuracy for composite and metal panels, utilizing both literature and in-house data. Comparison with other prediction methods indicate that significantly more accurate results are achieved by this approach.

  2. Flow-Structure-Acoustic Interaction Computational Modeling of Voice Production inside an Entire Airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weili; Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian

    2015-11-01

    Human voice quality is directly determined by the interplay of dynamic behavior of glottal flow, vibratory characteristics of VFs and acoustic characteristics of upper airway. These multiphysics constituents are tightly coupled together and precisely coordinate to produce understandable sound. Despite many years' research effort, the direct relationships among the detailed flow features, VF vibration and aeroacoustics still remains elusive. This study utilizes a first-principle based, flow-structure-acoustics interaction computational modeling approach to study the process of voice production inside an entire human airway. In the current approach, a sharp interface immersed boundary method based incompressible flow solver is utilized to model the glottal flow; A finite element based solid mechanics solver is utilized to model the vocal vibration; A high-order immersed boundary method based acoustics solver is utilized to directly compute sound. These three solvers are fully coupled to mimic the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. The geometry of airway is reconstructed based on the in-vivo MRI measurement reported by Story et al. (1995) and a three-layer continuum based vocal fold model is taken from Titze and Talkin (1979). Results from these simulations will be presented and further analyzed to get new insight into the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. This study is expected to improve the understanding of fundamental physical mechanism of voice production and to help to build direct cause-effect relationship between biomechanics and voice sound.

  3. Development of Modeling Capabilities for Launch Pad Acoustics and Ignition Transient Environment Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff; Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Putnam, Gabriel C.; Liever, Peter A.; Williams, Brandon R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents development efforts to establish modeling capabilities for launch vehicle liftoff acoustics and ignition transient environment predictions. Peak acoustic loads experienced by the launch vehicle occur during liftoff with strong interaction between the vehicle and the launch facility. Acoustic prediction engineering tools based on empirical models are of limited value in efforts to proactively design and optimize launch vehicles and launch facility configurations for liftoff acoustics. Modeling approaches are needed that capture the important details of the plume flow environment including the ignition transient, identify the noise generation sources, and allow assessment of the effects of launch pad geometric details and acoustic mitigation measures such as water injection. This paper presents a status of the CFD tools developed by the MSFC Fluid Dynamics Branch featuring advanced multi-physics modeling capabilities developed towards this goal. Validation and application examples are presented along with an overview of application in the prediction of liftoff environments and the design of targeted mitigation measures such as launch pad configuration and sound suppression water placement.

  4. Pulse echo and combined resonance techniques: a full set of LGT acoustic wave constants and temperature coefficients.

    PubMed

    Sturtevant, Blake T; Davulis, Peter M; da Cunha, Mauricio Pereira

    2009-04-01

    This work reports on the determination of langatate elastic and piezoelectric constants and their associated temperature coefficients employing 2 independent methods, the pulse echo overlap (PEO) and a combined resonance technique (CRT) to measure bulk acoustic wave (BAW) phase velocities. Details on the measurement techniques are provided and discussed, including the analysis of the couplant material in the PEO technique used to couple signal to the sample, which showed to be an order of magnitude more relevant than the experimental errors involved in the data extraction. At room temperature, elastic and piezoelectric constants were extracted by the PEO and the CRT methods and showed results consistent to within a few percent for the elastic constants. Both raw acquired data and optimized constants, based on minimization routines applied to all the modes involved in the measurements, are provided and discussed. Comparison between the elastic constants and their temperature behavior with the literature reveals the recent efforts toward the consistent growth and characterization of LGT, in spite of significant variations (between 1 and 30%) among the constants extracted by different groups at room temperature. The density, dielectric permittivity constants, and respective temperature coefficients used in this work have also been independently determined based on samples from the same crystal boule. The temperature behavior of the BAW modes was extracted using the CRT technique, which has the advantage of not relying on temperature dependent acoustic couplants. Finally, the extracted temperature coefficients for the elastic and piezoelectric constants between room temperature and 120 degrees C are reported and discussed in this work.

  5. A noncontacting method for measuring sheet grammage and thickness using acoustic pulse techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuohelainen, Reijo Antero

    A new way to use an acoustic pulse transmission method to measure the basis weight and the thickness of paper and other thin materials was developed. The apparatus consisted of a sound source, a microphone, a digital oscilloscope, and a microcomputer. A short acoustic tone burst is transmitted through the sample and the transmission loss is defined as the ratio of the receiver voltage amplitude measured with the sample present to the voltage amplitude measured without the sample. This attenuation is a function of the basis weight of the sample and of the frequency used in the measurement. Different types of paper and plastic foils were measured with good accuracy. The measurement frequencies vary from 5 kHz to 40 kHz depending on the sample parameters. With the optimum frequency for the specific sample the accuracy is about +/-1% and the resolution is 0.5% of the grammage of the sample. This system can be used to measure both transparent and opaque foils, which makes it useful for many industrial and laboratory applications.

  6. Damage Modes Recognition and Hilbert-Huang Transform Analyses of CFRP Laminates Utilizing Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WenQin, Han; Ying, Luo; AiJun, Gu; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-04-01

    Discrimination of acoustic emission (AE) signals related to different damage modes is of great importance in carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite materials. To gain a deeper understanding of the initiation, growth and evolution of the different types of damage, four types of specimens for different lay-ups and orientations and three types of specimens for interlaminar toughness tests are subjected to tensile test along with acoustic emission monitoring. AE signals have been collected and post-processed, the statistical results show that the peak frequency of AE signal can distinguish various damage modes effectively. After a AE signal were decomposed by Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method, it may separate and extract all damage modes included in this AE signal apart from damage mode corresponding to the peak frequency. Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) of AE signals can clearly illustrate the frequency distribution of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) components in time-scale in different damage stages, and can calculate accurate instantaneous frequency for damage modes recognition to help understanding the damage process.

  7. Volume I. Percussion Sextet. (original Composition). Volume II. The Simulation of Acoustical Space by Means of Physical Modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzara, Leonard Charles

    1990-01-01

    The dissertation is in two parts:. 1. Percussion Sextet. The Percussion Sextet is a one movement musical composition with a length of approximately fifteen minutes. It is for six instrumentalists, each on a number of percussion instruments. The overriding formal problem was to construct a coherent and compelling structure which fuses a diversity of musical materials and textures into a dramatic whole. Particularly important is the synthesis of opposing tendencies contained in stochastic and deterministic processes: global textures versus motivic detail, and randomness versus total control. Several compositional techniques are employed in the composition. These methods of composition will be aided, in part, by the use of artificial intelligence techniques programmed on a computer. Finally, the percussion ensemble is the ideal medium to realize the above processes since it encompasses a wide range of both pitched and unpitched timbres, and since a great variety of textures and densities can be created with a certain economy of means. 2. The simulation of acoustical space by means of physical modeling. This is a written report describing the research and development of a computer program which simulates the characteristics of acoustical space in two dimensions. With the computer program the user can simulate most conventional acoustical spaces, as well as those physically impossible to realize in the real world. The program simulates acoustical space by means of geometric modeling. This involves defining wall equations, phantom source points and wall diffusions, and then processing input files containing digital signals through the program, producing output files ready for digital to analog conversion. The user of the program is able to define wall locations and wall reflectivity and roughness characteristics, all of which can be changed over time. Sound source locations are also definable within the acoustical space and these locations can be changed independently at

  8. Acoustic and Perceptual Effects of Left-Right Laryngeal Asymmetries Based on Computational Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samlan, Robin A.; Story, Brad H.; Lotto, Andrew J.; Bunton, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Computational modeling was used to examine the consequences of 5 different laryngeal asymmetries on acoustic and perceptual measures of vocal function. Method: A kinematic vocal fold model was used to impose 5 laryngeal asymmetries: adduction, edge bulging, nodal point ratio, amplitude of vibration, and starting phase. Thirty /a/ and /?/…

  9. Modeling of Acoustic Field Statistics for Deep and Shallow Water Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    eddies, internal tides, internal waves, and fine structure ( spice ) are needed, while in the shallow water case a models of the random linear internal...waves and spice are lacking. APPROACH The approach to this research is to rigorously test acoustic fluctuation models using Monte Carlo

  10. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of a Helmholtz resonator: Discrete vortex model compared to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiwen; Jing, Xiaodong Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-15

    The acoustic resonance in a Helmholtz resonator excited by a low Mach number grazing flow is studied theoretically. The nonlinear numerical model is established by coupling the vortical motion at the cavity opening with the cavity acoustic mode through an explicit force balancing relation between the two sides of the opening. The vortical motion is modeled in the potential flow framework, in which the oscillating motion of the thin shear layer is described by an array of convected point vortices, and the unsteady vortex shedding is determined by the Kutta condition. The cavity acoustic mode is obtained from the one-dimensional acoustic propagation model, the time-domain equivalent of which is given by means of a broadband time-domain impedance model. The acoustic resistances due to radiation and viscous loss at the opening are also taken into account. The physical processes of the self-excited oscillations, at both resonance and off-resonance states, are simulated directly in the time domain. Results show that the shear layer exhibits a weak flapping motion at the off-resonance state, whereas it rolls up into large-scale vortex cores when resonances occur. Single and dual-vortex patterns are observed corresponding to the first and second hydrodynamic modes. The simulation also reveals different trajectories of the two vortices across the opening when the first and second hydrodynamic modes co-exist. The strong modulation of the shed vorticity by the acoustic feedback at the resonance state is demonstrated. The model overestimates the pressure pulsation amplitude by a factor 2, which is expected to be due to the turbulence of the flow which is not taken into account. The model neglects vortex shedding at the downstream and side edges of the cavity. This will also result in an overestimation of the pulsation amplitude.

  11. Analogies between the measurement of acoustic impedance via the reaction on the source method and the automatic microwave vector network analyzer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, James; Sutton, Robert; Post, John

    2003-10-01

    One useful method of acoustic impedance measurement involves the measurement of the electrical impedance ``looking into'' the electrical port of a reciprocal electroacoustic transducer. This reaction on the source method greatly facilitates the measurement of acoustic impedance by borrowing highly refined techniques to measure electrical impedance. It is also well suited for in situ acoustic impedance measurements. In order to accurately determine acoustic impedance from the measured electrical impedance, the characteristics of the transducer must be accurately known, i.e., the characteristics of the transducer must be ``removed'' completely from the data. The measurement of acoustic impedance via the measurement of the reaction on the source is analogous to modern microwave measurements made with an automatic vector network analyzer. The action of the analyzer is described as de-embedding the desired data (such as acoustic impedance) from the raw data. Such measurements are fundamentally substitution measurements in that the transducer's characteristics are determined by measuring a set of reference standards. The reaction on the source method is extended to take advantage of improvements in microwave measurement techniques which allow calibration via imperfect standard loads. This removes one of the principal weaknesses of the method in that the requirement of high-quality reference standards is relaxed.

  12. Modeling photothermal and acoustical induced microbubble generation and growth.

    PubMed

    Krasovitski, Boris; Kislev, Hanoch; Kimmel, Eitan

    2007-12-01

    Previous experimental studies showed that powerful heating of nanoparticles by a laser pulse using energy density greater than 100 mJ/cm(2), could induce vaporization and generate microbubbles. When ultrasound is introduced at the same time as the laser pulse, much less laser power is required. For therapeutic applications, generation of microbubbles on demand at target locations, e.g. cells or bacteria can be used to induce hyperthermia or to facilitate drug delivery. The objective of this work is to develop a method capable of predicting photothermal and acoustic parameters in terms of laser power and acoustic pressure amplitude that are needed to produce stable microbubbles; and investigate the influence of bubble coalescence on the thresholds when the microbubbles are generated around nanoparticles that appear in clusters. We develop and solve here a combined problem of momentum, heat and mass transfer which is associated with generation and growth of a microbubble, filled with a mixture of non-vaporized gas (air) and water vapor. The microbubble's size and gas content vary as a result of three mechanisms: gas expansion or compression, evaporation or condensation on the bubble boundary, and diffusion of dissolved air in the surrounding water. The simulations predict that when ultrasound is applied relatively low threshold values of laser and ultrasound power are required to obtain a stable microbubble from a single nanoparticle. Even lower power is required when microbubbles are formed by coalescence around a cluster of 10 nanoparticles. Laser pulse energy density of 21 mJ/cm(2) is predicted for instance together with acoustic pressure of 0.1 MPa for a cluster of 10 or 62 mJ/cm(2) for a single nanoparticle. Those values are well within the safety limits, and as such are most appealing for targeted therapeutic purposes.

  13. Comparing SO2 Emissions to Seismic and Acoustic Records: the Value and Limitations of the new UV Camera Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, M. P.; Waite, G. P.; Nadeau, P. A.; Watson, I. M.

    2008-12-01

    SO2 emission measurements are an important component of monitoring volcanic eruption processes. Owing mainly to limitations in the temporal resolution of measurements, the goal of merging a gas flux record with other geophysical datasets (seismic, acoustic) with the aim of investigating subsurface processes has been elusive. In recent years, ground-based, ultraviolet (UV) digital cameras have improved upon previous methods of SO2 observation by capturing a large portion of the plume in one measurement- a single image. The UV digital camera can record at up to 1Hz, producing a data set that is more comparable with other monitoring techniques, allowing for a more precise record of SO2 flux, and directly providing the plume speed. Many monitoring advantages are gained by using this technique, but the accuracy and limitations require thorough investigation. The effect of some user-controlled parameters, include image exposure length, the diameter of the lens aperture, the regularity of calibration cell imaging, and the use of the single or paired bandpass filters, are addressed in this study. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to clarify methodological consequences and quantify accuracy. Digital images of calibration cells were collected under varying observational conditions, and SO2 retrieval results from a coal power plant plume were compared to direct sampling measurements. The results indicate that the UV camera retrieval compares favorably with direct sampling methods; that careful attention must be paid to exposure times; and that there is some latitude in the calibration cell conversion technique. A multi-instrument field campaign was undertaken at Pacaya volcano, Guatemala to relate complementary high-temporal-resolution datasets. Between January 5 and January 9, 2008 SO2 flux was recorded at Pacaya using the UV camera. These measurements were coincident with recordings from a temporary network of five broadband seismometers and five low

  14. Acoustic normal modes using the propagator matrix technique for a stratified ocean overlaying an inhomogeneous anisotropic porous bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badiey, M.; Yamamoto, T.

    1986-01-01

    Propogation of acoustic normal modes at excitation frequencies of 50 to 50000 Hz in a shallow stratified ocean overlaying a transverse isotropic poro-elastic sediment bed is modeled. The Biot-Willis stiffness matrix of the poro-elastic anisotropy is defined in terms of physical properties of sediments to model the bed. Propagator matrix method is used to solve the differential equations for the motion stress vectors in both layered sediment and water. The effects of sediment properties on the dispersion and attenuation of acoustic waves are examined numerically. Using the relaxation principle it is observed that the energy loss is maximum at frequency referred to as relaxation frequency of the porous media given by f sub ri = (beta)(nu)/3 pi k (sub si), where beta is the porosity, nu is the kinematic viscosity of the pore fluid and k (sub si) is the anisotropic permeability coefficient. The phase speed of compressional and shear waves in the sediment becomes highly dispersive around this frequency. The sandy bottom's relaxation frequency is the range of several hundred hertz to several kilo hertz. This report presents the derivation of the mathematical expressions used in the model and a complete description of the computer program. Four examples of numerical calculations are provided.

  15. Acoustic source location in a jet-blown flap using a cross-correlation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. S.; Maus, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The acoustic source strength distribution in a turbulent flow field was measured for two far field microphones at 45 deg above and below the plane of the flap surface. A processed signal from an inclined hot-film anemometry probe was cross correlated with the signal from the appropriate far field microphone. The contribution made by the sources associated with the fluctuating pressure on the flap surface to the sound received at far field microphone was estimated by cross correlating the processed signals of microphones which were embedded in the flap surface with the far field microphone signals. In addition, detailed fluid dynamic measurements were made in the flow field of the jet flap using dual sensor hot-film anemometry probes.

  16. Protein fragment reconstruction using various modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniecki, Michal; Rotkiewicz, Piotr; Skolnick, Jeffrey; Kolinski, Andrzej

    2003-11-01

    Recently developed reduced models of proteins with knowledge-based force fields have been applied to a specific case of comparative modeling. From twenty high resolution protein structures of various structural classes, significant fragments of their chains have been removed and treated as unknown. The remaining portions of the structures were treated as fixed - i.e., as templates with an exact alignment. Then, the missed fragments were reconstructed using several modeling tools. These included three reduced types of protein models: the lattice SICHO (Side Chain Only) model, the lattice CABS (Cα + Cβ + Side group) model and an off-lattice model similar to the CABS model and called REFINER. The obtained reduced models were compared with more standard comparative modeling tools such as MODELLER and the SWISS-MODEL server. The reduced model results are qualitatively better for the higher resolution lattice models, clearly suggesting that these are now mature, competitive and complementary (in the range of sparse alignments) to the classical tools of comparative modeling. Comparison between the various reduced models strongly suggests that the essential ingredient for the sucessful and accurate modeling of protein structures is not the representation of conformational space (lattice, off-lattice, all-atom) but, rather, the specificity of the force fields used and, perhaps, the sampling techniques employed. These conclusions are encouraging for the future application of the fast reduced models in comparative modeling on a genomic scale.

  17. An acoustic-convective splitting-based approach for the Kapila two-phase flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Eikelder, M. F. P.; Daude, F.; Koren, B.; Tijsseling, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we propose a new acoustic-convective splitting-based numerical scheme for the Kapila five-equation two-phase flow model. The splitting operator decouples the acoustic waves and convective waves. The resulting two submodels are alternately numerically solved to approximate the solution of the entire model. The Lagrangian form of the acoustic submodel is numerically solved using an HLLC-type Riemann solver whereas the convective part is approximated with an upwind scheme. The result is a simple method which allows for a general equation of state. Numerical computations are performed for standard two-phase shock tube problems. A comparison is made with a non-splitting approach. The results are in good agreement with reference results and exact solutions.

  18. Long-range Acoustic Interactions in Insect Swarms: An Adaptive Gravity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbonos, Dan; Ianconescu, Reuven; Puckett, James G.; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Gov, Nir S.

    The collective motion of groups of animals emerges from the net effect of the interactions between individual members of the group. In many cases, such as birds, fish, or ungulates, these interactions are mediated by sensory stimuli that predominantly arise from nearby neighbors. But not all stimuli in animal groups are short range. Here, we consider mating swarms of midges, which interact primarily via long-range acoustic stimuli. We exploit the similarity in form between the decay of acoustic and gravitational sources to build a model for swarm behavior. By accounting for the adaptive nature of the midges' acoustic sensing, we show that our ``adaptive gravity'' model makes mean-field predictions that agree well with experimental observations of laboratory swarms. Our results highlight the role of sensory mechanisms and interaction range in collective animal behavior. The adaptive interactions that we present here open a new class of equations of motion, which may appear in other biological contexts.

  19. Acoustic characteristics of large-scale STOL model at forward speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falarski, M. D.; Aoyagi, K.; Koenig, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    Wind-tunnel investigations of the acoustic characteristics of the externally blown jet flap (EBF) and augmentor wing STOL concepts are dicussed. The large-scale EBF model was equipped with a triple-slotted blown by four JT15D turbofan engines with circular, coannular exhaust nozzles. The large-scale augmentor wing model was equipped with an unlined augmentor blown by a slot primary nozzle. The effects of airspeed and angle of attack on the acoustics of the EBF were small. At a forward speed of 60 knots, the impingement noise of the landing flap was approximately 2 db lower than in the static tests. Angle of attack increased the impingement noise approximately 0.1 decibels per degree. Flap deflection had a greater effect on the acoustics of the augmentor wing than did airspeed. For a nozzle pressure ratio of 1.9, the peak perceived noise level of the landing flap was 3 to 5 PNdb higher than that of the takeoff flap. The total sound power was also significantly higher for landing indicating that turning in the augmentor generated acoustic energy. Airspeed produced a small aft shift in acoustic directivity with no significant change in the peak perceived noise levels or sound power levels.

  20. Modeling and optimization of an acoustic diode based on micro-bubble nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiasheng; Lin, Zhou; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jianchun; Zhang, Dong

    2013-02-01

    The first acoustic diode (AD), which is composed by integrating a super lattice (SL) with a nonlinear medium (NLM), has recently been proposed to make a one-way street for the acoustic energy flux. This device prohibits the acoustic waves from one direction, but allows the transmission of the second harmonic wave (generated from the NLM) from the other direction. To improve its performance, it is crucial to transfer more acoustic energy from the stop-band of the acoustic filter (i.e., the SL) to its pass-band with the help of the NLM. In this work, a finite difference time domain model is developed to study the dynamic behaviors of the AD, in which a micro-bubble suspension takes the role of the NLM. Based on this model, the method of optimizing the nonlinearity-based AD is investigated by examining its performance with respect to several parameters, such as the periodicity number of the SL, the bubble size distribution, the bubble shell parameters, and the bubble concentration. It is also suggested that, instead of the rectification ratio, it might be more reasonable to characterize the performance of the AD with the energy attenuation coefficients (or transmission loss) for both incident directions.

  1. Acoustic and Perceptual Effects of Left–Right Laryngeal Asymmetries Based on Computational Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Samlan, Robin A.; Story, Brad H.; Lotto, Andrew J.; Bunton, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Computational modeling was used to examine the consequences of 5 different laryngeal asymmetries on acoustic and perceptual measures of vocal function. Method A kinematic vocal fold model was used to impose 5 laryngeal asymmetries: adduction, edge bulging, nodal point ratio, amplitude of vibration, and starting phase. Thirty /a/ and /I/ vowels were generated for each asymmetry and analyzed acoustically using cepstral peak prominence (CPP), harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR), and 3 measures of spectral slope (H1*-H2*, B0-B1, and B0-B2). Twenty listeners rated voice quality for a subset of the productions. Results Increasingly asymmetric adduction, bulging, and nodal point ratio explained significant variance in perceptual rating (R2 = .05, p < .001). The same factors resulted in generally decreasing CPP, HNR, and B0-B2 and in increasing B0-B1. Of the acoustic measures, only CPP explained significant variance in perceived quality (R2 = .14, p < .001). Increasingly asymmetric amplitude of vibration or starting phase minimally altered vocal function or voice quality. Conclusion Asymmetries of adduction, bulging, and nodal point ratio drove acoustic measures and perception in the current study, whereas asymmetric amplitude of vibration and starting phase demonstrated minimal influence on the acoustic signal or voice quality. PMID:24845730

  2. Characterization of a multi-element clinical HIFU system using acoustic holography and nonlinear modeling.

    PubMed

    Kreider, Wayne; Yuldashev, Petr V; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Farr, Navid; Partanen, Ari; Bailey, Michael R; Khokhlova, Vera A

    2013-08-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a treatment modality that relies on the delivery of acoustic energy to remote tissue sites to induce thermal and/or mechanical tissue ablation. To ensure the safety and efficacy of this medical technology, standard approaches are needed for accurately characterizing the acoustic pressures generated by clinical ultrasound sources under operating conditions. Characterization of HIFU fields is complicated by nonlinear wave propagation and the complexity of phased-array transducers. Previous work has described aspects of an approach that combines measurements and modeling, and here we demonstrate this approach for a clinical phased-array transducer. First, low amplitude hydrophone measurements were performed in water over a scan plane between the array and the focus. Second, these measurements were used to holographically reconstruct the surface vibrations of the transducer and to set a boundary condition for a 3-D acoustic propagation model. Finally, nonlinear simulations of the acoustic field were carried out over a range of source power levels. Simulation results were compared with pressure waveforms measured directly by hydrophone at both low and high power levels, demonstrating that details of the acoustic field, including shock formation, are quantitatively predicted.

  3. Characterization of a Multi-element Clinical HIFU System Using Acoustic Holography and Nonlinear Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Yuldashev, Petr V.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Farr, Navid; Partanen, Ari; Bailey, Michael R.; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a treatment modality that relies on the delivery of acoustic energy to remote tissue sites to induce thermal and/or mechanical tissue ablation. To ensure the safety and efficacy of this medical technology, standard approaches are needed for accurately characterizing the acoustic pressures generated by clinical ultrasound sources under operating conditions. Characterization of HIFU fields is complicated by nonlinear wave propagation and the complexity of phased-array transducers. Previous work has described aspects of an approach that combines measurements and modeling, and here we demonstrate this approach for a clinical phased array transducer. First, low-amplitude hydrophone measurements were performed in water over a scan plane between the array and the focus. Second, these measurements were used to holographically reconstruct the surface vibrations of the transducer and to set a boundary condition for a 3-D acoustic propagation model. Finally, nonlinear simulations of the acoustic field were carried out over a range of source power levels. Simulation results were compared to pressure waveforms measured directly by hydrophone at both low and high power levels, demonstrating that details of the acoustic field including shock formation are quantitatively predicted. PMID:25004539

  4. Flow-structure-acoustic interaction in a human voice model.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stefan; Kniesburges, Stefan; Müller, Stefan; Delgado, Antonio; Link, Gerhard; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Döllinger, Michael

    2009-03-01

    For the investigation of the physical processes of human phonation, inhomogeneous synthetic vocal folds were developed to represent the full fluid-structure-acoustic coupling. They consisted of polyurethane rubber with a stiffness in the range of human vocal folds and were mounted in a channel, shaped like the vocal tract in the supraglottal region. This test facility permitted extensive observations of flow-induced vocal fold vibrations, the periodic flow field, and the acoustic signals in the far field of the channel. Detailed measurements were performed applying particle-image velocimetry, a laser-scanning vibrometer, a microphone, unsteady pressure sensors, and a hot-wire probe, with the aim of identifying the physical mechanisms in human phonation. The results support the existence of the Coanda effect during phonation, with the flow attaching to one vocal fold and separating from the other. This behavior is not linked to one vocal fold and changes stochastically from cycle to cycle. The oscillating flow field generates a tonal sound. The broadband noise is presumed to be caused by the interaction of the asymmetric flow with the downstream-facing surfaces of the vocal folds, analogous to trailing-edge noise.

  5. Acoustic response modeling of energetics systems in confined spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, David R.; Hixon, Ray; Liou, William W.; Sanford, Matthew

    2007-04-01

    In recent times, warfighting has been taking place not in far-removed areas but within urban environments. As a consequence, the modern warfighter must adapt. Currently, an effort is underway to develop shoulder-mounted rocket launcher rounds suitable with reduced acoustic signatures for use in such environments. Of prime importance is to ensure that these acoustic levels, generated by propellant burning, reflections from enclosures, etc., are at tolerable levels without requiring excessive hearing protection. Presented below is a proof-of-concept approach aimed at developing a computational tool to aid in the design process. Unsteady, perfectly-expanded-jet simulations at two different Mach numbers and one at an elevated temperature ratio were conducted using an existing computational aeroacoustics code. From the solutions, sound pressure levels and frequency spectra were then obtained. The results were compared to sound pressure levels collected from a live-fire test of the weapon. Lastly, an outline of work that is to continue and be completed in the near future will be presented.

  6. An Acoustic Demonstration Model for CW and Pulsed Spectrosocopy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starck, Torben; Mäder, Heinrich; Trueman, Trevor; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2009-06-01

    High school and undergraduate students have often difficulties if new concepts are introduced in their physics or chemistry lectures. Lecture demonstrations and references to more familiar analogues can be of great help to the students in such situations. We have developed an experimental setup to demonstrate the principles of cw absorption and pulsed excitation - emission spectroscopies, using acoustical analogues. Our radiation source is a speaker and the detector is a microphone, both controlled by a computer sound card. The acoustical setup is housed in a plexiglas box, which serves as a resonator. It turns out that beer glasses are suitable samples; this also helps to keep the students interested! The instrument is controlled by a LabView program. In a cw experiment, the sound frequency is swept through a certain frequency range and the microphone response is recorded simultaneously as function of frequency. A background signal without sample is recorded, and background subtraction yields the beer glass spectrum. In a pulsed experiment, a short sound pulse is generated and the microphone is used to record the resulting emission signal of the beer glass. A Fourier transformation of the time domain signal gives then the spectrum. We will discuss the experimental setup and show videos of the experiments.

  7. Research Techniques Made Simple: Skin Carcinogenesis Models: Xenotransplantation Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mollo, Maria Rosaria; Antonini, Dario; Cirillo, Luisa; Missero, Caterina

    2016-02-01

    Xenotransplantation is a widely used technique to test the tumorigenic potential of human cells in vivo using immunodeficient mice. Here we describe basic technologies and recent advances in xenotransplantation applied to study squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the skin. SCC cells isolated from tumors can either be cultured to generate a cell line or injected directly into mice. Several immunodeficient mouse models are available for selection based on the experimental design and the type of tumorigenicity assay. Subcutaneous injection is the most widely used technique for xenotransplantation because it involves a simple procedure allowing the use of a large number of cells, although it may not mimic the original tumor environment. SCC cell injections at the epidermal-to-dermal junction or grafting of organotypic cultures containing human stroma have also been used to more closely resemble the tumor environment. Mixing of SCC cells with cancer-associated fibroblasts can allow the study of their interaction and reciprocal influence, which can be followed in real time by intradermal ear injection using conventional fluorescent microscopy. In this article, we will review recent advances in xenotransplantation technologies applied to study behavior of SCC cells and their interaction with the tumor environment in vivo.

  8. A finite element propagation model for extracting normal incidence impedance in nonprogressive acoustic wave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Tanner, Sharon E.; Parrott, Tony L.

    1995-04-01

    A propagation model method for extracting the normal incidence impedance of an acoustic material installed as a finite length segment in a wall of a duct carrying a nonprogressive wave field is presented. The method recasts the determination of the unknown impedance as the minimization of the normalized wall pressure error function. A finite element propagation model is combined with a coarse/fine grid impedance plane search technique to extract the impedance of the material. Results are presented for three different materials for which the impedance is known. For each material, the input data required for the prediction scheme was computed from modal theory and then contaminated by random error. The finite element method reproduces the known impedance of each material almost exactly for random errors typical of those found in many measurement environments. Thus, the method developed here provides a means for determining the impedance of materials in a nonprogressirve wave environment such as that usually encountered in a commercial aircraft engine and most laboratory settings.

  9. A Finite Element Propagation Model for Extracting Normal Incidence Impedance in Nonprogressive Acoustic Wave Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Tanner, Sharon E.; Parrott, Tony L.

    1996-04-01

    A propagation model method for extracting the normal incidence impedance of an acoustic material installed as a finite length segment in a wall of a duct carrying a nonprogressive wave field is presented. The method recasts the determination of the unknown impedance as the minimization of the normalized wall pressure error function. A finite element propagation model is combined with a coarse/fine grid impedance plane search technique to extract the impedance of the material. Results are presented for three different materials for which the impedance is known. For each material, the input data required for the prediction scheme were computed from modal theory and then contaminated by random error. The finite element method reproduces the known impedance of each material almost exactly for random errors typical of those found in many measurement environments. Thus, the method developed here provides a means for determining the impedance of materials in a nonprogressive wave environment such as that usually encountered in a commercial aircraft engine and in most laboratory settings.

  10. Rocket engine diagnostics using qualitative modeling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Michael; Maul, William; Meyer, Claudia; Sovie, Amy

    1992-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis Research Center are presently developing qualitative modeling techniques for automated rocket engine diagnostics. A qualitative model of a turbopump interpropellant seal system has been created. The qualitative model describes the effects of seal failures on the system steady-state behavior. This model is able to diagnose the failure of particular seals in the system based on anomalous temperature and pressure values. The anomalous values input to the qualitative model are generated using numerical simulations. Diagnostic test cases include both single and multiple seal failures.

  11. Rocket engine diagnostics using qualitative modeling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Michael; Maul, William; Meyer, Claudia; Sovie, Amy

    1992-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis Research Center are presently developing qualitative modeling techniques for automated rocket engine diagnostics. A qualitative model of a turbopump interpropellant seal system was created. The qualitative model describes the effects of seal failures on the system steady state behavior. This model is able to diagnose the failure of particular seals in the system based on anomalous temperature and pressure values. The anomalous values input to the qualitative model are generated using numerical simulations. Diagnostic test cases include both single and multiple seal failures.

  12. Measured and calculated acoustic attenuation rates of tuned resonator arrays for two surface impedance distribution models with flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Abrahamson, A. Louis; Jones, Michael G.

    1988-01-01

    An experiment was performed to validate two analytical models for predicting low frequency attenuation of duct liner configurations built from an array of seven resonators that could be individually tuned via adjustable cavity depths. These analytical models had previously been developed for high frequency aero-engine inlet duct liner design. In the low frequency application, the liner surface impedance distribution is unavoidably spatially varying by virtue of available fabrication techniques. The characteristic length of this spatial variation may be a significant fraction of the acoustic wavelength. Comparison of measured and predicted attenuation rates and transmission losses for both modal decomposition and finite element propagation models were in good to excellent agreement for a test frequency range that included the first and second cavity resonance frequencies. This was true for either of two surface impedance distribution modeling procedures used to simplify the impedance boundary conditions. In the presence of mean flow, measurements revealed a fine scale structure of acoustic hot spots in the attenuation and phase profiles. These details were accurately predicted by the finite element model. Since no impedance changes due to mean flow were assumed, it is concluded that this fine scale structure was due to convective effects of the mean flow interacting with the surface impedance nonuniformities.

  13. Characterisation of Al corrosion and its impact on the mechanical performance of composite cement wasteforms by the acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasova, L. M.; Ojovan, M. I.

    2008-04-01

    In this study acoustic emission (AE) non-destructive method was used to evaluate the mechanical performance of cementitious wasteforms with encapsulated Al waste. AE waves generated as a result of Al corrosion in small-size blast furnace slag/ordinary Portland cement wasteforms were recorded and analysed. The basic principles of the conventional parameter-based AE approach and signal-based analysis were combined to establish a relationship between recorded AE signals and different interactions between the Al and the encapsulating cement matrix. The AE technique was shown as a potential and valuable tool for a new area of application related to monitoring and inspection of the mechanical stability of cementitious wasteforms with encapsulated metallic wastes such as Al.

  14. Detection of coffee flavour ageing by solid-phase microextraction/surface acoustic wave sensor array technique (SPME/SAW).

    PubMed

    Barié, Nicole; Bücking, Mark; Stahl, Ullrich; Rapp, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The use of polymer coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor arrays is a very promising technique for highly sensitive and selective detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We present new developments to achieve a low cost sensor setup with a sampling method enabling the highly reproducible detection of volatiles even in the ppb range. Since the VOCs of coffee are well known by gas chromatography (GC) research studies, the new sensor array was tested for an easy assessable objective: coffee ageing during storage. As reference method these changes were traced with a standard GC/FID set-up, accompanied by sensory panellists. The evaluation of GC data showed a non-linear characteristic for single compound concentrations as well as for total peak area values, disabling prediction of the coffee age. In contrast, the new SAW sensor array demonstrates a linear dependency, i.e. being capable to show a dependency between volatile concentration and storage time.

  15. Non-Destructive Evaluation for Corrosion Monitoring in Concrete: A Review and Capability of Acoustic Emission Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Ahmad; Chai, Hwa Kian; Aggelis, Dimitrios G.; Alver, Ninel

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete (RC) structures has been one of the major causes of structural failure. Early detection of the corrosion process could help limit the location and the extent of necessary repairs or replacement, as well as reduce the cost associated with rehabilitation work. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods have been found to be useful for in-situ evaluation of steel corrosion in RC, where the effect of steel corrosion and the integrity of the concrete structure can be assessed effectively. A complementary study of NDT methods for the investigation of corrosion is presented here. In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) effectively detects the corrosion of concrete structures at an early stage. The capability of the AE technique to detect corrosion occurring in real-time makes it a strong candidate for serving as an efficient NDT method, giving it an advantage over other NDT methods. PMID:26251904

  16. Non-Destructive Evaluation for Corrosion Monitoring in Concrete: A Review and Capability of Acoustic Emission Technique.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Ahmad; Chai, Hwa Kian; Aggelis, Dimitrios G; Alver, Ninel

    2015-08-05

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete (RC) structures has been one of the major causes of structural failure. Early detection of the corrosion process could help limit the location and the extent of necessary repairs or replacement, as well as reduce the cost associated with rehabilitation work. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods have been found to be useful for in-situ evaluation of steel corrosion in RC, where the effect of steel corrosion and the integrity of the concrete structure can be assessed effectively. A complementary study of NDT methods for the investigation of corrosion is presented here. In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) effectively detects the corrosion of concrete structures at an early stage. The capability of the AE technique to detect corrosion occurring in real-time makes it a strong candidate for serving as an efficient NDT method, giving it an advantage over other NDT methods.

  17. Validation of High-Fidelity CFD/CAA Framework for Launch Vehicle Acoustic Environment Simulation against Scale Model Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liever, Peter A.; West, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) modeling framework has been developed for launch vehicle liftoff acoustic environment predictions. The framework couples the existing highly-scalable NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with a high-order accurate discontinuous Galerkin solver developed in the same production framework, Loci/THRUST, to accurately resolve and propagate acoustic physics across the entire launch environment. Time-accurate, Hybrid RANS/LES CFD modeling is applied for predicting the acoustic generation physics at the plume source, and a high-order accurate unstructured discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is employed to propagate acoustic waves away from the source across large distances using high-order accurate schemes. The DG solver is capable of solving 2nd, 3rd, and 4th order Euler solutions for non-linear, conservative acoustic field propagation. Initial application testing and validation has been carried out against high resolution acoustic data from the Ares Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) series to evaluate the capabilities and production readiness of the CFD/CAA system to resolve the observed spectrum of acoustic frequency content. This paper presents results from this validation and outlines efforts to mature and improve the computational simulation framework.

  18. Validation of High-Fidelity CFD/CAA Framework for Launch Vehicle Acoustic Environment Simulation against Scale Model Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liever, Peter A.; West, Jeffrey S.; Harris, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) modeling framework has been developed for launch vehicle liftoff acoustic environment predictions. The framework couples the existing highly-scalable NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin solver developed in the same production framework, Loci/THRUST, to accurately resolve and propagate acoustic physics across the entire launch environment. Time-accurate, Hybrid RANS/LES CFD modeling is applied for predicting the acoustic generation physics at the plume source, and a high-order accurate unstructured mesh Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is employed to propagate acoustic waves away from the source across large distances using high-order accurate schemes. The DG solver is capable of solving 2nd, 3rd, and 4th order Euler solutions for non-linear, conservative acoustic field propagation. Initial application testing and validation has been carried out against high resolution acoustic data from the Ares Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) series to evaluate the capabilities and production readiness of the CFD/CAA system to resolve the observed spectrum of acoustic frequency content. This paper presents results from this validation and outlines efforts to mature and improve the computational simulation framework.

  19. Langasite surface acoustic wave gas sensors: modeling and verification

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Zheng,; Greve, D. W.; Oppenheim, I. J.

    2013-03-01

    We report finite element simulations of the effect of conductive sensing layers on the surface wave velocity of langasite substrates. The simulations include both the mechanical and electrical influences of the conducting sensing layer. We show that three-dimensional simulations are necessary because of the out-of-plane displacements of the commonly used (0, 138.5, 26.7) Euler angle. Measurements of the transducer input admittance in reflective delay-line devices yield a value for the electromechanical coupling coefficient that is in good agreement with the three-dimensional simulations on bare langasite substrate. The input admittance measurements also show evidence of excitation of an additional wave mode and excess loss due to the finger resistance. The results of these simulations and measurements will be useful in the design of surface acoustic wave gas sensors.

  20. Acoustic Source Modeling for High Speed Air Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2005-01-01

    The far field acoustic spectra at 90deg to the downstream axis of some typical high speed jets are calculated from two different forms of Lilley s equation combined with some recent measurements of the relevant turbulent source function. These measurements, which were limited to a single point in a low Mach number flow, were extended to other conditions with the aid of a highly developed RANS calculation. The results are compared with experimental data over a range of Mach numbers. Both forms of the analogy lead to predictions that are in excellent agreement with the experimental data at subsonic Mach numbers. The agreement is also fairly good at supersonic speeds, but the data appears to be slightly contaminated by shock-associated noise in this case.

  1. A Comparison of Acoustic and Visual Determination of Cavitation Inception on a Model Propeller.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    results. Lighting conditions, as well as the location and visual acuity of the observer, can have a A I-II I I I . . . .II • , . . . . . . -15...AD-Al10 878 MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE DEPT OF OCEAN E--ETC F/6 20/1 COMPARISON OF ACOUSTIC AND VISUAL DETERMINATION OF CAVITATION--ETCIU...REPORT a sgmhoo COWERED A Comparison of Acoustic and Visual Determination THESIS of Cavitation Inception on a Model Propeller 7, 11. CSOTRATMO 0G.~k

  2. Suppression of harmonics in a model of thermoacoustic refrigerator based on an acoustic metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Ding, Jin; Zhu, Jun-jie; Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Shu-yi; Zhang, Hui; Li, Xiao-juan

    2015-10-01

    A model of thermoacoustic refrigerator on the basis of an acoustic metamaterial is presented, in which an array of side pipes is adopted to suppress harmonic waves in the thermoacoustic resonator. The array of side pipes traps the acoustic waves with Fabry-Perot resonant frequencies and induces narrow forbidden bands of transmission. When the resonant frequency of the thermoacoustic refrigerator is chosen as the operating frequency, the harmonic wave can be exactly located in the forbidden band by properly adapting the structural parameters of the system. Therefore, the component of the harmonic wave in the thermoacoustic resonator can be efficiently suppressed.

  3. Modeling and experimental analysis of acoustic cavitation bubbles for Burst Wave Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Kazuki; Colonius, Tim; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam; Cunitz, Bryan; Bailey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A combined modeling and experimental study of acoustic cavitation bubbles that are initiated by focused ultrasound waves is reported. Focused ultrasound waves of frequency 335 kHz and peak negative pressure 8 MPa are generated in a water tank by a piezoelectric transducer to initiate cavitation. The resulting pressure field is obtained by direct numerical simulation (DNS) and used to simulate single bubble oscillation. The characteristics of cavitation bubbles observed by high-speed photography qualitatively agree withs the simulation result. Finally, bubble clouds are captured using acoustic B-mode imaging that works in synchronization with high-speed photography. PMID:27087826

  4. Modeling the effects of wind tunnel wall absorption on the acoustic radiation characteristics of propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.

    1986-01-01

    Finite element theory is used to calculate the acoustic field of a propeller in a soft walled circular wind tunnel and to compare the radiation patterns to the same propeller in free space. Parametric solutions are present for a 'Gutin' propeller for a variety of flow Mach numbers, admittance values at the wall, microphone position locations, and propeller to duct radius ratios. Wind tunnel boundary layer is not included in this analysis. For wall admittance nearly equal to the characteristic value of free space, the free field and ducted propeller models agree in pressure level and directionality. In addition, the need for experimentally mapping the acoustic field is discussed.

  5. Modeling the effects of wind tunnel wall absorption on the acoustic radiation characteristics of propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.

    1986-01-01

    Finite element theory is used to calculate the acoustic field of a propeller in a soft walled circular wind tunnel and to compare the radiation patterns to the same propeller in free space. Parametric solutions are present for a "Gutin" propeller for a variety of flow Mach numbers, admittance values at the wall, microphone position locations, and propeller to duct radius ratios. Wind tunnel boundary layer is not included in this analysis. For wall admittance nearly equal to the characteristic value of free space, the free field and ducted propeller models agree in pressure level and directionality. In addition, the need for experimentally mapping the acoustic field is discussed.

  6. Application of acoustic noise and self-potential localization techniques to a buried hydrothermal vent (Waimangu Old Geyser site, New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Roux, P.; Gouédard, P.; Legaz, A.; Revil, A.; Hurst, A. W.; Bolève, A.; Jardani, A.

    2010-02-01

    A seismo-acoustic and self-potential survey has been performed in the hydrothermal area of the old Waimangu Geyser (New Zealand), which was violently erupting a century ago. Nowadays, no surface activity is visible there. We set-up an array of 16 geophones and recorded a high and steady acoustic ambient noise. We applied the matched field processing (MFP) approach to the acoustic data to locate the sources responsible for the ambient noise. The white noise constraint processor reveals the presence of a unique and well-focused acoustic source at a depth of 1.5 m below the seismic array. For this very shallow source, the application of MFP enabled the determination of both the source location and the dispersion curve of seismic velocity. The study was completed by self-potential (SP) measurements on several profiles around the acoustic noise source, which displayed a large positive anomaly above it. The results of the SP inversion gave an electric streaming current density source very close to the acoustic one. Both sources likely belong to a shallow hydrothermal structure interpreted as a small convective cell of boiling water beneath an impermeable layer. The joint application of these methods is a promising technique to recognize hydrothermal structures and to study their dynamics.

  7. Numerical modeling techniques for flood analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anees, Mohd Talha; Abdullah, K.; Nawawi, M. N. M.; Ab Rahman, Nik Norulaini Nik; Piah, Abd. Rahni Mt.; Zakaria, Nor Azazi; Syakir, M. I.; Mohd. Omar, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    Topographic and climatic changes are the main causes of abrupt flooding in tropical areas. It is the need to find out exact causes and effects of these changes. Numerical modeling techniques plays a vital role for such studies due to their use of hydrological parameters which are strongly linked with topographic changes. In this review, some of the widely used models utilizing hydrological and river modeling parameters and their estimation in data sparse region are discussed. Shortcomings of 1D and 2D numerical models and the possible improvements over these models through 3D modeling are also discussed. It is found that the HEC-RAS and FLO 2D model are best in terms of economical and accurate flood analysis for river and floodplain modeling respectively. Limitations of FLO 2D in floodplain modeling mainly such as floodplain elevation differences and its vertical roughness in grids were found which can be improve through 3D model. Therefore, 3D model was found to be more suitable than 1D and 2D models in terms of vertical accuracy in grid cells. It was also found that 3D models for open channel flows already developed recently but not for floodplain. Hence, it was suggested that a 3D model for floodplain should be developed by considering all hydrological and high resolution topographic parameter's models, discussed in this review, to enhance the findings of causes and effects of flooding.

  8. Propagation modeling for sperm whale acoustic clicks in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorovskaia, Natalia A.; Udovydchenkov, Ilya A.; Rypina, Irina I.; Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.; Caruthers, Jerald W.; Newcomb, Joal; Fisher, Robert

    2004-05-01

    Simulations of acoustic broadband (500-6000 Hz) pulse propagation in the northern Gulf of Mexico, based on environmental data collected as a part of the Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) experiments in the summers of 2001 and 2002, are presented. The results of the modeling support the hypothesis that consistent spectrogram interference patterns observed in the LADC marine mammal phonation data cannot be explained by the propagation effects for temporal analysis windows corresponding to the duration of an animal click, and may be due to a uniqueness of an individual animal phonation apparatus. The utilization of simulation data for the development of an animal tracking algorithm based on the acoustic recordings of a single bottom-moored hydrophone is discussed. The identification of the bottom and surface reflected clicks from the same animal is attempted. The critical ranges for listening to a deep-water forging animal by a surface receiving system are estimated. [Research supported by ONR.

  9. Ray-trace modeling of acoustic Green's function based on the semiclassical (eikonal) approximation.

    PubMed

    Prislan, Rok; Veble, Gregor; Svenšek, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    The Green's function (GF) for the scalar wave equation is numerically constructed by an advanced geometric ray-tracing method based on the eikonal approximation related to the semiclassical propagator. The underlying theory is first briefly introduced, and then it is applied to acoustics and implemented in a ray-tracing-type numerical simulation. The so constructed numerical method is systematically used to calculate the sound field in a rectangular (cuboid) room, yielding also the acoustic modes of the room. The simulated GF is rigorously compared to its analytic approximation. Good agreement is found, which proves the devised numerical approach potentially useful also for low frequency acoustic modeling, which is in practice not covered by geometrical methods.

  10. Cetacean Density Estimation from Novel Acoustic Datasets by Acoustic Propagation Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    not observed in Atlantic bottlenose dolphins and beluga whales for example. The beams were observed to be directed forward between 0˚ and -5˚ in the...data set, collected by a single hydrophone, to estimate the population density of false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) off of the Kona coast of...incorporate accurate modeling of sound propagation due to the complexities of its environment. Moreover, the target species chosen for the proposed

  11. A Biomechanical Modeling Guided CBCT Estimation Technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, You; Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; Wang, Jing

    2017-02-01

    Two-dimensional-to-three-dimensional (2D-3D) deformation has emerged as a new technique to estimate cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. The technique is based on deforming a prior high-quality 3D CT/CBCT image to form a new CBCT image, guided by limited-view 2D projections. The accuracy of this intensity-based technique, however, is often limited in low-contrast image regions with subtle intensity differences. The solved deformation vector fields (DVFs) can also be biomechanically unrealistic. To address these problems, we have developed a biomechanical modeling guided CBCT estimation technique (Bio-CBCT-est) by combining 2D-3D deformation with finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling of anatomical structures. Specifically, Bio-CBCT-est first extracts the 2D-3D deformation-generated displacement vectors at the high-contrast anatomical structure boundaries. The extracted surface deformation fields are subsequently used as the boundary conditions to drive structure-based FEA to correct and fine-tune the overall deformation fields, especially those at low-contrast regions within the structure. The resulting FEA-corrected deformation fields are then fed back into 2D-3D deformation to form an iterative loop, combining the benefits of intensity-based deformation and biomechanical modeling for CBCT estimation. Using eleven lung cancer patient cases, the accuracy of the Bio-CBCT-est technique has been compared to that of the 2D-3D deformation technique and the traditional CBCT reconstruction techniques. The accuracy was evaluated in the image domain, and also in the DVF domain through clinician-tracked lung landmarks.

  12. Towards a Comprehensive Model of Jet Noise Using an Acoustic Analogy and Steady RANS Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic analogy is developed to predict the noise from jet flows. It contains two source models that independently predict the noise from turbulence and shock wave shear layer interactions. The acoustic analogy is based on the Euler equations and separates the sources from propagation. Propagation effects are taken into account by calculating the vector Green's function of the linearized Euler equations. The sources are modeled following the work of Tam and Auriault, Morris and Boluriaan, and Morris and Miller. A statistical model of the two-point cross-correlation of the velocity fluctuations is used to describe the turbulence. The acoustic analogy attempts to take into account the correct scaling of the sources for a wide range of nozzle pressure and temperature ratios. It does not make assumptions regarding fine- or large-scale turbulent noise sources, self- or shear-noise, or convective amplification. The acoustic analogy is partially informed by three-dimensional steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solutions that include the nozzle geometry. The predictions are compared with experiments of jets operating subsonically through supersonically and at unheated and heated temperatures. Predictions generally capture the scaling of both mixing noise and BBSAN for the conditions examined, but some discrepancies remain that are due to the accuracy of the steady RANS turbulence model closure, the equivalent sources, and the use of a simplified vector Green's function solver of the linearized Euler equations.

  13. Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion for the 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jungkyun; Shin, Changsoo; Calandra, Henri

    2016-06-01

    Laplace-domain waveform inversion reconstructs long-wavelength subsurface models by using the zero-frequency component of damped seismic signals. Despite the computational advantages of Laplace-domain waveform inversion over conventional frequency-domain waveform inversion, an acoustic assumption and an iterative matrix solver have been used to invert 3D marine datasets to mitigate the intensive computing cost. In this study, we develop a Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion algorithm for 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media by using a parallel sparse direct solver library (MUltifrontal Massively Parallel Solver, MUMPS). We precisely simulate a real marine environment by coupling the 3D acoustic and elastic wave equations with the proper boundary condition at the fluid-solid interface. In addition, we can extract the elastic properties of the Earth below the sea bottom from the recorded acoustic pressure datasets. As a matrix solver, the parallel sparse direct solver is used to factorize the non-symmetric impedance matrix in a distributed memory architecture and rapidly solve the wave field for a number of shots by using the lower and upper matrix factors. Using both synthetic datasets and real datasets obtained by a 3D wide azimuth survey, the long-wavelength component of the P-wave and S-wave velocity models is reconstructed and the proposed modeling and inversion algorithm are verified. A cluster of 80 CPU cores is used for this study.

  14. Numerical modeling of undersea acoustics using a partition of unity method with plane waves enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hospital-Bravo, Raúl; Sarrate, Josep; Díez, Pedro

    2016-05-01

    A new 2D numerical model to predict the underwater acoustic propagation is obtained by exploring the potential of the Partition of Unity Method (PUM) enriched with plane waves. The aim of the work is to obtain sound pressure level distributions when multiple operational noise sources are present, in order to assess the acoustic impact over the marine fauna. The model takes advantage of the suitability of the PUM for solving the Helmholtz equation, especially for the practical case of large domains and medium frequencies. The seawater acoustic absorption and the acoustic reflectance of the sea surface and sea bottom are explicitly considered, and perfectly matched layers (PML) are placed at the lateral artificial boundaries to avoid spurious reflexions. The model includes semi-analytical integration rules which are adapted to highly oscillatory integrands with the aim of reducing the computational cost of the integration step. In addition, we develop a novel strategy to mitigate the ill-conditioning of the elemental and global system matrices. Specifically, we compute a low-rank approximation of the local space of solutions, which in turn reduces the number of degrees of freedom, the CPU time and the memory footprint. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the model and to assess its accuracy.

  15. Improving Robustness of Deep Neural Network Acoustic Models via Speech Separation and Joint Adaptive Training

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Arun; Wang, DeLiang

    2015-01-01

    Although deep neural network (DNN) acoustic models are known to be inherently noise robust, especially with matched training and testing data, the use of speech separation as a frontend and for deriving alternative feature representations has been shown to improve performance in challenging environments. We first present a supervised speech separation system that significantly improves automatic speech recognition (ASR) performance in realistic noise conditions. The system performs separation via ratio time-frequency masking; the ideal ratio mask (IRM) is estimated using DNNs. We then propose a framework that unifies separation and acoustic modeling via joint adaptive training. Since the modules for acoustic modeling and speech separation are implemented using DNNs, unification is done by introducing additional hidden layers with fixed weights and appropriate network architecture. On the CHiME-2 medium-large vocabulary ASR task, and with log mel spectral features as input to the acoustic model, an independently trained ratio masking frontend improves word error rates by 10.9% (relative) compared to the noisy baseline. In comparison, the jointly trained system improves performance by 14.4%. We also experiment with alternative feature representations to augment the standard log mel features, like the noise and speech estimates obtained from the separation module, and the standard feature set used for IRM estimation. Our best system obtains a word error rate of 15.4% (absolute), an improvement of 4.6 percentage points over the next best result on this corpus. PMID:26973851

  16. Computer programs for forward and inverse modeling of acoustic and electromagnetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    A suite of computer programs was developed by U.S. Geological Survey personnel for forward and inverse modeling of acoustic and electromagnetic data. This report describes the computer resources that are needed to execute the programs, the installation of the programs, the program designs, some tests of their accuracy, and some suggested improvements.

  17. Load influence on gear noise. [mathematical model for determining acoustic pressure level as function of load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merticaru, V.

    1974-01-01

    An original mathematical model is proposed to derive equations for calculation of gear noise. These equations permit the acoustic pressure level to be determined as a function of load. Application of this method to three parallel gears is reported. The logical calculation scheme is given, as well as the results obtained.

  18. High sensitivity of p-modes near the acoustic cutoff frequency to solar model parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guenther, D. B.

    1991-01-01

    The p-mode frequencies of low l have been calculated for solar models with initial helium mass fraction varying from Y = 0.2753-0.2875. The differences in frequency of the p-modes in the frequency range, 2500-4500 microHz, do not exceed 1-5 microHz among the models. But in the vicinity of the acoustic cutoff frequency, near 5000 microHz the p-mode frequency differences are enhanced by a factor of 4. The enhanced sensitivity of p-modes near the acoustic cutoff frequency was further tested by calculating and comparing p-mode frequencies of low l for two solar models one incorporating the Eddington T-tau relation and the other the Krishna Swamy T-tau relation. Again, it is found that p-modes with frequencies near the acoustic cutoff frequency show a significant increase in sensitivity to the different T-tau relations, compared to lower frequency p-modes. It is noted that frequencies above the acoustic cutoff frequency are complex, hence, cannot be modeled by the adiabatic pulsation code (assumes real eigenfrequencies) used in these calculations.

  19. FE Modelling of the Fluid-Structure-Acoustic Interaction for the Vocal Folds Self-Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švancara, Pavel; Horáček, J.; Hrůza, V.

    The flow induced self-oscillation of the human vocal folds in interaction with acoustic processes in the simplified vocal tract model was explored by three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model. Developed FE model includes vocal folds pretension before phonation, large deformations of the vocal fold tissue, vocal folds contact, fluid-structure interaction, morphing the fluid mesh according the vocal folds motion (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach), unsteady viscous compressible airflow described by the Navier-Stokes equations and airflow separation during the glottis closure. Iterative partitioned approach is used for modelling the fluid-structure interaction. Computed results prove that the developed model can be used for simulation of the vocal folds self-oscillation and resulting acoustic waves. The developed model enables to numerically simulate an influence of some pathological changes in the vocal fold tissue on the voice production.

  20. Development of Methodology to Assess the Failure Behaviour of Bamboo Single Fibre by Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md. Saiful; Gulshan, Fahmida; Ahsan, Qumrul; Wevers, Martine; Pfeiffer, Helge; van Vuure, Aart-Willem; Osorio, Lina; Verpoest, Ignaas

    2017-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) was used as a tool for detecting, evaluating and for better understanding of the damage mechanism and failure behavior in composites during mechanical loading. Methodology was developed for tensile test of natural fibres (bamboo single fibre). A series of experiments were performed and load drops (one or two) were observed in the load versus time graphs. From the observed AE parameters such as amplitude, energy, duration etc. significant information corresponding to the load drops were found. These AE signals from the load drop occurred from such failure as debonding between two elementary fibre or from join of elementary fibre at edge. The various sources of load at first load drop was not consistent for the different samples (for a particular sample the value is 8 N, stress: 517.51 MPa). Final breaking of fibre corresponded to saturated level AE amplitude of preamplifier (99.9 dB) for all samples. Therefore, it was not possible to determine the exact AE energy value for final breaking. Same methodology was used for tensile test of three single fibres, which gave clear indication of load drop before the final breaking of first and second fibre.

  1. Development of Methodology to Assess the Failure Behaviour of Bamboo Single Fibre by Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md. Saiful; Gulshan, Fahmida; Ahsan, Qumrul; Wevers, Martine; Pfeiffer, Helge; van Vuure, Aart-Willem; Osorio, Lina; Verpoest, Ignaas

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) was used as a tool for detecting, evaluating and for better understanding of the damage mechanism and failure behavior in composites during mechanical loading. Methodology was developed for tensile test of natural fibres (bamboo single fibre). A series of experiments were performed and load drops (one or two) were observed in the load versus time graphs. From the observed AE parameters such as amplitude, energy, duration etc. significant information corresponding to the load drops were found. These AE signals from the load drop occurred from such failure as debonding between two elementary fibre or from join of elementary fibre at edge. The various sources of load at first load drop was not consistent for the different samples (for a particular sample the value is 8 N, stress: 517.51 MPa). Final breaking of fibre corresponded to saturated level AE amplitude of preamplifier (99.9 dB) for all samples. Therefore, it was not possible to determine the exact AE energy value for final breaking. Same methodology was used for tensile test of three single fibres, which gave clear indication of load drop before the final breaking of first and second fibre.

  2. Pulp consistency determined by a combination of optical and acoustical measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törmänen, Matti; Niemi, Jan; Löfqvist, Torbjörn; Myllylä, Risto

    2006-04-01

    In this study, methods based on ultrasonic attenuation and optical time-of-flight measurements are used simultaneously in determining both the fibres and fines mass fractions, respectively, of a cellulose pulp fibre suspension. The optical measurements are done by a laser radar and the acoustical measurements are based on ultrasonic attenuation measurements in a pulse-echo set-up. Two kinds of long-fibre fractions are studied, thermo-mechanical pulp and chemical softwood pulp. Fibre and fines mass fraction ranges are 0.25-1.0% and 0-0.75%, respectively. The results show that the fibres are the predominant source for absorption and scattering of ultrasonic waves and are thus mainly contributing to the attenuation of ultrasound in the pulp. It is also found that the fines are the predominant source for optical scattering and fines are thus mainly contributing to the propagation delay of the light pulse in the laser radar set-up. By combining the ultrasonic attenuation and the optical time-of-flight measurements, it is shown that the mass fraction of fines and the mass fraction of fibres in a pulp sample could be determined, respectively.

  3. Determination of Initial Crack Strength of Silicon Die Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pei-Chi; Su, Yen-Fu; Yang, Shin-Yueh; Liang, Steven Y.; Chiang, Kuo-Ning

    2015-07-01

    The current market demand for high-efficiency, high-performance, small-sized electronic products has focused attention on the use of three-dimensional (3D) integrated circuits (IC) in the design of electronic packaging. Silicon wafers can be ground and polished to reduce their thickness and increase the chip stacking density. However, microcracks can result from the thinning and stacking process or during use of an electronic device over time; therefore, estimation of the cracking strength is an important issue in 3D IC packaging. This research combined the ball breaker test (BBT) with an acoustic emission (AE) system to measure the allowable force on a silicon die. To estimate the initial crack strength of a silicon die, the BBT was combined with finite-element (FE) analysis. The AE system can detect the initial crack and the subsequent bulk failure of the silicon die individually, thus avoiding overestimation of the die strength. In addition, the results of the modified ball breaker test showed that edge chipping did not affect the silicon die strength. However, the failure force and silicon die strength were reduced as the surface roughness of the test specimen increased. Thus, surface roughness must be controlled in the BBT to prevent underestimation of the silicon die strength.

  4. Analytical coupled vibroacoustic modeling of membrane-type acoustic metamaterials: plate model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangyang; Huang, Guoliang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hu, Gengkai; Sun, Chin-Teh

    2014-12-01

    By considering the elastic membrane's dissipation, the membrane-type acoustic metamaterial (MAM) has been demonstrated to be a super absorber for low-frequency sound. In the paper, a theoretical vibroacoustic plate model is developed to reveal the sound energy absorption mechanism within the MAM under a plane normal incidence. Based on the plate model in conjunction with the point matching method, the in-plane strain energy of the membrane due to the resonant and antiresonant motion of the attached masses can be accurately captured by solving the coupled vibroacoustic integrodifferential equation. The sound absorption ability of the MAM is quantitatively determined, which is also in good agreement with the prediction from the finite element method. In particular, microstructure effects including eccentricity of the attached masses, the depth, thickness, and loss factor of the membrane on sound absorption peak values are discussed.

  5. Acoustic Field Associated with Parabolized Stability Equation Models in Turbulent Jets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    discusses linear models of these wavepackets for supersonic turbulent jets based on Parabolized Stability Equations ( PSE ). In the past, results of...comparisons of the PSE models with near-field pressure fields from LES, filtered by means of Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD), demonstrate acceptable...fidelity of the model. Finally, the acoustic far-field associated with the PSE wavepackets is computed using a Kirchhoff surface method, capturing

  6. Numerical techniques in linear duct acoustics. [finite difference and finite element analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    Both finite difference and finite element analyses of small amplitude (linear) sound propagation in straight and variable area ducts with flow, as might be found in a typical turboject engine duct, muffler, or industrial ventilation system, are reviewed. Both steady state and transient theories are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the advantages and limitations associated with the various numerical techniques. Examples of practical problems are given for which the numerical techniques have been applied.

  7. Waveform inversion of acoustic waves for explosion yield estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Rodgers, A. J.

    2016-07-08

    We present a new waveform inversion technique to estimate the energy of near-surface explosions using atmospheric acoustic waves. Conventional methods often employ air blast models based on a homogeneous atmosphere, where the acoustic wave propagation effects (e.g., refraction and diffraction) are not taken into account, and therefore, their accuracy decreases with increasing source-receiver distance. In this study, three-dimensional acoustic simulations are performed with a finite difference method in realistic atmospheres and topography, and the modeled acoustic Green's functions are incorporated into the waveform inversion for the acoustic source time functions. The strength of the acoustic source is related to explosion yield based on a standard air blast model. The technique was applied to local explosions (<10 km) and provided reasonable yield estimates (<~30% error) in the presence of realistic topography and atmospheric structure. In conclusion, the presented method can be extended to explosions recorded at far distance provided proper meteorological specifications.

  8. Flow velocity profiling using acoustic time of flight flow metering based on wide band signals and adaptive beam-forming techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgan, I.; Candel, I.; Ioana, C.; Digulescu, A.; Bunea, F.; Ciocan, G. D.; Anghel, A.; Vasile, G.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to non-intrusive flow velocity profiling technique using multi-element sensor array and wide-band signal's processing methods. Conventional techniques for the measurements of the flow velocity profiles are usually based on intrusive instruments (current meters, acoustic Doppler profilers, Pitot tubes, etc.) that take punctual velocity readings. Although very efficient, these choices are limited in terms of practical cases of applications especially when non-intrusive measurements techniques are required and/or a spatial accuracy of the velocity profiling is required This is due to factors related to hydraulic machinery down time, the often long time duration needed to explore the entire section area, the frequent cumbersome number of devices that needs to be handled simultaneously, or the impossibility to perform intrusive tests. In the case of non-intrusive flow profiling methods based on acoustic techniques, previous methods concentrated on using a large number of acoustic transducers placed around the measured section. Although feasible, this approach presents several major drawbacks such as a complicated signal timing, transmission, acquisition and recording system, resulting in a relative high cost of operation. In addition, because of the geometrical constraints, a desired number of sensors may not be installed. Recent results in acoustic flow metering based on wide band signals and adaptive beamforming proved that it is possible to achieve flow velocity profiles using less acoustic transducers. In a normal acoustic time of flight path the transducers are both emitters and receivers, sequentially changing their roles. In the new configuration, proposed in this paper, two new receivers are added on each side. Since the beam angles of each acoustic transducer are wide enough the newly added transducers can receive the transmitted signals and additional time of flight estimation can be done. Thus, several flow

  9. Modeling acoustic wave propagation in the Southern Ocean to estimate the acoustic impact of seismic surveys on marine mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitzke, M.; Bohlen, T.

    2007-12-01

    According to the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, adopted 1991, seismic surveys in the Southern Ocean south of 60°S are exclusively dedicated to academic research. The seismic surveys conducted by the Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany during the last 20 years focussed on two areas: The Wedell Sea (60°W - 0°W) and the Amundsen/Bellinghausen Sea (120°W - 60°W). Histograms of the Julian days and water depths covered by these surveys indicate that maximum activities occurred in January and February, and most lines were collected either in shallow waters of 400 - 500 m depth or in deep waters of 2500 - 4500 m depth. To assess the potential risk of future seismic research on marine mammal populations an acoustic wave propagation modeling study is conducted for the Wedell and the Amundsen/ Bellinghausen Sea. A 2.5D finite-difference code is used. It allows to simulate the spherical amplitude decay of point sources correctly, considers P- and S-wave velocities at the sea floor and provides snapshots of the wavefield at any spatial and temporal resolution. As source signals notional signatures of GI-, G- and Bolt guns, computed by the NUCLEUS software (PGS) are used. Based on CTD measurements, sediment core samplings and sediment echosounder recordings two horizontally-layered, range-independent generic models are established for the Wedell and the Amundsen/Bellinghausen Sea, one for shallow (500 m) and one for deep water (3000 m). They indicate that the vertical structure of the water masses is characterized by a 100 m thick, cold, low sound velocity layer (~1440 - 1450 m/s), centered in 100 m depth. In the austral summer it is overlain by a warmer, 50 m thick surface layer with slightly higher sound velocities (~1447 - 1453 m/s). Beneath the low-velocity layer sound velocities increase rapidly to ~1450 - 1460 m/s in 200 m depth, and smoothly to ~1530 m/s in 4700 m depth. The sea floor is mainly

  10. Monitoring rock freezing and thawing by novel geoelectrical and acoustic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murton, Julian B.; Kuras, Oliver; Krautblatter, Michael; Cane, Tim; Tschofen, Dominique; Uhlemann, Sebastian; Schober, Sandra; Watson, Phil

    2016-12-01

    Automated monitoring of freeze-thaw cycles and fracture propagation in mountain rockwalls is needed to provide early warning about rockfall hazards. Conventional geoelectrical methods such as electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) are limited by large and variable ohmic contact resistances, requiring galvanic coupling with metal electrodes inserted into holes drilled into rock, and which can be loosened by rock weathering. We report a novel experimental methodology that combined capacitive resistivity imaging (CRI), ERT, and microseismic event recording to monitor freeze-thaw of six blocks of hard and soft limestones under conditions simulating an active layer above permafrost and seasonally frozen rock in a nonpermafrost environment. Our results demonstrate that the CRI method is highly sensitive to freeze-thaw processes; it yields property information equivalent to that obtained with conventional ERT and offers a viable route for nongalvanic long-term geoelectrical monitoring, extending the benefits of the methodology to soft/hard rock environments. Contact impedances achieved with CRI are less affected by seasonal temperature changes, the aggregate state of the pore water (liquid or frozen), and the presence of low-porosity rock with high matrix resistivities than those achieved with ERT. Microseismic monitoring has the advantage over acoustic emissions that events were recorded in relevant field distances of meters to decameters from cracking events. For the first time we recorded about 1000 microcracking events and clustered them in four groups according to frequency and waveform. Compared to previous studies, mainly on ice-cracking in glaciers, the groups are attributed to single- or multiple-stage cracking events such as crack coalescence.

  11. Structural Modeling Using "Scanning and Mapping" Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amos, Courtney L.; Dash, Gerald S.; Shen, J. Y.; Ferguson, Frederick; Noga, Donald F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Supported by NASA Glenn Center, we are in the process developing a structural damage diagnostic and monitoring system for rocket engines, which consists of five modules: Structural Modeling, Measurement Data Pre-Processor, Structural System Identification, Damage Detection Criterion, and Computer Visualization. The function of the system is to detect damage as it is incurred by the engine structures. The scientific principle to identify damage is to utilize the changes in the vibrational properties between the pre-damaged and post-damaged structures. The vibrational properties of the pre-damaged structure can be obtained based on an analytic computer model of the structure. Thus, as the first stage of the whole research plan, we currently focus on the first module - Structural Modeling. Three computer software packages are selected, and will be integrated for this purpose. They are PhotoModeler-Pro, AutoCAD-R14, and MSC/NASTRAN. AutoCAD is the most popular PC-CAD system currently available in the market. For our purpose, it plays like an interface to generate structural models of any particular engine parts or assembly, which is then passed to MSC/NASTRAN for extracting structural dynamic properties. Although AutoCAD is a powerful structural modeling tool, the complexity of engine components requires a further improvement in structural modeling techniques. We are working on a so-called "scanning and mapping" technique, which is a relatively new technique. The basic idea is to producing a full and accurate 3D structural model by tracing on multiple overlapping photographs taken from different angles. There is no need to input point positions, angles, distances or axes. Photographs can be taken by any types of cameras with different lenses. With the integration of such a modeling technique, the capability of structural modeling will be enhanced. The prototypes of any complex structural components will be produced by PhotoModeler first based on existing similar

  12. Passive acoustic leak detection for sodium cooled fast reactors using hidden Markov models

    SciTech Connect

    Riber Marklund, A.; Prakash, V.; Rajan, K.K.

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic leak detection for steam generators of sodium fast reactors have been an active research topic since the early 1970's and several methods have been tested over the years. Inspired by its success in the field of automatic speech recognition, we here apply hidden Markov models (HMM) in combination with Gaussian mixture models (GMM) to the problem. To achieve this, we propose a new feature calculation scheme, based on the temporal evolution of the power spectral density (PSD) of the signal. Using acoustic signals recorded during steam/water injection experiments done at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), the proposed method is tested. We perform parametric studies on the HMM+GMM model size and demonstrate that the proposed method a) performs well without a priori knowledge of injection noise, b) can incorporate several noise models and c) has an output distribution that simplifies false alarm rate control. (authors)

  13. Finite Element Analysis of Bulk-Acoustic-Wave Devices: Model Setup and Applications.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, Robert; Larson, John

    2016-04-20

    In this work, the principles of finite element modeling for the electro-acoustic simulation of bulk-acoustic- wave devices will be summarized. We will outline model setup including governing equations and boundary conditions, as well as its efficient computer implementation. Particular emphasis will be given to tailoring the model dimension to the specific requirements of the desired investigation. As 3D simulations still require a major effort, it will be illustrated that various aspects of device physics and design can be addressed already by fast and efficient 2D simulations. Multiple theoretical and experimental evidence will be presented to demonstrate the validity of the modeling concepts. Based on various examples it will be sketched how to benefit from numerical simulations for understanding fundamental effects, designing devices for actual products, and exploring novel technologies.

  14. Study of acoustic bubble cluster dynamics using a lattice Boltzmann model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daemi, Mahdi; Taeibi-Rahni, Mohammad; Massah, Hamidreza

    2015-02-01

    The search for the development of a reliable mathematical model for understanding bubble dynamics behavior is an ongoing endeavor. A long list of complex phenomena underlies the physics of this problem. In the past decades, the lattice Boltzmann method has emerged as a promising tool to address such complexities. In this regard, we have applied a 121-velocity multiphase lattice Boltzmann model to an asymmetric cluster of bubbles in an acoustic field. A problem as a benchmark is studied to check the consistency and applicability of the model. The problem of interest is to study the deformation and coalescence phenomena in bubble cluster dynamics, as well as the screening effect on an acoustic multi-bubble medium. It has been observed that the LB model is able to simulate the combination of the three aforementioned phenomena for a bubble cluster as a whole and for every individual bubble in the cluster.

  15. Acoustic Modeling and Analysis for the Space Shuttle Main Propulsion System Liner Crack Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, Matthew J.; Zoladz, Tom F.

    2004-01-01

    Cracks were found on bellows flow liners in the liquid hydrogen feedlines of several space shuttle orbiters in 2002. An effort to characterize the fluid environment upstream of the space shuttle main engine low-pressure fuel pump was undertaken to help identify the cause of the cracks and also provide quantitative environments and loads of the region. Part of this effort was to determine the duct acoustics several inches upstream of the low-pressure fuel pump in the region of a bellows joint. A finite element model of the complicated geometry was made using three-dimensional fluid elements. The model was used to describe acoustics in the complex geometry and played an important role in the investigation. Acoustic mode shapes and natural frequencies of the liquid hydrogen in the duct and in the cavity behind the flow liner were determined. Forced response results were generated also by applying an edgetone-like forcing to the liner slots. Studies were conducted for state conditions and also conditions assuming two-phase entrapment in the backing cavity. Highly instrumented single-engine hot fire data confirms the presence of some of the predicted acoustic modes.

  16. Vehicle acoustic classification in netted sensor systems using Gaussian mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necioglu, Burhan F.; Christou, Carol T.; George, E. B.; Jacyna, Garry M.

    2005-05-01

    Acoustic vehicle classification is a difficult problem due to the non-stationary nature of the signals, and especially the lack of strong harmonic structure for most civilian vehicles with highly muffled exhausts. Acoustic signatures will also vary largely depending on speed, acceleration, gear position, and even the aspect angle of the sensor. The problem becomes more complicated when the deployed acoustic sensors have less than ideal characteristics, in terms of both the frequency response of the transducers, and hardware capabilities which determine the resolution and dynamic range. In a hierarchical network topology, less capable Tier 1 sensors can be tasked with reasonably sophisticated signal processing and classification algorithms, reducing energy-expensive communications with the upper layers. However, at Tier 2, more sophisticated classification algorithms exceeding the Tier 1 sensor/processor capabilities can be deployed. The focus of this paper is the investigation of a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) based classification approach for these upper nodes. The use of GMMs is motivated by their ability to model arbitrary distributions, which is very relevant in the case of motor vehicles with varying operation modes and engines. Tier 1 sensors acquire the acoustic signal and transmit computed feature vectors up to Tier 2 processors for maximum-likelihood classification using GMMs. In a binary classification task of light-vs-heavy vehicles, the GMM based approach achieves 7% equal error rate, providing an approximate error reduction of 49% over Tier 1 only approaches.

  17. Modeling Hemodynamic Responses in Auditory Cortex at 1.5T Using Variable Duration Imaging Acoustic Noise

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shuowen; Olulade, Olumide; Gonzalez, Javier Castillo; Santos, Joseph; Kim, Sungeun; Tamer, Gregory G.; Luh, Wen-Ming; Talavage, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    A confound for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), especially for auditory studies, is the presence of imaging acoustic noise generated mainly as a byproduct of rapid gradient switching during volume acquisition and to a lesser extent, the radio-frequency transmit. This work utilized a novel pulse sequence to present actual imaging acoustic noise for characterization of the induced hemodynamic responses and assessment of linearity in the primary auditory cortex with respect to noise duration. Results show that responses to brief duration (46ms) imaging acoustic noise is highly nonlinear while responses to longer duration (>1s) imaging acoustic noise becomes approximately linear, with the right primary auditory cortex exhibiting a higher degree of nonlinearity than the left for the investigated noise durations. This study also assessed the spatial extent of activation induced by imaging acoustic noise, showing that the use of modeled responses (specific to imaging acoustic noise) as the reference waveform revealed additional activations in the auditory cortex not observed with a canonical gamma variate reference waveform, suggesting an improvement in detection sensitivity for imaging acoustic noise-induced activity. Longer duration (1.5s) imaging acoustic noise was observed to induce activity that expanded outwards from Heschl’s gyrus to cover the superior temporal gyrus as well as parts of the middle temporal gyrus and insula, potentially affecting higher level acoustic processing. PMID:19948232

  18. Glider-based Passive Acoustic Monitoring Techniques in the Southern California Region & West Coast Naval Training Range Demonstration of Glider-based Passive Acoustic Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The original document contains color images. 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...indicate sunset to sunrise , with vertical grid lines marking midnight local time. Figure 2 above shows data obtained from a HARP passive acoustic

  19. Study of Ocean Bottom Interactions with Acoustic Waves by a New Elastic Wave Propagation Algorithm and an Energy Flow Analysis Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Study Of Ocean Bottom Interactions With Acoustic Waves By A New Elastic Wave Propagation Algorithm And An Energy Flow Analysis Technique Ru-Shan Wu...imaging to study the wave/sea-bottom interaction, energy partitioning, scattering mechanism and other problems that are crucial for many ocean bottom...Elastic Wave Propagation Algorithm And An Energy Flow Analysis Technique 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  20. Monitoring of seafloor crustal deformation using GPS/Acoustic technique along the Nankai Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, K.; Tadokoro, K.; Ikuta, R.; Watanabe, T.; Fujii, C.; Matsuhiro, K.; Sayanagi, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor crustal deformation is crucial for estimating the interplate locking at the shallow subduction zone and has been carried out at subduction margins in Japan, e.g., Japan Trench and Nankai Trough [Sato et al., 2011; Tadokoro et al., 2012]. Iinuma et al. [2012] derived slip distributions during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake using GPS/Acoustic data and on-land GPS data. The result showed that maximum slip is more than 85 m near the trench axis. The focal area along the Nankai trough extended to the trough axis affected this earthquake by cabinet office, government of Japan.  We monitored seafloor crustal deformation along the Nankai trough, Japan. Observation regions are at the eastern end of Nankai trough (named Suruga trough) and at the central Nankai trough. We established and monitored by two sites across the trough at each region. In the Suruga trough region, we repeatedly observed from 2005 to 2013. We observed 13 and 14 times at a foot wall side (SNE) and at a hanging wall side (SNW), respectively. We estimated the displacement velocities with relative to the Amurian plate from the result of repeated observation. The estimated displacement velocity vectors at SNE and SNW are 42±8 mm/y to N94±3˚W direction and 39±11 mm/y to N84±9˚W direction, respectively. The directions are the same as those measured at the on-land GPS stations. The magnitudes of velocity vector indicate significant shortening by approximately 4 mm/y between SNW and on-land GPS stations at hanging wall side of the Suruga Trough. This result shows that the plate interface at the northernmost Suruga trough is strongly locked. In the central Nankai trough region, we established new two stations across the central Nankai trough (Both stations are about 15km distance from trough) and observed only three times, August 2013, January 2014, and June 2014. We report the results of monitoring performed in this year.

  1. Finite element modeling of nonlinear acoustics/ultrasonics for the detection of closed delaminations in composites.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashish Kumar; Chen, Bo-Yang; Tan, Vincent B C; Tay, Tong-Earn; Lee, Heow-Pueh

    2017-02-01

    Linear ultrasonics methods based on the principle of reflection, transmission, dissipation of sound waves have been traditionally used to detect delaminations in composite structures. However, when the delamination is in very early stages such that it is almost closed, or closed due to a compressive load, the linear methods may fail to detect such cases of delaminations. Nonlinear acoustics/ultrasonics have shown potential to identify damages in composite structures which are difficult to detect using conventional linear ultrasonic methods. The nonlinear method involves exciting the structure with a sinusoidal signal of certain (or multiple) frequency and observing the vibrations of the structure. The vibrations of the damage region differ significantly from intact regions and can be used to identify the damage. However due to the complex and varying nature of the nonlinear phenomena created by the interaction between the exciting signal and the damage, there are many variables at play which can lead to success or failure of the method. While experiments lead to the establishment of the method to be used as a damage detection technique, numerical simulations can help to explain the various phenomena associated with nonlinearity. This work presents a quick approach to model the nonlinear behavior caused by closed delaminations. The model is validated with a previously available approach for nonlinear vibrations modeling and a comparison is made between the two. The local nature of the nonlinearity enables to map out the area of damage in the structure. Additionally, a few parametric studies are performed to study the effect of various parameters related to the nonlinear phenomenon.

  2. Mathematical model of acoustic speech production with mobile walls of the vocal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimov, N. A.; Zakharov, E. V.

    2016-03-01

    A mathematical speech production model is considered that describes acoustic oscillation propagation in a vocal tract with mobile walls. The wave field function satisfies the Helmholtz equation with boundary conditions of the third kind (impedance type). The impedance mode corresponds to a threeparameter pendulum oscillation model. The experimental research demonstrates the nonlinear character of how the mobility of the vocal tract walls influence the spectral envelope of a speech signal.

  3. Fitting Models of the Population Consequences of Acoustic Disturbance to Data from Marine Mammal Populations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    2011 to 00-00-2011 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE Fitting Models of the Population Consequences of Acoustic Disturbance to Data from Marine Mammal...and 4 ) initialize each of the MCMC chains. The Gibbs sampler allows us to factor the above high dimensional model into a series of lower dimension 4 ...at NEAq, and an example time series for one animal highlights both body fat code, and entanglement episodes (Figure 4 ). Individual health is a

  4. Field Assessment Techniques for Bank Erosion Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-22

    Field Assessment Techniques for Bank Erosion Modeling First Interim Report Prepared for US Army European Research Office US AR DS G-. EDISON HOUSE...SEDIMENTATION ANALYSIS SHEETS and GUIDELINES FOR THE USE OF SEDIMENTATION ANALYSIS SHEETS IN THE FIELD Prepared for US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment...Material Type 3 Material Type 4 Cobbles Toe[’ Toe Toefl Toefl Protection Status Cobbles/boulders Mid-Bnak .. Mid-na.k Mid-Bnask[ Mid-Boak

  5. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor; Hearing loss - acoustic; Tinnitus - acoustic ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  6. Acoustical Techniques/Designs Investigated During the Southeast Asia Conflict 1966-1972

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-21

    targets, deployment strategy (including sensor mix), localization algorithms, etc. (6) Detection Methods . Several new remote sensing techniques and new...swimmers. They also may be used to detect such odors as engine exhaust. Methods more effective against underwater swimmers - perhaps active sonar...high data rate with low false alarms, high probability of detection , and satisfactory CEP’s. c. Analytical studies related to methods of determining a

  7. 3-D Acoustic Scattering from 2-D Rough Surfaces Using A Parabolic Equation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    acoustic propagation signals, especially at mid- frequencies and higher (e.g., acoustic communications systems). For many years, the effects of rough...of the effect of surface scattering on 3-D propagation , which is critical in evaluating the variability in underwater acoustic propagation . Results...14. SUBJECT TERMS Acoustic Propagation , Acoustic Scattering, Sea Surface Perturbations, Split- Step Fourier Algorithm, Finite Difference Algorithm

  8. Acoustic Image Models for Obstacle Avoidance with Forward-Looking Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masek, T.; Kölsch, M.

    Long-range forward-looking sonars (FLS) have recently been deployed in autonomous unmanned vehicles (AUV). We present models for various features in acoustic images, with the goal of using this sensor for altitude maintenance, obstacle detection and obstacle avoidance. First, we model the backscatter and FLS noise as pixel-based, spatially-varying intensity distributions. Experiments show that these models predict noise with an accuracy of over 98%. Next, the presence of acoustic noise from two other sources including a modem is reliably detected with a template-based filter and a threshold learned from training data. Lastly, the ocean floor location and orientation is estimated with a gradient-descent method using a site-independent template, yielding sufficiently accurate results in 95% of the frames. Temporal information is expected to further improve the performance.

  9. Acoustic resonators for noise control in enclosures: Modelling, design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ganghua

    This work systematically investigates the acoustic interaction between an enclosure and resonators, and establishes systematic design tools based upon the interaction theory to optimize the physical characteristics and the locations of resonators. A general theoretical model is first established to predict the acoustic performance of multiple resonators placed in an acoustic enclosure of arbitrary shape. Analytical solutions for the sound pressure inside the enclosure are obtained when a single resonator is installed, which provide insight into the physics of the acoustic interaction between the enclosure and resonators. The theoretical model is experimentally validated, showing the effectiveness and reliability of the theoretical model. Using the validated acoustic interaction model and the analytical solutions, the internal resistance of a resonator is optimized to improve its performance in a frequency band enclosing acoustic resonances. An energy reduction index is defined to conduct the optimization. The dual process of the energy dissipation and radiation of the resonator is quantified. Optimal resistance and its physical effect on the enclosure-resonator interaction are numerically evaluated and categorized in terms of frequency bandwidths. Predictions on the resonator performance are confirmed by experiments. Comparisons with existing models based on different optimization criteria are also performed. It is shown that the proposed model serves as an effective design tool to determine the optimal internal-resistance of the resonator in a chosen frequency band. Due to the multi-modal coupling, the resonator performance is also affected by its location besides its physical characteristics. When multiple resonators are used, the mutual interaction among resonators leads to the requirement of a systematic optimization tool to determine their locations. In the present work, different optimization methodologies are explored. These include a sequential design

  10. Acoustic guided waves in cylindrical solid-fluid structures: Modeling with a sweeping frequency finite element method and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; D'Angelo, Ralph M.; Sinha, Bikash K.; Zeroug, Smaine

    2017-02-01

    Modeling and understanding the complex elastic-wave physics prevalent in solid-fluid cylindrically-layered structures is of importance in many NDE fields, and most pertinently in the domain of well integrity evaluation of cased holes in the oil and gas industry. Current sonic measurements provide viable techniques for well integrity evaluation yet their practical effectiveness is hampered by the current lack of knowledge of acoustic wave fields particularly in complicated cased-hole geometry where for instance two or more nested steel strings are present in the borehole. In this article, we propose and implement a Sweeping Frequency Finite Element Method (SFFEM) for acoustic guided waves simulation in complex geometries that include double steel strings cemented to each other and to the formation and where the strings may be non-concentric. Transient dynamic finite element models are constructed with sweeping frequency signals being applied as the excitation sources. The sources and receivers disposition simulate current sonic measurement tools deployed in the oilfield. Synthetic wavetrains are recorded and processed with modified matrix pencil method to isolate both the dispersive and non-dispersive propagating guided wave modes. Scaled experiments of fluid-filled double strings with dimensions mimicking the real ones encountered in the field have also been carried out to generate reference data. A comparison of the experimental and numerical results indicates that the SFFEM is capable of accurately reproducing the rich and intricate higher-order multiple wave fields observed experimentally in the fluid-filled double string geometries.

  11. Wind-tunnel acoustic results of two rotor models with several tip designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. M.; Connor, A. B.

    1986-01-01

    A three-phase research program has been undertaken to study the acoustic signals due to the aerodynamic interaction of rotorcraft main rotors and tail rotors. During the first phase, two different rotor models with several interchangeable tips were tested in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel on the U.S. Army rotor model system. An extensive acoustic data base was acquired, with special emphasis on blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. The details of the experimental procedure, acoustic data acquisition, and reduction are documented. The overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of the high-twist rotor systems is relatively insensitive to flight speed but generally increases with rotor tip-path-plane angle. The OASPL of the high-twist rotors is dominated by acoustic energy in the low-frequency harmonics. The OASPL of the low-twist rotor systems shows more dependence on flight speed than the high-twist rotors, in addition to being quite sensitive to tip-path-plane angle. An integrated band-limited sound pressure level, limited by 500 to 3000 Hz, is a useful metric to quantify the occurrence of BVI noise. The OASPL of the low-twist rotors is strongly influenced by the band-limited sound levels, indicating that the blade-vortex impulsive noise is a dominant noise source for this rotor design. The midfrequency acoustic levels for both rotors show a very strong dependence on rotor tip-path-plane angle. The tip-path-plane angle at which the maximum midfrequency sound level occurs consistently decreases with increasing flight speed. The maximum midfrequency sound level measured at a given location is constant regardless of the flight speed.

  12. Acoustic streaming effects in megasonic cleaning of EUV photomasks: a continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapila, Vivek; Deymier, Pierre A.; Shende, Hrishikesh; Pandit, Viraj; Raghavan, Srini; Eschbach, Florence O.

    2005-11-01

    Removal of nano-scale contaminant particles from the photomasks is of critical importance to the implementation of EUV lithography for 32nm node. Megasonic cleaning has traditionally been used for photomask cleaning and extensions to sub 50nm particulates removal is being considered as a pattern damage free cleaning approach. Several mechanisms for removal are believed to be active in megasonic cleaning systems, e.g., cavitation, and acoustic streaming (Eckart, Schlichting, and microstreaming). It is often difficult to separate the effects of these individual mechanisms on contamination removal in a conventional experimental setup. Therefore, a theoretical approach is undertaken in this work with a focus on determining the contribution of acoustic streaming in cleaning process. A continuum model is used to describe the interaction between megasonic waves and a substrate (fused silica) immersed in a fluid (water). The model accounts for the viscous nature of the fluid. We calculate the acoustic vibrational modes of the system. These in turn are used to determine the acoustic streaming forces that lead to Schlichting streaming in a narrow acoustic boundary layer at the substrate/fluid interface. These forces are subsequently used to estimate the streaming velocities that may in turn apply a pressure and drag force on the contaminant particles adhering to the substrate. These effects are calculated as a function of angle of incidence, frequency and intensity of the megasonic wave. The relevance of this study is then discussed in the context of the cleaning efficiency and pattern damage in competing megasonic cleaning technologies, such as immersion, and nozzle-based systems.

  13. Estimation of acoustical streaming: theoretical model, Doppler measurements and optical visualisation.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, A; Kowalewski, T; Secomski, W; Wójcik, J

    1998-02-01

    An approximate solution for the streaming velocity generated by flat and weakly focused transducers was derived by directly solving the Dirichlet boundary conditions for the Poisson equation, the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for the axial components of the streaming velocity. The theoretical model was verified experimentally using a 32 MHz pulsed Doppler unit. The experimental acoustical fields were produced by three different 4 mm diameter flat and focused transducers driven by the transmitter generating the average acoustic power within the range from 1 microW to 6 mW. The streaming velocity was measured along the ultrasonic beam from 0 to 2 cm. Streaming was induced in a solution of water and corn starch. The experimental results showed that for a given acoustic power the streaming velocity was independent of the starch density in water, changed from 0.3 to 40 grams of starch in 1 l of distilled water. For applied acoustic powers, the streaming velocity changed linearly from 0.2 to 40 mm/s. Both, the theoretical solutions for plane and focused waves and the experimental results were in good agreement. The streaming velocity field was also visualised using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) and two different evaluation methods. The first based on the FFT-based cross-correlation analysis between small sections for each pair of images and the second employing the algorithm of searching for local displacements between several images.

  14. Deriving content-specific measures of room acoustic perception using a binaural, nonlinear auditory model.

    PubMed

    van Dorp Schuitman, Jasper; de Vries, Diemer; Lindau, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Acousticians generally assess the acoustic qualities of a concert hall or any other room using impulse response-based measures such as the reverberation time, clarity index, and others. These parameters are used to predict perceptual attributes related to the acoustic qualities of the room. Various studies show that these physical measures are not able to predict the related perceptual attributes sufficiently well under all circumstances. In particular, it has been shown that physical measures are dependent on the state of occupation, are prone to exaggerated spatial fluctuation, and suffer from lacking discrimination regarding the kind of acoustic stimulus being presented. Accordingly, this paper proposes a method for the derivation of signal-based measures aiming at predicting aspects of room acoustic perception from content specific signal representations produced by a binaural, nonlinear model of the human auditory system. Listening tests were performed to test the proposed auditory parameters for both speech and music. The results look promising; the parameters correlate with their corresponding perceptual attributes in most cases.

  15. Testing and verification of a scale-model acoustic propagation system.

    PubMed

    Sagers, Jason D; Ballard, Megan S

    2015-12-01

    This paper discusses the design and operation of a measurement apparatus used to conduct scale-model underwater acoustic propagation experiments, presents experimental results for an idealized waveguide, and compares the measured results to data generated by two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical models. The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of the apparatus for a simple waveguide that primarily exhibits 2D acoustic propagation. The apparatus contains a computer-controlled positioning system that accurately moves a receiving transducer in the water layer above a scale-model bathymetry while a stationary source transducer emits broadband pulsed waveforms. Experimental results are shown for a 2.133 m × 1.219 m bathymetric part possessing a flat-bottom bathymetry with a translationally invariant wedge of 10° slope along one edge. Beamformed results from a synthetic horizontal line array indicate the presence of strong in-plane arrivals along with weaker diffracted and horizontally refracted arrivals. A simulated annealing inversion method is applied to infer values for five waveguide parameters with the largest measurement uncertainty. The inferred values are then used in a 2D method of images model and a 3D adiabatic normal-mode model to simulate the measured acoustic data.

  16. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors.

    PubMed

    Hong, Z Y; Lü, P; Geng, D L; Zhai, W; Yan, N; Wei, B

    2014-10-01

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope.

  17. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Z. Y.; Lü, P.; Geng, D. L.; Zhai, W.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-10-15

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope.

  18. Numerical modeling of acoustic timescale detonation initiation using the Adaptive Wavelet-Collocation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regele, Jonathan D.

    Multi-dimensional numerical modeling of detonation initiation is the primary goal of this thesis. The particular scenario under examination is initiating a detonation wave through acoustic timescale thermal power deposition. Physically this would correspond to igniting a reactive mixture with a laser pulse as opposed to a typical electric spark. Numerous spatial and temporal scales are involved, which makes these problems computationally challenging to solve. In order to model these problems, a shock capturing scheme is developed that utilizes the computational efficiency of the Adaptive Wavelet-Collocation Method (AWCM) to properly handle the multiple scales involved. With this technique, previous one-dimensional problems with unphysically small activation energies are revisited and simulated with the AWCM. The results demonstrate a qualitative agreement with previous work that used a uniform grid MacCormack scheme. Both sets of data show the basic sequence of events that are needed in order for a DDT process to occur. Instead of starting with a strong shock-coupled reaction zone as many other studies have done, the initial pulse is weak enough to allow the shock and the reaction zone to decouple. Reflected compression waves generated by the inertially confined reaction zone lead to localized reaction centers, which eventually explode and further accelerate the process. A shock-coupled reaction zone forms an initially overdriven detonation, which relaxes to a steady CJ wave. The one-dimensional problems are extended to two dimensions using a circular heat deposition in a channel. Two-dimensional results demonstrate the same sequence of events, which suggests that the concepts developed in the original one-dimensional work are applicable to multiple dimensions.

  19. Subphonetic Acoustic Modeling for Speaker-Independent Continuous Speech Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-17

    concept of senone sharing across all hidden Markov models, such as triphones, multi-phones, words, or even phrase models ................. 50 3.15 The...For instance, training the 50 phone HMMs for English usually requires only 1-2 hours of training data, while to sufficiently train syllable models may...require 50 hours of speech. Faced with a limited amount of training data, the advantage of the improved structure of the stochastic model may not be

  20. High Frequency Acoustic Channel Characterization for Propagation and Ambient Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    has done in close collaboration with Michael Porter and Paul Hursky (HLS Research) also supported by ONR. We have also been collaborating with Steve... Michael Porter , “A passive fathometer technique for imaging seabed layering using ambient noise”, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 120, 1315-1323, (September...Siderius and Michael Porter , “Modeling broadband ocean acoustic transmissions with time- varying sea surfaces”, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 124 (1), 137-150

  1. Modelling acoustic propagation beneath Antarctic sea ice using measured environmental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Polly; Duncan, Alec; Bose, Neil; Williams, Guy

    2016-09-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles are improving and expanding in situ observations of sea ice for the validation of satellite remote sensing and climate models. Missions under sea ice, particularly over large distances (up to 100 km) away from the immediate vicinity of a ship or base, require accurate acoustic communication for monitoring, emergency response and some navigation systems. We investigate the propagation of acoustic signals in the Antarctic seasonal ice zone using the BELLHOP model, examining the influence of ocean and sea ice properties. We processed available observations from around Antarctica to generate input variables such as sound speed, surface reflection coefficient (R) and roughness parameters. The results show that changes in the sound speed profile make the most significant difference to the propagation of the direct path signal. The inclusion of the surface reflected signals from a flat ice surface was found to greatly decrease the transmission loss with range. When ice roughness was added, the transmission loss increased with roughness, in a manner similar to the direct path transmission loss results. The conclusions of this work are that: (1) the accuracy of acoustic modelling in this environment is greatly increased by using realistic sound speed data; (2) a risk averse ranging model would use only the direct path signal transmission; and (3) in a flat ice scenario, much greater ranges can be achieved if the surface reflected transmission paths are included. As autonomous missions under sea ice increase in scale and complexity, it will be increasingly important for operational procedures to include effective modelling of acoustic propagation with representative environmental data.

  2. Volumetric techniques: three-dimensional midface modeling

    PubMed Central

    Pierzchała, Ewa; Placek, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a complex process caused by many factors. The most important factors include exposure to UV radiation, smoking, facial muscle movement, gravity, loss and displacement of fat and bone resorption. As a symptom of aging, face loses elasticity, volume and cheerful look. While changing face proportions, the dominant part of a face is its bottom instead of the mid part. The use of three-dimensional face modelling techniques, particularly the mid-face – tear through and cheeks, restores the skin firmness, volume and healthy look. For this purpose the hyaluronic acid is used, calcium hydroxyapatite, and L-polylactic acid fillers. Volumetric techniques require precision and proper selection of the filling agent to give a sense of satisfaction to both the patient and the doctor. PMID:25610354

  3. Volumetric techniques: three-dimensional midface modeling.

    PubMed

    Macierzyńska, Arleta; Pierzchała, Ewa; Placek, Waldemar

    2014-12-01

    Aging is a complex process caused by many factors. The most important factors include exposure to UV radiation, smoking, facial muscle movement, gravity, loss and displacement of fat and bone resorption. As a symptom of aging, face loses elasticity, volume and cheerful look. While changing face proportions, the dominant part of a face is its bottom instead of the mid part. The use of three-dimensional face modelling techniques, particularly the mid-face - tear through and cheeks, restores the skin firmness, volume and healthy look. For this purpose the hyaluronic acid is used, calcium hydroxyapatite, and L-polylactic acid fillers. Volumetric techniques require precision and proper selection of the filling agent to give a sense of satisfaction to both the patient and the doctor.

  4. Modeling of oropharyngeal articulatory adaptation to compensate for the acoustic effects of nasalization.

    PubMed

    Rong, Panying; Kuehn, David P; Shosted, Ryan K

    2016-09-01

    Hypernasality is one of the most detrimental speech disturbances that lead to declines of speech intelligibility. Velopharyngeal inadequacy, which is associated with anatomic defects such as cleft palate or neuromuscular disorders that affect velopharygneal function, is the primary cause of hypernasality. A simulation study by Rong and Kuehn [J. Speech Lang. Hear. Res. 55(5), 1438-1448 (2012)] demonstrated that properly adjusted oropharyngeal articulation can reduce nasality for vowels synthesized with an articulatory model [Mermelstein, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 53(4), 1070-1082 (1973)]. In this study, a speaker-adaptive articulatory model was developed to simulate speaker-customized oropharyngeal articulatory adaptation to compensate for the acoustic effects of nasalization on /a/, /i/, and /u/. The results demonstrated that (1) the oropharyngeal articulatory adaptation effectively counteracted the effects of nasalization on the second lowest formant frequency (F2) and partially compensated for the effects of nasalization on vowel space (e.g., shifting and constriction of vowel space) and (2) the articulatory adaptation strategies generated by the speaker-adaptive model might be more efficacious for counteracting the acoustic effects of nasalization compared to the adaptation strategies generated by the standard articulatory model in Rong and Kuehn. The findings of this study indicated the potential of using oropharyngeal articulatory adaptation as a means to correct maladaptive articulatory behaviors and to reduce nasality.

  5. A linear acoustic model for intake wave dynamics in IC engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, M. F.; Stanev, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a linear acoustic model is described that has proven useful in obtaining a better understanding of the nature of acoustic wave dynamics in the intake system of an internal combustion (IC) engine. The model described has been developed alongside a set of measurements made on a Ricardo E6 single cylinder research engine. The simplified linear acoustic model reported here produces a calculation of the pressure time-history in the port of an IC engine that agrees fairly well with measured data obtained on the engine fitted with a simple intake system. The model has proved useful in identifying the role of pipe resonance in the intake process and has led to the development of a simple hypothesis to explain the structure of the intake pressure time history: the early stages of the intake process are governed by the instantaneous values of the piston velocity and the open area under the valve. Thereafter, resonant wave action dominates the process. The depth of the early depression caused by the moving piston governs the intensity of the wave action that follows. A pressure ratio across the valve that is favourable to inflow is maintained and maximized when the open period of the valve is such to allow at least, but no more than, one complete oscillation of the pressure at its resonant frequency to occur while the valve is open.

  6. Acoustical transmission-line model of the middle-ear cavities and mastoid air cells

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustical transmission line model of the middle-ear cavities and mastoid air cell system (MACS) was constructed for the adult human middle ear with normal function. The air-filled cavities comprised the tympanic cavity, aditus, antrum, and MACS. A binary symmetrical airway branching model of the MACS was constructed using an optimization procedure to match the average total volume and surface area of human temporal bones. The acoustical input impedance of the MACS was calculated using a recursive procedure, and used to predict the input impedance of the middle-ear cavities at the location of the tympanic membrane. The model also calculated the ratio of the acoustical pressure in the antrum to the pressure in the middle-ear cavities at the location of the tympanic membrane. The predicted responses were sensitive to the magnitude of the viscothermal losses within the MACS. These predicted input impedance and pressure ratio functions explained the presence of multiple resonances reported in published data, which were not explained by existing MACS models. PMID:25920840

  7. Acoustic emission signal processing technique to characterize reactor in-pile phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vivek; Tawfik, Magdy S.; Smith, James A.

    2015-03-31

    Existing and developing advanced sensor technologies and instrumentation will allow non-intrusive in-pile measurement of temperature, extension, and fission gases when coupled with advanced signal processing algorithms. The transmitted measured sensor signals from inside to the outside of containment structure are corrupted by noise and are attenuated, thereby reducing the signal strength and the signal-to-noise ratio. Identification and extraction of actual signal (representative of an in-pile phenomenon) is a challenging and complicated process. In the paper, empirical mode decomposition technique is utilized to reconstruct actual sensor signal by partially combining intrinsic mode functions. Reconstructed signal will correspond to phenomena and/or failure modes occurring inside the reactor. In addition, it allows accurate non-intrusive monitoring and trending of in-pile phenomena.

  8. Acoustic Emission Signal Processing Technique to Characterize Reactor In-Pile Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Vivek Agarwal; Magdy Samy Tawfik; James A Smith

    2014-07-01

    Existing and developing advanced sensor technologies and instrumentation will allow non-intrusive in-pile measurement of temperature, extension, and fission gases when coupled with advanced signal processing algorithms. The transmitted measured sensor signals from inside to the outside of containment structure are corrupted by noise and are attenuated, thereby reducing the signal strength and signal-to-noise ratio. Identification and extraction of actual signal (representative of an in-pile phenomenon) is a challenging and complicated process. In this paper, empirical mode decomposition technique is proposed to reconstruct actual sensor signal by partially combining intrinsic mode functions. Reconstructed signal corresponds to phenomena and/or failure modes occurring inside the reactor. In addition, it allows accurate non-intrusive monitoring and trending of in-pile phenomena.

  9. Determination of an acoustic reflection coefficient at the inlet of a model gas turbine combustor for power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W. J.; Cha, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    A phenomenon that potentially influences the reliability of power generation systems is the presence of thermo-acoustic oscillations in the combustion chamber of a land- based gas turbine. To develop specific measures that prevent the instability, it is essential to predict and/or evaluate the underlying physics of the thermo-acoustics, which requires the acoustic boundary condition at the exit of the burner, that is, at the inlet of the combustor. Here we report a procedure for calculating acoustic reflection coefficients at the burner exit by utilizing two microphone method (TMM) for dynamic pressure signals. The procedure has been verified by comparing its results with reported ones and further successfully employed to determine the acoustic boundary condition of the burner of a partially-premixed model gas turbine combustor.

  10. Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic plasmas using double adiabatic model and gyro-kinetic equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun; Cao, Jintao

    2014-12-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic tokamak plasmas is theoretically analyzed by using double adiabatic model and gyro-kinetic equation. The bi-Maxwellian distribution function for guiding-center ions is assumed to obtain a self-consistent form, yielding pressures satisfying the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) anisotropic equilibrium condition. The double adiabatic model gives the dispersion relation of geodesic acoustic mode (GAM), which agrees well with the one derived from gyro-kinetic equation. The GAM frequency increases with the ratio of pressures, p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}, and the Landau damping rate is dramatically decreased by p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}. MHD result shows a low-frequency zonal flow existing for all p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}, while according to the kinetic dispersion relation, no low-frequency branch exists for p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ∥}≳ 2.

  11. Scatterer size and concentration estimation technique based on a 3D acoustic impedance map from histologic sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Oelze, Michael L.; O'Brien, William D.; Zachary, James F.

    2004-05-01

    Accurate estimates of scatterer parameters (size and acoustic concentration) are beneficial adjuncts to characterize disease from ultrasonic backscatterer measurements. An estimation technique was developed to obtain parameter estimates from the Fourier transform of the spatial autocorrelation function (SAF). A 3D impedance map (3DZM) is used to obtain the SAF of tissue. 3DZMs are obtained by aligning digitized light microscope images from histologic preparations of tissue. Estimates were obtained for simulated 3DZMs containing spherical scatterers randomly located: relative errors were less than 3%. Estimates were also obtained from a rat fibroadenoma and a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor (MMT). Tissues were fixed (10% neutral-buffered formalin), embedded in paraffin, serially sectioned and stained with H&E. 3DZM results were compared to estimates obtained independently against ultrasonic backscatter measurements. For the fibroadenoma and MMT, average scatterer diameters were 91 and 31.5 μm, respectively. Ultrasonic measurements yielded average scatterer diameters of 105 and 30 μm, respectively. The 3DZM estimation scheme showed results similar to those obtained by the independent ultrasonic measurements. The 3D impedance maps show promise as a powerful tool to characterize ultrasonic scattering sites of tissue. [Work supported by the University of Illinois Research Board.

  12. Characterisation of Damaged Tubular Composites by Acoustic Emission, Thermal Diffusivity Mapping and TSR-RGB Projection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandarana, Neha; Lansiaux, Henri; Gresil, Matthieu

    2016-11-01

    An increase in the use of composite materials, owing to improved design and fabrication processes, has led to cost reductions in many industries. Resistance to corrosion, high specific strength, and stiffness are just a few of their many attractive properties. However, damage tolerance remains a major concern in the implementation of composites and uncertainty regarding component lifetimes can lead to over-design and under-use of such materials. A combination of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) have shown promise in improving confidence by enabling data collection in-situ and in real time. In this work, infrared thermography (IRT) is employed for NDE of tubular composite specimens before and after impact. Four samples are impacted with energies of 5 J, 7.5 J, and 10 J by an un-instrumented falling weight set-up. Acoustic emissions (AE) are monitored using bonded piezoelectric sensors during one of the four impact tests. IRT data is used to generate diffusivity and thermal depth mappings of each sample using the thermographic signal reconstruction (TSR) red green blue (RGB) projection technique. Analysis of AE data alone for a 10 J impact suggest significant damage to the fibres and matrix; this is in good agreement with the generated thermal depth mappings for each sample, which indicate damage through multiple fibre layers. IRT and AE data are correlated and validated by optical micrographs taken along the cross section of damage.

  13. Characterisation of Damaged Tubular Composites by Acoustic Emission, Thermal Diffusivity Mapping and TSR-RGB Projection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandarana, Neha; Lansiaux, Henri; Gresil, Matthieu

    2017-04-01

    An increase in the use of composite materials, owing to improved design and fabrication processes, has led to cost reductions in many industries. Resistance to corrosion, high specific strength, and stiffness are just a few of their many attractive properties. However, damage tolerance remains a major concern in the implementation of composites and uncertainty regarding component lifetimes can lead to over-design and under-use of such materials. A combination of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) have shown promise in improving confidence by enabling data collection in-situ and in real time. In this work, infrared thermography (IRT) is employed for NDE of tubular composite specimens before and after impact. Four samples are impacted with energies of 5 J, 7.5 J, and 10 J by an un-instrumented falling weight set-up. Acoustic emissions (AE) are monitored using bonded piezoelectric sensors during one of the four impact tests. IRT data is used to generate diffusivity and thermal depth mappings of each sample using the thermographic signal reconstruction (TSR) red green blue (RGB) projection technique. Analysis of AE data alone for a 10 J impact suggest significant damage to the fibres and matrix; this is in good agreement with the generated thermal depth mappings for each sample, which indicate damage through multiple fibre layers. IRT and AE data are correlated and validated by optical micrographs taken along the cross section of damage.

  14. Electromagnetic Launch Vehicle Fairing and Acoustic Blanket Model of Received Power Using FEKO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trout, Dawn H.; Stanley, James E.; Wahid, Parveen F.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the impact of radio frequency transmission in vehicle fairings is important to sensitive spacecraft. This paper employees the Multilevel Fast Multipole Method (MLFMM) feature of a commercial electromagnetic tool to model the fairing electromagnetic environment in the presence of an internal transmitter. This work is an extension of the perfect electric conductor model that was used to represent the bare aluminum internal fairing cavity. This fairing model includes typical acoustic blanketing commonly used in vehicle fairings. Representative material models within FEKO were successfully used to simulate the test case.

  15. Fitting Models of the Population Consequences of Acoustic Disturbance to Data from Marine Mammal Populations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    unlimited. Fitting Models of the Population Consequences of Acoustic Disturbance to Data from Marine Mammal Populations James S. Clark H.L... model  that provides daily  estimates  of lipid status, as lipid status of the mother is directly linked  to  pup survival.  This  model  will use the drift...assess the feasibility of #2. WORK COMPLETED We have completed the following tasks: 1. Built the statistical model to estimate at-sea lipid status 2

  16. Acoustic waves generated from seismic surface waves: propagation properties determined from Doppler sounding observations and normal-mode modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artru, Juliette; Farges, Thomas; Lognonné, Philippe

    2004-09-01

    Since 1960, experiments have shown that perturbations of the ionosphere can occur after earthquakes, by way of dynamic coupling between seismic surface waves and the atmosphere. The atmospheric wave is amplified exponentially while propagating upwards due to the decrease of density, and interaction with the ionospheric plasma leads to clearly identified signals on both ground-based or satellite ionospheric measurements. In 1999 and 2000, after an upgrade of the HF Doppler sounder, the Commisariat à l'Énergie Atomique systematically recorded these effects in the ionosphere with the Francourville (France) network, by measuring vertical oscillations of ionospheric layers with the Doppler technique. Normal-mode theory extended to a solid Earth with an atmosphere allows successful modelling of such signals, even if this 1-D approach is probably too crude, especially in the solid Earth, where 20 s surface waves see large lateral variations in the crust. The combination of observations and simulations provides a new tool to determine acoustic gravity wave propagation characteristics from the ground to ionospheric height. Observed velocity and amplification of the atmospheric waves show good agreement from the ground up to moderate sounding altitudes (140-150 km); however, at higher altitudes the propagation speed is found to be much smaller than predicted and attenuation is underestimated. This shows that the standard formalism of acoustic gravity waves in the atmosphere cannot efficiently describe propagation in the ionized atmosphere. Further work is needed to characterize the propagation of acoustic waves in this altitude range: we believe that seismic waves can provide a well-constrained source for such study.

  17. Signal processing Model/Method for Recovering Acoustic Reflectivity of Spot Weld

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, William B.

    2005-09-08

    empirically. For fast estimation of R using only observations beta(1, ..., T) a receiver state equation has been derived, and is attached as Eq. (3). This equation has the further advantage that the initial impulse S need not be known, rather it is estimated simultaneously. This is necessary because element failure and coupling can cause large variations in S. Constrained nonlinear least squares techniques can be applied to this equation to recover reflectivity (and initial impulse) [4]. In particular, the Gauss-Newton algorithm on the log of the sum of squared errors based on the receiver state equation is recommended. To summarize, it is the model described in Eqs. (2) and (3) that is novel, and that enables the recovery of acoustic reflectivity from the ultrasound signals. It has been verified that this reflectivity estimate provides a better indicator of weld veracity than other features previously derived from such signals.

  18. Incorporation of RAM techniques into simulation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.C. Jr.; Haire, M.J.; Schryver, J.C.

    1995-07-01

    This work concludes that reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) analytical techniques can be incorporated into computer network simulation modeling to yield an important new analytical tool. This paper describes the incorporation of failure and repair information into network simulation to build a stochastic computer model represents the RAM Performance of two vehicles being developed for the US Army: The Advanced Field Artillery System (AFAS) and the Future Armored Resupply Vehicle (FARV). The AFAS is the US Army`s next generation self-propelled cannon artillery system. The FARV is a resupply vehicle for the AFAS. Both vehicles utilize automation technologies to improve the operational performance of the vehicles and reduce manpower. The network simulation model used in this work is task based. The model programmed in this application requirements a typical battle mission and the failures and repairs that occur during that battle. Each task that the FARV performs--upload, travel to the AFAS, refuel, perform tactical/survivability moves, return to logistic resupply, etc.--is modeled. Such a model reproduces a model reproduces operational phenomena (e.g., failures and repairs) that are likely to occur in actual performance. Simulation tasks are modeled as discrete chronological steps; after the completion of each task decisions are programmed that determine the next path to be followed. The result is a complex logic diagram or network. The network simulation model is developed within a hierarchy of vehicle systems, subsystems, and equipment and includes failure management subnetworks. RAM information and other performance measures are collected which have impact on design requirements. Design changes are evaluated through ``what if`` questions, sensitivity studies, and battle scenario changes.

  19. Coastal Acoustic Tomography Data Constraints Applied to a Coastal Ocean Circulation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    proceed separately from observations, mainly due to the lack of synoptic observations to properly constrain the model physics. Two -ew technologies in...interior ocean structure. This underwater acoustic inverse techniq . - uses travel time changes of sound pulses to map sound speed/temperature perturbation...data were density measured along vari- ous hydrographic sections. The main result of the study is that a local section can be quite effective in

  20. A model for the acoustic impedance of a perforated plate liner with multiple frequency excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1971-01-01

    A nonlinear resistance model is used in the one-dimensional equations of motion with an arbitrary exciting pressure function. The effects of high amplitude fluid motion, grazing flow, and spectral excitation can be studied together. Sample calculations of acoustic resistances are presented using a high amplitude discrete tone superimposed upon a simulated white noise spectrum. The tone amplitude is varied and its effect is shown both with and without a grazing flow velocity.

  1. The Impact of Very High Frequency Surface Reverberation on Coherent Acoustic Propagation and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    range of wind -driven conditions. The model will focus on signal coherence, and second-order amplitude and Doppler statistics. A second long-term goal...surface scattering in the literature are rare. The physics of very high frequency (VHF) scattering is expected to be strongly dependent on wind speed...Doppler and coherence of VHF acoustic signals scattered from a rough ocean surface driven by a range of wind speeds. The second is to investigate the

  2. Acoustic performance of industrial mufflers with CAE modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Soohong; Kim, Daehwan; Hong, Chinsuk; Jeong, Weuibong

    2014-12-01

    This paper investigates the noise transmission performance of industrial mufflers widely used in ships based on the CAE modeling and simulation. Since the industrial mufflers have very complicated internal structures, the conventional Transfer Matrix Method (TMM) is of limited use. The CAE modeling and simulation is therefore required to incorporate commercial softwares: CATIA for geometry modeling, MSC/PATRAN for FE meshing and LMS/ SYSNOISE for analysis. Main sources of difficulties in this study are led by complicated arrangement of reactive elements, perforated walls and absorption materials. The reactive elements and absorbent materials are modeled by applying boundary conditions given by impedance. The perforated walls are modeled by applying the transfer impedance on the duplicated node mesh. The CAE approach presented in this paper is verified by comparing with the theoretical solution of a concentric-tube resonator and is applied for industrial mufflers.

  3. Computational spectrotemporal auditory model with applications to acoustical information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Tai-Shih

    A computational spectrotemporal auditory model based on neurophysiological findings in early auditory and cortical stages is described. The model provides a unified multiresolution representation of the spectral and temporal features of sound likely critical in the perception of timbre. Several types of complex stimuli are used to demonstrate the spectrotemporal information preserved by the model. Shown by these examples, this two stage model reflects the apparent progressive loss of temporal dynamics along the auditory pathway from the rapid phase-locking (several kHz in auditory nerve), to moderate rates of synchrony (several hundred Hz in midbrain), to much lower rates of modulations in the cortex (around 30 Hz). To complete this model, several projection-based reconstruction algorithms are implemented to resynthesize the sound from the representations with reduced dynamics. One particular application of this model is to assess speech intelligibility. The spectro-temporal Modulation Transfer Functions (MTF) of this model is investigated and shown to be consistent with the salient trends in the human MTFs (derived from human detection thresholds) which exhibit a lowpass function with respect to both spectral and temporal dimensions, with 50% bandwidths of about 16 Hz and 2 cycles/octave. Therefore, the model is used to demonstrate the potential relevance of these MTFs to the assessment of speech intelligibility in noise and reverberant conditions. Another useful feature is the phase singularity emerged in the scale space generated by this multiscale auditory model. The singularity is shown to have certain robust properties and carry the crucial information about the spectral profile. Such claim is justified by perceptually tolerable resynthesized sounds from the nonconvex singularity set. In addition, the singularity set is demonstrated to encode the pitch and formants at different scales. These properties make the singularity set very suitable for traditional

  4. Granular Shear Zone Formation: Acoustic Emission Measurements and Fiber-bundle Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Or, Dani

    2013-04-01

    We couple the acoustic emissions method with conceptual models of granular material behavior for investigation of granular shear zone formation and to assess eminence of landslide hazard. When granular materials are mechanically loaded or sheared, they tend to produce discrete events of force network restructuring, and frictional interaction at grain contacts. Such abrupt perturbations within the granular lattice release part of the elastic energy stored in the strained material. Elastic waves generated by such events can be measured as acoustic emissions (AE) and may be used as surrogates for intermittent structural transitions associated with shear zone formation. To experimentally investigate the connection between granular shearing and acoustic signals we performed an array of strain-controlled shear-frame tests using glass beads. AE were measured with two different systems operating at two frequency ranges. High temporal resolution measurements of the shear stresses revealed the presence of small fluctuations typically associated with low-frequency (< 20 kHz) acoustic bursts. Shear stress jumps and linked acoustic signals give account of discrete events of grain network rearrangements and obey characteristic exponential frequency-size distributions. We found that statistical features of force jumps and AE events depend on mechanical boundary conditions and evolve during the straining process. Activity characteristics of high-frequency (> 30 kHz) AE events is linked to friction between grains. To interpret failure associated AE signals, we adapted a conceptual fiber-bundle model (FBM) that describes some of the salient statistical features of failure and associated energy production. Using FBMs for the abrupt mechanical response of the granular medium and an associated grain and force chain AE generation model provides us with a full description of the mechanical-acoustical granular shearing process. Highly resolved AE may serve as a diagnostic tool not only

  5. Aerodynamic and acoustic investigation of inverted velocity profile coannular exhaust nozzle models and development of aerodynamic and acoustic prediction procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. S.; Nelson, D. P.; Stevens, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Five co-annular nozzle models, covering a systematic variation of nozzle geometry, were tested statically over a range of exhaust conditions including inverted velocity profile (IVP) (fan to primary stream velocity ratio 1) and non IVP profiles. Fan nozzle pressure ratio (FNPR) was varied from 1.3 to 4.1 at primary nozzle pressure ratios (PNPR) of 1.53 and 2.0. Fan stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R) and 1089 K(1960 deg R) were tested with primary stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R), 811 K (1460 deg R), and 1089 K (1960 deg R). At fan and primary stream velocities of 610 and 427 m/sec (2000 and 1400 ft/sec), respectively, increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced peak perceived noise level (PNL) 3 dB, and an increase in primary radius ratio from 0 to 0.81 (fan radius ratio constant at 0.83) reduced peak PNL an additional 1.0 dB. There were no noise reductions at a fan stream velocity of 853 m/sec (2800 ft/sec). Increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced nozzle thrust coefficient 1.2 to 1.5% at a PNPR of 1.53, and 1.7 to 2.0% at a PNPR of 2.0. The developed acoustic prediction procedure collapsed the existing data with standard deviation varying from + or - 8 dB to + or - 7 dB. The aerodynamic performance prediction procedure collapsed thrust coefficient measurements to within + or - .004 at a FNPR of 4.0 and a PNPR of 2.0.

  6. Numerical modeling of nonlinear acoustic waves in a tube connected with Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, Bruno; Mercier, Jean-François

    2014-02-01

    Acoustic wave propagation in a one-dimensional waveguide connected with Helmholtz resonators is studied numerically. Finite amplitude waves and viscous boundary layers are considered. The model consists of two coupled evolution equations: a nonlinear PDE describing nonlinear acoustic waves, and a linear ODE describing the oscillations in the Helmholtz resonators. The thermal and viscous losses in the tube and in the necks of the resonators are modeled by fractional derivatives. A diffusive representation is followed: the convolution kernels are replaced by a finite number of memory variables that satisfy local ordinary differential equations. A splitting method is then applied to the evolution equations: their propagative part is solved using a standard TVD scheme for hyperbolic equations, whereas their diffusive part is solved exactly. Various strategies are examined to compute the coefficients of the diffusive representation; finally, an optimization method is preferred to the usual quadrature rules. The numerical model is validated by comparisons with exact solutions. The properties of the full nonlinear solutions are investigated numerically. In particular, the existence of acoustic solitary waves is confirmed.

  7. Refined acoustic modeling and analysis of shotgun microphones.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Lo, Yi-Yang

    2013-04-01

    A shotgun microphone is a highly directional pickup device widely used in noisy environments. The key element that leads to its superior directivity is a tube with multiple slot openings along its length. One traditional way to model the directional response of a shotgun is to assume plane waves traveling in the tube as if it is in the free field. However, the frequency response and directivity predicted by this traveling wave model can differ drastically from practical measurements. In this paper, an in-depth electroacoustic analysis was conducted to examine the problem by considering the standing waves inside the tube with an analogous circuit containing phased pressure sources and T-networks of tube segments. A further refinement is to model the housing diffraction effect with the aid of the equivalent source method (ESM). The on-axis frequency response and directivity pattern predicted by the proposed model are in close agreement with the measurements. From the results, a peculiar bifurcation phenomenon of directivity pattern at the Helmholtz frequency was also noted. While the shotgun behaves like an endfire array above the Helmholtz frequency, it becomes a broadside array below the Helmholtz frequency. The standing wave effect can be mitigated by covering the slot openings with mesh screen, which was found to alter the shotgun response to be closer to that of the traveling wave model above a critical frequency predicted by the half-wavelength rule. A mode-switching model was developed to predict the directional responses of mesh-treated shotguns.

  8. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  9. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors.

  10. A novel closure based approach for fatigue crack length estimation using the acoustic emission technique in structural health monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagar, Daniel; Foote, Peter; Irving, Philip

    2014-10-01

    Use of Acoustic Emission (AE) for detecting and locating fatigue cracks in metallic structures is widely reported but studies investigating its potential for fatigue crack length estimation are scarce. Crack growth information enables prediction of the remaining useful life of a component using well established fracture mechanics principles. Hence, the prospects of AE for use in structural health monitoring applications would be significantly improved if it could be demonstrated not only as a means of detecting crack growth but also for estimation of crack lengths. A new method for deducing crack length has been developed based on correlations between AE signals generated during fatigue crack growth and corresponding cyclic loads. A model for crack length calculation was derived empirically using AE data generated during fatigue crack growth tests in 2 mm thick SEN aluminium 2014 T6 specimens subject to a tensile stress range of 52 MPa and an R ratio of 0.1. The model was validated using AE data generated independently in separate tests performed with a stress range of 27 MPa. The results showed that predictions of crack lengths over a range of 10 mm to 80 mm can be obtained with the mean of the normalised absolute errors ranging between 0.28 and 0.4. Predictions were also made using existing AE feature-based methods and the results compared to those obtained with the novel approach developed.

  11. Flap Side-Edge Noise: Acoustic Analysis of Sen's Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.; Martin, James E.

    1996-01-01

    The two-dimensional flap side-edge flow model developed by Sen is analyzed to reveal the noise production potential of the proposed mechanism. The model assumes that a vortex will form at the equilibrium position off the side edge of the flap. The vortex is then perturbed away from the equilibrium position by incoming turbulence causing it to oscillate and thus radiate sound. The noise field is calculated three-dimensionally by taking the flap to have a finite chord. Spectra and directivity of the farfield sound are presented. In addition, the effect of retarded time differences is evaluated. The parameters in the model are related to typical aircraft parameters and noise reduction possibilities are proposed.

  12. Comparison of Numerical Models for Vibro-Acoustic Analysis of Structural Panels in Low Modal Density Range Engaging Air Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimeno-Manguan, M.; Martinz-Calvo, B.; Roibas-Millan, E.; Fajardo, P.; Simon, F.; Lopez-Diez, J.

    2012-07-01

    During launch, satellite and their equipment are subjected to loads of random nature and with a wide frequency range. Their vibro-acoustic response is an important issue to be analysed, for example for folded solar arrays and antennas. The main issue at low modal density is the modelling combinations engaging air layers, structures and external fluid. Depending on the modal density different methodologies, as FEM, BEM and SEA should be considered. This work focuses on the analysis of different combinations of the methodologies previously stated used in order to characterise the vibro-acoustic response of two rectangular sandwich structure panels isolated and engaging an air layer between them under a diffuse acoustic field. Focusing on the modelling of air layers, different models are proposed. To illustrate the phenomenology described and studied, experimental results from an acoustic test on an ARA-MKIII solar array in folded configuration are presented along with numerical results.

  13. The Acoustic-Modeling Problem in Automatic Speech Recognition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    systems that use an artificial grammar do so in order to set this uncertainty by fiat, thereby ensuring that their task, will not be too difficult...an artificial grammar , the Pr (W = w)’s are known and Hm (W) can, in fact, achieve its lower bound if the system simply uses these probabilities. In a...finite-state grammar represented by that chain. As Jim Baker points out, the modeling of speech by a hidden Markov model should not be regarded as a

  14. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    gravity waves and other submesoscale features are of specific interest. There are many open questions regarding the processes of internal-wave...modeling suite that includes submesoscale features as well as data assimilation is expected to be a valuable asset to apply in numerous ocean regions

  15. Acoustic Model of the Remnant Bubble Cloud from Underwater Explosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    model provided by Geers&Hunter (2002). lg cc , 21, ff ∞p 3, f 4f Initial conditions for equation (1) are obtained from combina- tion of similitude ...variation of bubble depth with time depending on the initial bubble size. Mathematically , we can describe the bubble trajectories by the following equa

  16. MEMS based hair flow-sensors as model systems for acoustic perception studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krijnen, Gijs J. M.; Dijkstra, Marcel; van Baar, John J.; Shankar, Siripurapu S.; Kuipers, Winfred J.; de Boer, Rik J. H.; Altpeter, Dominique; Lammerink, Theo S. J.; Wiegerink, Remco

    2006-02-01

    Arrays of MEMS fabricated flow sensors inspired by the acoustic flow-sensitive hairs found on the cerci of crickets have been designed, fabricated and characterized. The hairs consist of up to 1 mm long SU-8 structures mounted on suspended membranes with normal translational and rotational degrees of freedom. Electrodes on the membrane and on the substrate form variable capacitors, allowing for capacitive read-out. Capacitance versus voltage, frequency dependence and directional sensitivity measurements have been successfully carried out on fabricated sensor arrays, showing the viability of the concept. The sensors form a model system allowing for investigations on sensory acoustics by their arrayed nature, their adaptivity via electrostatic interaction (frequency tuning and parametric amplification) and their susceptibility to noise (stochastic resonance).

  17. MEMS based hair flow-sensors as model systems for acoustic perception studies.

    PubMed

    Krijnen, Gijs J M; Dijkstra, Marcel; van Baar, John J; Shankar, Siripurapu S; Kuipers, Winfred J; de Boer, Rik J H; Altpeter, Dominique; Lammerink, Theo S J; Wiegerink, Remco

    2006-02-28

    Arrays of MEMS fabricated flow sensors inspired by the acoustic flow-sensitive hairs found on the cerci of crickets have been designed, fabricated and characterized. The hairs consist of up to 1 mm long SU-8 structures mounted on suspended membranes with normal translational and rotational degrees of freedom. Electrodes on the membrane and on the substrate form variable capacitors, allowing for capacitive read-out. Capacitance versus voltage, frequency dependence and directional sensitivity measurements have been successfully carried out on fabricated sensor arrays, showing the viability of the concept. The sensors form a model system allowing for investigations on sensory acoustics by their arrayed nature, their adaptivity via electrostatic interaction (frequency tuning and parametric amplification) and their susceptibility to noise (stochastic resonance).

  18. Accounting for false-positive acoustic detections of bats using occupancy models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clement, Matthew J.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.; Ormsbee, Patricia C.; Szewczak, Joseph M.; Nichols, James D.

    2014-01-01

    4. Synthesis and applications. Our results suggest that false positives sufficient to affect inferences may be common in acoustic surveys for bats. We demonstrate an approach that can estimate occupancy, regardless of the false-positive rate, when acoustic surveys are paired with capture surveys. Applications of this approach include monitoring the spread of White-Nose Syndrome, estimating the impact of climate change and informing conservation listing decisions. We calculate a site-specific probability of occupancy, conditional on survey results, which could inform local permitting decisions, such as for wind energy projects. More generally, the magnitude of false positives suggests that false-positive occupancy models can improve accuracy in research and monitoring of bats and provide wildlife managers with more reliable information.

  19. Artificial cochlea and acoustic black hole travelling waves observation: Model and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucaud, Simon; Michon, Guilhem; Gourinat, Yves; Pelat, Adrien; Gautier, François

    2014-07-01

    An inhomogeneous fluid structure waveguide reproducing passive behaviour of the inner ear is modelled with the help of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method. A physical setup is designed and built. Experimental results are compared with a good correlation to theoretical ones. The experimental setup is a varying width plate immersed in fluid and terminated with an acoustic black hole. The varying width plate provides a spatial repartition of the vibration depending on the excitation frequency. The acoustic black hole is made by decreasing the plate's thickness with a quadratic profile and by covering this region with a thin film of viscoelastic material. Such a termination attenuates the flexural wave reflection at the end of the waveguide, turning standing waves into travelling waves.

  20. Acoustic timescale characterisation of a one-dimensional model hot spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, Michael D.; Regele, Jonathan D.

    2014-09-01

    Hot spots have been shown to be the autoignition centre in reactive mixtures. Linear temperature gradients and thermal stratification are used to characterise their behaviour. In this work, a model hot spot is considered by combining a linear temperature gradient with a constant temperature plateau. This approach retains the simplicity of a linear temperature gradient, but captures the effects of a local temperature maximum of finite size. A one-step Arrhenius reaction for H2-air is used to model the reactive mixture. Plateaus of three different initial sizes spanning two orders of magnitude are simulated. Each length corresponds to a different ratio of excitation time to acoustic time. It is shown that ratios less than unity react at nearly isochoric conditions while ratios greater than unity react at nearly isobaric conditions. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the gasdynamic response is characterised by the a priori prescribed hot spot acoustic timescale ratio. Based upon the prescribed timescale ratio, it is shown that the plateau can have either a substantial or negligible impact on the reaction of a surrounding temperature gradient. This is explored further as the slope of the temperature gradient is varied. Based upon the heating-to-acoustic timescale ratio, plateaus of a particular size are shown to facilitate detonation formation inside gradients that would otherwise not detonate.