Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic monitoring program

  1. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  2. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-07-20

    The Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) has been designed to record and monitor the acoustic signal in natural gas transmission lines. In particular the three acoustic signals associated with a line leak. The system is portable ({approx}30 lbs) and is designed for line pressures up to 1000 psi. It has become apparent that cataloging of the various background acoustic signals in natural gas transmission line is very important if a system to identify leak signals is to be developed. The low-pressure (0-200 psig) laboratory test phase has been completed and a number of field trials have been conducted. Before the cataloging phase could begin, a few problems identified in field trials identified had to be corrected such as: (1) Decreased microphone sensitivity at line pressures above 250 psig. (2) The inability to deal with large data sets collected when cataloging the variety of signals in a transmission line. (3) The lack of an available online acoustic calibration system. These problems have been solved and the WVU PAMP is now fully functional over the entire pressure range found in the Natural Gas transmission lines in this region. Field portability and reliability have been greatly improved. Data collection and storage have also improved to the point were the full acoustic spectrum of acoustic signals can be accurately cataloged, recorded and described.

  3. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    John l. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-07-01

    The 1st generation acoustic monitoring package was designed to detect and analyze weak acoustic signals inside natural gas transmission lines. Besides a microphone it housed a three-inch diameter aerodynamic acoustic signal amplifier to maximize sensitivity to leak induced {Delta}p type signals. The theory and test results of this aerodynamic signal amplifier was described in the master's degree thesis of our Research Assistant Deepak Mehra who is about to graduate. To house such a large three-inch diameter sensor required the use of a steel 300-psi rated 4 inch weld neck flange, which itself weighed already 29 pounds. The completed 1st generation Acoustic Monitoring Package weighed almost 100 pounds. This was too cumbersome to mount in the field, on an access port at a pipeline shut-off valve. Therefore a 2nd generation and truly Portable Acoustic Monitor was built. It incorporated a fully self-contained {Delta}p type signal sensor, rated for line pressures up to 1000 psi with a base weight of only 6 pounds. This is the Rosemont Inc. Model 3051CD-Range 0, software driven sensor, which is believed to have industries best total performance. Its most sensitive unit was purchased with a {Delta}p range from 0 to 3 inch water. This resulted in the herein described 2nd generation: Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) for pipelines up to 1000 psi. Its 32-pound total weight includes an 18-volt battery. Together with a 3 pound laptop with its 4-channel data acquisition card, completes the equipment needed for field acoustic monitoring of natural gas transmission pipelines.

  4. Program Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Washington, DC.

    Program monitoring permits assessments to be made on a community-based program--its managerial and operational efficiency, its effectiveness, its acceptability by clients, and suitability to needs. It assists a program in defining objectives and developing and implementing quality care in an effective manner. This guide lists kinds of things…

  5. Acoustic transducer for nuclear reactor monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Ahlgren, Frederic F.; Scott, Paul F.

    1977-01-01

    A transducer to monitor a parameter and produce an acoustic signal from which the monitored parameter can be recovered. The transducer comprises a modified Galton whistle which emits a narrow band acoustic signal having a frequency dependent upon the parameter being monitored, such as the temperature of the cooling media of a nuclear reactor. Multiple locations within a reactor are monitored simultaneously by a remote acoustic receiver by providing a plurality of transducers each designed so that the acoustic signal it emits has a frequency distinct from the frequencies of signals emitted by the other transducers, whereby each signal can be unambiguously related to a particular transducer.

  6. Acoustically based fetal heart rate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald A.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.

    1991-01-01

    The acoustically based fetal heart rate monitor permits an expectant mother to perform the fetal Non-Stress Test in her home. The potential market would include the one million U.S. pregnancies per year requiring this type of prenatal surveillance. The monitor uses polyvinylidene fluoride (PVF2) piezoelectric polymer film for the acoustic sensors, which are mounted in a seven-element array on a cummerbund. Evaluation of the sensor ouput signals utilizes a digital signal processor, which performs a linear prediction routine in real time. Clinical tests reveal that the acoustically based monitor provides Non-Stress Test records which are comparable to those obtained with a commercial ultrasonic transducer.

  7. Acoustic emission monitoring of polymer composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardenheier, R.

    1981-01-01

    The techniques of acoustic emission monitoring of polymer composite materials is described. It is highly sensitive, quasi-nondestructive testing method that indicates the origin and behavior of flaws in such materials when submitted to different load exposures. With the use of sophisticated signal analysis methods it is possible the distinguish between different types of failure mechanisms, such as fiber fracture delamination or fiber pull-out. Imperfections can be detected while monitoring complex composite structures by acoustic emission measurements.

  8. Surface acoustic wave dust deposition monitor

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1988-02-12

    A system is disclosed for using the attenuation of surface acoustic waves to monitor real time dust deposition rates on surfaces. The system includes a signal generator, a tone-burst generator/amplifier connected to a transmitting transducer for converting electrical signals into acoustic waves. These waves are transmitted through a path defining means adjacent to a layer of dust and then, in turn, transmitted to a receiving transducer for changing the attenuated acoustic wave to electrical signals. The signals representing the attenuated acoustic waves may be amplified and used in a means for analyzing the output signals to produce an output indicative of the dust deposition rates and/or values of dust in the layer. 8 figs.

  9. Distributed acoustic sensing: towards partial discharge monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohwetter, Philipp; Eisermann, René; Krebber, Katerina

    2015-09-01

    We report on the successful application of distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) to the detection of partial discharge (PD). A detection limit of about 1 nC discharge magnitude was achieved for PD in a real-scale model of a high voltage termination. Dedicated ultrasonic fibre-optic transducers were interrogated using coherent optical time-domain Rayleigh backscatter reflectometry (C-OTDR). Random quadrature demodulation was employed for retrieving relevant acoustic information from the raw C-OTDR backscatter traces. To our knowledge, our results are a first-time demonstration that quasi-distributed fibre-optic acoustic sensing is a candidate technology for the acoustic partial discharge monitoring of power cable joints and terminations.

  10. Acoustic Techniques for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankenstein, B.; Augustin, J.; Hentschel, D.; Schubert, F.; Köhler, B.; Meyendorf, N.

    2008-02-01

    Future safety and maintenance strategies for industrial components and vehicles are based on combinations of monitoring systems that are permanently attached to or embedded in the structure, and periodic inspections. The latter belongs to conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and can be enhanced or partially replaced by structural health monitoring systems. However, the main benefit of this technology for the future will consist of systems that can be differently designed based on improved safety philosophies, including continuous monitoring. This approach will increase the efficiency of inspection procedures at reduced inspection times. The Fraunhofer IZFP Dresden Branch has developed network nodes, miniaturized transmitter and receiver systems for active and passive acoustical techniques and sensor systems that can be attached to or embedded into components or structures. These systems have been used to demonstrate intelligent sensor networks for the monitoring of aerospace structures, railway systems, wind energy generators, piping system and other components. Material discontinuities and flaws have been detected and monitored during full scale fatigue testing. This paper will discuss opportunities and future trends in nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring based on new sensor principles and advanced microelectronics. It will outline various application examples of monitoring systems based on acoustic techniques and will indicate further needs for research and development.

  11. Acoustic radiation from lined, unflanged ducts: Acoustic source distribution program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckemeyer, R. J.; Sawdy, D. T.

    1971-01-01

    An acoustic radiation analysis was developed to predict the far-field characteristics of fan noise radiated from an acoustically lined unflanged duct. This analysis is comprised of three modular digital computer programs which together provide a capability of accounting for the impedance mismatch at the duct exit plane. Admissible duct configurations include circular or annular, with or without an extended centerbody. This variation in duct configurations provides a capability of modeling inlet and fan duct noise radiation. The computer programs are described in detail.

  12. Acoustic emission monitoring of composite containment systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, John R.

    2011-07-01

    This paper considers two different types of composite containment system, and two different types of acoustic emission (AE) monitoring approach. The first system is a composite reinforced pressure vessel (CRPV) which is monitored both during construction and in-service using a broadband modal acoustic emission (MAE) technique. The second system is a membrane cargo containment system which is monitored using both a global as well as a local AE technique. For the CRPV, the damage assessment is concerned mainly with the integrity of the composite outer layer at the construction stage, and possible fatigue cracking of the inner steel liner at the in-service stage. For the membrane tank, the damage assessment is concerned with locating and quantifying any abnormal porosities that might develop in-service. By comparing and contrasting the different types of structural system and different monitoring approaches inferences are drawn as to what role AE monitoring could take in the damage assessment of other types of composite containment system. (Detailed technical data have not been included, due to client confidentiality constraints.)

  13. Acoustic emission monitoring of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jeremy; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    Damage to wind turbine blades can, if left uncorrected, evolve into catastrophic failures resulting in high costs and significant losses for the operator. Detection of damage, especially in real time, has the potential to mitigate the losses associated with such catastrophic failure. To address this need various forms of online monitoring are being investigated, including acoustic emission detection. In this paper, pencil lead breaks are used as a standard reference source and tests are performed on unidirectional glass-fiber-reinforced-polymer plates. The mechanical pencil break is used to simulate an acoustic emission (AE) that generates elastic waves in the plate. Piezoelectric sensors and a data acquisition system are used to detect and record the signals. The expected dispersion curves generated for Lamb waves in plates are calculated, and the Gabor wavelet transform is used to provide dispersion curves based on experimental data. AE sources using an aluminum plate are used as a reference case for the experimental system and data processing validation. The analysis of the composite material provides information concerning the wave speed, modes, and attenuation of the waveform, which can be used to estimate maximum AE event - receiver separation, in a particular geometry and materials combination. The foundational data provided in this paper help to guide improvements in online structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades using acoustic emission.

  14. Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Pantea, Cristian

    2012-05-04

    The projects objectives and purpose are to: (1) development a multipurpose acoustic sensor for downhole fluid monitoring in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) reservoirs over typical ranges of pressures and temperatures and demonstrate its capabilities and performance for different EGS systems; (2) determine in real-time and in a single sensor package several parameters - temperature, pressure, fluid flow and fluid properties; (3) needed in nearly every phase of an EGS project, including Testing of Injection and Production Wells, Reservoir Validation, Inter-well Connectivity, Reservoir Scale Up and Reservoir Sustainability. (4) Current sensors are limited to operating at lower temperatures, but the need is for logging at high temperatures. The present project deals with the development of a novel acoustic-based sensor that can work at temperatures up to 374 C, in inhospitable environments.

  15. Acoustic Flow Monitor System - User Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaHusen, Richard

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Acoustic Flow Monitor (AFM) is a portable system that was designed by the U.S. Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory to detect and monitor debris flows associated with volcanoes. It has been successfully used internationally as part of real-time warning systems in valleys threatened by such flows (Brantley, 1990; Marcial and others, 1996; Lavigne and others, 2000). The AFM system has also been proven to be an effective tool for monitoring some non-volcanic debris flows. This manual is intended to serve as a basic guide for the installation, testing, and maintenance of AFM systems. An overview of how the system works, as well as instructions for installation and guidelines for testing, is included. Interpretation of data is not covered in this manual; rather, the user should refer to the references provided for published examples of AFM data.

  16. Active Acoustic Monitoring of Aquatic Life.

    PubMed

    Stein, Peter J; Edson, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Active acoustic monitoring (AAM) can be used to study the behavioral response of marine life and to mitigate harm during high-danger anthropogenic activities. This has been done in fish studies for many decades, and there are now case studies in which AAM has been used for marine mammal monitoring as well. This includes monitoring where the ranges, AAM frequency of operation, and species are such that the AAM operation is completely outside the hearing range of the animals. However, it also includes AAM operations within the hearing range of marine life, although this does not necessarily that imply AAM is not a suitable tool. It is just not always possible to have a sufficient detection and tracking range and operate at a frequency outside the marine life hearing range. Likely, the best and most important application of AAM is when the anthropogenic activity to be conducted is temporary and presents a clear danger to aquatic life. PMID:26611075

  17. Detection of respiratory compromise by acoustic monitoring, capnography, and brain function monitoring during monitored anesthesia care.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Pedro P; Tanaka, Maria; Drover, David R

    2014-12-01

    Episodes of apnea in sedated patients represent a risk of respiratory compromise. We hypothesized that acoustic monitoring would be equivalent to capnography for detection of respiratory pauses, with fewer false alarms. In addition, we hypothesized that the patient state index (PSI) would be correlated with the frequency of respiratory pauses and therefore could provide information about the risk of apnea during sedation. Patients undergoing sedation for surgical procedures were monitored for respiration rate using acoustic monitoring and capnography and for depth of sedation using the PSI. A clinician blinded to the acoustic and sedation monitor observed the capnograph and patient to assess sedation and episodes of apnea. Another clinician retrospectively reviewed the capnography and acoustic waveform and sound files to identify true positive and false positive respiratory pauses by each method (reference method). Sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio for detection of respiratory pause was calculated for acoustic monitoring and capnography. The correlation of PSI with respiratory pause events was determined. For the 51 respiratory pauses validated by retrospective analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio positive for detection were 16, 96 %, and 3.5 for clinician observation; 88, 7 %, and 1.0 for capnography; and 55, 87 %, and 4.1 for acoustic monitoring. There was no correlation between PSI and respiratory pause events. Acoustic monitoring had the highest likelihood ratio positive for detection of respiratory pause events compared with capnography and clinician observation and, therefore, may provide the best method for respiration rate monitoring during these procedures. PMID:24420342

  18. 2-D acoustic VTI full waveform inversion for CCS monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, S.; Kim, W. K.; Min, D. J.; Jeong, W.; OH, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    These days many geophysicists have been working not only for oil and gas exploration but also for CO2 monitoring for CCS (Carbon Capture and storage). When CO2 is injected and stored to the target layer, it changes the physical properties of subsurface media like p-wave velocity, density and so on. Seismic method is one of the most widely used geophysical methods for CO2 monitoring, because it can delineate physical properties of subsurface media. To prevent CO2 from leaking out of reservoirs, most target areas require caprocks, and shale often acts as a caprock. However, shale has a strong anisotropic property. Without considering the anisotropic property of subsurface media, interpretations of seismic monitoring data can distort the CO2distribution or movement in the subsurface media. For computational efficiency, seismic data interpretation based on acoustic VTI (Vertical Transversely Isotropic) wave equations has been commonly done although it does not consider the shear waves. To investigate the importance of considering anisotropic properties in acoustic FWI (full waveform inversion) for CO2 monitoring, we compare results obtained by the acoustic VTI FWI with those of the conventional acoustic FWI for isotropic case in the frequency domain. Both methods are based on the node-based finite-element method. Numerical examples show that neglecting anisotropic properties of subsurface media can distort distribution of CO2 and degrade reliability of subsurface image obtained by FWI. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the Human Resources Development program (No. 20134010200510) of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korean government Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy and by the "Development of Technology for CO2 Marine Geological Storage" grant funded by the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries of Korea.

  19. Development of acoustic health monitoring for railroad tank cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gostautas, Richard; Finlayson, Richard; Godinez, Valery; Pollock, Adrian; Penya, Jose

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the research and development of an Acoustic Health Monitoring (AHM) system that uses Guided Lamb Wave (GLW) technology to determine the thickness of railroad tank car shells for identification of wall loss due to corrosion. In recent regulatory changes, the emphasis has shifted from the traditional hydrotest to more modern methods for assuring tank car integrity. The new generation of maintenance programs will rely heavily on nondestructive testing, and will use damage tolerance concepts and risk analysis to establish inspection frequencies and items to inspect. It is the responsibility of the owners to set up experience-based maintenance programs that are suitable for the working conditions of their own particular fleets. Development of an ideal AHM system for railroad cars would be an instrument that incorporates Acoustic Emission (AE) and GLW technology. The combination of active and passive acoustic technologies integrated into a single system would be a highly efficient means of determining the structural integrity of tank cars. The integration of the GLW technology will allow identification of corrosion wall loss in a zone between two sensors, rather than at a single point (traditional ultrasonic thickness measurements). Thus, a much larger area of the structure can be inspected for approximately the same inspection cost. With a suitable integration of this new technology into the overall inspection and corrosion management program, the fleet can be more efficiently maintained and the risk of accidental release through progressive corrosion damage can be significantly reduced.

  20. Introducing passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring: Motor bike piston-bore fault identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, D. P.; Panigrahi, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    Requirement of designing a sophisticated digital band-pass filter in acoustic based condition monitoring has been eliminated by introducing a passive acoustic filter in the present work. So far, no one has attempted to explore the possibility of implementing passive acoustic filters in acoustic based condition monitoring as a pre-conditioner. In order to enhance the acoustic based condition monitoring, a passive acoustic band-pass filter has been designed and deployed. Towards achieving an efficient band-pass acoustic filter, a generalized design methodology has been proposed to design and optimize the desired acoustic filter using multiple filter components in series. An appropriate objective function has been identified for genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization technique with multiple design constraints. In addition, the sturdiness of the proposed method has been demonstrated in designing a band-pass filter by using an n-branch Quincke tube, a high pass filter and multiple Helmholtz resonators. The performance of the designed acoustic band-pass filter has been shown by investigating the piston-bore defect of a motor-bike using engine noise signature. On the introducing a passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring reveals the enhancement in machine learning based fault identification practice significantly. This is also a first attempt of its own kind.

  1. Acoustic Source Bearing Estimation (ASBE) computer program development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    A new bearing estimation algorithm (Acoustic Source Analysis Technique - ASAT) and an acoustic analysis computer program (Acoustic Source Bearing Estimation - ASBE) are described, which were developed by Computer Sciences Corporation for NASA Langley Research Center. The ASBE program is used by the Acoustics Division/Applied Acoustics Branch and the Instrument Research Division/Electro-Mechanical Instrumentation Branch to analyze acoustic data and estimate the azimuths from which the source signals radiated. Included are the input and output from a benchmark test case.

  2. Tools for automated acoustic monitoring within the R package monitoR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, Jonathan; Hafner, Sasha D.; Donovan, Therese

    2016-01-01

    The R package monitoR contains tools for managing an acoustic-monitoring program including survey metadata, template creation and manipulation, automated detection and results management. These tools are scalable for use with small projects as well as larger long-term projects and those with expansive spatial extents. Here, we describe typical workflow when using the tools in monitoR. Typical workflow utilizes a generic sequence of functions, with the option for either binary point matching or spectrogram cross-correlation detectors.

  3. Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing

    SciTech Connect

    Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

  4. Remote Monitoring Transparency Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhoruchkin, V.K.; Shmelev, V.M.; Roumiantsev, A.N.

    1996-08-01

    The objective of the Remote Monitoring Transparency Program is to evaluate and demonstrate the use of remote monitoring technologies to advance nonproliferation and transparency efforts that are currently being developed by Russia and the United States without compromising the national security to the participating parties. Under a lab-to-lab transparency contract between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Kurchatov Institute (KI RRC), the Kurchatov Institute will analyze technical and procedural aspects of the application of remote monitoring as a transparency measure to monitor inventories of direct- use HEU and plutonium (e.g., material recovered from dismantled nuclear weapons). A goal of this program is to assist a broad range of political and technical experts in learning more about remote monitoring technologies that could be used to implement nonproliferation, arms control, and other security and confidence building measures. Specifically, this program will: (1) begin integrating Russian technologies into remote monitoring systems; (2) develop remote monitoring procedures that will assist in the application of remote monitoring techniques to monitor inventories of HEU and Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons; and (3) conduct a workshop to review remote monitoring fundamentals, demonstrate an integrated US/Russian remote monitoring system, and discuss the impacts that remote monitoring will have on the national security of participating countries.

  5. Meteorological Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, H.A. Jr.; Parker, M.J.; Addis, R.P.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of the meteorological monitoring program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The principle function of the program is to provide current, accurate meteorological data as input for calculating the transport and diffusion of any unplanned release of an atmospheric pollutant. The report is recommended for meteorologists, technicians, or any personnel who require an in-depth understanding of the meteorological monitoring program.

  6. Remote Monitoring Transparency Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhoruchkin, V.K.; Shmelev, V.M.; Roumiantsev, A.N.; Croessmann, C.D.; Horton, R.D.; Matter, J.C.; Czajkowski, A.F.; Sheely, K.B.; Bieniawski, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of the Remote Monitoring Transparency Program is to evaluate and demonstrate the use of remote monitoring technologies to advance nonproliferation and transparency efforts that are currently being developed by Russia and the US without compromising the national security of the participating parties. Under a lab-to-lab transparency contract between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Kurchatov Institute (KI RRC), the Kurchatov Institute will analyze technical and procedural aspects of the application of remote monitoring as a transparency measure to monitor inventories of direct-use HEU and plutonium (e.g., material recovered from dismantled nuclear weapons). A goal of this program is to assist a broad range of political and technical experts in learning more about remote monitoring technologies that could be used to implement nonproliferation, arms control, and other security and confidence building measures. Specifically, this program will: (1) begin integrating Russian technologies into remote monitoring systems; (2) develop remote monitoring procedures that will assist in the application of remote monitoring techniques to monitor inventories of HEU and Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons; and (3) conduct a workshop to review remote monitoring fundamentals, demonstrate an integrated US/Russian remote monitoring will have on the national security of participating countries.

  7. Acoustic Monitoring of the Arctic Ice Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. L.; Goemmer, S. A.; Chayes, D. N.

    2012-12-01

    Introduction The monitoring of the Arctic Ice Cap is important economically, tactically, and strategically. In the scenario of ice cap retreat, new paths of commerce open, e.g. waterways from Northern Europe to the Far East. Where ship-going commerce is conducted, the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard have always stood guard and been prepared to assist from acts of nature and of man. It is imperative that in addition to measuring the ice from satellites, e.g. Icesat, that we have an ability to measure the ice extent, its thickness, and roughness. These parameters play an important part in the modeling of the ice and the processes that control its growth or shrinking and its thickness. The proposed system consists of three subsystems. The first subsystem is an acoustic source, the second is an array of geophones and the third is a system to supply energy and transmit the results back to the analysis laboratory. The subsystems are described below. We conclude with a plan on how to tackle this project and the payoff to the ice cap modeler and hence the users, i.e. commerce and defense. System Two historically tested methods to generate a large amplitude multi-frequency sound source include explosives and air guns. A new method developed and tested by the University of Texas, ARL is a combustive Sound Source [Wilson, et al., 1995]. The combustive sound source is a submerged combustion chamber that is filled with the byproducts of the electrolysis of sea water, i.e. Hydrogen and Oxygen, an explosive mixture which is ignited via a spark. Thus, no additional compressors, gases, or explosives need to be transported to the Arctic to generate an acoustic pulse capable of the sediment and the ice. The second subsystem would be geophones capable of listening in the O(10 Hz) range and transmitting that data back to the laboratory. Thus two single arrays of geophones arranged orthogonal to each other with a range of 1000's of kilometers and a combustive sound source where the two

  8. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  9. User Program Performance Monitor

    1983-09-30

    PROGLOOK makes it possible to monitor the execution of virtually any OS/MVT or OS/VS2 Release 1.6 load module. The main reason for using PROGLOOK is to find out which portions of a code use most of the CPU time so that those parts of the program can be rewritten to reduce CPU time. For large production programs, users have typically found it possible to reduce CPU time by 10 to 30 percent without changing themore » program''s function.« less

  10. In-Flight Rotorcraft Acoustics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Randall L.; Warmbrodt, William (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    A key part of NASA's aeronautics research is reducing noise to make helicopters and tiltrotors more acceptable to the public. The objective of the In-Flight Rotorcraft Acoustics Program (IRAP) is to acquire rotorcraft. noise data in flight for comparison to wind tunnel data. The type of noise of concern is "blade-vortex-interaction," or BVI, noise. Microphones on the wing tips and tail fin of the quiet NASA YO-3A Acoustics Research Aircraft measure BVI noise while the YO-3A descends in close formation with the helicopter or tiltrotor emitting the noise.The data acquired through IRAP is needed to validate wind-tunnel test results, or, where the results cannot be validated, to provide researchers with clues as to how to improve testing methods.

  11. Passive acoustic monitoring of bed load for fluvial applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sediment transported as bed load in streams and rivers is notoriously difficult to monitor cheaply and accurately. Passive acoustic methods are relatively simple, inexpensive, and provide spatial integration along with high temporal resolution. In 1963 work began on monitoring emissions from par...

  12. OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR THE PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-08-29

    The Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) has been designed to record and monitor acoustic signals in high-pressure natural gas (NG) transmission lines. Of particular interest are the three acoustic signals associated with a pipeline fracture. The system is portable (less than 30 lbm) and can be used at all line pressures up to 1000 psig. The PAMP requires a shut-off valve equipped 1/2 inch NPT access port in the pipeline. It is fully functional over the typical pressure range found in the natural gas transmission pipelines in the West Virginia, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Ohio areas. With the use of the PAMP, a full spectrum of acoustic signals can be recorded and defined in terms of acoustic energy in decibels. To detect natural gas pipeline infringements and leaks, the acoustic energy generated inside the line is monitored with a sensitive pressure-equalized microphone and a step function type {Delta}p transducer. The assembly is mounted on a 1000 psig pipe fitting-tree called the PAMP. The electronics required to record, store and analyze the data are described within this report in the format of an operating manual.

  13. Between-hole acoustic surveying and monitoring of a granitic rock mass

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsson, B.N.P.; King, M.S.

    1980-02-01

    The purpose of this technical note is to present preliminary results of an acoustic monitoring study performed as part of a comprehensive rock mechanic and geophysics research program (Ref.20) associated with large-scale heater tests in an abandoned iron-ore mine in central Sweden. The investigation was performed in a fractured granitic rock mass at a sub-surface depth of 340 m, in a drift adjacent to the original iron-ore mine workings. Acoustic monitoring took place between four empty, dry, vertical boreholes of 10 m depth spaced in the vicinity of a vertical heater borehole in the floor of a drift.

  14. A plan for the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loeb, Susan C.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.; Ellison, Laura E.; Lausen, Cori L.; Reichard, Jonathan D.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Ingersoll, Thomas E.; Coleman, Jeremy; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Sauer, John R.; Francis, Charles M.; Bayless, Mylea L.; Stanley, Thomas R.; Johnson, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat) is to create a continent-wide program to monitor bats at local to rangewide scales that will provide reliable data to promote effective conservation decisionmaking and the long-term viability of bat populations across the continent. This is an international, multiagency program. Four approaches will be used to gather monitoring data to assess changes in bat distributions and abundances: winter hibernaculum counts, maternity colony counts, mobile acoustic surveys along road transects, and acoustic surveys at stationary points. These monitoring approaches are described along with methods for identifying species recorded by acoustic detectors. Other chapters describe the sampling design, the database management system (Bat Population Database), and statistical approaches that can be used to analyze data collected through this program.

  15. Ultrasonic waveguide sensor for acoustic monitoring of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mel'nikov, V.I.; Khokhlov, V.N.; Duntsev, A.V.

    1988-02-01

    Waveguide sensors are being increasingly used for acoustic emission monitoring of equipment in nuclear power plants and in systems for acoustic diagnostics of the coolant. In this paper we examine the construction of a waveguide sensor for acoustic monitoring for the example of an impedance sensor for the steam content of water coolant, intended for use in the active emission-reception mode. The dynamic properties of the sensor are determined by the construction and the dimensions of the transducer, and are usually represented by its amplitude-frequency characteristic, which, as a rule, is of the resonance type. The longitudinal-wave waveguide, made from steel wire 0.8-1.2 mm in diameter, can transmit signals in the band 50-1000 kHz. To increase the reliability and the ease of maintenance of the monitoring system the transducer and the waveguide are connected in a detachable manner.

  16. A novel sensor for monitoring acoustic cavitation. Part I: Concept, theory, and prototype development.

    PubMed

    Zeqiri, Bajram; Gélat, Pierre N; Hodnett, Mark; Lee, Nigel D

    2003-10-01

    This paper describes a new concept for an ultrasonic cavitation sensor designed specifically for monitoring acoustic emissions generated by small microbubbles when driven by an applied acoustic field. Its novel features include a hollow, open-ended, cylindrical shape, with the sensor being a right circular cylinder of height 32 mm and external diameter 38 mm. The internal diameter of the sensor is 30 mm; its inner surface is fabricated from a 110-microm layer of piezoelectrically active film whose measurement bandwidth is sufficient to enable acoustic emissions up to and beyond 10 MHz to be monitored. When in use, the sensor is immersed within the liquid test medium and high frequency (megahertz) acoustic emissions occurring within the hollow body of the sensor are monitored. In order to shield the sensor response from events occurring outside the cylinder, the outer surface of the sensor cylinder is encapsulated within a special 4-mm thick polyurethane-based cavitation shield with acoustic properties specifically developed to be minimally perturbing to the 40 kHz applied acoustic field but attenuating to ultrasound generated at megahertz frequencies (plane-wave transmission loss > 30 dB at 1 MHz). This paper introduces the rationale behind the new sensor, describing details of its construction and the materials formulation program undertaken to develop the cavitation shield. PMID:14609074

  17. Feasibility of a phased acoustic array for monitoring acoustic signatures from meshing gear teeth.

    PubMed

    Hood, Adrian A; Pines, Darryll J

    2002-12-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of sensing damage emanating from rotating drivetrain elements such as bearings, gear teeth, and drive shafts via airborne paths. A planar phased acoustic array is evaluated as a potential fault detection scheme for detecting spatially filtered acoustic signatures radiating from gearbox components. Specifically, the use of beam focusing and steering to monitor individual tooth mesh dynamics is analyzed taking into consideration the constraints of the array/gearbox geometry and the spectral content of typical gear noise. Experimental results for a linear array are presented to illustrate the concepts of adaptive beam steering and spatial acoustic filtering. This feasibility study indicates that the planar array can be used to track the acoustic signatures at higher harmonics of the gear mesh frequency. PMID:12509006

  18. Monitoring and Analysis of In-Pile Phenomena in Advanced Test Reactor using Acoustic Telemetry

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vivek; Smith, James A.; Jewell, James Keith

    2015-02-01

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. A number of research programs are developing acoustic-based sensing approach to take advantage of the acoustic transmission properties of reactor cores. Idaho National Laboratory has installed vibroacoustic receivers on and around the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) containment vessel to take advantage of acoustically telemetered sensors such as thermoacoustic (TAC) transducers. The installation represents the first step in developing an acoustic telemetry infrastructure. This paper presents the theory of TAC, application of installed vibroacoustic receivers in monitoring the in-pile phenomena inside the ATR, and preliminary data processing results.

  19. The Stockpile Monitor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Buntain, G.A.; Fletcher, M.; Rabie, R.

    1994-07-01

    Recent political changes have led to drastic reductions in the number of nuclear warheads in stockpile, as well as increased expectations for warhead-service lives. In order to support and maintain a shrinking and aging nuclear stockpile, weapon scientists and engineers need detailed information describing the environments experienced by weapons in the field. Hence, the Stockpile Monitor Program was initiated in 1991 to develop a comprehensive and accurate database of temperature and humidity conditions experienced by nuclear warheads both in storage and on-alert.

  20. Acoustics outreach program for the deaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vongsawad, Cameron T.; Berardi, Mark L.; Whiting, Jennifer K.; Lawler, M. Jeannette; Gee, Kent L.; Neilsen, Tracianne B.

    2016-03-01

    The Hear and See methodology has often been used as a means of enhancing pedagogy by focusing on the two strongest learning senses, but this naturally does not apply to deaf or hard of hearing students. Because deaf students' prior nonaural experiences with sound will vary significantly from those of students with typical hearing, different methods must be used to build understanding. However, the sensory-focused pedagogical principle can be applied in a different way for the Deaf by utilizing the senses of touch and sight, called here the ``See and Feel'' method. This presentation will provide several examples of how acoustics demonstrations have been adapted to create an outreach program for a group of junior high students from a school for the Deaf and discuss challenges encountered.

  1. Engineering acoustics: A pioneer undergraduate program at Rio de Janeiro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenenbaum, Roberto A.; Zindeluk, Moyses

    2002-11-01

    Acoustics, essentially a multidisciplinary subject, still has in Brazil a small but increasing number of professionals with a solid background to deal with various aspects of this area. Since 1970 the faculty of the Acoustics and Vibration Laboratory, COPPE/UFRJ, offers graduate (M.Sc and D.Sc) programs, and some undergraduate courses in acoustics, vibration, and signal processing. In January 2000, this group launched a formal undergraduate engineering acoustics program in the Mechanical Engineering Department of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. After three years of mechanical engineering, with a firm foundation in physics, applied mathematics, and engineering basics, the undergraduate student may elect to take the engineering acoustics program for the remaining two years. In this program, a wide number of courses are offered, including basic acoustics, room acoustics, signal processing, musical acoustics, machine diagnosis, etc. Approximately 30 different courses may be chosen from. However, the student is not completely free, since the courses selected must fit within a subject concentration profile, e.g., noise control or musical acoustics. In this paper the programs curriculum are presented and its impact on the students is discussed. A first evaluation of the qualifications achieved by the graduate students in the area is also presented.

  2. Cylinder monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Alderson, J.H.

    1991-12-31

    Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in storage at the Department of Energy (DOE) gaseous diffusion plants, managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are being evaluated to determine their expected storage life. Cylinders evaluated recently have been in storage service for 30 to 40 years. In the present environment, the remaining life for these storage cylinders is estimated to be 30 years or greater. The group of cylinders involved in recent tests will continue to be monitored on a periodic basis, and other storage cylinders will be observed as on a statistical sample population. The program has been extended to all types of large capacity UF{sub 6} cylinders.

  3. Acoustic surface waveguides for acoustic emission monitoring of fiber-reinforced plastic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.L.R.; He, Y.; Superfesky, M. . Constructed Facilities Center)

    1994-09-01

    Acoustic surface waveguides are developed to enhance the transmission of acoustic emission (AE) signals in high attenuating fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) structures. In this paper, the design of the surface waveguide system and the source location technique are described. Experimental results of using a surface waveguide for AE monitoring of a FRP composite pressure pipe are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed waveguide system. A metal wire was selected as a waveguide, and pencil breaks and electronic pulses were used as artificial AE signals. The results indicate that the use of the surface waveguide can significantly increase the AE monitoring range. Also, a high transmission efficiency was experimentally determined for the epoxy joints developed to attach the surface waveguide to the FRP pipe. The proposed surface waveguide appears to be a promising technique for AE monitoring on existing FRP pressure vessels and storage tanks.

  4. Monitoring corrosion in prestressed concrete beams using acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElBatanouny, Mohamed K.; Mangual, Jesé; Vélez, William; Ziehl, Paul H.; Matta, Fabio; González, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Early detection of corrosion can help reduce the cost of maintenance and extend the service life of structures. Acoustic emission (AE) sensing has proven to be a promising method for early detection of corrosion in reinforced concrete members. A test program is presented composed of four medium-scale prestressed concrete T-beams. Three of the beams have a length of 16 ft. 4 in. (4.98 m), and one is 9 ft. 8 in. (2.95 m). In order to corrode the specimens a 3% NaCl solution was prepared, which is representative of sea salt concentration. The beams were subjected to wet-dry cycles to accelerate the corrosion process. Two of the specimens were pre-cracked prior to conditioning in order to examine the effect of crack presence. AE data was recorded continuously while half-cell potential measurements and corrosion rate by Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) were measured daily. Corrosion current was also being acquired constantly to monitor any change in the concrete resistivity. Results indicate that the onset of corrosion may be identified using AE features, and were corroborated with measurements obtained from electrochemical techniques. Corroded areas were located using source triangulation. The results indicate that cracked specimens showed corrosion activity prior to un-cracked specimens and experienced higher corrosion rates. The level of corrosion was determined using corrosion rate results. Intensity analysis was used to link the corrosion rate and level to AE data.

  5. Acoustic emission monitoring of a fatigue crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granata, D. M.; Scott, W. R.; Davis, J.; Lee, E. U.; Boodey, J. B.; Kulowitch, P.

    AE monitoring is applied to crack detection in materials containing intermetallic compounds that have very small critical flaw sizes. The tests performed are simpler than structural monitoring since the source location is well defined and extraneous sources are limited. A correlation was found between defect propagation and AE events in the two titanium aluminide alloys studied. Because events that are apparently not crack related can occur, and because the number of events detected is threshold and gain-sensitive, the AE count alone is not an absolute measure of crack length. Parameters denoting the portion of the load cycle where events occur are valuable for identifying AE sources and cracking mechanisms. Pattern recognition algorithms can be developed on the basis of stored waveforms and load level parameters.

  6. Acoustic emission monitoring of hot functional testing: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, P.H.; Dawson, J.F.; Friesel, M.A.; Harris, J.C.; Pappas, R.A.

    1984-06-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant during hot functional preservice testing is described in this report. The report deals with background, methodology, and results. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing toward AE monitoring during reactor operation.

  7. Leak detection by acoustic emission monitoring. Phase 1: Feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenstein, Bernard; Winder, A. A.

    1994-05-01

    This investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of detecting leaks from underground storage tanks or pipelines using acoustic emissions. An extensive technical literature review established that distinguishable acoustic emission signals will be generated when a storage tank is subjected to deformation stresses. A parametric analysis was performed which indicated that leak rates less than 0.1 gallons per hour can be detected for leak sizes less than 1/32 inch with 99% probability if the transient signals were sensed with an array of accelerometers (cemented to the tank or via acoustic waveguides), each having a sensitivity greater than 250 mv/g over a frequency range of 0.1 to 4000 Hz, and processed in a multi-channel Fourier spectrum analyzer with automatic threshold detection. An acoustic transient or energy release processor could conceivably detect the onset of the leak at the moment of fracture of the tank wall. The primary limitations to realizing reliable and robust acoustic emission monitoring of underground fluid leaks are the various masking noise sources prevalent at Air Force bases, which are attributed to aircraft, motor traffic, pump station operation, and ground tremors.

  8. Smart acoustic emission system for wireless monitoring of concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Dong-Jin; Kim, Young-Gil; Kim, Chi-Yeop; Seo, Dae-Cheol

    2008-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) has emerged as a powerful nondestructive tool to detect preexisting defects or to characterize failure mechanisms. Recently, this technique or this kind of principle, that is an in-situ monitoring of inside damages of materials or structures, becomes increasingly popular for monitoring the integrity of large structures. Concrete is one of the most widely used materials for constructing civil structures. In the nondestructive evaluation point of view, a lot of AE signals are generated in concrete structures under loading whether the crack development is active or not. Also, it was required to find a symptom of damage propagation before catastrophic failure through a continuous monitoring. Therefore we have done a practical study in this work to fabricate compact wireless AE sensor and to develop diagnosis system. First, this study aims to identify the differences of AE event patterns caused by both real damage sources and the other normal sources. Secondly, it was focused to develop acoustic emission diagnosis system for assessing the deterioration of concrete structures such as a bridge, dame, building slab, tunnel etc. Thirdly, the wireless acoustic emission system was developed for the application of monitoring concrete structures. From the previous laboratory study such as AE event patterns analysis under various loading conditions, we confirmed that AE analysis provided a promising approach for estimating the condition of damage and distress in concrete structures. In this work, the algorithm for determining the damage status of concrete structures was developed and typical criteria for decision making was also suggested. For the future application of wireless monitoring, a low energy consumable, compact, and robust wireless acoustic emission sensor module was developed and applied to the concrete beam for performance test. Finally, based on the self-developed diagnosis algorithm and compact wireless AE sensor, new AE system for practical

  9. ClampOn acoustic solid fuel monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Vesterhus, T.

    1999-07-01

    The general idea of the project is to develop a ClampOn Solid Fuel Monitor, enabling optimization of the combustion process in pulverized coal fired boilers. The development will be based on adapting existing technology for measuring the content of sand particles in a flow of natural gas. The Norwegian firm ClampOn AS develops equipment for such measurements, and has already a proven track record as a result of its work with major oil companies throughout the world. The industry wants some sort of fuel indicator, e.g. a piece of equipment that enables the operator to measure and control the amounts of the fuel to each individual burner. The best techniques available today--as far as the author knows--can only offer samples of the fuel stream at discrete points of time. To truly optimize the combustion process, it is vital to continuously monitor the mass of fuel to each burner, and optimize the combustion process through continuous and infinitesimal adjustments of the fuel flow. This will minimize the NO{sub x} created by uneven temperature-distribution in the combustion chamber. In this way maximum power generation can be obtained at minimal emission of pollutants for a given amount of coal burned.

  10. Signal processing methodologies for an acoustic fetal heart rate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pretlow, Robert A., III; Stoughton, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Research and development is presented of real time signal processing methodologies for the detection of fetal heart tones within a noise-contaminated signal from a passive acoustic sensor. A linear predictor algorithm is utilized for detection of the heart tone event and additional processing derives heart rate. The linear predictor is adaptively 'trained' in a least mean square error sense on generic fetal heart tones recorded from patients. A real time monitor system is described which outputs to a strip chart recorder for plotting the time history of the fetal heart rate. The system is validated in the context of the fetal nonstress test. Comparisons are made with ultrasonic nonstress tests on a series of patients. Comparative data provides favorable indications of the feasibility of the acoustic monitor for clinical use.

  11. Nonintrusive Monitoring and Control of Metallurgical Processes by Acoustic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao-Ling; Khajavi, Leili Tafaghodi; Barati, Mansoor

    2011-06-01

    The feasibility of developing a new online monitoring technique based on the characteristic acoustic response of gas bubbles in a liquid has been investigated. The method is intended to monitor the chemistry of the liquid through its relation to the bubble sound frequency. A low-temperature model consisting of water and alcohol mixtures was established, and the frequency of bubbles rising under varying concentrations of methanol was measured. It was shown that the frequency of the sound created by bubble pulsation varies with the percentage of alcohol in water. The frequency drops sharply with the increase in methanol content up to 20 wt pct, after which the decreases is gradual. Surface tension seems to be a critical liquid property affecting the sound frequency through its two-fold effects on the bubble size and the pulsation domain. The dependence between the frequency and the liquid composition suggests the feasibility of developing an acoustic-based technique for process control purposes.

  12. Assessment of error rates in acoustic monitoring with the R package monitoR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, Jonathan; Hafner, Sasha D.; Donovan, Therese

    2016-01-01

    Detecting population-scale reactions to climate change and land-use change may require monitoring many sites for many years, a process that is suited for an automated system. We developed and tested monitoR, an R package for long-term, multi-taxa acoustic monitoring programs. We tested monitoR with two northeastern songbird species: black-throated green warbler (Setophaga virens) and ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla). We compared detection results from monitoR in 52 10-minute surveys recorded at 10 sites in Vermont and New York, USA to a subset of songs identified by a human that were of a single song type and had visually identifiable spectrograms (e.g. a signal:noise ratio of at least 10 dB: 166 out of 439 total songs for black-throated green warbler, 502 out of 990 total songs for ovenbird). monitoR’s automated detection process uses a ‘score cutoff’, which is the minimum match needed for an unknown event to be considered a detection and results in a true positive, true negative, false positive or false negative detection. At the chosen score cut-offs, monitoR correctly identified presence for black-throated green warbler and ovenbird in 64% and 72% of the 52 surveys using binary point matching, respectively, and 73% and 72% of the 52 surveys using spectrogram cross-correlation, respectively. Of individual songs, 72% of black-throated green warbler songs and 62% of ovenbird songs were identified by binary point matching. Spectrogram cross-correlation identified 83% of black-throated green warbler songs and 66% of ovenbird songs. False positive rates were  for song event detection.

  13. Monitoring Programs Using Rewriting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus; Rosu, Grigore; Lan, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a rewriting algorithm for efficiently testing future time Linear Temporal Logic (LTL) formulae on finite execution traces, The standard models of LTL are infinite traces, reflecting the behavior of reactive and concurrent systems which conceptually may be continuously alive in most past applications of LTL, theorem provers and model checkers have been used to formally prove that down-scaled models satisfy such LTL specifications. Our goal is instead to use LTL for up-scaled testing of real software applications, corresponding to analyzing the conformance of finite traces against LTL formulae. We first describe what it means for a finite trace to satisfy an LTL property end then suggest an optimized algorithm based on transforming LTL formulae. We use the Maude rewriting logic, which turns out to be a good notation and being supported by an efficient rewriting engine for performing these experiments. The work constitutes part of the Java PathExplorer (JPAX) project, the purpose of which is to develop a flexible tool for monitoring Java program executions.

  14. Acoustic emission monitoring for assessment of steel bridge details

    SciTech Connect

    Kosnik, D. E.; Corr, D. J.; Hopwood, T.

    2011-06-23

    Acoustic emission (AE) testing was deployed on details of two large steel Interstate Highway bridges: one cantilever through-truss and one trapezoidal box girder bridge. Quantitative measurements of activity levels at known and suspected crack locations were made by monitoring AE under normal service loads (e.g., live traffic and wind). AE indications were used to direct application of radiography, resulting in identification of a previously unknown flaw, and to inform selection of a retrofit detail.

  15. Acoustic module of the Acquabona (Italy) debris flow monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgaro, A.; Tecca, P. R.; Genevois, R.; Deganutti, A. M.

    2005-02-01

    Monitoring of debris flows aimed to the assessment of their physical parameters is very important both for theoretical and practical purposes. Peak discharge and total volume of debris flows are crucial for designing effective countermeasures in many populated mountain areas where losses of lives and property damage could be avoided. This study quantifies the relationship between flow depth, acoustic amplitude of debris flow induced ground vibrations and front velocity in the experimental catchment of Acquabona, Eastern Dolomites, Italy. The analysis of data brought about the results described in the following. Debris flow depth and amplitude of the flow-induced ground vibrations show a good positive correlation. Estimation of both mean front velocity and peak discharge can be simply obtained monitoring the ground vibrations, through geophones installed close to the flow channel; the total volume of debris flow can be so directly estimated from the integral of the ground vibrations using a regression line. The application of acoustic technique to debris flow monitoring seems to be of the outmost relevance in risk reduction policies and in the correct management of the territory. Moreover this estimation is possible in other catchments producing debris flows of similar characteristics by means of their acoustic characterisation through quick and simple field tests (Standard Penetration Tests and seismic refraction surveys).

  16. Choosing an Environmental Monitoring Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mappin, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    This survey reviews types of environmental monitoring as well as the general aims of the organizations who sponsor volunteer monitoring programs for school and community groups. These programs address educators' interest in involving students in authentic science experiences and provide interdisciplinary activities that link schools and…

  17. Combining whistle acoustic parameters to discriminate Mediterranean odontocetes during passive acoustic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Azzolin, Marta; Gannier, Alexandre; Lammers, Marc O; Oswald, Julie N; Papale, Elena; Buscaino, Giuseppa; Buffa, Gaspare; Mazzola, Salvatore; Giacoma, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic observation can complement visual observation to more effectively monitor occurrence and distribution of marine mammals. For effective acoustic censuses, calibration methods must be determined by joint visual and acoustic studies. Research is still needed in the field of acoustic species identification, particularly for smaller odontocetes. From 1994 to 2012, whistles of four odontocete species were recorded in different areas of the Mediterranean Sea to determine how reliably these vocalizations can be classified to species. Recordings were attributed to species by simultaneous visual observation. The results of this study highlight that the frequency parameters, which are linked to physical features of animals, show lower variability than modulation parameters, which are likely to be more dependent on complex eco-ethological contexts. For all the studied species, minimum and maximum frequencies were linearly correlated with body size. DFA and Classification Tree Analysis (CART) show that these parameters were the most important for classifying species; however, both statistical methods highlighted the need for combining them with the number of contour minima and contour maxima for correct classification. Generally, DFA and CART results reflected both phylogenetic distance (especially for common and striped dolphins) and the size of the species. PMID:24437790

  18. ORR Deer Hunt Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    Scofield, P.A.; Teasley, N.A.

    1999-09-01

    The primary purpose for the initiation of deer hunts on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was deer population control to reduce collisions with vehicles and maintain a healthy herd and habitat. As of 1997, thirteen annual deer hunts have been conducted on the ORR. The deer hunt monitoring program (DHMP) has two components -- a field screening monitoring program and a confirmatory laboratory analysis program of both retained and randomly selected released deer samples.

  19. Acoustic emission monitoring of reinforced and prestressed concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Timothy J.; Yepez, Luis O.; Barnes, Charles A.

    1998-03-01

    Acoustic emission is an important global nondestructive test method widely used to evaluate the structural integrity of metals and fiber reinforced plastic structures. However, in concrete, application of the technology is still at the experimental stage. Microcracking and crack growth are the principal sources of emission in concrete. Bond failure, anchor slippage, and crack rubbing are also sources of emission. Tension zone cracking in reinforced concrete is a significant source of emission and has made application of the technique to concrete structures difficult. The paper describes acoustic emission monitoring of full-scale prestressed concrete girders and a reinforced concrete frame during loading. The tests on the prestressed concrete girders showed three sources of emission: shear-induced cracking in the web, flexural cracking at the region of maximum moment, and strand slippage at the anchorage zone. The reinforced concrete frame was monitored with and without concrete shear panels. The research was directed to early detection of the cracks, signature analysis, source location, moment tensor analysis, and development of criteria for acoustic emission inspection of concrete structures. Cracking of concrete in the tension areas of the reinforced concrete sections was an early source of emission. More severe emission was detected as damage levels in the structure increased.

  20. Acoustic methods to monitor sliver linear density and yarn strength

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1997-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for monitoring sliver and yarn characteristics. Transverse waves are generated relative to the sliver or yarn. At least one acoustic sensor is in contact with the sliver or yarn for detecting waves coupled to the sliver or yarn and for generating a signal. The generated signal is processed to identify the predefined characteristics including sliver or yarn linear density. The transverse waves can be generated with a high-powered acoustic transmitter spaced relative to the sliver or yarn with large amplitude pulses having a central frequency in a range between 20 KHz and 40 KHz applied to the transmitter. The transverse waves can be generated by mechanically agitating the sliver or yarn with a tapping member.

  1. Fracture of Human Femur Tissue Monitored by Acoustic Emission Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Aggelis, Dimitrios. G.; Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Boulpaep, Frans; Polyzos, Demosthenes; van Hemelrijck, Danny

    2015-01-01

    The study describes the acoustic emission (AE) activity during human femur tissue fracture. The specimens were fractured in a bending-torsion loading pattern with concurrent monitoring by two AE sensors. The number of recorded signals correlates well with the applied load providing the onset of micro-fracture at approximately one sixth of the maximum load. Furthermore, waveform frequency content and rise time are related to the different modes of fracture (bending of femur neck or torsion of diaphysis). The importance of the study lies mainly in two disciplines. One is that, although femurs are typically subjects of surgical repair in humans, detailed monitoring of the fracture with AE will enrich the understanding of the process in ways that cannot be achieved using only the mechanical data. Additionally, from the point of view of monitoring techniques, applying sensors used for engineering materials and interpreting the obtained data pose additional difficulties due to the uniqueness of the bone structure. PMID:25763648

  2. Monitoring damage growth in titanium matrix composites using acoustic emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Prosser, W. H.; Johnson, W. S.

    1993-01-01

    The application of the acoustic emission (AE) technique to locate and monitor damage growth in titanium matrix composites (TMC) was investigated. Damage growth was studied using several optical techniques including a long focal length, high magnification microscope system with image acquisition capabilities. Fracture surface examinations were conducted using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The AE technique was used to locate damage based on the arrival times of AE events between two sensors. Using model specimens exhibiting a dominant failure mechanism, correlations were established between the observed damage growth mechanisms and the AE results in terms of the events amplitude. These correlations were used to monitor the damage growth process in laminates exhibiting multiple modes of damage. Results revealed that the AE technique is a viable and effective tool to monitor damage growth in TMC.

  3. Wildlife monitoring program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebesta, P.; Arno, R.

    1979-01-01

    A plan for integrating the various requirements for wildlife monitoring with modern aerospace technology is presented. This plan is responsive to user needs, recognizes legal requirements, and is based on an evolutionary growth from domestic animals and larger animals to smaller, more scarce and remote species. The basis for animal study selection was made from the 1973 Santa Cruz Summer Study on Wildlife Monitoring. As techniques are developed the monitoring and management tasks will be interfaced with and eventually operated by the user agencies. Field efforts, aircraft and satellites, will be supplemented by laboratory investigations. Sixty percent of the effort will be in hardware research and development (satellite technology, microminiaturization) and the rest for gathering and interpreting data.

  4. CHESAPEAKE BAY MONITORING PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chesapeake Bay Program is the unique regional partnership which has been directing and conducting the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay since the signing of the historic 1983 Chesapeake Bay Agreement. The Chesapeake Bay Program partners include the states of Maryland, Pennsyl...

  5. An acoustic sensor for monitoring airflow in pediatric tracheostomy patients.

    PubMed

    Ruscher, Thomas; Wicks Phd, Alexandrina; Muelenaer Md, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Without proper monitoring, patients with artificial airways in the trachea are at high risk for complications or death. Despite routine maintenance of the tube, dislodged or copious mucus can obstruct the airway. Young children ( 3yrs) have difficulty tending to their own tubes and are particularly vulnerable to blockages. They require external respiratory sensors. In a hospital environment, ventilators, end-tidal CO2 monitors, thermistors, and other auxiliary equipment provide sufficient monitoring of respiration. However, outpatient monitoring methods, such as thoracic impedance and pulse oximetry, are indirect and prone to false positives. Desensitization of caregivers to frequent false alarms has been cited in medical literature as a contributing factor in cases of child death. Ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) is a technique used in specialized industrial applications to non-invasively measure liquid and gas flow. Two transducers are oriented at a diagonal across a flow channel. Velocity measurement is accomplished by detecting slight variations in transit time of contra-propagating acoustic signals with a directional component parallel to air flow. Due to the symmetry of acoustic pathway between sensors, velocity measurements are immune to partial fouling in the tube from mucus, saliva, and condensation. A first generation proof of concept prototype was constructed to evaluate the ultrasonic TOF technique for medical tracheostomy monitoring. After successful performance, a second generation prototype was designed with a smaller form factor and more advanced electronics. This prototype was tested and found to measure inspired volume with a root-mean-square error < 2% during initial trials. PMID:22846306

  6. Use of acoustic monitoring system for debris flow discharge evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgaro, A. G.; Tecca, P. R.; Genevois, R.; Deganutti, A. M.

    2003-04-01

    In 1997 an automated system for monitoring of debris flows has been installed in the Acquabona channel Dolomites, Italy. Induction geophones, with a specific frequency of 10 Hz, measure the amplitude of vertical ground vibrations generated by the passage of a flowing mass along the channel. Continuous acoustic logs and ultrasonic hydrograph recorded at the lower-channel measurement station for the debris flow of August 17, 1998, show a striking correspondence. This correspondence, already observed in different flow sites, is represented by the best fit between flow depth and flow sensor amplitude. Average front velocity for surges, calculated from the signal peak time shift and the distance between the sensors along the flow path, range between 2.00 and 7.7 m/s. As the ultrasonic sensor provides a way to measure the variation of the flow section area with the flow depth, the debris flow peak discharge may be estimated; obtained values of debris flow peak discharge range from 4 and 30 m3/s. Volumes were calculated by integrating instantaneous discharges through the hydrograph and by integrating the geophone log (acoustic flux). Volumes of 13700 m3 and 15500 m3 have been respectively obtained. The slight difference between the two values may result from the fact that acoustic records: i) are sensitive to the high frequencies, typical of the debris flow tails; ii) sum up the contributions sent by the whole flowing mass, while the ecometer detect the flow depth at every time at only one section. As a consequence the rising of the whole geophone log gives a higher value at the integration result. This only acoustic system can give a reasonably proxy for discharge and total volumes involved, which are among the most important parameters for debris flow hazard assessment and planning countermeasures. This methodology can be used in other debris flow sites if they are calibrated by the acoustic characterization of debris, obtained by both seismic surveys and SPT tests, and

  7. HEPA filter monitoring program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, K. N.; Johnson, C. M.; Aiken, W. F.; Lucerna, J. J.; Barnett, R. L.; Jensen, R. T.

    1986-07-01

    The testing and replacement of HEPA filters, widely used in the nuclear industry to purify process air, are costly and labor-intensive. Current methods of testing filter performance, such as differential pressure measurement and scanning air monitoring, allow determination of overall filter performance but preclude detection of incipient filter failure such as small holes in the filters. Using current technology, a continual in-situ monitoring system was designed which provides three major improvements over current methods of filter testing and replacement. The improvements include: cost savings by reducing the number of intact filters which are currently being replaced unnecessarily; more accurate and quantitative measurement of filter performance; and reduced personnel exposure to a radioactive environment by automatically performing most testing operations.

  8. Multiplexing Technology for Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William; Percy, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The initiation and propagation of damage mechanisms such as cracks and delaminations generate acoustic waves, which propagate through a structure. These waves can be detected and analyzed to provide the location and severity of damage as part of a structural health monitoring (SHM) system. This methodology of damage detection is commonly known as acoustic emission (AE) monitoring, and is widely used on a variety of applications on civil structures. AE has been widely considered for SHM of aerospace vehicles. Numerous successful ground and flight test demonstrations have been performed, which show the viability of the technology for damage monitoring in aerospace structures. However, one significant current limitation for application of AE techniques on aerospace vehicles is the large size, mass, and power requirements for the necessary monitoring instrumentation. To address this issue, a prototype multiplexing approach has been developed and demonstrated in this study, which reduces the amount of AE monitoring instrumentation required. Typical time division multiplexing techniques that are commonly used to monitor strain, pressure and temperature sensors are not applicable to AE monitoring because of the asynchronous and widely varying rates of AE signal occurrence. Thus, an event based multiplexing technique was developed. In the initial prototype circuit, inputs from eight sensors in a linear array were multiplexed into two data acquisition channels. The multiplexer rapidly switches, in less than one microsecond, allowing the signals from two sensors to be acquired by a digitizer. The two acquired signals are from the sensors on either side of the trigger sensor. This enables the capture of the first arrival of the waves, which cannot be accomplished with the signal from the trigger sensor. The propagation delay to the slightly more distant neighboring sensors makes this possible. The arrival time from this first arrival provides a more accurate source location

  9. FRP/steel composite damage acoustic emission monitoring and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhi

    2015-04-01

    FRP is a new material with good mechanical properties, such as high strength of extension, low density, good corrosion resistance and anti-fatigue. FRP and steel composite has gotten a wide range of applications in civil engineering because of its good performance. As the FRP/steel composite get more and more widely used, the monitor of its damage is also getting more important. To monitor this composite, acoustic emission (AE) is a good choice. In this study, we prepare four identical specimens to conduct our test. During the testing process, the AE character parameters and mechanics properties were obtained. Damaged properties of FRP/steel composite were analyzed through acoustic emission (AE) signals. By the growing trend of AE accumulated energy, the severity of the damage made on FRP/steel composite was estimated. The AE sentry function has been successfully used to study damage progression and fracture emerge release rate of composite laminates. This technique combines the cumulative AE energy with strain energy of the material rather than analyzes the AE information and mechanical separately.

  10. Puna Geothermal Venture Hydrologic Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    1990-04-01

    This document provides the basis for the Hydrologic Monitoring Program (HMP) for the Puna Geothermal Venture. The HMP is complementary to two additional environmental compliance monitoring programs also being submitted by Puma Geothermal Venture (PGV) for their proposed activities at the site. The other two programs are the Meteorology and Air Quality Monitoring Program (MAQMP) and the Noise Monitoring Program (NMP), being submitted concurrently.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AGROECOSYSTEM MONITORING AND RESEARCH STRATEGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The monitoring program described in this document is one component of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP), a national program administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development. or EMAP, agroecosystems are defined ...

  12. Monitoring the Ocean Acoustically: A Review and Strategy for the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worcester, P. F.; Munk, W. H.; Dushaw, B. D.; Howe, B. M.; Spindel, R. C.

    2001-12-01

    Since ideas for monitoring the oceans acoustically were first voiced in the mid-1970's, ocean acoustic tomography has evolved into an effective tool for remote sensing of the ocean interior on a wide variety of time and space scales. Regional tomographic arrays have been employed at scales of up to about 1000 km for measuring changes in integrated heat content, for observing regions of active convection, for measuring transports through the Strait of Gibraltar, for observing the evolving ocean mesoscale, for measuring barotropic currents, for directly observing oceanic relative vorticity, and for measuring barotropic and baroclinic tidal signals. Basin-scale tomographic arrays have been employed out to ranges of 5000 km for measuring large-scale changes in temperature and heat content in the North Pacific, Mediterranean, and Arctic oceans. At these ranges acoustic methods give integral measurements of large-scale ocean temperature that provide the spatial low-pass filtering needed to observe small, gyre-scale signals in the presence of much larger, mesoscale noise. The acoustic measurements offer a signal-to-noise capability for observing ocean climate variability that is difficult to attain by an ensemble of point measurements. In addition, tomographic methods rely on the measurement of acoustic travel times, which can be made without risk of calibration drift. The remote sensing capability has proven particularly suitable for measurements such as those in the Arctic and in the Strait of Gibraltar, where the application of conventional in situ methods is difficult. The appropriate roles for acoustic tomography in an ocean observing system appear to be (1) to exploit the unique remote sensing capabilities for regional programs otherwise difficult to carry out, (2) to be a component of process-oriented programs in regions where integral or large-scale heat content or transport data are desired, and (3) to move toward deployment on basin to global scales as the

  13. Dual instrument passive acoustic monitoring of belugas in Cook Inlet, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Castellote, Manuel; Small, Robert J; Lammers, Marc O; Jenniges, Justin J; Mondragon, Jeff; Atkinson, Shannon

    2016-05-01

    As part of a long-term research program, Cook Inlet beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) presence was acoustically monitored with two types of acoustic sensors utilized in tandem in moorings deployed year-round: an ecological acoustic recorder (EAR) and a cetacean and porpoise detector (C-POD). The EAR was used primarily to record the calls, whistles, and buzzes produced by belugas and killer whales (Orcinus orca). The C-POD was used to log and classify echolocation clicks from belugas, killer whales, and porpoises. This paper describes mooring packages that maximized the chances of successful long-term data collection in the particularly challenging Cook Inlet environment, and presents an analytical comparison of odontocete detections obtained by the collocated EAR and C-POD instruments from two mooring locations in the upper inlet. Results from this study illustrate a significant improvement in detecting beluga and killer whale presence when the different acoustic signals detected by EARs and C-PODs are considered together. Further, results from concurrent porpoise detections indicating prey competition and feeding interference with beluga, and porpoise displacement due to ice formation are described. PMID:27250163

  14. Overview of the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    Launch environments, such as lift-off acoustic (LOA) and ignition overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. LOA environments are used directly in the development of vehicle vibro-acoustic environments and IOP is used in the loads assessment. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe for component survivability, reduction of the environment itself is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the Ares I LOA and IOP environments for the vehicle and ground systems including the Mobile Launcher (ML) and tower. An additional objective was to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. ASMAT was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116 (TS 116). The ASMAT program is described in this presentation.

  15. Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

  16. Guided wave acoustic monitoring of corrosion in recovery boiler tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Quarry, M J; Chinn, D J

    2004-02-19

    Corrosion of tubing used in black-liquor recovery boilers is a major concern in all pulp and paper mills. Extensive corrosion in recovery boiler tubes can result in a significant safety and environmental hazard. Considerable plant resources are expended to inspect recovery boiler tubing. Currently, visual and ultrasonic inspections are primarily used during the annual maintenance shutdown to monitor corrosion rates and cracking of tubing. This Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies project is developing guided acoustic waves for use on recovery boiler tubing. The feature of this acoustic technique is its cost-effectiveness in inspecting long lengths of tubes from a single inspection point. A piezoelectric or electromagnetic transducer induces guided waves into the tubes. The transducer detects fireside defects from the coldside or fireside of the tube. Cracking and thinning on recovery boiler tubes have been detected with this technique in both laboratory and field applications. This technique appears very promising for recovery boiler tube application, potentially expediting annual inspection of tube integrity.

  17. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1990-10-01

    DOE Order 5820.2A requires that low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites active on or after September 1988 and all transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites be monitored periodically to assure that radioactive contamination does not escape from the waste sites and pose a threat to the public or to the environment. This plan describes such a monitoring program for the active LLW disposal sites in SWSA 6 and the TRU waste storage sites in SWSA 5 North. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  18. A multi-channel acoustics monitor for perioperative respiratory monitoring: preliminary data.

    PubMed

    Jafarian, Kamal; Amineslami, Majid; Hassani, Kamran; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Lahiji, Mohammad Niakan; Doyle, D John

    2016-02-01

    This study pertains to a six-channel acoustic monitoring system for use in patient monitoring during or after surgery. The base hardware consists of a USB data acquisition system, a custom-built six-channel amplification system, and a series of microphones of various designs. The software is based on the MATLAB platform with data acquisition drivers installed. The displayed information includes: time domain signals, frequency domain signals, and tools to aid in the detection of endobronchial intubation. We hypothesize that the above mentioned arrangement may be helpful to the anesthesiologist in recognizing clinical conditions like wheezing, bronchospasm, endobronchial intubation, and apnea. The study also evaluated various types of microphone designs used to transduce breath sounds. The system also features selectable band-pass filtering using MATLAB algorithms as well as a collection of recordings obtained with the system to establish what respiratory acoustic signals look like under various conditions. PMID:25869899

  19. Acoustic emission monitoring of recycled aggregate concrete under bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    The amount of construction and demolition waste has increased considerably over the last few years, making desirable the reuse of this waste in the concrete industry. In the present study concrete specimens are subjected at the age of 28 days to four-point bending with concurrent monitoring of their acoustic emission (AE) activity. Several concrete mixtures prepared using recycled aggregates at various percentages of the total coarse aggregate and also a reference mix using natural aggregates, were included to investigate their influence of the recycled aggregates on the load bearing capacity, as well as on the fracture mechanisms. The results reveal that for low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates on the flexural strength is negligible while higher levels of substitution lead into its deterioration. The total AE activity, as well as the AE signals emitted during failure, was related to flexural strength. The results obtained during test processing were found to be in agreement with visual observation.

  20. Operational Performance Analysis of Passive Acoustic Monitoring for Killer Whales

    SciTech Connect

    Matzner, Shari; Fu, Tao; Ren, Huiying; Deng, Zhiqun; Sun, Yannan; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-09-30

    For the planned tidal turbine site in Puget Sound, WA, the main concern is to protect Southern Resident Killer Whales (SRKW) due to their Endangered Species Act status. A passive acoustic monitoring system is proposed because the whales emit vocalizations that can be detected by a passive system. The algorithm for detection is implemented in two stages. The first stage is an energy detector designed to detect candidate signals. The second stage is a spectral classifier that is designed to reduce false alarms. The evaluation presented here of the detection algorithm incorporates behavioral models of the species of interest, environmental models of noise levels and potential false alarm sources to provide a realistic characterization of expected operational performance.

  1. 1999 Environmental Monitoring Program Report

    SciTech Connect

    L. V. Street

    2000-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1999 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory management and operating contractor Environmental Monitoring Program. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1999 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the expectation of nitrogen in two disposal pond effluent streams iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal well, and coliform bacteria in drinking water systems at two facilities. Maintenance activities were performed on the two drinking water systems and tested prior to putting back into service. The monitoring and surveillance results demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

  2. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Siegfried; Kögel, Svea; Brunner, Yvonne; Schmieg, Barbara; Ewald, Christina; Kirschhöfer, Frank; Brenner-Weiß, Gerald; Länge, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    We propose surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators as a complementary tool for conditioning film monitoring. Conditioning films are formed by adsorption of inorganic and organic substances on a substrate the moment this substrate comes into contact with a liquid phase. In the case of implant insertion, for instance, initial protein adsorption is required to start wound healing, but it will also trigger immune reactions leading to inflammatory responses. The control of the initial protein adsorption would allow to promote the healing process and to suppress adverse immune reactions. Methods to investigate these adsorption processes are available, but it remains difficult to translate measurement results into actual protein binding events. Biosensor transducers allow user-friendly investigation of protein adsorption on different surfaces. The combination of several transduction principles leads to complementary results, allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the adsorbing layer. We introduce SAW resonators as a novel complementary tool for time-resolved conditioning film monitoring. SAW resonators were coated with polymers. The adsorption of the plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen onto the polymer-coated surfaces were monitored. Frequency results were compared with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor measurements, which confirmed the suitability of the SAW resonators for this application. PMID:26007735

  3. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Siegfried; Kögel, Svea; Brunner, Yvonne; Schmieg, Barbara; Ewald, Christina; Kirschhöfer, Frank; Brenner-Weiß, Gerald; Länge, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    We propose surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators as a complementary tool for conditioning film monitoring. Conditioning films are formed by adsorption of inorganic and organic substances on a substrate the moment this substrate comes into contact with a liquid phase. In the case of implant insertion, for instance, initial protein adsorption is required to start wound healing, but it will also trigger immune reactions leading to inflammatory responses. The control of the initial protein adsorption would allow to promote the healing process and to suppress adverse immune reactions. Methods to investigate these adsorption processes are available, but it remains difficult to translate measurement results into actual protein binding events. Biosensor transducers allow user-friendly investigation of protein adsorption on different surfaces. The combination of several transduction principles leads to complementary results, allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the adsorbing layer. We introduce SAW resonators as a novel complementary tool for time-resolved conditioning film monitoring. SAW resonators were coated with polymers. The adsorption of the plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen onto the polymer-coated surfaces were monitored. Frequency results were compared with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor measurements, which confirmed the suitability of the SAW resonators for this application. PMID:26007735

  4. A Landsat Agricultural Monitoring Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaronson, A. C.; Buchman, P. E.; Wescott, T.; Fries, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The paper discusses the Landsat Agricultural Monitoring Program which was developed to identify, observe, and evaluate alarm conditions influencing Iowa corn production in 1976. Used in conjunction with climatic and field reports, studies were made of crop development, crop alarms (such as heavy rainfall, hail, tornadoes, and drought) and estimated crop yield.

  5. Cavitation controlled acoustic probe for fabric spot cleaning and moisture monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for monitoring a fabric. An acoustic probe generates acoustic waves relative to the fabric. An acoustic sensor, such as an accelerometer is coupled to the acoustic probe for generating a signal representative of cavitation activity in the fabric. The generated cavitation activity representative signal is processed to indicate moisture content of the fabric. A feature of the invention is a feedback control signal is generated responsive to the generated cavitation activity representative signal. The feedback control signal can be used to control the energy level of the generated acoustic waves and to control the application of a cleaning solution to the fabric.

  6. Program in acoustics. [aeroacoustics, aircraft noise, and noise suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Relevant research projects conducted by faculty and graduate students in the general area of aeroacoustics to further the understanding of noise generation by aircraft and to aid in the development of practical methods for noise suppression are listed. Special activities summarized relate to the nonlinear acoustic wave theory and its application to several cases including that of the acoustic source located at the throat of a near-sonic duct, a computer program developed to compute the nonlinear wave theory, and a parabolic approximation for propagation of sounding in moving stratified media.

  7. Passive acoustic monitoring of human physiology during activity indicates health and performance of soldiers and firefighters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-04-01

    The Army Research Laboratory has developed a unique gel-coupled acoustic physiological monitoring sensor that has acoustic impedance properties similar to the skin. This facilitates the transmission of body sounds into the sensor pad, yet significantly repels ambient airborne noises due to an impedance mismatch. The sensor's sensitivity and bandwidth produce excellent signatures for detection and spectral analysis of diverse physiological events. Acoustic signal processing detects heartbeats, breaths, wheezes, coughs, blood pressure, activity, motion, and voice for communication and automatic speech recognition. The health and performance of soldiers, firefighters, and other first responders in strenuous and hazardous environments can be continuously and remotely monitored with body-worn acoustic sensors. Comfortable acoustic sensors can be in a helmet or in a strap around the neck, chest, and wrist. Noise-canceling sensor arrays help remove out-of-phase motion noise and enhance covariant physiology by using two acoustic sensors on the front sides of the neck and two additional acoustic sensors on each wrist. Pulse wave transit time between neck and wrist acoustic sensors will indicate systolic blood pressure. Larger torso-sized arrays can be used to acoustically inspect the lungs and heart, or built into beds for sleep monitoring. Acoustics is an excellent input for sensor fusion.

  8. Continuous acoustic emission monitoring of reinforced concrete under accelerated corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Benedetti, M.; Loreto, G.; Nanni, A.; Matta, F.; Gonzalez-Nunez, M. A.

    2011-04-01

    The development of techniques capable of evaluating deterioration of reinforced concrete (RC) structures is instrumental to the advancement of techniques for the structural health monitoring (SHM) and service life estimate for constructed facilities. One of the main causes leading to degradation of RC is the corrosion of the steel reinforcement. This process can be modeled phenomenologically, while laboratory tests aimed at studying durability responses are typically accelerated in order to provide useful results within a realistic period of time. To assess the condition of damage in RC, a number of nondestructive methods have been recently studied. Acoustic emission (AE) is emerging as a nondestructive tool to detect the onset and progression of deterioration mechanisms. In this paper, the development of accelerated corrosion and continuous AE monitoring test set-up for RC specimens are presented. Relevant information are provided with regard to the characteristics of the corrosion circuit, continuous measurement and acquisition of corrosion potential, selection of AE sensors and AE parameter setting. The effectiveness of the setup in detecting and characterizing the initiation and progression of the corrosion phenomenon is discussed on the basis of preliminary results from small-scale, pre-cracked RC specimens, which are representative of areas near the clear cover in typical RC bridge members.

  9. Early corrosion monitoring of prestressed concrete piles using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, William; Matta, Fabio; Ziehl, Paul H.

    2013-04-01

    The depassivation and corrosion of bonded prestressing steel strands in concrete bridge members may lead to major damage or collapse before visual inspections uncover evident signs of damage, and well before the end of the design life. Recognizing corrosion in its early stage is desirable to plan and prioritize remediation strategies. The Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is a rational means to develop structural health monitoring and prognosis systems for the early detection and location of corrosion in concrete. Compelling features are the sensitivity to events related to micro- and macrodamage, non-intrusiveness, and suitability for remote and wireless applications. There is little understanding of the correlation between AE and the morphology and extent of early damage on the steel surface. In this paper, the evidence collected from prestressed concrete (PC) specimens that are exposed to salt water is discussed vis-à-vis AE data from continuous monitoring. The specimens consist of PC strips that are subjected to wet/dry salt water cycles, representing portions of bridge piles that are exposed to tidal action. Evidence collected from the specimens includes: (a) values of half-cell potential and linear polarization resistance to recognize active corrosion in its early stage; and (b) scanning electron microscopy micrographs of steel areas from two specimens that were decommissioned once the electrochemical measurements indicated a high probability of active corrosion. These results are used to evaluate the AE activity resulting from early corrosion.

  10. Distributed acoustic fibre optic sensors for condition monitoring of pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussels, Maria-Teresa; Chruscicki, Sebastian; Habib, Abdelkarim; Krebber, Katerina

    2016-05-01

    Industrial piping systems are particularly relevant to public safety and the continuous availability of infrastructure. However, condition monitoring systems based on many discrete sensors are generally not well-suited for widespread piping systems due to considerable installation effort, while use of distributed fibre-optic sensors would reduce this effort to a minimum. Specifically distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) is employed for detection of third-party threats and leaks in oil and gas pipelines in recent years and can in principle also be applied to industrial plants. Further possible detection routes amenable by DAS that could identify damage prior to emission of medium are subject of a current project at BAM, which aims at qualifying distributed fibre optic methods such as DAS as a means for spatially continuous monitoring of industrial piping systems. Here, first tests on a short pipe are presented, where optical fibres were applied directly to the surface. An artificial signal was used to define suitable parameters of the measurement system and compare different ways of applying the sensor.

  11. Acoustic Monitor for Liquid-Solid Slurries Measurements at Low Weight Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2005-06-01

    Our effort in this project is to develop an acoustic monitor for accurate, real-time characterization of the size and weight fractions of solids in slurries for process monitoring and to determine the optimal timing for slurry transfers. This capability will be valuable in the Savannah River Site accelerated clean-up program. Our scientific work during the first research period developed a theory, supported by experiments, to describe sound attenuation of solids in suspensions in the presence of bubbles, which permits us to determine the solid-liquid weight percent. Engineering developments during the second research period led to the design, construction, and demonstration, in our laboratories, of the Syracuse Acoustic Monitor (SAM) system that measures weight percent solids accurately in slurries of 0.5 to 8.0 weight percent on-line and in real-time. Also, we had shown the potential for these measurements in solid-gas-liquid slurries by removing the interference due to the presence of gas bubbles.

  12. NASA's Lunar Impact Monitoring Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Robert M.; Cooke, William; Swift, Wesley; Hollon, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office nas implemented a program to monitor the Moon for meteoroid impacts from the Marshall Space Flight Center. Using off-the-shelf telescopes and video equipment, the moon is monitored for as many as 10 nights per month, depending on weather. Custom software automatically detects flashes which are confirmed by a second telescope, photometrically calibrated using background stars, and published on a website for correlation with other observations, Hypervelocity impact tests at the Ames Vertical Gun Facility have been performed to determine the luminous efficiency ana ejecta characteristics. The purpose of this research is to define the impact ejecta environment for use by lunar spacecraft designers of the Constellation (manned lunar) Program. The observational techniques and preliminary results will be discussed.

  13. Embedded and conventional ultrasonic sensors for monitoring acoustic emission during thermal fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Blaine; Zagrai, Andrei

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic emission is widely used for monitoring pressure vessels, pipes, critical infrastructure, as well as land, sea and air vehicles. It is one of dominant approaches to explore material degradation under fatigue and events leading to material fracture. Addressing a recent interest in structural health monitoring of space vehicles, a need has emerged to evaluate material deterioration due to thermal fatigue during spacecraft atmospheric reentry. Thermal fatigue experiments were conducted, in which aluminum plates were subjected to localized heating and acoustic emission was monitoring by embedded and conventional acoustic emission sensors positioned at various distances from a heat source. At the same time, surface temperature of aluminum plates was monitored using an IR camera. Acoustic emission counts collected by embedded sensors were compared to counts measured with conventional acoustic emission sensors. Both types of sensors show noticeable increase of acoustic emission activity as localized heating source was applied to aluminum plates. Experimental data demonstrate correlation between temperature increase on the surface of the plates and increase in measured acoustic emission activity. It is concluded that under particular conditions, embedded piezoelectric wafer active sensors can be used for acoustic emission monitoring of thermally-induced structural degradation.

  14. Acoustic monitoring system to quantify ingestive behavior of free-grazing cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods to estimate intake in grazing livestock include using markers, visual observation, mechanical sensors that respond to jaw movement and acoustic recording. In most of the acoustic monitoring studies, the microphone is inverted on the forehead of the grazing livestock and the skull is utilize...

  15. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  16. Acoustical method of whole-body hydration status monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvazyan, A. P.; Tsyuryupa, S. N.; Calhoun, M.; Utter, A.

    2016-07-01

    An acoustical handheld hydration monitor (HM) for assessing the water balance of the human body was developed. Dehydration is a critical public health problem. Many elderly over age of 65 are particularly vulnerable as are infants and young children. Given that dehydration is both preventable and reversible, the need for an easy-to-perform method for the detection of water imbalance is of the utmost clinical importance. The HM is based on an experimental fact that ultrasound velocity in muscle is a linear function of water content and can be referenced to the hydration status of the body. Studies on the validity of HM for the assessment of whole-body hydration status were conducted in the Appalachian State University, USA, on healthy young adults and on elderly subjects residing at an assisted living facility. The HM was able to track changes in total body water during periods of acute dehydration and rehydration in athletes and day-to-day and diurnal variability of hydration in elderly. Results of human studies indicate that HM has a potential to become an efficient tool for detecting abnormal changes in the body hydration status.

  17. Passive acoustic monitoring of Cook Inlet beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    Lammers, Marc O; Castellote, Manuel; Small, Robert J; Atkinson, Shannon; Jenniges, Justin; Rosinski, Anne; Oswald, Julie N; Garner, Chris

    2013-09-01

    The endangered beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) population in Cook Inlet, AK faces threats from a variety of anthropogenic factors, including coastal development, oil and gas exploration, vessel traffic, and military activities. To address existing gaps in understanding about the occurrence of belugas in Cook Inlet, a project was developed to use passive acoustic monitoring to document the year-round distribution of belugas, as well as killer whales (Orcinus orca), which prey on belugas. Beginning in June 2009, ten moorings were deployed throughout the Inlet and refurbished every two to eight months. Despite challenging conditions consisting of strong tidal currents carrying debris and seasonal ice cover, 83% of mooring deployments were successfully recovered. Noise from water flow, vessel traffic, and/or industrial activities was present at several sites, potentially masking some signals. However, belugas were successfully detected at multiple locations. Detections were relatively common in the upper inlet and less common or absent at middle and lower inlet locations. Killer whale signals were also recorded. Some seasonal variability in the occurrence of both belugas and killer whales was evident. PMID:23968047

  18. Field performance of an acoustic scour-depth monitoring system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, Jr., Robert R.; Sheppard, D. Max

    1994-01-01

    The Herbert C. Bonner Bridge over Oregon Inlet serves as the only land link between Bodie and Hatteras Islands, part of the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Periodic soundings over the past 30 years have documented channel migration, local scour, and deposition at several pilings that support the bridge. In September 1992, a data-collection system was installed to permit the off-site monitoring of scour at 16 bridge pilings. The system records channel-bed elevations at 15-minute intervals and transmits the data to a satellite receiver. A cellular phone connection also permits downloading and reviewing of the data as they are being collected. A digitally recording, acoustic fathometer is the main component of the system. In November 1993, current velocity, water-surface elevation, wave characteristics, and water temperature measuring instruments were also deployed at the site. Several performance problems relating to the equipment and to the harsh marine environment have not been resolved, but the system has collected and transmitted reliable scour-depth and water-level data.

  19. Hydraulic Fracturing of Heterogeneous Rock Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanchits, Sergey; Burghardt, Jeffrey; Surdi, Aniket

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the results of laboratory studies of hydraulic fracture in homogeneous sandstone blocks with man-made interfaces and heterogeneous shale blocks with weak natural interfaces are reported. Tests were conducted under similar stress conditions, with fluids of different viscosity and at different injection rates. The measurements and analysis allows the identification of fracture initiation and behavior. Fracturing with high-viscosity fluids resulted in stable fracture propagation initiated before breakdown, while fracturing with low-viscosity fluids resulted in unstable fracture propagation initiated almost simultaneously with breakdown. Analysis also allows us to measure the fluid volume entering the fracture and the fracture volume. Monitoring of acoustic emission hypocenter localizations, indicates the development of created fractured area including the intersection with interfaces, fluid propagation along interfaces, crossing interfaces, and approaching the boundaries of the block. We observe strong differences in hydraulic fracture behavior, fracture geometry and fracture propagation speed, when fracturing with water and high-viscosity fluids. We also observed distinct differences between sandstone blocks and shale blocks, when a certain P-wave velocity ray path is intersected by the hydraulic fracture. The velocity increases in sandstones and decreases in shale.

  20. Ocean acoustic field simulations for monitoring large-scale ocean structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, E. C.; Wang, Y. Y.

    1991-04-01

    Substantial numerical simulations of low-frequency acoustic field under different ocean models have been carried out on the CYBER-205 at WPL/NOAA. The purpose of these numerical simulations is to investigate our potential ability to monitor large-scale ocean structures by using modal ocean acoustic tomography (MOAT). For example, the possibility of monitoring El Niño by using MOAT has been illustrated.

  1. INTEGRAL Galactic bulge monitoring program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuulkers, E.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Belloni, T.; Chenevez, J.; Ibarra, A.; Munoz-Darias, T.; Bazzano, A.; Cadolle Bel, M.; De Cesare, G.; Diaz Trigo, M.; Jourdain, E.; Lubinski, P.; Natalucci, L.; Ness, J. U.; Parmar, A.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Rodriguez, J.; Roques, J. P.; Sanchez-Fernandez; C.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.

    2010-12-01

    The central region of our Galaxy, the Galactic bulge, is a rich host of variable high-energy X-ray and gamma-ray point sources. These sources include bright and relatively faint X-ray transients, X-ray bursters, persistent neutron star and black-hole candidate binaries, high-mass X-ray binaries, etc.. We have a program to monitor the Galactic bulge region regularly and frequently with the gamma-ray observatory INTEGRAL, whenever it is observable. As a service to the scientific community the high-energy light curves of sources present, as well as the images of the region are made available through the WWW at http://integral.esac.esa.int/BULGE/ as soon as possible after the observations have been performed. We show the ongoing results of this exciting program.

  2. Surface Acoustic Wave Monitor for Deposition and Analysis of Ultra-Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) based thin film deposition monitor device and system for monitoring the deposition of ultra-thin films and nanomaterials and the analysis thereof is characterized by acoustic wave device embodiments that include differential delay line device designs, and which can optionally have integral reference devices fabricated on the same substrate as the sensing device, or on a separate device in thermal contact with the film monitoring/analysis device, in order to provide inherently temperature compensated measurements. These deposition monitor and analysis devices can include inherent temperature compensation, higher sensitivity to surface interactions than quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices, and the ability to operate at extreme temperatures.

  3. Seismic augmentation of acoustic monitoring of mortar fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Thomas S.

    2007-10-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers Research and Development Center participated in a joint ARL-NATO TG-53 field experiment and data collect at Yuma Proving Ground, AZ in early November 2005. Seismic and acoustic signatures from both muzzle blasts and impacts of small arms fire and artillery were recorded using 7 seismic arrays and 3 acoustic arrays. Arrays comprised of 12 seismic and 12 acoustic sensors each were located from 700 m to 18 km from gun positions. Preliminary analysis of signatures attributed to 60mm, 81mm, 120 mm mortars recorded at a seismic-acoustic array 1.1 km from gun position are presented. Seismic and acoustic array f-k analysis is performed to detect and characterize the source signature. Horizontal seismic data are analyzed to determine efficacy of a seismic discriminant for mortar and artillery sources. Rotation of North and East seismic components to radial and transverse components relative to the source-receiver path provide maximum surface wave amplitude on the transverse component. Angles of rotation agree well with f-k analysis of both seismic and acoustic signals. The spectral energy of the rotated transverse surface wave is observable on the all caliber of mortars at a distance of 1.1 km and is a reliable source discriminant for mortar sources at this distance. In a step towards automation, travel time stencils using local seismic and acoustic velocities are applied to seismic data for analysis and determination of source characteristics.

  4. Remote acoustic monitoring of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) reveals seasonal and diel variations in acoustic behavior.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Leanna P; McCordic, Jessica A; Parks, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    Remote acoustic monitoring is a non-invasive tool that can be used to study the distribution, behavior, and habitat use of sound-producing species. The North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) is an endangered baleen whale species that produces a variety of stereotyped acoustic signals. One of these signals, the "gunshot" sound, has only been recorded from adult male North Atlantic right whales and is thought to function for reproduction, either as reproductive advertisement for females or as an agonistic signal toward other males. This study uses remote acoustic monitoring to analyze the presence of gunshots over a two-year period at two sites on the Scotian Shelf to determine if there is evidence that North Atlantic right whales may use these locations for breeding activities. Seasonal analyses at both locations indicate that gunshot sound production is highly seasonal, with an increase in the autumn. One site, Roseway West, had significantly more gunshot sounds overall and exhibited a clear diel trend in production of these signals at night. The other site, Emerald South, also showed a seasonal increase in gunshot production during the autumn, but did not show any significant diel trend. This difference in gunshot signal production at the two sites indicates variation either in the number or the behavior of whales at each location. The timing of the observed seasonal increase in gunshot sound production is consistent with the current understanding of the right whale breeding season, and our results demonstrate that detection of gunshots with remote acoustic monitoring can be a reliable way to track shifts in distribution and changes in acoustic behavior including possible mating activities. PMID:24646524

  5. Unique gel-coupled acoustic sensor array monitors human voice and physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Michael

    2002-11-01

    The health and performance of soldiers, firefighters, and other first responders in strenuous and hazardous environments can be continuously and remotely monitored with body-worn acoustic sensors. The Army Research Laboratory's gel-coupled acoustic physiological monitoring sensor has acoustic impedance properties similar to the skin that facilitate the transmission of body sounds into the sensor pad, yet significantly repel ambient airborne noises due to an impedance mismatch. Acoustic signal processing detects physiological events such as heartbeats, breaths, wheezes, coughs, blood pressure, activity, motion, and voice for communication and automatic speech recognition. Acoustic sensors can be in a helmet or in a strap around the neck, chest, and wrist. Although the physiological sounds have high SNR, the acoustic sensor also responds to motion-induced artifacts that sometimes obscure meaningful physiology. A noise-canceling sensor array configuration helps remove motion noise by using two acoustic sensors on the front sides of the neck and 2 additional acoustic sensors on each wrist. The motion noise detected on all 4 sensors will be dissimilar and out of phase, yet the physiology on all 4 sensors is covariant. Pulse wave transit time between neck and wrist will indicate systolic blood pressure. Data from a firefighter experiment will be presented.

  6. Reflection of no equilibrium two Phase Processes of Filtration in heterogeneous Media in the active seism acoustic borehole monitoring Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachay, Olga; Dryagin, Veniamin; Igolkina, Galina; Khachay, Oleg

    2013-04-01

    It is provided a comparison of no equilibrium effects by independent hydro dynamical and seism acoustic influence on an oil layer. It is known, that by drainage and steeps the hysteresis effect on curves of the relative phase permeability in dependence from porous medium water saturation by some cycles of influence: drainage-steep-drainage is observed. In earlier papers the analysis of the seism acoustic monitoring data in regimes of phone radiation, response on the first influence of given frequency and on the second influence is developed. For the analysis of seism acoustic response in time on fixed intervals along the borehole an algorithm of phase diagrams of the state of many phase medium is suggested In that paper on the base of developed algorithm a new algorithm of analyze of space, but integral in time for equal observation periods changing by the method of phase diagram state of many phase medium in the oil layer is developed. The paper was supported by the Program of Presidium UB RAS 2012-2014. Key words: Oil and gas deposits, seism acoustic borehole monitoring data, new method of processing, reflection of no equilibrium two phase processes, heterogeneous media.

  7. Real Time Monitoring of Containerless Microreactions in Acoustically Levitated Droplets via Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Elizabeth A; Esen, Cemal; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2016-09-01

    Direct in-droplet (in stillo) microreaction monitoring using acoustically levitated micro droplets has been achieved by combining acoustic (ultrasonic) levitation for the first time with real time ambient tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The acoustic levitation and inherent mixing of microliter volumes of reactants (3 μL droplets), yielding total reaction volumes of 6 μL, supported monitoring the acid-catalyzed degradation reaction of erythromycin A. This reaction was chosen to demonstrate the proof-of-principle of directly monitoring in stillo microreactions via hyphenated acoustic levitation and ambient ionization mass spectrometry. The microreactions took place completely in stillo over 30, 60, and 120 s within the containerless stable central pressure node of an acoustic levitator, thus readily promoting reaction miniaturization. For the evaluation of the miniaturized in stillo reactions, the degradation reactions were also carried out in vials (in vitro) with a total reaction volume of 400 μL. The reacted in vitro mixtures (6 μL total) were similarly introduced into the acoustic levitator prior to ambient ionization MS/MS analysis. The in stillo miniaturized reactions provided immediate real-time snap-shots of the degradation process for more accurate reaction monitoring and used a fraction of the reactants, while the larger scale in vitro reactions only yielded general reaction information. PMID:27505037

  8. Ductile Deformation of Dehydrating Serpentinite Evidenced by Acoustic Signal Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasc, J.; Hilairet, N.; Wang, Y.; Schubnel, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Serpentinite dehydration is believed to be responsible for triggering earthquakes at intermediate depths (i.e., 60-300 km) in subduction zones. Based on experimental results, some authors have proposed mechanisms that explain how brittle deformation can occur despite high pressure and temperature conditions [1]. However, reproducing microseismicity in the laboratory associated with the deformation of dehydrating serpentinite remains challenging. A recent study showed that, even for fast dehydration kinetics, ductile deformation could take place rather than brittle faulting in the sample [2]. This latter study was conducted in a multi-anvil apparatus without the ability to control differential stress during dehydration. We have since conducted controlled deformation experiments in the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) on natural serpentinite samples at sector 13 (GSECARS) of the APS. Monochromatic radiation was used with both a 2D MAR-CCD detector and a CCD camera to determine the stress and the strain of the sample during the deformation process [3]. In addition, an Acoustic Emission (AE) recording setup was used to monitor the microseismicity from the sample, using piezo-ceramic transducers glued on the basal truncation of the anvils. The use of six independent transducers allows locating the AEs and calculating the corresponding focal mechanisms. The samples were deformed at strain rates of 10-5-10-4 s-1 under confining pressures of 3-5 GPa. Dehydration was triggered during the deformation by heating the samples at rates ranging from 5 to 60 K/min. Before the onset of the dehydration, X-ray diffraction data showed that the serpentinite sustained ~1 GPa of stress which plummeted when dehydration occurred. Although AEs were recorded during the compression and decompression stages, no AEs ever accompanied this stress drop, suggesting ductile deformation of the samples. Hence, unlike many previous studies, no evidence for fluid embrittlement and anticrack generation was found

  9. Acoustic telemetry validates a citizen science approach for monitoring sharks on coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Vianna, Gabriel M S; Meekan, Mark G; Bornovski, Tova H; Meeuwig, Jessica J

    2014-01-01

    Citizen science is promoted as a simple and cost-effective alternative to traditional approaches for the monitoring of populations of marine megafauna. However, the reliability of datasets collected by these initiatives often remains poorly quantified. We compared datasets of shark counts collected by professional dive guides with acoustic telemetry data from tagged sharks collected at the same coral reef sites over a period of five years. There was a strong correlation between the number of grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) observed by dive guides and the telemetry data at both daily and monthly intervals, suggesting that variation in relative abundance of sharks was detectable in datasets collected by dive guides in a similar manner to data derived from telemetry at these time scales. There was no correlation between the number or mean depth of sharks recorded by telemetry and the presence of tourist divers, suggesting that the behaviour of sharks was not affected by the presence of divers during our study. Data recorded by dive guides showed that current strength and temperature were important drivers of the relative abundance of sharks at monitored sites. Our study validates the use of datasets of shark abundance collected by professional dive guides in frequently-visited dive sites in Palau, and supports the participation of experienced recreational divers as contributors to long-term monitoring programs of shark populations. PMID:24760081

  10. Acoustic Telemetry Validates a Citizen Science Approach for Monitoring Sharks on Coral Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Vianna, Gabriel M. S.; Meekan, Mark G.; Bornovski, Tova H.; Meeuwig, Jessica J.

    2014-01-01

    Citizen science is promoted as a simple and cost-effective alternative to traditional approaches for the monitoring of populations of marine megafauna. However, the reliability of datasets collected by these initiatives often remains poorly quantified. We compared datasets of shark counts collected by professional dive guides with acoustic telemetry data from tagged sharks collected at the same coral reef sites over a period of five years. There was a strong correlation between the number of grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) observed by dive guides and the telemetry data at both daily and monthly intervals, suggesting that variation in relative abundance of sharks was detectable in datasets collected by dive guides in a similar manner to data derived from telemetry at these time scales. There was no correlation between the number or mean depth of sharks recorded by telemetry and the presence of tourist divers, suggesting that the behaviour of sharks was not affected by the presence of divers during our study. Data recorded by dive guides showed that current strength and temperature were important drivers of the relative abundance of sharks at monitored sites. Our study validates the use of datasets of shark abundance collected by professional dive guides in frequently-visited dive sites in Palau, and supports the participation of experienced recreational divers as contributors to long-term monitoring programs of shark populations. PMID:24760081

  11. In-process acoustic emission monitoring of dissimilar metal welding: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    A system to provide real-time, in-process acoustic emission monitoring to detect and locate flaws in bimetallic welds has been demonstrated. This system could provide reliable inspection of critical welds in cases where conventional NDE would be costly or impossible to apply. Tests were completed on four sample welds to determine the sensitivity of the system. Artificial flaws were introduced into two test samples and the acoustic emission results were verified by radiography and visual inspection techniques.

  12. Acoustic vector sensor beamforming reduces masking from underwater industrial noise during passive monitoring.

    PubMed

    Thode, Aaron M; Kim, Katherine H; Norman, Robert G; Blackwell, Susanna B; Greene, Charles R

    2016-04-01

    Masking from industrial noise can hamper the ability to detect marine mammal sounds near industrial operations, whenever conventional (pressure sensor) hydrophones are used for passive acoustic monitoring. Using data collected from an autonomous recorder with directional capabilities (Directional Autonomous Seafloor Acoustic Recorder), deployed 4.1 km from an arctic drilling site in 2012, the authors demonstrate how conventional beamforming on an acoustic vector sensor can be used to suppress noise arriving from a narrow sector of geographic azimuths. Improvements in signal-to-noise ratio of up to 15 dB are demonstrated on bowhead whale calls, which were otherwise undetectable using conventional hydrophones. PMID:27106345

  13. Acoustic-wave sensor for ambient monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Hoyt, Andrea E.; Frye, Gregory C.

    1998-01-01

    The acoustic-wave sensor. The acoustic-wave sensor is designed for ambient or vapor-phase monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent such as N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP), ethoxyethylpropionate (EEP) or the like. The acoustic-wave sensor comprises an acoustic-wave device such as a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) device, a flexural-plate-wave (FPW) device, an acoustic-plate-mode (APM) device, or a thickness-shear-mode (TSM) device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance or QCM) having a sensing region on a surface thereof. The sensing region includes a sensing film for sorbing a quantity of the photoresist-stripping agent, thereby altering or shifting a frequency of oscillation of an acoustic wave propagating through the sensing region for indicating an ambient concentration of the agent. According to preferred embodiments of the invention, the acoustic-wave device is a SAW device; and the sensing film comprises poly(vinylacetate), poly(N-vinylpyrrolidinone), or poly(vinylphenol).

  14. Acoustic-wave sensor for ambient monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, K.B.; Hoyt, A.E.; Frye, G.C.

    1998-08-18

    The acoustic-wave sensor is disclosed. The acoustic-wave sensor is designed for ambient or vapor-phase monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent such as N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP), ethoxyethylpropionate (EEP) or the like. The acoustic-wave sensor comprises an acoustic-wave device such as a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) device, a flexural-plate-wave (FPW) device, an acoustic-plate-mode (APM) device, or a thickness-shear-mode (TSM) device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance or QCM) having a sensing region on a surface thereof. The sensing region includes a sensing film for sorbing a quantity of the photoresist-stripping agent, thereby altering or shifting a frequency of oscillation of an acoustic wave propagating through the sensing region for indicating an ambient concentration of the agent. According to preferred embodiments of the invention, the acoustic-wave device is a SAW device; and the sensing film comprises poly(vinylacetate), poly(N-vinylpyrrolidinone), or poly(vinylphenol). 3 figs.

  15. Valve- And Switch-Monitoring Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Matthew R.; Lowe, Carlyle M., III

    1991-01-01

    Human operators freed from tedious, repetitive monitoring tasks. Computer program applies techniques of artificial intelligence to monitoring positions of many switches and valves. Uses combination of procedural and declarative programming techniques. NASA's C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) provides rule-processing capabilities. Host program, written in C, acquires necessary data and applies valuation algorithm to generate knowledge-based propositions. Written to assist human flight controllers in comparing actual with expected configuration of switches and valves in Space Shuttle; underlying programming concept applicable to other complicated systems as chemical-processing plants, power-plants, and automated assembly lines. Program works with present monitoring equipment and computers.

  16. Programs Automate Complex Operations Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center, just off the east coast of Florida on Merritt Island, has been the starting place of every human space flight in NASA s history. It is where the first Americans left Earth during Project Mercury, the terrestrial departure point of the lunar-bound Apollo astronauts, as well as the last solid ground many astronauts step foot on before beginning their long stays aboard the International Space Station. It will also be the starting point for future NASA missions to the Moon and Mars and temporary host of the new Ares series rockets designed to take us there. Since the first days of the early NASA missions, in order to keep up with the demands of the intricate and critical Space Program, the launch complex - host to the large Vehicle Assembly Building, two launch pads, and myriad support facilities - has grown increasingly complex to accommodate the sophisticated technologies needed to manage today s space missions. To handle the complicated launch coordination safely, NASA found ways to automate mission-critical applications, resulting in streamlined decision-making. One of these methods, management software called the Control Monitor Unit (CMU), created in conjunction with McDonnell Douglas Space & Defense Systems, has since left NASA, and is finding its way into additional applications.

  17. The Minnesota Prescription Monitoring Program.

    PubMed

    Herman, Cory

    2011-01-01

    We must keep in mind that health care professionals practice in an environment of legal and regulatory influences, where some patients with pain also have an addictive disease. As dentists routinely manage acute oral and dental pain by pharmacological means, people who abuse prescription medications see dentists as easy targets to "score" prescription opioids and controlled substances. This potential for deception must be balanced with our professional responsibility to prescribe and dispense controlled substances appropriately, guarding against abuse while ensuring that patients have medication available when appropriate and necessary. However, dentists also have a personal responsibility to protect themselves and their practices from becoming easy targets for drug abuse and diversion. Becoming aware of the potential signs and symptoms of drug seeking behavior and recognizing the signs of controlled substance misuse will safeguard patients, practices, and practitioners. Utilizing the services of the Minnesota Prescription Monitoring Program may help to not only improve patient care, but to facilitate appropriate pain management and help identify patients having drug seeking behaviors PMID:21667591

  18. Listening to the Deep: live monitoring of ocean noise and cetacean acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    André, M; van der Schaar, M; Zaugg, S; Houégnigan, L; Sánchez, A M; Castell, J V

    2011-01-01

    The development and broad use of passive acoustic monitoring techniques have the potential to help assessing the large-scale influence of artificial noise on marine organisms and ecosystems. Deep-sea observatories have the potential to play a key role in understanding these recent acoustic changes. LIDO (Listening to the Deep Ocean Environment) is an international project that is allowing the real-time long-term monitoring of marine ambient noise as well as marine mammal sounds at cabled and standalone observatories. Here, we present the overall development of the project and the use of passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) techniques to provide the scientific community with real-time data at large spatial and temporal scales. Special attention is given to the extraction and identification of high frequency cetacean echolocation signals given the relevance of detecting target species, e.g. beaked whales, in mitigation processes, e.g. during military exercises. PMID:21665016

  19. Active sites environmental monitoring Program - Program Plan: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, C.M.; Hicks, D.S.; Ashwood, T.L.; Cunningham, G.R.

    1994-05-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of active low-level-waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Several changes have recently occurred in regard to the sites that are currently used for waste storage and disposal. These changes require a second set of revisions to the ASEMP program plan. This document incorporates those revisions. This program plan presents the organization and procedures for monitoring the active sites. The program plan also provides internal reporting levels to guide the evaluation of monitoring results.

  20. Acoustic Monitoring of Ebullitive Flux from a Mire Ecosystem in Subarctic Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, S. A.; Varner, R. K.; Palace, M. W.; Wik, M.; Crill, P. M.; McCalley, C. K.; Amante, J.

    2012-12-01

    Methane (CH4) is a potent green house gas with wetlands being the largest natural source to the atmosphere. Studies in the Stordalen Mire, a dynamic peatland complex 11km east of the Abisko Scientific Research Station (ANS) in northern Sweden, that focused on CH4 transport to the atmosphere from peatlands have shown increased emissions over the past decades. Ebullitive flux (bubbling) is a potentially significant pathway of CH4 from mire/lake ecosystems. Ebullitive fluxes were successfully monitored acoustically in peat and lakes in 2011. This work expands those measurements with installation of sensors in ponds and permafrost thaw margins in 2012. Eighteen acoustic sensors were installed in peat (6), pond (6), and lake (6) sites at Stordalen Mire. Recorders collected acoustic data continuously from each sensor and gas samples were collected from the traps at least once per week beginning 7 July. The CH4 concentration in the gas was measured using gas chromatography and selected samples were also analyzed for 13C-CH4 using a Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL). The acoustic data were evaluated using a MATLAB program for determine the timing and volume of each ebullition event. The CH4 ebullitive flux from the peat was greater in July 2011 than during the same period in 2012. In comparison, the ponds and thaw margins released CH4 at a faster rate in 2012 than was observed in the peat and lake sensors in 2011. Inter-annual differences in ebullitive rates suggest that weather scale differences between years may control CH4 ebullitive flux. 13C-CH4 measured in the pore waters of pond sediment suggests that not all ponds are dominated by the same production processes. However, 13C-CH4 measured in bubbles and sediments are not different, implying little or no oxidation of CH4 during transport to the water surface. Our data suggests that changes in atmospheric pressure and water table height correlated with the ebullitive release in all three sub-ecosystems.

  1. 1990 Weatherization Assistance Program monitoring. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Samuels, L.S.

    1992-06-19

    The fiscal year 1990 DOE weatherization programs were monitored in Indiana, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The focus of the monitoring was on a total of 18 subgrantees. Separate reports on the monitoring completed on each site was submitted as well as the final summary report for each state. The scope of monitoring consisted of a review of current contracts, budgets, program operating procedures, staffing, inventory control, financial and procurement procedures, review of client files and audit reports, inspection of completed dwelling units and assessment of monitoring, training, and technical assistance provided by the grantees. A random sampling of completed units were selected and visits were made to inspect these weatherized dwellings.

  2. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2011 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, D. J.; Anderson, D. C.; Hall, D. B.; Greger, P. D.; Ostler, W. K.

    2012-06-13

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2011. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2011, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ACOUSTIC SUSPENDED SEDIMENT MONITORING SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Suspended sediments represent a serious worldwide pollutant which need to be monitored and ultimately controlled. Significant entrainment and transport of these sediments occur during adverse weather conditions and during relatively short time spans which make manual sampling and monitoring cumberso...

  4. The acoustic cough monitoring and manometric profile of cough and throat clearing.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Carson, D; Boris, L; Mabary, J; Lin, Z; Nicodème, F; Cuttica, M; Kahrilas, P J; Pandolfino, J E

    2014-01-01

    Cough and throat clearing might be difficult to differentiate when trying to detect them acoustically or manometrically. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of acoustic monitoring for detecting cough and throat clearing, and to also determine whether these two symptoms present with different manometric profiles on esophageal pressure topography. Ten asymptomatic volunteers (seven females, mean age 31.1) were trained to simulate cough and throat clearing in a randomized order every 6 minutes during simultaneous acoustic monitoring and high-resolution manometry. The accuracy of automated acoustic analysis and two blinded reviewers were compared. The pattern of the events and the duration of the pressure changes were assessed using the 30 mmHg isobaric contour. There were 50 cough and 50 throat-clearing events according to the protocol. The sensitivity and specificity of automated acoustic analysis was 84% and 50% for cough, while the blinded analysis using sound revealed a sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 92%. The manometric profile of both cough and throat clearing was similar in terms of qualitative findings; however, cough was associated with a greater number of repetitive pressurizations and a more vigorous upper esophageal sphincter contraction compared with throat clearing. The acoustic analysis software has a moderate sensitivity and poor specificity to detect cough. The profile of cough and throat clearing in pressure topography revealed a similar qualitative pattern of pressurization with more vigorous pressure changes and a greater rate of repetitive pressurizations in cough. PMID:23442178

  5. Acoustic Emission Measurement with Fiber Bragg Gratings for Structure Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Walker, James L.; Russell, Sam; Roth, Don; Mabry, Nehemiah; Wilson, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Structural Health monitoring (SHM) is a way of detecting and assessing damage to large scale structures. Sensors used in SHM for aerospace structures provide real time data on new and propagating damage. One type of sensor that is typically used is an acoustic emission (AE) sensor that detects the acoustic emissions given off from a material cracking or breaking. The use of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors to provide acoustic emission data for damage detection is studied. In this research, FBG sensors are used to detect acoustic emissions of a material during a tensile test. FBG sensors were placed as a strain sensor (oriented parallel to applied force) and as an AE sensor (oriented perpendicular to applied force). A traditional AE transducer was used to collect AE data to compare with the FBG data. Preliminary results show that AE with FBGs can be a viable alternative to traditional AE sensors.

  6. Comparison of PAM Systems for Acoustic Monitoring and Further Risk Mitigation Application.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Stefan; Kreimeyer, Roman; Knoll, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    We present results of the SIRENA 2011 research cruises conducted by the NATO Undersea Research Centre (NURC) and joined by the Research Department for Underwater Acoustics and Geophysics (FWG), Bundeswehr Technical Centre (WTD 71) and the Universities of Kiel and Pavia. The cruises were carried out in the Ligurian Sea. The main aim of the FWG was to test and evaluate the newly developed towed hydrophone array as a passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) tool for risk mitigation applications. The system was compared with the PAM equipment used by the other participating institutions. Recorded sounds were used to improve an automatic acoustic classifier for marine mammals, and validated acoustic detections by observers were compared with the results of the classifier. PMID:26611016

  7. Ultrasonic acoustic health monitoring of ball bearings using neural network pattern classification of power spectral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, William; Southward, Steve; Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a generic passive non-contact based approach using ultrasonic acoustic emissions (UAE) to facilitate the neural network classification of bearing health, and more specifically the bearing operating condition. The acoustic emission signals used in this study are in the ultrasonic range (20-120 kHz). A direct benefit of microphones capable of measurements in this frequency range is their inherent directionality. Using selected bands from the UAE power spectrum signature, it is possible to pose the health monitoring problem as a multi-class classification problem, and make use of a single neural network to classify the ultrasonic acoustic emission signatures. Artificial training data, based on statistical properties of a significantly smaller experimental data set is used to train the neural network. This specific approach is generic enough to suggest that it is applicable to a variety of systems and components where periodic acoustic emissions exist.

  8. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  9. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2009 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J. Dennis; Anderson, David C.; Hall, Derek B.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent

    2010-07-13

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2009. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2009, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  10. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2010 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, D.J.; Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.; Greger, P.D.; Ostler, W.K.

    2011-07-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2010. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2010, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  11. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2012 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent; Hansen, Dennis J.

    2013-07-03

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2012. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2012, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  12. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2008 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Dennis J.; Anderson, David C.; Hall, Derek B.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent

    2009-04-30

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2008. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  13. Acoustic emission monitoring from a lab scale high shear granulator--a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Watson, N J; Povey, M J W; Reynolds, G K; Xu, B H; Ding, Y

    2014-04-25

    A new approach to the monitoring of granulation processes using passive acoustics together with precise control over the granulation process has highlighted the importance of particle-particle and particle-bowl collisions in acoustic emission. The results have shown that repeatable acoustic results could be obtained but only when a spray nozzle water addition system was used. Acoustic emissions were recorded from a transducer attached to the bowl and an airborne transducer. It was found that the airborne transducer detected very little from the granulation and only experienced small changes throughout the process. The results from the bowl transducer showed that during granulation the frequency content of the acoustic emission shifted towards the lower frequencies. Results from the discrete element model indicate that when larger particles are used the number of collisions the particles experience reduces. This is a result of the volume conservation methodology used in this study, therefore larger particles results in less particles. These simulation results coupled with previous theoretical work on the frequency content of an impacting sphere explain why the frequency content of the acoustic emissions reduces during granule growth. The acoustic system used was also clearly able to identify when large over-wetted granules were present in the system, highlighting its benefit for detecting undesirable operational conditions. High-speed photography was used to study if visual changes in the granule properties could be linked with the changing acoustic emissions. The high speed photography was only possible towards the latter stages of the granulation process and it was found that larger granules produced a higher magnitude of acoustic emission across a broader frequency range. PMID:24491527

  14. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-03

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted during the first quarter of 1992. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  15. The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-18

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted by EPD/EMS in the first quarter of 1991. In includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program's activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  16. CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Continuous emissions monitoring of hazardous and mixed waste thermal treatment processes is desired for verification of emission compliance, process control, and public safety perception. pecies of particular interest include trace metals and organic compounds resulting from inco...

  17. The acoustic cough monitoring and manometric profile of cough and throat clearing

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yinglian; Carlson, Dustin; Boris, Lubomyr; Mabary, Jerry; Lin, Zhiyue; Nicodème, Frédéric; Cuttica, Michael; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Pandolfino, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cough may coexist with throat clearing and it is possible that these two entities may be difficult to differentiate on acoustic monitoring and ambulatory manometry. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of acoustic monitoring for detecting cough and throat clearing and to also determine whether these two symptoms present with different manometric profiles on esophageal pressure topography. Methods Ten asymptomatic volunteers (7 females, mean age 31.1) were trained to simulate cough and throat clearing in a randomized order every 6 minutes during simultaneous acoustic monitoring and high resolution manometry. The accuracy of automated acoustic analysis and a blinded reviewer were compared against the scripted protocol. The pattern of the events and the duration of the pressure changes were assessed using the 30 mmHg isobaric contour to determine whether distinct patterns could be identified. Results In total, there were 50 cough and 50 throat clearing events according to the protocol. The sensitivity and specificity of acoustic cough monitoring was 84% and 50% for cough; while the blinded analysis based on sound alone revealed a sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 90%. The pressure topography manometric profile of both cough and throat clearing began with a decrease in esophageal pressure, followed by a distal excursion of the esophagogastric junction high-pressure zone and an increase in EGJ and UES contractile pressure that was followed immediately by a simultaneous abrupt increase in gastric and esophageal pressure. Cough was associated with a greater number of repetitive pressurizations, a more pronounced EGJ shift and a more vigorous augmentation of the UES pressure compared with throat clearing. Conclusions The automated acoustic analysis software has a moderate sensitivity and specificity to detect cough. The profile of cough and throat clearing in pressure topography revealed a similar qualitative pattern of pressurization with more

  18. Acoustic monitoring of first responder's physiology for health and performance surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Michael V.

    2002-08-01

    Acoustic sensors have been used to monitor firefighter and soldier physiology to assess health and performance. The Army Research Laboratory has developed a unique body-contacting acoustic sensor that can monitor the health and performance of firefighters and soldiers while they are doing their mission. A gel-coupled sensor has acoustic impedance properties similar to the skin that facilitate the transmission of body sounds into the sensor pad, yet significantly repel ambient airborne noises due to an impedance mismatch. This technology can monitor heartbeats, breaths, blood pressure, motion, voice, and other indicators that can provide vital feedback to the medics and unit commanders. Diverse physiological parameters can be continuously monitored with acoustic sensors and transmitted for remote surveillance of personnel status. Body-worn acoustic sensors located at the neck, breathing mask, and wrist do an excellent job at detecting heartbeats and activity. However, they have difficulty extracting physiology during rigorous exercise or movements due to the motion artifacts sensed. Rigorous activity often indicates that the person is healthy by virtue of being active, and injury often causes the subject to become less active or incapacitated making the detection of physiology easier. One important measure of performance, heart rate variability, is the measure of beat-to-beat timing fluctuations derived from the interval between two adjacent beats. The Lomb periodogram is optimized for non-uniformly sampled data, and can be applied to non-stationary acoustic heart rate features (such as 1st and 2nd heart sounds) to derive heart rate variability and help eliminate errors created by motion artifacts. Simple peak-detection above or below a certain threshold or waveform derivative parameters can produce the timing and amplitude features necessary for the Lomb periodogram and cross-correlation techniques. High-amplitude motion artifacts may contribute to a different

  19. Ground-Water Protection and Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dresel, P.E.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the ground-water protection and monitoring program strategy for the Hanford Site in 1994. Two of the key elements of this strategy are to (1) protect the unconfined aquifer from further contamination, and (2) conduct a monitoring program to provide early warning when contamination of ground water does occur. The monitoring program at Hanford is designed to document the distribution and movement of existing ground-water contamination and provides a historical baseline for evaluating current and future risk from exposure to the contamination and for deciding on remedial action options.

  20. Advanced Computing Methods for Knowledge Discovery and Prognosis in Acoustic Emission Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mejia, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) has gained significant popularity in the last decade. This growing interest, coupled with new sensing technologies, has resulted in an overwhelming amount of data in need of management and useful interpretation. Acoustic emission (AE) testing has been particularly fraught by the problem of growing data and is…

  1. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Dennis; Anderson, David; Derek, Hall; Greger, Paul; Ostler, W. Kent

    2008-03-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

  2. Monitoring the Ocean Acoustic Environment: A Model-Based Detection Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Sullivan, E.J.

    2000-03-13

    A model-based approach is applied in the development of a processor designed to passively monitor an ocean acoustic environment along with its associated variations. The technique employs an adaptive, model-based processor embedded in a sequential likelihood detection scheme. The trade-off between state-based and innovations-based monitor designs is discussed, conceptually. The underlying theory for the innovations-based design is briefly developed and applied to a simulated data set.

  3. Acoustic Emission and Guided Wave Monitoring of Fatigue Crack Growth on a Full Pipe Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2011-05-06

    Continuous on-line monitoring of active and passive systems, structures and components in nuclear power plants will be critical to extending the lifetimes of nuclear power plants in the US beyond 60 years. Acoustic emission and guided ultrasonic waves are two tools for continuously monitoring passive systems, structures and components within nuclear power plants and are the focus of this study. These tools are used to monitor fatigue damage induced in a SA 312 TP304 stainless steel pipe specimen. The results of acoustic emission monitoring indicate that crack propagation signals were not directly detected. However, acoustic emission monitoring exposed crack formation prior to visual confirmation through the detection of signals caused by crack closure friction. The results of guided ultrasonic wave monitoring indicate that this technology is sensitive to the presence and size of cracks. The sensitivity and complexity of GUW signals is observed to vary with respect to signal frequency and path traveled by the guided ultrasonic wave relative to the crack orientation.

  4. Density can be misleading for low-density species: benefits of passive acoustic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Tracey L; Ciaglia, Michaela B; Klinck, Holger; Southwell, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Climate-induced changes may be more substantial within the marine environment, where following ecological change is logistically difficult, and typically expensive. As marine animals tend to produce stereotyped, long-range signals, they are ideal for repeatable surveying. In this study we illustrate the potential for calling rates to be used as a tool for determining habitat quality by using an Antarctic pack-ice seal, the leopard seal, as a model.With an understanding of the vocal behavior of a species, their seasonal and diurnal patterns, sex and age-related differences, an underwater passive-acoustic survey conducted alongside a visual survey in an arc of 4,225 km across the Davis Sea, Eastern Antarctica, showed that while acoustic and visual surveys identified similar regions as having high densities, the acoustic surveys surprisingly identified the opposite regions as being 'critical' habitats. Density surveys of species that cannot be differentiated into population classes may be misleading because overall density can be a negative indicator of habitat quality.Under special circumstances acoustics can offer enormous advantage over traditional techniques and open up monitoring to regions that are remote, difficult and expensive to work within, no longer restricting long-term community assessment to resource-wealthy communities. As climatic change affects a broad range of organisms across geographic boundaries we propose that capitalizing on the significant advances in passive acoustic technology, alongside physical acoustics and population modeling, can help in addressing ecological questions more broadly. PMID:23326339

  5. Density Can Be Misleading for Low-Density Species: Benefits of Passive Acoustic Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Tracey L.; Ciaglia, Michaela B.; Klinck, Holger; Southwell, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Climate-induced changes may be more substantial within the marine environment, where following ecological change is logistically difficult, and typically expensive. As marine animals tend to produce stereotyped, long-range signals, they are ideal for repeatable surveying. In this study we illustrate the potential for calling rates to be used as a tool for determining habitat quality by using an Antarctic pack-ice seal, the leopard seal, as a model.With an understanding of the vocal behavior of a species, their seasonal and diurnal patterns, sex and age-related differences, an underwater passive-acoustic survey conducted alongside a visual survey in an arc of 4,225 km across the Davis Sea, Eastern Antarctica, showed that while acoustic and visual surveys identified similar regions as having high densities, the acoustic surveys surprisingly identified the opposite regions as being ‘critical’ habitats. Density surveys of species that cannot be differentiated into population classes may be misleading because overall density can be a negative indicator of habitat quality.Under special circumstances acoustics can offer enormous advantage over traditional techniques and open up monitoring to regions that are remote, difficult and expensive to work within, no longer restricting long-term community assessment to resource-wealthy communities. As climatic change affects a broad range of organisms across geographic boundaries we propose that capitalizing on the significant advances in passive acoustic technology, alongside physical acoustics and population modeling, can help in addressing ecological questions more broadly. PMID:23326339

  6. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2013 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.

    2014-06-05

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2013. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed activity sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, and (f) habitat restoration monitoring. During 2013, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  7. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-18

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the first quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and the other documentation for this program and provides a record of the program's activities and rationale and an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of the analytical data and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data and related data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

  8. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-18

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the fourth quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program's activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of analytical and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

  9. Acoustic Characteristics of Various Treatment Panel Designs for HSCT Ejector Liner Acoustic Technology Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Kraft, R. E.; Syed, A. a.; Vu, D. D.; Mungur, P.; Langenbrunner, L. E.; Majjigi, R. K.

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of the initial effort (Phase I) of HSR Liner Technology Program, the selection of promising liner concepts, design and fabrication of these concepts for laboratory tests, testing these liners in the laboratory by using impedance tube and flow ducts, and developing empirical impedance/suppression correlation, are successfully completed. Acoustic and aerodynamic criteria for the liner design are established. Based on these criteria several liners are designed. The liner concepts designed and fabricated include Single-Degree-of-Freedom (SDOF), Two-Degree-of-Freedom (2DOF), and Bulk Absorber. Two types of SDOF treatment are fabricated, one with a perforated type face plate and the other with a wiremesh (woven) type faceplate. In addition, special configurations of these concepts are also included in the design. Several treatment panels are designed for parametric study. In these panels the facesheets of different porosity, hole diameter, and sheet thickness are utilized. Several deep panels (i.e., 1 in. deep) are designed and instrumented to measure DC flow resistance and insitu impedance in the presence of grazing flow. Basic components of these panels (i.e., facesheets, bulk materials, etc.) are also procured and tested. The results include DC flow resistance, normal impedance, and insertion loss.

  10. Characterization monitoring & sensor technology crosscutting program

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the OFfice of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60).

  11. Acoustic attenuation analysis program for ducts with mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, R. K., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A computerized acoustic attenuation prediction procedure has been developed to evaluate acoustically lined ducts for various geometric and environmental parameters. The analysis procedure is based on solutions to the acoustic wave equation, assuming uniform airflow on a duct cross section, combined with appropriate mathematical lining impedance models. The impedance models included in the analysis procedure are representative of either perforated sheet or porous polyimide impregnated fiberglass facing sheet coupled with a cellular backing space. Advantages and limitations of the analysis procedure are reviewed.

  12. FEASIBILITY OF ACOUSTIC METHODS FOR IMPURITY GAS MONITORING IN DRY STORAGE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Cuta, Judith M.; Jones, Anthony M.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Adkins, Harold E.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2015-05-01

    This paper explores the feasibility of monitoring impurities in dry storage containers (DSCs) for spent nuclear fuel using non-invasive acoustic sensing. The conceived implementation considers measurements based on changes in acoustic velocity at successive measurement intervals. Uncertainty contributions from the measurement system and temperature variability are estimated. Sources of temperature variability considered include changes in the decay heat source over time and ambient temperature variation. The results show that performance of a system which does not incorporate temperature compensation will be dependent upon geographic location and the decay heat source strength. The results also indicate that an annual measurement interval is optimal.

  13. Atmospheric Visibility Monitoring (AVM) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeganathan, Muthu; Tong, Loretta

    1996-01-01

    The program objective is to obtain atmospheric transmission statistics data to support optical communications through: (1) Atmospheric loss in optical communication channel; (2) Joint PDFs for multiple site reception; (3) Statistical modeling; and (4) extrapolate PDFs for other sites.

  14. Acoustic impedance rhinometry (AIR): a technique for monitoring dynamic changes in nasal congestion.

    PubMed

    Patuzzi, Robert; Cook, Alison

    2014-04-01

    We describe a simple and inexpensive method for monitoring nasal air flow resistance using measurement of the small-signal acoustic input impedance of the nasal passage, similar to the audiological measurement of ear drum compliance with acoustic tympanometry. The method requires generation of a fixed sinusoidal volume-velocity stimulus using ear-bud speakers, and an electret microphone to monitor the resultant pressure fluctuation in the nasal passage. Both are coupled to the nose via high impedance silastic tubing and a small plastic nose insert. The acoustic impedance is monitored in real-time using a laptop soundcard and custom-written software developed in LabView 7.0 (National Instruments). The compact, lightweight equipment and fast time resolution lends the technique to research into the small and rapid reflexive changes in nasal resistance caused by environmental and local neurological influences. The acoustic impedance rhinometry technique has the potential to be developed for use in a clinical setting, where the need exists for a simple and inexpensive objective nasal resistance measurement technique. PMID:24577261

  15. The Modular Borehole Monitoring Program. A research program to optimize well-based monitoring for geologic carbon sequestration

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Freifeld, Barry; Daley, Tom; Cook, Paul; Trautz, Robert; Dodds, Kevin

    2014-12-31

    Understanding the impacts caused by injection of large volumes of CO2 in the deep subsurface necessitates a comprehensive monitoring strategy. While surface-based and other remote geophysical methods can provide information on the general morphology of a CO2 plume, verification of the geochemical conditions and validation of the remote sensing data requires measurements from boreholes that penetrate the storage formation. Unfortunately, the high cost of drilling deep wellbores and deploying instrumentation systems constrains the number of dedicated monitoring borings as well as limits the technologies that can be incorporated in a borehole completion. The objective of the Modular Borehole Monitoring (MBM)more » Program was to develop a robust suite of well-based tools optimized for subsurface monitoring of CO2 that could meet the needs of a comprehensive well-based monitoring program. It should have enough flexibility to be easily reconfigured for various reservoir geometries and geologies. The MBM Program sought to provide storage operators with a turn-key fully engineered design that incorporated key technologies, function over the decades long time-span necessary for post-closure reservoir monitoring, and meet industry acceptable risk profiles for deep-well installations. While still within the conceptual design phase of the MBM program, the SECARB Anthropogenic Test in Citronelle, Alabama, USA was identified as a deployment site for our engineered monitoring systems. The initial step in designing the Citronelle MBM system was to down-select from the various monitoring tools available to include technologies that we considered essential to any program. Monitoring methods selected included U-tube geochemical sampling, discrete quartz pressure and temperature gauges, an integrated fibre-optic bundle consisting of distributed temperature and heat-pulse sensing, and a sparse string of conventional 3C-geophones. While not originally planned within the initial MBM

  16. The Modular Borehole Monitoring Program. A research program to optimize well-based monitoring for geologic carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Freifeld, Barry; Daley, Tom; Cook, Paul; Trautz, Robert; Dodds, Kevin

    2014-12-31

    Understanding the impacts caused by injection of large volumes of CO2 in the deep subsurface necessitates a comprehensive monitoring strategy. While surface-based and other remote geophysical methods can provide information on the general morphology of a CO2 plume, verification of the geochemical conditions and validation of the remote sensing data requires measurements from boreholes that penetrate the storage formation. Unfortunately, the high cost of drilling deep wellbores and deploying instrumentation systems constrains the number of dedicated monitoring borings as well as limits the technologies that can be incorporated in a borehole completion. The objective of the Modular Borehole Monitoring (MBM) Program was to develop a robust suite of well-based tools optimized for subsurface monitoring of CO2 that could meet the needs of a comprehensive well-based monitoring program. It should have enough flexibility to be easily reconfigured for various reservoir geometries and geologies. The MBM Program sought to provide storage operators with a turn-key fully engineered design that incorporated key technologies, function over the decades long time-span necessary for post-closure reservoir monitoring, and meet industry acceptable risk profiles for deep-well installations. While still within the conceptual design phase of the MBM program, the SECARB Anthropogenic Test in Citronelle, Alabama, USA was identified as a deployment site for our engineered monitoring systems. The initial step in designing the Citronelle MBM system was to down-select from the various monitoring tools available to include technologies that we considered essential to any program. Monitoring methods selected included U-tube geochemical sampling, discrete quartz pressure and temperature gauges, an integrated fibre-optic bundle consisting of distributed temperature and heat-pulse sensing, and a sparse string of conventional 3C-geophones. While not originally planned

  17. Acoustic emission of offshore structures, attenuation - noise - crack monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Lovaas, S.

    1985-01-01

    No NDT crack detection methods have up to now proved to be the method which can overrule the others. We shall probably in the future in the offshore industry see a combination of various structure monitoring systems, remotely operated vehicles (ROV) with NDT-equipment and also the use of divers. The author believes that in some 5 - 10 years ROVs will perform much of the routine inspection, and mobile monitoring instrumentation will be concentrated to some hot spot areas, already detected defects or any repairs. The main areas for AE are monitoring of pressure vessels and fibre reinforced plastics. For application on offshore structures some fullscale trials have been performed (with practical problems) as well as some laboratory studies. Norwegian institutions seem to have a leading role today in the research of offshore applications. Norsk Hydro participated in a signature analysis project at Sintef/Veritas some years ago.

  18. Distributed feedback fiber laser acoustic emission sensor for concrete structure health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Gengjie; Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Sun, Baochen; Li, Fang

    2014-05-01

    This paper introduces a highly-sensitive fiber optical acoustic emission (AE) sensor and a parameter analysis method aiming at concrete structure health monitoring. Distributed feedback fiber-laser (DFB-FL), which is encapsulated to have a high acoustic sensitivity, is used for sensor unit of the AE sensor. The AE signal of concrete beam in different work stages, based on the four-point bending experiment of the concrete beam, is picked up, and the relationship between the concrete beam work stages and the AE parameter is found. The results indicate that DFB-FLAES can be used as sensitive transducers for recording acoustic events and forecasting the imminent failure of the concrete beam.

  19. Acoustic monitoring of carbon film formation by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, Y.; Yeung, E.S. )

    1993-04-01

    Acoustic signals generated by the deposition of carbon thin films were monitored in situ by a microphone. Photolysis of benzene or adamantane vapor in the presence of helium buffer gas of 5 to 100 Torr by an ArF excimer laser formed several kinds of carbon films (e.g., polymeric, amorphous, and graphitic films), depending on the optical configuration, the ambient pressure, the laser fluence, and the reagent pressure. Analysis of the acoustic signal offers some insight into the mechanism of the deposition processes, which include the graphitization of the deposited films and the role of energetic particles, such as vibrationally excited benzene, in the deposition of amorphous hydrogenated carbon film. Also, the acoustic signal clearly showed the presence of surface-related processes in the course of film deposition. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Characterization, Monitoring and Sensor Technology Integrated Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This booklet contains summary sheets that describe FY 1993 characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) development projects. Currently, 32 projects are funded, 22 through the OTD Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program (CMST-IP), 8 through the OTD Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) activity managed by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), and 2 through Interagency Agreements (IAGs). This booklet is not inclusive of those CMST projects which are funded through Integrated Demonstrations (IDs) and other Integrated Programs (IPs). The projects are in six areas: Expedited Site Characterization; Contaminants in Soils and Groundwater; Geophysical and Hydrogeological Measurements; Mixed Wastes in Drums, Burial Grounds, and USTs; Remediation, D&D, and Waste Process Monitoring; and Performance Specifications and Program Support. A task description, technology needs, accomplishments and technology transfer information is given for each project.

  1. Computer programs for forward and inverse modeling of acoustic and electromagnetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    A suite of computer programs was developed by U.S. Geological Survey personnel for forward and inverse modeling of acoustic and electromagnetic data. This report describes the computer resources that are needed to execute the programs, the installation of the programs, the program designs, some tests of their accuracy, and some suggested improvements.

  2. The Doppler Effect based acoustic source separation for a wayside train bearing monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Zhang, Shangbin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2016-01-01

    Wayside acoustic condition monitoring and fault diagnosis for train bearings depend on acquired acoustic signals, which consist of mixed signals from different train bearings with obvious Doppler distortion as well as background noises. This study proposes a novel scheme to overcome the difficulties, especially the multi-source problem in wayside acoustic diagnosis system. In the method, a time-frequency data fusion (TFDF) strategy is applied to weaken the Heisenberg's uncertainty limit for a signal's time-frequency distribution (TFD) of high resolution. Due to the Doppler Effect, the signals from different bearings have different time centers even with the same frequency. A Doppler feature matching search (DFMS) algorithm is then put forward to locate the time centers of different bearings in the TFD spectrogram. With the determined time centers, time-frequency filters (TFF) are designed with thresholds to separate the acoustic signals in the time-frequency domain. Then the inverse STFT (ISTFT) is taken and the signals are recovered and filtered aiming at each sound source. Subsequently, a dynamical resampling method is utilized to remove the Doppler Effect. Finally, accurate diagnosis for train bearing faults can be achieved by applying conventional spectrum analysis techniques to the resampled data. The performance of the proposed method is verified by both simulated and experimental cases. It shows that it is effective to detect and diagnose multiple defective bearings even though they produce multi-source acoustic signals.

  3. Acoustic emission monitoring of CFRP cables for cable-stayed bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco

    2001-08-01

    The advantages of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite include excellent corrosion resistance, high specific strength and stiffness, as well as outstanding fatigue behavior. The University of California San Diego's I- 5/Gilman Advanced Technology Bridge Project will help demonstrating the use of such materials in civil infrastructures. This paper presents an acoustic emission (AE) study performed during laboratory proof tests of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer stay-cables of possible use in the I-5/Gilman bridge. Three types of cables, both braided and single strand, were tested to failure at lengths ranging from 5500 mm to 5870 mm. AE allowed to monitor damage initiation and progression in the test pieces more accurately than the conventional load versus displacement curve. All of the cables exhibited acoustic activities revealing some degree of damage well before reaching final collapse, which is expected in FRP's. It was also shown that such cables are excellent acoustic waveguides exhibiting very low acoustic attenuation, which makes them an ideal application for an AE-based health monitoring approach.

  4. The Acid Rain Program: Monitoring the future

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, B.J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a summary of the development of the Acid Rain Program`s approach to Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) and their use in the market based pollution control program of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The roles of the regulatory agencies are discussed and projections are put forward as to how the roles will evolve over time. In addition a discussion of the activities the regulated community is expected to focus on is presented. Finally, a discussion occurs about the requirements that new technologies and instrument providers and purchasers should keep in mind about the Acid Rain Program`s monitoring requirements as they attempt to bring new products into this market.

  5. NASA LeRC's Acoustic Fill Effect Test Program and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; Mcnelis, Mark E.; Manning, Jerome E.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center, in conjunction with General Dynamics Space Systems Division, has performed a test program to investigate the acoustic fill effect for an unblanketed payload fairing for a variety of payload simulators. This paper will discuss this test program and fill factor test data, and make comparisons with theoretical predictions. This paper will also address the NASA acoustic fill effect standard which was verified from the test data analysis.

  6. Selected topics from the structural acoustics program for the B-1 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    The major elements of the structural acoustics program for the B-1 aircraft are considered. Acoustic pressures measured at 280 sites on the surface of the vehicle were used to develop pressure models for a resizing of airframe components for aircraft No. 4 (A/C4). Acoustical fatigue design data for two dynamically complex structural configurations were acquired in laboratory programs, the conceptions for and executions of which detailed significant departures from the conventional. Design requirements for mechanical fasteners for configurations other than these two made use of analytical extensions of regrettably limited available information.

  7. Wireless surface acoustic wave sensors for displacement and crack monitoring in concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, M.; McKeeman, I.; Saafi, M.; Niewczas, P.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that wireless surface acoustic wave devices can be used to monitor millimetre displacements in crack opening during the cyclic and static loading of reinforced concrete structures. Sensors were packaged to extend their gauge length and to protect them against brittle fracture, before being surface-mounted onto the tensioned surface of a concrete beam. The accuracy of measurements was verified using computational methods and optical-fibre strain sensors. After packaging, the displacement and temperature resolutions of the surface acoustic wave sensors were 10 μ {{m}} and 2 °C respectively. With some further work, these devices could be retrofitted to existing concrete structures to facilitate wireless structural health monitoring.

  8. Monitoring suspended sediment transport in an ice-affected river using acoustic Doppler current profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, S. A.; Ghareh Aghaji Zare, S.; Rennie, C. D.; Ahmari, H.; Seidou, O.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying sediment budgets and understanding the processes which control fluvial sediment transport is paramount to monitoring river geomorphology and ecological habitat. In regions that are subject to freezing there is the added complexity of ice. River ice processes impact flow distribution, water stage and sediment transport. Ice processes typically have the largest impact on sediment transport and channel morphodynamics when ice jams occur during ice cover formation and breakup. Ice jams may restrict flow and cause local acceleration when released. Additionally, ice can mechanically scour river bed and banks. Under-ice sediment transport measurements are lacking due to obvious safety and logistical reasons, in addition to a lack of adequate measurement techniques. Since some rivers can be covered in ice during six months of the year, the lack of data in winter months leads to large uncertainty in annual sediment load calculations. To address this problem, acoustic profilers are being used to monitor flow velocity, suspended sediment and ice processes in the Lower Nelson River, Manitoba, Canada. Acoustic profilers are ideal for under-ice sediment flux measurements since they can be operated autonomously and continuously, they do not disturb the flow in the zone of measurement and acoustic backscatter can be related to sediment size and concentration. In March 2012 two upward-facing profilers (1200 kHz acoustic Doppler current profiler, 546 KHz acoustic backscatter profiler) were installed through a hole in the ice on the Nelson River, 50 km downstream of the Limestone Generating Station. Data were recorded for four months, including both stable cover and breakup periods. This paper presents suspended sediment fluxes calculated from the acoustic measurements. Velocity data were used to infer the vertical distribution of sediment sizes and concentrations; this information was then used in the interpretation of the backscattered intensity data. It was found that

  9. Thermometric- and Acoustic-Based Beam Power Monitor for Ultra-Bright X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bentsen, Gregory; /Rochester U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A design for an average beam power monitor for ultra-bright X-ray sources is proposed that makes simultaneous use of calorimetry and radiation acoustics. Radiation incident on a solid target will induce heating and ultrasonic vibrations, both of which may be measured to give a fairly precise value of the beam power. The monitor is intended for measuring ultra-bright Free-Electron Laser (FEL) X-ray beams, for which traditional monitoring technologies such as photo-diodes or scintillators are unsuitable. The monitor consists of a Boron Carbide (B{sub 4}C) target designed to absorb most of the incident beam's energy. Resistance temperature detectors (RTD) and piezoelectric actuators are mounted on the outward faces of the target to measure the temperature changes and ultrasonic vibrations induced by the incident beam. The design was tested using an optical pulsed beam (780 nm, 120 and 360 Hz) from a Ti:sapphire oscillator at several energies between 0.8 and 2.6 mJ. The RTDs measured an increase in temperature of about 10 K over a period of several minutes. The piezoelectric sensors recorded ringing acoustic oscillations at 580 {+-} 40 kHz. Most importantly, the amplitude of the acoustic signals was observed to scale linearly with beam power up to 2 mJ of pulse energy. Above this pulse energy, the vibrational signals became nonlinear. Several causes for this nonlinearity are discussed, including amplifier saturation and piezoelectric saturation. Despite this nonlinearity, these measurements demonstrate the feasibility of such a beam power measurement device. The advantage of two distinct measurements (acoustic and thermometric) provides a useful method of calibration that is unavailable to current LCLS diagnostics tools.

  10. Automating the personnel dosimeter monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Compston, M.W.

    1982-12-01

    The personnel dosimetry monitoring program at the Portsmouth uranium enrichment facility has been improved by using thermoluminescent dosimetry to monitor for ionizing radiation exposure, and by automating most of the operations and all of the associated information handling. A thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) card, worn by personnel inside security badges, stores the energy of ionizing radiation. The dosimeters are changed-out periodically and are loaded 150 cards at a time into an automated reader-processor. The resulting data is recorded and filed into a useful form by computer programming developed for this purpose.

  11. Online acoustic emission monitoring of combustion turbines for compressor stator vane crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Sepandarmaz; Koduru, Jaya P.; Gonzalez, Miguel; Zarate, Boris; Godinez, Valery

    2013-03-01

    Combustion turbine components operate under extreme environmental conditions and are susceptible to failure. Turbine blades are the most susceptible components and need to be regularly inspected to assure their integrity. Undetected cracks on these blades may grow quickly due to the high fatigue loading to which they are subjected and eventually fail causing extensive damage to the turbine. Cracks in turbine blades can originate from manufacturing errors, impact damages or the due to corrosion from the aggressive environment in which they operate. The component most susceptible to failure in a combustion turbine is the mid-compressor blades. In this region, the blades experience the highest gradients in temperature and pressure. Cracks in the rotator blades can be detected by vibration monitoring; while, the stator vanes or blades cracking can only be monitored by Acoustic Emission (AE) method. The stator vanes are in contact with the external casing of the turbine and therefore, any acoustic emission activity from the blades can be captured non-intrusively by placing sensors on the turbine casing. The acoustic emission activity from cracks that are under fatigue loading is significantly higher than the background noise and hence can be captured and located accurately by a group of AE sensors. Using a total of twelve AE sensors per turbine, the crack generation and propagation in the stator vanes of the mid-compressor section is monitored continuously. The cracks appearing in the stator vanes is clearly identified and located by the AE sensors.

  12. Micro/meso scale fatigue damage accumulation monitoring using nonlinear acoustic vibro-modulation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrai, Andrei; Donskoy, Dimitri; Chudnovsky, Alexander; Golovin, Edward; Agarwala, Vinod S.

    2006-03-01

    Monitoring the incipient damage at the earliest possible stage is essential for predicting structural performance and remaining life of structural components. Existing prognostic methodologies incorporate conventional SHM and NDE techniques responsive to cracks and delaminations resulted from the irreversible material fracture and disintegration at the macro-scale. There is an increasing need for technologies that could allow for monitoring material degradation at the micro/meso scale before the onset of the macro-scale fracture. In this contribution, we report results of the real-time monitoring of the material micro/meso scale degradation using the nonlinear acoustic vibro-modulation technique. The technique explores nonlinear acoustic interaction of high frequency ultrasound and low frequency structural vibration at the site of the incipient damage. The indicator of the damage severity, nonlinear acoustic damage index (DI), was measured in real time during the strain-controlled three-point bending fatigue test of aluminum and steel specimens. Nondestructively, degradation of the specimen was revealed through the increase in the DI, which correlated well with the respective decrease in the specimen's stiffness. Destructive SEM examination confirmed sensitivity of the DI to the incipient micro/meso scale damage and advocated for utilizing the vibro-modulation approach for assessment of material degradation before fracture.

  13. An Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility for Underwater Sound Monitoring and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Huiying; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-05-31

    Fishes and other marine mammals suffer a range of potential effects from intense sound sources generated by anthropogenic underwater processes such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording devices (USR) were built to monitor the acoustic sound pressure waves generated by those anthropogenic underwater activities, so the relevant processing software becomes indispensable for analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. However, existing software packages did not meet performance and flexibility requirements. In this paper, we provide a detailed description of a new software package, named Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface (AAMI), which is a Graphical User Interface (GUI) designed for underwater sound monitoring and analysis. In addition to the general functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs, the software can compute a series of acoustic metrics in physical units, monitor the sound's influence on fish hearing according to audiograms from different species of fishes and marine mammals, and batch process the sound files. The detailed applications of the software AAMI will be discussed along with several test case scenarios to illustrate its functionality.

  14. Use of Modal Acoustic Emission to Monitor Damage Progression in Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Tows and Implications for Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess M.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Nichols, Charles T.; Wentzel, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of Modal Acoustic Emission to monitor damage progression to carbon fiber/epoxy tows. There is a risk for catastrophic failure of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) due to burst-before-leak (BBL) stress rupture (SR) failure of carbon-epoxy (C/Ep) COPVs. A lack of quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is causing problems in current and future spacecraft designs. It is therefore important to develop and demonstrate critical NDE that can be implemented during stages of the design process since the observed rupture can occur with little of no advanced warning. Therefore a program was required to develop quantitative acoustic emission (AE) procedures specific to C/Ep overwraps, but which also have utility for monitoring damage accumulation in composite structure in general, and to lay the groundwork for establishing critical thresholds for accumulated damage in composite structures, such as COPVs, so that precautionary or preemptive engineering steps can be implemented to minimize of obviate the risk of catastrophic failure. A computed Felicity Ratio (FR) coupled with fast Fourier Transform (FFT) frequency analysis shows promise as an analytical pass/fail criterion. The FR analysis and waveform and FFT analysis are reviewed

  15. A Fusion Model of Seismic and Hydro-Acoustic Propagation for Treaty Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Nimar; Prior, Mark

    2014-05-01

    We present an extension to NET-VISA (Network Processing Vertically Integrated Seismic Analysis), which is a probabilistic generative model of the propagation of seismic waves and their detection on a global scale, to incorporate hydro-acoustic data from the IMS (International Monitoring System) network. The new model includes the coupling of seismic waves into the ocean's SOFAR channel, as well as the propagation of hydro-acoustic waves from underwater explosions. The generative model is described in terms of multiple possible hypotheses -- seismic-to-hydro-acoustic, under-water explosion, other noise sources such as whales singing or icebergs breaking up -- that could lead to signal detections. We decompose each hypothesis into conditional probability distributions that are carefully analyzed and calibrated. These distributions include ones for detection probabilities, blockage in the SOFAR channel (including diffraction, refraction, and reflection around obstacles), energy attenuation, and other features of the resulting waveforms. We present a study of the various features that are extracted from the hydro-acoustic waveforms, and their correlations with each other as well the source of the energy. Additionally, an inference algorithm is presented that concurrently infers the seismic and under-water events, and associates all arrivals (aka triggers), both from seismic and hydro-acoustic stations, to the appropriate event, and labels the path taken by the wave. Finally, our results demonstrate that this fusion of seismic and hydro-acoustic data leads to very good performance. A majority of the under-water events that IDC (International Data Center) analysts built in 2010 are correctly located, and the arrivals that correspond to seismic-to-hydroacoustic coupling, the T phases, are mostly correctly identified. There is no loss in the accuracy of seismic events, in fact, there is a slight overall improvement.

  16. Aspect-Oriented Monitoring of C Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus; VanWyk, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents current work on extending ASPECTC with state machines, resulting in a framework for aspect-oriented monitoring of C programs. Such a framework can be used for testing purposes, or it can be part of a fault protection strategy. The long term goal is to explore the synergy between the fields of runtime verification, focused on program monitoring, and aspect-oriented programming, focused on more general program development issues. The work is inspired by the observation that most work in this direction has been done for JAVA, partly due to the lack of easily accessible extensible compiler frameworks for C. The work is performed using the SILVER extensible attribute grammar compiler framework, in which C has been defined as a host language. Our work consists of extending C with ASPECTC, and subsequently to extend ASPECTC with state machines.

  17. Specification and Error Pattern Based Program Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus; Johnson, Scott; Rosu, Grigore; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We briefly present Java PathExplorer (JPAX), a tool developed at NASA Ames for monitoring the execution of Java programs. JPAX can be used not only during program testing to reveal subtle errors, but also can be applied during operation to survey safety critical systems. The tool facilitates automated instrumentation of a program in order to properly observe its execution. The instrumentation can be either at the bytecode level or at the source level when the source code is available. JPaX is an instance of a more general project, called PathExplorer (PAX), which is a basis for experiments rather than a fixed system, capable of monitoring various programming languages and experimenting with other logics and analysis techniques

  18. Monitoring of Temperature Fatigue Failure Mechanism for Polyvinyl Alcohol Fiber Concrete Using Acoustic Emission Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongsheng; Cao, Hai

    2012-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission (AE) techniques to monitor the mechanism of evolution of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fiber concrete damage under temperature fatigue loading is investigated. Using the temperature fatigue test, real-time AE monitoring data of PVA fiber concrete is achieved. Based on the AE signal characteristics of the whole test process and comparison of AE signals of PVA fiber concretes with different fiber contents, the damage evolution process of PVA fiber concrete is analyzed. Finally, a qualitative evaluation of the damage degree is obtained using the kurtosis index and b-value of AE characteristic parameters. The results obtained using both methods are discussed. PMID:23012555

  19. Field trials of a tactile acoustic monitor for the profoundly deaf.

    PubMed

    Summers, I R; Peake, M A; Martin, M C

    1981-08-01

    Profoundly deaf subjects were given information about sound level in their environment by means of a body-worn unit coupled to a small vibrator worn on the finger. Results of trials on 19 adults are discussed. The Tactile Acoustic Monitor was found to be useful for identifying domestic sounds by means of their distinctive timing patterns. No significant overall improvement in subject's control of voice level was observed, although some subjects found that having a voice level monitor gave them greater confidence to join conversations. Various design improvements were suggested by the trials. Modifications which have been incorporated into an improved unit are described. PMID:7296098

  20. Volatile organic compound monitoring by photo acoustic radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1995-12-01

    Two methods for sampling and analyzing volatile organics in subsurface pore gas were developed for use at the Hazardous Waste Disposal Site at Los Alamos National Laboratory. One is Thermal Desorption Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (TDGCMS), the other is Photoacoustic Radiometry (PAR). Presented here are two years worth of experience and lessons learned as both techniques matured. The sampling technique is equally as important as the analysis method. PAR is a nondispersive infrared technique utilizing band pass filters in the region from 1 to 15 {mu}m. A commercial instrument, the Model 1302 Multigas Analyzer, made by Bruel and Kjaer, was adapted for field use. To use the PAR there must be some a priori knowledge of the constellation of analytes to be measured. The TDGCMS method is sensitive to 50 analytes. Hence TDGCMS is used in an initial survey of the site to determine what compounds are present and at what concentration. Once the major constituents of the soil-gas vapor plume are known the PAR can be configured to monitor for the five analytes of most interest. The PAR can analyse a sample in minutes, while in the field. The PAR is also quite precise in controlled situations.

  1. Monitoring Stress Changes in a Concrete Bridge with Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stähler, S.; Sens-Schönfelder, C.; Niederleithinger, E.; Pirskawetz, S.

    2009-12-01

    The sensitivity of coda waves for material changes has been demonstrated in various environments ranging form laboratory scale to regional seismology. Here we present a test for monitoring stress induced velocity variations in a concrete construction. The construction is a bridge made of reinforced concrete in Germany that is build in incremental launching method (Taktschiebe-Mode). This means that construction takes place at one end of the bridge from which the bridge is successively pushed over the pillars as the constructions continues. During the movement of the construction over the pillars the stress in the girder and the deck slab undergoes changes between 0 and 14 MPa in horizontal direction. We used seismic equipment to induce elastic waves in the deck slab of the bridge at different position of the array relative to the supporting pillars. Comparing reverberating waves in slab recorded at different stress states we can infer changes in the propagation velocity. The observed velocity change is compared to modeled stress variations in the slab. Comparison is difficult due to imprecise positioning of the array and the spatially periodic stress variations. But we can show that the observed velocity variation is in agreement with the predictions from the stress model. Samples of the concrete used in the bridge are tested under different loads in the laboratory to infer the stress-velocity relation. The experiments show that the acousto-elastic effect in the specific concrete can account for the observed velocity variations.

  2. A Device for Fetal Monitoring by Means of Control Over Cardiovascular Parameters Based on Acoustic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, L. A.; Seleznev, A. I.; Zhdanov, D. S.; Zemlyakov, I. Yu; Kiseleva, E. Yu

    2016-01-01

    The problem of monitoring fetal health is topical at the moment taking into account a reduction in the level of fertile-age women's health and changes in the concept of perinatal medicine with reconsideration of live birth criteria. Fetal heart rate monitoring is a valuable means of assessing fetal health during pregnancy. The routine clinical measurements are usually carried out by the means of ultrasound cardiotocography. Although the cardiotocography monitoring provides valuable information on the fetal health status, the high quality ultrasound devices are expensive, they are not available for home care use. The recommended number of measurement is also limited. The passive and fully non-invasive acoustic recording provides an alternative low-cost measurement method. The article describes a device for fetal and maternal health monitoring by analyzing the frequency and periodicity of heart beats by means of acoustic signal received on the maternal abdomen. Based on the usage of this device a phonocardiographic fetal telemedicine system, which will allow to reduce the antenatal fetal mortality rate significantly due to continuous monitoring over the state of fetus regardless of mother's location, can be built.

  3. Monitoring Thermal Fatigue Damage In Nuclear Power Plant Materials Using Acoustic Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Pitman, Stan G.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-04-26

    Proactive aging management of nuclear power plant passive components requires technologies to enable monitoring and accurate quantification of material condition at early stages of degradation (i.e., pre-macrocrack). Acoustic emission (AE) is well-suited to continuous monitoring of component degradation and is proposed as a method to monitor degradation during accelerated thermal fatigue tests. A key consideration is the ability to separate degradation responses from external sources such as water spray induced during thermal fatigue testing. Water spray provides a significant background of acoustic signals, which can overwhelm AE signals caused by degradation. Analysis of AE signal frequency and energy is proposed in this work as a means for separating degradation signals from background sources. Encouraging results were obtained by applying both frequency and energy filters to preliminary data. The analysis of signals filtered using frequency and energy provides signatures exhibiting several characteristics that are consistent with degradation accumulation in materials. Future work is planned to enable verification of the efficacy of AE for thermal fatigue crack initiation detection. While the emphasis has been placed on the use of AE for crack initiation detection during accelerated aging tests, this work also has implications with respect to the use of AE as a primary tool for early degradation monitoring in nuclear power plant materials. The development of NDE tools for characterization of aging in materials can also benefit from the use of a technology such as AE which can continuously monitor and detect crack initiation during accelerated aging tests.

  4. Update on the Stockpile Monitor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, T.; Harry, H.H.

    1999-04-01

    In 1991 the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) launched a program to develop a comprehensive database of warhead storage conditions. Because of the extended lifetimes expected of the Stockpile, it became desirable to obtain as much detailed information on the storage environments as possible. Temperature and relative humidity at various facilities capable of storing and/or handling nuclear weapons were used as monitoring locations. The Stockpile Monitor Program (SMP) was implemented in a variety of locations as illustrated in a figure. Probably the most useful data come from the most extreme conditions monitored. The hottest outside temperatures and relative humidities come from Barksdale, while some of the lowest relative humidity values come from Nellis, which continue to be monitored. The coldest conditions come from Grand Forks, Griffiss, and KI Sawyer, none of which are presently being monitored. For this reason, the authors would like to begin monitoring Minot, ND. The outside extreme temperatures are ameliorated by the structures to a significant degree. For example, the hottest outside temperature (120 F) is contrasted by the corresponding cooler inside temperature (85 F), and the coldest outside temperature ({minus}35 F) is contrasted by the corresponding warmer inside temperature (+25 F). These data have become useful for calculations related to stockpile-to-target sequence (STS) and other analyses. SMP information has been provided to a number of outside agencies.

  5. Crack propagation analysis using acoustic emission sensors for structural health monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems. PMID:24023536

  6. Effects of different analysis techniques and recording duty cycles on passive acoustic monitoring of killer whales.

    PubMed

    Riera, Amalis; Ford, John K; Ross Chapman, N

    2013-09-01

    Killer whales in British Columbia are at risk, and little is known about their winter distribution. Passive acoustic monitoring of their year-round habitat is a valuable supplemental method to traditional visual and photographic surveys. However, long-term acoustic studies of odontocetes have some limitations, including the generation of large amounts of data that require highly time-consuming processing. There is a need to develop tools and protocols to maximize the efficiency of such studies. Here, two types of analysis, real-time and long term spectral averages, were compared to assess their performance at detecting killer whale calls in long-term acoustic recordings. In addition, two different duty cycles, 1/3 and 2/3, were tested. Both the use of long term spectral averages and a lower duty cycle resulted in a decrease in call detection and positive pod identification, leading to underestimations of the amount of time the whales were present. The impact of these limitations should be considered in future killer whale acoustic surveys. A compromise between a lower resolution data processing method and a higher duty cycle is suggested for maximum methodological efficiency. PMID:23968036

  7. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN).more » Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems.« less

  8. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems. PMID:24023536

  9. An acoustic-array based structural health monitoring technique for wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kai; Poozesh, Peyman; Niezrecki, Christopher; Baqersad, Javad; Inalpolat, Murat; Heilmann, Gunnar

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes a non-contact measurement technique for health monitoring of wind turbine blades using acoustic beamforming techniques. The technique works by mounting an audio speaker inside a wind turbine blade and observing the sound radiated from the blade to identify damage within the structure. The main hypothesis for the structural damage detection is that the structural damage (cracks, edge splits, holes etc.) on the surface of a composite wind turbine blade results in changes in the sound radiation characteristics of the structure. Preliminary measurements were carried out on two separate test specimens, namely a composite box and a section of a wind turbine blade to validate the methodology. The rectangular shaped composite box and the turbine blade contained holes with different dimensions and line cracks. An acoustic microphone array with 62 microphones was used to measure the sound radiation from both structures when the speaker was located inside the box and also inside the blade segment. A phased array beamforming technique and CLEAN-based subtraction of point spread function from a reference (CLSPR) were employed to locate the different damage types on both the composite box and the wind turbine blade. The same experiment was repeated by using a commercially available 48-channel acoustic ring array to compare the test results. It was shown that both the acoustic beamforming and the CLSPR techniques can be used to identify the damage in the test structures with sufficiently high fidelity.

  10. LOVE CANAL MONITORING PROGRAM. VOLUME 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the prime contractor activities during the monitoring phase of the Love Canal project. Since GCA Corporation was only responsible for data collection, no analytical results appear in this report. The program involved a multifaceted sampling and analytical e...

  11. 78 FR 50399 - Spectrum Monitoring Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ...In his June 2013 Executive Memorandum on Expanding America's Leadership in Wireless Innovation, President Obama directed the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) to design and conduct a pilot program to monitor spectrum usage in real time in selected communities throughout the country. NTIA's budget request to Congress for fiscal year (FY) 2014 seeks an initial......

  12. Monitoring Anthropogenic Ocean Sound from Shipping Using an Acoustic Sensor Network and a Compressive Sensing Approach.

    PubMed

    Harris, Peter; Philip, Rachel; Robinson, Stephen; Wang, Lian

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring ocean acoustic noise has been the subject of considerable recent study, motivated by the desire to assess the impact of anthropogenic noise on marine life. A combination of measuring ocean sound using an acoustic sensor network and modelling sources of sound and sound propagation has been proposed as an approach to estimating the acoustic noise map within a region of interest. However, strategies for developing a monitoring network are not well established. In this paper, considerations for designing a network are investigated using a simulated scenario based on the measurement of sound from ships in a shipping lane. Using models for the sources of the sound and for sound propagation, a noise map is calculated and measurements of the noise map by a sensor network within the region of interest are simulated. A compressive sensing algorithm, which exploits the sparsity of the representation of the noise map in terms of the sources, is used to estimate the locations and levels of the sources and thence the entire noise map within the region of interest. It is shown that although the spatial resolution to which the sound sources can be identified is generally limited, estimates of aggregated measures of the noise map can be obtained that are more reliable compared with those provided by other approaches. PMID:27011187

  13. Strategies for rock slope failure early warning using acoustic emission monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codeglia, D.; Dixon, N.; Fowmes, G. J.; Marcato, G.

    2015-09-01

    Research over the last two decades has led to development of a system for soil slopes monitoring based on the concept of measuring Acoustic Emission (AE). A feature of the system is the use of waveguides installed within unstable soil slopes. It has been demonstrated that the AE measured through this technique are proportional to soil displacement rate. Attention has now been focused on the prospect of using the system within rock materials. The different nature of the slope material to be monitored and its setting means that different acoustic trends are measured, and development of new approaches for their interpretation are required. A total of six sensors have been installed in two pilot sites, firstly in Italy, for monitoring of a stratified limestone slope which can threaten a nationally important road, and secondly in Austria, for monitoring of a conglomerate slope that can endanger a section of the local railway. In this paper an outline of the two trial sites is given and AE data collected are compared with other physical measurements (i.e. rainfall and temperature) and traditional geotechnical instrumentation, to give an overview of recurring AE trends. These include clear AE signatures generated by stress changes linked to increased ground water levels and high energy events generated by freeze-thaw of the rock mass.

  14. Deep-water riser fatigue monitoring systems based on acoustic telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baojun; Wang, Haiyan; Shen, Xiaohong; Yan, Yongsheng; Yang, Fuzhou; Hua, Fei

    2014-12-01

    Marine risers play a key role in the deep and ultra-deep water oil and gas production. The vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of marine risers constitutes an important problem in deep water oil exploration and production. VIV will result in high rates of structural failure of marine riser due to fatigue damage accumulation and diminishes the riser fatigue life. In-service monitoring or full scale testing is essential to improve our understanding of VIV response and enhance our ability to predict fatigue damage. One marine riser fatigue acoustic telemetry scheme is proposed and an engineering prototype machine has been developed to monitor deep and ultra-deep water risers' fatigue and failure that can diminish the riser fatigue life and lead to economic losses and eco-catastrophe. Many breakthroughs and innovation have been achieved in the process of developing an engineering prototype machine. Sea trials were done on the 6th generation deep-water drilling platform HYSY-981 in the South China Sea. The inclination monitoring results show that the marine riser fatigue acoustic telemetry scheme is feasible and reliable and the engineering prototype machine meets the design criterion and can match the requirements of deep and ultra-deep water riser fatigue monitoring. The rich experience and field data gained in the sea trial which provide much technical support for optimization in the engineering prototype machine in the future.

  15. Usefulness of Acoustic Monitoring of Respiratory Rate in Patients Undergoing Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Shingo; Nakae, Hirohiko; Imai, Jin; Sawamoto, Kana; Kijima, Maiko; Tsukune, Yoko; Uchida, Tetsufumi; Igarashi, Muneki; Koike, Jun; Matsushima, Masashi; Suzuki, Toshiyasu; Mine, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The study assessed the usefulness of a recently developed method for respiratory rate (RR) monitoring in patients undergoing endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) under deep sedation. Methods. Study subjects comprised 182 consecutive patients with esophageal cancer or gastric cancer undergoing ESD. The usefulness of acoustic RR monitoring was assessed by retrospectively reviewing the patients' records for age, gender, height, weight, past history, serum creatinine, RR before ESD, and total dose of sedative. Results. Respiratory suppression was present in 37.9% of (69/182) patients. Continuous monitoring of RR led to detection of respiratory suppression in all these patients. RR alone was decreased in 24 patients, whereas both RR and blood oxygen saturation were decreased in 45 patients. Univariate analysis showed female gender, height, weight, and RR before treatment to be significantly associated with respiratory suppression. Multivariate analysis showed RR before treatment to be the only significant independent predictor [odds ratio (OR) 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73–0.95, and P = 0.006] of respiratory suppression. Conclusion. In this study, the difference in RR before treatment between patients with and without respiratory suppression was subtle. Therefore, we suggest that acoustic RR monitoring should be considered in patients undergoing ESD under sedation to prevent serious respiratory complications. PMID:26858748

  16. Environmental monitoring and assessment program forest health monitoring quality assurance project plan for detection monitoring project

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, S.P.; Alexander, S.A.; Barnard, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    The Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAP) is written specifically for the Detection Minitoring project of the interagency Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) program. Sections 1 through 3 briefly explain key features of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP), the FHM program, and their interrelationship, respectively. Section 4 describes the general quality assurance (QA) requirements for the FHM Detection Monitoring project. Section 5 contains the separate QAPs for each forest condition indicator: site condition and tree growth and regeneration, tree crown condition, tree damage assessment, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), vegetation structure, ozone bioindicator plants, and lichen communities.

  17. Acoustic emission technique for monitoring the pyrolysis of composites for process control.

    PubMed

    Tittmann, B R; Yen, C E

    2008-11-01

    Carbonization is the first step in the heat and pressure treatment (pyrolysis) of composites in preparing carbon-carbon parts. These find many uses, including aircraft brakes, rocket nozzles and medical implants. This paper describes the acoustic emissions (AE) from various stages of the manufacturing process of carbon-carbon composites. This process involves carbonization at a high temperature and this results in both thermal expansion and volume change (due to pyrolysis in which a sacrificial polymer matrix is converted to carbon). Importantly the resultant matrix is porous and has a network of small intra-lamina cracks. The formation of these microcracks produces AE and this paper describes how this observation can be used to monitor (and eventually control) the manufacturing process. The aim is to speed up manufacture, which is currently time-consuming. The first section of the paper describes the design of unimodal waveguides to enable the AE to propagate to a cool environment where a transducer can be located. The second part of the paper describes various experimental observations of AE under a range of process conditions. In particular, this paper presents a technique based on detecting acoustic emissions and (1) uses wire waveguides to monitor parts within the autoclave to 800 degrees C, (2) monitors microcracking during pyrolysis, (3) uses a four-level threshold to distinguish between low- and high-amplitude cracking events, (4) recognizes the occurrence of harmful delaminations, and (5) guides the control of the heating rate for optimum efficiency of the pyrolysis process. In addition, supporting data are presented of in situ measurements of porosity, weight loss, cross-ply shrinkage, and mass spectroscopy of gases emitted. The process evolution is illustrated by the use of interrupted manufacturing cycle micrographs obtained by optical, scanning acoustic (SAM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy. The technique promotes in-process monitoring and

  18. 29 CFR 97.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Monitoring and reporting program performance. 97.40 Section... Enforcement § 97.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are... and that performance goals are being achieved. Grantee monitoring must cover each program, function...

  19. 29 CFR 97.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 97.40 Section... Enforcement § 97.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are... and that performance goals are being achieved. Grantee monitoring must cover each program, function...

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM: AGRICULTURAL PROGRAM REPORT 1993

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document provides a comprehensive report on the EMAP Agricultural Lands 1993 Pilot Field Program, which was conducted in Nebraska. esults of the pilot monitoring effort are presented on land use and cover, crop productivity, and soil quality (physical, chemical, and biologic...

  1. The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-06

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1990 (July through September) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. All analytical results from third quarter 1990 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all site custodians. One or more analytes exceeded Flag 2 in 87 monitoring well series. Analytes exceeded Flat 2 for the first since 1984 in 14 monitoring well series. In addition to groundwater monitoring, EPD/EMS collected drinking water samples from SRS drinking water systems supplied by wells. The drinking water samples were analyzed for radioactive constituents.

  2. Method and apparatus for acoustically monitoring the flow of suspended solid particulate matter

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Paul D.; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring char flow in a coal gasifier system cludes flow monitor circuits which measure acoustic attenuation caused by the presence of char in a char line and provide a char flow/no flow indication and an indication of relative char density. The flow monitor circuits compute the ratio of signals in two frequency bands, a first frequency band representative of background noise, and a second higher frequency band in which background noise is attenuated by the presence of char. Since the second frequency band contains higher frequencies, the ratio can be used to provide a flow/no flow indication. The second band can also be selected so that attenuation is monotonically related to particle concentration, providing a quantitative measure of char concentration.

  3. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  4. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-10

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1991 EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  5. Institutional Conservation Program: Grants compliance monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, L.B.; Purpura, A.

    1991-09-01

    The Institutional Conservation Program (ICP) is a grant program for the States and certain eligible institutions (primarily schools and hospitals) to assist in administrating and funding energy conservation projects. These projects range from studies of building energy use conducted by engineers and architects, termed technical assistance reports, to actual acquisition and installation of equipment and materials to improve the efficiency of energy use in selected buildings. This document represents the final annual report on compliance monitoring of ICP grants and incorporates the findings of previous progress and other reports submitted under the contracts.

  6. Comparing Distribution of Harbour Porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) Derived from Satellite Telemetry and Passive Acoustic Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Rigét, Frank F.; Kyhn, Line A.; Sveegaard, Signe; Dietz, Rune; Tougaard, Jakob; Carlström, Julia A. K.; Carlén, Ida; Koblitz, Jens C.; Teilmann, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Cetacean monitoring is essential in determining the status of a population. Different monitoring methods should reflect the real trends in abundance and patterns in distribution, and results should therefore ideally be independent of the selected method. Here, we compare two independent methods of describing harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) relative distribution pattern in the western Baltic Sea. Satellite locations from 13 tagged harbour porpoises were used to build a Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) model of suitable habitats. The data set was subsampled to one location every second day, which were sufficient to make reliable models over the summer (Jun-Aug) and autumn (Sep-Nov) seasons. The modelled results were compared to harbour porpoise acoustic activity obtained from 36 static acoustic monitoring stations (C-PODs) covering the same area. The C-POD data was expressed as the percentage of porpoise positive days/hours (the number of days/hours per day with porpoise detections) by season. The MaxEnt model and C-POD data showed a significant linear relationship with a strong decline in porpoise occurrence from west to east. This study shows that two very different methods provide comparable information on relative distribution patterns of harbour porpoises even in a low density area. PMID:27463509

  7. Comparing Distribution of Harbour Porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) Derived from Satellite Telemetry and Passive Acoustic Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Lonnie; Rigét, Frank F; Kyhn, Line A; Sveegaard, Signe; Dietz, Rune; Tougaard, Jakob; Carlström, Julia A K; Carlén, Ida; Koblitz, Jens C; Teilmann, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Cetacean monitoring is essential in determining the status of a population. Different monitoring methods should reflect the real trends in abundance and patterns in distribution, and results should therefore ideally be independent of the selected method. Here, we compare two independent methods of describing harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) relative distribution pattern in the western Baltic Sea. Satellite locations from 13 tagged harbour porpoises were used to build a Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) model of suitable habitats. The data set was subsampled to one location every second day, which were sufficient to make reliable models over the summer (Jun-Aug) and autumn (Sep-Nov) seasons. The modelled results were compared to harbour porpoise acoustic activity obtained from 36 static acoustic monitoring stations (C-PODs) covering the same area. The C-POD data was expressed as the percentage of porpoise positive days/hours (the number of days/hours per day with porpoise detections) by season. The MaxEnt model and C-POD data showed a significant linear relationship with a strong decline in porpoise occurrence from west to east. This study shows that two very different methods provide comparable information on relative distribution patterns of harbour porpoises even in a low density area. PMID:27463509

  8. Damage Accumulation in Cyclically-Loaded Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    PubMed Central

    Aggelis, D. G.; Dassios, K. G.; Kordatos, E. Z.; Matikas, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    Barium osumilite (BMAS) ceramic matrix composites reinforced with SiC-Tyranno fibers are tested in a cyclic loading protocol. Broadband acoustic emission (AE) sensors are used for monitoring the occurrence of different possible damage mechanisms. Improved use of AE indices is proposed by excluding low-severity signals based on waveform parameters, rather than only threshold criteria. The application of such improvements enhances the accuracy of the indices as accumulated damage descriptors. RA-value, duration, and signal energy follow the extension cycles indicating moments of maximum or minimum strain, while the frequency content of the AE signals proves very sensitive to the pull-out mechanism. PMID:24381524

  9. Effective beam pattern of the Blainville's beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris) and implications for passive acoustic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Jessica Ward; Moretti, David; Jarvis, Susan; Tyack, Peter; Johnson, Mark

    2013-03-01

    The presence of beaked whales in mass-strandings coincident with navy maneuvers has prompted the development of methods to detect these cryptic animals. Blainville's beaked whales, Mesoplodon densirostris, produce distinctive echolocation clicks during long foraging dives making passive acoustic detection a possibility. However, performance of passive acoustic monitoring depends upon the source level, beam pattern, and clicking behavior of the whales. In this study, clicks recorded from Digital acoustic Tags (DTags) attached to four M. densirostris were linked to simultaneous recordings from an 82-hydrophone bottom-mounted array to derive the source level and beam pattern of the clicks, as steps towards estimating their detectability. The mean estimated on-axis apparent source level for the four whales was 201 dBrms97. The mean 3 dB beamwidth and directivity index, estimated from sequences of clicks directed towards the far-field hydrophones, were 13° and 23 dB, respectively. While searching for prey, Blainville's beaked whales scan their heads horizontally at a mean rate of 3.6°/s over an angular range of some +/-10°. Thus, while the DI indicates a narrow beam, the area of ensonification over a complete foraging dive is large given the combined effects of body and head movements associated with foraging. PMID:23464046

  10. Laser ablation of absorbing liquids under transparent cover: acoustical and optical monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samokhin, A. A.; Il'ichev, N. N.; Pivovarov, P. A.; Sidorin, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Phase transition induced with infrared (λ = 2920 nm and λ = 2940 nm) nanosecond laser pulses in strongly absorbing liquids (water, ethanol) under transparent solid cover is investigated with the help of acoustical and optical monitoring. LiNbO3 transducer is used for registration of pressure pulses generated in irradiated liquids. Optical signals due to scattering and specular reflection of probing optical beams are explored with the schemes involving total internal reflection and interference effects. Combination of these two optical diagnostic methods permits for the first time to show that irradiation of covered liquids leads to vapor cavity formation which is divided from the cover with thin (submicron) liquid film despite the fact that radiation intensity maximum is located just at the liquid-plate boundary. The cavity formation is due to explosive boiling which occurs when the superheated liquid reaches its superheating limit in near critical region. After the first acoustical signal, the second signal is observed with several hundreds microseconds time delay which is caused by the vapor cavity collapse. Some results of optical and acoustical diagnostics in the case of free liquid surface are also presented.

  11. Impact-acoustics-based health monitoring of tile-wall bonding integrity using principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, F.; Tso, S. K.; Hung, M. Y. Y.

    2006-06-01

    The use of the acoustic features extracted from the impact sounds for bonding integrity assessment has been extensively investigated. Nonetheless, considering the practical implementation of tile-wall non-destructive evaluation (NDE), the traditional defects classification method based directly on frequency-domain features has been of limited application because of the overlapping feature patterns corresponding to different classes whenever there is physical surface irregularity. The purpose of this paper is to explore the clustering and classification ability of principal component analysis (PCA) as applied to the impact-acoustics signature in tile-wall inspection with a view to mitigating the adverse influence of surface non-uniformity. A clustering analysis with signature acquired on sample slabs shows that impact-acoustics signatures of different bonding quality and different surface roughness are well separated into different clusters when using the first two principal components obtained. By adopting as inputs the feature vectors extracted with PCA applied, a multilayer back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN) classifier is developed for automatic health monitoring and defects classification of tile-walls. The inspection results obtained experimentally on the prepared sample slabs are presented and discussed, confirming the utility of the proposed method, particularly in dealing with tile surface irregularity.

  12. Acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB)

    DOEpatents

    O'Donnell, Matthew; Ye, Jing Yong; Norris, Theodore B.; Baker, Jr., James R.; Balogh, Lajos P.; Milas, Susanne M.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.; Hollman, Kyle W.

    2008-05-06

    An acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB) provides information which characterize material which is broken down, microbubbles in the material, and/or the microenvironment of the microbubbles. In one embodiment of the invention, femtosecond laser pulses are focused just inside the surface of a volume of aqueous solution which may include dendrimer nanocomposite (DNC) particles. A tightly focused, high frequency, single-element ultrasonic transducer is positioned such that its focus coincides axially and laterally with this laser focus. When optical breakdown occurs, a microbubble forms and a shock or pressure wave is emitted (i.e., acoustic emission). In addition to this acoustic signal, the microbubble may be actively probed with pulse-echo measurements from the same transducer. After the microbubble forms, received pulse-echo signals have an extra pulse, describing the microbubble location and providing a measure of axial microbubble size. Wavefield plots of successive recordings illustrate the generation, growth, and collapse of microbubbles due to optical breakdown. These same plots can also be used to quantify LIOB thresholds.

  13. Acoustic monitoring of laboratory faults: locating the origin of unstable slip events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkolis, Evangelos; Niemeijer, André; Spiers, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Over the past several decades, much work has been done on studying the frictional properties of fault gouges at earthquake nucleation velocities. In addition, post-experiment microstructural analyses have been performed in an attempt to link microphysical mechanisms to the observed mechanical data. However, all observations are necessarily post-mortem and it is thus difficult to directly link transients to microstructural characteristics. We are developing an acoustic monitoring system to be used in sliding experiments using a ring shear apparatus. The goal is to locate acoustic emission sources in sheared granular assemblages and link them to processes that act on microstructures responsible for the frictional stability of the simulated fault gouge. The results will be used to develop and constrain microphysical models that explain the relation of these processes to empirical friction laws, such as rate- and state-dependent friction. The acoustic monitoring setup is comprised of an array of 16 piezo-electric sensors installed on the top and bottom sides of an annular sample, at 45 degree intervals. Acoustic emissions associated with slip events can be recorded at sampling rates of up to 50 MHz, in triggered mode. Initial experiments on 0.1 to 0.2 mm and 0.4 to 0.5 mm diameter glass beads, at 1 to 5 MPa normal stress and 1 to 30 um/s load point velocity, have been conducted to estimate the sensitivity of the sensor array. Preliminary results reveal that the intensity of the audible signal is not necessarily proportional to the magnitude of the associated stress drop for constant loading conditions, and that acoustic emissions precede slip events by a small amount of time, in the order of a few milliseconds. Currently, our efforts are focused on developing a suitable source location algorithm with the aim to identify differences in the mode of (unstable) sliding for different types of materials. This will help to identify the micromechanical mechanisms operating

  14. Feasibility study of acoustic emission monitoring of pinch welding tritium reservoir fill stems at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether acoustic emission monitoring would be feasible in monitoring the solid-state resistance pinch weld used to seal tritium reservoirs at the Savannah River Site. Experiments were performed using a commercially available acoustic emission detection system, with a transducer mounted on a flat milled onto one of the pinch weld electrodes. Welds were made using a wide range of weld power, from very cold, with no metallurgical bond, to hot, with local fusion and excessive material injection into the tube bore. The tubes were drawn type 316L stainless steel. The welds were confined (anvils prevented material flow outward from the sides of the tube not being forced inward by the electrodes) and all were made using the same electrode force. The total number of ringdown counts for each weld was more correlated with weld power and bond length than total energy counts or total number of hits. The onset of large acoustic emission at higher weld power coincides with the injection of material into the tube bore, termed extrusion if arising from a solid state weld or spitting if arising from a weld with local fusion. Since large extrusions and spits, identified by radiography, cause rejection of production welds, a useful function of acoustic emission monitoring of pinch welding might be to detect the onset of extrusion or spitting. The low level of acoustic emission at production weld power levels (and below), the variability of acoustic emission at power levels causing extrusion and spitting, and the inability of acoustic emission to distinguish welds made with oxidized stems indicates that acoustic emission monitoring would not be a useful nondestructive evaluation of reservoir pinch welding at the Savannah River Site. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Near-Real-Time Acoustic Monitoring of Beaked Whales and Other Cetaceans Using a Seaglider™

    PubMed Central

    Klinck, Holger; Mellinger, David K.; Klinck, Karolin; Bogue, Neil M.; Luby, James C.; Jump, William A.; Shilling, Geoffrey B.; Litchendorf, Trina; Wood, Angela S.; Schorr, Gregory S.; Baird, Robin W.

    2012-01-01

    In most areas, estimating the presence and distribution of cryptic marine mammal species, such as beaked whales, is extremely difficult using traditional observational techniques such as ship-based visual line transect surveys. Because acoustic methods permit detection of animals underwater, at night, and in poor weather conditions, passive acoustic observation has been used increasingly often over the last decade to study marine mammal distribution, abundance, and movements, as well as for mitigation of potentially harmful anthropogenic effects. However, there is demand for new, cost-effective tools that allow scientists to monitor areas of interest autonomously with high temporal and spatial resolution in near-real time. Here we describe an autonomous underwater vehicle – a glider – equipped with an acoustic sensor and onboard data processing capabilities to passively scan an area for marine mammals in near-real time. The glider was tested extensively off the west coast of the Island of Hawai'i, USA. The instrument covered approximately 390 km during three weeks at sea and collected a total of 194 h of acoustic data. Detections of beaked whales were successfully reported to shore in near-real time. Manual analysis of the recorded data revealed a high number of vocalizations of delphinids and sperm whales. Furthermore, the glider collected vocalizations of unknown origin very similar to those made by known species of beaked whales. The instrument developed here can be used to cost-effectively screen areas of interest for marine mammals for several months at a time. The near-real-time detection and reporting capabilities of the glider can help to protect marine mammals during potentially harmful anthropogenic activities such as seismic exploration for sub-sea fossil fuels or naval sonar exercises. Furthermore, the glider is capable of under-ice operation, allowing investigation of otherwise inaccessible polar environments that are critical habitats for many

  16. Near-real-time acoustic monitoring of beaked whales and other cetaceans using a Seaglider™.

    PubMed

    Klinck, Holger; Mellinger, David K; Klinck, Karolin; Bogue, Neil M; Luby, James C; Jump, William A; Shilling, Geoffrey B; Litchendorf, Trina; Wood, Angela S; Schorr, Gregory S; Baird, Robin W

    2012-01-01

    In most areas, estimating the presence and distribution of cryptic marine mammal species, such as beaked whales, is extremely difficult using traditional observational techniques such as ship-based visual line transect surveys. Because acoustic methods permit detection of animals underwater, at night, and in poor weather conditions, passive acoustic observation has been used increasingly often over the last decade to study marine mammal distribution, abundance, and movements, as well as for mitigation of potentially harmful anthropogenic effects. However, there is demand for new, cost-effective tools that allow scientists to monitor areas of interest autonomously with high temporal and spatial resolution in near-real time. Here we describe an autonomous underwater vehicle--a glider--equipped with an acoustic sensor and onboard data processing capabilities to passively scan an area for marine mammals in near-real time. The glider was tested extensively off the west coast of the Island of Hawai'i, USA. The instrument covered approximately 390 km during three weeks at sea and collected a total of 194 h of acoustic data. Detections of beaked whales were successfully reported to shore in near-real time. Manual analysis of the recorded data revealed a high number of vocalizations of delphinids and sperm whales. Furthermore, the glider collected vocalizations of unknown origin very similar to those made by known species of beaked whales. The instrument developed here can be used to cost-effectively screen areas of interest for marine mammals for several months at a time. The near-real-time detection and reporting capabilities of the glider can help to protect marine mammals during potentially harmful anthropogenic activities such as seismic exploration for sub-sea fossil fuels or naval sonar exercises. Furthermore, the glider is capable of under-ice operation, allowing investigation of otherwise inaccessible polar environments that are critical habitats for many

  17. Acoustic monitoring of gas emissions from the seafloor. Part I: quantifying the volumetric flow of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Isabelle; Scalabrin, Carla; Berger, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    Three decades of continuous ocean exploration have led us to identify subsurface fluid related processes as a key phenomenon in marine earth science research. The number of seep areas located on the seafloor has been constantly increasing with the use of multi-scale imagery techniques. Due to recent advances in transducer technology and computer processing, multibeam echosounders are now commonly used to detect submarine gas seeps escaping from the seafloor into the water column. A growing number of en- route surveys shows that sites of gas emissions escaping from the seafloor are much more numerous than previously thought. Estimating the temporal variability of the gas flow rate and volumes escaping from the seafloor has thus become a challenge of relevant interest which could be addressed by sea-floor continuous acoustic monitoring. Here, we investigate the feasibility of estimating the volumetric flow rates of gas emissions from horizontal backscattered acoustic signals. Different models based on the acoustic backscattering theory of bubbles are presented. The forward volume backscattering strength and the inversion volumetric flow rate solutions were validated with acoustic measurements from artificial gas flow rates generated in controlled sea-water tank experiments. A sensitivity analysis was carried out to investigate the behavior of the 120-kHz forward solution with respect to model input parameters (horizontal distance between transducer and bubble stream, bubble size distribution and ascent rate). The most sensitive parameter was found to be the distance of the bubble stream which can affect the volume backscattering strength by 20 dB within the horizontal range of 0-200 m. Results were used to derive the detection probability of a bubble stream for a given volume backscattering strength threshold according to different bubble flow rates and horizontal distance.

  18. 24 CFR 266.520 - Program monitoring and compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... AUTHORITIES HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY RISK-SHARING PROGRAM FOR INSURED AFFORDABLE MULTIFAMILY PROJECT LOANS Project Management and Servicing § 266.520 Program monitoring and compliance. HUD will monitor...

  19. 24 CFR 266.520 - Program monitoring and compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AUTHORITIES HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY RISK-SHARING PROGRAM FOR INSURED AFFORDABLE MULTIFAMILY PROJECT LOANS Project Management and Servicing § 266.520 Program monitoring and compliance. HUD will monitor...

  20. 24 CFR 266.520 - Program monitoring and compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... AUTHORITIES HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY RISK-SHARING PROGRAM FOR INSURED AFFORDABLE MULTIFAMILY PROJECT LOANS Project Management and Servicing § 266.520 Program monitoring and compliance. HUD will monitor...

  1. 24 CFR 266.520 - Program monitoring and compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AUTHORITIES HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY RISK-SHARING PROGRAM FOR INSURED AFFORDABLE MULTIFAMILY PROJECT LOANS Project Management and Servicing § 266.520 Program monitoring and compliance. HUD will monitor...

  2. 24 CFR 266.520 - Program monitoring and compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AUTHORITIES HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY RISK-SHARING PROGRAM FOR INSURED AFFORDABLE MULTIFAMILY PROJECT LOANS Project Management and Servicing § 266.520 Program monitoring and compliance. HUD will monitor...

  3. Drug Monitoring Programs Do Curb Overdose Deaths: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159528.html Drug Monitoring Programs Do Curb Overdose Deaths: Study Opioid epidemic demands such measures, researcher says ... News) -- Drug monitoring programs appear to help reduce deaths from prescription painkillers called opioids, a new study ...

  4. Operational Environmental Monitoring Program Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, C.J.

    1994-08-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and operational environmental monitoring performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company as it implements the Operational Environmental Monitoring program. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company in implementing the Operational Environmental Monitoring program at the Hanford Site.

  5. 10 CFR 600.240 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 600.240... Post-Award Requirements § 600.240 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by... applicable Federal requirements and that performance goals are being achieved. Grantee monitoring must...

  6. Leak detection by acoustic emissions monitoring: An experimental investigation of the acoustic properties of leaks and the attenuation characteristics of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, James F.; March, Patrick A.

    1994-05-01

    This study experimentally explored the conditions, equipment, and methodology necessary for the acoustic detection of small leaks of jet fuel (JP4) from underground storage tank (UST) systems. The study indicates that acoustic leak detection of very small leaks is feasible. In general, significant JP4 fuel leaks which occur across a 5 PSI (pounds per square inch) or greater pressure drop are acoustically active and can be detected with proper sensors and proper placement of sensors. The primary source of leak noise is turbulent flow through the leak orifice. At lower pressures, the leak flow becomes laminar, and the leak becomes virtually silent. With direct transducer contact on the pipe or tank wall and sufficient system pressure, leaks smaller than 0.1 GPH (gallons per hour) can be detected. Larger leaks can be detected through short distances in soil. However, sand, which is the most commonly used fill material for UST systems, provides significant acoustic attenuation. Consequently, waveguides must be used when monitoring distances exceeding about 1 foot of travel through sand. Sand acts to reduce background noise levels, providing an ideal environment for acoustic leak detection using sensors mounted directly on the pipe or tank wall.

  7. Use of Acoustic Emission to Monitor Progressive Damage Accumulation in Kevlar (R) 49 Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess M.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Andrade, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during intermittent load hold tensile testing of epoxy impregnated Kevlar(Registeres TradeMark) 49 (K/Ep) composite strands were analyzed to monitor progressive damage during the approach to tensile failure. Insight into the progressive damage of K/Ep strands was gained by monitoring AE event rate and energy. Source location based on energy attenuation and arrival time data was used to discern between significant AE attributable to microstructural damage and spurious AE attributable to noise. One of the significant findings was the observation of increasing violation of the Kaiser effect (Felicity ratio < 1.0) with damage accumulation. The efficacy of three different intermittent load hold stress schedules that allowed the Felicity ratio to be determined analytically is discussed.

  8. Towards a global terrestrial species monitoring program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmeller, Dirk S.; Julliard, Romain; Bellingham, Peter J.; Böhm, Monika; Brummitt, Neil; Chiarucci, Alessandro; Couvet, Denis; Elmendorf, Sarah; Forsyth, David M.; Moreno, Jaime García; Gregory, Richard D.; Magnusson, William E.; Martin, Laura J.; McGeoch, Melodie A.; Mihoub, Jean-Baptiste; Pereira, Henrique M.; Proença, Vânia; van Swaay, Chris A.M.; Yahara, Tetsukazu; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The Convention for Biological Diversity’s (CBD) Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 envisions that “By 2050, biodiversity is valued, conserved, restored and wisely used, maintaining ecosystem services, sustaining a healthy planet and delivering benefits essential for all people.” Although 193 parties have adopted these goals, there is little infrastructure in place to monitor global biodiversity trends. Recent international conservation policy requires such data to be up-to-date, reliable, comparable among sites, relevant, and understandable; as is becoming obvious from the work plan adopted by the Intergovernmental Panel for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES: www.ipbes.net/; http://tinyurl.com/ohdnknq). In order to meet the five strategic goals of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 and its 20 accompanying Aichi Targets for 2020 (www.cbd.int/sp/targets/), advances need to be made in coordinating large-scale biodiversity monitoring and linking these with environmental data to develop a comprehensive Global Observation Network, as is the main idea behind GEOSS the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (Christian 2005)...Here we identify ten requirements important for the successful implementation of a global biodiversity monitoring network under the flag of GEO BON and especially a global terrestrial species monitoring program.

  9. Acoustic emission-based condition monitoring methods: Review and application for low speed slew bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caesarendra, Wahyu; Kosasih, Buyung; Tieu, Anh Kiet; Zhu, Hongtao; Moodie, Craig A. S.; Zhu, Qiang

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an acoustic emission-based method for the condition monitoring of low speed reversible slew bearings. Several acoustic emission (AE) hit parameters as the monitoring parameters for the detection of impending failure of slew bearings are reviewed first. The review focuses on: (1) the application of AE in typical rolling element bearings running at different speed classifications, i.e. high speed (>600 rpm), low speed (10-600 rpm) and very low speed (<10 rpm); (2) the commonly used AE hit parameters in rolling element bearings and (3) AE signal processing, feature extraction and pattern recognition methods. In the experiment, impending failure of the slew bearing was detected by the AE hit parameters after the new bearing had run continuously for approximately 15 months. The slew bearing was then dismantled and the evidence of the early defect was analysed. Based on the result, we propose a feature extraction method of the AE waveform signal using the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) algorithm and demonstrate that the LLE feature can detect the sign of failure earlier than the AE hit parameters with improved prediction of the progressive trend of the defect.

  10. Acoustic emission monitoring of a wind turbine blade during a fatigue test

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    A fatigue test of a wind turbine blade was conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in the fall of 1994. Acoustic emission monitoring of the test was performed, starting with the second loading level. The acoustic emission data indicated that this load exceeded the strength of the blade. From the first cycle at the new load, an oil can type of deformation occurred in two areas of the upper skin of the blade. One of these was near the blade root and the other was about the middle of the tested portion of the blade. The emission monitoring indicated that no damage was taking place in the area near the root, but in the deforming area near the middle of the blade, damage occurred from the first cycles at the higher load. The test was stopped after approximately one day and the blade was declared destroyed, although no gross damage had occurred. Several weeks later the test was resumed, to be continued until gross damage occurred. The upper skin tore approximately one half hour after the cycling was restarted.

  11. Monitoring accelerated carbonation on standard Portland cement mortar by nonlinear resonance acoustic test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiras, J. N.; Kundu, T.; Popovics, J. S.; Monzó, J.; Borrachero, M. V.; Payá, J.

    2015-03-01

    Carbonation is an important deleterious process for concrete structures. Carbonation begins when carbon dioxide (CO2) present in the atmosphere reacts with portlandite producing calcium carbonate (CaCO3). In severe carbonation conditions, C-S-H gel is decomposed into silica gel (SiO2.nH2O) and CaCO3. As a result, concrete pore water pH decreases (usually below 10) and eventually steel reinforcing bars become unprotected from corrosion agents. Usually, the carbonation of the cementing matrix reduces the porosity, because CaCO3 crystals (calcite and vaterite) occupy more volume than portlandite. In this study, an accelerated carbonation-ageing process is conducted on Portland cement mortar samples with water to cement ratio of 0.5. The evolution of the carbonation process on mortar is monitored at different levels of ageing until the mortar is almost fully carbonated. A nondestructive technique based on nonlinear acoustic resonance is used to monitor the variation of the constitutive properties upon carbonation. At selected levels of ageing, the compressive strength is obtained. From fractured surfaces the depth of carbonation is determined with phenolphthalein solution. An image analysis of the fractured surfaces is used to quantify the depth of carbonation. The results from resonant acoustic tests revealed a progressive increase of stiffness and a decrease of material nonlinearity.

  12. Laser tattoo removal as an ablation process monitored by acoustical and optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cencič, Boris; Gregorčič, Peter; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2013-07-01

    Strength of the laser-tissue interaction varies even within a single tattoo because of the inhomogeneous distribution of the tattoo pigment embedded in the skin. A monitoring system is therefore developed for simultaneous monitoring of the laser tattoo removal process based on acoustical and optical techniques. A laser-beam-deflection probe is used for measuring the acoustical signals accompanying the breakdown, and a CCD camera captures the level and the spatial distribution of the plasma radiation. Using these methods we examine the degree of excitation-pulse absorption within the pigment and the degree of the structural changes of the skin. A Nd:YAG laser with a top-hat beam profile, designed for tattoo removal, is used as the excitation source in our experiments. Special attention is given to structural changes in the skin, which depend on the applied fluence. Tattoo removal with multiple pulses is also analyzed. Experiments are made in vitro (skin phantoms) and ex vivo (marking tattoos on the pig skin). The presented results are important for the understanding and optimization of the process used in medical therapies.

  13. C-Coupon Studies of SiC/SiC Composites. Part 1; Acoustic Emission Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Hurwitz, Frances I.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Modal acoustic emission (AE) was used to monitor the acoustic activity during room temperature and elevated temperature c-coupon tests for a variety of SiC/SiC systems including composites containing Sylramic (trademark), ZMI (trademark), or Hi-Nicalon (trademark) fibers with melt-infiltrated or polymer-infiltrated SiC matrices. Modal AE proved excellent at monitoring matrix cracking in the curved portion of the C-coupon specimen with increasing load. This included the load at which the first AE event occurred and the location of AE events during the test that were, presumably, caused by the formation and growth of interlaminar cracks and, at higher loads, transverse cracks. Graphical techniques were employed to estimate the load for first AE. It was determined that for this test with these material systems, the first AE could be estimated within the load range bounded by the load at which initial deviation from linearity of the load-displacement curve occurs and the load where the 98% offset of the linear regression fit intercepted the load-displacement curve. The calculation of interlaminar tensile (ILT) stress from the load for first AE was determined for all the systems. Ultimate ILT strength usually corresponded to ILT stress determined from the ultimate load to failure of the C-coupon test, which was considerably higher than the first cracking stress.

  14. A portable Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopic system for the identification and environmental monitoring of algal cells.

    PubMed

    Wood, Bayden R; Heraud, Philip; Stojkovic, Slobodanka; Morrison, Danielle; Beardall, John; McNaughton, Don

    2005-08-01

    We report the coupling of a portable Raman spectrometer to an acoustic levitation device to enable environmental monitoring and the potential taxonomic identification of microalgae. Spectra of living cells were recorded at 785 nm using a fiber-optic probe coupled to a portable Raman spectrometer. The spectra exhibit an excellent signal-to-noise ratio and clearly show bands from chlorophyll a and beta-carotene. Spectra of levitated photobleached microalgae clearly show a reduction in chlorophyll a concentration relative to beta-carotene after 10 min of exposure to a quartz halogen lamp. Spectra recorded from levitated nitrogen-limited cells also show a significant reduction in bands associated with chlorophyll a, as compared to nitrogen-replete cells. To investigate the diagnostic capability of the technique, four species of microalgae were analyzed. Good quality spectra of all four species were obtained showing varying ratios of beta-carotene to chlorophyll. The combination of an acoustic levitation device and a portable Raman spectrometer shows potential as a taxonomic and environmental monitoring tool with direct application to field studies in remote environments. PMID:16053309

  15. 29 CFR 1470.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the day-to-day... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 1470.40... achieved. Grantee monitoring must cover each program, function or activity. (b) Nonconstruction...

  16. Acoustic emission (AE) health monitoring of diaphragm type couplings using neural network analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez-Azcuaga, Valery F.; Shu, Fong; Finlayson, Richard D.; O'Donnell, Bruce

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the latest results obtained from Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring and detection of cracks and/or damage in diaphragm couplings, which are used in some aircraft and engine drive systems. Early detection of mechanical failure in aircraft drive train components is a key safety and economical issue with both military and civil sectors of aviation. One of these components is the diaphragm-type coupling, which has been evaluated as the ideal drive coupling for many application requirements such as high speed, high torque, and non-lubrication. Its flexible axial and angular displacement capabilities have made it indispensable for aircraft drive systems. However, diaphragm-type couplings may develop cracks during their operation. The ability to monitor, detect, identify, and isolate coupling cracks on an operational aircraft system is required in order to provide sufficient advance warning to preclude catastrophic failure. It is known that metallic structures generate characteristic Acoustic Emission (AE) during crack growth/propagation cycles. This phenomenon makes AE very attractive among various monitoring techniques for fault detection in diaphragm-type couplings. However, commercially available systems capable of automatic discrimination between signals from crack growth and normal mechanical noise are not readily available. Positive classification of signals requires experienced personnel and post-test data analysis, which tend to be a time-consuming, laborious, and expensive process. With further development of automated classifiers, AE can become a fully autonomous fault detection technique requiring no human intervention after implementation. AE has the potential to be fully integrated with automated query and response mechanisms for system/process monitoring and control.

  17. Passive acoustic monitoring of coastally associated Hawaiian spinner dolphins, Stenella longirostris, ground-truthed through visual surveys.

    PubMed

    Heenehan, Heather L; Tyne, Julian A; Bejder, Lars; Van Parijs, Sofie M; Johnston, David W

    2016-07-01

    Effective decision making to protect coastally associated dolphins relies on monitoring the presence of animals in areas that are critical to their survival. Hawaiian spinner dolphins forage at night and rest during the day in shallow bays. Due to their predictable presence, they are targeted by dolphin-tourism. In this study, comparisons of presence were made between passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) and vessel-based visual surveys in Hawaiian spinner dolphin resting bays. DSG-Ocean passive acoustic recording devices were deployed in four bays along the Kona Coast of Hawai'i Island between January 8, 2011 and August 30, 2012. The devices sampled at 80 kHz, making 30-s recordings every four minutes. Overall, dolphins were acoustically detected on 37.1% to 89.6% of recording days depending on the bay. Vessel-based visual surveys overlapped with the PAM surveys on 202 days across the four bays. No significant differences were found between visual and acoustic detections suggesting acoustic surveys can be used as a proxy for visual surveys. Given the need to monitor dolphin presence across sites, PAM is the most suitable and efficient tool for monitoring long-term presence/absence. Concomitant photo-identification surveys are necessary to address changes in abundance over time. PMID:27475147

  18. Acoustic Methods to Monitor Protein Crystallization and to Detect Protein Crystals in Suspensions of Agarose and Lipidic Cubic Phase.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Daniel L; Yin, Xingyu; Scalia, Alexander; Samara, Yasmin N; Stearns, Richard; Vlahos, Harry; Ellson, Richard; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2016-02-01

    Improvements needed for automated crystallography include crystal detection and crystal harvesting. A technique that uses acoustic droplet ejection to harvest crystals was previously reported. Here a method is described for using the same acoustic instrument to detect protein crystals and to monitor crystal growth. Acoustic pulses were used to monitor the progress of crystallization trials and to detect the presence and location of protein crystals. Crystals were detected, and crystallization was monitored in aqueous solutions and in lipidic cubic phase. Using a commercially available acoustic instrument, crystals measuring ~150 µm or larger were readily detected. Simple laboratory techniques were used to increase the sensitivity to 50 µm by suspending the crystals away from the plastic surface of the crystallization plate. This increased the sensitivity by separating the strong signal generated by the plate bottom that can mask the signal from small protein crystals. It is possible to further boost the acoustic reflection from small crystals by reducing the wavelength of the incident sound pulse, but our current instrumentation does not allow this option. In the future, commercially available sound-emitting transducers with a characteristic frequency near 300 MHz should detect and monitor the growth of individual 3 µm crystals. PMID:26574563

  19. Seismic and Acoustic Array Monitoring of Signal from Tungurahua Volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terbush, B. R.; Anthony, R. E.; Johnson, J. B.; Ruiz, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Tungurahua Volcano is an active stratovolcano located in Ecuador's eastern Cordillera. Since its most recent cycle of eruptive activity, beginning in 1999, it has produced both strombolian-to-vulcanian eruptions, and regular vapor emissions. Tungurahua is located above the city of Baños, so volcanic activity is well-monitored by Ecuador's Instituto Geofisico Nacional with a seismic and infrasound network, and other surveillance tools. Toward better understanding of the complex seismic and acoustic signals associated with low-level Tungurahua activity, and which are often low in signal-to-noise, we deployed temporary seismo-acoustic arrays between June 9th and 20th in 2012. This deployment was part of a Field Volcano Geophysics class, a collaboration between New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the Escuela Politecnica Nacional's Instituto Geofísico in Ecuador. Two six-element arrays were deployed on the flank of the volcano. A seismo-acoustic array, which consisted of combined broadband seismic and infrasound sensors, possessed 100-meter spacing, and was deployed five kilometers north of the vent in an open field at 2700 m. The second array had only acoustic sensors with 30-meter spacing, and was deployed approximately six kilometers northwest of the vent, on an old pyroclastic flow deposit. The arrays picked up signals from four distinct explosion events, a number of diverse tremor signals, local volcano tectonic and long period earthquakes, and a regional tectonic event of magnitude 4.9. Coherency of both seismic and acoustic array data was quantified using Fisher Statistics, which was effective for identifying myriad signals. For most signals Fisher Statistics were particularly high in low frequency bands, between 0.5 and 2 Hz. Array analyses helped to filter out noise induced by cultural sources and livestock signals, which were particularly pronounced in the deployment site. Volcan Tungurahua sources were considered plane wave signals and could

  20. Energy monitoring and analysis during deformation of bedded-sandstone: use of acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Wasantha, P L P; Ranjith, P G; Shao, S S

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the mechanical behaviour and energy releasing characteristics of bedded-sandstone with bedding layers in different orientations, under uniaxial compression. Cylindrical sandstone specimens (54 mm diameter and 108 mm height) with bedding layers inclined at angles of 10°, 20°, 35°, 55°, and 83° to the minor principal stress direction, were produced to perform a series of Uniaxial Compressive Strength (UCS) tests. One of the two identical sample sets was fully-saturated with water before testing and the other set was tested under dry conditions. An acoustic emission system was employed in all the testing to monitor the acoustic energy release during the whole deformation process of specimens. From the test results, the critical joint orientation was observed as 55° for both dry and saturated samples and the peak-strength losses due to water were 15.56%, 20.06%, 13.5%, 13.2%, and 13.52% for the bedding orientations 10°, 20°, 35°, 55°, and 83°, respectively. The failure mechanisms for the specimens with bedding layers in 10°, 20° orientations showed splitting type failure, while the specimens with bedding layers in 55°, 83° orientations were failed by sliding along a weaker bedding layer. The failure mechanism for the specimens with bedding layers in 35° orientation showed a mixed failure mode of both splitting and sliding types. Analysis of the acoustic energy, captured from the acoustic emission detection system, revealed that the acoustic energy release is considerably higher in dry specimens than that of the saturated specimens at any bedding orientation. In addition, higher energy release was observed for specimens with bedding layers oriented in shallow angles (which were undergoing splitting type failures), whereas specimens with steeply oriented bedding layers (which were undergoing sliding type failures) showed a comparatively less energy release under both dry and saturated conditions. Moreover, a considerable amount of

  1. Program for the feasibility of developing a high pressure acoustic levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rey, Charles A.; Merkley, Dennis R.; Hammarlund, Gregory R.

    1988-01-01

    This is the final report for the program for the feasibility of developing a high-pressure acoustic levitator (HPAL). It includes work performed during the period from February 15, 1987 to October 26, 1987. The program was conducted for NASA under contract number NAS3-25115. The HPAL would be used for containerless processing of materials in the 1-g Earth environment. Results show that the use of increased gas pressure produces higher sound pressure levels. The harmonics produced by the acoustic source are also reduced. This provides an improvement in the capabilities of acoustic levitation in 1-g. The reported processing capabilities are directly limited by the design of the Medium Pressure Acoustic Levitator used for this study. Data show that sufficient acoustic intensities can be obtained to levitate and process a specimen of density 5 g/cu cm at 1500 C. However, it is recommended that a working engineering model of the HPAL be developed. The model would be used to establish the maximum operating parameters of furnace temperature and sample density.

  2. A multi path, weather independent avalanche monitoring tool using distributed acoustic fiber optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, Alexander; Wirbel, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Information on avalanche activity is a paramount parameter in avalanche forecasting. When avalanches are released spontaneously, the risk of avalanches is very high. Triggering avalanches by artificial means, such as explosives launched from helicopter or avalanche towers, can also give information on the stability of the snow pack. Hence, monitoring of avalanches released naturally or artificially, is an important quantity in avalanche forecasting. This information is also needed when deciding whether to close or not endangered ski runs, roads or railway lines. So far monitoring systems lack certain benefits. Either they monitor only large avalanches, can only be used for single avalanche tracks or are weather/sight dependant. Therefore a new tool for avalanche- monitoring, a distributed fiber optic system, is for the first time installed and adapted for the purpose of monitoring snow avalanche activity. The method is based on an optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) system, which dates back to the 1970`s and detects seismic vibrations and acoustic signals on a fiber optic cable that can have a length of up to 30 km. An appropriate test slope for this configuration has been found in the ski area of "Lech am Arlberg". In this work a detailed description of the theoretical background, the system implementation, the field installation, realization of tests and an investigation of the recorded data is presented. We conducted 100 tests and triggered 41 avalanches so far with a runout distances ranging from a few meters to approximately 250 meters, all of which were detected by the system, as well as the 59 not successful attempts of artificial triggering. Moreover we measured properly if critical infrastructure (in our case a ski run) was reached by the avalanches or not. The spatial distributed sensing approach allowed us to relate the amplitude and spectral content of the signals to avalanche size, avalanche speed and snow properties of the avalanches. In

  3. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were

  4. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were

  5. Prenatal acoustic communication programs offspring for high posthatching temperatures in a songbird.

    PubMed

    Mariette, Mylene M; Buchanan, Katherine L

    2016-08-19

    In many species, embryos can perceive and learn external sounds. Yet, the possibility that parents may use these embryonic capacities to alter their offspring's developmental trajectories has not been considered. Here, we demonstrate that zebra finch parents acoustically signal high ambient temperatures (above 26°C) to their embryos. We show that exposure of embryos to these acoustic cues alone adaptively alters subsequent nestling begging and growth in response to nest temperature and influences individuals' reproductive success and thermal preferences as adults. These findings have implications for our understanding of maternal effects, phenotypic plasticity, developmental programming, and the adaptation of endothermic species to a warming world. PMID:27540172

  6. Sandia National Laboratories California Environmental Monitoring Program Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Robert C.

    2007-03-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Environmental Monitoring Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2006 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  7. Stress-Induced Fracturing of Reservoir Rocks: Acoustic Monitoring and μCT Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Srutarshi; Stroisz, Anna M.; Fjær, Erling; Stenebråten, Jørn F.; Lund, Hans K.; Sønstebø, Eyvind F.

    2015-11-01

    Stress-induced fracturing in reservoir rocks is an important issue for the petroleum industry. While productivity can be enhanced by a controlled fracturing operation, it can trigger borehole instability problems by reactivating existing fractures/faults in a reservoir. However, safe fracturing can improve the quality of operations during CO2 storage, geothermal installation and gas production at and from the reservoir rocks. Therefore, understanding the fracturing behavior of different types of reservoir rocks is a basic need for planning field operations toward these activities. In our study, stress-induced fracturing of rock samples has been monitored by acoustic emission (AE) and post-experiment computer tomography (CT) scans. We have used hollow cylinder cores of sandstones and chalks, which are representatives of reservoir rocks. The fracture-triggering stress has been measured for different rocks and compared with theoretical estimates. The population of AE events shows the location of main fracture arms which is in a good agreement with post-test CT image analysis, and the fracture patterns inside the samples are visualized through 3D image reconstructions. The amplitudes and energies of acoustic events clearly indicate initiation and propagation of the main fractures. Time evolution of the radial strain measured in the fracturing tests will later be compared to model predictions of fracture size.

  8. Monitoring and Failure Analysis of Corroded Bridge Cables under Fatigue Loading Using Acoustic Emission Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping; Lan, Chengming; Li, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Cables play an important role in cable-stayed systems, but are vulnerable to corrosion and fatigue damage. There is a dearth of studies on the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cable. In the present study, the acoustic emission (AE) technology is adopted to monitor the fatigue damage evolution process. First, the relationship between stress and strain is determined through a tensile test for corroded and non-corroded steel wires. Results show that the mechanical performance of corroded cables is changed considerably. The AE characteristic parameters for fatigue damage are then established. AE energy cumulative parameters can accurately describe the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cables. The failure modes in each phase as well as the type of acoustic emission source are determined based on the results of scanning electron microscopy. The waveform characteristics, damage types, and frequency distribution of the corroded cable at different damage phases are collected. Finally, the number of broken wires and breakage time of the cables are determined according to the variation in the margin index. PMID:22666009

  9. Passive wireless surface acoustic wave sensors for monitoring sequestration sites CO2 emission

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yizhong; Chyu, Minking; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2013-02-14

    University of Pittsburgh’s Transducer lab has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient CO2 measuring technologies for geological sequestration sites leakage monitoring. A passive wireless CO2 sensing system based on surface acoustic wave technology and carbon nanotube nanocomposite was developed. Surface acoustic wave device was studied to determine the optimum parameters. Delay line structure was adopted as basic sensor structure. CNT polymer nanocomposite was fabricated and tested under different temperature and strain condition for natural environment impact evaluation. Nanocomposite resistance increased for 5 times under pure strain, while the temperature dependence of resistance for CNT solely was -1375ppm/°C. The overall effect of temperature on nanocomposite resistance was -1000ppm/°C. The gas response of the nanocomposite was about 10% resistance increase under pure CO2 . The sensor frequency change was around 300ppm for pure CO2 . With paralyne packaging, the sensor frequency change from relative humidity of 0% to 100% at room temperature decreased from over 1000ppm to less than 100ppm. The lowest detection limit of the sensor is 1% gas concentration, with 36ppm frequency change. Wireless module was tested and showed over one foot transmission distance at preferred parallel orientation.

  10. Monitoring and failure analysis of corroded bridge cables under fatigue loading using acoustic emission sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping; Lan, Chengming; Li, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Cables play an important role in cable-stayed systems, but are vulnerable to corrosion and fatigue damage. There is a dearth of studies on the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cable. In the present study, the acoustic emission (AE) technology is adopted to monitor the fatigue damage evolution process. First, the relationship between stress and strain is determined through a tensile test for corroded and non-corroded steel wires. Results show that the mechanical performance of corroded cables is changed considerably. The AE characteristic parameters for fatigue damage are then established. AE energy cumulative parameters can accurately describe the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cables. The failure modes in each phase as well as the type of acoustic emission source are determined based on the results of scanning electron microscopy. The waveform characteristics, damage types, and frequency distribution of the corroded cable at different damage phases are collected. Finally, the number of broken wires and breakage time of the cables are determined according to the variation in the margin index. PMID:22666009

  11. Final Report: Guided Acoustic Wave Monitoring of Corrosion in Recovery Boiler Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, D J; Quarry, M J; Rose, J L

    2005-03-31

    Corrosion of tubing used in black-liquor recovery boilers is a major concern in all pulp and paper mills. Extensive corrosion in recovery boiler tubes can result in a significant safety and environmental hazard. Considerable plant resources are expended to inspect recovery boiler tubing. Currently, visual and ultrasonic inspections are primarily used during the annual maintenance shutdown to monitor corrosion rates and cracking of tubing. This Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies project is developing guided acoustic waves for use on recovery boiler tubing. The feature of this acoustic technique is its cost-effectiveness in inspecting long lengths of tubes from a single inspection point. A piezoelectric or electromagnetic transducer induces guided waves into the tubes. The transducer detects fireside defects from the cold side or fireside of the tube. Cracking and thinning on recovery boiler tubes have been detected with this technique in both laboratory and field applications. This technique appears very promising for recovery boiler tube application, potentially expediting annual inspection of tube integrity.

  12. Hydraulic Fracture Propagation through Preexisting Discontinuity Monitored by Acoustic Emission and Ultrasonic Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanchits, S.; Lund, J.; Surdi, A.; Edelman, E.; Whitney, N.; Eldredge, R.; Suarez-Rivera, R.

    2011-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is critical to enhance hydrocarbon production from ultra-low permeability unconventional reservoirs, and is the common completion methodology for tight formations around the world. Unfortunately, these reservoirs are often highly heterogeneous and their heterogeneity imparts a degree of geometrical complexity in hydraulic fractures that is poorly understood. Fracture complexity (e.g. branching) results in higher surface area and could be beneficial to production provided it remains conductive. Understanding the sources and consequences of fracture complexity is thus of high importance to completion and production operations. In this study we postulate that textural complexity in tight heterogeneous formations induces fracture complexity, and that the main sources of textural complexity are associated with veins, bed boundaries, lithologic contacts, and geologic interfaces. We thus study the effect of interfaces on hydraulic fracture propagation under laboratory conditions by Acoustic Emission (AE) and Ultrasonic Transmission (UT) monitoring techniques. The experiments were conducted on low permeability sandstone blocks of 279 x 279 x 381 mm length with saw cut discontinuities oriented orthogonally to the expected direction of fracture propagation. The rock is loaded in a poly-axial test frame to representative effective in-situ stress conditions of normal and deviatoric stress. Hydraulic fracturing was initiated by injection of silicon oil into a borehole drilled off center from the block. Acoustic emission (AE) events were continuously monitored during testing using nineteen P-wave sensors. Additional sensors were installed to periodically monitor ultrasonic transmission (UT) along various directions oblique and perpendicular to the fracture and the interface. The AE and UT data were recorded using a Vallen AMSY-6 system, with 16-bit amplitude resolution and 5 MHz sampling rate. Detailed analysis of AE localizations allowed us to identify

  13. Status of OTEC environmental monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, P.

    1980-06-01

    Oceanographic studies in support of assessment and technical operations for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) have been conducted in the South Atlantic Plant-ship region and at benchmark sites off Puerto Rico, the Gulf of Mexico and off Hawaii. Data have been obtained from current meter arrays, hydrocasts, and net tows using essentially the same type of equipment, sample depths, sample frequencies, techniques and analyses to provide a uniform basis of comparison among the sites. In addition, particulate, trace metal, and radiologic studies off St. Croix, Virgin Islands and primary production bioassay experiments off Hawaii were performed to validate methods and a bottom assessment program is being developed in cooperation with the US Geological Survey for potential incorporation into the uniform sampling program. Environmental monitoring operations at the OTEC-1 site off Hawaii have been transferred to EG and G and the Hawaiian pre-site occupation program has been shifted to the Kahe Point area off the west coast of Oahu. Validated data from the OTEC cruises are on file with National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC). These data are being used with the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) developed physical models to jointly test potential ecologic models for use in pilot plant assessments. Marine geologic/oceanographic base maps and data compilation sheets were prepared for the Hawaiian and Puerto Rico-Virgin Island regions. Such sheets form a planning base for evaluation of regional characteristics and to identify areas for detailed surveys.

  14. Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering Program - Strategic Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2004-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering (NEM R&E) Program is dedicated to providing knowledge, technical expertise, and products to US agencies responsible for monitoring nuclear explosions in all environments and is successful in turning scientific breakthroughs into tools for use by operational monitoring agencies. To effectively address the rapidly evolving state of affairs, the NNSA NEM R&E program is structured around three program elements described within this strategic plan: Integration of New Monitoring Assets, Advanced Event Characterization, and Next-Generation Monitoring Systems. How the Program fits into the National effort and historical accomplishments are also addressed.

  15. 34 CFR 303.501 - Supervision and monitoring of programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supervision and monitoring of programs. 303.501 Section... INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES State Administration General § 303.501 Supervision and monitoring... supervision of programs and activities receiving assistance under this part; and (2) The monitoring...

  16. 22 CFR 226.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Recipients are responsible for managing and monitoring each... clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting performance data from recipients. ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program...

  17. 29 CFR 97.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Monitoring and reporting program performance. 97.40 Section... Enforcement § 97.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of grant and subgrant supported activities. Grantees...

  18. 24 CFR 85.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program..., Retention, and Enforcement § 85.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of grant and subgrant supported...

  19. 22 CFR 135.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance... Reports, Records, Retention, and Enforcement § 135.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of grant and...

  20. 49 CFR 18.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 18... Reports, Records, Retention, and Enforcement § 18.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of grant and...

  1. 7 CFR 3016.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 3016.40... Enforcement § 3016.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of grant and subgrant supported activities. Grantees...

  2. 43 CFR 12.80 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program... Enforcement § 12.80 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of grant and subgrant supported activities. Grantees...

  3. 10 CFR 600.240 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 600.240... Post-Award Requirements § 600.240 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of grant and subgrant...

  4. 20 CFR 437.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance... Reports, Records, Retention, and Enforcement § 437.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of grant and...

  5. 40 CFR 258.55 - Assessment monitoring program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Assessment monitoring program. 258.55 Section 258.55 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Ground-Water Monitoring and Corrective Action § 258.55 Assessment monitoring program. (a)...

  6. 40 CFR 31.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program... Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible...

  7. 29 CFR 97.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 97.40 Section... Enforcement § 97.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees...

  8. 40 CFR 31.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program... Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible...

  9. 32 CFR 33.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 33... Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible...

  10. 24 CFR 85.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program..., Retention, and Enforcement § 85.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by...

  11. 7 CFR 3016.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 3016.40... Enforcement § 3016.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees...

  12. 32 CFR 33.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 33... Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible...

  13. 43 CFR 12.80 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... performance. 12.80 Section 12.80 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior ADMINISTRATIVE... Enforcement § 12.80 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are... and that performance goals are being achieved. Grantee monitoring must cover each program, function...

  14. 40 CFR 258.54 - Detection monitoring program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Detection monitoring program. 258.54 Section 258.54 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Ground-Water Monitoring and Corrective Action § 258.54 Detection monitoring program. (a) Detection...

  15. Punch stretching process monitoring using acoustic emission signal analysis. II - Application of frequency domain deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Steven Y.; Dornfeld, David A.; Nickerson, Jackson A.

    1987-01-01

    The coloring effect on the acoustic emission signal due to the frequency response of the data acquisition/processing instrumentation may bias the interpretation of AE signal characteristics. In this paper, a frequency domain deconvolution technique, which involves the identification of the instrumentation transfer functions and multiplication of the AE signal spectrum by the inverse of these system functions, has been carried out. In this way, the change in AE signal characteristics can be better interpreted as the result of the change in only the states of the process. Punch stretching process was used as an example to demonstrate the application of the technique. Results showed that, through the deconvolution, the frequency characteristics of AE signals generated during the stretching became more distinctive and can be more effectively used as tools for process monitoring.

  16. Swept frequency acoustic interferometry technique for chemical weapons verification and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.; Anthony, B.W.; Lizon, D.C.

    1995-03-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are important for rapid on-site verification and monitoring of chemical munitions, such as artillery shells and bulk containers. Present NDE techniques provide only limited characterizations of such munitions. This paper describes the development of a novel noninvasive technique, swept-frequency acoustic interferometry (SFAI), that significantly enhances the capability of munitions characterizations. The SFAI technique allows very accurate and simultaneous determination of sound velocity and attenuation of chemical agents over a large frequency range inside artillery shells, in addition to determining agent density. The frequency-dependent sound velocity and attenuation can, in principle, provide molecular relaxation properties of the chemical agent. The same instrument also enables a direct fill-level measurement in bulk containers. Industrial and other applications of this general-purpose technique are also discussed.

  17. Fatigue damage monitoring for basalt fiber reinforced polymer composites using acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wentao; Li, Hui; Qu, Zhi

    2012-04-01

    Basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) is a structural material with superior mechanical properties. In this study, unidirectional BFRP laminates with 14 layers are made with the hand lay-up method. Then, the acoustic emission technique (AE) combined with the scanning electronic microscope (SEM) technique is employed to monitor the fatigue damage evolution of the BFRP plates in the fatigue loading tests. Time-frequency analysis using the wavelet transform technique is proposed to analyze the received AE signal instead of the peak frequency method. A comparison between AE signals and SEM images indicates that the multi-frequency peaks picked from the time-frequency curves of AE signals reflect the accumulated fatigue damage evolution and fatigue damage patterns. Furthermore, seven damage patterns, that is, matrix cracking, delamination, fiber fracture and their combinations, are identified from the time-frequency curves of the AE signals.

  18. Acoustic Emission Weld Monitoring in the 2195 Aluminum-Lithium Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Due to its low density, the 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy was developed as a replacement for alloy 2219 in the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET). The external tank is the single largest component of the space shuttle system. It is 154 feet long and 27.6 feet in diameter, and serves as the structural backbone for the shuttle during launch, absorbing most of the 7 million plus pounds of thrust produced. The almost 4% decrease in density between the two materials provides an extra 7500 pounds of payload capacity necessary to put the International Space Station components into orbit. The ET is an all-welded structure; hence, the requirement is for up to five rewelds without hot cracking. Unfortunately, hot cracking during re-welding or repair operations was occurring and had to be dealt with before the new super lightweight tank could be used. Weld metal porosity formation was also of concern because it leads to hot cracking during weld repairs. Accordingly, acoustic emission (AE) nondestructive testing was employed to monitor the formation of porosity and hot cracks in order to select the best filler metal and optimize the weld schedule. The purpose of this work is to determine the feasibility of detecting hot cracking in welded aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) structures through the analysis of acoustic emission data. By acoustically characterizing the effects of reheating during a repair operation, the potential for hidden flaws coalescing and becoming "unstable" as the panel is repaired could be reduced. Identification of regions where microcrack growth is likely to occur and the location of active flaw growth in the repair weld will provide the welder with direct feedback as to the current weld quality enabling adjustments to the repair process be made in the field. An acoustic emission analysis of the source mechanisms present during welding has been conducted with the goals of locating regions in the weld line that are susceptible to damage from a repair operation

  19. Gaussian mixture modeling of acoustic emissions for structural health monitoring of reinforced concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhidzadeh, Alireza; Dehghan-Niri, Ehsan; Salamone, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    Reinforced Concrete (RC) has been widely used in construction of infrastructures for many decades. The cracking behavior in concrete is crucial due to the harmful effects on structural performance such as serviceability and durability requirements. In general, in loading such structures until failure, tensile cracks develop at the initial stages of loading, while shear cracks dominate later. Therefore, monitoring the cracking modes is of paramount importance as it can lead to the prediction of the structural performance. In the past two decades, significant efforts have been made toward the development of automated structural health monitoring (SHM) systems. Among them, a technique that shows promises for monitoring RC structures is the acoustic emission (AE). This paper introduces a novel probabilistic approach based on Gaussian Mixture Modeling (GMM) to classify AE signals related to each crack mode. The system provides an early warning by recognizing nucleation of numerous critical shear cracks. The algorithm is validated through an experimental study on a full-scale reinforced concrete shear wall subjected to a reversed cyclic loading. A modified conventional classification scheme and a new criterion for crack classification are also proposed.

  20. Passive acoustic monitoring of beaked whale densities in the Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, John A.; Baumann-Pickering, Simone; Frasier, Kaitlin E.; Trickey, Jennifer S.; Merkens, Karlina P.; Wiggins, Sean M.; McDonald, Mark A.; Garrison, Lance P.; Harris, Danielle; Marques, Tiago A.; Thomas, Len

    2015-01-01

    Beaked whales are deep diving elusive animals, difficult to census with conventional visual surveys. Methods are presented for the density estimation of beaked whales, using passive acoustic monitoring data collected at sites in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) from the period during and following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (2010–2013). Beaked whale species detected include: Gervais’ (Mesoplodon europaeus), Cuvier’s (Ziphius cavirostris), Blainville’s (Mesoplodon densirostris) and an unknown species of Mesoplodon sp. (designated as Beaked Whale Gulf — BWG). For Gervais’ and Cuvier’s beaked whales, we estimated weekly animal density using two methods, one based on the number of echolocation clicks, and another based on the detection of animal groups during 5 min time-bins. Density estimates derived from these two methods were in good general agreement. At two sites in the western GOM, Gervais’ beaked whales were present throughout the monitoring period, but Cuvier’s beaked whales were present only seasonally, with periods of low density during the summer and higher density in the winter. At an eastern GOM site, both Gervais’ and Cuvier’s beaked whales had a high density throughout the monitoring period. PMID:26559743

  1. Monitoring of stress corrosion cracking in stainless steel weldments by acoustic and electrochemical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezu, Akio; Cho, Hideo; Takemoto, Mikio

    2006-09-01

    A new hybrid monitoring technique for chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is proposed. It uses both the acoustic emission (AE) and corrosion potential fluctuation (CPF) techniques. This paper discusses the results of SCC tests on butt-welded Type 304 stainless steel pipes. The weld pipe suffered transgranular (TG)-SCC in a concentrated magnesium chloride solution (40 mass%), but suffered intergranular (IG) attack and falling-off of grains in a heat-affected zone (HAZ) in a dilute chloride solution (35 mass%). SCC initiations in both concentrated and dilute corrodants were successfully monitored using a CPF technique. However, the CPF technique could not monitor the propagation of the SCC. This propagation could be detected using an AE technique. Secondary AE was produced by hydrogen gas evolution and by the cracking of corrosion products, and the primary AE was produced by the falling-off of grains due to the mutual actions of anodic dissolution and the mechanical fracture along a chromium-depleted zone in the grain boundary. The volume of metal loss by the dissolution was predicted from the local anodic current due to the fluctuation of the corrosion potential, and was found to correspond to the volume of the grain boundary attack. The fact that the primary AE was detected just after rapid drop (RD)-type CPF suggested that the grain boundary corrosion caused the falling-off of the grain that produced the primary AE.

  2. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  3. Validation of an acoustic location system to monitor Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii) long calls.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Brigitte; van Noordwijk, Maria A; Willems, Erik P; Mitra Setia, Tatang; Wipfli, Urs; van Schaik, Carel P

    2015-07-01

    The long call is an important vocal communication signal in the widely dispersed, semi-solitary orangutan. Long calls affect individuals' ranging behavior and mediate social relationships and regulate encounters between dispersed individuals in a dense rainforest. The aim of this study was to test the utility of an Acoustic Location System (ALS) for recording and triangulating the loud calls of free-living primates. We developed and validated a data extraction protocol for an ALS used to record wild orangutan males' long calls at the Tuanan field site (Central Kalimantan). We installed an ALS in a grid of 300 ha, containing 20 SM2+ recorders placed in a regular lattice at 500 m intervals, to monitor the distribution of calling males in the area. The validated system had the following main features: (i) a user-trained software algorithm (Song Scope) that reliably recognized orangutan long calls from sound files at distances up to 700 m from the nearest recorder, resulting in a total area of approximately 900 ha that could be monitored continuously; (ii) acoustic location of calling males up to 200 m outside the microphone grid, which meant that within an area of approximately 450 ha, call locations could be calculated through triangulation. The mean accuracy was 58 m, an error that is modest relative to orangutan mobility and average inter-individual distances. We conclude that an ALS is a highly effective method for detecting long-distance calls of wild primates and triangulating their position. In combination with conventional individual focal follow data, an ALS can greatly improve our knowledge of orangutans' social organization, and is readily adaptable for studying other highly vocal animals. PMID:25773926

  4. Examination on the use of acoustic emission for monitoring metal forging process: A study using simulation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, W.M.; Malas, J.C. III; Venugopal, S.

    1997-05-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility of using acoustic emission as a monitoring technique for metal forging operations. From the sensor development paradigm proposed by McClean et al. the most likely approach to determining feasibility for application is through signal recognition. For this reason, signature prediction and analysis was chosen to determine the suitability for forging applications.

  5. 40 CFR 258.54 - Detection monitoring program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Ground-Water Monitoring and Corrective Action § 258.54 Detection monitoring program. (a) Detection monitoring is required at MSWLF units at all ground-water monitoring wells... in the unit. (2) The Director of an approved State may establish an alternative list of...

  6. 40 CFR 258.54 - Detection monitoring program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Ground-Water Monitoring and Corrective Action § 258.54 Detection monitoring program. (a) Detection monitoring is required at MSWLF units at all ground-water monitoring wells... in the unit. (2) The Director of an approved State may establish an alternative list of...

  7. 40 CFR 258.54 - Detection monitoring program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Ground-Water Monitoring and Corrective Action § 258.54 Detection monitoring program. (a) Detection monitoring is required at MSWLF units at all ground-water monitoring wells... in the unit. (2) The Director of an approved State may establish an alternative list of...

  8. 40 CFR 258.54 - Detection monitoring program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Ground-Water Monitoring and Corrective Action § 258.54 Detection monitoring program. (a) Detection monitoring is required at MSWLF units at all ground-water monitoring wells... in the unit. (2) The Director of an approved State may establish an alternative list of...

  9. User's manual for UCAP: Unified Counter-Rotation Aero-Acoustics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culver, E. M.; Mccolgan, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    This is the user's manual for the Unified Counter-rotation Aeroacoustics Program (UCAP), the counter-rotation derivative of the UAAP (Unified Aero-Acoustic Program). The purpose of this program is to predict steady and unsteady air loading on the blades and the noise produced by a counter-rotation Prop-Fan. The aerodynamic method is based on linear potential theory with corrections for nonlinearity associated with axial flux induction, vortex lift on the blades, and rotor-to-rotor interference. The theory for acoustics and the theory for individual blade loading and wakes are derived in Unified Aeroacoustics Analysis for High Speed Turboprop Aerodynamics and Noise, Volume 1 (NASA CR-4329). This user's manual also includes a brief explanation of the theory used for the modelling of counter-rotation.

  10. A prediction of helicopter rotor discrete frequency noise for three scale models using a new acoustics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.

    1987-01-01

    A new computer program which uses Farassat's most advanced subsonic time domain formulation has been written to predict helicopter rotor discrete frequency noise. A brief description of the program, WOPWOP, is followed by a comparison of predicted and experimentally measured acoustic pressure and spectra for a 1/4 scale UH-1 model rotor blade and a 1/7 scale OLS (AH-1G) model rotor blade. The C81 computer program was used to predict the spanwise loading on the rotor for aerodynamic input into the acoustic prediction. Comparisons are made for different flight conditions and microphone locations with good results. In general the acoustic pressure is underpredicted. The acoustic predictions for a tapered rotor blade and predictions for microphones well below the tip path plane show less underprediction. Finally, in-plane motion of the rotor blade is shown to significantly affect the peak-to-peak amplitude of the acoustic pressure for high advancing tip Mach numbers.

  11. 7 CFR 550.26 - Monitoring program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monitoring program performance. 550.26 Section 550.26... Agreements Program Management § 550.26 Monitoring program performance. (a) Cooperators are responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of REE nonassistance awards using their established controls...

  12. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2014 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent

    2015-05-12

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2014. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed activity sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, and (f) habitat restoration monitoring. During 2014, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives. Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NNSS include 42 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, 236 birds, and 27 mammals. These species are protected, regulated, or considered sensitive according to state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and the western yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) are the only species on the NNSS protected under the Endangered Species Act, both listed as threatened. However, only one record of the cuckoo has ever been documented on the NNSS, and there is no good habitat for this species on the NNSS. It is considered a rare migrant. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 18 projects. A total of 199.18 hectares (ha) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found during these surveys included a predator burrow, one sidewinder rattlesnake (Crotalus cerastes), two mating speckled rattlesnakes

  13. CASTNet mountain acid deposition monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Bowser, J.J.; Anderson, J.B.; Edgerton, E.S.; Mohnen, V.; Baumgardener, R.

    1994-12-31

    Concern over the influence of air pollution on forest decline has led the USEPA to establish the Mountain Acid Deposition Monitoring Program (MADMP) to quantify total deposition at high altitudes, i.e., above cloud base. Clouds can be a major source of atmospheric deposition to sensitive, mountain ecosystems. This program is a part of the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet), a national assessment of the effects of the 1990 Clean Air Act. The objectives of MADMP are to estimate total deposition, measure cloud chemistry, and characterize spacial and temporal trends at four selected high altitude sites in the Eastern US. Four MADMP sites have been established for the 1994 field season: Clingman`s Dome, Great Smoky Mountain Nat. Park, TN; Slide Mountain, Catskill State Park, NY; Whiteface Mountain, Adirondack State Park, NY; and Whitetop Mountain, Mt. Rogers Nat`l Recreational Area, VA. An automated cloud collection system will be utilized in combination with continuous measurements of cloud liquid water content in order to estimate cloudwater deposition. Other relevant data will include continuous meteorological measurements, ozone and sulfur dioxide concentrations, wet deposition from rainfall analysis, and dry deposition from filter pack analysis. Quality assurance and quality control measures will be employed to maximize accuracy and precision.

  14. Ambient Noise Surface Wave Tomography for Geotechnical Monitoring Using "Large N" Distributed Acoustic Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Lindsey, N.; Martin, E. R.; Wagner, A. M.; Robertson, M.; Bjella, K.; Gelvin, A.; Ulrich, C.; Wu, Y.; Freifeld, B. M.; Daley, T. M.; Dou, S.

    2015-12-01

    Surface wave tomography using ambient noise sources has found broad application at the regional scale but has not been adopted fully for geotechnical applications despite the abundance of noise sources in this context. The recent development of Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) provides a clear path for inexpensively recording high spatial resolution (< 1m sampling) surface wave data in the context of infrastructure monitoring over significant spatial domains (10s of km). Infrastructure monitoring is particularly crucial in the context of high-latitude installations where a changing global climate can trigger reductions in soil strength due to permafrost thaw. DAS surface wave monitoring systems, particularly those installed in/near transport corridors and coupled to ambient noise inversion algorithms, could be a critical "early warning" system to detect zones of decreased shear strength before failure. We present preliminary ambient noise tomography results from a 1.3 km continuously recording subsurface DAS array used to record traffic noise next to an active road in Fairbanks, AK. The array, depolyed at the Farmer's Loop Permafrost Test Station, was designed as a narrow 2D array and installed via trenching at ~30 cm. We develop a pre-processing and QC approach to analyze the large resulting volume of data, equivalent to a 1300 geophone array sampled at 1 khz. We utilize automated dispersion analysis and a quasi-2D MC inversion to generate a shear wave velocity profile underneath the road in a region of discontinuous permafrost. The results are validated against a high-resolution ERT survey as well as direct-push data on ice content. We also compare vintages of ambient noise DAS data to evaluate the short-term repeatability of the technique in the face of changing noise environments. The resulting dataset demonstrates the utility of using DAS for real-time shear-modulus monitoring in support of critical infrastructure.

  15. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED THERMAL-ACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeffrey J. Swetelitsch

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project is to explore microwave-excited thermal-acoustic (META) phenomena for quantitative analysis of granular and powdered materials, with the culmination of the research to be an on-line carbon-in-ash monitor for coal-fired power plants. This technique of analyzing unburned carbon in fly ash could be a less tedious and time consuming method as compared to the traditional LOI manual procedure. Phase 1 of the research focused on off-line single-frequency thermal-acoustic measurements where an off-line fly ash monitor was constructed that could operate as analytical tool to explore instrument and methodology parameters for quantifying the microwave-excited thermal-acoustic effect of carbon in fly ash, and it was determined that the off-line thermal-acoustic technique could predict the carbon content of a random collection of fly ashes with a linear correlation constant of R{sup 2} = 0.778. Much higher correlations are expected for fly ashes generated from a single boiler. Phase 2 of the research developing a methodology to generate microwave spectra of various powders, including fly ash, coal, and inorganic minerals, and to determine if these microwave spectra could be used for chemical analyses. Although different minerals produced different responses, higher resolution microwave spectra would be required to be able to distinguish among minerals. Phase 3 of the research focused on the development of an on-line fly ash monitor that could be adapted to measure either a thermal-acoustic or thermal-elastic response to due microwave excitation of fly ash. The thermal-acoustic response was successfully employed for this purpose but the thermal-elastic response was too weak to yield a useful on-line device.

  16. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1999 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy A. Wills

    1999-12-01

    The Ecological and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1999. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites (2) desert tortoise compliance (3) ecosystem mapping (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center.

  17. Calibrating passive acoustic monitoring: correcting humpback whale call detections for site-specific and time-dependent environmental characteristics.

    PubMed

    Helble, Tyler A; D'Spain, Gerald L; Campbell, Greg S; Hildebrand, John A

    2013-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the importance of accounting for environmental effects on passive underwater acoustic monitoring results. The situation considered is the reduction in shipping off the California coast between 2008-2010 due to the recession and environmental legislation. The resulting variations in ocean noise change the probability of detecting marine mammal vocalizations. An acoustic model was used to calculate the time-varying probability of detecting humpback whale vocalizations under best-guess environmental conditions and varying noise. The uncorrected call counts suggest a diel pattern and an increase in calling over a two-year period; the corrected call counts show minimal evidence of these features. PMID:24181982

  18. Acoustic emission monitoring for inspection of seam-welded hot reheat piping in fossil power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, John M.; Morgan, Bryan C.; Tilley, Richard M.

    1996-11-01

    Although failure of the seam weld on reheat steam piping has been an infrequent occurrence, such failure is still a major safety concern for fossil plant operations. EPRI has provided guidelines for a piping management program base don periodic inspection. More recently, EPRI has also sponsored research to develop inspection techniques to both improve the quality and reduce the cost of piping inspections. Foremost in this research has been the use of acoustic emission (AE) techniques to detect crack damage in seam welds. AE has the substantial cost advantages of both allowing inspection without full removal of the thermal insulation on the reheat piping and making short-re- inspection intervals practical. This paper reviews the EPRI guidelines for performing an AE inspection on seam-welded hot reheat piping.

  19. Clinical Studies of Real-Time Monitoring of Lithotripter Performance Using Passive Acoustic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighton, T. G.; Fedele, F.; Coleman, A. J.; McCarthy, C.; Ryves, S.; Hurrell, A. M.; De Stefano, A.; White, P. R.

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the development and clinical testing of a passive device which monitors the passive acoustic emissions generated within the patient's body during Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL). Designed and clinically tested so that it can be operated by a nurse, the device analyses the echoes generated in the body in response to each ESWL shock, and so gives real time shock-by-shock feedback on whether the stone was at the focus of the lithotripter, and if so whether the previous shock contributed to stone fragmentation when that shock reached the focus. A shock is defined as being `effective' if these two conditions are satisfied. Not only can the device provide real-time feedback to the operator, but the trends in shock `effectiveness' can inform treatment. In particular, at any time during the treatment (once a statistically significant number of shocks have been delivered), the percentage of shocks which were `effective' provides a treatment score TS(t) which reflects the effectiveness of the treatment up to that point. The TS(t) figure is automatically delivered by the device without user intervention. Two clinical studies of the device were conducted, the ethics guidelines permitting only use of the value of TS(t) obtained at the end of treatment (this value is termed the treatment score TS0). The acoustically-derived treatment score was compared with the treatment score CTS2 given by the consultant urologist at the three-week patient's follow-up appointment. In the first clinical study (phase 1), records could be compared for 30 out of the 118 patients originally recruited, and the results of phase 1 were used to refine the parameter values (the `rules') with which the acoustic device provides its treatment score. These rules were tested in phase 2, for which records were compared for 49 of the 85 patients recruited. Considering just the phase 2 results (since the phase 1 data were used to draw up the `rules' under which phase 2 operated

  20. Conformational Changes of Calmodulin on Calcium and Peptide Binding Monitored by Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Nirschl, Martin; Ottl, Johannes; Vörös, Janos

    2011-01-01

    Film bulk acoustic resonators (FBAR) are mass sensitive, label-free biosensors that allow monitoring of the interaction between biomolecules. In this paper we use the FBAR to measure the binding of calcium and the CaMKII peptide to calmodulin. Because the mass of the calcium is too small to be detected, the conformational change caused by the binding process is measured by monitoring the resonant frequency and the motional resistance of the FBAR. The resonant frequency is a measure for the amount of mass coupled to the sensor while the motional resistance is influenced by the viscoelastic properties of the adsorbent. The measured frequency shift during the calcium adsorptions was found to be strongly dependent on the surface concentration of the immobilized calmodulin, which indicates that the measured signal is significantly influenced by the amount of water inside the calmodulin layer. By plotting the measured motional resistance against the frequency shift, a mass adsorption can be distinguished from processes involving measurable conformational changes. With this method three serial processes were identified during the peptide binding. The results show that the FBAR is a promising technology for the label-free measurement of conformational changes. PMID:25585566

  1. Environmental Influences on the Spatial Ecology of Juvenile Smalltooth Sawfish (Pristis pectinata): Results from Acoustic Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Simpfendorfer, Colin A.; Yeiser, Beau G.; Wiley, Tonya R.; Poulakis, Gregg R.; Stevens, Philip W.; Heupel, Michelle R.

    2011-01-01

    To aid recovery efforts of smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata) populations in U.S. waters a research project was developed to assess how changes in environmental conditions within estuarine areas affected the presence, movements, and activity space of this endangered species. Forty juvenile P. pectinata were fitted with acoustic tags and monitored within the lower 27 km of the Caloosahatchee River estuary, Florida, between 2005 and 2007. Sawfish were monitored within the study site from 1 to 473 days, and the number of consecutive days present ranged from 1 to 125. Residency index values for individuals varied considerably, with annual means highest in 2005 (0.95) and lowest in 2007 (0.73) when several P. pectinata moved upriver beyond detection range during drier conditions. Mean daily activity space was 1.42 km of river distance. The distance between 30-minute centers of activity was typically <0.1 km, suggesting limited movement over short time scales. Salinity electivity analysis demonstrated an affinity for salinities between 18 and at least 24 psu, suggesting movements are likely made in part, to remain within this range. Thus, freshwater flow from Lake Okeechobee (and its effect on salinity) affects the location of individuals within the estuary, although it remains unclear whether or not these movements are threatening recovery. PMID:21347294

  2. A novel technique for acoustic emission monitoring in civil structures with global fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstrynge, E.; Pfeiffer, H.; Wevers, M.

    2014-06-01

    The application of acoustic emission (AE)-based damage detection is gaining interest in the field of civil structural health monitoring. Damage progress can be detected and located in real time and the recorded AEs hold information on the fracture process which produced them. One of the drawbacks for on-site application in large-scale concrete and masonry structures is the relatively high attenuation of the ultrasonic signal, which limits the detection range of the AE sensors. Consequently, a large number of point sensors are required to cover a certain area. To tackle this issue, a global damage detection system, based on AE detection with a polarization-modulated, single mode fiber optic sensor (FOS), has been developed. The sensing principle, data acquisition and analysis in time and frequency domain are presented. During experimental investigations, this AE-FOS is applied for the first time as a global sensor for the detection of crack-induced AEs in a full-scale concrete beam. Damage progress is monitored during a cyclic four-point bending test and the AE activity, detected with the FOS, is related to the subsequent stages of damage progress in the concrete element. The results obtained with the AE-FOS are successfully linked to the mechanical behavior of the concrete beam and a qualitative correspondence is found with AE data obtained by a commercial system.

  3. Acoustic emission detection with fiber optical sensors for dry cask storage health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bin; Bao, Jingjing; Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    The increasing number, size, and complexity of nuclear facilities deployed worldwide are increasing the need to maintain readiness and develop innovative sensing materials to monitor important to safety structures (ITS). In the past two decades, an extensive sensor technology development has been used for structural health monitoring (SHM). Technologies for the diagnosis and prognosis of a nuclear system, such as dry cask storage system (DCSS), can improve verification of the health of the structure that can eventually reduce the likelihood of inadvertently failure of a component. Fiber optical sensors have emerged as one of the major SHM technologies developed particularly for temperature and strain measurements. This paper presents the development of optical equipment that is suitable for ultrasonic guided wave detection for active SHM in the MHz range. An experimental study of using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) as acoustic emission (AE) sensors was performed on steel blocks. FBG have the advantage of being durable, lightweight, and easily embeddable into composite structures as well as being immune to electromagnetic interference and optically multiplexed. The temperature effect on the FBG sensors was also studied. A multi-channel FBG system was developed and compared with piezoelectric based AE system. The paper ends with conclusions and suggestions for further work.

  4. Acoustic monitoring in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, using hydrophone of the Ocean Bottom Seismometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Sukyoung; Lee, Won Sang; Kuk Hong, Jong; Yoo, Hyun Jae; Park, Yongcheol; Schmidt-Aursch, Mechita; Geissler, Wolfram H.

    2016-04-01

    Although a number of active source seismic experiments have been conducted over the last few decades to investigate the crustal structure in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, long-term observation to monitor underwater tectonic activities and changes in the cryospheric environment still remains challenging due to existence of sea ice in the study region. Korea Polar Research Institute has accomplished successful deployment of ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) in the Ross Sea collaborating with Alfred Wegener Institute during the period of 2011-2012 and 2014 by Korean icebreaker RV Araon. The OBS system manufactured by K.U.M. contains a hydrophone sensor that allow us to monitor underwater acoustics generated by tectonic and ice-related events. We present spectrograms of the continuous hydroacoustic data and various types of signals, e.g. seismic T-waves, iceequakes, and tremors. There are periodic and harmonic tremors that might be related with tidal modulation, and the seasonal variation of the background noise seems to be related with sea ice concentration.

  5. Challenge of Using Passive Acoustic Monitoring in High-Energy Environments: UK Tidal Environments and Other Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Booth, Cormac G

    2016-01-01

    The use of passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) around marine developments is commonplace. A buffer-based PAM system (e.g., C-POD) is a cost-effective method for assessing cetacean acoustic presence. Devices have been deployed by Sea Mammal Research Unit (SMRU) Marine around the United Kingdom, allowing an examination of the performance of C-PODs with respect to background noise, tilt angle, and environmental factors. C-PODs were found to often only monitor for a few seconds of each minute, resulting in significant loss of monitoring time. Issues were likely driven by environmental and deployment factors. The practical limitations of buffer-based PAM systems in high-energy/noisy environments are indicated here. PMID:26610949

  6. Complex monitoring and alert network for electromagnetic, infrasound, acoustic seismotectonic phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    -Emilian Toader, Victorin; Moldovan, Iren-Adelina; Constantin, Ionescu

    2014-05-01

    The Romanian seismicity recorded in 2013 three important events: the largest seismic "silence", the shortest sequence of two earthquakes greater than 4.8R in less than 14 days after the "Romanian National Institute for Earth Physics" (NIEP) developed a digital network, and a very high crustal activity in Galati area. We analyze the variations of the telluric currents and local magnetic field, variations of the atmospheric electrostatic field, infrasound, temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, variations in the earth crust with inclinometers and animal behavior. The general effect is the first high seismic energy discontinuity that could be a precursor factor. Since 1977 Romania did not register any important earthquake that would generate a sense of fear among the population. In parallel with the seismic network NIEP developed a magneto-telluric, bioseismic, VLF and acoustic network. A large frequency spectrum is covered for mechanical vibration, magnetic and electric field with ground and air sensors. Special software was designed for acquisition, analysis and real time alert using internet direct connection, web page, email and SMS. Many examples show the sensitivity of telluric current, infrasound, acoustic records (from air-ground), and the effect of tectonic stress on the magnetic field or ground deformation. The next update of the multidisciplinary monitoring network will include measurement of ionization, radon emission, sky color, solar radiation and extension of infrasound and VL/LF equipment. NOAA Space Weather satellites transmit solar activity magnetic field data, X ray flux, electron, and proton flux information useful for complex analysis.

  7. Mechanical Weakening during Fluid Injection in Critically Stressed Sandstones with Acoustic Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, C.; Dautriat, J. D.; Sarout, J.; Macault, R.; Bertauld, D.

    2014-12-01

    Water weakening is a well-known phenomenon which can lead to subsidence during the production of hydrocarbon reservoirs. The example of the Ekofisk oil field in the North Sea has been well documented for years. In order to assess water weakening effects in reservoir rocks, previous studies have focused on changes in the failure envelopes derived from mechanical tests conducted on rocks saturated either with water or with inert fluids. However, little attention has been paid so far on the mechanical behaviour during the fluid injection stage, like in enhanced oil recovery operations. We studied the effect of fluid injection on the mechanical behaviour of Sherwood sandstone, a weakly-consolidated sandstone sampled at Ladram Bay in UK. In order to highlight possible weakening effects, water and inert oil have been injected into critically-loaded samples to assess their effect on strength and elastic properties and to derive the acoustic signature of the saturation front for each fluid. The specimens were instrumented with 16 ultrasonic P-wave transducers for both passive and active acoustic monitoring during fluid injection and loading. After conducting standard triaxial tests on three samples saturated with air, water and oil respectively, mechanical creep tests were conducted on dry samples loaded at 80% of the compressive strength of the dry rock. While these conditions are kept constant, a fluid is injected at the bottom end of the sample with a low back pressure (0.5 MPa) to minimize effective stress variations during injection. Both water and oil were used as the injected pore fluid in two experiments. As soon as the fluids start to flow into the samples, creep is taking place with a much higher strain rate for water injection compared to oil injection. A transition from secondary creep to tertiary creep is observed in the water injection test whereas in the oil injection test no significant creep acceleration is observed after one pore volume of oil was

  8. Development of hydroacoustical techniques for the monitoring and classification of benthic habitats in Puck Bay: Modeling of acoustic waves scattering by seagrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raczkowska, A.; Gorska, N.

    2012-12-01

    Puck Bay is an area of high species biodiversity belonging to the Coastal Landscape Park of Baltic Sea Protected Areas (BSPA) and is also included in the list of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and covered by the protection program "Natura 2000". The underwater meadows of the Puck Bay are important for Europe's natural habitats due to their role in enhancing the productivity of marine ecosystems and providing shelter and optimal feeding conditions for many marine organisms. One of the dominant species comprising the underwater meadows of the Southern Baltic Sea is the seagrass Zostera marina. The spatial extent of underwater seagrass meadows is altered by pollution and eutrophication; therefore, to properly manage the area one must monitor its ecological state. Remote acoustic methods are useful tools for the monitoring of benthic habitats in many marine areas because they are non-invasive and allow researchers to obtain data from a large area in a short period of time. Currently there is a need to apply these methods in the Baltic Sea. Here we present an analysis of the mechanism of scattering of acoustic waves on seagrass in the Southern Baltic Sea based on the numerical modeling of acoustic wave scattering by the biological tissues of plants. The study was conducted by adapting a model developed on the basis of DWBA (Distorted Wave Born Approximation) developed by Stanton and Chu (2005) for fluid-like objects, including the characteristics of the Southern Baltic seagrass. Input data for the model, including the morphometry of seagrass leaves, their angle of inclination and the density plant cover, was obtained through the analysis of biological materials collected in the Puck Bay in the framework of a research project financed by the Polish Government (Development of hydroacoustic methods for studies of underwater meadows of Puck Bay, 6P04E 051 20). On the basis of the developed model, we have analyzed the dependence of the target strength of a single

  9. Summer Food Service Program for Children. Monitor's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Nutrition Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    In this handbook, monitors of food service programs for children are given instructions concerning their general responsibilities, training session requirements, meal requirements, daily record keeping, and specific responsibilities. Site review forms for vended programs are included. (WI)

  10. Study Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James; Workman,Gary

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work will be to develop techniques for monitoring the acoustic emissions from carbon epoxy composite structures at cryogenic temperatures. Performance of transducers at temperatures ranging from ambient to cryogenic and the characteristics of acoustic emission from composite structures will be studied and documented. This entire effort is directed towards characterization of structures used in NASA propulsion programs such as the X-33.

  11. The environmental program at Kennedy Space Center - Baseline to monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    KSC has developed an environmental program to ensure that its activities do not adversely affect the surrounding environment. Two essential elements of the total program are the baseline and monitoring programs. The goal of the baseline program is to collect sufficient information about the environment prior to Shuttle launches so that adverse changes in the environment - if and when they occur after the Shuttle program becomes active - can be detected and cause-effect relationships established when possible. The goal of the monitoring program is to use information from the baseline program along with survey and sampling operations during the period of initial Shuttle launches to document adverse changes in the environment.

  12. The USDA Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring Program.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, D. S.; Slusser, J. R.; Beaubien, A. F.; Gibson, J. H.

    1998-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation Monitoring Program has been measuring UV radiation since 1994. The initial network of 12 stations employed broadband meters to measure UVB irradiance and included ancillary measurements of temperature, humidity, and irradiance at seven wavelengths in the visible produced by a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). Since that beginning the network has expanded to more than 20 stations and the broadband meters have been supplemented with a seven-wavelength Ultraviolet Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (UV-MFRSR). The network has been designed to include 30 stations, each with a full complement of instrumentation. Annual characterizations of the network's filter radiometers indicate that gradual shifts in instrument response are manageable but must be accounted for to achieve accurate and precise measurements of UV irradiance. The characterization and calibration of the filter instruments is discussed along with filter stability and instrument precision. Broadband instruments are shown to be quite stable and collocated instruments are shown to agree to within 2.3% for zenith angles less than 80° under all sky conditions. Preliminary investigations into the accuracy of the UV-MFRSR calibrated with the Langley method are presented and successful column ozone retrievals are demonstrated with the UV-MFRSR under clear skies.

  13. DATA MONITORING AND ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL

    SciTech Connect

    Gravois, Melanie

    2007-07-06

    This procedure provides guidelines and techniques for analyzing and trending data using statistical methods for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This procedure outlines the steps used in data analysis and trending. It includes guidelines for performing data analysis and for monitoring (or controlling) processes using performance indicators. This procedure is used when trending and analyzing item characteristics and reliability, process implementation, and other quality-related information to identify items, services, activities, and processes needing improvement, in accordance with 10 CFR Part 830, Subpart A, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 414.1C, and University of California (UC) Assurance Plan for LBNL. Trend codes, outlined in Attachment 4, are assigned to issues at the time of initiation and entry into the Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) database in accordance with LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Issues Management Program Manual. Throughout this procedure, the term performance is used to encompass all aspects of performance including quality, timeliness, efficiency, effectiveness, and reliability. Data analysis tools are appropriate whenever quantitative information describing the performance of an item, service, or process can be obtained.

  14. Acoustic habitat and shellfish mapping and monitoring in shallow coastal water - Sidescan sonar experiences in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Overmeeren, Ronnie; Craeymeersch, Johan; van Dalfsen, Jan; Fey, Frouke; van Heteren, Sytze; Meesters, Erik

    2009-11-01

    Sidescan sonar has been applied in a number of shallow water environments along the Dutch coast to map and monitor shellfish and seabed habitats. The littoral setting of these surveys may hamper data acquisition flying the towfish in zones of turbulence and waves, but also offers valuable opportunities for understanding, interpreting and validating sidescan sonar images because of the ability to ground-truth during low water periods, enabling easy identification and validation. Acoustical images of some of the mussel banks on the tidal flats of the Wadden Sea, recorded at high tide, show a marked resemblance with optical Google Earth images of the same banks. These sonar images may thus serve as ' acoustic type signatures' for the interpretation of sonar patterns recorded in deeper water where ground-truthing is more difficult and more expensive. Similarly, acoustic type signatures of (Japanese) oyster banks were obtained in the estuaries in the southwest of the Netherlands. Automated acoustic pattern recognition of different habitats and acoustical estimation of faunal cover and density are possible applications of sidescan sonar. Both require that the backscattering observed on the sidescan sonar images is directly caused by the biological component of the seafloor. Filtering offers a simple and effective pre-processing technique to separate the faunal signals from linear trends such as emanating from wave ripples or the central tracks of the towfish. Acoustically estimating the faunal density is approached by in-situ counting peaks in backscattering in unit squares. These counts must be calibrated by ground-truthing. Ground-truthing on littoral mussel banks in the Wadden Sea has been carried out by measuring their cover along lines during low tide. Due to its capacity of yielding full-cover, high resolution images of large surfaces, sidescan sonar proves to be an excellent, cost-effective tool for quantitative time-lapse monitoring of habitats.

  15. Size Distribution of Sperm Whales Acoustically Identified during Long Term Deep-Sea Monitoring in the Ionian Sea.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Francesco; Sciacca, Virginia; Bellia, Giorgio; De Domenico, Emilio; Larosa, Giuseppina; Papale, Elena; Pellegrino, Carmelo; Pulvirenti, Sara; Riccobene, Giorgio; Simeone, Francesco; Speziale, Fabrizio; Viola, Salvatore; Pavan, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) emits a typical short acoustic signal, defined as a "click", almost continuously while diving. It is produced in different time patterns to acoustically explore the environment and communicate with conspecifics. Each emitted click has a multi-pulse structure, resulting from the production of the sound within the sperm whale's head. A Stable Inter Pulse Interval (Stable IPI) can be identified among the pulses that compose a single click. Applying specific algorithms, the measurement of this interval provides useful information to assess the total length of the animal recorded. In January 2005, a cabled hydrophone array was deployed at a depth of 2,100 m in the Central Mediterranean Sea, 25 km offshore Catania (Ionian Sea). The acoustic antenna, named OνDE (Ocean noise Detection Experiment), was in operation until November 2006. OνDE provided real time acoustic data used to perform Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) of cetacean sound emissions. In this work, an innovative approach was applied to automatically measure the Stable IPI of the clicks, performing a cepstrum analysis to the energy (square amplitude) of the signals. About 2,100 five-minute recordings were processed to study the size distribution of the sperm whales detected during the OνDE long term deep-sea acoustic monitoring. Stable IPIs were measured in the range between 2.1 ms and 6.4 ms. The equations of Gordon (1991) and of Growcott (2011) were used to convert the IPIs into measures of size. The results revealed that the sperm whales recorded were distributed in length from about 7.5 m to 14 m. The size category most represented was from 9 m to 12 m (adult females or juvenile males) and specimens longer than 14 m (old males) seemed to be absent. PMID:26675588

  16. Size Distribution of Sperm Whales Acoustically Identified during Long Term Deep-Sea Monitoring in the Ionian Sea

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Francesco; Sciacca, Virginia; Bellia, Giorgio; De Domenico, Emilio; Larosa, Giuseppina; Papale, Elena; Pellegrino, Carmelo; Pulvirenti, Sara; Riccobene, Giorgio; Simeone, Francesco; Speziale, Fabrizio; Viola, Salvatore; Pavan, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) emits a typical short acoustic signal, defined as a “click”, almost continuously while diving. It is produced in different time patterns to acoustically explore the environment and communicate with conspecifics. Each emitted click has a multi-pulse structure, resulting from the production of the sound within the sperm whale’s head. A Stable Inter Pulse Interval (Stable IPI) can be identified among the pulses that compose a single click. Applying specific algorithms, the measurement of this interval provides useful information to assess the total length of the animal recorded. In January 2005, a cabled hydrophone array was deployed at a depth of 2,100 m in the Central Mediterranean Sea, 25 km offshore Catania (Ionian Sea). The acoustic antenna, named OνDE (Ocean noise Detection Experiment), was in operation until November 2006. OνDE provided real time acoustic data used to perform Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) of cetacean sound emissions. In this work, an innovative approach was applied to automatically measure the Stable IPI of the clicks, performing a cepstrum analysis to the energy (square amplitude) of the signals. About 2,100 five-minute recordings were processed to study the size distribution of the sperm whales detected during the OνDE long term deep-sea acoustic monitoring. Stable IPIs were measured in the range between 2.1 ms and 6.4 ms. The equations of Gordon (1991) and of Growcott (2011) were used to convert the IPIs into measures of size. The results revealed that the sperm whales recorded were distributed in length from about 7.5 m to 14 m. The size category most represented was from 9 m to 12 m (adult females or juvenile males) and specimens longer than 14 m (old males) seemed to be absent. PMID:26675588

  17. Nighttime foraging by deep diving echolocating odontocetes off the Hawaiian islands of Kauai and Ni'ihau as determined by passive acoustic monitors.

    PubMed

    Au, Whitlow W L; Giorli, Giacomo; Chen, Jessica; Copeland, Adrienne; Lammers, Marc; Richlen, Michael; Jarvis, Susan; Morrissey, Ronald; Moretti, David; Klinck, Holger

    2013-05-01

    Remote autonomous ecological acoustic recorders (EARs) were deployed in deep waters at five locations around the island of Kauai and one in waters off Ni'ihau in the main Hawaiian island chain. The EARs were moored to the bottom at depths between 400 and 800 m. The data acquisition sampling rate was 80 kHz and acoustic signals were recorded for 30 s every 5 min to conserve battery power and disk space. The acoustic data were analyzed with the M3R (Marine Mammal Monitoring on Navy Ranges) software, an energy-ratio-mapping algorithm developed at Oregon State University and custom MATLAB programs. A variety of deep diving odontocetes, including pilot whales, Risso's dolphins, sperm whales, spinner and pan-tropical spotted dolphins, and beaked whales were detected at all sites. Foraging activity typically began to increase after dusk, peaked in the middle of the night and began to decrease toward dawn. Between 70% and 84% of biosonar clicks were detected at night. At present it is not clear why some of the known deep diving species, such as sperm whales and beaked whales, concentrate their foraging efforts at night. PMID:23654414

  18. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock-walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, L.; Beutel, J.; Gruber, S.; Hunziker, J.; Lim, R.; Weber, S.

    2012-06-01

    We present a custom acoustic emission (AE) monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock-walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node) integrated into a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock-wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock-wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock-wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock-fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  19. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, L.; Beutel, J.; Gruber, S.; Hunziker, J.; Lim, R.; Weber, S.

    2012-11-01

    We present a custom acoustic emission (AE) monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node) integrated into a wireless sensor network (WSN) customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  20. Overview of national bird population monitoring programs and databases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butcher, G.S.; Peterjohn, B.; Ralph, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    A number of programs have been set up to monitor populations of nongame migratory birds. We review these programs and their purposes and provide information on obtaining data or results from these programs. In addition, we review recommendations for improving these programs.

  1. Use of Information Systems for Monitoring Mental Health Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    The monitoring process and the role of monitoring in mental health center decision making are discussed in relation to information systems. Monitoring requires an information system based on the center's annual plan for programs and budgets. This system must contain at least minimal data on client movement, services, staff activity, and costs. The…

  2. 38 CFR 43.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting... Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible...

  3. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-17

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1991, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. Analytical results from third quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  4. ECOLOGICAL MONITORING AND COMPLIANCE PROGRAM CALENDAR YEAR 2005 REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTEL NEVADA ECOLOGICAL SERVICES

    2006-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during the Calendar Year 2005. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive and protected/regulated species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  5. Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Program

    PubMed Central

    Heuer, Ole E.; Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe; Bagger-Skjøt, Line; Jensen, Vibeke F.; Rogues, Anne-Marie; Skov, Robert L.; Agersø, Yvonne; Brandt, Christian T.; Seyfarth, Anne Mette; Muller, Arno; Hovgaard, Karin; Ajufo, Justin; Bager, Flemming; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Wegener, Henrik C.; Monnet, Dominique L.

    2007-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial agents is an emerging problem worldwide. Awareness of the undesirable consequences of its widespread occurrence has led to the initiation of antimicrobial agent resistance monitoring programs in several countries. In 1995, Denmark was the first country to establish a systematic and continuous monitoring program of antimicrobial drug consumption and antimicrobial agent resistance in animals, food, and humans, the Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Program (DANMAP). Monitoring of antimicrobial drug resistance and a range of research activities related to DANMAP have contributed to restrictions or bans of use of several antimicrobial agents in food animals in Denmark and other European Union countries. PMID:18217544

  6. Autonomous hydrophone array for long-term acoustic monitoring in the open ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Eu, J.-F.; Brachet, C.; Goslin, J.; Royer, J.-Y.; Ammann, J.

    2009-04-01

    We are developing an array of new autonomous hydrophones, benefiting from a long-lasting collaboration with the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (NOAA and Oregon state University). The hydrophones are deployed on a mooring line anchored to the seafloor by an expendable anchor weight. The length of the line is adjusted so that the sensor (and buoy) lies in the middle of the SOFAR channel at about 1000m depth for mid-latitudes (depending on the speed-of-sound profile). The buoy at depth keeps the line under tension and prevents wave-motion noise from the sensor. The instrument continuously samples and records the acoustic signals at 240Hz for seismic studies, or 480Hz (or more) for marine mammal studies. The SOFAR channel acts as an acoustic wave-guide in the ocean so that acoustic waves can propagate with little attenuation over long distances. Autonomous hydrophones allow the detection and localization of the low-magnitude (Mw>2.5) seismic activity along oceanic ridges and in deformed intraplate areas, which remains generally undetected or poorly localized by land-based seismic networks. An array of hydrophones can monitor a much wider area (more than 1000 km across) than ocean-bottom seismometers, which suffer from the rapid attenuation of seismic waves in the crust and upper mantle. Arrays of autonomous hydrophones thus succeed in detecting and locating 30 to 50 times more earthquakes than those listed in the catalogs from land-based seismograph stations. Data are buffered on flash cards and then regularly stored on hard disks or on solid-state drives (e.g. 20Gb of data per year at 240Hz sampling rate). We use 24-bit sigma-delta converters with programmable gain amplifiers. As timing is a key issue for an accurate localisation of the seismic events, instruments are synchronized with GPS time and have a low-power, highly stable calibrated clock (10-8 drift). All electronics and batteries (Li or alcaline) are placed in titanium pressure cases for long

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM: AGROECOSYSTEM 1992 PILOT PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agroecosystem Resource Group (ARG) of the Environmental Protection Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) has developed a five year program strategy for implementation of a suite of indicators for monitoring agroecosystem status and trends. he five-year period (1991-1995) i...

  8. 49 CFR 19.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... (a) Recipients are responsible for managing and monitoring each project, program, subaward, function...) Federal awarding agencies shall comply with clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance....

  9. 7 CFR 3019.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... responsible for managing and monitoring each project, program, subaward, function or activity supported by the...) Federal awarding agencies shall comply with clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance....

  10. 45 CFR 2543.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... reporting program performance. (a) Recipients are responsible for managing and monitoring each project... requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting performance data from recipients. ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance....

  11. 22 CFR 145.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... managing and monitoring each project, program, subaward, function or activity supported by the award...) The Department shall comply with clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting performance... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program...

  12. 29 CFR 95.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Recipients are responsible for managing and monitoring each project, program, subaward, function or activity..., as needed. (h) DOL shall comply with clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Monitoring and reporting program performance. 95.51...

  13. 20 CFR 435.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reporting program performance. (a) Recipients are responsible for managing and monitoring each project... make site visits, as needed. (h) SSA will comply with clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program...

  14. 22 CFR 518.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) Recipients are responsible for managing and monitoring each project, program, subaward, function...) Federal awarding agencies shall comply with clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Monitoring and reporting program...

  15. 36 CFR 1207.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... program performance. 1207.40 Section 1207.40 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND... Enforcement § 1207.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of grant and subgrant supported activities. Grantees...

  16. 44 CFR 13.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... program performance. 13.40 Section 13.40 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT... Enforcement § 13.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of grant and subgrant supported activities. Grantees...

  17. 22 CFR 226.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 226.51 Section 226.51 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OF ASSISTANCE AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Reports and Records § 226.51 Monitoring and reporting program...

  18. 22 CFR 226.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 226.51 Section 226.51 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OF ASSISTANCE AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Reports and Records § 226.51 Monitoring and reporting program...

  19. 28 CFR 66.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the expiration or termination of... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program... Requirements Reports, Records, Retention, and Enforcement § 66.40 Monitoring and reporting program...

  20. 45 CFR 92.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 92... reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the...

  1. 45 CFR 92.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 92... reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the...

  2. 45 CFR 2541.400 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 2541... reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the...

  3. 45 CFR 2541.400 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 2541... reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the...

  4. 13 CFR 143.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the expiration or termination of... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monitoring and reporting program... Requirements Reports, Records, Retention, and Enforcement § 143.40 Monitoring and reporting program...

  5. 15 CFR 24.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... reporting period. The final performance report will be due 90 days after the expiration or termination of... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monitoring and reporting program... Requirements Reports, Records, Retention, and Enforcement § 24.40 Monitoring and reporting program...

  6. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2003 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada

    2003-12-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2003.

  7. 34 CFR 80.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 80.40... Reports, Records Retention, and Enforcement § 80.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a... with applicable Federal requirements and that performance goals are being achieved. Grantee...

  8. 22 CFR 518.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Federal awarding agencies shall comply with clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Monitoring and reporting program performance... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Reports and Records § 518.51 Monitoring and reporting program...

  9. 29 CFR 1470.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 1470.40... program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the day-to-day... activities to assure compliance with applicable Federal requirements and that performance goals are...

  10. 21 CFR 1403.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 1403... Reports, Records, Retention, and Enforcement § 1403.40 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a... with applicable Federal requirements and that performance goals are being achieved. Grantee...

  11. 45 CFR 92.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 92... reporting program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the day-to... supported activities to assure compliance with applicable Federal requirements and that performance...

  12. 34 CFR 74.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting performance data from recipients. (Approved by the Office of... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 74.51... Requirements Reports and Records § 74.51 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Recipients...

  13. 25 CFR 276.9 - Monitoring and reporting program performances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performances. 276.9 Section 276.9 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT PROGRAM UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS § 276.9 Monitoring...

  14. 25 CFR 276.9 - Monitoring and reporting program performances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performances. 276.9 Section 276.9 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT PROGRAM UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS § 276.9 Monitoring...

  15. 25 CFR 276.9 - Monitoring and reporting program performances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performances. 276.9 Section 276.9 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT PROGRAM UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS § 276.9 Monitoring...

  16. 25 CFR 276.9 - Monitoring and reporting program performances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Monitoring and reporting program performances. 276.9 Section 276.9 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT PROGRAM UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS § 276.9 Monitoring...

  17. 25 CFR 276.9 - Monitoring and reporting program performances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performances. 276.9 Section 276.9 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT PROGRAM UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS § 276.9 Monitoring...

  18. High Speed Research Program Structural Acoustics Multi-Year Summary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beier, Theodor H.; Bhat, Waman V.; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Silcox, Richard J.; Simpson, Myles A.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the work conducted by the Structural Acoustics Integrated Technology Development (ITD) Team under NASA's High Speed Research (HSR) Phase II program from 1993 to 1999. It is intended to serve as a reference for future researchers by documenting the results of the interior noise and sonic fatigue technology development activities conducted during this period. For interior noise, these activities included excitation modeling, structural acoustic response modeling, development of passive treatments and active controls, and prediction of interior noise. For sonic fatigue, these activities included loads prediction, materials characterization, sonic fatigue code development, development of response reduction techniques, and generation of sonic fatigue design requirements. Also included are lessons learned and recommendations for future work.

  19. Influence of geometry on the fracturing behavior of textile reinforced cement monitored by acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggelis, D. G.; Blom, J.; El Kadi, M.; Wastiels, J.

    2014-03-01

    In this work the flexural behavior of textile reinforced cement (TRC) laminate is examined using acoustic emission (AE). The TRC composite is a combination of inorganic phosphate cement (IPC) with randomly distributed glass fibres. IPC has been developed at the "Vrije Universiteit Brussel" and shows a neutral pH meaning that glass fibers are hardly attacked. During bending, stresses lead to the activation of damage mechanisms like matrix cracking, delaminations and fiber pull-out being in succession or overlapping in time. AE records the responses of the damage propagation events and allows the monitoring of the fracture behavior from the onset to the final stage. The effect of the span in three-point bending tests, which is varied to create different stress fields, is targeted. Parameters like duration and frequency reveal information about the mode of the damage sources in relation to the span. Results show that as the span decreases, the dominant damage mode shifts away from bending and acquires more shear characteristics by increasing the interlaminar shearing events.

  20. Multi-functional surface acoustic wave sensor for monitoring enviromental and structural condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Y.; Kon, T.; Okazaki, T.; Saigusa, Y.; Nomura, T.

    2006-03-01

    As a first step to develop a health monitoring system with active and embedded nondestructive evaluation devices for the machineries and structures, multi-functional SAW (surface acoustic wave) device was developed. A piezoelectric LiNbO3(x-y cut) materials were used as a SAW substrate on which IDT(20μm pitch) was produced by lithography. On the surface of a path of SAW between IDTs, environmentally active material films of shape memory Ti50Ni41Cu(at%) with non-linear hysteresis and superelastic Ti48Ni43Cu(at%) with linear deformation behavior were formed by magnetron-sputtering technique. In this study, these two kinds of shape memory alloys SMA) system were used to measure 1) loading level, 2) phase transformation and 3)stress-strain hysteresis under cyclic loading by utilizing their linearity and non-linearity deformation behaviors. Temperature and stress dependencies of SAW signal were also investigated in the non-sputtered film state. Signal amplitude and phase change of SAW were chosen to measure as the sensing parameters. As a result, temperature, stress level, phase transformation in SMA depending on temperature and mechanical damage accumulation could be measured by the proposed multi-functional SAW sensor. Moreover, the wireless SAW sensing system which has a unique feature of no supplying electric battery was constructed, and the same characteristic evaluation is confirmed in comparison with wired case.

  1. Acoustic emission monitoring of cement-based structures immobilising radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Spasova, L.M.; Ojovan, M.I.; Hayes, M.; Godfrey, H.

    2007-07-01

    The long term performance of cementitious structures immobilising radioactive waste can be affected by physical and chemical processes within the encapsulating materials such as formation of new phases (e.g., vaterite, brucite), degradation of cement phases (e.g., CSH gel, portlandite), degradation of some waste components (e.g., organics), corrosion of metallic constituents (aluminium, magnesium), gas emission, further hydration etc. The corrosion of metals in the high pH cementitious environment is of especial concern as it can potentially cause wasteform cracking. One of the perspective non-destructive methods used to monitor and assess the mechanical properties of materials and structures is based on an acoustic emission (AE) technique. In this study an AE non-destructive technique was used to evaluate the mechanical performance of cementitious structures with encapsulated metallic waste such as aluminium. AE signals generated as a result of aluminium corrosion in a small-size blast furnace slag (BFS)/ordinary Portland cement (OPC) sample were detected, recorded and analysed. A procedure for AE data analysis including conventional parameter-based AE approach and signal-based analysis was applied and demonstrated to provide information on the aluminium corrosion process and its impact on the mechanical performance of the encapsulating cement matrix. (authors)

  2. Automatic Detection of Swallowing Events by Acoustical Means for Applications of Monitoring of Ingestive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sazonov, Edward S.; Makeyev, Oleksandr; Schuckers, Stephanie; Lopez-Meyer, Paulo; Melanson, Edward L.; Neuman, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of etiology of obesity and overweight is incomplete due to lack of objective and accurate methods for Monitoring of Ingestive Behavior (MIB) in the free living population. Our research has shown that frequency of swallowing may serve as a predictor for detecting food intake, differentiating liquids and solids, and estimating ingested mass. This paper proposes and compares two methods of acoustical swallowing detection from sounds contaminated by motion artifacts, speech and external noise. Methods based on mel-scale Fourier spectrum, wavelet packets, and support vector machines are studied considering the effects of epoch size, level of decomposition and lagging on classification accuracy. The methodology was tested on a large dataset (64.5 hours with a total of 9,966 swallows) collected from 20 human subjects with various degrees of adiposity. Average weighted epoch recognition accuracy for intra-visit individual models was 96.8% which resulted in 84.7% average weighted accuracy in detection of swallowing events. These results suggest high efficiency of the proposed methodology in separation of swallowing sounds from artifacts that originate from respiration, intrinsic speech, head movements, food ingestion, and ambient noise. The recognition accuracy was not related to body mass index, suggesting that the methodology is suitable for obese individuals. PMID:19789095

  3. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Multicell Reinforced Concrete Box Girders Subjected to Torsion

    PubMed Central

    Bagherifaez, Marya; Behnia, Arash; Majeed, Abeer Aqeel; Hwa Kian, Chai

    2014-01-01

    Reinforced concrete (RC) box girders are a common structural member for road bridges in modern construction. The hollow cross-section of a box girder is ideal in carrying eccentric loads or torques introduced by skew supports. This study employed acoustic emission (AE) monitoring on multicell RC box girder specimens subjected to laboratory-based torsion loading. Three multicell box girder specimens with different cross-sections were tested. The aim is to acquire AE analysis data indicative for characterizing torsion fracture in the box girders. It was demonstrated through appropriate parametric analysis that the AE technique could be utilized to effectively classify fracture developed in the specimens for describing their mechanical behavior under torsion. AE events localization was presented to illustrate the trend of crack and damage propagation in different stages of fracture. It could be observed that spiral-like patterns of crack were captured through AE damage localization system and damage was quantified successfully in different stages of fracture by using smoothed b-value analysis. PMID:25180203

  4. A Catheter-Based Acoustic Interrogation Device for Monitoring Motility Dynamics of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qian; Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Sadowski, Daniel C.; Mintchev, Martin P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents novel minimally-invasive, catheter-based acoustic interrogation device for monitoring motility dynamics of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). A micro-oscillator actively emitting sound wave at 16 kHz is located at one side of the LES, and a miniature microphone is located at the other side of the sphincter to capture the sound generated from the oscillator. Thus, the dynamics of the opening and closing of the LES can be quantitatively assessed. In this paper, experiments are conducted utilizing an LES motility dynamics simulator. The sound strength is captured by the microphone and is correlated to the level of LES opening and closing controlled by the simulator. Measurements from the simulator model show statistically significant (p < 0.05) Pearson correlation coefficients (0.905 on the average in quiet environment and 0.736 on the average in noisy environment, D.O.F. = 9). Measuring the level of LES opening and closing has the potential to become a valuable diagnostic technique for understanding LES dysfunction and the disorders associated with it. PMID:25120160

  5. Acoustic emission monitoring of low velocity impact damage in graphite/epoxy laminates during tensile loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Bradford H.

    1992-01-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) system was set up in a linear location data acquisition mode to monitor the tensile loading of eight-ply quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy specimens containing low velocity impact damage. The impact damage was induced using an instrumented drop weight tower. During impact, specimens were supported by either an aluminum plate or a membrane configuration. Cross-sectional examinations revealed that the aluminum plate configuration resulted in primarily matrix cracking and back surface fiber failure. The membrane support resulted in only matrix cracking and delamination damage. Penetrant enhanced radiography and immersion ultrasonics were used in order to assess the amount of impact damage in each tensile specimen. During tensile loading, AE reliably detected and located the damage sites which included fiber failure. All specimens with areas of fiber breakage ultimately failed at the impact site. AE did not reliably locate damage which consisted of only delaminations and matrix cracking. Specimens with this type of damage did not ultimately fail at the impact site. In summary, AE demonstrated the ability to increase the reliability of structural proof tests; however, the successful use of this technique requires extensive baseline testing.

  6. Acoustic emission monitoring of concrete columns and beams strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Gao; Li, Hui; Zhou, Wensong; Xian, Guijun

    2012-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is an effective method in the nondestructive testing (NDT) field of civil engineering. During the last two decades, Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) has been widely used in repairing and strengthening concrete structures. The damage state of FRP strengthened concrete structures has become an important issue during the service period of the structure and it is a meaningful work to use AE technique as a nondestructive method to assess its damage state. The present study reports AE monitoring results of axial compression tests carried on basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) confined concrete columns and three-point-bending tests carried on BFRP reinforced concrete beams. AE parameters analysis was firstly utilized to give preliminary results of the concrete fracture process of these specimens. It was found that cumulative AE events can reflect the fracture development trend of both BFRP confined concrete columns and BFRP strengthened concrete beams and AE events had an abrupt increase at the point of BFRP breakage. Then the fracture process of BFRP confined concrete columns and BFRP strengthened concrete beams was studied through RA value-average frequency analysis. The RA value-average frequency tendencies of BFRP confined concrete were found different from that of BFRP strengthened concrete beams. The variation tendency of concrete crack patterns during the loading process was revealed.

  7. Detection of bond failure in the anchorage zone of reinforced concrete beams via acoustic emission monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouhussien, Ahmed A.; Hassan, Assem A. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was utilised to identify the onset of bond failure in reinforced concrete beams. Beam anchorage specimens were designed and tested to fail in bond in the anchorage zone. The specimens included four 250 × 250 × 1500 mm beams with four variable bonded lengths (100, 200, 300, and 400 mm). Meanwhile, an additional 250 × 250 × 2440 mm beam, with 200 mm bonded length, was tested to investigate the influence of sensor location on the identification of bond damage. All beams were tested under four-point loading setup and continuously monitored using three distributed AE sensors. These attached sensors were exploited to record AE signals resulting from both cracking and bond deterioration until failure. The variations in the number of AE hits and cumulative signal strength (CSS) versus test time were evaluated to achieve early detection of crack growth and bar slippage. In addition, AE intensity analysis was performed on signal strength of collected AE signals to develop two additional parameters: historic index (H (t)) and severity (S r). The analysis of these AE parameters enabled an early detection of both first cracks (at almost the mid-span of the beam) and bar slip in either of the anchorage zones at the beams’ end before their visual observation, regardless of sensor location. The results also demonstrated a clear correlation between the damage level in terms of crack development/measured free end bar slip and AE parameters (number of hits, CSS, H(t), and S r).

  8. Acoustic Monitoring System for Frog Population Estimation Using In-Situ Progressive Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboudan, Adam

    Frog populations are considered excellent bio-indicators and hence the ability to monitor changes in their populations can be very useful for ecological research and environmental monitoring. This thesis presents a new population estimation approach based on the recognition of individual frogs of the same species, namely the Pseudacris Regilla (Pacific Chorus Frog), which does not rely on the availability of prior training data. An in-situ progressive learning algorithm is developed to determine whether an incoming call belongs to a previously detected individual frog or a newly encountered individual frog. A temporal call overlap detector is also presented as a pre-processing tool to eliminate overlapping calls. This is done to prevent the degrading of the learning process. The approach uses Mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) and multivariate Gaussian models to achieve individual frog recognition. In the first part of this thesis, the MFCC as well as the related linear predictive cepstral coefficients (LPCC) acoustic feature extraction processes are reviewed. The Gaussian mixture models (GMM) are also reviewed as an extension to the classical Gaussian modeling used in the proposed approach. In the second part of this thesis, the proposed frog population estimation system is presented and discussed in detail. The proposed system involves several different components including call segmentation, feature extraction, overlap detection, and the in-situ progressive learning process. In the third part of the thesis, data description and system performance results are provided. The process of synthetically generating test sequences of real frog calls, which are applied to the proposed system for performance analysis, is described. Also, the results of the system performance are presented which show that the system is successful in distinguishing individual frogs, hence capable of providing reasonable estimates of the frog population. The system can readily be

  9. Fatigue crack growth monitoring of idealized gearbox spline component using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Ozevin, Didem; Hardman, William; Kessler, Seth; Timmons, Alan

    2016-04-01

    The spline component of gearbox structure is a non-redundant element that requires early detection of flaws for preventing catastrophic failures. The acoustic emission (AE) method is a direct way of detecting active flaws; however, the method suffers from the influence of background noise and location/sensor based pattern recognition method. It is important to identify the source mechanism and adapt it to different test conditions and sensors. In this paper, the fatigue crack growth of a notched and flattened gearbox spline component is monitored using the AE method in a laboratory environment. The test sample has the major details of the spline component on a flattened geometry. The AE data is continuously collected together with strain gauges strategically positions on the structure. The fatigue test characteristics are 4 Hz frequency and 0.1 as the ratio of minimum to maximum loading in tensile regime. It is observed that there are significant amount of continuous emissions released from the notch tip due to the formation of plastic deformation and slow crack growth. The frequency spectra of continuous emissions and burst emissions are compared to understand the difference of sudden crack growth and gradual crack growth. The predicted crack growth rate is compared with the AE data using the cumulative AE events at the notch tip. The source mechanism of sudden crack growth is obtained solving the inverse mathematical problem from output signal to input signal. The spline component of gearbox structure is a non-redundant element that requires early detection of flaws for preventing catastrophic failures. In this paper, the fatigue crack growth of a notched and flattened gearbox spline component is monitored using the AE method The AE data is continuously collected together with strain gauges. There are significant amount of continuous emissions released from the notch tip due to the formation of plastic deformation and slow crack growth. The source mechanism of

  10. Technical Basis Document for PFP Area Monitoring Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect

    COOPER, J.R.

    2000-04-17

    This document describes the phantom dosimetry used for the PFP Area Monitoring program and establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) area monitoring dosimetry program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), part 835, ''Occupational Radiation Protection'' Part 835.403; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1), Part 514; HNF-PRO-382, Area Dosimetry Program; and PNL-MA-842, Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual.

  11. Real-time temperature estimation and monitoring of HIFU ablation through a combined modeling and passive acoustic mapping approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, C. R.; Cleveland, R. O.; Coussios, C. C.

    2013-09-01

    Passive acoustic mapping (PAM) has been recently demonstrated as a method of monitoring focused ultrasound therapy by reconstructing the emissions created by inertially cavitating bubbles (Jensen et al 2012 Radiology 262 252-61). The published method sums energy emitted by cavitation from the focal region within the tissue and uses a threshold to determine when sufficient energy has been delivered for ablation. The present work builds on this approach to provide a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring software that displays both real-time temperature maps and a prediction of the ablated tissue region. This is achieved by determining heat deposition from two sources: (i) acoustic absorption of the primary HIFU beam which is calculated via a nonlinear model, and (ii) absorption of energy from bubble acoustic emissions which is estimated from measurements. The two sources of heat are used as inputs to the bioheat equation that gives an estimate of the temperature of the tissue as well as estimates of tissue ablation. The method has been applied to ex vivo ox liver samples and the estimated temperature is compared to the measured temperature and shows good agreement, capturing the effect of cavitation-enhanced heating on temperature evolution. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that by using PAM and predictions of heating it is possible to produce an evolving estimate of cell death during exposure in order to guide treatment for monitoring ablative HIFU therapy. Portions presented at the 13th International Symposium on Therapeutic Ultrasound, Heidelberg, Germany (2012).

  12. The acoustic simulation and analysis of complicated reciprocating compressor piping systems, II: Program structure and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, C. W. S.

    1984-09-01

    The main objectives of the investigation reported in this paper, Part II, and its companion paper, Part I, are (a) to provide a formulation, including the mean flow effects and suitable for digital computer automation, of the acoustics of complicated piping systems, and (b) to develop a comprehensive digital computer program for the simulation and analysis of complicated reciprocating compressor piping systems. In this paper, the digital computer program structure and applications of the program developed, written in Fortran IV, are described. It is concluded that the computer program is versatile and user-friendly. It is capable of providing a great deal of information from one set of input data, and is open-ended and modular for updating.

  13. ACOUSTIC MONITOR FOR LIQUID-SOLID SLURRIES MEASUREMENTS AT LOW WEIGHT FRACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principal objective of the project is to develop an acoustic probe for determining the weight fraction of particles in a flowing suspension. The suspension can be solid-liquid (S-L) or solid-gas-liquid (S-G-L). The work will include testing the theory of acoustic wave propaga...

  14. Systems and methods of monitoring acoustic pressure to detect a flame condition in a gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Krull, Anthony Wayne; Healy, Timothy Andrew , Yilmaz, Ertan

    2011-05-17

    A method may detect a flashback condition in a fuel nozzle of a combustor. The method may include obtaining a current acoustic pressure signal from the combustor, analyzing the current acoustic pressure signal to determine current operating frequency information for the combustor, and indicating that the flashback condition exists based at least in part on the current operating frequency information.

  15. Monitoring of seafloor crustal deformation using GPS/Acoustic technique along the Nankai Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, K.; Tadokoro, K.; Ikuta, R.; Watanabe, T.; Fujii, C.; Matsuhiro, K.; Sayanagi, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor crustal deformation is crucial for estimating the interplate locking at the shallow subduction zone and has been carried out at subduction margins in Japan, e.g., Japan Trench and Nankai Trough [Sato et al., 2011; Tadokoro et al., 2012]. Iinuma et al. [2012] derived slip distributions during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake using GPS/Acoustic data and on-land GPS data. The result showed that maximum slip is more than 85 m near the trench axis. The focal area along the Nankai trough extended to the trough axis affected this earthquake by cabinet office, government of Japan.  We monitored seafloor crustal deformation along the Nankai trough, Japan. Observation regions are at the eastern end of Nankai trough (named Suruga trough) and at the central Nankai trough. We established and monitored by two sites across the trough at each region. In the Suruga trough region, we repeatedly observed from 2005 to 2013. We observed 13 and 14 times at a foot wall side (SNE) and at a hanging wall side (SNW), respectively. We estimated the displacement velocities with relative to the Amurian plate from the result of repeated observation. The estimated displacement velocity vectors at SNE and SNW are 42±8 mm/y to N94±3˚W direction and 39±11 mm/y to N84±9˚W direction, respectively. The directions are the same as those measured at the on-land GPS stations. The magnitudes of velocity vector indicate significant shortening by approximately 4 mm/y between SNW and on-land GPS stations at hanging wall side of the Suruga Trough. This result shows that the plate interface at the northernmost Suruga trough is strongly locked. In the central Nankai trough region, we established new two stations across the central Nankai trough (Both stations are about 15km distance from trough) and observed only three times, August 2013, January 2014, and June 2014. We report the results of monitoring performed in this year.

  16. Considerations for acoustic emission monitoring of spherical Kevlar/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.; Patterson, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    We are continuing to research the applications of acoustic emission testing for predicting burst pressure of filament-wound Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels. This study has focused on three specific areas. The first area involves development of an experimental technique and the proper instrumentation to measure the energy given off by the acoustic emission transducer per acoustic emission burst. The second area concerns the design of a test fixture in which to mount the composite vessel so that the acoustic emission transducers are held against the outer surface of the composite. Included in this study area is the calibration of the entire test setup including couplant, transducer, electronics, and the instrument measuring the energy per burst. In the third and final area of this study, we consider the number, location, and sensitivity of the acoustic emission transducers used for proof testing composite pressure vessels.

  17. Machinery Vibration Monitoring Program at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Potvin, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    The Reactor Maintenance's Machinery Vibration Monitoring Program (MVMP) plays an essential role in ensuring the safe operation of the three Production Reactors at the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WRSC) Savannah River Site (SRS). This program has increased machinery availability and reduced maintenance cost by the early detection and determination of machinery problems. This paper presents the Reactor Maintenance's Machinery Vibration Monitoring Program, which has been documented based on Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) NP-5311, Utility Machinery Monitoring Guide, and some examples of the successes that it has enjoyed.

  18. Using multi-frequency acoustic attenuation to monitor grain size and concentration of suspended sediment in rivers.

    PubMed

    Moore, S A; Le Coz, J; Hurther, D; Paquier, A

    2013-04-01

    Multi-frequency acoustic backscatter profiles recorded with side-looking acoustic Doppler current profilers are used to monitor the concentration and size of sedimentary particles suspended in fluvial environments. Data at 300, 600, and 1200 kHz are presented from the Isère River in France where the dominant particles in suspension are silt and clay sizes. The contribution of suspended sediment to the through-water attenuation was determined for three high concentration (> 100 mg/L) events and compared to theoretical values for spherical particles having size distributions that were measured by laser diffraction in water samples. Agreement was good for the 300 kHz data, but it worsened with increasing frequency. A method for the determination of grain size using multi-frequency attenuation data is presented considering models for spherical and oblate spheroidal particles. When the resulting size estimates are used to convert sediment attenuation to concentration, the spheroidal model provides the best agreement with optical estimates of concentration, but the aspect ratio and grain size that provide the best fit differ between events. The acoustic estimates of size were one-third the values from laser grain sizing. This agreement is encouraging considering optical and acoustical instruments measure different parameters. PMID:23556566

  19. A ground-water-quality monitoring program for Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowlin, Jon O.

    1986-01-01

    A program was designed for the systematic monitoring of ground-water quality in Nevada. Basic hydrologic and water-quality principles are discussed in the formulation of a rational approach to developing a statewide monitoring program. A review of ground-water monitoring efforts in Nevada through 1977 indicates that few requirements for an effective statewide program are being met. A suggested program has been developed that consists of five major elements: (1) A Background-Quality Network to assess the existing water quality in Nevada aquifers, (2) a Contamination Source Inventory of known or potential threats to ground-water quality, (3) Surveillance Networks to monitor ground-water quality in selected hydrographic areas, (4) Intensive Surveys of individual instances of known or potential ground-water contamination, and (5) Ground-Water Data File to manage data generated by the other monitoring elements. Two indices have been developed to help assign rational priorities for monitoring ground water in the 255 hydrographic areas of Nevada: (1) A Hydrographic-Area Priority Index for surveillance monitoring, and (2) A Development-Potential Index for background monitoring of areas with little or no current development. Requirements for efficient management of data from ground-water monitoring are discussed and the three major systems containing Nevada ground-water data are reviewed. More than 11,000 chemical analyses of ground water have been acquired from existing systems and incorporated into a prototype data base.

  20. Bird biodiversity assessments in temperate forest: the value of point count versus acoustic monitoring protocols.

    PubMed

    Klingbeil, Brian T; Willig, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Effective monitoring programs for biodiversity are needed to assess trends in biodiversity and evaluate the consequences of management. This is particularly true for birds and faunas that occupy interior forest and other areas of low human population density, as these are frequently under-sampled compared to other habitats. For birds, Autonomous Recording Units (ARUs) have been proposed as a supplement or alternative to point counts made by human observers to enhance monitoring efforts. We employed two strategies (i.e., simultaneous-collection and same-season) to compare point count and ARU methods for quantifying species richness and composition of birds in temperate interior forests. The simultaneous-collection strategy compares surveys by ARUs and point counts, with methods matched in time, location, and survey duration such that the person and machine simultaneously collect data. The same-season strategy compares surveys from ARUs and point counts conducted at the same locations throughout the breeding season, but methods differ in the number, duration, and frequency of surveys. This second strategy more closely follows the ways in which monitoring programs are likely to be implemented. Site-specific estimates of richness (but not species composition) differed between methods; however, the nature of the relationship was dependent on the assessment strategy. Estimates of richness from point counts were greater than estimates from ARUs in the simultaneous-collection strategy. Woodpeckers in particular, were less frequently identified from ARUs than point counts with this strategy. Conversely, estimates of richness were lower from point counts than ARUs in the same-season strategy. Moreover, in the same-season strategy, ARUs detected the occurrence of passerines at a higher frequency than did point counts. Differences between ARU and point count methods were only detected in site-level comparisons. Importantly, both methods provide similar estimates of species

  1. Bird biodiversity assessments in temperate forest: the value of point count versus acoustic monitoring protocols

    PubMed Central

    Willig, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Effective monitoring programs for biodiversity are needed to assess trends in biodiversity and evaluate the consequences of management. This is particularly true for birds and faunas that occupy interior forest and other areas of low human population density, as these are frequently under-sampled compared to other habitats. For birds, Autonomous Recording Units (ARUs) have been proposed as a supplement or alternative to point counts made by human observers to enhance monitoring efforts. We employed two strategies (i.e., simultaneous-collection and same-season) to compare point count and ARU methods for quantifying species richness and composition of birds in temperate interior forests. The simultaneous-collection strategy compares surveys by ARUs and point counts, with methods matched in time, location, and survey duration such that the person and machine simultaneously collect data. The same-season strategy compares surveys from ARUs and point counts conducted at the same locations throughout the breeding season, but methods differ in the number, duration, and frequency of surveys. This second strategy more closely follows the ways in which monitoring programs are likely to be implemented. Site-specific estimates of richness (but not species composition) differed between methods; however, the nature of the relationship was dependent on the assessment strategy. Estimates of richness from point counts were greater than estimates from ARUs in the simultaneous-collection strategy. Woodpeckers in particular, were less frequently identified from ARUs than point counts with this strategy. Conversely, estimates of richness were lower from point counts than ARUs in the same-season strategy. Moreover, in the same-season strategy, ARUs detected the occurrence of passerines at a higher frequency than did point counts. Differences between ARU and point count methods were only detected in site-level comparisons. Importantly, both methods provide similar estimates of species

  2. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of the Syracuse Athena Temple: Scale Invariance in the Timing of Ruptures

    SciTech Connect

    Niccolini, G.; Carpinteri, A.; Lacidogna, G.; Manuello, A.

    2011-03-11

    We perform a comparative statistical analysis between the acoustic-emission time series from the ancient Greek Athena temple in Syracuse and the sequence of nearby earthquakes. We find an apparent association between acoustic-emission bursts and the earthquake occurrence. The waiting-time distributions for acoustic-emission and earthquake time series are described by a unique scaling law indicating self-similarity over a wide range of magnitude scales. This evidence suggests a correlation between the aging process of the temple and the local seismic activity.

  3. Monitoring Anthropogenic Ocean Sound from Shipping Using an Acoustic Sensor Network and a Compressive Sensing Approach †

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Peter; Philip, Rachel; Robinson, Stephen; Wang, Lian

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring ocean acoustic noise has been the subject of considerable recent study, motivated by the desire to assess the impact of anthropogenic noise on marine life. A combination of measuring ocean sound using an acoustic sensor network and modelling sources of sound and sound propagation has been proposed as an approach to estimating the acoustic noise map within a region of interest. However, strategies for developing a monitoring network are not well established. In this paper, considerations for designing a network are investigated using a simulated scenario based on the measurement of sound from ships in a shipping lane. Using models for the sources of the sound and for sound propagation, a noise map is calculated and measurements of the noise map by a sensor network within the region of interest are simulated. A compressive sensing algorithm, which exploits the sparsity of the representation of the noise map in terms of the sources, is used to estimate the locations and levels of the sources and thence the entire noise map within the region of interest. It is shown that although the spatial resolution to which the sound sources can be identified is generally limited, estimates of aggregated measures of the noise map can be obtained that are more reliable compared with those provided by other approaches. PMID:27011187

  4. Fatigue-crack monitoring in-flight using acoustic emission - hardware, technique, and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, P.H.; Skorpik, J.R.; Lemon, D.K.

    1981-07-01

    The three programs described represent a logical evolutionary process toward effective flaw surveillance in aircraft using AE. The Macchi tests showed that an AE system can withstand extended in-flight service and collect meaningful information relative to fatigue crack growth at a single specific location. The MIrage aircraft work seeks to extend the methods demonstrated on the Macchi into a more complex circumstance. We are now attempting to detect and locate crack growth at any of twenty fastener locations in a relatively complex geometry. The DARPA pattern recognition program seeks to develop signal identification capability that would pave the way for general monitoring of aircraft structures using AE to detect fatigue crack growth. It appears that AE technology may be capable of enhancing aircraft safety assurance while reducing inspection requirements with the associated costs.

  5. Validation and verification of the acoustic emission technique for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagar, Daniel Omatsola

    The performance of the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique was investigated to establish its reliability in detecting and locating fatigue crack damage as well as distinguishing between different AE sources in potential SHM applications. Experiments were conducted to monitor the AE signals generated during fatigue crack growth in coupon 2014 T6 aluminium. The influence of stress ratio, stress range, sample geometry and whether or not the load spectrum was of constant or variable amplitude were all investigated. AE signals detected were correlated with values of applied cyclic load throughout the tests. Measurements of time difference of arrival were taken for assessment of errors in location estimates obtained using time of flight algorithms with a 1D location setup. At the onset of crack growth high AE Hit rates were observed for the first few millimetres after which they rapidly declined to minimal values for an extended period of crack growth. Another peak and then decline in AE Hit rates was observed for subsequent crack growth before yet another increase as the sample approached final failure.. AE signals were seen to occur in the lower two-thirds of the maximum load in the first few millimetres of crack growth before occurring at progressively smaller values as the crack length increased. A separate set of AE signals were observed close to the maximum cyclic stress throughout the entire crack growth process. At the failure crack length AE signals were generated across the entire loading range. Novel metrics were developed to statistically characterise variability of AE generation with crack growth and at particular crack lengths across different samples. A novel approach for fatigue crack length estimation was developed based on monitoring applied loads to the sample corresponding with generated AE signals. An acousto-ultrasonic method was used to calibrate the AE wave velocity in a representative wing-box structure which was used to successfully locate the

  6. Atmospheric Mercury Deposition Monitoring – National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) developed and operates a collaborative network of atmospheric mercury monitoring sites based in North America – the Atmospheric Mercury Network (AMNet). The justification for the network was growing interest and demand from many ...

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM: METHODS FORMAT GUIDANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) established the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) to provide quantitative assessment of the condition of our nation's ecological resources. he Methods Coordination Group is responsible for coordinating methods ...

  8. Some applications of remote sensing in atmospheric monitoring programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, A. N.; Bryson, J. C.; Vasuki, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    The applications of remote sensing in atmospheric monitoring programs are described. The organization, operations, and functions of an air quality monitoring network at New Castle County, Delaware is discussed. The data obtained by the air quality monitoring network ground stations and the equipment used to obtain atmospheric data are explained. It is concluded that correlation of the information obtained by the network will make it possible to anticipate air pollution problems in the Chesapeake Bay area before a crisis develops.

  9. The community environmental monitoring program: a historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, L.H.; Hartwell, W.T.; Tappen, J.; Giles, K.

    2007-07-01

    With the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) entering its 26. year of monitoring the offsite areas around the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a look back on the history and the hows and whys of its formation is in order. In March of 1979, the accident at Three-Mile Island Nuclear Power Generating Plant near Middletown, Pennsylvania occurred, and Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV), along with other governmental agencies such as the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was requested to provide monitoring personnel. Public concerns over the accident were high, especially for those living around the power plant. It was found that involving the local community in the sample collection process helped to ease some of the concerns, and the Citizens Monitoring Program (CMP) was instituted. This idea was brought back to Las Vegas and in 1981, the NTS Community Monitoring Program was started to involve the communities surrounding and downwind of the NTS, who were experiencing many of the same concerns, in the monitoring of the Nuclear Weapons Testing Program. By reviewing the history of the CEMP, one can see what the concerns of the local communities were, how they were addressed, and the effect this has had on them. From the standpoint of stakeholders, getting information on radiation safety issues from an informed local citizen rather than from a government agency official living elsewhere can only have a positive effect on how the public views the reliability of the monitoring data. (authors)

  10. 20 CFR 437.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 437.40 Section 437.40 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE... Federal agencies to monitor progress under construction grants and subgrants. SSA will require...

  11. 24 CFR 84.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... managing and monitoring each project, program, subaward, function or activity supported by the award... may make site visits, as needed. (h) HUD shall comply with clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting...

  12. 28 CFR 70.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and reporting program performance. (a) Recipients are responsible for managing and monitoring each... site visits, as needed. (g) The Department will comply with clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting...

  13. 43 CFR 12.951 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... responsible for managing and monitoring each project, program, subaward, function or activity supported by the...) Federal awarding agencies shall comply with clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting...

  14. 40 CFR 30.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Records § 30.51 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Recipients are responsible for managing... with clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting performance data from recipients. ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting...

  15. 14 CFR 1260.151 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... managing and monitoring each project, program, subcontract, function or activity supported by the award..., as needed. (h) NASA shall comply with clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monitoring and reporting...

  16. 15 CFR 14.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... reporting program performance. (a) Recipients are responsible for managing and monitoring each project... comply with clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting performance data from recipients. ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monitoring and reporting...

  17. METHODS MANUAL FOR PERDIDO BAY CITIZENS MONITORING PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Methods Manual for Perdido Bay Citizens' Monitoring Program and its companion quality assurance/quality control plan were developed in response to a request made by the Friends of Perdido Bay, Inc. (FPB). The monitoring and other activities of the FPB form an important compon...

  18. Evaluating the efficiency of environmental monitoring programs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levine, Carrie R.; Yanai, Ruth D.; Lampman, Gregory G.; Burns, Douglas A.; Driscoll, Charles T.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Lynch, Jason; Schoch, Nian

    2014-01-01

    Statistical uncertainty analyses can be used to improve the efficiency of environmental monitoring, allowing sampling designs to maximize information gained relative to resources required for data collection and analysis. In this paper, we illustrate four methods of data analysis appropriate to four types of environmental monitoring designs. To analyze a long-term record from a single site, we applied a general linear model to weekly stream chemistry data at Biscuit Brook, NY, to simulate the effects of reducing sampling effort and to evaluate statistical confidence in the detection of change over time. To illustrate a detectable difference analysis, we analyzed a one-time survey of mercury concentrations in loon tissues in lakes in the Adirondack Park, NY, demonstrating the effects of sampling intensity on statistical power and the selection of a resampling interval. To illustrate a bootstrapping method, we analyzed the plot-level sampling intensity of forest inventory at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH, to quantify the sampling regime needed to achieve a desired confidence interval. Finally, to analyze time-series data from multiple sites, we assessed the number of lakes and the number of samples per year needed to monitor change over time in Adirondack lake chemistry using a repeated-measures mixed-effects model. Evaluations of time series and synoptic long-term monitoring data can help determine whether sampling should be re-allocated in space or time to optimize the use of financial and human resources.

  19. National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) – Enteric Bacteria is a national public health surveillance system in the United States that tracks changes in the susceptibility of certain enteric bacteria to antimicrobial agents of human and veterinary medical importance. The NARMS ...

  20. Multidate Landsat lake quality monitoring program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, L. T.; Scarpace, F. L.; Thomsen, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    A unified package of files and programs has been developed to automate the multidate Landsat-derived analyses of water quality for about 3000 inland lakes throughout Wisconsin. A master lakes file which stores geographic information on the lakes, a file giving the latitudes and longitudes of control points for scene navigation, and a program to estimate control point locations and produce microfiche character maps for scene navigation are among the files and programs of the system. The use of ground coordinate systems to isolate irregular shaped areas which can be accessed at will appears to provide an economical means of restricting the size of the data set.

  1. Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, Monty

    2014-02-05

    Cook Inlet, Alaska is home to some of the greatest tidal energy resources in the U.S., as well as an endangered population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). Successfully permitting and operating a tidal power project in Cook Inlet requires a biological assessment of the potential and realized effects of the physical presence and sound footprint of tidal turbines on the distribution, relative abundance, and behavior of Cook Inlet beluga whales. ORPC Alaska, working with the Project Team—LGL Alaska Research Associates, University of Alaska Anchorage, TerraSond, and Greeneridge Science—undertook the following U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) study to characterize beluga whales in Cook Inlet – Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with the Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project (Project). ORPC Alaska, LLC, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, (collectively, ORPC). ORPC is a global leader in the development of hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of ocean and river currents to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC is developing a tidal energy demonstration project in Cook Inlet at East Foreland where ORPC has a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) preliminary permit (P-13821). The Project collected baseline data to characterize pre-deployment patterns of marine mammal distribution, relative abundance, and behavior in ORPC’s proposed deployment area at East Foreland. ORPC also completed work near Fire Island where ORPC held a FERC preliminary permit (P-12679) until March 6, 2013. Passive hydroacoustic devices (previously utilized with bowhead whales in the Beaufort Sea) were adapted for study of beluga whales to determine the relative abundance of beluga whale vocalizations within the proposed deployment areas. Hydroacoustic data collected during the Project were used to characterize the ambient acoustic environment of the project site pre-deployment to inform the

  2. Near-continuous suspended sediment monitoring of the Rio Grande using multi-frequency acoustic instrumentation in Big Bend National Park, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, D. J.; Topping, D. J.; Schmidt, J. C.; Sabol, T. A.; Griffiths, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Rio Grande in the Big Bend region of Texas, USA, and Chihuahua and Coahuila, Mexico, is in disequilibrium. The river in this reach rapidly narrows during low-flow years, and widens during rare, large magnitude floods. One management strategy to improve in-channel habitat for the native ecosystem is to limit the rate and magnitude of channel narrowing during low-flow years through water releases from re-operated upstream dams. The proposed purpose of these dam re-operations is to maximize fine-sediment transport downstream, thereby limiting fine-sediment deposition within the channel and channel narrowing. A suspended-sediment monitoring program consisting of two suspended-sediment gages was established in November 2010 at two sites in Big Bend National Park (BBNP), Texas, to inform these management efforts. Suspended-sediment gages consist of two single-frequency sideways-looking acoustic-Doppler profilers that collect data at 15-minute intervals. Acoustic attenuation is used to calculate silt-and-clay concentration, and acoustic backscatter is used to calculate sand concentration in two size classes. Acoustic attenuation and backscatter are calibrated to velocity-weighted suspended silt-and-clay and sand concentrations in the cross sections near the acoustic instrumentation by using standard depth-integrating samplers deployed according to the Equal-Width-Increment (EWI) method. During flood periods, when depth-integrated samples cannot be collected, automatic pump samplers collect suspended-sediment samples to augment the EWI dataset. Initial analyses indicate that steady, long-duration dam releases are able to transport a consistent load of silt and clay through the study reach in BBNP. However, when tributary flash floods are superimposed on dam releases, the large influx of silt and clay from these tributary floods is not transported through the study reach, even though discharge remains high. When tributary flash floods occur during low-flow periods on

  3. The Westinghouse Hanford Company Operational Environmental Monitoring Program CY-93

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.W.

    1993-10-01

    The Operational Environmental Monitoring Program (OEMP) provides facility-specific environmental monitoring to protect the environment adjacent to facilities under the responsibility of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and assure compliance with WHC requirements and local, state, and federal environmental regulations. The objectives of the OEMP are to evaluate: compliance with federal (DOE, EPA), state, and internal WHC environmental radiation protection requirements and guides; performance of radioactive waste confinement systems; and trends of radioactive materials in the environment at and adjacent to nuclear facilities and waste disposal sites. This paper identifies the monitoring responsibilities and current program status for each area of responsibility.

  4. Method and apparatus for acoustically monitoring the flow of suspended solid particulate matter. [Patent application; monitoring char flow in coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Roach, P.D.; Raptis, A.C.

    1980-11-24

    A method and apparatus for monitoring char flow in a coal gasifier system includes flow monitor circuits which measure acoustic attenuation caused by the presence of char in a char line and provides a char flow/no flow indication and an indication of relative char density. The flow monitor circuits compute the ratio of signals in two frequency bands, a first frequency band representative of background noise, and a second higher frequency band in which background noise is attenuated by the presence of char. Since the second frequency band contains higher frequencies, the ratio can be used to provide a flow/no flow indication. The second band can also be selected so that attenuation is monotonically related to particle concentration, providing a quantitative measure of char concentration.

  5. Investigation of acoustic emission coupling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    A three-phase research program was initiated by NASA in 1983 to investigate the use of acoustic monitoring techniques to detect incipient failure in turbopump bearings. Two prototype acoustic coupler probes were designed and evaluated, and four units of the final probe design were fabricated. Success in this program could lead to development of an on-board monitor which could detect bearing damage in flight and reduce or eliminate the need for disassembly after each flight. This final report reviews the accomplishments of the first two phases and presents the results of fabrication and testing completed in the final phase of the research program.

  6. The data collection component of the Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    Glantz, C.S.; Islam, M.M.

    1988-09-01

    An intensive program of meteorological monitoring is in place at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Program involves the measurement, observation, and storage of various meteorological data; continuous monitoring of regional weather conditions by a staff of professional meteorologists; and around-the-clock forecasting of weather conditions for the Hanford Site. The objective of this report is to document the data collection component of the program. In this report, each meteorological monitoring site is discussed in detail. Each site's location and instrumentation are described and photographs are presented. The methods for processing and communicating data to the Hanford Meteorology Station are also discussed. Finally, the procedures followed to maintain and calibrate these instruments are presented. 2 refs., 83 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. 40 CFR 125.63 - Establishment of a monitoring program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Establishment of a monitoring program. 125.63 Section 125.63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS CRITERIA AND STANDARDS FOR THE NATIONAL POLLUTANT DISCHARGE ELIMINATION SYSTEM Criteria for Modifying the Secondary Treatment...

  8. 36 CFR 1210.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... managing and monitoring each project, program, subaward, function or activity supported by the award... visits, as needed. (h) The NHPRC shall comply with clearance requirements of 5 CFR Part 1320 when... program performance. 1210.51 Section 1210.51 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES...

  9. 38 CFR 49.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Federal awarding agencies shall comply with clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting... program performance. 49.51 Section 49.51 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Records § 49.51 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Recipients are responsible for...

  10. 36 CFR 1210.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... visits, as needed. (h) The NHPRC shall comply with clearance requirements of 5 CFR Part 1320 when... program performance. 1210.51 Section 1210.51 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND... and Records § 1210.51 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Recipients are responsible...

  11. 24 CFR 266.115 - Program monitoring and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Program monitoring and evaluation. 266.115 Section 266.115 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND...

  12. 24 CFR 266.658 - Program monitoring and compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program monitoring and compliance. 266.658 Section 266.658 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND...

  13. 24 CFR 266.658 - Program monitoring and compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Program monitoring and compliance. 266.658 Section 266.658 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND...

  14. INTEGRATED COASTAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gulf of Mexico Program (GMP) Office in cooperation with Gulf State agencies, EPA Regions 4 and 6, EPA's Office of Water and Office of Research and Development (ORD), and the GMP principal partners are developing an integrated coastal monitoring program for the Gulf of Mexico....

  15. 43 CFR 12.951 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Monitoring and reporting program performance. 12.951 Section 12.951 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior ADMINISTRATIVE AND AUDIT REQUIREMENTS AND COST PRINCIPLES FOR ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements With...

  16. 43 CFR 12.80 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Monitoring and reporting program performance. 12.80 Section 12.80 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior ADMINISTRATIVE AND AUDIT REQUIREMENTS AND COST PRINCIPLES FOR ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to...

  17. A new setup for studying thermal microcracking through acoustic emission monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Thermal stressing is common in geothermal environments and has been shown in the laboratory to induce changes in the physical and mechanical properties of rocks. These changes are generally considered to be a consequence of the generation of thermal microcracks and debilitating chemical reactions. Thermal microcracks form as a result of the build-up of internal stresses due to: (1) the thermal expansion mismatch between the different phases present in the material, (2) thermal expansion anisotropy within individual minerals, and (3) thermal gradients. The generation of cracks during thermal stressing has been monitored in previous studies using the output of acoustic emissions (AE), a common proxy for microcrack damage, and through microstructural observations. Here we present a new experimental setup which is optimised to record AE from a rock sample at high temperatures and under a servo-controlled uniaxial stress. The design is such that the AE transducer is embedded in the top of the piston, which acts as a continuous wave guide to the sample. In this way, we simplify the ray path geometry whilst minimising the number of interfaces between the microcrack and the transducer, maximising the quality of the signal. This allows for an in-depth study of waveform attributes such as energy, amplitude, counts and duration. Furthermore, the capability of this device to apply a servo-controlled load on the sample, whilst measuring strain in real time, leads to a spectrum of possible tests combining mechanical and thermal stress. It is also an essential feature to eliminate the build-up of stresses through thermal expansion of the pistons and the sample. We plan a systematic experimental study of the AE of thermally stressed rock during heating and cooling cycles. We present results from pilot tests performed on Darley Dale sandstone and Westerly granite. Understanding the effects of thermal stressing in rock is of particular interest at a geothermal site, where

  18. GROUNDWATER QUALITY MONITORING OF WESTERN OIL SHALE DEVELOPMENT: MONITORING PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the development of a preliminary design of a groundwater quality monitoring program for oil shale operations, such as proposed for Federal Prototype Lease Tracts U-a and U-b in eastern Utah. A preliminary decision framework for monitoring design for this type...

  19. WETLANDS MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to address the environmental problems associated with wetlands on the Blackfeet Reservation, the Blackfeet Tribe completed a Wetlands Conservation Strategy (WCS) for the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. In fiscal year 2002 the Wetlands Program is proposing to focus on Comp...

  20. A passive acoustic monitoring method applied to observation and group size estimation of finless porpoises.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Li, Songhai; Xiao, Jianqiang

    2005-08-01

    The present study aimed at determining the detection capabilities of an acoustic observation system to recognize porpoises under local riverine conditions and compare the results with sighting observations. Arrays of three to five acoustic data loggers were stationed across the main channel of the Tian-e-zhou Oxbow of China's Yangtze River at intervals of 100-150 m to record sonar signals of free-ranging finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides). Acoustic observations, concurrent with visual observations, were conducted at two occasions on 20-22 October 2003 and 17-19 October 2004. During a total of 42 h of observation, 316 finless porpoises were sighted and 7041 sonar signals were recorded by loggers. The acoustic data loggers recorded ultrasonic signals of porpoises clearly, and detected the presence of porpoises with a correct detection level of 77.6% and a false alarm level of 5.8% within an effective distance of 150 m. Results indicated that the stationed passive acoustic observation method was effective in detecting the presence of porpoises and showed potential in estimating the group size. A positive linear correlation between the number of recorded signals and the group size of sighted porpoises was indicated, although it is faced with some uncertainty and requires further investigation. PMID:16158672

  1. A passive acoustic monitoring method applied to observation and group size estimation of finless porpoises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Li, Songhai; Xiao, Jianqiang

    2005-08-01

    The present study aimed at determining the detection capabilities of an acoustic observation system to recognize porpoises under local riverine conditions and compare the results with sighting observations. Arrays of three to five acoustic data loggers were stationed across the main channel of the Tian-e-zhou Oxbow of China's Yangtze River at intervals of 100-150 m to record sonar signals of free-ranging finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides). Acoustic observations, concurrent with visual observations, were conducted at two occasions on 20-22 October 2003 and 17-19 October 2004. During a total of 42 h of observation, 316 finless porpoises were sighted and 7041 sonar signals were recorded by loggers. The acoustic data loggers recorded ultrasonic signals of porpoises clearly, and detected the presence of porpoises with a correct detection level of 77.6% and a false alarm level of 5.8% within an effective distance of 150 m. Results indicated that the stationed passive acoustic observation method was effective in detecting the presence of porpoises and showed potential in estimating the group size. A positive linear correlation between the number of recorded signals and the group size of sighted porpoises was indicated, although it is faced with some uncertainty and requires further investigation.

  2. Quality assurance and quality control in monitoring programs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shampine, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    There are three general characteristics of the data to be collected in a monitoring program that should be met in order to maximize the use and value of the data: the data quality should be known the data type and quality should be consistent and comparable, and the data should be available and accessible. Potential problems with each of these characteristics are addressed effectively by quality assurance and quality control. One of the most important aspects of quality assurance in a monitoring program is the development of a quality assurance plan, which should identify clearly the quality of the data needed and describe in detail the planned actions to provide confidence that the program will meet its stated objectives. Quality control data, which allow for the quality and suitability of the environmental data to be evaluated and ascertained, should be collected and utilized as an integral part of the QA effort associated with a monitoring program.

  3. Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program; Annual report, FY91

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize Yucca Mountain as a possible site for a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a repository. To ensure that site characterization activities (SCA) do not adversely affect the Yucca Mountain area, an environmental program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and to ensure that activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments during fiscal year 1991 (FY91) for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the YMP environmental program. The six program areas are Site Characterization Activities Effects, Desert Tortoises, Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

  4. Yucca Mountain biological resources monitoring program; Annual report FY92

    SciTech Connect

    1993-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize Yucca Mountain as a potential site for a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities (SCA) do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, an environmental program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG&G/EM) during fiscal year 1992 (FY92) for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the YMP environmental program. The six program areas are Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises, Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

  5. Aerosol monitoring program in Hong Kong

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Heng-Chi; Tanner, P.A.

    1996-12-31

    The control of suspended particulate matter in the Hong Kong environment is currently an important issue, and in December 1995 a diesel-petrol switch plan was voted down by legislators. PM10 have been monitored at 5-minute intervals for the past year at rooftop level in central Kowloon, Hong Kong, together with selected measurements of TSP. Wind speed, wind direction, and the concentrations of SO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} have also been monitored. Measurements are currently in progress of relative contributions of the small particles (nominal aerodynamic diameter 0.3-2.5 gm), as well as of the PM{sub 10} fraction, to the total aerosol content, using two TEOMS. The chemical nature of selected different aerosol size fractions is also under investigation. Aerosol concentration exhibits a marked seasonal trend, being lower in the wet summer than in the dry winter. The diurnal variation shows two peaks which are linked to anthropogenic actions. Our measurements will be compared with the newly-established AQI of the Hong Kong EPD.

  6. Passive Acoustic Monitoring of the Environmental Impact of Oil Exploration on Marine Mammals in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sidorovskaia, Natalia A; Ackleh, Azmy S; Tiemann, Christopher O; Ma, Baoling; Ioup, Juliette W; Ioup, George E

    2016-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a region densely populated by marine mammals that must adapt to living in a highly active industrial environment. This paper presents a new approach to quantifying the anthropogenic impact on the marine mammal population. The results for sperm and beaked whales of a case study of regional population dynamics trends after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, derived from passive acoustic-monitoring data gathered before and after the spill in the vicinity of the accident, are presented. PMID:26611062

  7. In Vivo Monitoring Program Manual, PNL-MA-574

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Timothy P.

    2010-07-01

    An overview of the administration for the In Vivo Monitoring Program (IVMP) for Hanford. This includes organizational structure and program responsibilities; coordination of in vivo measurements; scheduling measurements; performing measurements; reporting results; and quality assurance. Overall responsibility for the management of the IVMP rests with the Program Manager (PM). The PM is responsible for providing the required in vivo counting services for Hanford Site contractor employees in accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and the specific statements of work.

  8. A Permanent Automated Real-Time Passive Acoustic Monitoring System for Bottlenose Dolphin Conservation in the Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Brunoldi, Marco; Bozzini, Giorgio; Casale, Alessandra; Corvisiero, Pietro; Grosso, Daniele; Magnoli, Nicodemo; Alessi, Jessica; Bianchi, Carlo Nike; Mandich, Alberta; Morri, Carla; Povero, Paolo; Wurtz, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Christian; Viano, Gianni; Cappanera, Valentina; Fanciulli, Giorgio; Bei, Massimiliano; Stasi, Nicola; Taiuti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the EU Life+ project named LIFE09 NAT/IT/000190 ARION, a permanent automated real-time passive acoustic monitoring system for the improvement of the conservation status of the transient and resident population of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) has been implemented and installed in the Portofino Marine Protected Area (MPA), Ligurian Sea. The system is able to detect the simultaneous presence of dolphins and boats in the area and to give their position in real time. This information is used to prevent collisions by diffusing warning messages to all the categories involved (tourists, professional fishermen and so on). The system consists of two gps-synchronized acoustic units, based on a particular type of marine buoy (elastic beacon), deployed about 1 km off the Portofino headland. Each one is equipped with a four-hydrophone array and an onboard acquisition system which can record the typical social communication whistles emitted by the dolphins and the sound emitted by boat engines. Signals are pre-filtered, digitized and then broadcast to the ground station via wi-fi. The raw data are elaborated to get the direction of the acoustic target to each unit, and hence the position of dolphins and boats in real time by triangulation. PMID:26789265

  9. A Permanent Automated Real-Time Passive Acoustic Monitoring System for Bottlenose Dolphin Conservation in the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Brunoldi, Marco; Bozzini, Giorgio; Casale, Alessandra; Corvisiero, Pietro; Grosso, Daniele; Magnoli, Nicodemo; Alessi, Jessica; Bianchi, Carlo Nike; Mandich, Alberta; Morri, Carla; Povero, Paolo; Wurtz, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Christian; Viano, Gianni; Cappanera, Valentina; Fanciulli, Giorgio; Bei, Massimiliano; Stasi, Nicola; Taiuti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the EU Life+ project named LIFE09 NAT/IT/000190 ARION, a permanent automated real-time passive acoustic monitoring system for the improvement of the conservation status of the transient and resident population of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) has been implemented and installed in the Portofino Marine Protected Area (MPA), Ligurian Sea. The system is able to detect the simultaneous presence of dolphins and boats in the area and to give their position in real time. This information is used to prevent collisions by diffusing warning messages to all the categories involved (tourists, professional fishermen and so on). The system consists of two gps-synchronized acoustic units, based on a particular type of marine buoy (elastic beacon), deployed about 1 km off the Portofino headland. Each one is equipped with a four-hydrophone array and an onboard acquisition system which can record the typical social communication whistles emitted by the dolphins and the sound emitted by boat engines. Signals are pre-filtered, digitized and then broadcast to the ground station via wi-fi. The raw data are elaborated to get the direction of the acoustic target to each unit, and hence the position of dolphins and boats in real time by triangulation. PMID:26789265

  10. The NASA Lunar Impact Monitoring Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Rob

    2008-01-01

    We have a fruitful observing program underway which has significantly increased the number of lunar impacts observed. We have done initial test shots at the Ames Vertical Gun Range obtained preliminary luminous efficiency values. More shots and better diagnostics are needed to determine ejecta properties. We are working to have a more accurate ejecta. environment definition to support lunar lander, habitat, and EVA design. Data also useful for validation of sporadic model at large size range.

  11. Residual water bactericide monitor development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A silver-ion bactericidal monitor is considered for the Space Shuttle Potable Water System. Potentiometric measurement using an ion-selective electrode is concluded to be the most feasible of available techniques. Four commercially available electrodes and a specially designed, solid-state, silver-sulfide electrode were evaluated for their response characteristics and suitability for space use. The configuration of the solid-state electrode with its Nernstian response of 10 to 10,000 ppb silver shows promise for use in space. A pressurized double-junction reference electrode with a quartz-fiber junction and a replaceable bellows electrolyte reservoir was designed verification-tested, and paired with a solid-state silver-sulfide electrode in a test fixture.

  12. Acoustic monitoring of gas emissions from the seafloor. Part II: a case study from the Sea of Marmara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, Gaye; Scalabrin, Carla; Dupré, Stéphanie; Leblond, Isabelle; Tary, Jean-Baptiste; Lanteri, Nadine; Augustin, Jean-Marie; Berger, Laurent; Cros, Estelle; Ogor, André; Tsabaris, Christos; Lescanne, Marc; Géli, Louis

    2014-09-01

    A rotating, acoustic gas bubble detector, BOB (Bubble OBservatory) module was deployed during two surveys, conducted in 2009 and 2011 respectively, to study the temporal variations of gas emissions from the Marmara seafloor, along the North Anatolian Fault zone. The echosounder mounted on the instrument insonifies an angular sector of 7° during a given duration (of about 1 h). Then it rotates to the next, near-by angular sector and so forth. When the full angular domain is insonified, the "pan and tilt system" rotates back to its initial position, in order to start a new cycle (of about 1 day). The acoustic data reveal that gas emission is not a steady process, with observed temporal variations ranging between a few minutes and 24 h (from one cycle to the other). Echo-integration and inversion performed on the acoustic data as described in the companion paper of Leblond et al. (Mar Geophys Res, 2014), also indicate important variations in, respectively, the target strength and the volumetric flow rates of individual sources. However, the observed temporal variations may not be related to the properties of the gas source only, but reflect possible variations in sea-bottom currents, which could deviate the bubble train towards the neighboring sector. During the 2011 survey, a 4-component ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) was co-located at the seafloor, 59 m away from the BOB module. The acoustic data from our rotating, monitoring system support, but do not provide undisputable evidence to confirm, the hypothesis formulated by Tary et al. (2012), that the short-duration, non-seismic micro-events recorded by the OBS are likely produced by gas-related processes within the near seabed sediments. Hence, the use of a multibeam echosounder, or of several split beam echosounders should be preferred to rotating systems, for future experiments.

  13. Planning aquatic ecosystem restoration monitoring programs

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, R.M.; Wellman, K.F.

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted as part of the Evaluation of Environmental Investments Research Program (EEIRP). The EEIRP is sponsored by the US Army Corps of Engineers. The objectives of this work are to (1) identify relevant approaches and features for environmental investment measures to be applied throughout the project life; (2) develop methods to access the effectiveness of the approach or feature for providing the intended environmental output; (3) develop and provide guidance for formulating environmental projects; and (4) provide guidance for formulating and identifying relevant cost components of alternate restoration plans.

  14. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program. FY 1993: Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, C.M.; Ashwood, T.L.; Hicks, D.S.; Marsh, J.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report continues a series of annual and semiannual reports that present the results of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) monitoring activities. The report details monitoring data for fiscal year (FY) 1993 and is divided into three major areas: SWSA 6 [including tumulus pads, Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), and other sites], the low-level Liquid-Waste Solidification Project (LWSP), and TRU-waste storage facilities in SWSA 5 N. The detailed monitoring methodology is described in the second revision of the ASEMP program plan. This report also presents a summary of the methodology used to gather data for each major area along with the results obtained during FY 1993.

  15. GPS Monitor Station Upgrade Program at the Naval Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galysh, Ivan J.; Craig, Dwin M.

    1996-01-01

    One of the measurements made by the Global Positioning System (GPS) monitor stations is to measure the continuous pseudo-range of all the passing GPS satellites. The pseudo-range contains GPS and monitor station clock errors as well as GPS satellite navigation errors. Currently the time at the GPS monitor station is obtained from the GPS constellation and has an inherent inaccuracy as a result. Improved timing accuracy at the GPS monitoring stations will improve GPS performance. The US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is developing hardware and software for the GPS monitor station upgrade program to improve the monitor station clock accuracy. This upgrade will allow a method independent of the GPS satellite constellation of measuring and correcting monitor station time to US Naval Observatory (USNO) time. THe hardware consists of a high performance atomic cesium frequency standard (CFS) and a computer which is used to ensemble the CFS with the two CFS's currently located at the monitor station by use of a dual-mixer system. The dual-mixer system achieves phase measurements between the high-performance CFS and the existing monitor station CFS's to within 400 femtoseconds. Time transfer between USNO and a given monitor station is achieved via a two way satellite time transfer modem. The computer at the monitor station disciplines the CFS based on a comparison of one pulse per second sent from the master site at USNO. The monitor station computer is also used to perform housekeeping functions, as well as recording the health status of all three CFS's. This information is sent to the USNO through the time transfer modem. Laboratory time synchronization results in the sub nanosecond range have been observed and the ability to maintain the monitor station CFS frequency to within 3.0 x 10 (sup minus 14) of the master site at USNO.

  16. Acoustic Monitor for Liquid-Solid Slurries Measurements at Low Weight Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. L.L. Tavlarides; Dr. A.S. Sangan

    2004-12-08

    The principle objective of the project was to develop an acoustic probe for determining the weight fraction of particles in a flowing suspension. The suspension can be solid-liquid (S-L) or solid-gas-liquid (S-G-L). The work accomplished during the first three years of DOE funding was devoted to the development of a rigorous theory for acoustic wave propagation through solid-liquid (S-L) and solid-gas-liquid (S-G-L). In the first funding period we developed an acoustic probe for S-G-L suspensions that has resulted in a theory, supported by our experiments, to describe small amplitude acoustic wave propagations in dilute suspensions (Norato, 1999; Spelter al., 1999, 2001: Norato et al. 2002). The theory agrees well with experimental data of sound attenuation over a wide range of particle sizes, frequencies, and weight percent solids. We have also completed theoretical and experimental investigation on the effect of entrained gas bubbles on the attenuation. This analysis permits us to determine the S-L weight percent in the presence of bubbles.

  17. Program Monitoring with LTL in EAGLE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barringer, Howard; Goldberg, Allen; Havelund, Klaus; Sen, Koushik

    2004-01-01

    We briefly present a rule-based framework called EAGLE, shown to be capable of defining and implementing finite trace monitoring logics, including future and past time temporal logic, extended regular expressions, real-time and metric temporal logics (MTL), interval logics, forms of quantified temporal logics, and so on. In this paper we focus on a linear temporal logic (LTL) specialization of EAGLE. For an initial formula of size m, we establish upper bounds of O(m(sup 2)2(sup m)log m) and O(m(sup 4)2(sup 2m)log(sup 2) m) for the space and time complexity, respectively, of single step evaluation over an input trace. This bound is close to the lower bound O(2(sup square root m) for future-time LTL presented. EAGLE has been successfully used, in both LTL and metric LTL forms, to test a real-time controller of an experimental NASA planetary rover.

  18. Acoustic Emission and Guided Ultrasonic Waves for Detection and Continuous Monitoring of Cracks in Light Water Reactor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-06-28

    Acoustic emission (AE) and guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are considered for continuous monitoring and detection of cracks in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components. In this effort, both techniques are applied to the detection and monitoring of fatigue crack growth in a full scale pipe component. AE results indicated crack initiation and rapid growth in the pipe, and significant GUW responses were observed in response to the growth of the fatigue crack. After initiation, the crack growth was detectable with AE for approximately 20,000 cycles. Signals associated with initiation and rapid growth where distinguished based on total rate of activity and differences observed in the centroid frequency of hits. An intermediate stage between initiation and rapid growth was associated with significant energy emissions, though few hits. GUW exhibit a nearly monotonic trend with crack length with an exception of measurements obtained at 41 mm and 46 mm.

  19. Passive acoustic monitoring to detect spawning in large-bodied catostomids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Straight, Carrie A.; Freeman, Byron J.; Freeman, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    Documenting timing, locations, and intensity of spawning can provide valuable information for conservation and management of imperiled fishes. However, deep, turbid or turbulent water, or occurrence of spawning at night, can severely limit direct observations. We have developed and tested the use of passive acoustics to detect distinctive acoustic signatures associated with spawning events of two large-bodied catostomid species (River Redhorse Moxostoma carinatum and Robust Redhorse Moxostoma robustum) in river systems in north Georgia. We deployed a hydrophone with a recording unit at four different locations on four different dates when we could both record and observe spawning activity. Recordings captured 494 spawning events that we acoustically characterized using dominant frequency, 95% frequency, relative power, and duration. We similarly characterized 46 randomly selected ambient river noises. Dominant frequency did not differ between redhorse species and ranged from 172.3 to 14,987.1 Hz. Duration of spawning events ranged from 0.65 to 11.07 s, River Redhorse having longer durations than Robust Redhorse. Observed spawning events had significantly higher dominant and 95% frequencies than ambient river noises. We additionally tested software designed to automate acoustic detection. The automated detection configurations correctly identified 80–82% of known spawning events, and falsely indentified spawns 6–7% of the time when none occurred. These rates were combined over all recordings; rates were more variable among individual recordings. Longer spawning events were more likely to be detected. Combined with sufficient visual observations to ascertain species identities and to estimate detection error rates, passive acoustic recording provides a useful tool to study spawning frequency of large-bodied fishes that displace gravel during egg deposition, including several species of imperiled catostomids.

  20. Continuous wavelet transform analysis and modal location analysis acoustic emission source location for nuclear piping crack growth monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd, Shukri; Holford, Karen M.; Pullin, Rhys

    2014-02-12

    Source location is an important feature of acoustic emission (AE) damage monitoring in nuclear piping. The ability to accurately locate sources can assist in source characterisation and early warning of failure. This paper describe the development of a novelAE source location technique termed 'Wavelet Transform analysis and Modal Location (WTML)' based on Lamb wave theory and time-frequency analysis that can be used for global monitoring of plate like steel structures. Source location was performed on a steel pipe of 1500 mm long and 220 mm outer diameter with nominal thickness of 5 mm under a planar location test setup using H-N sources. The accuracy of the new technique was compared with other AE source location methods such as the time of arrival (TOA) techniqueand DeltaTlocation. Theresults of the study show that the WTML method produces more accurate location resultscompared with TOA and triple point filtering location methods. The accuracy of the WTML approach is comparable with the deltaT location method but requires no initial acoustic calibration of the structure.

  1. Citizen radiation monitoring program for the TMI area

    SciTech Connect

    Baratta, A.J.; Gricar, B.G.; Jester, W.A.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of the program was to develop a system for citizens to independently measure radiation levels in and around their communities. This report describes the process by which the Program was developed and operated. It also presents the methods used to select and train the citizens in making and interpreting the measurements. The test procedures used to select the equipment for the program are described as are the results of the testing. Finally, the actual monitoring results are discussed along with the citizens' reactions to the program.

  2. TVA Reservoir Monitoring Program: Fish community results, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, E.M. Jr.

    1992-07-31

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) operates 9 reservoirs on the Tennessee River and 37 reservoirs on its tributaries. TVA is committed to maintaining the health of aquatic resources created when the reservoir system was built. To that end, TVA conducts the Water Resources and Biological Monitoring Program that includes physical, chemical, and biological data collection components. Biological monitoring targets the following selected elements within three zones of the reservoir (inflow, transition, and forebay): Sediment/Water-column Acute Toxicity Screening (forebay and transition zone only); Benthic macroinvertebrates Fish Reservoir fish monitoring is divided into the following activities: Fish Biomass; Fish Tissue Contamination; Fish Community Monitoring; Fish Health Assessment. This report presents the results of fall1991 fish community monitoring and fish health assessment data using a new analytical approach: Reservoir Index of Biotic Integrity (RIBI). Fish health assessment is included in this report as one of the RIBI metrics.

  3. Introduction to the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to a long-term biological monitoring program and the Environmental Management special issue titled Long-term Biological Monitoring of an Impaired Stream: Implications for Environmental Management. The Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program, or BMAP, was implemented to assess biological impairment downstream of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, beginning in 1985. Several of the unique aspects of the program include its long-term consistent sampling, a focus on evaluating the effectiveness of specific facility abatement and remedial actions, and the use of quantitative sampling protocols using a multidisciplinary approach. This paper describes the need and importance of long-term watershed-based biological monitoring strategies, in particular for addressing long-term stewardship goals at DOE sites, and provides a summary of the BMAP's objectives, spatial and temporal extent, and overall focus. The primary components of the biological monitoring program for East Fork Poplar Creek in Oak Ridge, Tennessee are introduced, as are the additional 9 papers in this Environmental Management special issue.

  4. ELECTROCHEMICAL NOISE BASED CORROSION MONITORING HANFORD SITE PROGRAM STATUS

    SciTech Connect

    EDGEMON, G.L.

    2005-03-21

    The Hanford Site near Richland, Washington has 177 underground waste tanks that store approximately 253 million liters of radioactive waste from 50 years of plutonium production. Prior to 1995 no online corrosion monitoring systems were in place at Hanford to facilitate the early detection of the onset of localized corrosion should it occur in a waste tank. Because of this, a program was started in 1995 to develop an electrochemical noise (EN) corrosion monitoring system to improve Hanford's corrosion monitoring strategy. Three systems are now installed and operating at Hanford. System design, performance history, data and the results of a recent analysis of tank vapor space data are presented.

  5. EPA program for monitoring ecological status and trends

    SciTech Connect

    Messer, J.J.; Linthurst, R.A.; Overton, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Despite hundreds of millions of dollars spent annually in the United States on environmental monitoring, policy and decision makers seldom have ready access to monitoring data to aid in prioritizing research and assessment efforts or to assess the extent to which current policies are meeting the desired objectives. EPA is currently conducting research to evaluate options for establishing an integrated, cooperative monitoring program, with participation by federal, state, and private entities, that could result in annual statistical reports and interpretive summaries on the status and trends in indicators of adverse disturbance and corresponding health of the nation's ecosystems on the regional and national scale.

  6. An EPA program for monitoring ecological status and trends.

    PubMed

    Messer, J J; Linthurst, R A; Overton, W S

    1991-04-01

    Despite hundreds of millions of dollars spent annually in the United States on environmental monitoring, policy and decision makers seldom have ready access to monitoring data to aid in prioritizing reasearch and assessment efforts or to assess the extent to which current policies are meeting the desired objectives. EPA is currently conducting research to evaluate options for establishing an integrated, cooperative monitoring program, with participation by federal, state, and private entities, that could result in annual statistical reports and interpretive summaries on the status and trends in indicators of adverse disturbance and corresponding 'health' of the nation's ecosystem on the regional and national scale. PMID:24233374

  7. Nonradiological liquid effluent monitoring program. 1992 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.A.; Peterson-Wright, L.J.; Meachum, T.R.

    1993-08-01

    A monitoring program for nonradioactive parameters and pollutants in liquid effluents was initiated in October 1985 for facilities operated by EG&G Idaho, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Program design and implementation are discussed in this report. Design and methodologies for sampling, analysis, and data management are also discussed. Monitoring results for 28 liquid effluent streams from (October 1991 through December 1992) are presented with emphasis on calendar year 1992 activities. All parameter measurements and concentrations were below the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act toxic characteristics limits.

  8. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1998 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada Ecological Services

    1998-10-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1998. Twenty-one sites for seven projects were surveyed for the presence of state or federally protected species. Three projects were in or near habitat of the threatened desert tortoise and required special clearance and transect surveys. All geospatial data collected were entered into Bechtel Nevada's Ecological Geographic Information system for use in ongoing ecosystem management of the NTS.

  9. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program FY 1996 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, C.M.; Marshall, D.S.; Cunningham, G.R.

    1997-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1995 through September 1996. The Radioactive Solid Waste Operations Group (RSWOG) of the Waste Management and Remedial Action Division (WMRAD) and the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) established ASEMP in 1989. The purpose of the program is to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 North as required by Chapters 2 and 3 of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A.

  10. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

    1990-10-01

    In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

  11. EPA's monitoring program at Love Canal 1980.

    PubMed

    Hauser, T R; Bromberg, S M

    1982-09-01

    As stated at the beginning of this paper conclusions reached thus far cannot be discussed in this paper. However, a great deal of information is available for examination.EPA displayed its ability to coordinate widely separated laboratories, both Federal and private, into a smooth working team in a very short period of time. A very comprehensive study plan was also developed and implemented quickly. EPA was fortunate to have already had GCA under contract when the emergency arose. In no small part the success of the field effort was due to the managerial and technical abilities of the GCA team.Within a period of 6 weeks a plan was developed, a prime contractor retained, subcontractors hired, and field activities begun. Within a period of 3 months in excess of 8600 field samples were collected and over 12,000 field and QC samples were analyzed. During this same period 2 major data systems were developed, debugged, and placed into operation.In short this EPA project was probably the most comprehensive multimedia field project ever attempted by EPA and certainly the data is being subjected to the most strenuous quality control measures ever imposed by this Agency. The entire program is presently under peer review and the results are being prepared for publication by EPA Headquarters. PMID:24264296

  12. Acoustic fault injection tool (AFIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.

    1999-05-01

    On September 18, 1997, Honeywell Technology Center (HTC) successfully completed a three-week flight test of its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS) at Patuxent River Flight Test Center. This flight test was the culmination of an ambitious 38-month proof-of-concept effort directed at demonstrating the feasibility of detecting crack propagation in helicopter rotor components. The program was funded as part of the U.S. Navy's Air Vehicle Diagnostic Systems (AVDS) program. Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. The application of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults has proven the feasibility of the technology. The flight-test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. During the RAMS flight test, 12 test flights were flown from which 25 Gbyte of digital acoustic data and about 15 hours of analog flight data recorder (FDR) data were collected from the eight on-rotor acoustic sensors. The focus of this paper is to describe the CH-46 flight-test configuration and present design details about a new innovative machinery diagnostic technology called acoustic fault injection. This technology involves the injection of acoustic sound into machinery to assess health and characterize operational status. The paper will also address the development of the Acoustic Fault Injection Tool (AFIT), which was successfully demonstrated during the CH-46 flight tests.

  13. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Groundwater Monitoring Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillesheim, M. B.; Beauheim, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    The development of a groundwater monitoring program is an integral part of any radioactive waste disposal facility. Monitoring improves our understanding of the geologic and hydrologic framework, which improves conceptual models and the quality of groundwater models that provide data input for performance assessment. The purpose of a groundwater monitoring program is to provide objective evidence that the hydrologic system is behaving as expected (i.e., performance confirmation). Monitoring should not be limited to near-field observations but should include the larger natural system in which the repository is situated. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility designed for the safe disposal of transuranic wastes resulting from U.S. defense programs, can serve as a model for other radioactive waste disposal facilities. WIPP has a long-established groundwater monitoring program that is geared towards meeting compliance certification requirements set forth by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The primary task of the program is to measure various water parameters (e.g.., water level, pressure head, chemical and physical properties) using a groundwater monitoring network that currently consists of 85 wells in the vicinity of the WIPP site. Wells are completed to a number of water-bearing horizons and are monitored on a monthly basis. In many instances, they are also instrumented with programmable pressure transducers that take high-frequency measurements that supplement the monthly measurements. Results from higher frequency measurements indicate that the hydrologic system in the WIPP vicinity is in a transient state, responding to both natural and anthropogenic stresses. The insights gathered from the monitoring, as well as from hydrologic testing activities, provide valuable information that contributes to groundwater modeling efforts and performance assessment. Sandia is a multi program laboratory operated by

  14. A Non-Intrusive GMA Welding Process Quality Monitoring System Using Acoustic Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cayo, Eber Huanca; Alfaro, Sadek Crisostomo Absi

    2009-01-01

    Most of the inspection methods used for detection and localization of welding disturbances are based on the evaluation of some direct measurements of welding parameters. This direct measurement requires an insertion of sensors during the welding process which could somehow alter the behavior of the metallic transference. An inspection method that evaluates the GMA welding process evolution using a non-intrusive process sensing would allow not only the identification of disturbances during welding runs and thus reduce inspection time, but would also reduce the interference on the process caused by the direct sensing. In this paper a nonintrusive method for weld disturbance detection and localization for weld quality evaluation is demonstrated. The system is based on the acoustic sensing of the welding electrical arc. During repetitive tests in welds without disturbances, the stability acoustic parameters were calculated and used as comparison references for the detection and location of disturbances during the weld runs. PMID:22399990

  15. 1993 Annual Report: San Francisco estuary regional monitoring program for trace substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, B.; Lacy, Jessica; Hardin, Dane; Grovhaug, Tom; Taberski, K.; Jassby, Alan D.; Cloern, James E.; Caffrey, J.; Cole, B.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    1993-01-01

    Summaries of other monitoring activities pertinent to regional monitoring are also included in the Report: a description of the Regional Board’s Bay Protection Studies, the Sacramento Coordinated Monitoring Program, and a wetlands monitoring plan are included.

  16. Hawaii Beach Monitoring Program: Beach Profile Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbs, Ann E.; Richmond, Bruce M.; Fletcher, Charles H.; Hillman, Kindra P.

    2001-01-01

    , rising sea level leads to a natural landward migration of the shoreline. Dramatic examples of coastal erosion, such as houses and roads falling into the sea, are rare in Hawaii, but the impact of erosion is still very serious. The signs of erosion are much more subtle and typically start as a "temporary" hardening structure designed to mitigate an immediate problem which, eventually, results in a proliferation of structures along a stretch of coast. The natural ability of the sandy shoreline to respond to changes in wave climate is lost. The overall goals of this study are to document the coastal erosion history in Hawaii, determine the causal factors of that erosion, provide high-quality data for other "end-users" in applied studies (i.e. coastal engineers, planners, and managers), and increase our general understanding of low-latitude coastal geologic development. This project involves close cooperation between the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program and the University of Hawaii.

  17. Integration of acoustic emission systems within Integri-TechTM analysis system for structural health monitoring of pressurised engineering plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghouri, A. A.; Rafferty, Steven; Pickwell, Andy; Galbraith, Walter; Pierce, S. Gareth; Gachagan, Anthony

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this Acoustic Emission (AE) based Structural Health Monitoring project is to enable accurate location of AE sources in pressurised engineering plant and to use AE source location data to establish defect locations for use within Integri-TechTM; a finite element based analysis, monitoring and fitness for service assessment system. Integri-TechTM is a windows based system which carries out combined analysis and assessment providing fatigue life and remnant life calculations and inspection priorities presenting the results in an accessible web portal format. The software uses finite element stress models created in the companion software Model Wizard. The AE monitoring system that has been developed can be used with an array of up to four AE broad band sensor channels with associated signal processing. Using a flexible approach in MATLAB, the authors have developed algorithms which were used for analysing the received AE signals to extract information about the nature and location of the source. The ability to carry out source location and possibly perform real time monitoring (detecting cracking as it occurs) is attractive feature of the AE system developed for this project. The time of arrival (TOA) data was used by Integri-TechTM software to calculate source location using its own built-in algorithm, and this was verified independently using a MATLAB approach.

  18. Analysis of Wireline Acoustic Logs, India National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerin, G.; Nghp Expedition 1 Scientific Party

    2007-12-01

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 1 was designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate along the east and west coast of India and near the Andaman Islands. In the spring and summer 2006, the expedition discovered gas hydrate in sand, silt, and clay dominated sediments. One of the best recognized influences of gas hydrate on the host sediment is a change in mechanical and elastic properties, typically an increase in sonic velocity, but also a measurable increase in attenuation. Recognizing the strong influence of gas hydrate and free gas on the propagation and amplitude of acoustic waves, sonic waveforms were recorded in multiple modes and frequencies in the ten sites where wireline logs were acquired. To complete the characterization and integrate the drilling data with the regional seismic surveys, vertical seismic profiles (VSP) were acquired successfully in six holes. These data, recorded with a wide range of frequency and scales provide an extensive survey of the acoustic properties in very diverse gas hydrate systems. Because of the poorly consolidated nature of the sediments in some east coast sites, automatic picking of velocity was only partially successful during the expedition, and a complete post cruise reprocessing of the sonic waveforms was necessary to draw accurate compressional (Vp) and shear velocity (Vs) logs in these holes. Synthetic seismograms generated with the Vp and density logs confirm the depth and nature of the main reflectors in the seismic surveys that were used to select the sites, in particular the BSR marking the deepest occurrence of gas hydrate. Despite heterogeneous distributions, the sonic logs clearly identify the presence of gas hydrate in very distinct intervals, and the eventual occurrence of free gas underneath. In addition to providing Vp and Vs logs, the amplitude of the waveforms offers a complete insight into the distribution of gas hydrate in a rich and deformed lithology. The dissipative

  19. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, M.Y.

    1995-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting a program to monitor the waste water from PNL-operated research and development facilities on the Hanford Site. The purpose of the program is to collect data to assess administrative controls and to determine whether discharges to the process sewer meet sewer criteria. Samples have been collected on a regular basis from the major PNL facilities on the Hanford Site since March 1994. A broad range of analyses has been performed to determine the primary constituents in the liquid effluent. The sampling program is briefly summarized in the paper. Continuous monitoring of pH, conductivity, and flow also provides data on the liquid effluent streams. In addition to sampling and monitoring, the program is evaluating the dynamics of the waste stream with dye studies and is evaluating the use of newer technologies for potential deployment in future sampling/monitoring efforts. Information collected to date has been valuable in determining sources of constituents that may be higher than the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). This facility treats the waste streams before discharge to the Columbia River.

  20. 20 CFR 437.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 437.40 Section 437.40 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award...

  1. 45 CFR 602.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 602.40 Section 602.40 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... actual accomplishments to the objectives established for the period. Where the output of the project...

  2. 45 CFR 602.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 602.40 Section 602.40 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... actual accomplishments to the objectives established for the period. Where the output of the project...

  3. 45 CFR 602.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 602.40 Section 602.40 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... actual accomplishments to the objectives established for the period. Where the output of the project...

  4. Quality Assurance Program Plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, L.M.

    1993-07-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) describes the quality assurance requirements and responsibilities for radioactive airborne emissions measurements activities from regulated stacks are controlled at the Hanford Site. Detailed monitoring requirements apply to stacks exceeding 1% of the standard of 10 mrem annual effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual from operations of the Hanford Site.

  5. 10 CFR 600.151 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 600.151 Section 600.151 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements With Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other...

  6. 10 CFR 600.151 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 600.151 Section 600.151 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements With Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other...

  7. 49 CFR 227.103 - Noise monitoring program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Noise monitoring program. 227.103 Section 227.103 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE Occupational Noise Exposure for Railroad Operating Employees. § 227.103 Noise...

  8. DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES-FOUNDATION OF A SUCCESSFUL MONITORING PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The data quality objectives (DQO) process is a fundamental site characterization tool and the foundation of a successful monitoring program. The DQO process is a systematic planning approach based on the scientific method of inquiry. The process identifies the goals of data col...

  9. 34 CFR 74.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 74.51 Section 74.51 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education ADMINISTRATION OF GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Reports and Records §...

  10. 2 CFR 215.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 215.51 Section 215.51 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULARS AND GUIDANCE Reserved UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER...

  11. 29 CFR 95.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 95.51 Section 95.51 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS, AND WITH COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS, FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS, ORGANIZATIONS UNDER THE JURISDICTION...

  12. FRESHWATER POTOMAC LONG-TERM BENTHIC MONITORING PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Maryland Department of the Environments Freshwater Potomac Long-Term Benthic Monitoring Program provides seasonal information on abundance and composition for the benthic fauna of the freshwater portion of the Potomac River for use in recommendations to State agencies accordi...

  13. 40 CFR 257.25 - Assessment monitoring program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Assessment monitoring program. 257.25 Section 257.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR CLASSIFICATION OF SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES AND PRACTICES Disposal Standards for the Receipt of Conditionally Exempt Small...

  14. 45 CFR 1157.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... grant year, quarterly or semi-annual reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final... developments. Events may occur between the scheduled performance reporting dates which have significant impact... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance....

  15. 45 CFR 1157.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... grant year, quarterly or semi-annual reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final... developments. Events may occur between the scheduled performance reporting dates which have significant impact... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance....

  16. 22 CFR 135.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... grant year, quarterly or semi-annual reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final... developments. Events may occur between the scheduled performance reporting dates which have significant impact... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program...

  17. 45 CFR 602.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... grant year, quarterly or semi-annual reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final... developments. Events may occur between the scheduled performance reporting dates which have significant impact... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance....

  18. 21 CFR 1403.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... grant year, quarterly or semi-annual reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final... developments. Events may occur between the scheduled performance reporting dates which have significant impact... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance....

  19. 10 CFR 600.240 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... grant year, quarterly or semi-annual reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final... developments. Events may occur between the scheduled performance reporting dates which have significant impact... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance....

  20. 45 CFR 1174.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... grant year, quarterly or semi-annual reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final... developments. Events may occur between the scheduled performance reporting dates which have significant impact... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance....

  1. 45 CFR 602.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... grant year, quarterly or semi-annual reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final... developments. Events may occur between the scheduled performance reporting dates which have significant impact... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance....

  2. 45 CFR 1183.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... grant year, quarterly or semi-annual reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final... developments. Events may occur between the scheduled performance reporting dates which have significant impact... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance....

  3. 21 CFR 1403.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... grant year, quarterly or semi-annual reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final... developments. Events may occur between the scheduled performance reporting dates which have significant impact... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance....

  4. 34 CFR 80.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... grant year, quarterly or semi-annual reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final... developments. Events may occur between the scheduled performance reporting dates which have significant impact... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance....

  5. 45 CFR 1183.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... grant year, quarterly or semi-annual reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final... developments. Events may occur between the scheduled performance reporting dates which have significant impact... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance....

  6. 45 CFR 1174.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... grant year, quarterly or semi-annual reports shall be due 30 days after the reporting period. The final... developments. Events may occur between the scheduled performance reporting dates which have significant impact... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance....

  7. 40 CFR 30.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting performance data from recipients. ... performance. 30.51 Section 30.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER... Records § 30.51 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Recipients are responsible for...

  8. 45 CFR 74.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) The HHS awarding agency complies with the applicable report clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320....51 Section 74.51 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION... Records § 74.51 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Recipients are responsible for...

  9. 32 CFR 32.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting performance data from recipients. ....51 Section 32.51 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT... Records § 32.51 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Recipients are responsible for...

  10. 7 CFR 550.26 - Monitoring program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Monitoring program performance. 550.26 Section 550.26 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE POLICY FOR NON-ASSISTANCE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS Management...

  11. Cumulative distribution functions and their use in monitoring programs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological resource monitoring programs typically have estimating the status and change in status as an objective. A well designed and skillfully implemented survey design will produce an accurate representation of the status of the resource at the time the survey was conducted....

  12. 14 CFR 1260.151 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., as needed. (h) NASA shall comply with clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting... performance. 1260.151 Section 1260.151 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... Records § 1260.151 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Recipients are responsible...

  13. 14 CFR 1273.40 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... performance. 1273.40 Section 1273.40 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... program performance. (a) Monitoring by grantees. Grantees are responsible for managing the day-to-day... assure compliance with applicable Federal requirements and that performance goals are being...

  14. 43 CFR 12.951 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Federal awarding agencies shall comply with clearance requirements of 5 CFR part 1320 when requesting... performance. 12.951 Section 12.951 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior... Organizations Post-Award Requirements § 12.951 Monitoring and reporting program performance. (a) Recipients...

  15. 36 CFR 1210.51 - Monitoring and reporting program performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Monitoring and reporting program performance. 1210.51 Section 1210.51 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION GENERAL RULES UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION,...

  16. 12 CFR 27.6 - Substitute monitoring program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (12 CFR 202.13(d)). A bank collecting the data in compliance with § 27.3 of this part will be in... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Substitute monitoring program. 27.6 Section 27.6 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR HOUSING HOME...

  17. 49 CFR 227.103 - Noise monitoring program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy of the incorporated materials from the... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Noise monitoring program. 227.103 Section 227.103..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE Occupational Noise Exposure for Railroad...

  18. 49 CFR 227.103 - Noise monitoring program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy of the incorporated materials from the... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Noise monitoring program. 227.103 Section 227.103..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE Occupational Noise Exposure for Railroad...

  19. 49 CFR 227.103 - Noise monitoring program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy of the incorporated materials from the... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Noise monitoring program. 227.103 Section 227.103..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE Occupational Noise Exposure for Railroad...

  20. 34 CFR 303.171 - Supervision and monitoring of programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... information to show that the requirements in § 303.501 are met. (Approved by the Office of Management and... INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES State Application for a Grant Components of A Statewide System... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supervision and monitoring of programs. 303.171...