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Sample records for acoustic neuroma excision

  1. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... search IRSA's site Unique Hits since January 2003 Acoustic Neuroma Click Here for Acoustic Neuroma Practice Guideline ... to microsurgery. One doctor's story of having an acoustic neuroma In August 1991, Dr. Thomas F. Morgan ...

  2. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor; Hearing loss - acoustic; Tinnitus - acoustic ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  3. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  4. Functional outcome in patients after excision of extracanalicular acoustic neuromas using the suboccipital approach.

    PubMed Central

    Kane, N. M.; Kazanas, S.; Maw, A. R.; Coakham, H. B.; Torrens, M. J.; Morgan, M. H.; Stranjalis, G.; Butler, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    An audit of surgery for acoustic neuroma was carried out to determine the frequency and nature of postoperative symptoms and their impact upon the patient's quality of life and vocation. Fifty-six patients were interviewed between 6 months and 5 years (mean 26 months) after surgical excision of an acoustic neuroma. The objective surgical results in these patients are good, with normal or near normal functional preservation rates of 80% for the facial nerve (House-Brackmann grade I/II), and 27.3% for a previously functioning acoustic nerve. Despite this there was no significant overall reduction in the reported occurrence of balance problems, tinnitus, headache and other neurological sequelae of the tumour after surgical excision. In 20% of the patients persistent symptoms, including deafness and facial weakness, had prevented the resumption of former social activities. As a result of these symptoms 8.6% of the patients were certified medically unfit for work, but of those employed preoperatively over 70% had returned to their jobs. The success of neuro-otological surgical management of acoustic neuroma is offset by some degree of chronic morbidity. Our patients expressed the need to know whether their symptoms would resolve, but were often too afraid to ask. Patients can be reassured that the majority resume their former social and vocational activities, but should be advised that some symptoms can persist or occur de novo after surgery. Our data suggest that early intervention would reduce the incidence of these troublesome sequelae. PMID:7598420

  5. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... ANAUSA.org Connect with us! What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Each heading slides to reveal information. Important ... Acoustic Neuroma Important Points To Know About an Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular ...

  6. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  7. Identifying the Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  8. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... this sponsor... Platinum Sponsor More from this sponsor... Gold Sponsor University of Colorado Acoustic Neuroma Program Rocky Mountain Gamma Knife Center More from this sponsor... Gold Sponsor NYU Langone Medical Center Departments of Neurosurgery ...

  9. Post Treatment of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Identifying an AN Symptoms Acoustic Neuroma Keywords Educational Video Pre-Treatment Treatment Options Summary Treatment Options Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions ...

  10. Subarachnoid fat embolism complicating autologous fat grafting following translabyrinthine excision of acoustic neuroma.

    PubMed

    Reece, A T; O'Reilly, B; Teasdale, E; Todd, N V

    1989-09-01

    A 64-year-old man had complete excision of an acoustic schwannoma via the translabyrinthine route and the mastoid cavity was packed with fat. Post-operatively there were two episodes of aseptic meningitis and CT scanning demonstrated migration of fat into the basal subarachnoid CSF spaces. This unusual complication should be recognized and differentiated from both true infective meningitis and aseptic meningitis from other causes.

  11. Clinical and diagnostic evaluation of acoustic neuromas.

    PubMed

    Stucken, Emily Z; Brown, Kevin; Selesnick, Samuel H

    2012-04-01

    In the past century, significant advances have been made in understanding the clinical features of acoustic neuromas. Furthermore, rapid technological advances have led to the development of sensitive, rapid, and relatively noninvasive diagnostic modalities, which has allowed for earlier discovery of acoustic neuromas and has reduced the average tumor size at time of diagnosis. The ultimate result has been improved clinical outcomes after surgery and radiotherapy.

  12. Decision Making in Acoustic Neuroma Management

    PubMed Central

    Naguib, Maged B.; Saleh, Essam; Aristegui, Miguel; Mazzoni, Antonio; Sanna, Mario

    1994-01-01

    Patients with acoustic neuroma in their only hearing ear are not frequently seen in clinical practice. Managing this group of patients is a challenge to both patient and surgeon. In this study we report on five cases of acoustic neuroma in an only hearing ear. Our decision for nonsurgical management of those patients with regular follow-up using auditory brainstem responses and magnetic resonance imaging is discussed. Other management options currently available are considered as well. PMID:17170923

  13. Incidental discovery of acoustic neuromas.

    PubMed

    Selesnick, S H; Deora, M; Drotman, M B; Heier, L A

    1999-06-01

    Our objective is to report 4 cases of incidentally discovered acoustic neuromas (ANs) and to determine the incidence of asymptomatic ANs. A prospective study of 161 consecutive patients undergoing gadolinium-enhanced MRI (Gd-MRI) at a tertiary-care university-affiliated medical center was carried out from September 1994 to April 1995. The Gd-MRI scans were performed for tentative diagnoses other than AN or sensorineural hearing loss. In 161 consecutive patients examined, no ANs were found incidentally on Gd-MRI scans. Previous studies have suggested that the incidence of occult ANs is as high as 1%. On the basis of our results, we suggest that the actual incidence may be lower. However, our study is limited by its small size and the low incidence of ANs in the general population. Also reported are the clinical and MRI characteristics of 4 patients with incidentally diagnosed ANs.

  14. Resection planning for robotic acoustic neuroma surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBrayer, Kepra L.; Wanna, George B.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Balachandran, Ramya; Labadie, Robert F.; Noble, Jack H.

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic neuroma surgery is a procedure in which a benign mass is removed from the Internal Auditory Canal (IAC). Currently this surgical procedure requires manual drilling of the temporal bone followed by exposure and removal of the acoustic neuroma. This procedure is physically and mentally taxing to the surgeon. Our group is working to develop an Acoustic Neuroma Surgery Robot (ANSR) to perform the initial drilling procedure. Planning the ANSR's drilling region using pre-operative CT requires expertise and around 35 minutes' time. We propose an approach for automatically producing a resection plan for the ANSR that would avoid damage to sensitive ear structures and require minimal editing by the surgeon. We first compute an atlas-based segmentation of the mastoid section of the temporal bone, refine it based on the position of anatomical landmarks, and apply a safety margin to the result to produce the automatic resection plan. In experiments with CTs from 9 subjects, our automated process resulted in a resection plan that was verified to be safe in every case. Approximately 2 minutes were required in each case for the surgeon to verify and edit the plan to permit functional access to the IAC. We measured a mean Dice coefficient of 0.99 and surface error of 0.08 mm between the final and automatically proposed plans. These preliminary results indicate that our approach is a viable method for resection planning for the ANSR and drastically reduces the surgeon's planning effort.

  15. Repeat Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuromas

    SciTech Connect

    Kano, Hideyuki; Kondziolka, Douglas; Niranjan, Ajay M.Ch.; Flannery, Thomas J.; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuromas, we assessed tumor control, clinical outcomes, and the risk of adverse radiation effects in patients whose tumors progressed after initial management. Methods and Materials: During a 21-year experience at our center, 1,352 patients underwent SRS as management for their acoustic neuromas. We retrospectively identified 6 patients who underwent SRS twice for the same tumor. The median patient age was 47 years (range, 35-71 years). All patients had imaging evidence of tumor progression despite initial SRS. One patient also had incomplete surgical resection after initial SRS. All patients were deaf at the time of the second SRS. The median radiosurgery target volume at the time of the initial SRS was 0.5 cc and was 2.1 cc at the time of the second SRS. The median margin dose at the time of the initial SRS was 13 Gy and was 11 Gy at the time of the second SRS. The median interval between initial SRS and repeat SRS was 63 months (range, 25-169 months). Results: At a median follow-up of 29 months after the second SRS (range, 13-71 months), tumor control or regression was achieved in all 6 patients. No patient developed symptomatic adverse radiation effects or new neurological symptoms after the second SRS. Conclusions: With this limited experience, we found that repeat SRS for a persistently enlarging acoustic neuroma can be performed safely and effectively.

  16. Management of hydrocephalus resulting from acoustic neuromas.

    PubMed

    Briggs, R J; Shelton, C; Kwartler, J A; Hitselberger, W

    1993-12-01

    Patients with large acoustic neuromas may have secondary obstructive hydrocephalus and occasionally significant neurologic deficit develops. At the House Ear Clinic, we have managed patients with hydrocephalus by translabyrinthine tumor removal without preoperative ventriculoperitoneal shunting. Forty-three patients with documented hydrocephalus who underwent acoustic neuroma removal have been reviewed. Six patients had neurologic deficit resulting from raised intracranial pressure before surgery. In each of these six cases, the deficit resolved after tumor removed without requiring shunting. Two patients had had ventriculoperitoneal shunts inserted because of neurologic deficit before referral for tumor removal. Two other patients underwent postoperative shunting for neurologic deficit --one at 2 weeks and one at 2 years. Cerebral or cerebellar herniation was not noted in any case. Cerebrospinal fluid leak occurred in five patients (11.6%) and culture-positive meningitis in two patients (4.6%). We conclude that decompression by translabyrinthine tumor removal is a safe method of management for patients with hydrocephalus resulting from large acoustic tumors.

  17. LINAC radiosurgery and radiotherapy treatment of acoustic neuromas. 2007.

    PubMed

    Likhterov, Ilya; Allbright, Robert M; Selesnick, Samuel H

    2008-04-01

    This article provides an introduction to radiation therapy as it applies to intracranial tumors. It also provides a review of the natural growth progression of acoustic neuromas and accuracy of tumor size determination. Literature on the use of linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated radiotherapy in acoustic neuroma management is reviewed and summarized. Specifically, the rates of reported tumor control, hearing preservation, facial and trigeminal nerve complications, and hydrocephalus are analyzed. Although the complication rates associated with linear accelerator therapy are relatively low, hearing preservation is poor and acoustic neuroma control is variable.

  18. LINAC radiosurgery and radiotherapy treatment of acoustic neuromas.

    PubMed

    Likhterov, Ilya; Allbright, Robert M; Selesnick, Samuel H

    2007-06-01

    This article provides an introduction to radiation therapy as it applies to intracranial tumors. It also provides a review of the natural growth progression of acoustic neuromas and accuracy of tumor size determination. Literature on the use of linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated radiotherapy in acoustic neuroma management is reviewed and summarized. Specifically, the rates of reported tumor control, hearing preservation, facial and trigeminal nerve complications, and hydrocephalus are analyzed. Although the complication rates associated with linear accelerator therapy are relatively low, hearing preservation is poor and acoustic neuroma control is variable.

  19. Acoustic Neuroma Mimicking Orofacial Pain: A Unique Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Naveen; Mendigeri, Vijaylaxmi; Puranik, Surekha R.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic neuroma (AN), also called vestibular schwannoma, is a tumor composed of Schwann cells that most frequently involve the vestibular division of the VII cranial nerve. The most common symptoms include orofacial pain, facial paralysis, trigeminal neuralgia, tinnitus, hearing loss, and imbalance that result from compression of cranial nerves V–IX. Symptoms of acoustic neuromas can mimic and present as temporomandibular disorder. Therefore, a thorough medical and dental history, radiographic evaluation, and properly conducted diagnostic testing are essential in differentiating odontogenic pain from pain that is nonodontogenic in nature. This article reports a rare case of a young pregnant female patient diagnosed with an acoustic neuroma located in the cerebellopontine angle that was originally treated for musculoskeletal temporomandibular joint disorder. PMID:28053796

  20. MRI in acoustic neuroma: a review of 35 patients.

    PubMed

    Curati, W L; Graif, M; Kingsley, D P; King, T; Scholtz, C L; Steiner, R E

    1986-01-01

    This retrospective study is aimed to assess the diagnostic efficacy of MRI in relation to contrast enhanced CT and air-CT-cisternography. MRI examinations were performed in 35 patients with suspected neurosensorial damage and suggestive of acoustic neuroma: 27 presented on MRI with unilateral tumors, 3 patients had a bilateral tumor and 5 patients were negative on all imaging modalities. The total number of acoustic neuromas detected was therefore 33. To date microscopic analysis has been performed on 12 tumors and histological data based on type Antoni A and Antoni B classification is available. Contrast enhanced CT detected 19 tumors, yielding an overall sensitivity rate of 58%. Air-CT cisternography identified an additional 5 tumors with a sensitivity rate of 100%. MRI identified 33 acoustic neuromas in 30 patients and was negative in 5 patients (sensitivity and accuracy 100%). Considering sensitivity in relation to location, MRI was much better than contrast enhanced CT for internal auditory canal (IAC) tumors (100% versus 36%) and better for cerebello-pontine angle tumors (CPA) tumors (100% versus 68%). The evolution of MRI technique, the various pulse sequences used and their actual selection is discussed. Seven patients received a paramagnetic contrast agent (Gadolinium-DTPA) with the additional benefit of a better demonstration of the tumor. The results suggest that MRI is the best non invasive technique for demonstrating acoustic neuromas.

  1. [Diagnostic strategy of acoustic neuroma. Evaluation of efficacy of auditory evoked potentials. Apropos of a series of 50 neuroma cases].

    PubMed

    Gilain, L; Bouccara, D; Jacquier, I; Achouche, J; Casteran, J M; Freyss, G; Tran Ba Huy, P

    1991-01-01

    The authors carry out a retrospective study of the diagnostic procedures used in a series of 50 acoustic neuromas. AEP were performed for thirty-four neuromas at some stage of their history. The findings were perfectly normal for eight of them, which represents a sensitivity level of 76%. Various elements likely to account for this are put forward, then the role of AEP and MRI in the diagnostic strategy for neuroma is discussed in the light of this study. Finally, the authors emphasize the necessity to regularly evaluate the diagnostic methods in order to guarantee their quality and reliability.

  2. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuromas: What Happens Long Term?

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Daniel E.; Potter, Andrew E.; Brophy, Brian P.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the clinical outcomes for acoustic neuroma treated with low-dose linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) >10 years earlier at the Royal Adelaide Hospital using data collected prospectively at a dedicated SRS clinic. Methods and Materials: Between November 1993 and December 2000, 51 patients underwent SRS for acoustic neuroma. For the 44 patients with primary SRS for sporadic (unilateral) lesions, the median age was 63 years, the median of the maximal tumor diameter was 21 mm (range, 11-34), and the marginal dose was 14 Gy for the first 4 patients and 12 Gy for the other 40. Results: The crude tumor control rate was 97.7% (1 patient required salvage surgery for progression at 9.75 years). Only 8 (29%) of 28 patients ultimately retained useful hearing (interaural pure tone average {<=}50 dB). Also, although the Kaplan-Meier estimated rate of hearing preservation at 5 years was 57% (95% confidence interval, 38-74%), this decreased to 24% (95% confidence interval, 11-44%) at 10 years. New or worsened V and VII cranial neuropathy occurred in 11% and 2% of patients, respectively; all cases were transient. No case of radiation oncogenesis developed. Conclusions: The long-term follow-up data of low-dose (12-14 Gy) linear accelerator SRS for acoustic neuroma have confirmed excellent tumor control and acceptable cranial neuropathy rates but a continual decrease in hearing preservation out to {>=}10 years.

  3. Protection of Facial Nerves During Acoustic Neuroma Surgery.

    PubMed

    Xing, Hong-Shun; Wang, Shou-Xian; Wang, Zhe; Cao, Pei-Cheng; Ma, Yong-Qian; Wang, Zeng-Wu

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to summarize the experience about the protection of the facial nerve in surgery for acoustic neuroma surgery with the aim to improve the retention of facial nerve function and the quality of life. Forty-two patients with acoustic neuroma were recruited from the year 2010 to 2013. Using microsurgical techniques, the tumors were resected through the suboccipital approach over the posterior edge of the sigmoid sinus, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring of the facial nerve function was performed. The House-Brackmann (H-B) grading was used to evaluate the facial nerve function evaluation postoperatively. Total tumor resection was achieved in 32 cases, and partial resection in 10 cases, without any intraoperative deaths. Also facial nerves were retained in 35 of 42 cases (83.33 %). One week after surgery, the facial nerve H-B grading was grade I in 8 cases, grade II in 15 cases, grade III in 12 cases, grade IV in 6 cases, and grade V in 1 case. The key to improved protection of the facial nerve during acoustic neuroma surgery includes a complete understanding of the anatomy of the cerebellopontine angle, proper use of microsurgical techniques, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring of the status of facial nerve functions to avoid damage to the nerves.

  4. Intraoperative monitoring during surgery for acoustic neuroma: benefits of an extratympanic intrameatal electrode

    PubMed Central

    Mullatti, N; Coakham, H; Maw, A; Butler, S; Morgan, M

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess the utility of an extratympanic intrameatal electrode for intraoperative monitoring during acoustic neuroma and other cerebellopontine angle tumour surgery and to define the neurophysiological and surgical factors which influence hearing preservation.
METHODS—Twenty two patients, 18 with acoustic neuromas and four with other cerebellopontine angle tumours, underwent intraoperative monitoring during tumour excision. The extratympanic intrameatal electrode (IME) was used to record the electrocochleogram (ECoG) and surface electrodes to record the brainstem auditory evoked response (ABR).
RESULTS—The compound action potential (CAP) of the ECoG was two and a half times greater in amplitude than wave I of the ABR and was easily monitored. Virtually instant information was available as minimal averaging was required. Continuous monitoring was possible from the commencement of anaesthesia to skin closure. The IME was easy to place, non-invasive, and did not interfere with the operative field. Operative procedures which affected CAP or wave V latency or amplitude were drilling around the internal auditory meatus, tumour dissection, nerve section, and brainstem and cerebellar retraction. Hearing was achieved in 59% of patients.
CONCLUSIONS—The IME had significant benefits in comparison with other methods of monitoring. The technique provided information beneficial to preservation of hearing.

 PMID:10209169

  5. Dural Defect Repair in Translabyrinthine Acoustic Neuroma Surgery and Its Implications in Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Aloysio Augusto Tahan de Campos; Colafêmina, José Fernando; Centeno, Ricardo Silva

    2012-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is a complication that may occur after translabyrinthine (translab) acoustic neuroma (AN) removal. The aim of this study is to verify the incidence of CSF leak using two techniques for dural defect closure in translab AN surgery and present a new technique for dural repair. A retrospective study was held, reviewing charts of 34 patients in a tertiary neurotologic referral center. Out of these 34 patients that underwent translab AN excision in a 1-year period, 18 had their dural defect repaired using only abdominal fat graft and 16 using synthetic dura substitute (SDS) plus abdominal fat tissue. One patient (5.5%) in the first group had CSF leak and 1 (6.2%) in the second group had CSF leak postoperatively. Our data suggest that there are no significant differences in CSF leak rates using both techniques, although studies in a larger series must be undertaken to conclude it. We believe that the development of some points in the new technique for dural repair can achieve better results and reduce the CSF leak incidence in the translabyrinthine acoustic neuroma surgery in the near future. PMID:24083124

  6. Preoperative computerized dynamic posturography as a prognostic indicator of balance function in patients with acoustic neuroma.

    PubMed

    Bergson, Eric; Sataloff, Robert T

    2005-03-01

    We conducted a study to determine the prognostic reliability of preoperative computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) in patients undergoing surgical excision of an acoustic neuroma. Our goal was to determine the correlation between objective preoperative assessments of balance function and subjective postoperative patient self-assessments. To that end, we retrospectively reviewed the records of 21 adults who had undergone preoperative CDP, and we subsequently obtained their subjective assessments of balance function by follow-up telephone surveys at least 1 year postoperatively. We conclude that although CDP has proven to be useful in many aspects of balance evaluation, it did not appear to be a valuable predictor of subjective postoperative balance function in these patients.

  7. Stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife for acoustic neuromas

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, R.L.; Coffey, R.J.; Swanson, J.W.

    1995-07-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife for acoustic neuromas. Between January 1990 and January 1993, 36 patients with acoustic neuromas were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife. The median maximum tumor diameter was 21 mm (range: 6-32 mm). Tumor volumes encompasses within the prescribed isodose line varied from 266 to 8,667 mm{sup 3} (median: 3,135 mm{sup 3}). Tumors {<=} 20 mm in maximum diameter received a dose of 20 Gy to the margin, tumors between 21 and 30 mm received 18 Gy, and tumors > 30 mm received 16 Gy. The dose was prescribed to the 50% isodose line in 31 patients and to the 45%, 55%, 60%, 70%, and 80% isodose line in one patient each. Nine tumors (26%) were smaller, and 26 tumors (74%) were unchanged. No tumor had progressed. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidences of facial neuropathy were 52.2% and 66.5%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidences of trigeminal neuropathy were 33.7% and 58.9%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidence of facial or trigeminal neuropathy (or both) was 60.8% and 81.7%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the following were associated with the time of onset or worsening of facial weakness or trigeminal neuropathy: (a) patients < age 65 years, (b) dose to the tumor margin, (c) maximum tumor diameter {>=} 21 mm, (d) use of the 18 mm collimator, and (e) use of > five isocenters. The 1- and 2-year actuarial rates of preservation of useful hearing (Gardner-Robertson class I or II) were 100% and 41.7% {plus_minus} 17.3, respectively. Stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife provides short-term control of acoustic neuromas when a dose of 16 to 20 Gy to the tumor margin is used. Preservation of useful hearing can be accomplished in a significant proportion of patients. 30 refs., 5 tabs.

  8. VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMA (ACOUSTIC NEUROMA) MIMICKING TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Bisi, Maurício A.; Selaimen, Caio M. P.; Chaves, Karen D.; Bisi, Melissa C.; Grossi, Márcio L.

    2006-01-01

    Approximately 6 to 16% of patients with trigeminal neuralgia symptoms present intracranial tumors, the most common being the vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma). Some symptoms reported by patients include hearing loss, tinnitus, headaches, vertigo and trigeminal disturbances. An increased muscle response in the surrounding head and neck musculature may also be observed, which mimics signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. In these cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be a useful tool in tumor diagnosis. The differential diagnosis between myofascial and neuralgic pain is important, as both may present similar characteristics, while being of different origin, and demanding special treatment approaches. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship among trigeminal neuralgia symptoms, intracranial tumors and temporomandibular dysfunction by presenting a clinical case. PMID:19089251

  9. Acoustic (loudspeaker) facial EMG monitoring: II. Use of evoked EMG activity during acoustic neuroma resection.

    PubMed

    Prass, R L; Kinney, S E; Hardy, R W; Hahn, J F; Lüders, H

    1987-12-01

    Facial electromyographic (EMG) activity was continuously monitored via loudspeaker during eleven translabyrinthine and nine suboccipital consecutive unselected acoustic neuroma resections. Ipsilateral facial EMG activity was synchronously recorded on the audio channels of operative videotapes, which were retrospectively reviewed in order to allow detailed evaluation of the potential benefit of various acoustic EMG patterns in the performance of specific aspects of acoustic neuroma resection. The use of evoked facial EMG activity was classified and described. Direct local mechanical (surgical) stimulation and direct electrical stimulation were of benefit in the localization and/or delineation of the facial nerve contour. Burst and train acoustic patterns of EMG activity appeared to indicate surgical trauma to the facial nerve that would not have been appreciated otherwise. Early results of postoperative facial function of monitored patients are presented, and the possible value of burst and train acoustic EMG activity patterns in the intraoperative assessment of facial nerve function is discussed. Acoustic facial EMG monitoring appears to provide a potentially powerful surgical tool for delineation of the facial nerve contour, the ongoing use of which may lead to continued improvement in facial nerve function preservation through modification of dissection strategy.

  10. Intermedius nerve involvement and testing in acoustic neuromas.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, J; Zilstorff, K

    1975-01-01

    The clinical findings in 125 patients with surgically confirmed acoustic neuromas are presented, with special regard to the involvement of the intermedius nerve in the diagnosis. In assessing the function of the intermedius nerve the examination of the nasolacrimal reflex and the sensation of taste on the anterior two-thirds of the tongue are used. The methods of investigation are described in detail. The material consisted of 20 medium-sized and 105 large tumours; no intracanalicular tumor was found. Hearing loss was the initial symptom in 85% of the patients, 10% had tinitus and 4% vertigo as the first symptom. Apart from the VIII cranial nerve symptoms, a defective nasolacrimal reflex was the most significant evidence of cerebellopontine angle pathology. The test was positive in 65% of the medium-sized tumours, in the entire material, 85%. The figures are higher than the incidence of trigeminal nerve symptoms. This in contrast to the reports of most authors. The tests described are simple and quick to perform, and it is emphasized that they should be applied to all patients with unilateral hearing loss of unknown origin.

  11. Intraoperative monitoring of facial nerve antidromic potentials during acoustic neuroma surgery.

    PubMed

    Colletti, V; Fiorino, F; Policante, Z; Bruni, L

    1997-09-01

    The present paper presents monopolar recording of facial nerve antidromic potentials as an alternative technique to facial electromyography for the continuous monitoring of the facial nerve during acoustic neuroma surgery. The investigation involved 22 patients undergoing acoustic neuroma surgery via a retrosigmoid approach (tumour sizes ranging from 5 to 28 mm). Bipolar electrical stimulation of the marginalis mandibulae was performed to elicit facial nerve antidromic potentials. Stimulus intensity ranged from 2 to 6 mA with a delivery rate of 7/sec. A silver wire monopolar electrode positioned intracranially on the proximal portion of the acoustic facial bundle was used to record antidromic potentials. To define the specific origin of the action potentials and acquire normative data, monopolar and bipolar recordings of facial nerve antidromic potentials were performed in 15 subjects undergoing retrosigmoid vestibular neurectomy for Meniere's disease. The average facial nerve antidromic potential latency was 4.2 (+/- 0.6) msec in subjects with acoustic neuroma and 3.3 (+/- 0.2) msec in subjects with Meniere's disease. Facial nerve antidromic potentials furnished near real-time information about intraoperative facial nerve damage and postoperative facial nerve function during acoustic neuroma surgery. Facial nerve antidromic potentials may provide additional information to conventional EMG. They allow the use of endplate blockers, yield quantitative estimation of facial nerve conduction properties in terms of amplitude and latency, and allow actual continuous monitoring of the facial nerve.

  12. False diagnosis of acoustic neuroma due to subdural injection during gas CT cisternogram.

    PubMed

    Larsson, E M; Holtås, S

    1986-01-01

    Gas CT cisternography is a reliable examination for the detection of small acoustic neuromas. False-positive or equivocal findings do result, however, from a small number of these examinations. In this case report inadvertent subdural injection of gas caused diagnostic difficulties.

  13. Risk Factors of Acoustic Neuroma: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mantao; Fan, Zuoxu; Cao, Fei; Wang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many epidemiological studies have investigated environmental risk factors for the development of acoustic neuroma. However, these results are controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis of case-control studies to identify any potential relationship between history of noise exposure, smoking, allergic diseases, and risk of acoustic neuroma. Materials and Methods We searched PubMed to identify relevant articles. Two researchers evaluated the eligibility and extracted the data independently. Results Eleven case-control studies were included in our meta-analysis. Acoustic neuroma was found to be associated with leisure noise exposure [odds ratio (OR)=1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05–1.68], but not with occupational noise exposure and ever noise exposure (OR=1.20, 95% CI: 0.84–1.72 and OR=1.15, 95% CI: 0.80–1.65). The OR of acoustic neuroma for ever (versus never) smoking was 0.53 (95% CI: 0.30–0.94), while the subgroup analysis indicated ORs of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.81–1.10) and 0.49 (95% CI: 0.41–0.59) for ex-smoker and current smoker respectively. The ORs for asthma, eczema, and seasonal rhinitis were 0.98 (95% CI: 0.80–1.18), 0.91 (95% CI: 0.76–1.09), and 1.52 (95% CI: 0.90–2.54), respectively. Conclusion Our meta-analysis is suggestive of an elevated risk of acoustic neuroma among individuals who were ever exposed to leisure noise, but not to occupational noise. Our study also indicated a lower acoustic neuroma risk among ever and current cigarette smokers than never smokers, while there was no significant relationship for ex-smokers. No significant associations were found between acoustic neuroma and history of any allergic diseases, such as asthma, eczema, and seasonal rhinitis. PMID:26996581

  14. Acoustic neuroma surgery as an interdisciplinary approach: a neurosurgical series of 508 patients

    PubMed Central

    Tonn, J.; Schlake, H.; Goldbrunner, R.; Milewski, C.; Helms, J.; Roosen, K.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate an interdisciplinary concept (neurosurgery/ear, nose, and throat (ENT)) of treating acoustic neuromas with extrameatal extension via the retromastoidal approach. To analyse whether monitoring both facial nerve EMG and BAEP improved the functional outcome in acoustic neuroma surgery.
METHODS—In a series of 508 patients consecutively operated on over a period of 7 years, functional outcome of the facial nerve was evaluated according to the House/Brackmann scale and hearing preservation was classified using the Gardner/Robertson system.
RESULTS—Facial monitoring (396 of 508 operations) and continuous BAEP recording (229 of 399 cases with preserved hearing preoperatively) were performed routinely. With intraoperative monitoring, the rate of excellent/good facial nerve function (House/Brackmann I-II) was 88.7%. Good functional hearing (Gardner/Robertson 1-3) was preserved in 39.8%.
CONCLUSION—Acoustic neuroma surgery via a retrosigmoidal approach is a safe and effective treatment for tumours with extrameatal extension. Functional results can be substantially improved by intraoperative monitoring. The interdisciplinary concept of surgery performed by ENT and neurosurgeons was particularly convincing as each pathoanatomical phase of the operation is performed by a surgeon best acquainted with the regional specialties.

 PMID:10896686

  15. Influencing Factors Analysis of Facial Nerve Function after the Microsurgical Resection of Acoustic Neuroma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, WenMing; Cheng, HongWei; Wang, XiaoJie; Feng, ChunGuo

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore and analyze the influencing factors of facial nerve function retainment after microsurgery resection of acoustic neurinoma. Methods Retrospective analysis of our hospital 105 acoustic neuroma cases from October, 2006 to January 2012, in the group all patients were treated with suboccipital sigmoid sinus approach to acoustic neuroma microsurgery resection. We adopted researching individual patient data, outpatient review and telephone followed up and the House-Brackmann grading system to evaluate and analyze the facial nerve function. Results Among 105 patients in this study group, complete surgical resection rate was 80.9% (85/105), subtotal resection rate was 14.3% (15/105), and partial resection rate 4.8% (5/105). The rate of facial nerve retainment on neuroanatomy was 95.3% (100/105) and the mortality rate was 2.1% (2/105). Facial nerve function when the patient is discharged from the hospital, also known as immediate facial nerve function which was graded in House-Brackmann: excellent facial nerve function (House-Brackmann I–II level) cases accounted for 75.2% (79/105), facial nerve function III–IV level cases accounted for 22.9% (24/105), and V–VI cases accounted for 1.9% (2/105). Patients were followed up for more than one year, with excellent facial nerve function retention rate (H-B I–II level) was 74.4% (58/78). Conclusion Acoustic neuroma patients after surgery, the long-term (≥1 year) facial nerve function excellent retaining rate was closely related with surgical proficiency, post-operative immediate facial nerve function, diameter of tumor and whether to use electrophysiological monitoring techniques; while there was no significant correlation with the patient’s age, surgical approach, whether to stripping the internal auditory canal, whether there was cystic degeneration, tumor recurrence, whether to merge with obstructive hydrocephalus and the length of the duration of symptoms. PMID:28264236

  16. A case-case study of mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma risk in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasuto; Akiba, Suminori; Kubo, Osami; Yamaguchi, Naohito

    2011-02-01

    Results of case-control studies of mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma have been inconsistent. We conducted a case-case study of mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma using a self-administered postal questionnaire. A total of 1589 cases identified in 22 hospitals throughout Japan were invited to participate, and 787 cases (51%) actually participated. Associations between laterality of mobile phone use prior to the reference dates (1 and 5 years before diagnosis) and tumor location were analyzed. The overall risk ratio was 1.08 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.93-1.28) for regular mobile phone use until 1 year before diagnosis and 1.14 (95% CI, 0.96-1.40) for regular mobile phone use until 5 years before diagnosis. A significantly increased risk was identified for mobile phone use for >20 min/day on average, with risk ratios of 2.74 at 1 year before diagnosis, and 3.08 at 5 years before diagnosis. Cases with ipsilateral combination of tumor location and more frequently used ear were found to have tumors with smaller diameters, suggesting an effect of detection bias. Furthermore, analysis of the distribution of left and right tumors suggested an effect of tumor-side-related recall bias for recall of mobile phone use at 5 years before diagnosis. The increased risk identified for mobile phone users with average call duration >20 min/day should be interpreted with caution, taking into account the possibilities of detection and recall biases. However, we could not conclude that the increased risk was entirely explicable by these biases, leaving open the possibility that mobile phone use increased the risk of acoustic neuroma.

  17. Trends in acoustic neuroma management: a 20-year review of the oxford skull base clinic.

    PubMed

    Mackeith, Samuel A C; Kerr, Richard S; Milford, Chris A

    2013-08-01

    Objective To describe the change in the management of acoustic neuromas at one United Kingdom center over a 20-year period and to compare this with what is known regarding trends in practice on a national and international scale. Design, Setting, and Participants Data was collected prospectively on all patients attending the Oxford Skull Base Clinic between 1990 and 2009. Main Outcome Measures The proportion of patients managed initially by observation versus radiotherapy versus surgery was recorded for each year. Results Significantly more patients received radiation treatment (instead of surgery) between 2000 and 2009 when compared with 1990 to 1999. Compared with national audit data, the Oxford Skull Base Clinic treats a higher proportion of patients with radiotherapy and significantly lower proportion with surgery, though the trend nationally is toward more observation and radiotherapy and less surgery. Conclusion Surgery will remain crucial in the management of some patients with acoustic neuromas (usually those with the larger tumors where radiosurgery is recognized to be less appropriate), but using current trends to predict future practice would suggest that alternative nonmicrosurgical treatment may play an increasingly important role in the future.

  18. Facial reanimation after acoustic neuroma resection: options and timing of intervention.

    PubMed

    Boahene, Kofi

    2015-04-01

    Facial paralysis following acoustic neuroma (AN) resection can be devastating, but timely and strategic intervention can minimize the resulting facial morbidity. A central strategy in reanimating the paralyzed face after AN resection is to restore function of the native facial muscles using available facial nerves or repurposed cranial nerves, mainly the hypoglossal or masseter nerves. The timing of reinnervation is the single most influential factor that determines outcomes in facial reanimation surgery. The rate of recovery of facial function in the first 6 months following AN resection may be used to predict ultimate facial function. Patients who show no signs of recovery in the first 6 months, even when their facial nerves are intact, recover poorly and are candidates for early facial reinnervation. With delay, facial muscles become irreversibly paralyzed. Reanimation in irreversible paralysis requires the transfer of functional muscle units such as the gracilis or the temporalis muscle tendon unit.

  19. Risk of a second cancer from scattered radiation in acoustic neuroma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Hyunho; Sung, Jiwon; Shin, Dongoh; Park, Sungho; Chung, Weon Kuu; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Kim, Dong Wook

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to compare the risk of a secondary cancer from scattered and leakage doses in patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of a secondary cancer were estimated using the corresponding secondary doses measured at various organs by using radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, liver, bowel, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were 14.6, 1.7, 0.9, 0.8, 0.6, 0.6, and 0.6 cGy, respectively, for IMRT whereas they were 19.1, 1.8, 2.0, 0.6, 0.4, 0.4, and 0.4 cGy, respectively, for VMAT, and 22.8, 4.6, 1.4, 0.7, 0.5, 0.5, and 0.5 cGy, respectively, for SRS. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A lifetime attributable risk evaluation estimated that more than 0.03% of acoustic neuroma (AN) patients would get radiation-induced cancer within 20 years of receiving radiation therapy. The organ with the highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN was the thyroid. We found that the LAR could be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  20. Hearing preservation in acoustic neuroma resection: Analysis of petrous bone measurement and intraoperative application

    PubMed Central

    Tanrikulu, Levent; Lohse, Peer; Fahlbusch, Rudolf; Naraghi, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an increased risk for labyrinthine injury for the resection of acoustic neuromas (AN) on the suboccipital, retrosigmoid approach. Prognostic factors should be analyzed for the postoperative hearing function. Methods: We examined 51 patients with ANs using preoperative intact hearing function. Audiological data were obtained by pure tone audiogram (PTA) and speech audiogram. The preoperative and postoperative anatomical localization of the labyrinth was measured with specific distances regarding the tumor and corresponding anatomy of the posterior fossa by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: Postoperative MRI controls confirmed no injuries to the labyrinth (0%). The postoperative hearing results showed 100% hearing preservation for T1-tumors (<1 ml/<1.1 cm), 50% for T2-tumors (1–4 ml/1.1–1.8 cm), 40% for T3-tumors (4–8 ml/1.8–2.3 cm) and 18% for T4-tumors (>8 ml/>2.3 cm). Postoperative deafness was seen in all cases with ventral tumor extension higher than 5.5 mm. Postoperative loss of hearing was seen in all cases with hearing preservation with 6–8% of speech discrimination and an increase in the hearing threshold of 12 dB in the PTA compared to the preoperative hearing status. Conclusion: Petrous bone measurement by high-resolution MRI data enables safe surgical exposure of the internal acoustic canal with avoidance of injury to the labyrinth and a better postoperative prognosis, especially for intrameatal ANs and for the resection of intrameatal portions of larger neuromas. The prognostic factors enable the patients and the surgeon a better estimation of postoperative results regarding deafness and postoperative hypacusis and support a consolidated treatment planning. PMID:28144470

  1. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... on adjacent nerves, nearby blood vessels or brain structures. As the tumor grows, it may be more ... an incision. The doctor attaches a lightweight head frame to your scalp, which has been numbed, to ...

  2. Acoustic tumors: operation versus radiation--making sense of opposing viewpoints. Part II. Acoustic neuromas: sorting out management options.

    PubMed

    Kondziolka, Douglas; Lunsford, L Dade; Flickinger, John C

    2003-01-01

    Patients with acoustic neuromas have several options available to them. Large tumors with significant brain stem compression usually require surgical resection. For patients with small or medium-sized tumors, radiosurgery has become a common treatment, with excellent long-term results being reported. Patients must be comfortable with the concept of tumor control rather than tumor removal. Most seem to be satisfied with this concept if it allows them to avoid brain surgery. Surgeons should strive to educate their patients with information from the peer-reviewed literature. Confusion exists among patients, because the information from Internet sources, newsletters, support groups, and physicians has not always been validated and supported by outcomes data. Although we are asked to provide our opinions, our comments should not be based on myth, conjecture, training bias, or socioeconomic concerns.

  3. In vivo visualization of the facial nerve in patients with acoustic neuroma using diffusion tensor imaging-based fiber tracking.

    PubMed

    Song, Fei; Hou, Yuanzheng; Sun, Guochen; Chen, Xiaolei; Xu, Bainan; Huang, Jason H; Zhang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Preoperative determination of the facial nerve (FN) course is essential to preserving its function. Neither regular preoperative imaging examination nor intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring is able to determine the exact position of the FN. The diffusion tensor imaging-based fiber tracking (DTI-FT) technique has been widely used for the preoperative noninvasive visualization of the neural fasciculus in the white matter of brain. However, further studies are required to establish its role in the preoperative visualization of the FN in acoustic neuroma surgery. The object of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using DTI-FT to visualize the FN. METHODS Data from 15 patients with acoustic neuromas were collected using 3-T MRI. The visualized FN course and its position relative to the tumors were determined using DTI-FT with 3D Slicer software. The preoperative visualization results of FN tracking were verified using microscopic observation and electrophysiological monitoring during microsurgery. RESULTS Preoperative visualization of the FN using DTI-FT was observed in 93.3% of the patients. However, in 92.9% of the patients, the FN visualization results were consistent with the actual surgery. CONCLUSIONS DTI-FT, in combination with intraoperative FN electrophysiological monitoring, demonstrated improved FN preservation in patients with acoustic neuroma. FN visualization mainly included the facial-vestibular nerve complex of the FN and vestibular nerve.

  4. Mobile phone use and risk of acoustic neuroma: results of the Interphone case–control study in five North European countries

    PubMed Central

    Schoemaker, M J; Swerdlow, A J; Ahlbom, A; Auvinen, A; Blaasaas, K G; Cardis, E; Christensen, H Collatz; Feychting, M; Hepworth, S J; Johansen, C; Klæboe, L; Lönn, S; McKinney, P A; Muir, K; Raitanen, J; Salminen, T; Thomsen, J; Tynes, T

    2005-01-01

    There is public concern that use of mobile phones could increase the risk of brain tumours. If such an effect exists, acoustic neuroma would be of particular concern because of the proximity of the acoustic nerve to the handset. We conducted, to a shared protocol, six population-based case–control studies in four Nordic countries and the UK to assess the risk of acoustic neuroma in relation to mobile phone use. Data were collected by personal interview from 678 cases of acoustic neuroma and 3553 controls. The risk of acoustic neuroma in relation to regular mobile phone use in the pooled data set was not raised (odds ratio (OR)=0.9, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7–1.1). There was no association of risk with duration of use, lifetime cumulative hours of use or number of calls, for phone use overall or for analogue or digital phones separately. Risk of a tumour on the same side of the head as reported phone use was raised for use for 10 years or longer (OR=1.8, 95% CI: 1.1–3.1). The study suggests that there is no substantial risk of acoustic neuroma in the first decade after starting mobile phone use. However, an increase in risk after longer term use or after a longer lag period could not be ruled out. PMID:16136046

  5. Long-term outcome of stereotactic radiosurgery (Srs) in patients with acoustic neuromas

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephanie E. . E-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Thilmann, Christoph; Debus, Juergen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness and long-term outcome of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuromas (AN). Patients and Methods: Between 1990 and 2001, we treated 26 patients with 27 AN with SRS. Two patients suffered from neurofibromatosis type 2. Before SRS, a subtotal or total resection had been performed in 3 and in 5 patients, respectively. For SRS, a median single dose of 13 Gy/80% isodose was applied. Results: The overall actuarial 5-year and 10-year tumor control probability in all patients was 91%. Two patients developed tumor progression after SRS at 36 and 48 months. Nineteen patients (73%) were at risk of treatment-related facial nerve toxicity; of these, 1 patient developed a complete facial nerve palsy after SRS (5%). A total of 93% of the lesions treated were at risk of radiation-induced trigeminal neuralgia. Two patients (8%) developed mild dysesthesia of the trigeminal nerve after SRS. The hearing preservation rate in patients with useful hearing before SRS was 55% at 9 years. Conclusion:: Stereotactic radiosurgery results in good local control rates of AN and the risk of cranial nerve toxicities is acceptable. As toxicity is lower with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, SRS should be reserved for smaller lesions.

  6. SU-E-T-208: Incidence Cancer Risk From the Radiation Treatment for Acoustic Neuroma Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D; Chung, W; Shin, D; Yoon, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to compare the incidence risk of a secondary cancer from therapeutic doses in patients receiving intensitymodulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their incidnece excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) were estimated using the corresponding therapeutic doses measured at various organs by radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. Results: When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, normal liver, colon, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were measured. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A LAR were estimated that more than 0.03% of AN patients would get radiation-induced cancer. Conclusion: The tyroid was highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN. We found that LAR can be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  7. Immunohistochemical localization and mRNA expression of aquaporins in the macula utriculi of patients with Meniere's disease and acoustic neuroma.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Gail; Lopez, Ivan A; Beltran-Parrazal, Luis; Ishiyama, Akira

    2010-06-01

    Meniere's disease is nearly invariably associated with endolymphatic hydrops (the net accumulation of water in the inner ear endolymphatic space). Vestibular maculae utriculi were acquired from patients undergoing surgery for Meniere's disease and acoustic neuroma and from autopsy (subjects with normal hearing and balance). Quantitative immunostaining was conducted with antibodies against aquaporins (AQPs) 1, 4, and 6, Na(+)K(+)ATPase, Na(+)K(+)2Cl co-transporter (NKCC1), and alpha-syntrophin. mRNA was extracted from the surgically acquired utricles from subjects with Meniere's disease and acoustic neuroma to conduct quantitative real-time reverse transcription with polymerase chain reaction for AQP1, AQP4, and AQP6. AQP1 immunoreactivity (-IR) was located in blood vessels and fibrocytes in the underlying stroma, without any apparent alteration in Meniere's specimens when compared with acoustic neuroma and autopsy specimens. AQP4-IR localized to the epithelial basolateral supporting cells in Meniere's disease, acoustic neuroma, and autopsy. In specimens from subjects with Meniere's disease, AQP4-IR was significantly decreased compared with autopsy and acoustic neuroma specimens. AQP6-IR occurred in the sub-apical vestibular supporting cells in acoustic neuroma and autopsy samples. However, in Meniere's disease specimens, AQP6-IR was significantly increased and diffusely redistributed throughout the supporting cell cytoplasm. Na(+)K(+)ATPase, NKCC1, and alpha-syntrophin were expressed within sensory epithelia and were unaltered in Meniere's disease specimens. Expression of AQP1, AQP4, or AQP6 mRNA did not differ in vestibular endorgans from patients with Meniere's disease. Changes in AQP4 (decreased) and AQP6 (increased) expression in Meniere's disease specimens suggest that the supporting cell might be a cellular target.

  8. Validation of the facial dysfunction domain of the Penn Acoustic Neuroma Quality-of-Life (PANQOL) Scale.

    PubMed

    Lodder, Wouter L; Adan, Guleed H; Chean, Chung S; Lesser, Tristram H; Leong, Samuel C

    2017-04-08

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the strength of content validity within the facial dysfunction domain of the Penn Acoustic Neuroma Quality-of-Life (PANQOL) Scale and to compare how it correlates with a facial dysfunction-specific QOL instrument (Facial Clinimetric Evaluation, FaCE). The study design is online questionnaire survey. Members of the British Acoustic Neuroma Association received both PANQOL questionnaires and the FaCE scale. 158 respondents with self-identified facial paralysis or dysfunction had completed PANQOL and FaCE data sets for analysis. The mean composite PANQOL score was 53.5 (range 19.2-93.5), whilst the mean total FaCE score was 50.9 (range 10-95). The total scores of the PANQOL and FaCE correlated moderate (r = 0.48). Strong correlation (r = 0.63) was observed between the PANQOL's facial dysfunction domain and the FaCE total score. Of all the FaCE domains, social function was strongly correlated with the PANQOL facial dysfunction domain (r = 0.66), whilst there was very weak-to-moderate correlation (range 0.01-0.43) to the other FaCE domains. The current study has demonstrated a strong correlation between the facial dysfunction domains of PANQOL with a facial paralysis-specific QOL instrument.

  9. Fat graft-assisted internal auditory canal closure after retrosigmoid transmeatal resection of acoustic neuroma: Technique for prevention of cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Azad, Tareq; Mendelson, Zachary S; Wong, Anni; Jyung, Robert W; Liu, James K

    2016-02-01

    The retrosigmoid transmeatal approach remains an important strategy in the surgical management of acoustic neuromas. Gross total resection of acoustic neuromas requires removal of tumor within the cerebellopontine angle as well as tumor involving the internal auditory canal (IAC). Drilling into the petrous bone of the IAC can expose petrous air cells, which can potentially result in a fistulous tract to the nasopharynx manifesting as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea. We describe our method of IAC closure using autologous fat graft and assessed the rates of postoperative CSF leakage. We performed a retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients who underwent retrosigmoid transmeatal resection of acoustic neuroma who underwent our method of fat graft-assisted IAC closure. We assessed rates of postoperative CSF leak (incisional leak, rhinorrhea, or otorrhea), pseudomeningocele formation, and occurrence of meningitis. Twenty-four patients (10 males, 14 females) with a mean age of 47 years (range 18-84) underwent fat graft-assisted IAC closure. No lumbar drains were used postoperatively. There were no instances of postoperative CSF leak (incisional leak, rhinorrhea, or otorrhea), pseudomeningocele formation, or occurrence of meningitis. There were no graft site complications. Our results demonstrate that autologous fat grafts provide a safe and effective method of IAC defect closure to prevent postoperative CSF leakage after acoustic tumor removal via a retrosigmoid transmeatal approach. The surgical technique and operative nuances are described.

  10. Twenty years' experience in the treatment of acoustic neuromas with fractionated radiotherapy: A review of 45 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Maire, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: jean-philippe.maire@chu-bordeaux.fr; Huchet, Aymeri; Milbeo, Yann; Darrouzet, Vincent; Causse, Nicole; Celerier, Denis; Liguoro, Dominique; Bebear, Jean-Pierre

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate very long-term results of fractionated radiotherapy (FRT) of acoustic neuromas (AN). Methods and Materials: From January 1986 to January 2004, FRT was performed in 45 consecutive patients (46 AN). Indications were as follows: poor general condition contraindicating surgery, hearing preservation in bilateral neuromas, partial resection, nonsurgical recurrence. A 3-field to 5-field technique with static beams was used. A mean total dose of 51 Gy was given (1.80 Gy/fraction). The median tumor diameter was 31 mm (range, 11-55 mm). The median follow-up from FRT was 80 months (range, 4-227 months). Results: The particularity of our series consists of a very long-term follow-up of FRT given to selected patients. Nineteen patients died, two with progressive disease, and 17 from non-AN causes. A serviceable level of hearing was preserved in 7/9 hearing patients. No patient had facial or trigeminal neuropathy. Tumor shrinkage was observed in 27 (59%) and stable disease in 16 (35%). Tumor progression occurred in three patients, 12 to 15 months after FRT. Two additional tumors recurred after shrinkage 20 and 216 months after treatment and were operated on. Actuarial local tumor control rates at 5 and 15 years were 86%. For the patient who had a tumor recurrence at 216 months, histologic examination documented transformation to a low-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Conclusion: Very long-term efficacy of FRT is well documented in this series. However, our results suggest that malignant transformation can occur many years after FRT so we advocate caution when using this treatment for young patients.

  11. SU-E-T-14: A Comparative Study Between Forward and Inverse Planning in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuroma Tumours

    SciTech Connect

    Gopishankar, N; Agarwal, Priyanka; Bisht, Raj Kishor; Kale, S S; Rath, G K; Chander, S; Sharma, B S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate forward and inverse planning methods for acoustic neuroma cases treated in Gamma Knife Perfexion. Methods: Five patients with acoustic neuroma tumour abutting brainstem were planned twice in LGP TPS (Version 10.1) using TMR10 algorithm. First plan was entirely based on forward planning (FP) in which each shot was chosen manually. Second plan was generated using inverse planning (IP) for which planning parameters like coverage, selectivity, gradient index (GI) and beam-on time threshold were set. Number of shots in IP was automatically selected by objective function using iterative process. In both planning methods MRI MPRAGE sequence images were used for tumour localization and planning. A planning dose of 12Gy at 50% isodose level was chosen. Results and Discussion: Number of shots used in FP was greater than IP and beam-on time in FP was in average 1.4 times more than IP. One advantage of FP was that the brainstem volume subjected to 6Gy dose (25% isodose) was less in FP than IP. Our results showed use of more number of shots as in FP results in GI less than or equal to 2.55 which is close to its lower limit. Dose homogeneity index (DHI) analysis of FP and IP showed average values of 0.59 and 0.67 respectively. General trend in GK for planning in acoustic neuroma cases is to use small collimator shots to avoid dose to adjacent critical structures. More number of shots and prolonged treatment time causes inconvenience to the patients. Similarly overuse of automatic shot shaping as in IP results in increased scatter dose. A compromise is required in shot selection for these cases. Conclusion: IP method could be used in acoustic neuroma cases to decrease treatment time provided the source sector openings near brainstem are shielded or adjusted appropriately to reduce brainstem dose.

  12. Use of mobile phones and cordless phones is associated with increased risk for glioma and acoustic neuroma.

    PubMed

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael; Hansson Mild, Kjell

    2013-04-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) at WHO evaluation of the carcinogenic effect of RF-EMF on humans took place during a 24-31 May 2011 meeting at Lyon in France. The Working Group consisted of 30 scientists and categorised the radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from mobile phones, and from other devices that emit similar non-ionising electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF), as Group 2B, i.e., a 'possible', human carcinogen. The decision on mobile phones was based mainly on the Hardell group of studies from Sweden and the IARC Interphone study. We give an overview of current epidemiological evidence for an increased risk for brain tumours including a meta-analysis of the Hardell group and Interphone results for mobile phone use. Results for cordless phones are lacking in Interphone. The meta-analysis gave for glioma in the most exposed part of the brain, the temporal lobe, odds ratio (OR)=1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.04-2.81 in the ≥10 years (>10 years in the Hardell group) latency group. Ipsilateral mobile phone use ≥1640h in total gave OR=2.29, 95% CI=1.56-3.37. The results for meningioma were OR=1.25, 95% CI=0.31-4.98 and OR=1.35, 95% CI=0.81-2.23, respectively. Regarding acoustic neuroma ipsilateral mobile phone use in the latency group ≥10 years gave OR=1.81, 95% CI=0.73-4.45. For ipsilateral cumulative use ≥1640h OR=2.55, 95% CI=1.50-4.40 was obtained. Also use of cordless phones increased the risk for glioma and acoustic neuroma in the Hardell group studies. Survival of patients with glioma was analysed in the Hardell group studies yielding in the >10 years latency period hazard ratio (HR)=1.2, 95% CI=1.002-1.5 for use of wireless phones. This increased HR was based on results for astrocytoma WHO grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme). Decreased HR was found for low-grade astrocytoma, WHO grades I-II, which might be caused by RF-EMF exposure leading to tumour-associated symptoms and earlier detection and surgery with better

  13. Validation of the Penn Acoustic Neuroma Quality-of-Life Scale (PANQOL) for Spanish-Speaking Patients.

    PubMed

    Medina, Maria Del Mar; Carrillo, Alvaro; Polo, Ruben; Fernandez, Borja; Alonso, Daniel; Vaca, Miguel; Cordero, Adela; Perez, Cecilia; Muriel, Alfonso; Cobeta, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    Objective To perform translation, cross-cultural adaptation, and validation of the Penn Acoustic Neuroma Quality-of-Life Scale (PANQOL) to the Spanish language. Study Design Prospective study. Setting Tertiary neurotologic referral center. Subjects and Methods PANQOL was translated and translated back, and a pretest trial was performed. The study included 27 individuals diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma. Inclusion criteria were adults with untreated vestibular schwannoma, diagnosed in the past 12 months. Feasibility, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity, and ceiling and floor effects were assessed for the present study. Results The mean overall score of the PANQOL was 69.21 (0-100 scale, lowest to highest quality of life). Cronbach's α was 0.87. Intraclass correlation coefficient was performed for each item, with an overall score of 0.92. The κ coefficient scores were between moderate and almost perfect in more than 92% of patients. Anxiety and energy domains of the PANQOL were correlated with both physical and mental components of the SF-12. Hearing, balance, and pain domains were correlated with the SF-12 physical component. Facial and general domains were not significantly correlated with any component of the SF-12. Furthermore, the overall score of the PANQOL was correlated with the physical component of the SF-12. Conclusion Feasibility, internal consistency, reliability, and construct validity outcomes in the current study support the validity of the Spanish version of the PANQOL.

  14. Pooled analysis of case-control studies on acoustic neuroma diagnosed 1997-2003 and 2007-2009 and use of mobile and cordless phones.

    PubMed

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael; Söderqvist, Fredrik; Mild, Kjell Hansson

    2013-10-01

    We previously conducted a case-control study of acoustic neuroma. Subjects of both genders aged 20-80 years, diagnosed during 1997-2003 in parts of Sweden, were included, and the results were published. We have since made a further study for the time period 2007-2009 including both men and women aged 18-75 years selected from throughout the country. These new results for acoustic neuroma have not been published to date. Similar methods were used for both study periods. In each, one population-based control, matched on gender and age (within five years), was identified from the Swedish Population Registry. Exposures were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire supplemented by a phone interview. Since the number of acoustic neuroma cases in the new study was low we now present pooled results from both study periods based on 316 participating cases and 3,530 controls. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was performed, adjusting for age, gender, year of diagnosis and socio-economic index (SEI). Use of mobile phones of the analogue type gave odds ratio (OR) = 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.0-4.3, increasing with >20 years latency (time since first exposure) to OR = 7.7, 95% CI = 2.8-21. Digital 2G mobile phone use gave OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-2.1, increasing with latency >15 years to an OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 0.8-4.2. The results for cordless phone use were OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-2.1, and, for latency of >20 years, OR = 6.5, 95% CI = 1.7-26. Digital type wireless phones (2G and 3G mobile phones and cordless phones) gave OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-2.0 increasing to OR = 8.1, 95% CI = 2.0-32 with latency >20 years. For total wireless phone use, the highest risk was calculated for the longest latency time >20 years: OR = 4.4, 95% CI = 2.2-9.0. Several of the calculations in the long latency category were based on low numbers of exposed cases. Ipsilateral use resulted in a higher risk than contralateral for both mobile and cordless phones. OR increased per 100 h

  15. A rare case of Pacinian corpuscle neuroma.

    PubMed

    Narayanamurthy, Vb; Winston, A Thomas; Gupta, Amit

    2005-01-01

    The authors discuss an interesting case of a Pacinian corpuscle neuroma in the thumb of an elderly woman who presented with severe digital pain. The pain was initially attributed to osteoarthritis of the interphalangeal joint of the thumb. The clinical signs were very subtle. The patient had complete pain relief following excision of the tumour. Pacinian corpuscle neuromas are rare, with only about 70 cases reported in the literature. The histology, presenting features and associated conditions are discussed in detail. In addition to a neuroma or glomus tumour, Pacinian corpuscle hyperplasia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of digital or palmar pain of unknown etiology.

  16. Impact of insurance status and race on receipt of treatment for acoustic neuroma: A national cancer database analysis.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Shearwood; Kim, Ellen; Murphy, James D; Jaboin, Jerry J

    2017-03-23

    Acoustic neuroma (AN) management involves surgery, radiation, or observation. Previous studies have demonstrated that patient race and insurance status impact in-hospital morbidity/mortality following surgery; however the nationwide impact of these demographics on the receipt of each treatment modality has not been examined. The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) from 2004 to 2013 identified AN patients. Multivariate analysis adjusted for several variables within each treatment modality, including patient age, race, sex, income, primary payer for care, tumor size, and medical comorbidities. Patients who were African-American (OR=0.7; 95%CI=0.5-0.9; p=0.01), elderly (minimum age 65) (OR=0.4; 95%CI=0.4-0.6; p<0.0001), on Medicare (OR=0.6; 95% CI=0.4-0.7; p=0.0005), or treated at a community hospital (OR=0.4; 95%CI=0.2-0.7; p=0.007) were less likely to receive surgery. Patients on Medicaid (OR=1.2; 95%CI=0.8-1.8; p=0.04) or treated at an integrated network (OR=1.2; 95%CI=0.9-1.6; p=0.0004) were more likely to receive surgery. Patients who were elderly (OR=2.2; 95%CI=1.7-2.9; p<0.0001) or treated in a comprehensive cancer center (OR=1.5; 95%CI=1.3-1.9; p=0.02) were more likely and Medicaid patients (OR=0.8; 95%CI=0.5-1.2; p=0.04) were less likely to receive radiation. Patients who were elderly (OR=2.2; 95%CI=1.7-2.7; p<0.0001), African-American (OR=1.5; 95%CI=1.1-2.0; p=0.01), on Medicare (OR=1.8; 95%CI=1.4-2.3; p=0.0003), or treated in a community hospital (OR=3.0; 95%CI=1.6-5.6; p=0.0007) were more likely to receive observation. Patients on Medicaid (OR=0.8; 95%CI=0.5-1.2; p=0.04) or treated in an integrated network (OR=0.8; 95%CI=0.6-1.0; p=0.0001) were less likely to receive observation. African-American race, elderly age, and community hospital treatment triaged towards observation/away from surgery; age also triaged towards radiation. Conversely, integrated networks triaged towards surgery/away from observation; comprehensive cancer centers triaged towards

  17. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... for Healthcare Providers Patient Surveys Related Links Health Care Insurance Toolkit ANA Store Clinical Trials.gov Additional ... for Healthcare Providers Patient Surveys Related Links Health Care Insurance Toolkit ANA Store Clinical Trials.gov Additional ...

  18. Excised acoustic black holes: The scattering problem in the time domain

    SciTech Connect

    Cherubini, C.; Federici, F.; Tosi, M.P.; Succi, S.

    2005-10-15

    The scattering process of a dynamic perturbation impinging on a draining-tub model of an acoustic black hole is numerically solved in the time domain. Analogies with real black holes of general relativity are explored by using recently developed mathematical tools involving finite elements methods, excision techniques, and constrained evolution schemes for strongly hyperbolic systems. In particular it is shown that superradiant scattering of a quasimonochromatic wave packet can produce strong amplification of the signal, offering the possibility of a significant extraction of rotational energy at suitable values of the angular frequency of the vortex and of the central frequency of the wave packet. The results show that theoretical tools recently developed for gravitational waves can be brought to fruition in the study of other problems in which strong anisotropies are present.

  19. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma): Predicting the Risk of Hydrocephalus;Vestibular schwannoma; Hydrocephalus; Fractionated; Stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Ceri; Micallef, Caroline; Gonsalves, Adam; Wharram, Bev; Ashley, Sue; Brada, Michael

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and predictive factors for the development of hydrocephalus in patients with acoustic neuromas (AN) treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Seventy-two patients with AN were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy between 1998 and 2007 (45-50 Gy in 25-30 fractions over 5 to 6 weeks). The pretreatment MRI scan was assessed for tumor characteristics and anatomic distortion independently of subsequent outcome and correlated with the risk of hydrocephalus. Results: At a median follow-up of 49 months (range, 1-120 months), 5-year event-free survival was 95%. Eight patients (11%) developed hydrocephalus within 19 months of radiotherapy, which was successfully treated. On univariate analysis, pretreatment factors predictive of hydrocephalus were maximum diameter (p = 0.005), proximity to midline (p = 0.009), displacement of the fourth ventricle (p = 0.02), partial effacement of the fourth ventricle (p < 0.001), contact with the medulla (p = 0.005), and more brainstem structures (p = 0.004). On multivariate analysis, after adjusting for fourth ventricular effacement, no other variables remained independently associated with hydrocephalus formation. Conclusions: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy results in excellent tumor control of AN, albeit with a risk of developing hydrocephalus. Patients at high risk, identified as those with larger tumors with partial effacement of the fourth ventricle before treatment, should be monitored more closely during follow-up. It would also be preferable to offer treatment to patients with progressive AN while the risk of hydrocephalus is low, before the development of marked distortion of fourth ventricle before tumor diameter significantly exceeds 2 cm.

  20. Validation of self-reported start year of mobile phone use in a Swedish case-control study on radiofrequency fields and acoustic neuroma risk.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, David; Bottai, Matteo; Mathiesen, Tiit; Prochazka, Michaela; Feychting, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The possible effect of radiofrequency exposure from mobile phones on tumor risk has been studied since the late 1990s. Yet, empirical information about recall of the start of mobile phone use among adult cases and controls has never been reported. Limited knowledge about recall errors hampers interpretations of the epidemiological evidence. We used network operator data to validate the self-reported start year of mobile phone use in a case-control study of mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma risk. The answers of 96 (29%) cases and 111 (22%) controls could be included in the validation. The larger proportion of cases reflects a more complete and detailed reporting of subscription history. Misclassification was substantial, with large random errors, small systematic errors, and no significant differences between cases and controls. The average difference between self-reported and operator start year was -0.62 (95% confidence interval: -1.42, 0.17) years for cases and -0.71 (-1.50, 0.07) years for controls, standard deviations were 3.92 and 4.17 years, respectively. Agreement between self-reported and operator-recorded data categorized into short, intermediate and long-term use was moderate (kappa statistic: 0.42). Should an association exist, dilution of risk estimates and distortion of exposure-response patterns for time since first mobile phone use could result from the large random errors in self-reported start year. Retrospective collection of operator data likely leads to a selection of "good reporters", with a higher proportion of cases. Thus, differential recall cannot be entirely excluded.

  1. Aerodynamic and Nonlinear Dynamic Acoustic Analysis of Tension Asymmetry in Excised Canine Larynges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Erin E.; Bulleit, Erin E.; Hoffman, Matthew R.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To model tension asymmetry caused by superior laryngeal nerve paralysis (SLNP) in excised larynges and apply perturbation, nonlinear dynamic, and aerodynamic analyses. Method: SLNP was modeled in 8 excised larynges using sutures and weights to mimic cricothyroid (CT) muscle function. Weights were removed from one side to create tension…

  2. [Computed tomography in the diagnosis of intracranial trigeminal neuroma].

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Wang, D; Deng, K

    1993-12-01

    CT scans of 12 cases of intracranial trigeminal neuroma were presented. Three of the neuromas were located in petrous apex-middle cranial fossa, two in posterior cranial fossa, and 7 in both the middle and posterior cranial fossae. The tumors appeared hypo- and isodense on the plain CT scan. After contrast infusion, all tumors were well circumscribed with marked enhancement, which was homogeneous, inhomogeneous or circular. None of the trigeminal neuroma had surrounding brain edema. Of 12 cases, 10 showed change of cranial bones, which included dilatation of Meckle's cave and destructions of petrous apex, clivus and the bottom of middle cranial fossa. The tumor in one case extended to paranasopharyngeal space from the bottom of middle cranial fossa, Various features of trigeminal neuroma on CT were reviewed. Also presented were the author's experiences in differentiating intracranial trigeminal neuroma from meningiom, from pituitary adenoma spreading to parasella and glioma adjacent to cranial bottom in middle cranial fossa, and from acoustic neuroma, meningioma, cholesteatoma in cerebellopontine angle.

  3. Morton's interdigital neuroma: a comprehensive treatment protocol.

    PubMed

    Bennett, G L; Graham, C E; Mauldin, D M

    1995-12-01

    One hundred fifteen patients with signs and symptoms of Mortons' interdigital neuroma were studied in an attempt to evaluate the efficacy of a staged treatment program. The first stage consisted of patient education, footwear modifications, and metatarsal head relief. The second stage consisted of a steroid/local anesthetic injection into the affected interspace. The third stage was surgical excision of the inflamed interdigital nerve. Overall, 97 of 115 patients (85%) believed that they had improved with the treatment program. Twenty-four patients (21%) eventually required surgical excision of the nerve and 23 of 24 patients (96%) had satisfactory results. The results of the staged treatment protocol were very satisfactory and patient satisfaction was high.

  4. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Effects of Abrupt Frequency Changes in Excised Larynges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alipour, Fariborz; Finnegan, Eileen M.; Scherer, Ronald C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the aerodynamic and acoustic effects due to a sudden change from chest to falsetto register or vice versa. It was hypothesized that the continuous change in subglottal pressure and flow rate alone (pressure-flow sweep [PFS]) can trigger a mode change in the canine larynx. Method: Ten canine larynges were each mounted over a…

  5. Neurofibromatosis and the Painful Neuroma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    clinical treatment of neuropathic pain and pain from neuroma formation. Systemic administration of lidocaine has also been used to treat neuropathic... pain . We performed an experiment to compare the effect of pregabalin(PGB), morphine, and lidocaine (LDC) on the TNT model. Method: TNT model...of mechanical hyperalgesia (partially dennervated skin). Further, systemic lidocaine can be expected to impact neuroma sensitivity related pain

  6. Neurofibromatosis and the Painful Neuroma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    tibial nerve exposure group on all postoperative test days except day 33. Thus, proximal tibial nerve transection led to a reversal of the neuroma pain ...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0176 TITLE: Neurofibromatosis and the Painful ...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01 Jan 06 – 31 Dec 06 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Neurofibromatosis and the Painful Neuroma 5a. CONTRACT

  7. Neurofibromatosis and the Painful Neuroma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) coupled to Saporin as an interesting neuronal toxin. This toxin will bind 5 preferentially to small neuronal fibers...from a neuroma and lead to a significant reduction of neuroma tenderness. Wheat Germ Agglutinin - SAP In our open labeled studies we used doses...application of Wheat Germ Agglutinin – SAP to a nerve will result in retrograde transport of the neural toxin and loss of small fiber axons. In

  8. Unusual case of traumatic neuroma of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Ulivieri, Simone; Muscas, Giovanni; Miracco, Clelia; Oliveri, Giuseppe; Galluzzi, Paolo; Giorgio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic or amputation neuromas are neoformations developing after damage to a peripheral nerve. They are not proper tumors but rather a reactive process or a frustrated attempt of nerve regeneration. Traumatic neuromas are potentially found in every sensory peripheral nerve and often at the site of past surgical intervention, including orbital surgery. A 29-year-old Northern African migrant presented progressive exophthalmos and progressive loss of acuity in left eye, which had started about 6 months before after a cranio-facial trauma caused by a violent assault. MRI of the orbits showed a massive intra-orbital, intra-conical lesion, clearly compressing and dislocating the optic nerve and extending posteriorly to the orbital apex. Surgery was performed through lateral approach of Kroenlein and led to complete excision of the lesion. Histology revealed fibrotic, adipose and striated muscle tissues, a disordered, non-neoplastic overgrowth of small and large fascicles of nerves, inflammatory infiltrates, and fibrosis with sparse calcifications were diffusely observed in a background of fat, scar and striated muscle tissued. Patient was discharged on the fifth day in good health condition, without deficit of eye motion but without recovery of visual acuity. In conclusion, this case demonstrates that traumatic neuromas may arise in the orbit in patients with minor direct trauma to nerves and without previous surgical treatment.

  9. Neurofibromatosis and the Painful Neuroma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    identified two other neural toxins that may be effective: Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) coupled to saporin and cholera toxin B (CTB) coupled to saporin...degeneration. There is a dose dependent loss of axons and prevention of neuroma formation. The application of Wheat Germ Agglutinin – SAP to a nerve will

  10. Neuromas of the calcaneal nerves.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Dellon, A L

    2001-11-01

    A neuroma of a calcaneal nerve has never been reported. A series of 15 patients with heel pain due to a neuroma of a calcaneal nerve are reviewed. These patients previously had either a plantar fasciotomy (n = 4), calcaneal spur removal (n = 2), ankle fusion (n = 2), or tarsal tunnel decompression (n = 7). Neuromas occurred on calcaneal branches that arose from either the posterior tibial nerve (n = 1), lateral plantar nerve (n = 1), the medial plantar nerve (n = 9), or more than one of these nerves (n = 4). Operative approach was through an extended tarsal tunnel incision to permit identification of all calcaneal nerves. The neuroma was resected and implanted into the flexor hallucis longus muscle. Excellent relief of pain occurred in 60%, and good relief in 33%. One patient (17%) had no improvement and required resection of the lateral plantar nerve. Awareness that the heel may be innervated by multiple calcaneal branches suggests that surgery for heel pain of neural origin employ a surgical approach that permits identification of all possible calcaneal branches.

  11. Treatment of Foot and Ankle Neuroma Pain With Processed Nerve Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Jason M.; Purnell, Chad A.; Cheesborough, Jennifer E.; Kelikian, Armen S.; Dumanian, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Localized nerve pain in the foot and ankle can be a chronic source of disability after trauma and has been identified as the most common complication following operative interventions in the foot and ankle. The superficial location of the injured nerves and lack of suitable tissue for nerve implantation make this pain refractory to conventional methods of neuroma management. We describe a novel strategy for management using processed nerve allografts to bridge nerve gaps created by resection of both end neuromas and neuromas-in-continuity. Methods: A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database was performed of all patients who received a processed nerve allograft for treatment of painful neuromas in the foot and ankle between May 2010 and June 2015. Patient demographic and operative information was obtained, as well as preoperative and postoperative pain assessments using a conventional ordinal scale and PROMIS (Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System) Pain Behavior and Pain Interference assessments. Twenty-two patients were identified, with postoperative pain assessments occurring at a mean of 15.5 months after surgery. Results: Neuromas of the sural and superficial peroneal nerves were the most common diagnoses, with 3-cm nerve allografts being used as the interposition graft in the majority of cases. Eight patients had end neuromas and 18 patients had neuromas in continuity. Analysis of paired data demonstrated a mean ordinal pain score decrease of 2.6, with 24 and 31 percentage-point decreases in PROMIS Pain Behavior and Pain Interference measures, respectively. All changes were significant (P < .002). Conclusion: The painful sequelae of superficial nerve injuries in the foot and ankle was significantly improved with complete excision of the involved nerve segment followed by bridging of the resulting nerve gap with a processed nerve allograft. This approach limits surgery to the site of injury and reconstitutes the

  12. Reexcision Perineural Invasion and Epithelial Sheath Neuroma Possibly on a Spectrum of Postinjury Reactive Hyperplasia Mediated by IL-6.

    PubMed

    Wang, James Y; Nuovo, Gerard; Kline, Mitchell; Magro, Cynthia M

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial sheath neuroma is a rarely recognized but established entity in the medical literature. First described in 2000 by Requena et al, there have only been 7 published cases to date, mostly in female patients and presenting as symptomatic solitary lesions on the back without a known history of trauma. In 2006, Beer et al described and reviewed a dozen cases in which epithelial sheath neuroma-like features were seen in the advent of a surgical procedure, which was termed "re-excision perineural invasion" and attributed to possible eccrine duct implantation during surgery. Our case is a 66-year-old male patient who underwent an excision of a melanocytic neoplasm in which a reactive epithelial sheath neuroma was incidentally discovered in the excision specimen, adjacent to the biopsy site cicatrix. Histologically, there was benign cutaneous nerve hyperplasia with a proliferation of squamous epithelium in intimate apposition to the nerve bundles in the superficial dermis. We postulate that the process active in the formation of re-excision perineural invasion is the same as in epithelial sheath neuroma and that minor trauma not appreciable on histologic examination is responsible in the latter entity. We performed IL-6 staining and documented that IL-6 was upregulated at the interface of the nerve and reactive epithelium, but was absent in nerves distant from the site of surgery, suggesting that IL-6 may be essential to the lesion's development. The recognition of reactive epithelial sheath neuroma including the subcategory of re-excision perineural invasion is crucial for the dermatopathologist to prevent mislabeling this reactive entity as a perineural squamous cell carcinoma, which has clinical consequences for the patient such as wider re-excision and radiation treatment. Additionally, we have identified a potential pathophysiologic basis for this lesion.

  13. Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... MD 20892-3456 Toll-free voice: (800) 241-1044 Toll-free TTY: (800) 241-1055 Email: nidcdinfo@ ... questions in English or Spanish. Voice: (800) 241-1044 TTY: (800) 241-1055 nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov ...

  14. Excision without excision

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, David; Sarbach, Olivier; Schnetter, Erik; Diener, Peter; Tiglio, Manuel; Hawke, Ian; Pollney, Denis

    2007-10-15

    to turducken (turduckens, turduckening, turduckened, turduckened) [math.]: To stuff a black hole. We analyze and apply an alternative to black hole excision based on smoothing the interior of black holes with arbitrary initial data, and solving the vacuum Einstein evolution equations everywhere. By deriving the constraint propagation system for our hyperbolic formulation of the BSSN evolution system we rigorously prove that the constraints propagate causally and so any constraint violations introduced inside the black holes cannot affect the exterior spacetime. We present evolutions of Cook-Pfeiffer binary black hole initial configurations showing that these techniques appear to work robustly for generic data. We also present evidence from spherically symmetric evolutions that for the gauge conditions used the same stationary end-state is approached irrespective of the choice of initial data and smoothing procedure.

  15. Palisaded Encapsulated Neuroma of the Trunk: A Case Report and Review of Palisaded Encapsulated Neuroma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    Palisaded encapsulated neuroma is a rare, benign cutaneous tumor. It most commonly presents as a solitary, flesh-colored, dome-shaped nodule affecting the face. However, albeit rarely, palisaded encapsulated neuroma may also appear on the trunk, genitals, or extremities. We describe the clinical and pathologic findings of a male patient who presented with a palisaded encapsulated neuroma on his left flank. In addition, we review the characteristics of patients with truncal palisaded encapsulated neuromas and summarize the clinical and histologic differential diagnosis of this tumor. PMID:27630799

  16. Postoperative radicular neuroma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Erman, T; Tuna, M; Göçer, A I; Idan, F; Akgül, E; Zorludemir, S

    2001-11-15

    Lumbar discectomy is the most common surgical procedure performed in neurosurgery clinics. Such a large number of procedures underscore not only the prevalence of conditions such as intervertebral disc herniation, but also the strong belief of surgeons that the operation does provide benefits to patients suffering from sciatica. In spite of this belief, sciatic pain may continue after the surgery. The recurrence of sciatic and/or back pain after primary discectomy is called the "failed back surgery syndrome." The rate of the complications involved in standard lumbar discectomy ranges from 5.4 to 14%. One of the complications of the lumbar disc surgery is nerve root injury. The complication rate of this injury ranges from 0.7 to 2.2%. Postoperative radicular neuroma must be considered in differential diagnosis for the patient who has failed back surgery syndrome. In this study the authors evaluate a patient who had undergone surgery for lumbar disc herniation and suffered intractable pain. A traumatic radicular neuroma is demonstrated and the pertinent literature is presented.

  17. Neuromas

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPME REdRC Manage Your Practice Reimbursement Issues Compliance Materials Hospital Privileging and Credentialing Health Information Technology State Laws & Regulations Coding Resource Center APMA Buyers' Guide Promote Your Practice APMA e-Store Patient Information Career Center APMA Working for You ...

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of Morton's neuroma.

    PubMed

    Summers, Anthony

    2010-09-01

    Morton's neuroma is a benign foot condition that occurs more often in women than men, and particularly in those who wear narrow, high-heeled shoes. This article presents a case study of the condition, discusses its symptoms and diagnosis, and provides information about the range of treatments on offer.

  19. Neuroma under the fifth metatarsal head. A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Valero, J; Gallart, J; González, D; Agustín, L; Marquina, R; Deus, J; Lahoz, M

    2012-08-01

    This retrospective study was carried out over 83 surgical cases at the distal portion of the fifth metatarsal, compromising the treatment of tailor's bunion, fifth metatarsal overload and the concomitant presence of both pathologies in some cases. Neuromas were founded under the fifth metatarsal head in 18 of the cases studied (21.7%). The results look at whether if there is an association between different fifth metatarsal pathologies and the presence of neuromas and found a significant association between the appearance of neuromas in patients with the same metatarsal overload, especially if it is accompanied by a tailor's bunion pathology.

  20. Posttraumatic neuroma of the radial nerve treated with an autogenous epineural conduit technique. A case report.

    PubMed

    Ignatiadis, I A; Yiannakopoulos, C K; Avram, A M; Gerostathopoulos, N E

    2009-01-01

    We present the outcome of the first clinical application of a new technique using an epineural flap to bridge a short nerve defect. A 28-year-old male had suffered a radial nerve laceration at the lower third of the arm, proximal to the brachioradialis branch, 3 weeks before surgery. During surgery, a neuroma-in-continuity was excised preserving the epineural sleeve. Two longitudinal epineural flaps were created, one from the proximal and one from the distal nerve stump and used to bridge a 1-cm-long nerve defect. Each epineurium flap was sutured to the intact epineurium of the other side and additionally to each other. An electromagnetic nerve stimulator was used to enhance the nerve regeneration process. Nerve regeneration was followed up for 17 months with excellent functional results.

  1. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  2. Acoustic Neuroma: Questions to Discuss with Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... products will be searched. Shopping Cart Description Qty Price The Harvard Medical School 6-Week Plan for ... Memory: Understanding Age-Related Memory Loss (PDF - Lowest Price!) $18.00 Harvard Health Letter (Print & Online Access ( ...

  3. Carcinoma Metastatic to Both Cerebellopontine Angles Masquerading as Acoustic Neuromas

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Eric Winslow; Herschman, Barry Ronald; LaRouere, Michael Joseph

    1995-01-01

    Metastases to the cerebellopontine angles (CPAs) are rare. Typically, the clinical course is one of rapid onset and progression of crarial nerve deficits. The clinical presentation and course of carcinoma metastatic to the CPAs are reviewed. We report a case of bilateral CPA metastases with a radiographic appearance similar to neurofibromatosis type 2 presenting with rapidly progressive bilateral hearing loss followed by unilateral facial nerve palsy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:17171154

  4. Traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve: a case report.

    PubMed

    Arribas-García, Ignacio; Alcalá-Galiano, Andrea; Gutiérrez, Ramón; Montalvo-Moreno, Juan José

    2008-03-01

    Traumatic neuromas are rare entities which characteristically arise subsequently to surgery and are usually accompanied by pain, typically neuralgic. We present an unusual case of an intraosseous traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve following tooth extraction. A 56-year-old man consulted for paresthesias and hyperesthesia in the left mandibular region following extraction of the left mandibular third molar (#38). The panoramic radiograph revealed a radiolucent lesion in the inferior alveolar nerve canal, and CT demonstrated the existence of a mass within the canal, producing widening of the same. Nerve-sparing excisional biopsy was performed. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were consistent with traumatic neuroma of the left inferior alveolar nerve. After 3 years of follow-up, the patient is asymptomatic and there are no signs of recurrence.

  5. Hemangioma excision (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A hemangioma is a non-cancerous (benign) growth of blood vessels. They are the most common benign blood vessel ( ... time and occasionally with medication. Large or disfiguring hemangiomas may require surgical excision.

  6. [Neurofibromatosis 2 (bilateral acoustic neurofibromatosis)].

    PubMed

    Yalcinkaya, C; Sarioglu, A; Boltshauser, E

    1989-10-14

    We report a personal series of 28 patients with neurofibromatosis 2 (NF-2), emphasizing the differences from classical NF-1. The hallmark of NF-2 is bilateral acoustic neuromas with initial symptoms usually occurring in the second or third decade. The natural history may lead to bilateral deafness, but hearing loss may also be a complication of surgery. NF-2 is frequently accompanied by additional intracranial tumors (particularly multiple meningiomas). Half of our patients had a spinal space-occupying lesion. NF-2 is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, and many patients appear to represent new mutations.

  7. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Choi, Seong Hee; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic, and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method: Twenty-four 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups: chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100-ng basic…

  8. Laparoscopic Total Mesorectum Excision

    PubMed Central

    Quilici, F.A.; Cordeiro, F.; Reis, J.A.; Kagohara, O.; Simões Neto, J.

    2002-01-01

    The main controversy of colon-rectal laparoscopic surgery comes from its use as a cancer treatment. Two points deserve special attention: the incidence of portsite tumor implantation and the possibility of performing radical cancer surgery, such as total mesorectum excision. Once these points are addressed, the laparoscopic approach will be used routinely to treat rectal cancer. To clarify these points, 32 patients with cancer of the lower rectum participated in a special protocol that included preoperative radiotherapy and laparoscopic total mesorectum excision. All data were recorded. At the same time, all data recorded from the experience of a multicenter laparoscopic group (Brazilian Colorectal Laparoscopic Surgeons – 130 patients with tumor of the lower rectum) were analyzed and compared with the data provided by our patients. Analysis of the results suggests that a laparoscopic approach allows the same effective resection as that of conventional surgery and that preoperative irradiation does not influence the incidence of intraoperative complications. The extent of lymph nodal excision is similar to that obtained with open surgery, with an average of 12.3 lymph nodes dissected per specimen. The rate of local recurrence was 3.12%. No port site implantation of tumor was noted in this series of patients with cancer of the lower rectum. PMID:12113422

  9. Regenerative Peripheral Nerve Interfaces for the Treatment of Postamputation Neuroma Pain: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Shoshana L.; Kung, Theodore A.; Brown, David L.; Leonard, James A.; Kelly, Brian M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Originally designed for prosthetic control, regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces (RPNIs) prevent neuroma formation by providing free muscle grafts as physiological targets for peripheral nerve ingrowth. We report the first series of patients undergoing RPNI implantation for treatment of symptomatic postamputation neuromas. Methods: A retrospective case series of all amputees undergoing RPNI implantation for treatment of symptomatic neuromas between November 2013 and June 2015 is presented. Data were obtained via chart review and phone interviews using questions derived from the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System instruments. Statistical analyses were performed using dependent sample t tests with a significance threshold of P < 0.01. Results: Forty-six RPNIs were implanted into 16 amputees for neuroma relief (3 upper extremities and 14 lower extremities). Mean age was 53.5 years (6 females and 10 males). All patients participated in postoperative phone interviews at 7.5 ± 3.4 (range: 3–15) months. Patients reported a 71% reduction in neuroma pain and a 53% reduction in phantom pain. Most patients felt satisfied or highly satisfied with RPNI surgery (75%), reporting decreased (56%) or stable (44%) levels of analgesic use. Most patients would strongly recommend RPNI surgery to a friend (88%) and would do it again if given the option (94%). Complications included delayed wound healing (n = 4) and neuroma pain at a different site (n = 2). Conclusions: RPNI implantation carries a reasonable complication profile while offering a simple, effective treatment for symptomatic neuromas. Most patients report a significant reduction in neuroma and phantom pain with a high level of satisfaction. The physiological basis for preventing neuroma recurrence is an intriguing benefit to this approach. PMID:28293490

  10. Arthroscopic excision of ganglion cysts.

    PubMed

    Bontempo, Nicholas A; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2014-02-01

    Arthroscopy is an advancing field in orthopedics, the applications of which have been expanding over time. Traditionally, excision of ganglion cysts has been done in an open fashion. However, more recently, studies show outcomes following arthroscopic excision to be as good as open excision. Cosmetically, the incisions are smaller and heal faster following arthroscopy. In addition, there is the suggested benefit that patients will regain function and return to work faster following arthroscopic excision. More prospective studies comparing open and arthroscopic excision of ganglion cysts need to be done in order to delineate if there is a true functional benefit.

  11. Interdigital Neuroma in the Second Intermetatarsal Space Associated with Metatarsophalangeal Joint Instability

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Song Ho; Izawa, Naohiro; Ohshiro, Yohei

    2016-01-01

    The entrapment theory is the most commonly accepted theory concerning the development of interdigital neuroma; it incriminates the deep transverse metatarsal ligament as the major causative factor of the condition. This report presents a patient with interdigital neuroma in the second intermetatarsal space, which was strongly suspected to be caused by the metatarsophalangeal joint instability due to plantar plate injury. Surgical intervention revealed that the neuroma was located more distally and dorsally than the deep transverse metatarsal ligament and was pinched between the adjacent metatarsal heads, suggesting the involvement of the metatarsophalangeal joint instability and chronic trauma as etiologies in this case. PMID:28003923

  12. Multiple Neuromas Cause Painful "Jumping Stump" in a Transfemoral Amputee: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Buntragulpoontawee, Montana; Pattamapaspong, Nuttaya; Tongprasert, Siam

    2016-09-01

    Painful "jumping stump" is an uncommon but very disturbing complication postamputation. This condition is one of the movement disorder entities resulting from peripheral nerve pathology, often known as "peripherally induced movement disorders." Previously case reports have been written about painful and nonpainful incidence of "jumping stump"; however, only the earliest "jumping stump" article in 1852 suspected that neuromas might influence the involuntary movement. In this study, we describe a 38-year-old man with bilateral transfemoral amputee who suffered from painful "jumping stump" with multiple neuromas confirmed by imaging. He was treated successfully by ultrasound-guided phenol injection into the sciatic neuroma stalks. The pathophysiology of jumping stump and its possible association with neuroma are briefly discussed.

  13. RFI Mitigation / Excision techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshi, D. A.

    2004-06-01

    Radio frequency interference (RFI) is increasingly affecting radio astronomy research. A few years ago, active research to investigate the possibility of observing in the presence of interference using RFI mitigation techniques was initiated. In this paper, I briefly discuss four RFI mitigation/excision projects. These projects are:- (1) A technique to suppress double sideband amplitude modulated interference in which I show that an astronomical signal in the presence of a DSB interference can be observed with a signal-to-noise ratio factor of 2 less compared to observations if the RFI were not present. (2) Techniques to suppress interference due to synchronization signals in composite video signals are presented. A combination of noise-free modelling of the synchronization signals and adaptive filtering is used for suppressing the interference. (3) Design techniques to minimize spurious pick-up at the analog input of an analog-to-digital converter are discussed. (4) Spectral RFI excision using a spectral channel weighted scheme and its application to Green Bank telescope observations are also presented.

  14. Prevention and treatment of amputation neuroma by an atelocollagen tube in rat sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yasuo; Ochi, Mitsuo; Uchio, Yuji; Ryoke, Koji; Yamamoto, Soichiro

    2005-05-01

    To evaluate the potential of the atelocollagen tube as a cap for amputation neuromas, the histological and histochemical characteristics of the neuroma and spinal cord were compared with those following silicone capping. Four weeks after the transection of 18 rat sciatic nerves, the amputated neuroma was resected, and the nerve stump inserted into an atelocollagen or silicone tube. The histological changes in the nerve ends and c-fos expression in the dorsal horn of the fourth lumbar spinal cord were evaluated at 4 weeks postoperatively. The regenerated nerve structure in the atelocollagen or silicone tube was very thin. In contrast, a typical bulbous neuroma was observed in the control group (the nerve stump was left in place). The atelocollagen and silicone tube groups demonstrated fewer c-fos-expressed cells in the spinal cord than the controls. These results suggest that capping by an atelocollagen tube, like that by a silicone tube, might successfully prevent an amputated neuroma from forming, and suppress induced pain. The atelocollagen tube may be a promising biomaterial for the prevention or treatment of a painful amputation neuroma.

  15. Pain and neuroma formation in Wallenberg's lateral medullary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moffie, D; Hamburger, H L

    1986-01-01

    We report a patient with a Wallenberg's lateral medullary syndrome in which pain was a prominent feature. This led to substitution of the original and correct diagnosis by that of a thalamic syndrome for which a prefrontal leucotomy was performed. The patient died some years later from a myocardial infarction and autopsy was performed. In the dorsolateral part of the medulla oblongata a cavity was found in which aberrant nerve fibres with neuroma-like formations could be seen. These fibres coursed along blood vessels, and penetrated from the surface of the medulla oblongata. On the base of the clinico-pathological correlations, it is conjectured that destruction of the lateral reticular formation cannot be the sole cause of the severe pain.

  16. The diagnosis and management of Morton's neuroma: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sameer; Mannan, Ken

    2013-08-01

    Morton's neuroma is a common condition mainly affecting middle aged women, and there are many proposed etiological theories involving chronic repetitive trauma, ischemia, entrapment, and intermetatarsal bursitis. Incorrect terminology suggests that the underlying pathological process is a nerve tumor, although histological examination reveals the presence of inflammatory tissue-that is, perineural fibrosis. The common digital nerve and its branches in the third planter webspace are most commonly affected. Diagnosis is usually made through history taking and clinical examination but may be aided by ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. Current nonoperative treatment strategies include shoe-wear modifications, custom made orthoses, and injections of local anesthetic agents, sclerosing agents, and steroids. Operative management options primarily involve either nerve decompression or neurectomy. We have reviewed the published literature to evaluate the outcomes of the available diagnostic modalities and treatment options and present an algorithm for clinical practice.

  17. In-continuity neuroma of the median nerve after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Depaoli, R; Coscia, D R; Alessandrino, F

    2015-03-01

    Iatrogenic injuries of the median nerve after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome resulting in the formation of a neuroma are rare. We present here the case of two patients, one with a bifid median nerve, showing in-continuity neuroma after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome. The patients reported persistent post-operative pain and showing symptoms. In both cases, ultrasound showed an in-continuity neuroma with a hypoechoic and enlarged median nerve at the carpal tunnel. The case report shows that ultrasound may be helpful in confirming the clinical diagnosis of neuroma and it is useful for evaluation of the percentage of the area affected by the tear.

  18. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Hydrodissection of a Symptomatic Sural Neuroma.

    PubMed

    Fader, Ryan R; Mitchell, Justin J; Chadayammuri, Vivek P; Hill, John; Wolcott, Michelle L

    2015-11-01

    Symptomatic neuromas of the sural nerve are a rare but significant cause of pain and debilitation in athletes. Presentation is usually in the form of chronic pain and dysesthesias or paresthesias of the lateral foot and ankle. Treatment traditionally ranges from conservative measures, such as removing all external compressive forces, to administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vitamin B6, tricyclic antidepressants, antiepileptics, or topical anesthetics. This article reports a case of sural nerve entrapment in a 34-year-old male triathlete with a history of recurrent training-induced right-sided gastrocnemius strains. The patient presented with numbness in the right lateral foot and ankle that had persisted for 3 months, after he was treated unsuccessfully with extensive nonoperative measures, including anti-inflammatory drugs, activity modification, and a dedicated physical therapy program of stretching and strengthening. Orthopedic assessment showed worsening pain with forced passive dorsiflexion and manual pressure applied over the distal aspect of the gastrocnemius. Plain radiographs showed normal findings, but in-office ultrasound imaging showed evidence of sural nerve entrapment with edema and neuromatous scar formation in the absence of gastrocnemius or soleus pathology. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided hydrodissection of the sural nerve at the area of symptomatic neuroma and neural edema was performed the same day. The patient had complete relief of symptoms and full return to the preinjury level of participation in competitive sports. This case report shows that hydrodissection, when performed by an experienced physician, can be an effective, minimally invasive technique for neurolysis in the setting of sural nerve entrapment, resulting in improvement in clinical symptoms.

  19. [Mesocolic excision for colonic adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Debove, Clotilde; Lefèvre, Jérémie H; Parc, Yann

    2017-02-01

    On the same principle than total mesorectal excision in rectal cancer, the effect of complete mesocolic excision on short and long-term outcomes is actually evaluated for colonic adenocarcinoma. This method, usually performed for left colectomy, offers a surgical specimen of higher quality, with a larger number of lymph nodes harvested. For right colectomy, surgical specifications make it less common complete mesocolic excision and conventional surgery offer comparable outcomes, as regards to postoperative morbidity and mortality rates. No differences are identified between laparoscopic and open surgery. On oncologic outcomes, only two studies report a higher free-disease survival after complete mesocolic excision. Then, there is evidence that complete mesocolic excision offers a higher rate of specimen with extensive lymph node resection, without increased morbidity rate. However, there is limited evidence that it leads to improve long-term oncological outcomes.

  20. Iterative marker excision system.

    PubMed

    Myronovskyi, Maksym; Rosenkränzer, Birgit; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2014-05-01

    The deletions of large genomic DNA fragments and consecutive gene knockouts are prerequisites for the generation of organisms with improved properties. One of the key issues in this context is the removal of antibiotic resistance markers from engineered organisms without leaving an active recombinase recognition site. Here, we report the establishment of an iterative marker excision system (IMES) that solves this problem. Based on the phiC31 integrase and its mutant att sites, IMES can be used for highly effective deletion of DNA fragments between inversely oriented B-CC and P-GG sites. The B-CC and P-GG sites are derived from attB and attP by substitution of the central core TT dinucleotide with CC and GG, respectively. An unnatural RR site that resides in the chromosome following deletion is the joining product of the right shoulders of B-CC and P-GG. We show that the RR sites do not recombine with each other as well as the RR site recombines with B-CC. The recombination efficiencies between RR and P-GG or RR and LL are only 0.1 % and 1 %, respectively. Thus, IMES can be used for multistep genomic engineering without risking unwanted DNA recombination. The fabrication of multi-purpose antibiotic cassettes and examples of the utilisation of IMES are described.

  1. Intraoperative and pathological findings of intramedullary amputation neuroma associated with spinal ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Tsunetoshi, Kenzo; Kodera, Toshiaki; Kitai, Ryuhei; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro

    2013-07-01

    Amputation neuromas typically arise in injured peripheral nerves; rarely, however, they arise in the spinal cord. We report a rare case of intramedullary amputation neuroma associated with ependymoma in the cervical spinal cord. A 73-year-old woman presented with a 5-year history of progressive gait disturbance. Neurological examination revealed complete motor deficit of her hands and legs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine revealed an enhancing mass within the spinal cord at the C6/7 level. The patient underwent C5-C7 laminectomy surgery. During resection of the spinal tumor, we found a whitish string resembling an aberrant nerve root or schwannoma with adhesion to the tumor on the ventral side of the spinal cord. After resecting the tumor, the surgical specimen was cut and separated into a soft greyish tumor (spinal tumor) and the tough whitish string. Histopathological and immunohistochemical examination revealed the former was a spinal ependymoma and the latter was a neuroma. An intramedullary amputation neuroma associated with a spinal ependymoma is rare, and this is the first known case in which intraoprerative findings were clearly shown. Neurosurgeons should be aware that spinal ependymomas might coexist with neuromas.

  2. Myelinated sensory and alpha motor axon regeneration in peripheral nerve neuromas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macias, M. Y.; Lehman, C. T.; Sanger, J. R.; Riley, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase (CE) activities was used to analyze sensory and motor axon regeneration, respectively, during neuroma formation in transected and tube-encapsulated peripheral nerves. Median-ulnar and sciatic nerves in the rodent model permitted testing whether a 4 cm greater distance of the motor neuron soma from axotomy site or intrinsic differences between motor and sensory neurons influenced regeneration and neuroma formation 10, 30, and 90 days later. Ventral root radiculotomy confirmed that CE-stained axons were 97% alpha motor axons. Distance significantly delayed axon regeneration. When distance was negligible, sensory axons grew out sooner than motor axons, but motor axons regenerated to a greater quantity. These results indicate regeneration differences between axon subtypes and suggest more extensive branching of motor axons within the neuroma. Thus, both distance from injury site to soma and inherent motor and sensory differences should be considered in peripheral nerve repair strategies.

  3. DNA excision repair at telomeres.

    PubMed

    Jia, Pingping; Her, Chengtao; Chai, Weihang

    2015-12-01

    DNA damage is caused by either endogenous cellular metabolic processes such as hydrolysis, oxidation, alkylation, and DNA base mismatches, or exogenous sources including ultraviolet (UV) light, ionizing radiation, and chemical agents. Damaged DNA that is not properly repaired can lead to genomic instability, driving tumorigenesis. To protect genomic stability, mammalian cells have evolved highly conserved DNA repair mechanisms to remove and repair DNA lesions. Telomeres are composed of long tandem TTAGGG repeats located at the ends of chromosomes. Maintenance of functional telomeres is critical for preventing genome instability. The telomeric sequence possesses unique features that predispose telomeres to a variety of DNA damage induced by environmental genotoxins. This review briefly describes the relevance of excision repair pathways in telomere maintenance, with the focus on base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mismatch repair (MMR). By summarizing current knowledge on excision repair of telomere damage and outlining many unanswered questions, it is our hope to stimulate further interest in a better understanding of excision repair processes at telomeres and in how these processes contribute to telomere maintenance.

  4. Traumatic Neuroma in Continuity Injury Model in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Stephen William Peter; Khu, Kathleen Joy Ong Lopez; Kumar, Ranjan; Webb, Aubrey A.; Midha, Rajiv

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic neuroma in continuity (NIC) results in profound neurological deficits, and its management poses the most challenging problem to peripheral nerve surgeons today. The absence of a clinically relevant experimental model continues to handicap our ability to investigate ways of better diagnosis and treatment for these disabling injuries. Various injury techniques were tested on Lewis rat sciatic nerves. Optimal experimental injuries that consistently resulted in NIC combined both intense focal compression and traction forces. Nerves were harvested at 0, 5, 13, 21, and 65 days for histological examination. Skilled locomotion and ground reaction force (GRF) analysis were performed up to 9 weeks on the experimental (n=6) and crush-control injuries (n=5). Focal widening, disruption of endoneurium and perineurium with aberrant intra- and extrafascicular axonal regeneration and progressive fibrosis was consistently demonstrated in 14 of 14 nerves with refined experimental injuries. At 8 weeks, experimental animals displayed a significantly greater slip ratio in both skilled locomotor assessments, compared to nerve crush animals (p<0.01). GRFs of the crush- injured animals showed earlier improvement compared to the experimental animals, whose overall GRF patterns failed to recover as well as the crush group. We have demonstrated histological features and poor functional recovery consistent with NIC formation in a rat model. The injury mechanism employed combines traction and compression forces akin to the physical forces at play in clinical nerve injuries. This model may serve as a tool to help diagnose this injury earlier and to develop intervention strategies to improve patient outcomes. PMID:22011082

  5. Manual therapy in the management of a patient with a symptomatic Morton's Neuroma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Sault, Josiah D; Morris, Matthew V; Jayaseelan, Dhinu J; Emerson-Kavchak, Alicia J

    2016-02-01

    Patients with Morton's neuroma are rarely referred to physical therapy. This case reports the resolution of pain, increase in local pressure pain thresholds, and improvement of scores on the Lower Extremity Functional Scale and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure following a course of joint based manual therapy for a patient who had failed standard conservative medical treatment.

  6. Surgical management of neuroma pain: a prospective follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Stokvis, Annemieke; van der Avoort, Dirk-Jan J C; van Neck, Johan W; Hovius, Steven E R; Coert, J Henk

    2010-12-01

    Painful neuromas can cause severe loss of function and have great impact on the daily life of patients. Surgical management remains challenging; despite improving techniques, success rates are low. To accurately study the success of surgical neuroma treatment and factors predictive of outcome, a prospective follow-up study was performed. Between 2006 and 2009, pre- and post-operative questionnaires regarding pain (VAS, McGill), function (DASH), quality of life (SF-36), symptoms of psychopathology (SCL-90), epidemiologic determinants and other outcome factors were sent to patients surgically treated for upper extremity neuroma pain. Pain scores after diagnostic nerve blocks were documented at the outpatient clinic before surgery. Thirty-four patients were included, with an average follow up time of 22 months. The mean VAS score decreased from 6.8 to 4.9 after surgery (p<0.01), 19 (56%) of patients were satisfied with surgical results. Upper extremity function improved significantly (p=0.001). Neuroma patients had significantly lower quality of life compared to a normal population. Employment status, duration of pain and CRPS symptoms were found to be prognostic factors. VAS scores after diagnostic nerve block were predictive of post-operative VAS scores (p=0.001). Furthermore, smoking was significantly related to worse outcome (relative risk: 2.10). The results could lead to improved patient selection and treatment strategies. If a diagnostic nerve block is ineffective in relieving pain, patients will most likely not benefit from surgical treatment. Patients should be encouraged to focus on activity and employment instead of their symptoms. Smoking should be discouraged in patients who will undergo surgical neuroma treatment.

  7. The expression of α-SMA in the painful traumatic neuroma: potential role in the pathobiology of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hede; Gao, Weiyang; Pan, Zhijun; Zhang, Feng; Fan, Cunyi

    2012-12-10

    The exact mechanism of neuroma-associated pain is not yet fully understood, thus contributing to the substantial challenge faced in managing patients with painful neuromas. We aimed to observe the expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in the painful traumatic neuroma and to investigate its possible roles in the cause of neuroma-associated pain. Its expression is considered to be a useful phenotypic marker for myofibroblast, and may contribute to its increased contractile activity. We collected peripheral neuroma specimens prospectively and subsequently divided them into two groups: painful (n=21) and non-painful (n=27) based on blinded preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores. We also harvested normal nerve specimens from the discarded limbs as a control group (n=8). We performed immunohistological studies to observe the expression of α-SMA in each group, and calculated the expression level by a high-resolution pathological image analysis system. There was no positive staining of α-SMA observed in the control group, slight positive staining in the non-painful group, and obviously positive staining in the painful group. Pearson correlation analysis demonstrated that VAS scores were significantly associated with the expression intensity of α-SMA (R=0.831; p<0.001). Linear regression analysis indicated that the expression intensity of α-SMA was positively related to the scale of VAS (R(2)=0.691, p<0.001). These findings suggest that: 1) expression of α-SMA may play certain roles in painful traumatic neuroma, either as a direct cause of neuroma-associated pain or as an indirect marker of local mechanical stimuli, and 2) the presence of α-SMA in the painful group may provide rationale for transpositional procedures in the management of traumatic neuroma. The persistent existence of α-SMA in the painful group and the correlation with VAS scores may provide insight into the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  8. Traumatic Neuroma at the Inferior Mesenteric Artery Stump after Rectal Cancer Surgery: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sung Mi; Lee, Jae Young; Byeon, Sun Ju

    2016-11-25

    Traumatic neuroma results from regeneration attempts of the proximal end of an injured or severed nerve, resulting in a non-neoplastic nodular lesion. The lower extremity after amputation is the most common site, followed by the head and neck. Traumatic neuromas occurring in the abdomen, however, are rare. In the abdominal region, traumatic neuromas occur in the cystic duct stump and the common bile ducts as well as around the celiac trunk. This study reports a case of a 59-year-old man who presented with a traumatic neuroma arising at the stump of the inferior mesenteric artery after rectal cancer surgery. Traumatic neuromas at the stump of the inferior mesenteric artery have not been previously reported. The lesion exhibited atypical imaging features, including a well-enhanced nodule, a significant interval growth in size and a mild increase in 18F-fluo-rodeoxyglucose uptake, resembling lymph node metastasis. This case report will help physicians understand the sites of occurrence and imaging features of traumatic neuromas in the abdomen.

  9. Nucleotide excision repair in humans.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Graciela

    2015-12-01

    The demonstration of DNA damage excision and repair replication by Setlow, Howard-Flanders, Hanawalt and their colleagues in the early 1960s, constituted the discovery of the ubiquitous pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER). The serial steps in NER are similar in organisms from unicellular bacteria to complex mammals and plants, and involve recognition of lesions, adducts or structures that disrupt the DNA double helix, removal of a short oligonucleotide containing the offending lesion, synthesis of a repair patch copying the opposite undamaged strand, and ligation, to restore the DNA to its original form. The transcription-coupled repair (TCR) subpathway of NER, discovered nearly two decades later, is dedicated to the removal of lesions from the template DNA strands of actively transcribed genes. In this review I will outline the essential factors and complexes involved in NER in humans, and will comment on additional factors and metabolic processes that affect the efficiency of this important process.

  10. Nucleotide excision repair in humans

    PubMed Central

    Spivak, Graciela

    2015-01-01

    The demonstration of DNA damage excision and repair replication by Setlow, Howard-Flanders, Hanawalt and their colleagues in the early 1960s, constituted the discovery of the ubiquitous pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER). The serial steps in NER are similar in organisms from unicellular bacteria to complex mammals and plants, and involve recognition of lesions, adducts or structures that disrupt the DNA double helix, removal of a short oligonucleotide containing the offending lesion, synthesis of a repair patch copying the opposite undamaged strand, and ligation, to restore the DNA to its original form. The transcription-coupled repair (TCR) subpathway of NER, discovered nearly two decades later, is dedicated to the removal of lesions from the template DNA strands of actively transcribed genes. In this review I will outline the essential factors and complexes involved in NER in humans, and will comment on additional factors and metabolic processes that affect the efficiency of this important process. PMID:26388429

  11. Endoscopic excision of cheek lipomas.

    PubMed

    Pyon, Jai-Kyong; Park, Bum-Jin; Mun, Goo-Hyun; Cha, Myung-Kyu; Lim, So-Young; Bang, Sa-Ik; Oh, Kap-Sung

    2008-10-01

    Although the removal of forehead and brow benign tumors using an endoscopic technique has proven to be valuable, the efficacy of an endoscopic excision for cheek masses is unclear. A retrospective review was performed on 8 patients with a lipoma (7) and a foreign body granuloma (1) located at the cheek region. There were 7 men and 1 woman with a mean age of 34.8 years (range, 22-54 years). All the excisional procedures were performed with an endoscope through 2 small incisions, one on the hair-bearing sideburns and the other behind the earlobe. The masses varied from 0.7 x 0.7 cm to 4.0 x 3.0 cm in size. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications, and no recurrence was detected after a 5- to 61-month follow-up. An endoscopically assisted excision of cheek lipomas is an effective procedure and might be a good alternative to the more conventional procedures.

  12. Osteophyte excision without cyst excision for a mucous cyst of the finger.

    PubMed

    Lee, H-J; Kim, P-T; Jeon, I-H; Kyung, H-S; Ra, I-H; Kim, T-K

    2014-03-01

    Osteophyte excision is a mainstay of treatment for mucous cyst combined with Heberden's node in a distal interphalangeal joint or in an interphalangeal joint of the thumb. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of osteophyte excision without cyst excision for the treatment of a mucous cyst combined with Heberden's node. The medical records of 37 patients (42 cases) with a mucous cyst with Heberden's node were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-eight of 40 cases with available pre-operative simple radiographs showed evidence of joint arthrosis. A T-shaped skin incision of the joint capsule between the extensor tendon and lateral collateral ligament was used. Osteophyte excision without cyst excision was performed. All cysts, except one, regressed without recurrence or a skin complication after osteophyte excision, but eight cases showed post-operative pain and loss of range of motion. Osteophyte excision without cyst excision may be a good treatment choice for mucous cyst of the finger.

  13. Proteomic profiling of neuromas reveals alterations in protein composition and local protein synthesis in hyper-excitable nerves

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong-Lei; Cendan, Cruz-Miguel; Roza, Carolina; Okuse, Kenji; Cramer, Rainer; Timms, John F; Wood, John N

    2008-01-01

    Neuropathic pain may arise following peripheral nerve injury though the molecular mechanisms associated with this are unclear. We used proteomic profiling to examine changes in protein expression associated with the formation of hyper-excitable neuromas derived from rodent saphenous nerves. A two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) profiling strategy was employed to examine protein expression changes between developing neuromas and normal nerves in whole tissue lysates. We found around 200 proteins which displayed a >1.75-fold change in expression between neuroma and normal nerve and identified 55 of these proteins using mass spectrometry. We also used immunoblotting to examine the expression of low-abundance ion channels Nav1.3, Nav1.8 and calcium channel α2δ-1 subunit in this model, since they have previously been implicated in neuronal hyperexcitability associated with neuropathic pain. Finally, S35methionine in vitro labelling of neuroma and control samples was used to demonstrate local protein synthesis of neuron-specific genes. A number of cytoskeletal proteins, enzymes and proteins associated with oxidative stress were up-regulated in neuromas, whilst overall levels of voltage-gated ion channel proteins were unaffected. We conclude that altered mRNA levels reported in the somata of damaged DRG neurons do not necessarily reflect levels of altered proteins in hyper-excitable damaged nerve endings. An altered repertoire of protein expression, local protein synthesis and topological re-arrangements of ion channels may all play important roles in neuroma hyper-excitability. PMID:18700027

  14. 27 CFR 70.412 - Excise taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Excise taxes. 70.412 Section 70.412 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Beer § 70.412 Excise taxes. (a) Collection. Taxes on distilled spirits, wines, and beer are paid...

  15. 27 CFR 70.412 - Excise taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Excise taxes. 70.412 Section 70.412 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Beer § 70.412 Excise taxes. (a) Collection. Taxes on distilled spirits, wines, and beer are paid...

  16. 27 CFR 26.30 - Excise taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Excise taxes. 26.30 Section 26.30 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Into the United States From Areas Other Than Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands § 26.30 Excise...

  17. 27 CFR 70.412 - Excise taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excise taxes. 70.412 Section 70.412 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Beer § 70.412 Excise taxes. (a) Collection. Taxes on distilled spirits, wines, and beer are paid...

  18. 27 CFR 26.30 - Excise taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excise taxes. 26.30 Section 26.30 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Into the United States From Areas Other Than Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands § 26.30 Excise...

  19. 27 CFR 70.412 - Excise taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Excise taxes. 70.412 Section 70.412 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Beer § 70.412 Excise taxes. (a) Collection. Taxes on distilled spirits, wines, and beer are paid...

  20. 27 CFR 26.30 - Excise taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Excise taxes. 26.30 Section 26.30 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Into the United States From Areas Other Than Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands § 26.30 Excise...

  1. 27 CFR 70.412 - Excise taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Excise taxes. 70.412 Section 70.412 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Beer § 70.412 Excise taxes. (a) Collection. Taxes on distilled spirits, wines, and beer are paid...

  2. 27 CFR 26.30 - Excise taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Excise taxes. 26.30 Section 26.30 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Into the United States From Areas Other Than Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands § 26.30 Excise...

  3. 27 CFR 26.30 - Excise taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Excise taxes. 26.30 Section 26.30 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Into the United States From Areas Other Than Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands § 26.30 Excise...

  4. Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision: West meets East.

    PubMed

    Chow, Carina F K; Kim, Seon Hahn

    2014-10-21

    Complete mesocolic excision is a relatively new concept in western literature. It follows the same concept of total mesorectal excision and units' routinely performing complete mesocolic excisions have good pathological results as well as good improvements in overall survival, disease free survival and local recurrence. And yet unlike total mesorectal excision, uptake in the West has been relatively slow with many units sceptical of the true benefits gained by taking up a more technically challenging and potentially more morbid procedure when there is a paucity of literature to support these claims. This article reviews complete mesocolic excision for colon cancer, attempting to identify the risks and benefits of the technique and particularly looking at the reasons why its uptake has not been universal. It also discusses the similarities of a complete mesocolic excision to a colon resection with a D3 lymphadenectomy as well as the role of a laparoscopic approach to this technique. Considering a D3 lymphadenectomy has been the standard of care for stage II and III colon cancers in many of our Asian neighbours for over 20 years, combining this data with data on complete mesocolic excision may provide enough evidence to support or refute the need for complete mesocolic excisions. Maybe there might be lessons to be learnt from our colleagues in the east.

  5. Experiments on Analysing Voice Production: Excised (Human, Animal) and In Vivo (Animal) Approaches.

    PubMed

    Döllinger, Michael; Kobler, James; Berry, David A; Mehta, Daryush D; Luegmair, Georg; Bohr, Christopher

    Experiments on human and on animal excised specimens as well as in vivo animal preparations are so far the most realistic approaches to simulate the in vivo process of human phonation. These experiments do not have the disadvantage of limited space within the neck and enable studies of the actual organ necessary for phonation, i.e., the larynx. The studies additionally allow the analysis of flow, vocal fold dynamics, and resulting acoustics in relation to well-defined laryngeal alterations.

  6. Types of Vestibular Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... include complications from aging, autoimmune disorders, and allergies. Acoustic Neuroma Acoustic neuroma (also called a vestibular schwannoma) is a ... This nerve is also referred to as the acoustic nerve, hence the name.) As an acoustic neuroma ...

  7. Comparative light-microscopic and immunohistochemical study of traumatic and palisaded encapsulated neuromas of the skin.

    PubMed

    Argenyi, Z B; Santa Cruz, D; Bromley, C

    1992-12-01

    The primary hyperplastic nature of palisaded encapsulated neuromas (PENs) has been recently challenged by suggesting a traumatic origin. We studied eight cases of traumatic neuroma (TN) and 12 cases of PEN by routine light-microscopic, histochemical, and immunohistochemical methods to assess evidence of previous tissue injury. Sections from the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, trichrome, elastic, reticulin, Giemsa, colloidal iron (with and without hyaluronidase), and Bielschowsky silver stains. Antibodies were applied to collagen types I, III, and IV, MAC 387, factor XIIIa, alpha 1-antitrypsin (A1AT), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), Leu-7, and myelin basic protein using ABC techniques. We found that (a) in TN the individual fascicles were usually surrounded by perineurial cells, whereas in PEN the perineurial cells were observed mainly in the capsular areas and only rarely within the fascicles as evidenced by EMA antibodies; (b) histochemically TN contained considerably larger amounts of collagen (types I and III), acidic mucin, and myelin products than did PEN; and (c) neither PEN nor TN contained increased inflammatory cells or cells positive for factor XIIIa, MAC 387, or A1AT. We conclude that (a) there are substantial structural and histochemical differences between TN and PEN, (b) the changes suggest that the classic form of PEN has a different histogenesis than TN, and (c) on histologic grounds, chronic minor trauma could not be excluded as an etiologic factor for PEN.

  8. An alternative eukaryotic DNA excision repair pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Freyer, G A; Davey, S; Ferrer, J V; Martin, A M; Beach, D; Doetsch, P W

    1995-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by UV light, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, and (6-4)pyrimidine pyrimidones are known to be repaired by the process of nucleotide excision repair (NER). However, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, studies have demonstrated that at least two mechanisms for excising UV photo-products exist; NER and a second, previously unidentified process. Recently we reported that S. pombe contains a DNA endonuclease, SPDE, which recognizes and cleaves at a position immediately adjacent to cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and (6-4)pyrimidine pyrimidones. Here we report that the UV-sensitive S. pombe rad12-502 mutant lacks SPDE activity. In addition, extracts prepared from the rad12-502 mutant are deficient in DNA excision repair, as demonstrated in an in vitro excision repair assay. DNA repair activity was restored to wild-type levels in extracts prepared from rad12-502 cells by the addition of partially purified SPDE to in vitro repair reaction mixtures. When the rad12-502 mutant was crossed with the NER rad13-A mutant, the resulting double mutant was much more sensitive to UV radiation than either single mutant, demonstrating that the rad12 gene product functions in a DNA repair pathway distinct from NER. These data directly link SPDE to this alternative excision repair process. We propose that the SPDE-dependent DNA repair pathway is the second DNA excision repair process present in S. pombe. PMID:7623848

  9. Acoustic Seaglider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-07

    a national naval responsibility. Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial...problem and acoustic navigation and communications within the context of distributed autonomous persistent undersea surveillance sensor networks...Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial coherence and the description of ambient

  10. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  11. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  12. 29 CFR 794.121 - Exclusion of excise taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exclusion of excise taxes. 794.121 Section 794.121 Labor... Exclusion of excise taxes. The computation of the annual gross volume of sales of the enterprise for purposes of section 7(b)(3) is made “exclusive of excise taxes.” It will be noted that the excise...

  13. Promotion of peripheral nerve regeneration and prevention of neuroma formation by PRGD/PDLLA/β-TCP conduit: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yixia; Li, Binbin; Yan, Qiongjiao; Dai, Honglian; Wang, Xinyu; Huang, Jifeng; Li, Shipu

    2015-06-01

    In the field of nerve repair, one major challenge is the formation of neuroma. However, reports on both the promotion of nerve regeneration and prevention of traumatic neuroma in the clinical settings are rare in the field of nerve repair. One of the reasons could be the insufficiency in the follow-up system. We have conducted 33 cases of nerve repair using PRGD/PDLLA/β-TCP conduit without any sign of adverse reaction, especially no neuroma formation. Among them, we have selected two cases as representatives to report in this article. The first case was a patient with an upper limb nerve wound was bridged by PRGD/PDLLA/β-TCP conduit and a plate fixation was given. After nearly 3-years' follow-up, the examination results demonstrated that nerve regeneration effect was very good. When the reoperation was performed to remove the steel plate we observed a uniform structure of the regenerated nerve without the formation of neuroma, and to our delight, the implanted conduit was completely degraded 23 months after the implantation. The second case had an obsolete nerve injury with neuroma formation. After removal of the neuroma, the nerve was bridged by PRGD/PDLLA/β-TCP conduit. Follow-up examinations showed that the structure and functional recovery were improved gradually in the 10-month follow-up; no end-enlargement and any other abnormal reaction associated with the characteristic of neuroma were found. Based on our 33-case studies, we have concluded that PRGD/PDLLA/β-TCP nerve conduit could both promote nerve regeneration and prevent neuroma formation; therefore, it is a good alternative for peripheral nerve repair.

  14. Partial excision of residual burn lesions.

    PubMed

    Engrav, L H; Gottlieb, J R; Millard, S P; Walkinshaw, M D; Heimbach, D M; Marvin, J A

    1987-01-01

    Most burn victims have unattractive residual lesions, which may include hypertrophic donor sites, unsightly skin grafts, hypertrophic scars, and mature scars with altered pigmentation or texture. Some of these lesions can be treated by total excision in one or more stages or they can be reconstructed utilizing grafts, flaps, Z-plasties, or tissue expansion. But frequently these procedures are either not indicated or not elected by the patient. In such a situation, the only surgical option is partial excision, with the goal of making the lesion less conspicuous and more easily concealed by clothing. Whether or not such partial excisions are worthwhile is the obvious question. We could not find an answer in the literature and therefore decided to review our own experience. Between 6/30/81 and 3/12/86, 92 such procedures were performed and followed in 25 patients. Partial excision of hypertrophic donor sites, unsightly skin grafts, and hypertrophic scars did yield improved appearance in most patients. However, partial excision of mature scars, ie, areas of altered pigmentation or texture, did not have the same success. We continue to treat the first three types of lesions in this fashion but no longer include the latter.

  15. Control of Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island excision.

    PubMed

    Mir-Sanchis, Ignacio; Martínez-Rubio, Roser; Martí, Miguel; Chen, John; Lasa, Íñigo; Novick, Richard P; Tormo-Más, María Ángeles; Penadés, José R

    2012-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are a group of related 15-17 kb mobile genetic elements that commonly carry genes for superantigen toxins and other virulence factors. The key feature of their mobility is the induction of SaPI excision and replication by certain phages and their efficient encapsidation into specific small-headed phage-like infectious particles. Previous work demonstrated that chromosomal integration depends on the SaPI-encoded recombinase, Int. However, although involved in the process, Int alone was not sufficient to mediate efficient SaPI excision from chromosomal sites, and we expected that SaPI excision would involve an Xis function, which could be encoded by a helper phage or by the SaPI, itself. Here we report that the latter is the case. In vivo recombination assays with plasmids in Escherichia coli demonstrate that SaPI-coded Xis is absolutely required for recombination between the SaPI att(L) and att(R) sites, and that both sites, as well as their flanking SaPI sequences, are required for SaPI excision. Mutational analysis reveals that Xis is essential for efficient horizontal SaPI transfer to a recipient strain. Finally, we show that the master regulator of the SaPI life cycle, Stl, blocks expression of int and xis by binding to inverted repeats present in the promoter region, thus controlling SaPI excision.

  16. Morton's Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  17. Morton neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the development of this condition: Wearing tight shoes and high heels Abnormal positioning of toes Flat ... and sometimes toes Pain that increases when wearing shoes or pressing on the area Pain that gets ...

  18. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  19. 29 CFR 779.264 - Excise taxes separately stated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excise taxes separately stated. 779.264 Section 779.264... Coverage Excise Taxes § 779.264 Excise taxes separately stated. A tax is separately stated where it clearly... was no invoice or sales slip. In the absence of a sales slip or invoice, the amount of the tax...

  20. 26 CFR 25.2512-7 - Effect of excise tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Effect of excise tax. 25.2512-7 Section 25.2512... TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Transfers § 25.2512-7 Effect of excise tax. If jewelry, furs or other property, the purchase of which is subject to an excise tax, is purchased at...

  1. 75 FR 9359 - Drawback of Internal Revenue Excise Tax

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... Parts 113 and 191 RIN 1505-AC18 Drawback of Internal Revenue Excise Tax AGENCY: Customs and Border... Regulations to: preclude the filing of a substitution drawback claim for internal revenue excise tax paid on imported merchandise in situations where no excise tax was paid upon the substituted merchandise or...

  2. Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Renal Schwannoma Excision.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Jeremy; Collins, Ryan; Allam, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background: To report the first case of a renal schwannoma excised with robot-assisted laparoscopy. Case Presentation: A 43-year-old Caucasian female patient with vague abdominal symptoms was noted to have incidental right renal mass. Physical examination and laboratory tests were within normal limits. CT revealed a 4.6 cm heterogeneous enhancing right renal mass arising near the hilum. RENAL nephrometry score was 11a. She was treated by right robot-assisted laparoscopic nephrectomy. She recovered well without complications. Pathology analysis revealed a benign renal schwannoma. Conclusion: Renal schwannoma is a rare kidney tumor. We report the first known case of this tumor excised by robot-assisted laparoscopic nephrectomy.

  3. Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Renal Schwannoma Excision

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Jeremy; Collins, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: To report the first case of a renal schwannoma excised with robot-assisted laparoscopy. Case Presentation: A 43-year-old Caucasian female patient with vague abdominal symptoms was noted to have incidental right renal mass. Physical examination and laboratory tests were within normal limits. CT revealed a 4.6 cm heterogeneous enhancing right renal mass arising near the hilum. RENAL nephrometry score was 11a. She was treated by right robot-assisted laparoscopic nephrectomy. She recovered well without complications. Pathology analysis revealed a benign renal schwannoma. Conclusion: Renal schwannoma is a rare kidney tumor. We report the first known case of this tumor excised by robot-assisted laparoscopic nephrectomy. PMID:27872900

  4. Transanal local excision of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Read, D R; Sokil, S; Ruiz-Salas, G

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with invasive rectal cancer treated by transanal excision between 1978-1989 are presented. Two patients had poorly differentiated tumours and were converted to abdominoperineal resection and one patient had extensive liver metastases documented preoperatively. The remaining twenty-two, mean age 64 years, fulfilled the criteria for local treatment. Eighty-two percent of tumours were T1 or T2 stage. There was no operative mortality. Six complications in five patients occurred, none requiring surgical intervention. Five patients died of unrelated causes without evidence of recurrence at 4, 4, 14, 26 and 58 months. The length of follow-up for the surviving group (17 patients) was 16 to 115 months (mean 63 months). Two patients developed local recurrence at 32 and 60 months. Transanal excision can be curative for selected rectal cancers.

  5. Osteoid osteoma: excision with scintimetric guidance

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, T.M.; Murray, T.E.; Malone, L.A.; Dervan, P.; Walsh, M.; McManus, R.; Ennis, J.T.

    1984-11-01

    The definite diagnosis of osteoid osteoma relies on the demonstration of the nidus, best shown by CT, which also provides precise preoperative localization of the nidus. While bone-block excision to remove the nidus is feasible in the long bones, there may be unacceptable sequelae in the vertebral column and small bones of the hands. By precisely localizing the nidus, radionuclide scintimetry permits excellent therapeutic results, with minimal morbidity.

  6. Nucleotide excision repair in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Van Houten, B

    1990-01-01

    One of the best-studied DNA repair pathways is nucleotide excision repair, a process consisting of DNA damage recognition, incision, excision, repair resynthesis, and DNA ligation. Escherichia coli has served as a model organism for the study of this process. Recently, many of the proteins that mediate E. coli nucleotide excision have been purified to homogeneity; this had led to a molecular description of this repair pathway. One of the key repair enzymes of this pathway is the UvrABC nuclease complex. The individual subunits of this enzyme cooperate in a complex series of partial reactions to bind to and incise the DNA near a damaged nucleotide. The UvrABC complex displays a remarkable substrate diversity. Defining the structural features of DNA lesions that provide the specificity for damage recognition by the UvrABC complex is of great importance, since it represents a unique form of protein-DNA interaction. Using a number of in vitro assays, researchers have been able to elucidate the action mechanism of the UvrABC nuclease complex. Current research is devoted to understanding how these complex events are mediated within the living cell. PMID:2181258

  7. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  8. Tautomerization-dependent recognition and excision of oxidation damage in base-excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chenxu; Lu, Lining; Zhang, Jun; Yue, Zongwei; Song, Jinghui; Zong, Shuai; Liu, Menghao; Stovicek, Olivia; Gao, Yi Qin; Yi, Chengqi

    2016-01-01

    NEIL1 (Nei-like 1) is a DNA repair glycosylase guarding the mammalian genome against oxidized DNA bases. As the first enzymes in the base-excision repair pathway, glycosylases must recognize the cognate substrates and catalyze their excision. Here we present crystal structures of human NEIL1 bound to a range of duplex DNA. Together with computational and biochemical analyses, our results suggest that NEIL1 promotes tautomerization of thymine glycol (Tg)—a preferred substrate—for optimal binding in its active site. Moreover, this tautomerization event also facilitates NEIL1-catalyzed Tg excision. To our knowledge, the present example represents the first documented case of enzyme-promoted tautomerization for efficient substrate recognition and catalysis in an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. PMID:27354518

  9. Pathologic Processing of the Total Mesorectal Excision

    PubMed Central

    Campa-Thompson, Molly; Weir, Robert; Calcetera, Natalie; Quirke, Philip; Carmack, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Total mesorectal excision (TME) is the current optimal surgical treatment for patients with rectal carcinoma. A complete TME is related to lower local recurrence rates and increased patient survival. Many confounding factors in the patient's anatomy and prior therapy can make it difficult to obtain a perfect plane, and thus a complete TME. The resection specimen can be thoroughly evaluated, grossly and microscopically, to identify substandard surgical outcomes and increased risk of local recurrence. Complete and accurate data reporting is critical for patient care and helps surgeons improve their technique. PMID:25733973

  10. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  11. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors.

  12. Endoscopic-assisted excision of esthesioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kishore Chandra; Kumar, Ashwini; Prasad, Sampath Chandra; Jain, Disha

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to report a case of esthesioneuroblastoma involving the bilateral paranasal sinuses, which was excised using an endoscopic-assisted transfacial approach. A patient presented with nasal swelling and left-sided nasal obstruction, epistaxis, and diplopia. Examination revealed broadening of the nasal dorsum with a fleshy pink mass in both nasal cavities. Computed tomographic scan showed a mass involving the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses on both sides. The tumor was diagnosed as group C esthesioneuroblastoma. The mass was excised by bilateral medial maxillectomy and bilateral frontoethmoidectomy. Using a 0 degrees endoscope, the attachment of the tumor to the cribriform plate was identified and resected using a motordrill. On Waroff staining, Hispathology slides suggested esthesioneuroblastoma. The patient was asymptomatic for 1 year, following which he developed infection of the nasal cavity for which he had no form of treatment. He subsequently developed maggots in the nasal cavity after which he died. An endoscopic resection of the cribriform plate from the nasal cavity without a formal craniofacial resection can be safely performed with oncologic safety.

  13. Staged excisions of moderate-sized burns compared with total excision with immediate autograft: an evaluation of two strategies

    PubMed Central

    Elmasry, Moustafa; Steinvall, Ingrid; Thorfinn, Johan; Abdelrahman, Islam; Olofsson, Pia; Sjoberg, Folke

    2017-01-01

    Background: Different surgical techniques have evolved since excision and autografting became the treatment of choice for deep burns in the 1970s. The treatment plan at the Burn Center, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden, has shifted from single-stage excision and immediate autografting to staged excisions and temporary cover with xenografts before autografting. The aim of this study was to find out if the change in policy resulted in extended duration of hospital stay/total body surface area burned (LOS/TBSA%). Methods: Retrospective clinical cohort including surgically-managed patients with burns of 15%-60% TBSA% within each treatment group. The first had early full excisions of deep dermal and full thickness burns and immediate autografts (1997-98), excision and immediate autograft group) and the second had staged excisions before final autografts using xenografts for temporary cover (2010-11, staged excision group). Results: The study included 57 patients with deep dermal and full-thickness burns, 28 of whom had excision and immediate autografting, and 29 of whom had staged excisions with xenografting before final autografting. Adjusted (LOS/TBSA%) was close to 1, and did not differ between groups. Mean operating time for the staged excision group was shorter and the excised area/operation was smaller. The total operating time/TBSA% did not differ between groups. Conclusion: Staged excisions with temporary cover did not affect adjusted LOS/TBSA% or total operating time. Staged excisions may be thought to be more expensive because of the cost of covering the wound between stages, but this needs to be further investigated as do the factors that predict long term outcome. PMID:28123862

  14. Precise excision of transposons and point mutations induced by chemicals.

    PubMed

    Rusina OYu; Mirskaya, E E; Andreeva, I V; Skavronskaya, A G

    1992-11-01

    The ability of 23 chemicals (carcinogens and non-carcinogens) to induce precise excision of Tn10 and point mutations was studied in experiments with a single strain. The mutation assay was shown to detect a wider spectrum of genotoxic agents than the assay of Tn10 precise excision. The latter was induced only by potent SOS mutagens, which is in accordance with data on the SOS dependence of the induction of precise excision of Tn10. The precise excision assay as an additional test contributing to the knowledge of particular features of the action of a tested mutagen is discussed. The induction of precise excision of Tn10 by pyrene (and its failure to induce point mutations in this strain) demonstrates the value of using the transposon excision assay in cases of 'problem' mutagens.

  15. Ultrasound-guided alcohol neurolysis and radiofrequency ablation of painful stump neuroma: effective treatments for post-amputation pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Xu, Yongming; Zhou, Jin; Pu, Shaofeng; Lv, Yingying; Chen, Yueping; Du, Dongping

    2017-01-01

    Background Post-amputation pain (PAP) is highly prevalent after limb amputation, and stump neuromas play a key role in the generation of the pain. Presently, PAP refractory to medical management is frequently treated with minimally invasive procedures guided by ultrasound, such as alcohol neurolysis and radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Objective To record the immediate and long-term efficacy of alcohol neurolysis and RFA. We first used alcohol neurolysis and then, when necessary, we performed RFA on PAP patients. Study design Prospective case series. Setting Pain management center. Methods Thirteen subjects were treated with ultrasound-guided procedures. Results All patients were treated with neurolysis using alcohol solutions guided by ultrasound. Seven (54%) of 13 subjects achieved pain relief after 1–3 alcohol injection treatments. The remaining 6 subjects obtained pain relief after receiving 2 administrations of ultrasound-guided RFA. After a 6-month follow-up evaluation period, pain quantities were also assessed. Both stump pain (including intermittent sharp pain and continuous burning pain) and phantom pain were relieved. The frequency of intermittent sharp pain was decreased, and no complications were noted during the observation. Conclusion The use of ultrasound guidance for alcohol injection and RFA of painful stump neuromas is a simple, radiation-free, safe, and effective procedure that provides sustained pain relief in PAP patients. In this case series, RFA was found to be an effective alternative to alcohol injection. PMID:28223839

  16. Nonlinear Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-02-14

    Wester- velt. [60] Streaming. In 1831, Michael Faraday [61] noted that currents of air were set up in the neighborhood of vibrating plates-the first... ducei in the case of a paramettc amy (from Berktay an Leahy 141). C’ "". k•, SEC 10.1 NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS 345 The principal results of their analysis

  17. Mammalian transcription-coupled excision repair.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Wim; Fousteri, Maria

    2013-08-01

    Transcriptional arrest caused by DNA damage is detrimental for cells and organisms as it impinges on gene expression and thereby on cell growth and survival. To alleviate transcriptional arrest, cells trigger a transcription-dependent genome surveillance pathway, termed transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) that ensures rapid removal of such transcription-impeding DNA lesions and prevents persistent stalling of transcription. Defective TC-NER is causatively linked to Cockayne syndrome, a rare severe genetic disorder with multisystem abnormalities that results in patients' death in early adulthood. Here we review recent data on how damage-arrested transcription is actively coupled to TC-NER in mammals and discuss new emerging models concerning the role of TC-NER-specific factors in this process.

  18. Local excision by transanal endoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    García-Flórez, Luis J; Otero-Díez, Jorge L

    2015-01-01

    Transanal endoscopic surgery (TES) consists of a series of anorectal surgical procedures using different devices that are introduced into the anal canal. TES has been developed significantly since it was first used in the 1980s. The key point for the success of these techniques is how accurately patients are selected. The main indication was the resection of endoscopically unresectable adenomas. In recent years, these techniques have become more widespread which has allowed them to be applied in conservative rectal procedures for both benign diseases and selected cases of rectal cancer. For more advanced rectal cancers it should be considered palliative or, in some controlled trials, experimental. The role of newer endoscopic techniques available has not yet been defined. TES may allow for new strategies in the treatment of rectal pathology, like transanal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery or total mesorectal excision. PMID:26309355

  19. Base excision repair capacity in informing healthspan

    PubMed Central

    Brenerman, Boris M.; Illuzzi, Jennifer L.; Wilson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a frontline defense mechanism for dealing with many common forms of endogenous DNA damage, several of which can drive mutagenic or cell death outcomes. The pathway engages proteins such as glycosylases, abasic endonucleases, polymerases and ligases to remove substrate modifications from DNA and restore the genome back to its original state. Inherited mutations in genes related to BER can give rise to disorders involving cancer, immunodeficiency and neurodegeneration. Studies employing genetically defined heterozygous (haploinsufficient) mouse models indicate that partial reduction in BER capacity can increase vulnerability to both spontaneous and exposure-dependent pathologies. In humans, measurement of BER variation has been imperfect to this point, yet tools to assess BER in epidemiological surveys are steadily evolving. We provide herein an overview of the BER pathway and discuss the current efforts toward defining the relationship of BER defects with disease susceptibility. PMID:25355293

  20. Elasticity of excised dog lung parenchyma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vawter, D. L.; Fung, Y. C.; West, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    An optical-electromechanical system is used to measure the force-deformation behavior of biaxially loaded rectangular slabs of excised dog lung parenchyma. In the course of the study, the effects of time, the consistency of reference lengths and areas, the presence of hysteresis, the necessity of preconditioning, the repeatability of results, the effects of lateral load, the effect of strain rate, the effect of pH, the influence of temperature, and the variations among specimens are considered. A new finding is that there is a change in elastic behavior when the tissue undergoes a compressive strain. When the tissue is in tension, increasing the lateral load decreases the compliance, whereas the opposite is true when compressive strain is present.

  1. Variation in Base Excision Repair Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, David M.; Kim, Daemyung; Berquist, Brian R.; Sigurdson, Alice J.

    2010-01-01

    The major DNA repair pathway for coping with spontaneous forms of DNA damage, such as natural hydrolytic products or oxidative lesions, is base excision repair (BER). In particular, BER processes mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions such as non-bulky base modifications, abasic sites, and a range of chemically distinct single-strand breaks. Defects in BER have been linked to cancer predisposition, neurodegenerative disorders, and immunodeficiency. Recent data indicate a large degree of sequence variability in DNA repair genes and several studies have associated BER gene polymorphisms with disease risk, including cancer of several sites. The intent of this review is to describe the range of BER capacity among individuals and the functional consequences of BER genetic variants. We also discuss studies that associate BER deficiency with disease risk and the current state of BER capacity measurement assays. PMID:21167187

  2. Molecular mechanisms of pyrimidine dimer excision in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: excision of dimers in cell extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, R.J.; Love, J.D.; Friedberg, E.C.

    1981-08-01

    Cell-free extracts prepared from rad1-19, rad2-2, rad3-1, rad4-3, rad7-1, rad10-1, rad14-1, rad16-1, and cycl-1 (rad7) mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae all catalyze the preferential excision of thymine-containing pyrimidine dimers from ultraviolet-irradiated DNA specifically incised with M. luteus ultraviolet deoxyribonucleic acid incising activity.

  3. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  4. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  5. Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed signal excision software: User's manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parliament, Hugh A.

    1992-05-01

    The Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed (ASPT) signal excision software is a set of programs that provide real-time processing functions for the excision of interfering tones from a live spread-spectrum signal as well as off-line functions for the analysis of the effectiveness of the excision technique. The processing functions provided by the ASPT signal excision software are real-time adaptive filtering of live data, storage to disk, and file sorting and conversion. The main off-line analysis function is bit error determination. The purpose of the software is to measure the effectiveness of an adaptive filtering algorithm to suppress interfering or jamming signals in a spread spectrum signal environment. A user manual for the software is provided, containing information on the different software components available to perform signal excision experiments: the real-time excision software, excision host program, file processing utilities, and despreading and bit error rate determination software. In addition, information is presented describing the excision algorithm implemented, the real-time processing framework, the steps required to add algorithms to the system, the processing functions used in despreading, and description of command sequences for post-run analysis of the data.

  6. 27 CFR 24.323 - Excise Tax Return form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Excise Tax Return form. 24.323 Section 24.323 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Records and Reports § 24.323 Excise Tax Return form. A proprietor...

  7. 48 CFR 970.2902 - Federal excise taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Federal excise taxes. 970.2902 Section 970.2902 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Taxes 970.2902 Federal excise taxes....

  8. 76 FR 66181 - Disregarded Entities; Excise Taxes and Employment Taxes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 301 RIN 1545-BH90 Disregarded Entities; Excise Taxes and Employment Taxes AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Final regulations and removal of... and excise taxes. These regulations also make conforming changes to the tax liability rule...

  9. P element excision in drosophila melanogaster and related drosophilids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The frequency of P element excision and the structure of the resulting excision products were determined in three drosophilid species, Drosophila melanogaster, D. virilis, and Chymomyza procnemis. A transient P element mobility assay was conducted in the cells of developing insect embryos, but unlik...

  10. 26 CFR 25.2512-7 - Effect of excise tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Effect of excise tax. 25.2512-7 Section 25.2512-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Transfers § 25.2512-7 Effect of excise tax....

  11. Mechanism of integration and excision in conjugative transposons.

    PubMed

    Mullany, P; Roberts, A P; Wang, H

    2002-12-01

    Translocation of conjugative transposons proceeds via excision of the element to generate a circular molecule that can then integrate into a new site, which can be in the same or a different cell. This review summarises some of the different mechanisms used for excision and integration of conjugative transposons.

  12. Excision technique in constrained formulations of Einstein equations: collapse scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero-Carrión, I.; Vasset, N.; Novak, J.; Jaramillo, J. L.

    2015-04-01

    We present a new excision technique used in constrained formulations of Einstein equations to deal with black hole in numerical simulations. We show the applicability of this scheme in several scenarios. In particular, we present the dynamical evolution of the collapse of a neutron star to a black hole, using the CoCoNuT code and this excision technique.

  13. Dimer excision in Escherichia coli in the presence of caffeine

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, R.H.

    1980-07-01

    The observation that polA1 and recL152 mutations result in both slow pyrimidine dimer excision and large repair patch size leads to the hypothesis that patch size is directly related to the rate of excision. In this study caffeine, a known inhibitor of excision repair, was used to examine the extent of correlation between excision rate and patch size by measuring patch size in the presence of several concentrations of caffeine. Both the rate of excision and the resistance to ultraviolet radiation were reduced with increasing concentrations of caffeine after irradiation. Caffeine also inhibited the rate at which incisions were made and prolonged the time required to rejoin the discontinuities. Patch size, however, was unaffected by caffeine treatment.

  14. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  16. Alar base reduction: the boomerang-shaped excision.

    PubMed

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2011-04-01

    A boomerang-shaped alar base excision is described to narrow the nasal base and correct the excessive alar flare. The boomerang excision combined the external alar wedge resection with an internal vestibular floor excision. The internal excision was inclined 30 to 45 degrees laterally to form the inner limb of the boomerang. The study included 46 patients presenting with wide nasal base and excessive alar flaring. All cases were followed for a mean period of 18 months (range, 8 to 36 months). The laterally oriented vestibular floor excision allowed for maximum preservation of the natural curvature of the alar rim where it meets the nostril floor and upon its closure resulted in a considerable medialization of alar lobule, which significantly reduced the amount of alar flare and the amount of external alar excision needed. This external alar excision measured, on average, 3.8 mm (range, 2 to 8 mm), which is significantly less than that needed when a standard vertical internal excision was used ( P < 0.0001). Such conservative external excisions eliminated the risk of obliterating the natural alar-facial crease, which did not occur in any of our cases. No cases of postoperative bleeding, infection, or vestibular stenosis were encountered. Keloid or hypertrophic scar formation was not encountered; however, dermabrasion of the scars was needed in three (6.5%) cases to eliminate apparent suture track marks. The boomerang alar base excision proved to be a safe and effective technique for narrowing the nasal base and elimination of the excessive flaring and resulted in a natural, well-proportioned nasal base with no obvious scarring.

  17. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  18. Phonation instability flow in excised canine larynges

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Matthew R.; Rieves, Adam L.; Budde, Adam J.; Surender, Ketan; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Jack J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Disordered voices are often associated with abnormal changes in aerodynamic parameters of subglottal pressure and airflow. Phonation instability pressure (PIP) has been previously proposed to evaluate subglottal pressure at the onset of chaotic phonation. We propose the concept of and measure phonation instability flow (PIF), the airflow at which phonation becomes chaotic. Phonation flow range (PFR), PIF minus phonation threshold flow (PTF), is proposed to assess the range over which normal vocal fold vibration occurs. Study Design Repeated measures with each ex vivo larynx serving as its own control. Methods Pressure and airflow were measured at phonation onset and chaos onset in seven excised canine larynges under three experimental conditions: 0% elongation with no glottal gap; 20% elongation with no glottal gap; 20% elongation with a 3 mm posterior glottal gap. Paired t-tests were performed to determine if experimental measurements differed between elongations (0% and 20%) or degrees of abduction (20% elongation with and without a 3 mm glottal gap). Results Both PIF and PFR were dependent on abduction but not elongation. PIP was not significantly dependent on either condition. PIF and PFR showed greater differences for abduction than either phonation threshold pressure (PTP) or PTF. Conclusions PIF and PFR may be useful parameters in the experimental or clinical settings, particularly when evaluating disorders characterized by a glottal gap such as vocal fold paralysis and presbylaryngis. PMID:21555205

  19. Lingual Thyroid Excision with Transoral Robotic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy Callıoglu, Elif; Bozdemir, Kazım; Ulusoy, Bulent; Oguzhan, Tolga; Korkmaz, M. Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic thyroid gland may be detected at any place between foramen caecaum and normal thyroid localization due to inadequacy of the embryological migration of the thyroid gland. It has a prevalence varying between 1/10.000 and 1/100000 in the community. Usually follow-up without treatment is preferred except for obstructive symptoms, bleeding, and suspicion of malignity. Main symptoms are dysphagia, dysphonia, bleeding, dyspnea, and obstructive sleep apnea. In symptomatic cases, the first described method in surgical treatment is open approach since it is a region difficult to have access to. However, this approach has an increased risk of morbidity and postoperative complications. Transoral robotic surgery, which is a minimally invasive surgical procedure, has advantages such as larger three-dimensional point of view and ease of manipulation due to robotic instruments. In this report, a case at the age of 49 who presented to our clinic with obstructive symptoms increasing within the last year and was found to have lingual thyroid and underwent excision of ectopic thyroid tissue by da Vinci surgical system is presented. PMID:26064746

  20. Diode Laser Excision of Oral Benign Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Ena; Sareen, Mohit; Dhaka, Payal; Baghla, Pallavi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lasers have made tremendous progress in the field of dentistry and have turned out to be crucial in oral surgery as collateral approach for soft tissue surgery. This rapid progress can be attributed to the fact that lasers allow efficient execution of soft tissue procedures with excellent hemostasis and field visibility. When matched to scalpel, electrocautery or high frequency devices, lasers offer maximum postoperative patient comfort. Methods: Four patients agreed to undergo surgical removal of benign lesions of the oral cavity. 810 nm diode lasers were used in continuous wave mode for excisional biopsy. The specimens were sent for histopathological examination and patients were assessed on intraoperative and postoperative complications. Results: Diode laser surgery was rapid, bloodless and well accepted by patients and led to complete resolution of the lesions. The excised specimen proved adequate for histopathological examination. Hemostasis was achieved immediately after the procedure with minimal postoperative problems, discomfort and scarring. Conclusion: We conclude that diode lasers are rapidly becoming the standard of care in contemporary dental practice and can be employed in procedures requiring excisional biopsy of oral soft tissue lesions with minimal problems in histopathological diagnosis. PMID:26464781

  1. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  2. 77 FR 43157 - Disregarded Entities and the Indoor Tanning Services Excise Tax; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... Excise Tax; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Correcting amendment... qualified subchapter S subsidiaries) and the indoor tanning services excise tax. DATES: This correction is... Employment taxes, Estate taxes, Excise taxes, Gift taxes, Income taxes, Penalties, Reporting...

  3. 77 FR 37806 - Disregarded Entities and the Indoor Tanning Services Excise Tax

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ... Services Excise Tax AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Final and temporary... (including qualified subchapter S subsidiaries) and the indoor tanning services excise tax. These regulations affect disregarded entities responsible for collecting the indoor tanning services excise tax and...

  4. Experiments on Analysing Voice Production: Excised (Human, Animal) and In Vivo (Animal) Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Döllinger, Michael; Kobler, James; Berry, David A.; Mehta, Daryush D.; Luegmair, Georg; Bohr, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Experiments on human and on animal excised specimens as well as in vivo animal preparations are so far the most realistic approaches to simulate the in vivo process of human phonation. These experiments do not have the disadvantage of limited space within the neck and enable studies of the actual organ necessary for phonation, i.e., the larynx. The studies additionally allow the analysis of flow, vocal fold dynamics, and resulting acoustics in relation to well-defined laryngeal alterations. Purpose of Review This paper provides an overview of the applications and usefulness of excised (human/animal) specimen and in vivo animal experiments in voice research. These experiments have enabled visualization and analysis of dehydration effects, vocal fold scarring, bifurcation and chaotic vibrations, three-dimensional vibrations, aerodynamic effects, and mucosal wave propagation along the medial surface. Quantitative data will be shown to give an overview of measured laryngeal parameter values. As yet, a full understanding of all existing interactions in voice production has not been achieved, and thus, where possible, we try to indicate areas needing further study. Recent Findings A further motivation behind this review is to highlight recent findings and technologies related to the study of vocal fold dynamics and its applications. For example, studies of interactions between vocal tract airflow and generation of acoustics have recently shown that airflow superior to the glottis is governed by not only vocal fold dynamics but also by subglottal and supraglottal structures. In addition, promising new methods to investigate kinematics and dynamics have been reported recently, including dynamic optical coherence tomography, X-ray stroboscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction with laser projection systems. Finally, we touch on the relevance of vocal fold dynamics to clinical laryngology and to clinically-oriented research. PMID:26581597

  5. Schwannoma of the ciliary body treated by block excision.

    PubMed Central

    Küchle, M; Holbach, L; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, U; Naumann, G O

    1994-01-01

    A 26-year-old man developed a non-pigmented ciliary body tumour of his right eye. A 7 mm block excision and tectonic corneoscleral graft were performed. The excised tissue was studied using histopathological, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic techniques. The tumour revealed characteristic features of a Schwann cell neoplasm including Antoni A and B patterns, acid mucopolysaccharides, S-100, and vimentin positivity, and--by electron microscopy--Luse bodies. It was classified as a schwannoma. Although rare, schwannoma should be included in the clinical differential diagnosis of non-pigmented ciliary body tumours. Local excision should be considered to avoid over-treatment by enucleation. Images PMID:8025076

  6. Surgical excision of acne keloidalis nuchae with secondary intention healing.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, V; Langtry, J A A

    2008-01-01

    Acne keloidalis nuchae (AKN) is a chronic scarring folliculitis that presents clinically as follicular papules and pustules. These can coalesce into firm hypertrophic plaques and nodules on the nape of the neck, most commonly affecting young adult men. Treatment includes topical steroids/antibiotics and oral antibiotics, but often has disappointing results. Surgical approaches include excision with primary closure or skin grafting, and hair-removal lasers. Another surgical approach is excision with secondary intention healing. This can result in good cosmesis with little or no recurrence. We report two men with AKN where treatment by excision with secondary intention was successful.

  7. Laparoscopic choledochal cyst excision and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy

    PubMed Central

    Kayaalp, Cüneyt; Soyer, Vural; Ersan, Veysel; Aydın, Cemalettin; Karagül, Servet

    2016-01-01

    Congenital choledochal cysts are rare in adults. Due to the risk of developing cholangiocarcinoma, the current standard of care is complete excision of the cyst and reconstruction with hepaticojejunostomy. So far, more than 200 laparoscopic resections have been reported in adults, the majority being from Far Eastern countries over the last five years. Herein, the technique of laparoscopic type I choledochal cyst excision and hepaticojejunostomy is presented in a 37-year-old male with an accompanying video. The advantages of laparoscopic surgery are applicable for choledochal cyst excision as well. We believe that teamwork, expertise on intracorporeal suturing and hepatobiliary surgery are central issues for this operation. PMID:27436941

  8. Surgical Excision of Multiple Penile Syringomas With Scrotal Flap Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Vaca, Elbert E.; Mundinger, Gerhard S.; Zelken, Jonathan A.; Erdag, Gulsun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Penile syringomas are rare lesions usually occurring in isolation. We report the excision and reconstruction of multiple synchronous penile shaft syringomas with local scrotal flaps. Methods: We report a rare case of excision of multiple penile syringomas and reconstruction with scrotal flaps in a 29-year-old man. Results: Penile syringomas were excised and reconstructed with scrotal flaps in a single-stage procedure. Conclusions: In addition to providing wound coverage, this reconstructive option allowed for excellent functional results with regard to shaft alignment and erectile function, and it should be considered in the reconstructive armamentarium for penile shaft lesions. PMID:24966995

  9. Robotic assisted excision of retrovesical angiomyxoma in a male patient

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Vipin; Dar, Tanveer Iqbal; Durani, Abdul Munan; Chada, Sudhir

    2014-01-01

    Angiomyxoma is a rare tumour found predominantly in pelvis of young females. Less than 150 cases have been reported, more than 90% in females and only few cases in males. Its surgical excision is a big challenge and usually leads to recurrence due to incomplete excision. We report a case of retrovesical Angiomyxoma in an elderly male. The aim of this report is to highlight the rarity of this disease, especially in males, and robotic assisted excision as an evolving option of treatment. PMID:24761083

  10. DNA excision repair in permeable human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, W.K.; Bodell, W.J.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    U.v. irradiation of confluent human fibroblasts activated DNA repair, aspects of which were characterized in the cells after they were permeabilized. Incubation of intact cells for 20 min between irradiation and harvesting was necessary to obtain a maximum rate of reparative DNA synthesis. Cells harvested immediately after irradiation before repair was initiated displayed only a small stimulation of DNA synthesis, indicating that permeable cells have a reduced capacity to recognize pyrimidine dimers and activate repair. The distribution of sizes of DNA strands labeled during 10 min of reparative DNA synthesis resembled that of parental DNA. However, during a 60-min incubation of permeable cells at 37 degrees C, parental DNA and DNA labeled by reparative DNA synthesis were both cleaved to smaller sizes. Cleavage also occurred in unirradiated cells, indicating that endogenous nuclease was active during incubation. Repair patches synthesized in permeable cells displayed increased sensitivity to digestion by micrococcal nuclease. However, the change in sensitivity during a chase with unlabeled DNA precursors was small, suggesting that reassembly of nucleosome structure at sites of repair was impaired. To examine whether this deficiency was due to a preponderance of incomplete or unligated repair patches, 3H-labeled (repaired) DNA was purified, then digested with exonuclease III and nuclease S1 to probe for free 3' ends and single-stranded regions. About 85% of the (3H)DNA synthesized during a 10-min pulse resisted digestion, suggesting that a major fraction of the repair patches that were filled were also ligated. U.v. light-activated DNA synthesis in permeable cells, therefore, appears to represent the continuation of reparative gap-filling at sites of excision repair activated within intact cells. Gap-filling and ligation were comparatively efficient processes in permeable cells.

  11. Temporary coverage of burns with a xenograft and sequential excision, compared with total early excision and autograft.

    PubMed

    Elmasry, M; Steinvall, I; Thorfinn, J; Olofsson, P; Abbas, A H; Abdelrahman, I; Adly, O A; Sjoberg, F

    2016-09-30

    During the 80s and 90s, early and total excision of full thickness burns followed by immediate autograft was the most common treatment, with repeated excision and grafting, mostly for failed grafts. It was hypothesized, therefore, that delayed coverage with an autograft preceded by a temporary xenograft after early and sequential smaller excisions would lead to a better wound bed with fewer failed grafts, a smaller donor site, and possibly also a shorter duration of stay in hospital. We carried out a case control study with retrospective analysis from our National Burn Centre registry for the period 1997-2011. Patients who had been managed with early total excision and autograft were compared with those who had had sequential smaller excisions covered with temporary xenografts until the burn was ready for the final autograft. The sequential excision and xenograft group (n=42) required one-third fewer autografts than patients in the total excision and autograft group (n=45), who needed more than one operation (p<0.001). We could not detect any differences in duration of stay in hospital / total body surface area burned% (duration of stay/TBSA%) (2.0 and 1.8) (p=0.83). The two groups showed no major differences in terms of adjusted duration of stay, but our findings suggest that doing early, smaller, sequential excisions using a xenograft for temporary cover can result in shorter operating times, saving us the trouble of making big excisions. However, costs tended to be higher when the burns were > 25% TBSA.

  12. Temporary coverage of burns with a xenograft and sequential excision, compared with total early excision and autograft

    PubMed Central

    Elmasry, M.; Steinvall, I.; Thorfinn, J.; Olofsson, P.; Abbas, A.H.; Abdelrahman, I.; Adly, O.A.; Sjoberg, F.

    2016-01-01

    Summary During the 80s and 90s, early and total excision of full thickness burns followed by immediate autograft was the most common treatment, with repeated excision and grafting, mostly for failed grafts. It was hypothesized, therefore, that delayed coverage with an autograft preceded by a temporary xenograft after early and sequential smaller excisions would lead to a better wound bed with fewer failed grafts, a smaller donor site, and possibly also a shorter duration of stay in hospital. We carried out a case control study with retrospective analysis from our National Burn Centre registry for the period 1997-2011. Patients who had been managed with early total excision and autograft were compared with those who had had sequential smaller excisions covered with temporary xenografts until the burn was ready for the final autograft. The sequential excision and xenograft group (n=42) required one-third fewer autografts than patients in the total excision and autograft group (n=45), who needed more than one operation (p<0.001). We could not detect any differences in duration of stay in hospital / total body surface area burned% (duration of stay/TBSA%) (2.0 and 1.8) (p=0.83). The two groups showed no major differences in terms of adjusted duration of stay, but our findings suggest that doing early, smaller, sequential excisions using a xenograft for temporary cover can result in shorter operating times, saving us the trouble of making big excisions. However, costs tended to be higher when the burns were > 25% TBSA. PMID:28149249

  13. Acoustic iridescence.

    PubMed

    Cox, Trevor J

    2011-03-01

    An investigation has been undertaken into acoustic iridescence, exploring how a device can be constructed which alter sound waves, in a similar way to structures in nature that act on light to produce optical iridescence. The main construction had many thin perforated sheets spaced half a wavelength apart for a specified design frequency. The sheets create the necessary impedance discontinuities to create backscattered waves, which then interfere to create strongly reflected sound at certain frequencies. Predictions and measurements show a set of harmonics, evenly spaced in frequency, for which sound is reflected strongly. And the frequency of these harmonics increases as the angle of observation gets larger, mimicking the iridescence seen in natural optical systems. Similar to optical systems, the reflections become weaker for oblique angles of reflection. A second construction was briefly examined which exploited a metamaterial made from elements and inclusions which were much smaller than the wavelength. Boundary element method predictions confirmed the potential for creating acoustic iridescence from layers of such a material.

  14. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  15. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  16. Nucleotide excision repair of DNA: The very early history.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2011-07-15

    This article, taken largely from the book Correcting the Blueprint of Life: An Historical Account of the Discovery of DNA Repair Mechanisms, summarizes the very early history of the discovery of nucleotide excision repair.

  17. ASPT software source code: ASPT signal excision software package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parliament, Hugh

    1992-08-01

    The source code for the ASPT Signal Excision Software Package which is part of the Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed (ASPT) is presented. The source code covers the programs 'excision', 'ab.out', 'd0.out', 'bd1.out', 'develop', 'despread', 'sorting', and 'convert'. These programs are concerned with collecting data, filtering out interference from a spread spectrum signal, analyzing the results, and developing and testing new filtering algorithms.

  18. Excision of Mucocele Using Diode Laser in Lower Lip

    PubMed Central

    Ramkumar, Subramaniam; Ramkumar, Lakshmi; Malathi, Narasimhan

    2016-01-01

    Mucoceles are nonneoplastic cystic lesions of major and minor salivary glands which result from the accumulation of mucus. These lesions are most commonly seen in children. Though usually these lesions can be treated by local surgical excision, in our case, to avoid intraoperative surgical complications like bleeding and edema and to enable better healing, excision was done using a diode laser in the wavelength of 940 nm. PMID:28097026

  19. Exploration of Acoustic Features for Automatic Vowel Discrimination in Spontaneous Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyson, Na'im R.

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to understand what acoustic/auditory feature sets motivated transcribers towards certain labeling decisions, I built machine learning models that were capable of discriminating between canonical and non-canonical vowels excised from the Buckeye Corpus. Specifically, I wanted to model when the dictionary form and the transcribed-form…

  20. Base excision repair: A critical player in many games

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    This perspective reviews the many dimensions of base excision repair from a 10,000 foot vantage point and provides one person’s view on where the field is headed. Enzyme function is considered under the lens of X-ray diffraction and single molecule studies. Base excision repair in chromatin and telomeres, regulation of expression and the role of posttranslational modifications are also discussed in the context of enzyme activities, cellular localization and interacting partners. The specialized roles that base excision repair play in transcriptional activation by active demethylation and targeted oxidation as well as how base excision repair functions in the immune processes of somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination and its possible involvement in retroviral infection are also discussed. Finally the complexities of oxidative damage and its repair and its link to neurodegenerative disorders, as well as the role of base excision repair as a tumor suppressor are examined in the context of damage, repair and aging. By outlining the many base excision repair-related mysteries that have yet to be unraveled, hopefully this perspective will stimulate further interest in the field. PMID:24780558

  1. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  2. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  3. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  4. Two-dimensional measurement of the nonlinearity parameter B/A in excised biological samples.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shigemi; Kim, Jung-Ho

    2011-06-01

    The method previously developed for measuring the acoustic nonlinearity parameter B/A in a liquid sample with a volume as small as 0.1 ml [S. Saito, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 51(2010)] has been automated and applied to two-dimensional measurements of excised biological samples using a LabVIEW program. The focus of the sound beam is laterally shifted on the 3 × 3 mm(2) area of the sample while measuring the B/A successively. By displaying the result of 256 time repeated measurements with an interval of 0.2 mm in two dimensions, a C-mode image was generated for B/A. The images of linear properties such as density, sound speed, and attenuation coefficient are also obtained. The image, whose pattern can be different from those of the density and sound speed, has the capability to reveal the detailed structure of the B/A, which varies from region to region in a single biological sample. The application of the method to small samples is also demonstrated by measuring a thermally coagulated biological sample.

  5. Two-dimensional measurement of the nonlinearity parameter B/A in excised biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shigemi; Kim, Jung-Ho

    2011-06-01

    The method previously developed for measuring the acoustic nonlinearity parameter B/A in a liquid sample with a volume as small as 0.1 ml [S. Saito, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 51(2010)] has been automated and applied to two-dimensional measurements of excised biological samples using a LabVIEW program. The focus of the sound beam is laterally shifted on the 3 × 3 mm2 area of the sample while measuring the B/A successively. By displaying the result of 256 time repeated measurements with an interval of 0.2 mm in two dimensions, a C-mode image was generated for B/A. The images of linear properties such as density, sound speed, and attenuation coefficient are also obtained. The image, whose pattern can be different from those of the density and sound speed, has the capability to reveal the detailed structure of the B/A, which varies from region to region in a single biological sample. The application of the method to small samples is also demonstrated by measuring a thermally coagulated biological sample.

  6. Differential diagnosis and management of giant fibroadenoma: comparing excision with reduction mammoplasty incision and excision with inframammary incision.

    PubMed

    Ugburo, Andrew O; Olajide, Thomas O; Fadeyibi, Idowu O; Mofikoya, Bolaji O; Lawal, Abdulrazzaq O; Osinowo, Adedapo O

    2012-10-01

    Giant fibroadenoma (GFA) may present with breast asymmetry and can be excised with an inframammary incision (IFI) or reduction mammoplasty incision (RMI). This study investigated the clinical presentation and compared excision with the IFI and RMI. All patients with benign breast tumours greater than 5 cm underwent core needle biopsy and a histopathological diagnosis. All confirmed GFA had their clinical details documented and randomised into two groups for excision with an IFI or RMI. Twenty-two patients were studied. The age range was 12-46 years, mean 21.18 ± 2.22 years. The patients were divided into two groups: a juvenile group (n = 16) (73%) aged 12-18 years, mean age 14.06 ± 0.42 years, and a perimenopausal group (n = 5) aged 28-46 years. The juvenile group showed cyclic increases in breast size monthly with menstruation while the perimenopausal showed an initial slow growth of 6-24 months followed by a rapid growth. Fifteen patients (68%) had excision biopsy with IMI and seven patients with RMI. Seven of the patients treated with IFI had minimal preoperative asymmetry and satisfactory aesthetic outcome. Among the patients with severe preoperative asymmetry treated with IFI (n = 8) and RMI (n = 7), those treated with IFI had persistent postoperative skin redundancy and asymmetry, which was not found in those treated with RMI. In conclusion, for patients with significant asymmetry, excision with the IFI was associated with persistent asymmetry while excision with RMI was associated with restoration of symmetry.

  7. The Integration and Excision of CTnDOT

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Margaret M.; Gardner, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides species are one of the most prevalent groups of bacteria present in the human colon. Many strains carry large, integrated elements including integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs). One such ICE is CTnDOT, which is 65 kb in size and encodes resistances to tetracycline and erythromycin. CTnDOT has been increasing in prevalence in Bacteroides spp., and is now found in greater than 80% of natural isolates. In recent years, CTnDOT has been implicated in the spread of antibiotic resistance among gut microbiota. Interestingly, the excision and transfer of CTnDOT is stimulated in the presence of tetracycline. The tyrosine recombinase IntDOT catalyzes the integration and excision reactions of CTnDOT. Unlike the well-characterized lambda Int, IntDOT tolerates heterology in the overlap region between the sites of cleavage and strand exchange. IntDOT also appears to have a different arrangement of active site catalytic residues. It is missing one of the arginine residues that is conserved in other tyrosine recombinases. The excision reaction of CTnDOT is complex, involving excision proteins Xis2c, Xis2d, and Exc, as well as IntDOT and a Bacteroides host factor. Xis2c and Xis2d are small, basic proteins like other recombination directionality factors (RDFs). Exc is a topoisomerase; however, the topoisomerase function is not required for the excision reaction. Exc has been shown to stimulate excision frequencies when there are mismatches in the overlap regions, suggesting that it may play a role in resolving Holliday junctions containing heterology. Work is currently under way to elucidate the complex interactions involved with the formation of the CTnDOT excisive intasomes. PMID:26104696

  8. Cold adaptation regulated by cryptic prophage excision in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhenshun; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Jianyun; Guo, Yunxue; Li, Baiyuan; Li, Yangmei; Jiao, Nianzhi; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2016-12-01

    Among the environmental stresses experienced by bacteria, temperature shifts are one of the most important. In this study, we discovered a novel cold adaptation mechanism in Shewanella oneidensis that occurs at the DNA level and is regulated by cryptic prophage excision. Previous studies on bacterial cold tolerance mainly focus on the structural change of cell membrane and changes at the RNA and protein levels. Whether or not genomic change can also contribute to this process has not been explored. Here we employed a whole-genome deep-sequencing method to probe the changes at DNA level in a model psychrotrophic bacteria strain. We found that temperature downshift induced a 10 000-fold increase of the excision of a novel P4-like cryptic prophage. Importantly, although prophage excision only occurred in a relatively small population of bacteria, it was able to facilitate biofilm formation and promote the survival of the entire population. This prophage excision affected cell physiology by disrupting a critical gene encoding transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). In addition, we found that the histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS) could silence prophage excision via binding to the promoter of the putative excisionase gene at warm temperatures. H-NS level was reduced at cold temperatures, leading to de-repression of prophage excision. Collectively, our results reveal that cryptic prophage excision acts as a regulatory switch to enable the survival of the host at low temperature by controlling the activity of tmRNA and biofilm formation.

  9. Hypofibrinogenemia Caused by Hemocoagulase After Colon Polyps Excision

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Case series Patient: — Final Diagnosis: Routine use of hemocoagulase for injection for the prevention of late-onset bleeding is not recommended for patients who have undergone excision of colon polyps. Hemocoagulase following excision of colon polyps can cause hypofibrinogenemia and even l Symptoms: Hematochezia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Three patients also had lower gastrointestinal bleeding Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: In patients with large colon polyps, late-onset bleeding may be more likely to occur because of the larger cutting surface. In these patients, hemostatic agents may be applied to prevent the late-onset bleeding. A total of 7 patients developed hypofibrinogenemia caused by hemocoagulase following excision of colon polyps in our center from November to December 2015. Case Report: Seven patients underwent excision of colon polyps in our center from November to December 2015. The cutting face was large in these patients after surgery; therefore, hemocoagulase was used to prevent potential late-onset bleeding. Evaluation of clotting function showed that the fibrinogen level was normal before surgery in all 7 patients. Hemocoagulase was intravenously administered twice daily beginning from postoperative day 1. Hypofibrinogenemia of varying severity occurred 2–4 d later. Three patients also had lower-gastrointestinal bleeding. After drug withdrawal and infusion of fibrinogen, blood fibrinogen level gradually returned to normal. In contrast, among 13 patients who had not received hemocoagulase treatment for preventing hemorrhage following excision of colon polyps, detection of blood fibrinogen before surgery and 2–4 d after showed normal results. Conclusions: Routine use of Hemocoagulase For Injection for the prevention of late-onset bleeding is not recommended for patients who have undergone excision of colon polyps. Hemocoagulase following excision of colon

  10. Cold adaptation regulated by cryptic prophage excision in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhenshun; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Jianyun; Guo, Yunxue; Li, Baiyuan; Li, Yangmei; Jiao, Nianzhi; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2016-01-01

    Among the environmental stresses experienced by bacteria, temperature shifts are one of the most important. In this study, we discovered a novel cold adaptation mechanism in Shewanella oneidensis that occurs at the DNA level and is regulated by cryptic prophage excision. Previous studies on bacterial cold tolerance mainly focus on the structural change of cell membrane and changes at the RNA and protein levels. Whether or not genomic change can also contribute to this process has not been explored. Here we employed a whole-genome deep-sequencing method to probe the changes at DNA level in a model psychrotrophic bacteria strain. We found that temperature downshift induced a 10 000-fold increase of the excision of a novel P4-like cryptic prophage. Importantly, although prophage excision only occurred in a relatively small population of bacteria, it was able to facilitate biofilm formation and promote the survival of the entire population. This prophage excision affected cell physiology by disrupting a critical gene encoding transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). In addition, we found that the histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS) could silence prophage excision via binding to the promoter of the putative excisionase gene at warm temperatures. H-NS level was reduced at cold temperatures, leading to de-repression of prophage excision. Collectively, our results reveal that cryptic prophage excision acts as a regulatory switch to enable the survival of the host at low temperature by controlling the activity of tmRNA and biofilm formation. PMID:27482926

  11. 29 CFR 779.262 - Excise taxes at the retail level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excise taxes at the retail level. 779.262 Section 779.262... Coverage Excise Taxes § 779.262 Excise taxes at the retail level. (a) Federal excise taxes are imposed at the retail level on highway vehicle fuels other than gasoline under the provisions of 26 U.S.C....

  12. Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers undergo sprouting and neuroma formation in the painful arthritic joint of geriatric mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although the prevalence of arthritis dramatically increases with age, the great majority of preclinical studies concerning the mechanisms that drive arthritic joint pain have been performed in young animals. One mechanism hypothesized to contribute to arthritic pain is ectopic nerve sprouting; however, neuroplasticity is generally thought to be greater in young versus old nerves. Here we explore whether sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers can undergo a significant ectopic nerve remodeling in the painful arthritic knee joint of geriatric mice. Methods Vehicle (saline) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was injected into the knee joint of 27- to 29-month-old female mice. Pain behaviors, macrophage infiltration, neovascularization, and the sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers were then assessed 28 days later, when significant knee-joint pain was present. Knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry by using antibodies raised against CD68 (monocytes/macrophages), PECAM (endothelial cells), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43; nerve fibers undergoing sprouting). Results At 4 weeks after initial injection, CFA-injected mice displayed robust pain-related behaviors (which included flinching, guarding, impaired limb use, and reduced weight bearing), whereas animals injected with vehicle alone displayed no significant pain-related behaviors. Similarly, in the CFA-injected knee joint, but not in the vehicle-injected knee joint, a remarkable increase was noted in the number of CD68+ macrophages, density of PECAM+ blood vessels, and density and formation of neuroma-like structures by CGRP+, NF200+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium and periosteum. Conclusions Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers that innervate the aged knee joint clearly maintain the capacity for robust

  13. Dynamic control of strand excision during human DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yongmoon; Kim, Daehyung; Martín-López, Juana V; Lee, Ryanggeun; Oh, Jungsic; Hanne, Jeungphill; Fishel, Richard; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2016-03-22

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is activated by evolutionarily conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS). MSH recognizes mismatched nucleotides and form extremely stable sliding clamps that may be bound by MLH/PMS to ultimately authorize strand-specific excision starting at a distant 3'- or 5'-DNA scission. The mechanical processes associated with a complete MMR reaction remain enigmatic. The purified human (Homo sapien or Hs) 5'-MMR excision reaction requires the HsMSH2-HsMSH6 heterodimer, the 5' → 3' exonuclease HsEXOI, and the single-stranded binding heterotrimer HsRPA. The HsMLH1-HsPMS2 heterodimer substantially influences 5'-MMR excision in cell extracts but is not required in the purified system. Using real-time single-molecule imaging, we show that HsRPA or Escherichia coli EcSSB restricts HsEXOI excision activity on nicked or gapped DNA. HsMSH2-HsMSH6 activates HsEXOI by overcoming HsRPA/EcSSB inhibition and exploits multiple dynamic sliding clamps to increase tract length. Conversely, HsMLH1-HsPMS2 regulates tract length by controlling the number of excision complexes, providing a link to 5' MMR.

  14. Pure cutting current for loop excision of squamous intraepithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    McLucas, B; McGill, J

    1994-05-01

    Clear margins are critical to the identification of complete excision of premalignant lesions on the cervix. Large loop excision of the transformation zone aids the pathologic evaluation of the excised specimen while it causes minimal thermal damage. Prior studies of loop excision were performed with a cutting current blended with a coagulating waveform to aid hemostasis. Blended current has higher voltage, which may cause tissue to stick to the electrode and produce thermal damage to the cervix. In this series, pure cutting current was used to excise the cervical transformation zone in 20 patients. The depth of thermal damage was studied in 6 patients; the average endocervical zone of damage was 0.47 mm and that of the exocervical zone, 0.43 mm. The base of the cervix could be examined with the colposcope for the presence of glands. None of our procedures was complicated by intraoperative or delayed bleeding. The preoperative injection of a vasoconstrictor into the cervical stroma is thought to aid the surgery by its hemostatic properties.

  15. Characterizing Tissue with Acoustic Parameters Derived from Ultrasound Data

    SciTech Connect

    Littrup, P; Duric, N; Leach, R R; Azevedo, S G; Candy, J V; Moore, T; Chambers, D H; Mast, J E; Johnson, S A; Holsapple, E

    2002-01-23

    In contrast to standard reflection ultrasound (US), transmission US holds the promise of more thorough tissue characterization by generating quantitative acoustic parameters. We compare results from a conventional US scanner with data acquired using an experimental circular scanner operating at frequencies of 0.3 - 1.5 MHz. Data were obtained on phantoms and a normal, formalin-fixed, excised breast. Both reflection and transmission-based algorithms were used to generate images of reflectivity, sound speed and attenuation.. Images of the phantoms demonstrate the ability to detect sub-mm features and quantify acoustic properties such as sound speed and attenuation. The human breast specimen showed full field evaluation, improved penetration and tissue definition. Comparison with conventional US indicates the potential for better margin definition and acoustic characterization of masses, particularly in the complex scattering environments of human breast tissue. The use of morphology, in the context of reflectivity, sound speed and attenuation, for characterizing tissue, is discussed.

  16. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  17. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  18. Management of Recurrent Stricture Formation after Transverse Vaginal Septum Excision

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ridhima; Bozzay, Joseph D.; Williams, David L.; DePond, Robert T.; Gantt, Pickens A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. A transverse vaginal septum (TVS) is a rare obstructing anomaly, caused due to improper fusion of Müllerian ducts and urogenital sinus during embryogenesis. Case. A 15-year-old girl presented with primary amenorrhea. She had multiple congenital anomalies. Initial examination and imaging investigation revealed the presence of a unicornuate uterus and a TVS. The TVS was excised; however the patient was unable to perform vaginal dilation postoperatively leading to recurrent stricture formation. She underwent multiple surgeries for excision of the stricture. The patient was eventually evaluated every day in the clinic until she was able to demonstrate successful vaginal dilatation in the presence of a clinician. Summary and Conclusion. Properly guided regular and intensive vaginal dilation after TVS excision may decrease the need of reoperations due to recurrent stricture formation. PMID:26078895

  19. Outcome of extralevator abdominoperineal excision over conventional abdominoperineal excision for low rectal tumor: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Xu, Huirong; Shang, Zhenhua; Chen, Shouzhen; Chen, Fan; Deng, Qiming; Luo, Li; Zhu, Liang; Shi, Benkang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A meta-analysis was undertaken to provide an evidence-based basis of clinical trials comparing extralevator abdominoperineal excision with conventional abdominoperineal excision for low rectal tumor. Methods: We searched through the major medical databases such as PubMed, EMBASE, Medline, Science Citation Index, Web of Science for all published studies without any limit on language from January 2009 until January 2015. The following search terms were used: extralevator abdominoperineal excision or cylindrical abdominoperineal resection or conventional abdominoperineal excision or abdominoperineal excision or rectal cancer. Furthermore, Additional related studies were manually searched in the reference lists of all published reviews and retrieved articles. Results: In this meta-analysis, there are a total number of 1797 patients included: 1099 patients in the ELAPE group and 698 in the APE group, and there are not statistically differences between groups in CRM [RR=0.65, 95% CI (0.41, 1.04), P=0.07] and wound complications [RR=1.14, 95% CI (1.09, 1.66), P=0.45] between ELAPE and APE. However, ELAPE has a lower rate of intraoperation perforation [RR=0.44; 95% CI (0.33, 0.60); P<0.00001] and local recurrence [RR=0.45, 95% CI (0.27, 0.77), P=0.003] than APE in terms of short follow-up time. PMID:26628967

  20. AUXIN AND GROWTH OF EXCISED ROOTS OF Bryophyllum calycinum

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, William J.; Hervey, Annette

    1969-01-01

    Exogenous auxin (α-naphthalene acetic acid, indole acetic acid, or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) was essential for the growth of single excised root tips of Bryophyllum calycinum in 50 ml of a mineral salt-sucrose medium supplemented with vitamins. Large inocula with a dry weight of 2.0 mg or more grew with no auxin added to the medium. Evidence for the synthesis of auxin by the excised roots grown from the larger inocula is presented. Leaching of auxin from single root tips cultivated in 15 or 50 ml of basal medium is considered to account for their failure to grow. Images PMID:16591793

  1. AUXIN AND GROWTH OF EXCISED ROOTS OF Bryophyllum calycinum.

    PubMed

    Robbins, W J; Hervey, A

    1969-10-01

    Exogenous auxin (alpha-naphthalene acetic acid, indole acetic acid, or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) was essential for the growth of single excised root tips of Bryophyllum calycinum in 50 ml of a mineral salt-sucrose medium supplemented with vitamins. Large inocula with a dry weight of 2.0 mg or more grew with no auxin added to the medium. Evidence for the synthesis of auxin by the excised roots grown from the larger inocula is presented. Leaching of auxin from single root tips cultivated in 15 or 50 ml of basal medium is considered to account for their failure to grow.

  2. A complex twintron is excised as four individual introns.

    PubMed Central

    Drager, R G; Hallick, R B

    1993-01-01

    Twintrons are introns-within-introns excised by sequential splicing reactions. A new type of complex twintron comprised of four individual group III introns has been characterized. The external intron is interrupted by an internal intron containing two additional introns. This 434 nt complex twintron within a Euglena gracilis chloroplast ribosomal protein gene is excised by four sequential splicing reactions. Two of the splicing reactions utilize multiple 5'- and/or 3'-splice sites. These findings are evidence that introns with multiple active splice sites can be formed by the repeated insertion of introns into existing introns. Images PMID:7685079

  3. CCD filter and transform techniques for interference excision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsuk, G. M.; Dewitt, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    The theoretical and some experimental results of a study aimed at applying CCD filter and transform techniques to the problem of interference excision within communications channels were presented. Adaptive noise (interference) suppression was achieved by the modification of received signals such that they were orthogonal to the recently measured noise field. CCD techniques were examined to develop real-time noise excision processing. They were recursive filters, circulating filter banks, transversal filter banks, an optical implementation of the chirp Z transform, and a CCD analog FFT.

  4. Nodular Fasciitis Complicating a Staged Surgical Excision of Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Brandon; Wagner, Richard F.; Resto, Vicente; Kelly, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is an unusual spindle cell tumor with a high rate of local recurrence with traditional excision. Fortunately, Mohs micrographic surgery yields excellent cure rates for this neoplasm due to contiguous tumor spread and meticulous tumor mapping and margin analysis. We present the unique case of a patient treated with a modified Mohs technique with an analysis of the final margin with permanent sections, who developed a spindle cell neoplasm in the margins of her second stage excision consistent with nodular fasciitis. Distinguishing residual DFSP from a benign reactive process was an essential and challenging component of this patient's management. PMID:28018683

  5. NPL closes acoustics department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Extance, Andy

    2016-11-01

    The UK's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has withdrawn funding for its acoustics, polymer and thermoelectrics groups, triggering concern among airborne acoustics specialists that the move could undermine the country's noise-management policies.

  6. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  7. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-17

    under-ice scattering , bathymetric diffraction and the application of the ocean acoustic Parabolic Equation to infrasound. 2. Tasks a. Task 1...QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Figure 10. Estimated reflection coefficient as a function of frequency by taking the difference of downgoing and...OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

  8. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-19

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-093015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...number. 1. REPORT DATE OCT 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2015 to 30-09-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to develop

  9. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies James F. Lynch MS #12...N00014-14-1-0040 http://acoustics.whoi.edu/sw06/ LONG TERM GOALS The long term goals of our shallow water acoustics work are to: 1) understand the...nature of low frequency (10-1500 Hz) acoustic propagation, scattering and noise in shallow water when strong oceanic variability is present in the

  10. Evaluation of an asymmetric anterior glottic web in an excised canine larynx model.

    PubMed

    Pulvermacher, Allyson C; Xue, Chao; Leggon, Robert; Mills, Randal; Jiang, Jack J

    2017-03-01

    The main objective of the study is to model asymmetry within anterior glottic webs in excised larynges using sutures and apply aerodynamic and acoustic analyses. Anterior glottic webs (AGW) were modeled in eight excised larynges using sutures secured at the level of the glottis to mimic the scar tissue of the web. Each of the eight larynges were tested under three different pressure increments for each of the three models of AGW: symmetric, vertically asymmetric, and laterally asymmetric. Phonation threshold pressure (PTP) and flow (PTF) differed significantly across AGW conditions (p = 0.006 and p = 0.005, respectively). Additionally, vocal efficiency was significantly different among conditions (p = 0.005) as well as significantly lower in the asymmetric groups (p = 0.015 and p = 0.007). Perturbation measures were not significantly different across conditions. Correlation dimension (D2) was significantly different at PTP, 1.25 × PTP, and 1.5 × PTP (p = 0.003, p = 0.010, and p < 0.001, respectively) as well as significantly higher in the asymmetric groups at each pressure increment. The increased PTP, PTF, and D2 values as well as decreased vocal efficiency among the asymmetric conditions indicates a significant decrease in vocal function, and thus represents that asymmetries could be a contributing factor to the pathological symptoms associated with glottic webs.

  11. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Effects of Ventricular Gap

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Fariborz; Karnell, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Supraglottic compression is frequently observed in individuals with dysphonia. It is commonly interpreted as an indication of excessive circumlaryngeal muscular tension and ventricular medialization. The purpose of this study was to describe the aerodynamic and acoustic impact of varying ventricular medialization in a canine model. Methods Subglottal air pressure, glottal airflow, electroglottograph, acoustic signals and high-speed video images were recorded in seven excised canine larynges mounted in vitro for laryngeal vibratory experimentation. The degree of gap between the ventricular folds was adjusted and measured using sutures and weights. Data was recorded during phonation when the ventricular gap was narrow, neutral, and large. Glottal resistance was estimated by measures of subglottal pressure and glottal flow. Results Glottal resistance increased systematically as ventricular gap became smaller. Wide ventricular gaps were associated with increases in fundamental frequency and decreases in glottal resistance. Sound pressure level did not appear to be impacted by the adjustments in ventricular gap used in this research. Conclusions Increases in supraglottic compression and associated reduced ventricular width may be observed in a variety of disorders that affect voice quality. Ventricular compression may interact with true vocal fold posture and vibration resulting in predictable changes in aerodynamic, physiologic, acoustic, and perceptual measures of phonation. The data from this report supports the theory that narrow ventricular gaps may be associated with disordered phonation. In vitro and in vivo human data are needed to further test this association. PMID:24321590

  12. Coding Acoustic Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Xie, Boyang; Tang, Kun; Cheng, Hua; Liu, Zhengyou; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Jianguo

    2017-02-01

    Coding acoustic metasurfaces can combine simple logical bits to acquire sophisticated functions in wave control. The acoustic logical bits can achieve a phase difference of exactly π and a perfect match of the amplitudes for the transmitted waves. By programming the coding sequences, acoustic metasurfaces with various functions, including creating peculiar antenna patterns and waves focusing, have been demonstrated.

  13. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  14. Structural basis of HIV-1 resistance to AZT by excision

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Xiongying; Das, Kalyan; Han, Qianwei; Bauman, Joseph D.; Clark, Jr., Arthur D.; Hou, Xiaorong; Frenkel, Yulia V.; Gaffney, Barbara L.; Jones, Roger A.; Boyer, Paul L.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Arnold, Eddy

    2011-11-23

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) develops resistance to 3'-azido-2',3'-deoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine) by acquiring mutations in reverse transcriptase that enhance the ATP-mediated excision of AZT monophosphate from the 3' end of the primer. The excision reaction occurs at the dNTP-binding site, uses ATP as a pyrophosphate donor, unblocks the primer terminus and allows reverse transcriptase to continue viral DNA synthesis. The excision product is AZT adenosine dinucleoside tetraphosphate (AZTppppA). We determined five crystal structures: wild-type reverse transcriptase-double-stranded DNA (RT-dsDNA)-AZTppppA; AZT-resistant (AZTr; M41L D67N K70R T215Y K219Q) RT-dsDNA-AZTppppA; AZTr RT-dsDNA terminated with AZT at dNTP- and primer-binding sites; and AZTr apo reverse transcriptase. The AMP part of AZTppppA bound differently to wild-type and AZTr reverse transcriptases, whereas the AZT triphosphate part bound the two enzymes similarly. Thus, the resistance mutations create a high-affinity ATP-binding site. The structure of the site provides an opportunity to design inhibitors of AZT-monophosphate excision.

  15. Excise Taxes and the Price Elasticity of Demand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Ralph C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Points out that, although the analysis of the imposition of an excise tax is widely used in economics courses, the consequences of a change in the tax rate are different and ignored. This article presents an effective way to teach about such a change. (GG)

  16. Results of lumbar hemivertebral excision for congenital scoliosis.

    PubMed

    King, J D; Lowery, G L

    1991-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the long-term correction achieved by excision of lumbar hemivertebrae and the risk attendant. Seven patients had a follow-up of 41.14 months for lumbar hemivertebral excisions. Six had two-stage anterior vertebral body excision and, 7-8 days later, posterior lamina and pedicle excision with fusion. One patient had a single-stage correction. After surgery, the patients were in pantaloon casts or braces for a minimum of 6 months (supine, first 6-12 weeks). Hemivertebrae were at L2 (N = 1), L3 (N = 1), L4-L5 (N = 1), and L5-S1 (N = 4). Preoperative curves or hemivertebral angles averaged 36.6 degrees (range, 30-52 degrees). Average age was 7.5 years (range, 22 months to 12.5 years). Mean follow-up was 41.14 months. Surgical correction of the seven cases averaged 28.0 degrees. Two-stage procedures yielded 29.7 degrees correction with no complications; single-stage yielded 18 degrees correction, and the only complication was an L5 nerve root paresis.

  17. An Economic Analysis of a Change in an Excise Tax

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, John M.; Blanchard, Kelly Hunt; Umbeck, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The authors present an example of the effect a change in the excise tax can have on retail gasoline prices. The findings provide support for standard economic theory, as well as provide a vehicle for illustrating some of the subtleties of the analysis, including the implicit assumptions regarding the implications for the buying and selling prices…

  18. 76 FR 46677 - Indoor Tanning Services; Cosmetic Services Excise Taxes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 40 and 49 RIN 1545-BJ40 Indoor Tanning Services; Cosmetic Services Excise Taxes AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of public hearing...

  19. 29 CFR 779.264 - Excise taxes separately stated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Excise taxes separately stated. 779.264 Section 779.264 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS...

  20. 29 CFR 779.264 - Excise taxes separately stated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Excise taxes separately stated. 779.264 Section 779.264 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS...

  1. Indoor acoustic gain design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha-Abarca, Justo Andres

    2002-11-01

    The design of sound reinforcement systems includes many variables and usually some of these variables are discussed. There are criteria to optimize the performance of the sound reinforcement systems under indoor conditions. The equivalent acoustic distance, the necessary acoustic gain, and the potential acoustic gain are parameters which must be adjusted with respect to the loudspeaker array, electric power and directionality of loudspeakers, the room acoustics conditions, the distance and distribution of the audience, and the type of the original sources. The design and installation of front of the house and monitoring systems have individual criteria. This article is about this criteria and it proposes general considerations for the indoor acoustic gain design.

  2. CO2 laser excision of pediatric airway lesions.

    PubMed

    Bagwell, C E

    1990-11-01

    Treatment of life-threatening pediatric airway lesions has been greatly enhanced by development of the CO2 laser. Using this modality, endoscopic access and precise tissue destruction are possible with minimal local inflammation and subsequent edema of the narrow airway. From October 1986 through October 1988, 26 patients underwent 96 laser procedures for excision of airway lesions, in 23 patients via bronchoscopy and in three patients via microlaryngoscopy. Ages ranged from 1 day to 20 years, with most patients under 2 years of age. Diagnoses included: laryngeal cysts (1); cystic hygroma (3); tumor (neurofibroma, 1) subglottic hemangioma (1); excision of airway granulation tissue (8); and tracheal stenosis (13, including subglottic stenosis in 9). Therapy of the offending lesion required from one to eight laser procedures (mean, 2.8), excluding one patient with congenital long-segment tracheal stenosis who required 24 laser treatments for repeated excision of tracheal granulation tissue. Most lesions responded to only one or two laser treatments. No bleeding or perforation occurred secondary to laser use. Use of the laser was responsible for salvaging the airway or simplifying management of the airway in 21 of the 26 patients. In three patients with cystic hygroma affecting the laryngeal structures as well as soft tissues of the neck, laser excision was performed to maintain upper airway patency with a tracheostomy for airway control. Two patients with critical subglottic stenosis initially responded to laser excision, but moved away from the area and developed recurrence of their subglottic stenosis requiring tracheostomy, because further laser treatment was either unavailable or was deferred in their new locale.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Structure of fructans from excised leaves of New Zealand flax.

    PubMed

    Sims, I M; Cairns, A J; Furneaux, R H

    2001-07-01

    The accumulation of total water-soluble carbohydrate, and specifically sucrose and fructan, by excised leaves of Phormium tenax and P. cookianum (family Phormiaceae J. G. Agardh, order Asparagales) was investigated. Total water-soluble carbohydrate content of excised leaves of P. tenax and P. cookianum increased during 48 h of continuous illumination at an average rate of 1.3 and 0.9 mg g(-1) fresh weight leaf per hour, respectively. The sucrose content of excised leaves increased throughout the experimental period. The fructan content of excised leaves of P. tenax increased slightly throughout the experimental period, whilst that of P. cookianum was variable and showed no overall change. Chemical and spectroscopic analysis of the fructans obtained from the two Phormium species showed that they were similar to each other and contained mostly 1-linked and terminal fructofuranosyl (Fruf) residues, together with smaller amounts of 6-linked Fruf, 1,6-branched Fruf, terminal and 6-linked glucopyranosyl residues. Separation of the fructans by thin-layer and high-performance anion-exchange chromatography revealed the presence of a complex mixture of fructo-oligosaccharides and higher molecular weight fructan. The branched structure of the fructans isolated from excised leaves of Phormium resembles that of fructans and fructo-oligosaccharides isolated from some related species within the order Asparagales (Agave vera cruz, Cordyline australis and Urginea maritima), but is distinct from the linear structure of fructans from others (Allium cepa and Asparagus officinalis). The structural heterogeniety of fructans within both the order Asparagales and superorder Liliiflorae may be a useful chemotaxonomic aid.

  4. 76 FR 52862 - Time for Payment of Certain Excise Taxes, and Quarterly Excise Tax Payments for Small Alcohol...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... excise tax on distilled spirits, wine, beer, tobacco products, and cigarette papers and tubes, and... (IRC). These provisions of the IRC concern the taxation of distilled spirits, wine, beer, tobacco... taxes. See 26 U.S.C. 5061 pertaining to distilled spirits, wine, and beer and 26 U.S.C. 5703...

  5. 76 FR 3584 - Time for Payment of Certain Excise Taxes, and Quarterly Excise Tax Payments for Small Alcohol...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... regulations pertaining to the semimonthly payments of excise tax on distilled spirits, wine, beer, tobacco.../regulations_laws/all_rulemaking.shtml . You also may view copies of these documents by appointment at the TTB... spirits, wine, beer, tobacco products, and cigarette papers and tubes. The temporary rule also...

  6. Preliminary results of comparative study for subsequent photodynamic therapy versus secondary excision after primary excision for treating basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bu, Wenbo; Zhang, Mengli; Zhang, Qian; Yuan, Chunyu; Chen, Xu; Fang, Fang

    2016-11-22

    Some basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are indistinguishable from nevi based on clinical manifestations. Therefore, it is often difficult for the excision margins of the initial surgical treatment to achieve radical removal of the malignancy. This study was a comparative analysis of the clinical results of aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-photodynamic therapy (PDT) or secondary surgery after the primary excision. In total, 20 patients with preoperative clinical diagnoses of nevi underwent in situ resection. The postoperative pathological diagnoses confirmed all cases were BCC. Ten patients received PDT twice after the primary excision, and 10 cases received extended resection after the primary excision. Patients were followed up for 8 months at least, and the 2 groups did not show statistically significant differences in the recurrence rate, while the PDT group had better results in terms of economic burden, healing period, and cosmetic satisfaction than the group with secondary surgery. Our study demonstrates that ALA-PDT can sever as a considerable remedial treatment for the BCC patients who have not accepted radical resection due to primary clinical misdiagnosis.

  7. "Flag Excision and Flap" Procedure: a Novel Modification for Off-Midline Closure After Pilonidal Sinus Excision.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Ergun; Tezcan, Levent; Yilmaz, O Cem; Akin, Mehmet Levhi

    2015-12-01

    Pilonidal sinus surgery has evolved with the novel flap techniques, and off-midline closure became a preferred surgical procedure due to shorter recovery time and low recurrence rates. To obtain a better off-midline closure without maceration and a possible wound problem, we modified a novel excision technique. We aimed to present this novel flag modification of rhomboid excision and flap reconstruction experience. From December 2007 to June 2009, 100 patients were treated with flag excision and flap reconstruction under regional anesthesia and followed with a mean of 42 (range 35-55) months. Competent closure results were obtained successfully in all patients without an overlap between incision line and midline. None of the patients had seroma. Two patients (2 %) had partial wound detachment superiorly. None of the patients had recurrence during follow-up. The flag excision and flap reconstruction procedure is an effective and comfortable technique both for the surgeon and the patient with a quick healing period and low complication rates without maceration.

  8. Comparison of Three Surgical Methods in Treatment of Patients with Pilonidal Sinus: Modified Excision and Repair/Wide Excision/Wide Excision and Flap in RASOUL, OMID and SADR Hospitals( 2004-2007).

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mostafa; Heidari, Afshin; Jafarnejad, Babak

    2013-10-01

    This study is a comparison between three methods that are frequently used for the surgical treatment of pilonidal disease all over the world: modified excision and repair, wide excision and secondary repair, and wide excision and flap. The first technique is done by our group for the first time, and has not been described previously in the literature. This is an interventional study performed at Omid, Sadr, and Rasoul Akram hospitals on patients who had undergone operation because of pilonidal sinus disease and met the inclusion criteria between 2004 and 2007. Exclusion criteria were (1) acute pilonidal sinus diseases, (2) history of pilonidal sinus surgery, (3) history of systemic diseases (DM, malignancy, etc.), and (4) pilonidal abscess. Essential information was extracted from complete medical archives. Any data not available in files or during follow-up visits (all patients supposed to be followed at least for 1 year) were gathered by a telephone interview. A total of 194 patients met the criteria and had complete archived files. Longer duration of hospital stay was found in the "wide excision and closing with flap" method comparing with two other methods (P < 0.05). Length of incapacity for work was not different between the "wide excision and modified repair" and "wide excision" (P > 0.5) methods, but longer for "wide excision and flap" in comparison with two others (P < 0.05). Healing time was significantly longer in the "wide excision" method in comparison with two other methods (P < 0.05). However, "wide excision and modified repair" method had the least healing time between all above techniques, except for length of leaving the office. All the three recurrences (1.5 %) occurred in the wide excision and flap method (P < 0.05). The frequency of postoperative complications was 2 (3.3 %) in wide excision and modified repair, 15 (18.5 %) in wide excision, and 17 (32.7 %) in wide excision and flap closure; these differences in

  9. Radiosurgery for acoustic neurinomas: Early experience

    SciTech Connect

    Linskey, M.E.; Lunsford, L.D.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1990-05-01

    We reviewed our early experience with the first 26 patients with acoustic neurinomas (21 unilateral, 5 bilateral) treated by stereotactic radiosurgery using the first North American 201-source cobalt-60 gamma knife. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 19 months (median, 13 months). Serial postoperative imaging showed either a decrease in tumor size (11 patients) or growth arrest (15 patients). Loss of central contrast enhancement was a characteristic change (18 patients). Seven patients had good or serviceable hearing preoperatively. In all 7 the preoperative hearing status was retained immediately after radiosurgery. At follow-up, 3 had preserved hearing, 1 had reduced hearing, and 3 had lost all hearing in the treated ear. Hearing in 1 patient that was nonserviceable preoperatively later improved to a serviceable hearing level. Delayed facial paresis developed in 6 patients, and delayed trigeminal sensory loss developed in 7 patients, none of whom had significant deficits before radiosurgery. Both facial and trigeminal deficits tended to improve within 3 to 6 months of onset with excellent recovery anticipated. Lower cranial nerve dysfunction was not observed. All 26 patients remain at their preoperative employment or functional status. At present, stereotactic radiosurgery is an alternative treatment for acoustic neurinomas in patients who are elderly, have significant concomitant medical problems, have a tumor in their only hearing ear, have bilateral acoustic neurinomas, refuse microsurgical excision, or have recurrent tumor despite surgical resection. Although longer and more extensive follow-up is required, the control of tumor growth and the acceptable rate of complications in this early experience testifies to the future expanding role of this technique in the management of selected acoustic neurinomas.

  10. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  11. Resolution of vitiligo following excision of halo congenital melanocytic nevus: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Wang, Zhi; Huang, Weiqing

    2016-05-01

    Halo congenital melanocytic nevus (CMN) associated with vitiligo is rare, especially with regard to CMN excision. Only two reports of excision of halo CMN following repigmentation of vitiligo are found in the literature. We present a case of a girl with halo CMN and periorbital vitiligo. The halo CMN was excised and followed by spontaneous improvement of vitiligo. The result suggests excision of the inciting lesion may be a promising way to control vitiligo.

  12. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  13. 77 FR 37838 - Disregarded Entities and the Indoor Tanning Services Excise Tax

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ... Services Excise Tax AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... (including qualified subchapter S subsidiaries) and the indoor tanning services excise tax. These regulations affect disregarded entities responsible for collecting the indoor tanning services excise tax and...

  14. 29 CFR 779.263 - Excise taxes not at the retail level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excise taxes not at the retail level. 779.263 Section 779... Coverage Excise Taxes § 779.263 Excise taxes not at the retail level. There are also a wide variety of taxes levied at the manufacturer's or distributor's level and not at the retail level. It should...

  15. 48 CFR 552.229-71 - Federal Excise Tax-DC Government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Federal Excise Tax-DC....229-71 Federal Excise Tax—DC Government. As prescribed in 529.401-71, insert the following clause: Federal Excise Tax—DC Government (SEP 1999) If the District of Columbia cites an Internal Revenue...

  16. 48 CFR 552.229-71 - Federal Excise Tax-DC Government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Federal Excise Tax-DC....229-71 Federal Excise Tax—DC Government. As prescribed in 529.401-71, insert the following clause: Federal Excise Tax—DC Government (SEP 1999) If the District of Columbia cites an Internal Revenue...

  17. 48 CFR 552.229-71 - Federal Excise Tax-DC Government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Federal Excise Tax-DC....229-71 Federal Excise Tax—DC Government. As prescribed in 529.401-71, insert the following clause: Federal Excise Tax—DC Government (SEP 1999) If the District of Columbia cites an Internal Revenue...

  18. 48 CFR 552.229-71 - Federal Excise Tax-DC Government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal Excise Tax-DC....229-71 Federal Excise Tax—DC Government. As prescribed in 529.401-71, insert the following clause: Federal Excise Tax—DC Government (SEP 1999) If the District of Columbia cites an Internal Revenue...

  19. 48 CFR 552.229-71 - Federal Excise Tax-DC Government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Federal Excise Tax-DC....229-71 Federal Excise Tax—DC Government. As prescribed in 529.401-71, insert the following clause: Federal Excise Tax—DC Government (SEP 1999) If the District of Columbia cites an Internal Revenue...

  20. Excision of Thoracic Chondrosarcoma: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Rishi; Theodore, Pierre; Mummaneni, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are cartilage-matrix-forming tumors that make up 20-27% of primary malignant bone tumors and are the third most common primary bone malignancy after multiple myelomas and osteosarcomas. Radiographic assessment of this condition includes plain radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for tumor characterization and delineation of intraosseous and extraosseous involvement. Most chondrosarcomas are refractory to chemotherapy and radiation therapy; therefore, wide en bloc surgical excision offers the best chance for cure. Chondrosarcomas frequently affect the pelvis and upper and lower extremities. In rare instances, the chest wall can be involved, with chondrosarcomas occurring in the ribs, sternum, anterior costosternal junction, and posterior costotransverse junction. In this article, we present a patient with thoracic chondrosarcoma centered at the left T7 costotransverse joint with effacement of the left T7-T8 neuroforamen. We also detail our operative technique of wide en bloc chondrosarcoma excision and review current literature on this topic. PMID:27588229

  1. Regulation of endonuclease activity in human nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Fagbemi, Adebanke F.; Orelli, Barbara; Schärer, Orlando D.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a DNA repair pathway that is responsible for removing a variety of lesions caused by harmful UV light, chemical carcinogens, and environmental mutagens from DNA. NER involves the concerted action of over 30 proteins that sequentially recognize a lesion, excise it in the form of an oligonucleotide, and fill in the resulting gap by repair synthesis. ERCC1-XPF and XPG are structure-specific endonucleases responsible for carrying out the incisions 5′ and 3′ to the damage respectively, culminating in the release of the damaged oligonucleotide. This review focuses on the recent work that led to a greater understanding of how the activities of ERCC1-XPF and XPG are regulated in NER to prevent unwanted cuts in DNA or the persistence of gaps after incision that could result in harmful, cytotoxic DNA structures. PMID:21592868

  2. Confocal reflectance imaging of excised malignant human bladder biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniltchenko, Dmitri I.; Kastein, Albrecht; Koenig, Frank; Sachs, Markus; Schnorr, Dietmar; Al-Shukri, Salman; Loening, Stefan A.

    2004-08-01

    To evaluate the potential of reflectance confocal scanning laser microscopy (CM) for rapid imaging of non-processed freshly excised human bladder biopsies and cystectomy specimens. Freshly excised bladder tumors from three cystectomy specimens and random biopsies from twenty patients with a history of superficial bladder tumors were imaged with CM. Additional acetic acid washing prior to CM imaging was performed in some of the samples. Confocal images were compared to corresponding routine histologic sections. CM allows imaging of unprocessed bladder tissue at a subcellular resolution. Urothelial cell layers, collagen, vessels and muscle fibers can be rapidly visualized, in native state. In this regard, umbrella cells, basement membrane elucidated. Besides obvious limitations partly due to non-use of exogenous dyes, CM imaging offers several advantages: rapid imaging of the tissue in its native state like the basement membrane, normally seen only by using immunohistopathology. Reflectance CM opens a new avenue for imaging bladder cancer.

  3. Excise Tax Avoidance: The Case of State Cigarette Taxes

    PubMed Central

    DeCicca, Philip; Kenkel, Donald; Liu, Feng

    2013-01-01

    We conduct an applied welfare economics analysis of cigarette tax avoidance. We develop an extension of the standard formula for the optimal Pigouvian corrective tax to incorporate the possibility that consumers avoid the tax by making purchases in nearby lower-tax jurisdictions. To provide a key parameter for our formula, we estimate a structural endogenous switching regression model of border-crossing and cigarette prices. In illustrative calculations, we find that for many states, after taking into account tax avoidance the optimal tax is at least 20 percent smaller than the standard Pigouvian tax that simply internalizes external costs. Our empirical estimate that tax avoidance strongly responds to the price differential is the main reason for this result. We also use our results to examine the benefits of replacing avoidable state excise taxes with a harder-to-avoid federal excise tax on cigarettes. PMID:24140760

  4. Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Straatsma, TP; McCammon, J A; Miller, John H; Smith, Paul E; Vorpagel, Erich R; Wong, Chung F; Zacharias, Martin W

    2006-03-03

    The goal of the Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling project is to enhance our understanding of the mechanism of human polymerase-β, one of the key enzymes in base excision repair (BER) and the cell-signaling enzymes cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. This work used molecular modeling and simulation studies to specifically focus on the • dynamics of DNA and damaged DNA • dynamics and energetics of base flipping in DNA • mechanism and fidelity of nucleotide insertion by BER enzyme human polymerase-β • mechanism and inhibitor design for cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. Molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure calculations have been performed using the computer resources at the Molecular Science Computing Facility at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory.

  5. Nodular fasciitis of the hand: excision preserving 'vital' structures.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, M M; Arafah, M M

    2014-10-01

    Nodular fasciitis is an extremely rare benign fibrous tumour of the hand. Although benign, the tumour is frequently adherent to tendons/nerves and joints of the hand. However, the tumour may spontaneously regress and does not tend to recur following excision with histologically positive margins. For the last 20 years, the author has adopted a specific management approach for these and other benign fibrous tumours of the hand. Following the clinical/radiological diagnosis, tumour excision is done preserving 'vital' structures within the hand. The diagnosis is confirmed histologically and by immune stains, and the patient is then followed up for local recurrence. Over a 20-year period, the author has treated four cases of nodular fasciitis of the hand using this management approach. Despite the positive margins in all cases, there were no recurrences at a minimum follow-up interval of 3 years.

  6. Laparoscopic excision versus open excision for the treatment of choledochal cysts: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Chen; Xia, Zhang; Long, Li; Lishuang, Ma; Pu, Yu; Wenjuan, Zheng; Xiaofan, Li

    2015-01-01

    In 1723, Vater first described choledochal cyst and in 1977, Todani et al classified this disease. For many years, open excision (OP) as the standard procedure made a great impact in the treatment of choledochal cyst. Since 1995, when Farello et al first reported laparoscopic choledochal cyst excision, laparoscopic excision (LA) has been used worldwide. However, its safety remains a major concern. The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare OP with LA in treating choledochal cyst and then to determine whether LA is safe and valid. The design of this study involved systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources were Medline, Ovid, Elsevier, Google Scholar, Embase, and Cochrane library. The study selection entailed comparative cohort studies. For data extraction, 2 investigators independently assessed selected studies and extracted the following information: study characteristics, quality, outcomes data, etc. For the results, 7 comparative cohort studies about the effectiveness of LA compared with OP were performed meta-analysis. The results showed that although the LA group had a longer operative time (MD = 56.57; 95% CI = 32.20-80.93; P < 0.00001), LA had a shorter duration of hospital stay (MD = -1.93; 95% CI = -2.51 to -1.36; P < 0.00001), and recovery of bowel function (MD = -0.94; 95% CI = -1.33 to -0.55; P < 0.00001). Meta-analysis found no significant difference between most of the 2 groups: bile leak (RR = 0.60; 95% CI = 0.29-1.24; P = 0.17), abdominal bleeding (RR = 0.33; 95% CI = 0.01-8.98; P = 0.51), pancreatitis (RR = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.06-1.03; P = 0.06), total postoperative complications (RR = 1.04; 95% CI = 0.66-1.62; P = 0.88). The LA group had significant lower rates in intraoperative blood transfusion (RR = 0.20; 95% CI = 0.11-0.38; P < 0.00001), and adhesive intestinal obstruction (RR = 0.17, 95% CI = 0.04-0.77; P = 0.02). In conclusion, compared with open excision, laparoscopic excision is a safe, valid, and feasible alternative to open

  7. How are base excision DNA repair pathways deployed in vivo?

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Upasna; Demple, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the base excision repair (BER) system for DNA more than 40 years ago, new branches of the pathway have been revealed at the biochemical level by in vitro studies. Largely for technical reasons, however, the confirmation of these subpathways in vivo has been elusive. We review methods that have been used to explore BER in mammalian cells, indicate where there are important knowledge gaps to fill, and suggest a way to address them. PMID:28357058

  8. Envisioning the molecular choreography of DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Parikh, S S; Mol, C D; Hosfield, D J; Tainer, J A

    1999-02-01

    Recent breakthroughs integrate individual DNA repair enzyme structures, biochemistry and biology to outline the structural cell biology of the DNA base excision repair pathways that are essential to genome integrity. Thus, we are starting to envision how the actions, movements, steps, partners and timing of DNA repair enzymes, which together define their molecular choreography, are elegantly controlled by both the nature of the DNA damage and the structural chemistry of the participating enzymes and the DNA double helix.

  9. Excising das All: Evolving Maxwell waves beyond Scri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanMeter, James R.; Fiske, David R.; Misner, Charles W.

    2006-01-01

    We study the numerical propagation of waves through future null infinity in a conformally compactified spacetime. We introduce an artificial cosmological constant, which allows us some control over the causal structure near null infinity. We exploit this freedom to ensure that all light cones are tilted outward in a region near null infinity, which allows us to impose excision-style boundary conditions in our finite difference code. In this preliminary study we consider electromagnetic waves propagating in a static, conformally compactified spacetime.

  10. How are base excision DNA repair pathways deployed in vivo?

    PubMed

    Thapar, Upasna; Demple, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the base excision repair (BER) system for DNA more than 40 years ago, new branches of the pathway have been revealed at the biochemical level by in vitro studies. Largely for technical reasons, however, the confirmation of these subpathways in vivo has been elusive. We review methods that have been used to explore BER in mammalian cells, indicate where there are important knowledge gaps to fill, and suggest a way to address them.

  11. [Laryngeal interarytenoid neurilemmoma excised via microlaryngeal endoscopy: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Cheng, Lixin; Tang, Ming

    2015-12-01

    Laryngeal interarytenoid neurilemmomas (LIN) is a benign encapsulated tumor originating from the schwann cells lining nerve fibers. Even though LINs are extremely rare in incidence, they could present with potential threat to the airway and thus requiring prompt diagnosis and treatment. Here, we report two cases of LINs. Both patients underwent excision of the tumor via microlaryngeal endoscopic procedures and recovered well postoperatively without complications. No recurrence was observed postoperatively on routine follow-up after 14 months.

  12. Autophagy positively regulates DNA damage recognition by nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Lei; Zhao, Baozhong; Shah, Palak; Sample, Ashley; Yang, Seungwon; He, Yu-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) is a cellular catabolic process that is essential for maintaining tissue homeostasis and regulating various normal and pathologic processes in human diseases including cancer. One cancer-driving process is accumulation of genetic mutations due to impaired DNA damage repair, including nucleotide excision repair. Here we show that autophagy positively regulates nucleotide excision repair through enhancing DNA damage recognition by the DNA damage sensor proteins XPC and DDB2 via 2 pathways. First, autophagy deficiency downregulates the transcription of XPC through TWIST1-dependent activation of the transcription repressor complex E2F4-RBL2. Second, autophagy deficiency impairs the recruitment of DDB2 to ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced DNA damage sites through TWIST1-mediated inhibition of EP300. In mice, the pharmacological autophagy inhibitor Spautin-1 promotes UVB-induced tumorigenesis, whereas the autophagy inducer rapamycin reduces UVB-induced tumorigenesis. These findings demonstrate the crucial role of autophagy in maintaining proper nucleotide excision repair in mammalian cells and suggest a previously unrecognized tumor-suppressive mechanism of autophagy in cancer.

  13. Recombinant methods for screening human DNA excision repair proficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Athas, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    A method for measuring DNA excision repair in response to ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced DNA damage has been developed, validated, and field-tested in cultured human lymphocytes. The methodology is amenable to population-based screening and should facilitate future epidemiologic studies seeking to investigate associations between excision repair proficiency and cancer susceptibility. The impetus for such endeavors derives from the belief that the high incidence of skin cancer in the genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) primarily is a result of the reduced capacity of patients cells to repair UV-induced DNA damage. For assay, UV-irradiated non-replicating recombinant plasmid DNA harboring a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) indicator gene is introduced into lymphocytes using DEAE-dextran short-term transfection conditions. Exposure to UV induces transcriptionally-inactivating DNA photoproducts in the plasmid DNA which inactivate CAT gene expression. Excision repair of the damaged CAT gene is monitored indirectly as a function of reactivated CAT enzyme activity following a 40 hour repair/expression incubation period.

  14. New synthetic substrates of mammalian nucleotide excision repair system

    PubMed Central

    Evdokimov, Alexey; Petruseva, Irina; Tsidulko, Aleksandra; Koroleva, Ludmila; Serpokrylova, Inna; Silnikov, Vladimir; Lavrik, Olga

    2013-01-01

    DNA probes for the studies of damaged strand excision during the nucleotide excision repair (NER) have been designed using the novel non-nucleosidic phosphoramidite reagents that contain N-[6-(9-antracenylcarbamoyl)hexanoyl]-3-amino-1,2-propandiol (nAnt) and N-[6-(5(6)-fluoresceinylcarbamoyl)hexanoyl]-3-amino-1,2-propandiol (nFlu) moieties. New lesion-imitating adducts being inserted into DNA show good substrate properties in NER process. Modified extended linear nFlu– and nAntr–DNA are suitable for estimation of specific excision activity catalysed with mammalian whole-cell extracts. The following substrate activity range was revealed for the model 137-bp linear double-stranded DNA: nAnt–DNA ≈ nFlu–DNA > Chol–DNA (Chol–DNA—legitimate NER substrate that contains non-nucleoside fragment bearing cholesterol residue). In vitro assay shows that modified DNA can be a useful tool to study NER activity in whole-cell extracts. The developed approach should be of general use for the incorporation of NER-sensitive distortions into model DNAs. The new synthetic extended linear DNA containing bulky non-nucleoside modifications will be useful for NER mechanism study and for applications. PMID:23609543

  15. Nearfield Acoustical Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Sabih I.

    Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is a method by which a set of acoustic pressure measurements at points located on a specific surface (called a hologram) can be used to image sources on vibrating surfaces on the acoustic field in three-dimensional space. NAH data are processed to take advantage of the evanescent wavefield to image sources that are separated less that one-eighth of a wavelength.

  16. Deep Water Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-28

    Estimates of basin-wide sound speed ( temperature ) fields obtained by the combination of acoustic, altimetry, and other data types with ocean...of acoustic coherence at long ranges in the ocean. Estimates of basin-wide sound speed ( temperature ) fields obtained by the combination of acoustic...index.html Award Number N00014-13-1-0053 LONG-TERM GOALS The ultimate limitations to the performance of long-range sonar are due to ocean sound speed

  17. Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-14

    Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD Tam Nguyen 2531 Jefferson Davis Hwy Arlington, VA 22242 phone: (703) 604-6013 ext 520 fax: (703) 604-6056...email: NguyenTL@navsea.navy.mil Award # N0001499PD30007 LONG-TERM GOALS The goal of the recently completed Acoustic Communications Advanced...Technology Demonstration program (ACOMMS ATD) was to demonstrate long range and moderate data rate underwater acoustic communications between a submarine

  18. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-043016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to...improve our understanding. During the past few years, the physics effects studied have been three-dimensional propagation on global scales, deep water

  19. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  20. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-07

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  1. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  2. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  3. State-specific liquor excise taxes and retail prices in 8 US states, 2012.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Michael; Grundman, Jody; DeJong, William; Naimi, Timothy S; King, Charles; Albers, Alison B; Williams, Rebecca S; Jernigan, David H

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the relationship between state excise taxes and liquor prices in 8 states, using 2012 data for 45 brands. The authors made 6042 price observations among 177 liquor stores with online prices. Using a hierarchical model, the authors examined the relationship between excise taxes and product prices. State excise taxes were significantly related to liquor prices, with an estimated pass-through rate of 0.93. The proportion of price accounted for by excise taxes averaged 7.0%. The authors find that excise taxes do increase the price of alcohol, but states are not taking advantage of this opportunity to reduce alcohol-related morbidity and mortality.

  4. The Therapeutic Effects of Intracavernosal Plaque Excision in Peyronie’s Disease: A None Grafting or Tunical Excising Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadnia, Hassan; Kamalati, Ali; Younesi Rostami, Mehdi; Imani, Mohammad Mehdi; Asadpour, Amir Abbas; Hariri, Mohammad Kazem

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Current surgical treatments in Peyronie’s disease are accompanied by complications such as penile shortening, loss of sensation, erectile dysfunction and recurrence of disease. The aim of this study was the evaluation of clinical results of intracavernosal plaque excision in Peyronie’s disease. METHODS The operation was performed on 35 men. It was consisted of incising the tunica albuginea parallel to the plaque and through this incision, and the plaque was removed from the inside surface without excision or replacing the underlying tunica albuginea by grafts. All patients were evaluated before and periodically within 12 months after the surgery with measurement of penile length, curvature angle in the rigidity phase, and sexual satisfaction. RESULTS The mean age of patients was 51.4±5.3 years (range 42-59 years). The angle of penile curvature was 25-45° (mean=35°). Thirty patients (86%) obtained a nearly complete straightening of penis. All patients restored their previous penile length without any disorder of sensation within the glans penis and expressed improvement of sexual activity. CONCLUSION Intracavernosal plaque excision is a simple, easy and minimal invasive method that does not result in penile shortening, loss of sensation or erectile dysfunction. In properly selected patients, this technique can lead to acceptable elimination of penile curvature and sexual satisfaction. PMID:27308243

  5. The Acoustical Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melissa

    Asserting that without an adequate acoustical environment, learning activities can be hindered, this paper reviews the literature on classroom acoustics, particularly noise, reverberation, signal-to-noise ratio, task performance, and recommendations for improvement. Through this review, the paper seeks to determine whether portable classrooms…

  6. Cystic acoustic schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, P; Missori, P; Mastronardi, L; Fortuna, A

    1991-01-01

    Three cases with large space-occupying cysts in the cerebellopontine angle are reported. CT and MRI findings were not typical for acoustic schwannomas but at operation, besides the large cysts, small acoustic schwannomas could be detected and removed. The clinical and neuroradiological features of this unusual variety and the CT and MRI differential diagnosis of cerebellopontine angle lesions are discussed.

  7. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  8. Acoustic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic levitation system is described, with single acoustic source and a small reflector to stably levitate a small object while the object is processed as by coating or heating it. The system includes a concave acoustic source which has locations on opposite sides of its axis that vibrate towards and away from a focal point to generate a converging acoustic field. A small reflector is located near the focal point, and preferably slightly beyond it, to create an intense acoustic field that stably supports a small object near the reflector. The reflector is located about one-half wavelength from the focal point and is concavely curved to a radius of curvature (L) of about one-half the wavelength, to stably support an object one-quarter wavelength (N) from the reflector.

  9. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  10. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  11. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  12. Direct Field Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Paul; Goldstein, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the methods and procedures used in Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT). The paper will discuss some of the recent techniques and developments that are currently being used and the future publication of a reference standard. Acoustic testing using commercial sound system components is becoming a popular and cost effective way of generating a required acoustic test environment both in and out of a reverberant chamber. This paper will present the DFAT test method, the usual setup and procedure and the development and use of a closed-loop, narrow-band control system. Narrow-band control of the acoustic PSD allows all standard techniques and procedures currently used in random control to be applied to acoustics and some examples are given. The paper will conclude with a summary of the development of a standard practice guideline that is hoped to be available in the first quarter of next year.

  13. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-03-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  14. Robotic-Laparoscopic Rectal Cancer Excision Versus Traditional Laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Michael S.; Abbass, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Robotic surgery has been advocated for the radical excision of rectal cancer. Most data supporting its use have been reported from European and Asian centers, with a paucity of data from the United States documenting clear advantages of the robotic technique. This study compares the short-term outcome of robotic versus laparoscopic surgery. Methods: Consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic (group 1) or robotic (group 2) rectal cancer excision at a single institution over a 2-year period were retrospectively reviewed. The main outcome measures were operative time, blood loss, conversion rates, number of lymph nodes, margin positivity, length of hospital stay, complications, and readmission rates. Results: Forty-two patients were analyzed. The median operative time was shorter in group 1 than that in group 2 (240 minutes vs 260 minutes, P = .04). No difference was noted in blood loss, transfusion rates, intraoperative complications, or conversion rates. There was no difference in circumferential or distal margin positivity. The median length of stay was shorter in group 1 (5 days vs 6 days, P = .05). The 90-day complication rate was similar in both groups (33% vs 43%, P = .75), but there was a trend toward more anastomotic leaks in group 1 (14% vs 0%, P = .23). Similarly, a non–statistically significant trend toward a higher readmission rate was noted in group 1 (24% vs 5%, P = .18). Conclusion: Robotic rectal cancer excision yielded a longer operative time and hospital length of stay, although immediate oncologic results were comparable. The need for randomized data is critical to determine whether the added resource utilization in robotic surgery is justifiable. PMID:25392653

  15. Proton therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat the following types of cancer: Brain ( acoustic neuroma , childhood brain tumors ) Eye ( ocular melanoma , retinoblastoma ) ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 27. Read More Acoustic neuroma Bone tumor Brain tumor - children Melanoma of ...

  16. Stereotactic radiosurgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... nerve that connects the ear to the brain ( acoustic neuroma ) Pituitary tumors Spinal cord tumors Other cancers ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 179. Read More Acoustic neuroma Brain tumor - primary - adults Cerebral arteriovenous malformation ...

  17. BAER - brainstem auditory evoked response

    MedlinePlus

    ... be a sign of hearing loss , multiple sclerosis , acoustic neuroma , or stroke. Abnormal results may also be ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 34. Read More Acoustic neuroma Central pontine myelinolysis Hearing loss Multiple sclerosis ...

  18. Stereotactic Radiosurgery - Gamma Knife

    MedlinePlus

    ... nerve that connects the ear to the brain ( acoustic neuroma ) Pituitary tumors Tumors that are not cancer ( ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Acoustic Neuroma Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy Browse the Encyclopedia ...

  19. Stereotactic radiosurgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... pg=stereotactic . Accessed July 22, 2016. Read More Acoustic neuroma Brain tumor - primary - adults Cerebral arteriovenous malformation ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Acoustic Neuroma Arteriovenous Malformations Brain Tumors Childhood Brain Tumors ...

  20. Cytokinin and growth of excised roots of Bryophyllum calycinum.

    PubMed

    Robbins, W J; Hervey, A

    1971-02-01

    Excised roots of Bryophyllum calycinum require for growth both auxin and cytokinin. This is demonstrated by the poor growth of 2-mm root tips in a basal medium of mineral salts, sucrose, and vitamins supplemented with either an auxin or a cytokinin, and much better growth when the basal medium is supplemented with both auxin and cytokinin. However, both substances are synthesized by the root, as is demonstrated by the growth of large inocula (dry wt 6-7 mg) through many successive passages in a medium limited to mineral salts, sugar, and vitamins.

  1. Cytokinin and Growth of Excised Roots of Bryophyllum calycinum

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, William J.; Hervery, Annette

    1971-01-01

    Excised roots of Bryophyllum calycinum require for growth both auxin and cytokinin. This is demonstrated by the poor growth of 2-mm root tips in a basal medium of mineral salts, sucrose, and vitamins supplemented with either an auxin or a cytokinin, and much better growth when the basal medium is supplemented with both auxin and cytokinin. However, both substances are synthesized by the root, as is demonstrated by the growth of large inocula (dry wt 6-7 mg) through many successive passages in a medium limited to mineral salts, sugar, and vitamins. Images PMID:5277083

  2. Excision arthroplasty for management of coxofemoral luxation in pet birds.

    PubMed

    MacCoy, D M

    1989-01-01

    Coxofemoral luxation, although not a common injury, can cause considerable pelvic limb dysfunction in pet birds. Luxation usually is craniodorsal, as it is in dogs. Previously recommended treatments have not always been effective in managing the injury. Sequelae can include dorsolateral deviation of the pelvic limb, with loss of function and bumblefoot in the nonluxated limb, owing to abnormal weight-bearing. Excision arthroplasty combined with a muscular sling constructed from a segment of the iliofibularis muscle was used to treat coxofemoral luxation in a hyacinth macaw, a moluccan cockatoo, and an African gray parrot. The outcome was excellent in 2 of the 3 birds.

  3. Total mesorectal excision and management of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pinsk, Ilia; Phang, P Terry

    2007-10-01

    Treatment of rectal cancer over the last two decades has evolved with changes in techniques of surgery and radiation based on national and international trials. Preoperative adjuvant radiation is now preferred over postoperative adjuvant radiation, and total mesorectal excision with preservation of pelvic nerves is the gold standard for surgical treatment of rectal cancer. Preservation of the anal sphincter without compromising oncological outcome is an additional benefit for patients with carcinoma in the distal rectum. Further progress in imaging and a multidisciplinary team approach will facilitate individualization of treatment strategy with more focus on quality of life.

  4. Marking excision margins of surgical specimens by silver impregnation.

    PubMed

    Feit, J

    2005-07-01

    Marking excision margins of surgical specimens by silver impregnation has several advantages over commonly used Indian ink: during the slicing the tissue preserves its natural color, the staining is permanent, and the pigment does not smudge over cutting surfaces. The pigment is clearly visible in tissue sections. The tissue specimen is shortly dipped into a 10% water solution of argent nitrate (AgNO3 with HNO3). After slicing, the tissue specimens are developed in common black & white developer for several seconds and paraffin processed as usual. The method is suitable for formaldehyde fixed as well as fresh tissue specimens.

  5. [Alternative therapeutic excision of intraepithelial conjunctival carcinoma with corneal extension].

    PubMed

    Zemba, M; Stamate, Alina-Cristina; Avram, Corina Ioana; Sîrbu, Laura Nicoleta Urucu; Camburu, Raluca Lăcrămioara; Ochinciuc, Uliana; Burcea, M

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment for conjunctival neoplasms, with wide local excision, with or without supplemental cryotherapy to the surgical margins represents the treatment of choice for this pathology. In some cases, these neoplasms can be diffuse or multifocal, with borders that are difficult to detect clinically, such that topical therapies offer a more efficient method for treating the entire ocular surface, delivering high drug concentrations at this level, with negligible systemic side effects. Beginning from the clinical case of a patient diagnosed with conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia, we try to present other therapeutical alternatives, although in this case the therapeutical approach was the classic one.

  6. 26 CFR 55.4981-2 - Imposition of excise tax with respect to certain undistributed income of real estate investment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... certain undistributed income of real estate investment trusts; calendar years beginning after December 31... (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) EXCISE TAX ON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT TRUSTS AND REGULATED INVESTMENT COMPANIES Excise Tax on Real Estate Investment Trusts § 55.4981-2 Imposition of excise tax...

  7. 26 CFR 55.4981-1 - Imposition of excise tax on certain real estate investment trust taxable income not distributed...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Imposition of excise tax on certain real estate... TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) EXCISE TAX ON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT TRUSTS AND REGULATED INVESTMENT COMPANIES Excise Tax on Real Estate Investment Trusts § 55.4981-1 Imposition of...

  8. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  9. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  10. Acoustic sniper localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  11. Clinical outcomes of excision arthroplasty for Kienbock's disease.

    PubMed

    Matsuhashi, Tomoya; Iwasaki, Norimasa; Kato, Hiroyuki; Minami, Michio; Minami, Akio

    2011-01-01

    We have carried out a replacement of the lunate in 12 patients with advanced Kienböck's disease, with excision of the lunate and insertion of an iliac bone flap wrapped into palmaris longus. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of this procedure for advanced Kienböck's disease. At a mean follow-up period of 45.3 months, the mean clinical score was excellent in all cases. Radiographically, progression of osteoarthritis (OA) in the radiocarpal joint was found in two patients. At follow-up, the X-ray findings indicated a reduced of osseous core in four patients. On the other hand, carpal height ratio showed no significant change at follow-up. Excision arthroplasty using a tendon ball with osseous core for advanced Kienböck's disease leads to OA progression in some cases. However, clinical results were excellent in all cases. Therefore, this current study provides effective therapeutic procedure for advanced Kienböck's disease.

  12. Framing the policy debate over spirits excise tax in Poland.

    PubMed

    Zatoński, Mateusz; Hawkins, Benjamin; McKee, Martin

    2016-12-23

    Industry lobbying remains an obstacle to effective health-oriented alcohol policy. In 2013, an increase in excise tax on spirits was announced by the Polish government. This article presents a qualitative analysis of the public debate that ensued on the potential economic, health and social effects of the policy. It focuses on how competing groups, including industry actors, framed their position and sought to dominate the debate. Online archives of five Polish national newspapers, two spirits trade associations, and parliamentary and ministerial archives were searched. A thematic content analysis of the identified sources was conducted. The overall findings were compared with existing research on the framing of the Minimum Unit Pricing (MUP) debate in the UK. A total of 155 sources were analysed. Two main frames were identified: health, and economic The spirits industry successfully promoted the economic frame in their own publications and in the media. The debate was dominated by arguments about potential growth of the grey market and losses in tax revenue that might result from the excise tax increase. The framing of the debate in Poland differed from the framing of the MUP debate in the United Kingdom. The Polish public health community was unsuccessful in making health considerations a significant element of the alcohol policy debate. The strategies pursued by UK health advocates offer lessons for how to make a more substantial impact on media coverage and promote health-oriented legislation.

  13. Pterygium excision with conjunctival autografting: an effective and safe technique.

    PubMed Central

    Allan, B D; Short, P; Crawford, G J; Barrett, G D; Constable, I J

    1993-01-01

    The optimum mode of treatment for symptomatic pterygia would combine efficacy (a low recurrence rate) with safety (freedom from sight threatening complications), and would not affect visual acuity adversely. The efficacy of pterygium excision with conjunctival autografting in a sun exposed population in which pterygia are prevalent has previously been questioned. A cross sectional review of 93 eyes of 85 patients was carried out by slit-lamp examination a minimum of 6 months (range 6-76 months) after pterygium excision and free conjunctival autografting. Case notes were reviewed to obtain details of complications and visual acuity changes related to surgery. Of six recurrences (6.5%) four of these were asymptomatic with minor recurrences. Two patterns of recurrence were identified: cross graft recurrence (three cases) and outflanking (three cases). Complications (wound dehiscence, three cases; Tenon's granuloma one case; conjunctival cyst, one case) were all corrected by minor surgical revision without sequelae. Unaided acuities were unchanged or improved 3 months after surgery in 86 cases, with a minor diminution (1 Snellen line) in seven cases. This study demonstrates a low recurrence rate for a safe technique in an area in which ongoing ultraviolet light exposure levels are high and pterygia are prevalent. Images PMID:8280682

  14. Photobiomodulatory effects of He-Ne laser on excision wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Satish B. S.; Kumar, Pramod; Rao, Lakshmi; Mahato, Krishna K.

    2011-03-01

    Presently, great importance has been given to Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) with the intent of promoting wound healing process. The present study was aimed to investigate the promotive effect of LLLT on full thickness excision wounds in Swiss albino mice using optical fiber probe based light device. Circular wounds of diameter 15 mm were illuminated with single exposure of various laser doses 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 10 J/cm2 along with appropriate controls. Further, an optimal dose of 2 J/cm2 was applied to excision wounds at different post-wounding treatment schedules (0, 24 h and 48 h) to explicate the relations between treatment schedule and its tissue regeneration potential. Wound area, mean wound healing time along with hydroxyproline and glucosamine levels from wound ground tissue was assessed to evaluate the resultant photobiostimulatory outcome. Histological analysis was performed on day 10 of post-wounding. A significant increase in hydroxyproline (P< 0.001) and glucosamine levels (P< 0.01) were observed in 2 J/cm2 irradiation group, which was also substantiated by histological findings. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the immediate irradiation of 2 J/cm2 dose following wounding hasten the healing process compared to the unilluminated control.

  15. The room acoustic rendering equation.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Lokki, Tapio; Kiminki, Sami; Savioja, Lauri

    2007-09-01

    An integral equation generalizing a variety of known geometrical room acoustics modeling algorithms is presented. The formulation of the room acoustic rendering equation is adopted from computer graphics. Based on the room acoustic rendering equation, an acoustic radiance transfer method, which can handle both diffuse and nondiffuse reflections, is derived. In a case study, the method is used to predict several acoustic parameters of a room model. The results are compared to measured data of the actual room and to the results given by other acoustics prediction software. It is concluded that the method can predict most acoustic parameters reliably and provides results as accurate as current commercial room acoustic prediction software. Although the presented acoustic radiance transfer method relies on geometrical acoustics, it can be extended to model diffraction and transmission through materials in future.

  16. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  17. Acoustic well cleaner

    DOEpatents

    Maki, Jr., Voldi E.; Sharma, Mukul M.

    1997-01-21

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

  18. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  19. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  20. Vocal power and pressure-flow relationships in excised tiger larynges.

    PubMed

    Titze, Ingo R; Fitch, W Tecumseh; Hunter, Eric J; Alipour, Fariborz; Montequin, Douglas; Armstrong, Douglas L; McGee, Joann; Walsh, Edward J

    2010-11-15

    Despite the functional importance of loud, low-pitched vocalizations in big cats of the genus Panthera, little is known about the physics and physiology of the mechanisms producing such calls. We investigated laryngeal sound production in the laboratory using an excised-larynx setup combined with sound-level measurements and pressure-flow instrumentation. The larynges of five tigers (three Siberian or Amur, one generic non-pedigreed tiger with Bengal ancestry and one Sumatran), which had died of natural causes, were provided by Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo over a five-year period. Anatomical investigation indicated the presence of both a rigid cartilaginous plate in the arytenoid portion of the glottis, and a vocal fold fused with a ventricular fold. Both of these features have been confusingly termed 'vocal pads' in the previous literature. We successfully induced phonation in all of these larynges. Our results showed that aerodynamic power in the glottis was of the order of 1.0 W for all specimens, acoustic power radiated (without a vocal tract) was of the order of 0.1 mW, and fundamental frequency ranged between 20 and 100 Hz when a lung pressure in the range of 0-2.0 kPa was applied. The mean glottal airflow increased to the order of 1.0 l s(-1) per 1.0 kPa of pressure, which is predictable from scaling human and canine larynges by glottal length and vibrational amplitude. Phonation threshold pressure was remarkably low, on the order of 0.3 kPa, which is lower than for human and canine larynges phonated without a vocal tract. Our results indicate that a vocal fold length approximately three times greater than that of humans is predictive of the low fundamental frequency, and the extraordinarily flat and broad medial surface of the vocal folds is predictive of the low phonation threshold pressure.

  1. Vocal power and pressure–flow relationships in excised tiger larynges

    PubMed Central

    Titze, Ingo R.; Fitch, W. Tecumseh; Hunter, Eric J.; Alipour, Fariborz; Montequin, Douglas; Armstrong, Douglas L.; McGee, JoAnn; Walsh, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the functional importance of loud, low-pitched vocalizations in big cats of the genus Panthera, little is known about the physics and physiology of the mechanisms producing such calls. We investigated laryngeal sound production in the laboratory using an excised-larynx setup combined with sound-level measurements and pressure–flow instrumentation. The larynges of five tigers (three Siberian or Amur, one generic non-pedigreed tiger with Bengal ancestry and one Sumatran), which had died of natural causes, were provided by Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo over a five-year period. Anatomical investigation indicated the presence of both a rigid cartilaginous plate in the arytenoid portion of the glottis, and a vocal fold fused with a ventricular fold. Both of these features have been confusingly termed ‘vocal pads’ in the previous literature. We successfully induced phonation in all of these larynges. Our results showed that aerodynamic power in the glottis was of the order of 1.0 W for all specimens, acoustic power radiated (without a vocal tract) was of the order of 0.1 mW, and fundamental frequency ranged between 20 and 100 Hz when a lung pressure in the range of 0–2.0 kPa was applied. The mean glottal airflow increased to the order of 1.0 l s–1 per 1.0 kPa of pressure, which is predictable from scaling human and canine larynges by glottal length and vibrational amplitude. Phonation threshold pressure was remarkably low, on the order of 0.3 kPa, which is lower than for human and canine larynges phonated without a vocal tract. Our results indicate that a vocal fold length approximately three times greater than that of humans is predictive of the low fundamental frequency, and the extraordinarily flat and broad medial surface of the vocal folds is predictive of the low phonation threshold pressure. PMID:21037066

  2. Management of a large, recurrent simple cyst of the liver by total excision: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sriussadaporn, Suvit; Sriussadaporn, Sukanya; Pak-art, Rattaplee; Krittayakirana, Krittaya; Prichayuhd, Supparerk

    2011-04-01

    Simple cysts are common benign lesions of the liver. Treatment is reserved for symptomatic patients. Current management includes percutaneous aspiration with instillation of sclerosing agents, wide excision or unroofing, or fenestration of the cyst wall (> 50%) either by open or laparoscopic surgery. Total excision of the cyst wall is infrequently mentioned. The authors report a case of a large, recurrent simple cyst of the liver that was successfully treated by total excision.

  3. Acoustic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  4. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  5. Acoustic borehole logging

    SciTech Connect

    Medlin, W.L.; Manzi, S.J.

    1990-10-09

    This patent describes an acoustic borehole logging method. It comprises traversing a borehole with a borehole logging tool containing a transmitter of acoustic energy having a free-field frequency spectrum with at least one characteristic resonant frequency of vibration and spaced-apart receiver, repeatedly exciting the transmitter with a swept frequency tone burst of a duration sufficiently greater than the travel time of acoustic energy between the transmitter and the receiver to allow borehole cavity resonances to be established within the borehole cavity formed between the borehole logging tool and the borehole wall, detecting acoustic energy amplitude modulated by the borehole cavity resonances with the spaced-apart receiver, and recording an amplitude verses frequency output of the receiver in correlation with depth as a log of the borehole frequency spectrum representative of the subsurface formation comprising the borehole wall.

  6. Acoustic imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Tool detects noise sources by scanning sound "scene" and displaying relative location of noise-producing elements in area. System consists of ellipsoidal acoustic mirror and microphone and a display device.

  7. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  8. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  9. Acoustic bubble traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Reinhard; Kurz, Thomas; Lauterborn, Werner

    2000-07-01

    A small, oscillating bubble in a liquid can be trapped in the antinode of an acoustic standing wave field. Bubble stability is required for the study of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). The properties of the acoustic resonator are essential for the stable trapping of sonoluminescing bubbles. Resonators can be chosen according to the intended application: size and geometry can be varied in a wide range. In this work, the acoustic responses of different resonators were measured by means of holographic interferometry, hydrophones and a laser vibrometer. Also, high-speed photography was used to observe the bubble dynamics. Several single, stable sonoluminescent bubbles were trapped simultaneously within an acoustic resonator in the pressure antinodes of a higher harmonic mode (few bubble sonoluminescence, FBSL).

  10. Department of Cybernetic Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The development of the theory, instrumentation and applications of methods and systems for the measurement, analysis, processing and synthesis of acoustic signals within the audio frequency range, particularly of the speech signal and the vibro-acoustic signal emitted by technical and industrial equipments treated as noise and vibration sources was discussed. The research work, both theoretical and experimental, aims at applications in various branches of science, and medicine, such as: acoustical diagnostics and phoniatric rehabilitation of pathological and postoperative states of the speech organ; bilateral ""man-machine'' speech communication based on the analysis, recognition and synthesis of the speech signal; vibro-acoustical diagnostics and continuous monitoring of the state of machines, technical equipments and technological processes.

  11. Basic Linear Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Alan D.

    This chapter deals with the physical and mathematical aspects of sound when the disturbances are, in some sense, small. Acoustics is usually concerned with small-amplitude phenomena, and consequently a linear description is usually acoustics applicable. Disturbances are governed by the properties of the medium in which they occur, and the governing equations are the equations of continuum mechanics, which apply equally to gases, liquids, and solids. These include the mass, momentum, and energy equations, as well as thermodynamic principles. The viscosity and thermal conduction enter into the versions of these equations that apply to fluids. Fluids of typical great interest are air and sea water, and consequently this chapter includes a summary of their relevant acoustic properties. The foundation is also laid for the consideration of acoustic waves in elastic solids, suspensions, bubbly liquids, and porous media.

  12. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  13. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-11-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell’s law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  14. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-11-24

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  15. Phyllodes tumor diagnosed after ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted excision: should it be followed by surgical excision?

    PubMed

    Youk, Ji Hyun; Kim, Hana; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Son, Eun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Jeong-Ah

    2015-03-01

    Our aim was to retrospectively evaluate the results of ultrasound (US)-guided vacuum-assisted excision (US-VAE) of phyllodes tumors (PTs). A total of 41 PTs diagnosed at US-VAE followed by surgery (n = 27) or at least 2 y of US monitoring (n = 14) were included. By comparison of US-VAE pathology with surgical histology or follow-up US results, cases were divided into upgraded (malignant) and non-upgraded (benign) groups. These two groups were compared with respect to clinical, procedural and US features. Among 27 surgical cases, 2 (8.7%) of 23 benign PTs were upgraded to malignant PTs. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System category was retrospectively assigned as 4a (50%) or 4b (50%) in the upgraded group (n = 2) and 3 (64%) or 4a (36%) in the non-upgraded group (n = 39) (p = 0.018). Residual tumor was observed at the site of US-VAE in 15 of 27 surgical cases and 0 of 14 US follow-up cases (36.6%, 15/41). Given the rates of upgrade to malignancy (8.7%) and residual tumor (36.6%), PTs diagnosed after US-VAE should be surgically excised.

  16. Ocean Acoustic Observatory Federation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    J., C. G. Fox, and F. K. Duennebier, Hydroacoustic detection of submarine landslides on Kilauea volcano , Geophys. Res. Lett., vol. 28, 1811-1814...acoustic tomography experiments in the vicinity of coastal North America, • Monitor, in real time, marine mammals, earthquakes and volcanoes in the...distances, coastal tomography and thermometry, and earthquakes and volcanoes in the northern Pacific. APPROACH The members of the Ocean Acoustic

  17. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  18. The neonatal acoustic reflex.

    PubMed

    Weatherby, L A; Bennett, M J

    1980-01-01

    Probe tones from 220 Hz to 2 000 Hz were used to measure the static and dynamic acoustic impedance of 44 neonates. Acoustic reflex thresholds to broad band noise were obtained from every neonate tested when employing the higher frequency probe tones. The reflex threshold levels measured are similar to those of adults. The static impedance values are discussed to give a possible explanation of why reflex thresholds cannot be detected using conventional 220 Hz impedance bridges.

  19. Directional Acoustic Density Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-13

    fluctuations of fluid density at a point . (2) DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART [0004] Conventional vector sensors measure particle velocity, v (vx,Vytvz...dipole-type or first order sensor that is realized by measuring particle velocity at a point , (which is the vector sensor sensing approach for...underwater sensors), or by measuring the gradient of the acoustic pressure at two closely spaced (less than the wavelength of an acoustic wave) points as it

  20. Low Frequency Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    with NOAA , ONR is providing technical services that will help establish a baseline for assessment of long- term VLF acoustic trends in selected...ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 sponsored by NOAA , was added to the...with NOAA (NMFS) and other parties has dealt with ocean acoustics related to issues stimulated by the Marine Mammal Protection Act. A focal point has

  1. Excision of Sleeping Beauty transposons: parameters and applications to gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Geyi; Aronovich, Elena L.; Cui, Zongbin; Whitley, Chester B.; Hackett, Perry B.

    2007-01-01

    A major problem in gene therapy is the determination of the rates at which gene transfer has occurred. Our work has focused on applications of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system as a non-viral vector for gene therapy. Excision of a transposon from a donor molecule and its integration into a cellular chromosome are catalyzed by SB transposase. In this study, we used a plasmid-based excision assay to study the excision step of transposition. We used the excision assay to evaluate the importance of various sequences that border the sites of excision inside and outside the transposon in order to determine the most active sequences for transposition from a donor plasmid. These findings together with our previous results in transposase binding to the terminal repeats suggest that the sequences in the transposon-junction of SB are involved in steps subsequent to DNA binding but before excision, and that they may have a role in transposase–transposon interaction. We found that SB transposons leave characteristically different footprints at excision sites in different cell types, suggesting that alternative repair machineries operate in concert with transposition. Most importantly, we found that the rates of excision correlate with the rates of transposition. We used this finding to assess transposition in livers of mice that were injected with the SB transposon and transposase. The excision assay appears to be a relatively quick and easy method to optimize protocols for delivery of genes in SB transposons to mammalian chromosomes in living animals. PMID:15133768

  2. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  3. Endoscopic Excision of Symptomatic Simple Bone Cyst at Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Gunawat, Prashant; Karmarkar, Vikram; Deopujari, Chandrashekhar; Shah, Nishit

    2016-01-01

    Seizure is a classical feature of intra axial brain parenchymal lesion. Simple bone cyst is an unusual bony pathology at skull base presenting with unexpected symptoms of complex partial seizures. Skull base neuro-endoscopy has managed such lesions more effectively with reduced post-operative morbidity as compared to transcranial approach. This case report discusses a 20-year-old male who presented with 3 episodes of seizure over a time period of 10 months. MRI brain revealed T1 hypo and T2 hyper intense cystic lesion in middle cranial fossa with no enhancement on contrast administration. CT scan showed cystic lesion involving greater wing and pterygoid plate of sphenoid on left side. CT cisternographic evaluation showed CSF outpouching in the sphenoid air sinus. Excision of the cystic lesion was carried out through endoscopic transmaxillary transpterygoid approach. Histopathological examination showed the lesion to be a simple bone cyst. PMID:27891396

  4. Base excision repair in chromatin: Insights from reconstituted systems

    PubMed Central

    Balliano, Angela J.; Hayes, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    The process of base excision repair has been completely reconstituted in vitro and structural and biochemical properties of the component enzymes thoroughly studied on naked DNA templates. More recent work in this field aims to understand how BER operates on the natural substrate, chromatin [1, 2]. Toward this end, a number of researchers, including the Smerdon group, have focused attention to understand how individual enzymes and reconstituted BER operate on nucleosome substrates. While nucleosomes were once thought to completely restrict access of DNA-dependent factors, the surprising finding from these studies suggests that at least some BER components can utilize target DNA bound within nucleosomes as substrates for their enzymatic processes. This data correlates well with both structural studies of these enzymes and our developing understanding of nucleosome conformation and dynamics. While more needs to be learned, these studies highlight the utility of reconstituted BER and chromatin systems to inform our understanding of in vivo biological processes. PMID:26411876

  5. Orbitopalpebral repair after 835 excisions of malignant tumours.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Othon; Konofaos, Petros; Chrisostomidis, Chrisostomos; Georgiou, Panagis; Frangoulis, Marios; Champsas, Grigorios; Betsi, Evanthia; Zapantis-Fragos, Menelaos

    2005-01-01

    Repair of any defect in the eyelid depends on its size and position and the state of the surrounding tissues. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common malignant tumour of the eyelids, and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), mixed carcinomas or basosquamous cell carcinomas (BSC), and cutaneous melanomas (CM), also invade the eyelids and periocular zones. Reconstruction of the eyelids and associated orbital structures after resection requires a complete understanding of the anatomy. The adequacy of the reconstruction is judged by the quality of functional restoration and the aesthetic appearance. The purpose of this study was to document various, simple or complex reconstructive procedures that may be used after excision of malignant tumours of the eyelids and to assess the outcome of surgical treatment.

  6. Profiling base excision repair glycosylases with synthesized transition state analogs.

    PubMed

    Chu, Aurea M; Fettinger, James C; David, Sheila S

    2011-09-01

    Two base excision repair glycosylase (BER) transition state (TS) mimics, (3R,4R)-1-benzyl (hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidin-3-ol (1NBn) and (3R,4R)-(hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidin-3-ol (1N), were synthesized using an improved method. Several BER glycosylases that repair oxidized DNA bases, bacterial formamidopyrimdine glycosylase (Fpg), human OG glycosylase (hOGG1) and human Nei-like glycosylase 1 (hNEIL1) exhibit exceptionally high affinity (K(d)∼pM) with DNA duplexes containing the 1NBn and 1N nucleotide. Notably, comparison of the K(d) values of both TS mimics relative to an abasic analog (THF) in duplex contexts paired opposite C or A suggest that these DNA repair enzymes use distinctly different mechanisms for damaged base recognition and catalysis despite having overlapping substrate specificities.

  7. Transanal total mesorectal excision: A valid option for rectal cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Buchs, Nicolas C; Nicholson, Gary A; Ris, Frederic; Mortensen, Neil J; Hompes, Roel

    2015-01-01

    Low anterior resection can be a challenging operation, especially in obese male patients and in particular after radiotherapy. Transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) might offer technical advantages over laparoscopic or open approaches particularly for tumors in the distal third of the rectum. The aim of this article is to review the current experience with TaTME. The limits and future developments are also explored. Although the experience with TaTME is still limited, it might be a promising alternative to laparoscopic TME, especially for difficult cases where laparoscopy is too demanding. The preliminary data on complications and short-term oncological outcomes are good, but also emphasize the importance of careful patient selection. Finally, there is a need for large-scale trials focusing on long-term outcomes and oncological safety before widespread adoption can be recommended. PMID:26556997

  8. DNA base excision repair nanosystem engineering: model development.

    PubMed

    Sokhansanj, B A

    2005-01-01

    DNA base damage results from a combination of endogenous sources, (normal metabolism, increased metabolism due to obesity, stress from diseases such as arthritis and diabetes, and ischemia) and the environment (ingested toxins, ionizing radiation, etc.). If unrepaired DNA base damage can lead to diminished cell function, and potentially diseases and eventually mutations that lead to cancer. Sophisticated DNA repair mechanisms have evolved in all living cells to preserve the integrity of inherited genetic information and transcriptional control. Understanding a system like DNA repair is greatly enhanced by using engineering methods, in particular modeling interactions and using predictive simulation to analyze the impact of perturbations. We describe the use of such a "nanosystem engineering" approach to analyze the DNA base excision repair pathway in human cells, and use simulation to predict the impact of varying enzyme concentration on DNA repair capacity.

  9. Absorption of Magnesium and Chloride by Excised Corn Root

    PubMed Central

    Maas, E. V.; Ogata, Gen

    1971-01-01

    Absorption characteristics of Mg2+ and Cl− were investigated with 5-day-old excised corn (Zea mays) roots. Uptake from both 0.5 and 10 milliequivalents per liter MgCl2 solutions occurred at steady state rates for the first 6 hours. Inhibition by dinitrophenol and low temperatures established that absorption during this period was metabolically mediated in the absence and presence of Ca2+. Absorption isotherms indicated dual mechanisms of Mg2+ and Cl− absorption from solutions above 1 milliequivalent per liter. The effect of H+ on absorption of Mg2+ and Cl− was typical of that generally reported for other plant roots and other ions. In the physiological pH range, Ca2+ greatly suppressed the rate of Mg2+ absorption but had little effect on Cl−. The influence of Ca2+ on Mg2+ appeared to be noncompetitive and independent of its effect on membrane permeability. PMID:16657622

  10. Absorption of magnesium and chloride by excised corn root.

    PubMed

    Maas, E V; Ogata, G

    1971-03-01

    Absorption characteristics of Mg(2+) and Cl(-) were investigated with 5-day-old excised corn (Zea mays) roots. Uptake from both 0.5 and 10 milliequivalents per liter MgCl(2) solutions occurred at steady state rates for the first 6 hours. Inhibition by dinitrophenol and low temperatures established that absorption during this period was metabolically mediated in the absence and presence of Ca(2+). Absorption isotherms indicated dual mechanisms of Mg(2+) and Cl(-) absorption from solutions above 1 milliequivalent per liter. The effect of H(+) on absorption of Mg(2+) and Cl(-) was typical of that generally reported for other plant roots and other ions. In the physiological pH range, Ca(2+) greatly suppressed the rate of Mg(2+) absorption but had little effect on Cl(-). The influence of Ca(2+) on Mg(2+) appeared to be noncompetitive and independent of its effect on membrane permeability.

  11. Terahertz pulsed imaging of freshly excised human colonic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Caroline B.; Fitzgerald, Anthony; Reese, George; Goldin, Robert; Tekkis, Paris; O'Kelly, P. S.; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma; Gibson, Adam P.; Wallace, Vincent P.

    2011-07-01

    We present the results from a feasibility study which measures properties in the terahertz frequency range of excised cancerous, dysplastic and healthy colonic tissues from 30 patients. We compare their absorption and refractive index spectra to identify trends which may enable different tissue types to be distinguished. In addition, we present statistical models based on variations between up to 17 parameters calculated from the reflected time and frequency domain signals of all the measured tissues. These models produce a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 77% in distinguishing between healthy and all diseased tissues and a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 71% in distinguishing between dysplastic and healthy tissues. The contrast between the tissue types was supported by histological staining studies which showed an increased vascularity in regions of increased terahertz absorption.

  12. Accuracy of lesion boundary tracking in navigated breast tumor excision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Emily; Ungi, Tamas; Vaughan, Thomas; Pezeshki, Padina; Lasso, Andras; Gauvin, Gabrielle; Rudan, John; Engel, C. Jay; Morin, Evelyn; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    PURPOSE: An electromagnetic navigation system for tumor excision in breast conserving surgery has recently been developed. Preoperatively, a hooked needle is positioned in the tumor and the tumor boundaries are defined in the needle coordinate system. The needle is tracked electromagnetically throughout the procedure to localize the tumor. However, the needle may move and the tissue may deform, leading to errors in maintaining a correct excision boundary. It is imperative to quantify these errors so the surgeon can choose an appropriate resection margin. METHODS: A commercial breast biopsy phantom with several inclusions was used. Location and shape of a lesion before and after mechanical deformation were determined using 3D ultrasound volumes. Tumor location and shape were estimated from initial contours and tracking data. The difference in estimated and actual location and shape of the lesion after deformation was quantified using the Hausdorff distance. Data collection and analysis were done using our 3D Slicer software application and PLUS toolkit. RESULTS: The deformation of the breast resulted in 3.72 mm (STD 0.67 mm) average boundary displacement for an isoelastic lesion and 3.88 mm (STD 0.43 mm) for a hyperelastic lesion. The difference between the actual and estimated tracked tumor boundary was 0.88 mm (STD 0.20 mm) for the isoelastic and 1.78 mm (STD 0.18 mm) for the hyperelastic lesion. CONCLUSION: The average lesion boundary tracking error was below 2mm, which is clinically acceptable. We suspect that stiffness of the phantom tissue affected the error measurements. Results will be validated in patient studies.

  13. Excisable cassettes: new tools for functional analysis of Streptomyces genomes.

    PubMed

    Raynal, Alain; Karray, Fatma; Tuphile, Karine; Darbon-Rongère, Emmanuelle; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    2006-07-01

    The functional analysis of microbial genomes often requires gene inactivation. We constructed a set of cassettes consisting of single antibiotic resistance genes flanked by the attL and attR sites resulting from site-specific integration of the Streptomyces pSAM2 element. These cassettes can easily be used to inactivate genes by in-frame deletion in Streptomyces by a three-step strategy. In the first step, in Escherichia coli, the cassette is inserted into a cloned copy of the gene to be inactivated. In the second step, the gene is replaced by homologous recombination in Streptomyces, allowing substitution of the wild-type target gene with its inactivated counterpart. In the third step, the cassette can be removed by expression of the pSAM2 genes xis and int. The resulting strains are marker-free and contain an "attB-like" sequence of 33, 34, or 35 bp with no stop codon if the cassette is correctly chosen. Thus, a gene can be disrupted by creating an in-frame deletion, avoiding polar effects if downstream genes are cotranscribed with the target gene. A set of cassettes was constructed to contain a hygromycin or gentamicin resistance gene flanked by the attL and attR sites. The initial constructions carrying convenient cloning sites allow the insertion of any other marker gene. We tested insertion and excision by inserting a cassette into orf3, the third gene of an operon involved in spiramycin biosynthesis. We verified that the cassette exerted a polar effect on the transcription of downstream genes but that, after excision, complementation with orf3 alone restored spiramycin production.

  14. Excisable Cassettes: New Tools for Functional Analysis of Streptomyces Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Raynal, Alain; Karray, Fatma; Tuphile, Karine; Darbon-Rongère, Emmanuelle; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    2006-01-01

    The functional analysis of microbial genomes often requires gene inactivation. We constructed a set of cassettes consisting of single antibiotic resistance genes flanked by the attL and attR sites resulting from site-specific integration of the Streptomyces pSAM2 element. These cassettes can easily be used to inactivate genes by in-frame deletion in Streptomyces by a three-step strategy. In the first step, in Escherichia coli, the cassette is inserted into a cloned copy of the gene to be inactivated. In the second step, the gene is replaced by homologous recombination in Streptomyces, allowing substitution of the wild-type target gene with its inactivated counterpart. In the third step, the cassette can be removed by expression of the pSAM2 genes xis and int. The resulting strains are marker-free and contain an “attB-like” sequence of 33, 34, or 35 bp with no stop codon if the cassette is correctly chosen. Thus, a gene can be disrupted by creating an in-frame deletion, avoiding polar effects if downstream genes are cotranscribed with the target gene. A set of cassettes was constructed to contain a hygromycin or gentamicin resistance gene flanked by the attL and attR sites. The initial constructions carrying convenient cloning sites allow the insertion of any other marker gene. We tested insertion and excision by inserting a cassette into orf3, the third gene of an operon involved in spiramycin biosynthesis. We verified that the cassette exerted a polar effect on the transcription of downstream genes but that, after excision, complementation with orf3 alone restored spiramycin production. PMID:16820478

  15. Measuring acoustic habitats.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies.

  16. Measuring acoustic habitats

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies. PMID:25954500

  17. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  18. The Role of Adaptive Photorefractive Power Limiting on Acousto-Optic Radio Frequency (RF) Signal Excision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    Adaptive RF interference reduction for broadband communication systems continues to be problematic. The acousto - optic RF signal excision system...novel photorefractive optical power limiting device to achieve adaptive notch filtering, and multi- channel acousto - optic deflection to achieve angle...of-arrival signal discrimination at the notch filter. This dissertation describes basic principles of acousto - optic RF signal excision, including

  19. 75 FR 46844 - Excise Taxes on Prohibited Tax Shelter Transactions and Related Disclosure Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 53 and 54 RIN 1545-BG18 Excise Taxes on Prohibited Tax Shelter... Shelter Transactions; Requirement of Return and Time for Filing; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue...-level and manager-level excise taxes with respect to prohibited tax shelter transactions to which...

  20. 75 FR 38700 - Excise Taxes on Prohibited Tax Shelter Transactions and Related Disclosure Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ..., 53, 54, 301 and 602 [TD 9492] RIN 1545-BG18 Excise Taxes on Prohibited Tax Shelter Transactions and Related Disclosure Requirements; Disclosure Requirements With Respect to Prohibited Tax Shelter...-level and manager-level excise taxes with respect to prohibited tax shelter transactions to which...

  1. Posterior Endoscopic Excision of Os Trigonum in Professional National Ballet Dancers.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Moez S; Roche, Andy; Brodrick, Anna; Williams, R Lloyd; Calder, James D F

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have compared the outcomes after open and endoscopic excision of an os trigonum in patients of mixed professions. No studies have compared the differences in outcomes between the 2 procedures in elite ballet dancers. From October 2005 to February 2010, 35 professional ballet dancers underwent excision of a symptomatic os trigonum of the ankle after a failed period of nonoperative treatment. Of the 35 patients, 13 (37.1%) underwent endoscopic excision and 22 (62.9%) open excision. We compared the outcomes, complications, and time to return to dancing. The open excision group experienced a significantly greater incidence of flexor hallucis longus tendon decompression compared with the endoscopic group. The endoscopic release group returned to full dance earlier at a mean of 9.8 (range 6.5 to 16.1) weeks and those undergoing open excision returned to full dance at a mean of 14.9 (range 9 to 20) weeks (p = .001). No major complications developed in either group, such as deep infection or nerve or vessel injury. We have concluded that both techniques are safe and effective in the treatment of symptomatic os trigonum in professional ballet dancers. Endoscopic excision of the os trigonum offers a more rapid return to full dance compared with open excision.

  2. Acorns containing deeper plumule survive better: how white oaks counter embryo excision by rodents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingming; Dong, Zhong; Yi, Xianfeng; Bartlow, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    Several squirrel species excise the embryo of acorns of most white oak species to arrest germination for long-term storage. However, it is not clear how these acorns counter embryo excision and survive in the arms race of coevolution. In this study, we simulated the embryo excision behavior of squirrels by removing 4 mm of cotyledon from the apical end of white oak acorns differing in embryo depths to investigate the effects of embryo excision on acorn germination and seedling performance of white oak species. The embryo depth in the cotyledons was significantly different among white oak acorns, with Quercus mongolica containing the embryo most deeply in the acorns. We found that artificial embryo excision significantly decreased acorn germination rates of Quercus variabilis, Quercus acutissima, Quercus aliena, Quercus aliena var. acutiserrata, Quercus serrata. var. brevipetiolata but not Q. mongolica. Artificial embryo excision exerted significant negative impacts on seedling performance of all oak species except Quercus aliena. Our study demonstrates the role of embryo depth of acorns in countering embryo excision by squirrels and may explain the fact that squirrels do not perform embryo excision in acorns of Q. mongolica with deeper embryos. This apparent adaptation of acorns sheds light on the coevolutionary dynamics between oaks and their seed predators.

  3. A history of the DNA repair and mutagenesis field: The discovery of base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the early history of the discovery of an DNA repair pathway designated as base excision repair (BER), since in contrast to the enzyme-catalyzed removal of damaged bases from DNA as nucleotides [called nucleotide excision repair (NER)], BER involves the removal of damaged or inappropriate bases, such as the presence of uracil instead of thymine, from DNA as free bases.

  4. ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOELLE, LESLIE L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

  5. Feasibility of partial A2 and A4 pulley excision: effect on finger flexor tendon biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Mitsionis, G; Bastidas, J A; Grewal, R; Pfaeffle, H J; Fischer, K J; Tomaino, M M

    1999-03-01

    We investigated the effect of partial excision of the A2 and A4 digital pulleys, separately and in combination, on finger angular rotation and the energy for finger flexion. Statistically significant decreases in angular rotation resulted only after 50% and 75% excision of A2, A4, or A2 and A4 in combination. Work of flexion trends were weak and none of the changes were statistically significant. Although optimal finger function relies on the integrity of the A2 and A4 pulleys to maintain the efficiency of the digital flexor system, these data suggest that the A2 and A4 pulleys can be excised up to 25%, either separately or in combination, without significant effects on angular rotation. Decreases in total angular range of motion after 50% and 75% pulley excision were small, even for combined pulley excision (9 degrees +/- 3 degrees and 15 degrees +/- 5 degrees [mean +/- SD], respectively), and may be clinically acceptable.

  6. Resolution and recurrence of vitiligo following excision of congenital melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Workman, Meredith; Sawan, Kamal; El Amm, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Vitiligo associated with halo congenital melanocytic nevus (CMN) is rare. There are limited reports in the literature, especially with regard to CMN excision. We present the case of a 5-year-old girl who presented with vitiligo of the periorbital and axillary regions and halo formation around CMN of the buttock. The lesion was excised, and all areas of vitiligo improved, but 18 months postoperatively, a halo of depigmentation appeared around the excision scar and later in the periorbital and axillary regions. In review of literature, there is only one report of excision of halo CMN and resultant improvement of vitiligo. Although initial resolution of vitiligo in this case was promising, the recurrence indicates that this complex process is not reliably controlled with excision of the inciting lesion.

  7. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  8. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  9. Architectural-acoustics consulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Anthony K.

    2004-05-01

    Consulting involves both the science of acoustics and the art of communication, requiring an array of inherent and created skills. Perhaps because consulting on architectural acoustics is a relatively new field, there is a remarkable variety of career paths, all influenced by education, interest, and experience. Many consultants juggle dozens of chargeable projects at a time, not to mention proposals, seminars, teaching, articles, business concerns, and professional-society activities. This paper will discuss various aspects of career paths, projects, and clients as they relate to architectural-acoustics consulting. The intended emphasis will be considerations for those who may be interested in such a career, noting that consultants generally seem to thrive on the numerous challenges.

  10. High temperature acoustic levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically levitating an object within a portion of a chamber that is heated to a high temperature, while a driver at the opposite end of the chamber is maintained at a relatively low temperature. The cold end of the chamber is constructed so it can be telescoped to vary the length (L sub 1) of the cold end portion and therefore of the entire chamber, so that the chamber remains resonant to a normal mode frequency, and so that the pressure at the hot end of the chamber is maximized. The precise length of the chamber at any given time, is maintained at an optimum resonant length by a feedback loop. The feedback loop includes an acoustic pressure sensor at the hot end of the chamber, which delivers its output to a control circuit which controls a motor that varies the length (L) of the chamber to a level where the sensed acoustic pressure is a maximum.

  11. Basic Linear Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Alan

    This chapter deals with the physical and mathematical aspects of sound when the disturbances are, in some sense, small. Acoustics is usually concerned with small-amplitude phenomena, and consequently a linear description is usually applicable. Disturbances are governed by the properties of the medium in which they occur, and the governing equations are the equations of continuum mechanics, which apply equally to gases, liquids, and solids. These include the mass, momentum, and energy equations, as well as thermodynamic principles. The viscosity and thermal conduction enter into the versions of these equations that apply to fluids. Fluids of typical great interest are air and sea water, and consequently this chapter includes a summary of their relevant acoustic properties. The foundation is also laid for the consideration of acoustic waves in elastic solids, suspensions, bubbly liquids, and porous media.

  12. Acoustic Liners for Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G (Inventor); Grady, Joseph E (Inventor); Kiser, James D. (Inventor); Miller, Christopher (Inventor); Heidmann, James D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An improved acoustic liner for turbine engines is disclosed. The acoustic liner may include a straight cell section including a plurality of cells with straight chambers. The acoustic liner may also include a bent cell section including one or more cells that are bent to extend chamber length without increasing the overall height of the acoustic liner by the entire chamber length. In some cases, holes are placed between cell chambers in addition to bending the cells, or instead of bending the cells.

  13. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher; Chu, S. Reynold

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles to ensure compliance with acoustic requirements and thus provide a safe and habitable acoustic environment for the crews, and to validate developed models via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements.

  14. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  15. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  16. Broadband Acoustic Hyperbolic Metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen; Xie, Yangbo; Sui, Ni; Wang, Wenqi; Cummer, Steven A; Jing, Yun

    2015-12-18

    In this Letter, we report on the design and experimental characterization of a broadband acoustic hyperbolic metamaterial. The proposed metamaterial consists of multiple arrays of clamped thin plates facing the y direction and is shown to yield opposite signs of effective density in the x and y directions below a certain cutoff frequency, therefore, yielding a hyperbolic dispersion. Partial focusing and subwavelength imaging are experimentally demonstrated at frequencies between 1.0 and 2.5 kHz. The proposed metamaterial could open up new possibilities for acoustic wave manipulation and may find usage in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  17. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  18. Electromechanical acoustic liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Cattafesta, III, Louis N. (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikazu (Inventor); Horowitz, Stephen Brian (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A multi-resonator-based system responsive to acoustic waves includes at least two resonators, each including a bottom plate, side walls secured to the bottom plate, and a top plate disposed on top of the side walls. The top plate includes an orifice so that a portion of an incident acoustical wave compresses gas in the resonators. The bottom plate or the side walls include at least one compliant portion. A reciprocal electromechanical transducer coupled to the compliant portion of each of the resonators forms a first and second transducer/compliant composite. An electrical network is disposed between the reciprocal electromechanical transducer of the first and second resonator.

  19. Broadband Acoustic Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    fluidized mud, which has sound speeds at (or sometimes below) the sound speed of the water column, here 1512 m/s. Interestingly, there is a sound speed...data. 3 specular 25m Figure 1. The map shows the AUV track (red line) overlaid on multibeam bathymetry. Mean water depth is about 165m...Preston, and D.A. Abraham, Long-range acoustic scattering from a shallow- water mud volcano cluster J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 122, 1946-1958, 2007. [3

  20. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  1. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  2. Is dust acoustic wave a new plasma acoustic mode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, C. B.

    1997-09-01

    In this Brief Communication, the claim of the novelty of the dust acoustic wave in a dusty plasma within the constant dust charge model is questioned. Conceptual lacunas behind the claim have been highlighted and appropriate physical arguments have been forwarded against the claim. It is demonstrated that the so-called dust acoustic wave could better be termed as a general acoustic fluctuation response with a dominant characteristic feature of the acoustic-like mode (ALM) fluctuation response reported by Dwivedi et al. [J. Plasma Phys. 41, 219 (1989)]. It is suggested that both correct and more usable nomenclature of the ALM should be the so-called acoustic mode.

  3. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic resonant metalens

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun; Zhou, Chen; Wei, Qi; Wu, DaJian

    2013-11-25

    Early research into acoustic metamaterials has shown the possibility of achieving subwavelength near-field acoustic imaging. However, a major restriction of acoustic metamaterials is that the imaging objects must be placed in close vicinity of the devices. Here, we present an approach for acoustic imaging of subsurface objects far below the diffraction limit. An acoustic metalens made of holey-structured metamaterials is used to magnify evanescent waves, which can rebuild an image at the central plane. Without changing the physical structure of the metalens, our proposed approach can image objects located at certain distances from the input surface, which provides subsurface signatures of the objects with subwavelength spatial resolution.

  4. Nucleosomes determine their own patch size in base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Meas, Rithy; Smerdon, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) processes non-helix distorting lesions (e.g., uracils and gaps) and is composed of two subpathways that differ in the number of nucleotides (nts) incorporated during the DNA synthesis step: short patch (SP) repair incorporates 1 nt and long patch (LP) repair incorporates 2–12 nts. This choice for either LP or SP repair has not been analyzed in the context of nucleosomes. Initial studies with uracil located in nucleosome core DNA showed a distinct DNA polymerase extension profile in cell-free extracts that specifically limits extension to 1 nt, suggesting a preference for SP BER. Therefore, we developed an assay to differentiate long and short repair patches in ‘designed’ nucleosomes containing a single-nucleotide gap at specific locations relative to the dyad center. Using cell-free extracts or purified enzymes, we found that DNA lesions in the nucleosome core are preferentially repaired by DNA polymerase β and there is a significant reduction in BER polymerase extension beyond 1 nt, creating a striking bias for incorporation of short patches into nucleosomal DNA. These results show that nucleosomes control the patch size used by BER. PMID:27265863

  5. Base sequence context effects on nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuqin; Patel, Dinshaw J; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E

    2010-08-23

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) plays a critical role in maintaining the integrity of the genome when damaged by bulky DNA lesions, since inefficient repair can cause mutations and human diseases notably cancer. The structural properties of DNA lesions that determine their relative susceptibilities to NER are therefore of great interest. As a model system, we have investigated the major mutagenic lesion derived from the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), 10S (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(2)-dG in six different sequence contexts that differ in how the lesion is positioned in relation to nearby guanine amino groups. We have obtained molecular structural data by NMR and MD simulations, bending properties from gel electrophoresis studies, and NER data obtained from human HeLa cell extracts for our six investigated sequence contexts. This model system suggests that disturbed Watson-Crick base pairing is a better recognition signal than a flexible bend, and that these can act in concert to provide an enhanced signal. Steric hinderance between the minor groove-aligned lesion and nearby guanine amino groups determines the exact nature of the disturbances. Both nearest neighbor and more distant neighbor sequence contexts have an impact. Regardless of the exact distortions, we hypothesize that they provide a local thermodynamic destabilization signal for repair.

  6. Nucleotide exchange and excision technology DNA shuffling and directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Speck, Janina; Stebel, Sabine C; Arndt, Katja M; Müller, Kristian M

    2011-01-01

    Remarkable success in optimizing complex properties within DNA and proteins has been achieved by directed evolution. In contrast to various random mutagenesis methods and high-throughput selection methods, the number of available DNA shuffling procedures is limited, and protocols are often difficult to adjust. The strength of the nucleotide exchange and excision technology (NExT) DNA shuffling described here is the robust, efficient, and easily controllable DNA fragmentation step based on random incorporation of the so-called 'exchange nucleotides' by PCR. The exchange nucleotides are removed enzymatically, followed by chemical cleavage of the DNA backbone. The oligonucleotide pool is reassembled into full-length genes by internal primer extension, and the recombined gene library is amplified by standard PCR. The technique has been demonstrated by shuffling a defined gene library of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase variants using uridine as fragmentation defining exchange nucleotide. Substituting 33% of the dTTP with dUTP in the incorporation PCR resulted in shuffled clones with an average parental fragment size of 86 bases and revealed a mutation rate of only 0.1%. Additionally, a computer program (NExTProg) has been developed that predicts the fragment size distribution depending on the relative amount of the exchange nucleotide.

  7. Excision of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine by DEMETER family DNA glycosylases

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hosung; Shin, Hosub; Eichman, Brandt F.; Huh, Jin Hoe

    2016-01-01

    In plants and animals, 5-methylcytosine (5mC) serves as an epigenetic mark to repress gene expression, playing critical roles for cellular differentiation and transposon silencing. Mammals also have 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), resulting from hydroxylation of 5mC by TET family-enzymes. 5hmC is abundant in mouse Purkinje neurons and embryonic stem cells, and regarded as an important intermediate for active DNA demethylation in mammals. However, the presence of 5hmC in plants has not been clearly demonstrated. In Arabidopsis, the DEMETER (DME) family DNA glycosylases efficiently remove 5mC, which results in DNA demethylation and transcriptional activation of target genes. Here we show that DME and ROS1 have a significant 5hmC excision activity in vitro, although we detected no 5hmC in Arabidopsis, suggesting that it is very unlikely for plants to utilize 5hmC as a DNA demethylation intermediate. Our results indicate that both plants and animals have 5mC in common but DNA demethylation systems have independently evolved with distinct mechanisms. PMID:24661881

  8. Tissue-specific accelerated aging in nucleotide excision repair deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a multi-step DNA repair mechanism that removes helix-distorting modified nucleotides from the genome. NER is divided into two subpathways depending on the location of DNA damage in the genome and how it is first detected. Global genome NER identifies and repairs DNA lesions throughout the genome. This subpathway of NER primarily protects against the accumulation of mutations in the genome. Transcription-coupled (TC) NER rapidly repairs lesions in the transcribed strand of DNA that block transcription by RNA polymerase II. TC-NER prevents cell death in response to stalled transcription. Defects in NER cause three distinct human diseases: xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome and trichothiodystrophy. Each of these syndromes is characterized by premature onset of pathologies that overlap with those associated with old age in humans. This reveals the contribution of DNA damage to multiple age-related diseases. Tissues affected include the skin, eye, bone marrow, nervous system and endocrine axis. This review emphasizes accelerated aging associated with xeroderma pigmentosum and discusses the cause of these pathologies, either mutation accumulation or cell death as a consequence of failure to repair DNA damage. PMID:18538374

  9. Total Humeral Endoprosthetic Replacement following Excision of Malignant Bone Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kotwal, Suhel; Moon, Bryan; Lin, Patrick; Satcher, Robert; Lewis, Valerae

    2016-01-01

    Humerus is a common site for malignant tumors. Advances in adjuvant therapies and reconstructive methods provide salvage of the upper limb with improved outcomes. Reports of limb salvage with total humeral replacement in extensive humeral tumors are sparse. We undertook a retrospective study of 20 patients who underwent total humeral endoprosthetic replacement as limb salvage following excision of extensile malignant tumor from 1990 to 2011. With an average followup of 42.9, functional and oncological outcomes were analyzed. Ten patients were still alive at the time of review. Mean estimated blood loss was 1131 mL and duration of surgery was 314 minutes. Deep infection was encountered in one patient requiring debridement while mechanical loosening of ulnar component was identified in one patient. Subluxation of prosthetic humeral head was noted in 3 patients. Mean active shoulder abduction was 12.5° and active flexion was 15°. Incompetence of abduction mechanism was the major determinant of poor active functional outcome. Mean elbow flexion was 103.5° with 30.5° flexion contracture in 10 patients with good and useful hand function. Average MSTS score was 71.5%. Total humeral replacement is a reliable treatment option in restoring mechanical stability and reasonable functional results without compromising patient survival, with low complication rate. PMID:27042158

  10. The Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway Limits L1 Retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Servant, Geraldine; Streva, Vincent A.; Derbes, Rebecca S.; Wijetunge, Madushani I.; Neeland, Marc; White, Travis B.; Belancio, Victoria P.; Roy-Engel, Astrid M.; Deininger, Prescott L.

    2017-01-01

    Long interspersed elements 1 (L1) are active mobile elements that constitute almost 17% of the human genome. They amplify through a “copy-and-paste” mechanism termed retrotransposition, and de novo insertions related to these elements have been reported to cause 0.2% of genetic diseases. Our previous data demonstrated that the endonuclease complex ERCC1-XPF, which cleaves a 3′ DNA flap structure, limits L1 retrotransposition. Although the ERCC1-XPF endonuclease participates in several different DNA repair pathways, such as single-strand annealing, or in telomere maintenance, its recruitment to DNA lesions is best characterized in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. To determine if the NER pathway prevents the insertion of retroelements in the genome, we monitored the retrotransposition efficiencies of engineered L1 elements in NER-deficient cells and in their complemented versions. Core proteins of the NER pathway, XPD and XPA, and the lesion binding protein, XPC, are involved in limiting L1 retrotransposition. In addition, sequence analysis of recovered de novo L1 inserts and their genomic locations in NER-deficient cells demonstrated the presence of abnormally large duplications at the site of insertion, suggesting that NER proteins may also play a role in the normal L1 insertion process. Here, we propose new functions for the NER pathway in the maintenance of genome integrity: limitation of insertional mutations caused by retrotransposons and the prevention of potentially mutagenic large genomic duplications at the site of retrotransposon insertion events. PMID:28049704

  11. Hematopoietic myeloid cell differentiation diminishes nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yuki; Sato, Ayako; Mizutani, Shuki; Takagi, Masatoshi

    2014-09-01

    Myeloid cell differentiation is the process by which stem cells develop into mature monocytes or granulocytes. This process is achieved by the sequential activation of variety of genes. Disruption of this process can result in immunodeficiency, bone marrow failure syndrome, or leukemia. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by the t(15;17) translocation and can be treated by a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and anthracycline. This treatment can induce leukemic cell differentiation, leading to extremely high remission rates. XAB2, a molecule involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER), is downregulated during granulocyte differentiation and shows reduced expression in NB4 APL-derived cells in vitro. Differentiation of APL by ATRA treatment reduced XAB2 expression levels in vivo. These observations suggest that cellular differentiation is associated with reduced NER activity and provides new insights into combined differentiation induction. NB4 cells were more susceptible than the immature myeloid leukemic cell lines, Kasumi-3 and Kasumi-1, to the DNA interstrand crosslinking agent cisplatin.

  12. President Carter signs $227 billion excise tax measure

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.J.; McAfee, J.; Dibona, C.J.; Carter, J.

    1980-04-07

    According to President J. Carter, who signed into law a $227 billion excise tax (windfall profits tax) on revenue from decontrolled U.S. crude oil production, the new tax program will provide the U.S. with the incentive and the means to produce and conserve domestic oil and replace more oil with alternative sources of energy. According to C. DiBona (API), the new tax will discourage the increased amount of domestic production required to compensate, by the mid-to-late 1980's, for a 1.7 million bbl/day shortfall, which will have to be made up with imports from foreign producers. According to J. McAfee of Gulf Oil Corp., only a token amount, about $34 billion of the $227 billion which will be raised by the new tax over the next decade, will be devoted to energy development and mass transit. According to C. J. Miller of the Independent Petroleum Association of America, the tax's complex and sometimes conflicting regulations will pose harsh problems for smaller producers.

  13. Voiding Dysfunction after Total Mesorectal Excision in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Noh, Tae Il; Oh, Mi Mi; Park, Jae Young; Lee, Jeong Gu; Um, Jun Won; Min, Byung Wook

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the voiding dysfunction after rectal cancer surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Methods This was part of a prospective study done in the rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery with TME between November 2006 and June 2008. Consecutive uroflowmetry, post-voided residual volume, and a voiding questionnaire were performed at preoperatively and postoperatively. Results A total of 50 patients were recruited in this study, including 28 male and 22 female. In the comparison of the preoperative data with the postoperative 3-month data, a significant decrease in mean maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume were found. In the comparison with the postoperative 6-month data, however only the maximal flow rate was decreased with statistical significance (P=0.02). In the comparison between surgical methods, abdominoperineal resection patients showed delayed recovery of maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume. There was no significant difference in uroflowmetry parameters with advances in rectal cancer stage. Conclusions Voiding dysfunction is common after rectal cancer surgery but can be recovered in 6 months after surgery or earlier. Abdominoperineal resection was shown to be an unfavorable factor for postoperative voiding. Larger prospective study is needed to determine the long-term effect of rectal cancer surgery in relation to male and female baseline voiding condition. PMID:22087426

  14. Oncologic Safety of Local Excision Compared With Total Mesorectal Excision for ypT0-T1 Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Min; Yu, Chang Sik; Park, In Ja; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yoon, Yong Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Good oncologic outcomes, demonstrated by a complete pathologic response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT), have led to local excision (LE) in selected patients with rectal cancer. We evaluated the oncologic safety of LE compared with total mesorectal excision (TME) in patients with ypT0-T1 rectal cancer. A retrospective review of 304 patients who underwent PCRT, followed by LE or TME, for ypT0-T1 rectal cancer was performed. Propensity scores were computed and used to match groups (LE:TME = 1:1), and analysis of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) was made by comparing patients who underwent LE or TME. Prognostic factors of relapse were analyzed for all patients. Tumor categories were ypT0 in 25 (61.9%) cases, ypTis in 6 (14.3%) cases, and ypT1 in 11 (26.2%) cases for the LE group, and ypT0 in 28 (66.7%) cases, ypTis in 4 (9.5%) cases, and ypT1 in 10 (23.8%) cases for the matched TME patients. There was no significant difference between the matched LE and TME groups in relapse (4.8% and 7.14%, respectively; P = 0.646), 5-year DFS (95.2% vs 91.6%; P = 0.33) and 5-year OS (96.6% vs 88.0%; P = 0.238). In the multivariate Cox regression analysis, tumor distance from the anal verge (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.616–0.992) and the tumor grade (HR = 4.29; 95% CI = 1.430–12.886) were significantly associated with the recurrence risk. LE results in oncologic outcomes that are comparable to those achieved by TME in selected patients with ypT0-T1 rectal cancer after PCRT. PMID:27196490

  15. Acoustics- Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-13

    This package contains modules that model acoustic sensors and acoustic sources (hearable) in Umbra. It is typically used to represent hearing in characters within Umbra. Typically, the acoustic sensors detect acoustic sources at a given point; however, it also contains the capability to detect bullet cracks by detecting the sound along the bullet path that is closest to the sensor. A memory module, acoustic memory, represents remembered sounds within a given character. Over time, the sounds are removed, as a character forgets what it has heard.

  16. Acoustic visualizations using surface mapping.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Robinson, Philip W; Saarelma, Jukka; Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Savioja, Lauri; Lokki, Tapio

    2014-06-01

    Sound visualizations have been an integral part of room acoustics studies for more than a century. As acoustic measurement techniques and knowledge of hearing evolve, acousticians need more intuitive ways to represent increasingly complex data. Microphone array processing now allows accurate measurement of spatio-temporal acoustic properties. However, the multidimensional data can be a challenge to display coherently. This letter details a method of mapping visual representations of acoustic reflections from a receiver position to the surfaces from which the reflections originated. The resulting animations are presented as a spatial acoustic analysis tool.

  17. Intelligent Engine Systems: Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojno, John; Martens, Steve; Simpson, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    An extensive study of new fan exhaust nozzle technologies was performed. Three new uniform chevron nozzles were designed, based on extensive CFD analysis. Two new azimuthally varying variants were defined. All five were tested, along with two existing nozzles, on a representative model-scale, medium BPR exhaust nozzle. Substantial acoustic benefits were obtained from the uniform chevron nozzle designs, the best benefit being provided by an existing design. However, one of the azimuthally varying nozzle designs exhibited even better performance than any of the uniform chevron nozzles. In addition to the fan chevron nozzles, a new technology was demonstrated, using devices that enhance mixing when applied to an exhaust nozzle. The acoustic benefits from these devices applied to medium BPR nozzles were similar, and in some cases superior to, those obtained from conventional uniform chevron nozzles. However, none of the low noise technologies provided equivalent acoustic benefits on a model-scale high BPR exhaust nozzle, similar to current large commercial applications. New technologies must be identified to improve the acoustics of state-of-the-art high BPR jet engines.

  18. Concert hall acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Manfred

    2004-05-01

    I will review some work at Bell Laboratories on artificial reverberation and concert hall acoustics including Philharmonic Hall (Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, New York). I will also touch on sound diffusion by number-theoretic surfaces and the measurement of reverberation time using the music as played in the hall as a ``test'' signal.

  19. Acoustics in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Miriam J.

    This paper explores the issues associated with poor acoustics within schools. Additionally, it suggests remedies for existing buildings and those under renovation, as well as concerns for new construction. The paper discusses the effects of unwanted noise on students in terms of physiological, motivational, and cognitive influences. Issues are…

  20. Micro acoustic spectrum analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Schubert, W. Kent; Butler, Michael A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Anderson, Larry F.

    2004-11-23

    A micro acoustic spectrum analyzer for determining the frequency components of a fluctuating sound signal comprises a microphone to pick up the fluctuating sound signal and produce an alternating current electrical signal; at least one microfabricated resonator, each resonator having a different resonant frequency, that vibrate in response to the alternating current electrical signal; and at least one detector to detect the vibration of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can further comprise a mixer to mix a reference signal with the alternating current electrical signal from the microphone to shift the frequency spectrum to a frequency range that is a better matched to the resonant frequencies of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can be designed specifically for portability, size, cost, accuracy, speed, power requirements, and use in a harsh environment. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer is particularly suited for applications where size, accessibility, and power requirements are limited, such as the monitoring of industrial equipment and processes, detection of security intrusions, or evaluation of military threats.

  1. Detecting Contaminant Particles Acoustically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus "listens" for particles in interior of complex turbomachinery. Contact microphones are attached at several points on pump housing. Acoustic transducer also attached to housing to excite entire pump with sound. Frequency of sound is slowly raised until pump resonates. Microphones detect noise of loose particles scraping against pump parts. Such as machining chips in turbopumps or other machinery without disassembly.

  2. Indigenous Acoustic Detection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-26

    considerable distances, and they act as good sensors of human presence. Though singing insects are ubiquitous in warm areas, even in the desert ( Nevo and...methodology. DTIC. CD-58-PL. Lloyd, J. E. 1981. Personnel communication. Nevo , E. and S. A. Blondheim. 1972. Acoustic isolation in the speciation of

  3. Psychrometric Field Measurement of Water Potential Changes following Leaf Excision 1

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Michael J.; Cass, Alfred

    1984-01-01

    In situ measurement of sudden leaf water potential changes has not been performed under field conditions. A laboratory investigation involving the measurement of leaf water potential prior to and 2 to 200 minutes after excision of citrus leaves (Citrus jambhiri) showed good linear correlation (r = 0.99) between in situ leaf psychrometer and Scholander pressure chamber measurements. Following this, a field investigation was conducted which involved psychrometric measurement prior to petiole excision and 1 minute after excision. Simultaneous pressure chamber measurements were performed on neighboring leaves prior to the time of excision and then on the psychrometer leaf about 2 minutes after excision. These data indicate that within the first 2 minutes after excision, psychrometer and pressure chamber measurements were linearly correlated (r = 0.97). Under high evaporative demand conditions, the rate of water potential decrease was between 250 and 700 kilopascals in the first minute after excision. These results show that the thermocouple psychrometer can be used as a dynamic and nondestructive field technique for monitoring leaf water potential. PMID:16663394

  4. Tetracycline labeling as an aid to complete excision of partial physeal arrest: a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Post, W R; Jones, E T

    1992-01-01

    We determined whether ultraviolet (UV) visualization of tetracycline-labeled bone allows more complete excision of experimentally created physeal arrests while minimizing required bone resection. Lateral distal femoral growth arrests were surgically created bilaterally in eight 6-week-old New Zealand white rabbits, given 3 daily oxytetracycline doses (10 mg/kg); the animals were killed 6 weeks postoperatively. Femurs were excised and dissected free of soft tissue. Ten of 16 operated femurs randomized into two groups had consistent deformity. In group I, arrest was excised with a high-speed burr without, and, in group II, with ultraviolet visualization. In group II, metaphyseal bone and calcified arrest glowed brightly, contrasting well with the epiphyseal plate. All excised specimens were examined under x 9 magnification to assess remaining bone bridges. Excision defects were filled with modeling clay, which was then removed and weighed. Thorough excision was confirmed in each specimen. Resection was easier and less bone usually was resected in the UV group (difference not statistically significant). This technique would best be used in resection of arrests involving small physes such as the distal radius, in which maximal visualization and minimal resection are essential to preserve all possible growth potential. Tetracycline labeling and intraoperative UV visualization of fluorescence allows thorough excision of partial physeal arrest while minimizing required bone resection.

  5. Roles of Exc protein and DNA homology in the CTnDOT excision reaction.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Carolyn M; Gardner, Jeffrey F

    2012-07-01

    Excision from the chromosome is the first step during the transfer of conjugative transposons (CTns) to a recipient. We previously showed that the excision of CTnDOT is more complex than the excision of lambdoid phages and CTns such as Tn916. The excision in vivo of CTnDOT utilizes four CTnDOT-encoded proteins, IntDOT, Xis2c, Xis2d, and Exc, and a host factor. We previously developed an in vitro excision reaction where the recombination sites attL and attR were located on different plasmids. The reaction was inefficient and did not require Exc, suggesting that the reaction conditions did not mimic in vivo conditions. Here, we report the development of an intramolecular excision reaction where the attL and attR sites are located on the same DNA molecule. We found that Exc stimulates the reaction 3- to 5-fold. The efficiency of the excision reaction was also dependent on the distance between the attL and attR sites and on the sequences of the overlap regions between the sites of the strand exchanges. Substrates with identical overlap sequences recombined more efficiently than ones with heterologous overlap sequences. This was surprising, because the integration reaction is not sensitive to heterology in the overlap regions of the attDOT and attB sites.

  6. Human AP Endonuclease I Stimulates Multiple-Turnover Base Excision by Alkyladenine DNA Glycosylase†

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Michael R.; O’Brien, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) locates and excises a wide variety of damaged purine bases from DNA, including hypoxanthine that is formed by the oxidative deamination of adenine. We used steady state, pre-steady state, and single-turnover kinetic assays to show that the multiple-turnover excision of hypoxanthine in vitro is limited by release of the abasic DNA product. This suggests the possibility that the product release step is regulated in vivo by interactions with other base excision repair (BER) proteins. Such coordination of BER activities would protect the abasic DNA repair intermediate and ensure its correct processing. AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) is the predominant enzyme for processing abasic DNA sites in human cells. Therefore, we have investigated the functional effects of added APE1 on the base excision activity of AAG. We find that APE1 stimulates the multiple-turnover excision of hypoxanthine by AAG, but has no effect on single-turnover excision. Since the amino terminus of AAG has been implicated in other protein-protein interactions we also characterize the deletion mutant lacking the first 79 amino acids. We find that APE1 fully stimulates the multiple-turnover glycosylase activity of this mutant, demonstrating that the amino terminus of AAG is not strictly required for this functional interaction. These results are consistent with a model whereby APE1 displaces AAG from the abasic site, thereby coordinating the first two steps of the base excision repair pathway. PMID:19449863

  7. Holograms for acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G.; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  8. Radio-guided surgery improves outcome of therapeutic excision in non-palpable invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gallegos Hernandez, J F; Tanis, P J; Deurloo, E E; Nieweg, O E; Th Rutgers, E J; Kroon, B B R; Valdés Olmos, R A

    2004-03-01

    Intratumoral injection of a radiocolloid for lymphatic mapping enables the therapeutic excision of clinically occult breast cancer with the aid of a gamma-ray detection probe. The aim of this study was to determine the success rate of radio-guided tumour excision in addition to a guide wire and to identify factors predicting clear margins. Sixty-five consecutive patients underwent radio-guided tumour excision after intratumoral injection of 99mTc-nanocolloid guided by ultrasound or stereotaxis. A localization wire was inserted after scintigraphy had been performed (group 1). The results were compared with retrospective data from 67 consecutive patients who underwent therapeutic wire-directed excision alone (group 2). Factors predicting clear margins (> or = 1 mm) were determined in a logistic regression model. Adequate margins were obtained in 83% of group 1 and in 64% of group 2 (P = 0.014). The invasive component was incompletely excised in two patients in group 1 and in 14 patients in group 2. Further surgery was performed in four patients in group 1 and in 14 patients in group 2. Factors predictive of clear margins were decreasing pathological tumour diameter (P = 0.035), increasing weight of the specimen (P = 0.046), absence of microcalcifications (P = 0.004) and absence of carcinoma in situ component (P = 0.024). Radio-guided excision was an independent predictor of complete excision of the invasive component (P = 0.012). The application of radio-guided surgery combined with wire localization seems to improve the outcome of therapeutic excision of non-palpable invasive breast cancer compared with wire-directed excision alone.

  9. Acoustic field modulation in regenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. Y.; Wang, W.; Luo, E. C.; Chen, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The regenerator is a key component that transfers energy between heat and work. The conversion efficiency is significantly influenced by the acoustic field in the regenerator. Much effort has been spent to quantitatively determine this influence, but few comprehensive experimental verifications have been performed because of difficulties in modulating and measuring the acoustic field. In this paper, a method requiring two compressors is introduced and theoretically investigated that achieves acoustic field modulation in the regenerator. One compressor outputs the acoustic power for the regenerator; the other acts as a phase shifter. A RC load dissipates the acoustic power out of both the regenerator and the latter compressor. The acoustic field can be modulated by adjusting the current in the two compressors and opening the RC load. The acoustic field is measured with pressure sensors instead of flow-field imaging equipment, thereby greatly simplifying the experiment.

  10. Substrate overlap and functional competition between human nucleotide excision repair and Escherichia coli photolyase and (A)BC excision nuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Sibghat-Ullah; Sancar, Z. )

    1990-06-19

    Human cell free extract prepared by the method of Manley et al. carries out repair synthesis on UV-irradiated DNA. Removal of pyrimidine dimers by photoreactivation with DNA photolyase reduces repair synthesis by about 50%. With excess enzyme in the reaction mixture photolyase reduced the repair signal by the same amount even in the absence of photoreactivating light, presumably by binding to pyrimidine dimers and interfering with the binding of human damage recognition protein. Similarly, the UvrB subunit of Escherichia coli (A)BC excinuclease when loaded onto UV-irradiated or psoralen-adducted DNA inhibited repair synthesis by cell-free extract by 75-80%. The opposite was true also as HeLa cell free extract specifically inhibited the photorepair of a thymine dimer by DNA photolyase and its removal by (A)BC excinuclease. Cell-free extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation groups A and C were equally effective in blocking the E. coli repair proteins, while extracts from complementation groups D and E were ineffective in blocking the E. coli enzyme. These results suggest that XP-D and XP-E cells are defective in the damage recognition subunits(s) of human excision nuclease.

  11. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  12. Cervical osteomyelitis after carbon dioxide laser excision of recurrent carcinoma of the posterior pharyngeal wall.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, A Jacqueline; Brandsma, Dieta; Smeele, Ludi E; Rosingh, Andert W; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Lohuis, Peter J F M

    2013-04-01

    Two patients with recurrent carcinoma of the posterior pharyngeal wall, previously treated with carbon dioxide (CO2) laser excision and (chemo)radiotherapy, presented with neck pain due to cervical osteomyelitis. In one patient this led to cervical spine instability, for which a haloframe was applied. Our working hypothesis was that cervical osteomyelitis was caused by an infected wound bed induced by CO2 laser excision of the tumor in the already vascular-compromised area of the irradiated posterior pharyngeal wall. We discuss the risks of leaving a wound for secondary granulation after CO2 laser excision of the posterior pharyngeal wall and prophylactic antibiotic treatment.

  13. Arthroscopic excision of distal pole of patella for refractory patellar tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John D

    2009-07-01

    This article examines the results of arthroscopic tendon debridement with excision of the distal pole of the patella for refractory patellar tendinitis. Nine patients failed at least 3 months of conservative therapy and underwent arthroscopic excision of the distal patellar pole with debridement of the deep proximal patella tendon. At least 3 months postoperatively (range, 3 months-5 years), 8 patients reported no distal patellar pole tenderness (Bassett sign), and 1 patient reported only mild tenderness. Arthroscopic excision of the distal patellar pole with tendon debridement holds promise for the treatment of refractory patellar tendinitis.

  14. Use of Intraoperative Indocyanine Green Videoangiography to Guide Cutaneous Angiosarcoma Excision

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Teresa; Mo, Kevin W. L.; Wong, Pauline S. Y.; Chiu, Tor

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Complete excision of cutaneous angiosarcoma, which is a rare, vascular, and aggressive tumor, is challenging. Its multifocal nature and propensity for lateral spread make the gross assessment of surgical margins difficult. Neither the use of frozen section analysis nor Mohs surgery consistently improves the probability of margin-free excision. Recent studies have advocated the use of indocyanine green to evaluate the vascular system perioperatively. We describe the intraoperative use of indocyanine green to help define the excision margin of a locally extensive scalp angiosarcoma in an elderly man. PMID:27536487

  15. Nonuniform distribution of excision repair synthesis in nucleosome core DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, S.Y.; Smerdon, M.J.

    1985-12-17

    We have studied the distribution in nucleosome core DNA of nucleotides incorporated by excision repair synthesis occurring immediately after UV irradiation in human cells. The differences previously observed for whole nuclei between the DNase I digestion profiles of repaired DNA (following its refolding into a nucleosome structure) and bulk DNA are obtained for isolated nucleosome core particles. Analysis of the differences obtained indicates that they could reflect a significant difference in the level of repair-incorporated nucleotides at different sites within the core DNA region. To test this possibility directly, we have used exonuclease III digestion of very homogeneous sized core particle DNA to map the distribution of repair synthesis in these regions. Results indicate that in a significant fraction of the nucleosomes the 5' and 3' ends of the core DNA are markedly enhanced in repair-incorporated nucleotides relative to the central region of the core particle. A best fit analysis indicates that a good approximation of the data is obtained for a distribution where the core DNA is uniformly labeled from the 5' end to position 62 and from position 114 to the 3' end, with the 52-base central region being devoid of repair-incorporated nucleotides. This distribution accounts for all of the quantitative differences observed previously between repaired DNA and bulk DNA following the rapid phase of nucleosome rearrangement when it is assumed that linker DNA and the core DNA ends are repaired with equal efficiency and the nucleosome structure of newly repaired DNA is identical with that of bulk chromatin. The 52-base central region that is devoid of repair synthesis contains the lowest frequency cutting sites for DNase I in vitro, as well as the only internal locations where two (rather than one) histones interact with a 10-base segment of each DNA strand.

  16. Alkaline unwinding flow cytometry assay to measure nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Thyagarajan, Bharat; Anderson, Kristin E; Lessard, Christopher J; Veltri, Gregory; Jacobs, David R; Folsom, Aaron R; Gross, Myron D

    2007-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER), one of the DNA repair pathways, is the primary mechanism for repair of bulky adducts caused by physical and chemical agents, such as UV radiation, cisplatin and 4-nitroquinolones. Variations in DNA repair may be a significant risk factor for several cancers, but its measurement in epidemiological studies has been hindered by the high variability, complexity and laborious nature of currently available assays. An alkaline unwinding flow cytometric assay using UV-C radiation as a DNA-damaging agent was adapted for measurement of NER-mediated breaks. This assay was based on the principle of alkaline unwinding of strand breaks in double-stranded DNA to yield single-stranded DNA with the number of strand breaks being proportional to the amount of DNA damage. This assay measured 50,000 events per sample with several samples being analyzed per specimen, thereby providing very reliable measurements, which can be performed on a large-scale basis. Using area under the curve (AUC) to quantitate amount of NER-mediated breaks, this assay was able to detect increased NER-mediated breaks with increasing doses of UV-C radiation. The assay detected NER-mediated breaks in lymphocytes from normal donors and not in xeroderma pigmentosum lymphoblastoid cell lines indicating specificity for the detection of NER-mediated breaks. The assay measured NER-mediated breaks within G(1), S and G(2)/M phases of the cell cycle; thereby decreasing variability in measurements of NER-mediated breaks due to differences in cell cycle phases. Intraindividual variability for AUC after 120 min of repair was 15% with interindividual variability being approximately 43% for cells in the G(1) phase, indicating substantial between-subject variation and relatively low within-subject variation. Thus, the alkaline unwinding flow cytometry-based assay provides a high-throughput method for the specific measurement of NER-mediated breaks in lymphocytes.

  17. Modeling expiratory flow from excised tracheal tube laws.

    PubMed

    Aljuri, N; Freitag, L; Venegas, J G

    1999-11-01

    Flow limitation during forced exhalation and gas trapping during high-frequency ventilation are affected by upstream viscous losses and by the relationship between transmural pressure (Ptm) and cross-sectional area (A(tr)) of the airways, i.e., tube law (TL). Our objective was to test the validity of a simple lumped-parameter model of expiratory flow limitation, including the measured TL, static pressure recovery, and upstream viscous losses. To accomplish this objective, we assessed the TLs of various excised animal tracheae in controlled conditions of quasi-static (no flow) and steady forced expiratory flow. A(tr) was measured from digitized images of inner tracheal walls delineated by transillumination at an axial location defining the minimal area during forced expiratory flow. Tracheal TLs followed closely the exponential form proposed by Shapiro (A. H. Shapiro. J. Biomech. Eng. 99: 126-147, 1977) for elastic tubes: Ptm = K(p) [(A(tr)/A(tr0))(-n) - 1], where A(tr0) is A(tr) at Ptm = 0 and K(p) is a parametric factor related to the stiffness of the tube wall. Using these TLs, we found that the simple model of expiratory flow limitation described well the experimental data. Independent of upstream resistance, all tracheae with an exponent n < 2 experienced flow limitation, whereas a trachea with n > 2 did not. Upstream viscous losses, as expected, reduced maximal expiratory flow. The TL measured under steady-flow conditions was stiffer than that measured under expiratory no-flow conditions, only if a significant static pressure recovery from the choke point to atmosphere was assumed in the measurement.

  18. Polymorphism of the DNA Base Excision Repair Genes in Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Katarzyna A.; Synowiec, Ewelina; Sobierajczyk, Katarzyna; Izdebska, Justyna; Blasiak, Janusz; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a degenerative corneal disorder for which the exact pathogenesis is not yet known. Oxidative stress is reported to be associated with this disease. The stress may damage corneal biomolecules, including DNA, and such damage is primarily removed by base excision repair (BER). Variation in genes encoding BER components may influence the effectiveness of corneal cells to cope with oxidative stress. In the present work we genotyped 5 polymorphisms of 4 BER genes in 284 patients and 353 controls. The A/A genotype of the c.–1370T>A polymorphism of the DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene was associated with increased occurrence of KC, while the A/T genotype was associated with decreased occurrence of KC. The A/G genotype and the A allele of the c.1196A>G polymorphism of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) were associated with increased, and the G/G genotype and the G allele, with decreased KC occurrence. Also, the C/T and T as well as C/C genotypes and alleles of the c.580C>T polymorphism of the same gene displayed relationship with KC occurrence. Neither the g.46438521G>C polymorphism of the Nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1) nor the c.2285T>C polymorphism of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was associated with KC. In conclusion, the variability of the XRCC1 and POLG genes may play a role in KC pathogenesis and determine the risk of this disease. PMID:25356504

  19. Iontophoretic delivery of 5-fluorouracil through excised human stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Singh, B N; Jayaswal, S B

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of ionization, current density and penetration enhancers on the iontophoretic delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) through excised human stratum corneum (HSC). The iontophoretic (cathodal) transport of 5-FU was assessed in vitro at three physiologically relevant pH values of 5.0, 7.4 and 8.0, at various levels of current density ranging between 0.15 to 0.98 mA/cm2, and in the presence of suitable penetration enhancers, namely Azone(®) (AZ), lauryl alcohol (LA), and isopropyl myristate (IPM). The steady-state flux at constant current density (0.47 mA/cm(2)) was increased by approximately 19, 10 and 27 fold at pH 5, 7.4 and 8.0, respectively. The effect of current density at pH 7.4 exhibited a linear correlation between current density and steady-state flux (r = 0.98, p = 0.002), which indicates the potential of iontophoresis for controlled transdermal delivery of 5-FU. The combination of cathodal iontophoresis with IPM produced an additive enhancement which may be attributed to aggravated skin perturbation effect and increased skin conductivity. Other enhancers such as AZ and LA produced negative or no further enhancement respectively, when used in conjunction with cathodal iontophoresis. It may be therefore concluded that pH and current density play critical role during iontophoretic delivery of 5-FU, and combination of a chemical penetration enhancer and iontophoresis can not be always viewed as a synergistic strategy which should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis for each drug candidate/enhancer combination.

  20. Education in acoustics in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyara, Federico

    2002-11-01

    Over the last decades, education in acoustics (EA) in Argentina has experienced ups and downs due to economic and political issues interfering with long term projects. Unlike other countries, like Chile, where EA has reached maturity in spite of the acoustical industry having shown little development, Argentina has several well-established manufacturers of acoustic materials and equipment but no specific career with a major in acoustics. At the university level, acoustics is taught as a complementary--often elective--course for careers such as architecture, communication engineering, or music. In spite of this there are several research centers with programs covering environmental and community noise, effects of noise on man, acoustic signal processing, musical acoustics and acoustic emission, and several national and international meetings are held each year in which results are communicated and discussed. Several books on a variety of topics such as sound system, architectural acoustics, and noise control have been published as well. Another chapter in EA is technical and vocational education, ranging between secondary and postsecondary levels, with technical training on sound system operation or design. Over the last years there have been several attempts to implement master degrees in acoustics or audio engineering, with little or no success.

  1. Acoustic energy harvesting based on a planar acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuibao; Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically report on an innovative and practical acoustic energy harvester based on a defected acoustic metamaterial (AMM) with piezoelectric material. The idea is to create suitable resonant defects in an AMM to confine the strain energy originating from an acoustic incidence. This scavenged energy is converted into electrical energy by attaching a structured piezoelectric material into the defect area of the AMM. We show an acoustic energy harvester based on a meta-structure capable of producing electrical power from an acoustic pressure. Numerical simulations are provided to analyze and elucidate the principles and the performances of the proposed system. A maximum output voltage of 1.3 V and a power density of 0.54 μW/cm3 are obtained at a frequency of 2257.5 Hz. The proposed concept should have broad applications on energy harvesting as well as on low-frequency sound isolation, since this system acts as both acoustic insulator and energy harvester.

  2. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Mei, Jun; Aljahdali, Rasha

    We design a type of acoustic metasurface, which is composed of carefully designed slits in a rigid thin plate. The effective refractive indices of different slits are different but the impedances are kept the same as that of the host medium. Numerical simulations show that such a metasurface can redirect or reflect a normally incident wave at different frequencies, even though it is impedance matched to the host medium. We show that the underlying mechanisms can be understood by using the generalized Snell's law, and a unified analytic model based on mode-coupling theory. We demonstrate some simple realization of such acoustic metasurface with real materials. The principle is also extended to the design of planar acoustic lens which can focus acoustic waves. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces.

  3. On the Incidence of Excise Taxes on a Monopolist's Price: A Pedagogical Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mixon, J. Wilson, Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Maintains that intermediate level undergraduate microeconomic theory texts mislead by their treatment of the effect of an excise tax on a monopolist's price and output. Offers a simple demonstration of the correct approach. (Author/JDH)

  4. Recurrent sialoliths after excision of the bilateral submandibular glands for sialolithiasis treatment: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YING, XIAOXIA; KANG, JIANAN; ZHANG, FUYIN; DONG, HUI

    2016-01-01

    Sialolithiasis is a common disease that is characterized by the obstruction of the salivary gland. Sialolithiasis mainly affects the submandibular glands and the Wharton's duct. However, bilateral sialolithiasis is a rare condition. In addition, recurrence of sialoliths subsequent to surgical excision of the submandibular gland for the treatment of sialolithiasis has been rarely reported. The present study reported a case presenting with recurrent sialoliths with sialadenitis in the residual Wharton's duct following the excision of bilateral submandibular glands. An 81-year-old man presented with a solid and painful mass in the left submandibular area. The patient had a history of bilateral submandibular sialolithiasis, and had undergone excision of bilateral submandibular glands with the right Wharton's duct 4 years earlier. Computed tomography scans demonstrated two calculi in the residual Wharton's duct, which were surgically removed without any complications. The present study discussed the mechanisms underlying sialolith formation subsequent to the excision of submandibular glands. PMID:26889264

  5. Acoustic Environment Simulation Study; Acoustic Intrusion Sensor Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    RD-R149 245 ACOUSTIC ENVIRONMENT SIMULATION STUDY; ACOUSTIC is INTRUSION SENSOR PERFORMANCE(U) TIME SERIES ASSOCIATES PALO ALTO CA L ENOCHSON ET AL...ACOUSTIC ENVIRONMENT SIMULATION STUDY PREPARED BY: LOREN ENOCHSON TIME SERIES ASSOCIATES 920 WEST 33RD AVENUE SPOKANE, WA 99203 PREPARED FOR: NAVAL... TIME COVERED 5A0pA OF 1 jeamonth, Day) S, 54 ( 4UNT ,inal; .. na, F ROM TO o . !L,,Nv; REJa- ,GE U -. ,16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION COSATI CODES 18

  6. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  7. A Martian acoustic anemometer.

    PubMed

    Banfield, Don; Schindel, David W; Tarr, Steve; Dissly, Richard W

    2016-08-01

    An acoustic anemometer for use on Mars has been developed. To understand the processes that control the interaction between surface and atmosphere on Mars, not only the mean winds, but also the turbulent boundary layer, the fluxes of momentum, heat and molecular constituents between surface and atmosphere must be measured. Terrestrially this is done with acoustic anemometers, but the low density atmosphere on Mars makes it challenging to adapt such an instrument for use on Mars. This has been achieved using capacitive transducers and pulse compression, and was successfully demonstrated on a stratospheric balloon (simulating the Martian environment) and in a dedicated Mars Wind Tunnel facility. This instrument achieves a measurement accuracy of ∼5 cm/s with an update rate of >20 Hz under Martian conditions.

  8. Acoustic methodology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    It is important for industry and NASA to assess the status of acoustic design technology for predicting and controlling helicopter external noise in order for a meaningful research program to be formulated which will address this problem. The prediction methodologies available to the designer and the acoustic engineer are three-fold. First is what has been described as a first principle analysis. This analysis approach attempts to remove any empiricism from the analysis process and deals with a theoretical mechanism approach to predicting the noise. The second approach attempts to combine first principle methodology (when available) with empirical data to formulate source predictors which can be combined to predict vehicle levels. The third is an empirical analysis, which attempts to generalize measured trends into a vehicle noise prediction method. This paper will briefly address each.

  9. Radiosurgery of acoustic neurinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Flickinger, J.C.; Lunsford, L.D.; Coffey, R.J.; Linskey, M.E.; Bissonette, D.J.; Maitz, A.H.; Kondziolka, D. )

    1991-01-15

    Eighty-five patients with acoustic neurinomas underwent stereotactic radiosurgery with the gamma unit at the University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA) during its first 30 months of operation. Neuroimaging studies performed in 40 patients with more than 1 year follow-up showed that tumors were smaller in 22 (55%), unchanged in 17 (43%), and larger in one (2%). The 2-year actuarial rates for preservation of useful hearing and any hearing were 46% and 62%, respectively. Previously undetected neuropathies of the trigeminal (n = 12) and facial nerves (n = 14) occurred 1 week to 1 year after radiosurgery (median, 7 and 6 months, respectively), and improved at median intervals of 13 and 8 months, respectively, after onset. Hearing loss was significantly associated with increasing average tumor diameter (P = 0.04). No deterioration of any cranial nerve function has yet developed in seven patients with average tumor diameters less than 10 mm. Radiosurgery is an important treatment alternative for selected acoustic neurinoma patients.

  10. Acoustics Discipline Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane; Thomas, Russell

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Annual Review, a summary of the progress made in 2007 in acoustics research under the Subsonic Fixed Wing project is given. The presentation describes highlights from in-house and external activities including partnerships and NRA-funded research with industry and academia. Brief progress reports from all acoustics Phase 1 NRAs are also included as are outlines of the planned activities for 2008 and all Phase 2 NRAs. N+1 and N+2 technology paths outlined for Subsonic Fixed Wing noise targets. NRA Round 1 progressing with focus on prediction method advancement. NRA Round 2 initiating work focused on N+2 technology, prediction methods, and validation. Excellent partnerships in progress supporting N+1 technology targets and providing key data sets.

  11. Acoustic absorption by sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, D. C.; Labonte, B. J.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the initial results of a series of observations designed to probe the nature of sunspots by detecting their influence on high-degree p-mode oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The analysis decomposes the observed oscillations into radially propagating waves described by Hankel functions in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the sunspot. From measurements of the differences in power between waves traveling outward and inward, it is demonstrated that sunspots appear to absorb as much as 50 percent of the incoming acoustic waves. It is found that for all three sunspots observed, the amount of absorption increases linearly with horizontal wavenumber. The effect is present in p-mode oscillations with wavelengths both significantly larger and smaller than the diameter of the sunspot umbrae. Actual absorption of acoustic energy of the magnitude observed may produce measurable decreases in the power and lifetimes of high-degree p-mode oscillations during periods of high solar activity.

  12. Electromagnetic acoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Jane F; Chang, David B; McNaughton, Stuart; Jeong, Jong Seob; Shung, K K; Cerwin, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    Electromagnetic acoustic imaging (EMAI) is a new imaging technique that uses long-wavelength RF electromagnetic (EM) waves to induce ultrasound emission. Signal intensity and image contrast have been found to depend on spatially varying electrical conductivity of the medium in addition to conventional acoustic properties. The resultant conductivity- weighted ultrasound data may enhance the diagnostic performance of medical ultrasound in cancer and cardiovascular applications because of the known changes in conductivity of malignancy and blood-filled spaces. EMAI has a potential advantage over other related imaging techniques because it combines the high resolution associated with ultrasound detection with the generation of the ultrasound signals directly related to physiologically important electrical properties of the tissues. Here, we report the theoretical development of EMAI, implementation of a dual-mode EMAI/ultrasound apparatus, and successful demonstrations of EMAI in various phantoms designed to establish feasibility of the approach for eventual medical applications.

  13. Suppression through acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Kevin D.; Short, Kenneth R.; VanMeenen, Kirsten M.; Servatius, Richard J.

    2006-05-01

    This paper reviews research conducted by our laboratory exploring the possible use of acoustical stimuli as a tool for influencing behavior. Over the course of several programs, different types of acoustic stimuli have been evaluated for their effectiveness in disrupting targeting, balance, and high-order cognitive processes in both humans and animals. Escape responses are of particular use in this regard. An escape response serves not only as an objective measure of aversion, but as a potential substitute for ongoing behavior. We have also assessed whether the level of performance changes if the individual does not perform an escape response. In general these studies have both suggested certain types of sounds are more aversive or distracting than others. Although the laboratory development of additional stimuli needs to continue, we are taking the next step by testing some of the more effective stimuli in more applied experimental scenarios including those involving group dynamics.

  14. FY 89 Acoustics Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-11

    small. (=0.3%) a result which exhibits qualitative agreemnent with the results of Korobko and Chernobaiŕ . We saw no detectable change in...Senlis, France, (1990). 5. A Practical Sensor for Acoustic Detection of Larvae and Insects in Harvested Commodities, R. Hickling, S.T. Chang , J.C. Webb...to detect or gene;rate ;Couste ,,vc’-. "hcsc mater;als are unitiue in that thcv can he formed into largecxihlc sheet. lhmrelut, it is possible to

  15. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    1999-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported are a synopsis of the work and accomplishments reported by the Division during the 1996 calendar year. A bibliography containing 42 citations is provided.

  16. Ocean acoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornuelle, Bruce D.; Worcester, Peter F.; Dzieciuch, Matthew A.

    2008-10-01

    Ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) was proposed in 1979 by Walter Munk and Carl Wunsch as an analogue to x-ray computed axial tomography for the oceans. The oceans are opaque to most electromagnetic radiation, but there is a strong acoustic waveguide, and sound can propagate for 10 Mm and more with distinct multiply-refracted ray paths. Transmitting broadband pulses in the ocean leads to a set of impulsive arrivals at the receiver which characterize the impulse response of the sound channel. The peaks observed at the receiver are assumed to represent the arrival of energy traveling along geometric ray paths. These paths can be distinguished by arrival time, and by arrival angle when a vertical array of receivers is available. Changes in ray arrival time can be used to infer changes in ocean structure. Ray travel time measurements have been a mainstay of long-range acoustic measurements, but the strong sensitivity of ray paths to range-dependent sound speed perturbations makes the ray sampling functions uncertain in real cases. In the ray approximation travel times are sensitive to medium changes only along the corresponding eigenrays. Ray theory is an infinite-frequency approximation, and its eikonal equation has nonlinearities not found in the acoustic wave equation. We build on recent seismology results (kernels for body wave arrivals in the earth) to characterize the kernel for converting sound speed change in the ocean to travel time changes using more complete propagation physics. Wave-theoretic finite frequency kernels may show less sensitivity to small-scale sound speed structure.

  17. Broadband Acoustic Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    shallow water 1 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to...claims to the contrary in the ocean acoustics community, sub-bottom clutter can and does occur in shallow water environments. A step-by-step detailed...that of the overlying water column and hence there is no critical angle. Thus, the reflection, scattering, propagation and reverberation are

  18. Advanced Broadband Acoustic Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-31

    7, 18]). Key result: despite some claims to the contrary in the ocean acoustics community, sub-bottom clutter can and does occur in shallow water ...propagation, and clutter in both theory and measurements. This is important because in some shallow water areas (especially those with significant riverine...Abraham, data from Clutter󈧋 Experiment) to examine dependence of clutter statistics on multipath (Ref [8]). Key result: in the shallow water

  19. Acoustics Local Area Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-31

    contract was to provide a shared computing i : resource - the acou tics local area network (ALAN) - to support ocean acoustic and related oceanographic...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. UMITATION OF ABSTRACT OF REPORT: THIS PAGE OF ABSTRACT Unclassified I I ONRCtI COMPUTER V 10 11/94 STANDARD FORM 233 (REV 241) oo 0 90 " VLNV1LV HNO Og6OuLtOI, CT:tT 96/OT/0

  20. Acoustic Communications for UUVs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Acoustic Communications for UUVs Josko Catipovic Lee Freitag Naval Undersea Warfare Center Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Newport, RI 02841... Woods Hole, MA 02543 (401) 832-3259 (508) 289-3285 catipovicj@npt.nuwc.navy.mil lfreitag@whoi.edu Dan Nagle Sam Smith Naval Undersea Warfare Center...positioned within a streamlined flow shield which reduces drag and protects them from damage. While the HF transducers are placed on the structure and the

  1. Acoustic Characterization of Soil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    modified SAR imaging algorithm. Page 26 Final Report In the acoustic subsurface imaging scenario, the "object" to be imaged (i.e., cultural artifacts... subsurface imaging scenario. To combat this potential difficulty we can utilize a new SAR imaging algorithm (Lee et al., 1996) derived from a geophysics...essentially a transmit plane wave. This is a cost-effective means to evaluate the feasibility of subsurface imaging . A more complete (and costly

  2. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  3. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    2001-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of the NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included in this report are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported is a synopsis of the work and accomplishments completed by the Division during the 1997, 1998, and 1999 calendar years. A bibliography containing 93 citations is provided.

  4. Excision repair and patch size in UV-irradiated bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Yarosh, D.B.; Rosenstein, B.S.; Setlow, R.B.

    1981-11-01

    We determined the average size of excision repair patches in repair of UV lesions in bacteriophage T4 by measuring the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated during repair. The average patch was small, approximately four nucleotides long. In control, experiments with the denV/sub 1/ excision-deificient mutant, we encountered an artifact, a protein(s) which remained bound to phenol-extracted DNA and prevented nicking by the UV-specific endonucleases of Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4.

  5. Excision repair and patch size in UV-irradiated bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Yarosh, D.B.; Rosenstein, B.S.; Setlow, R.B.

    1981-11-01

    We determined the average size of excision repair patches in repair of UV lesions in bacteriophage T4 by measuring the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated during repair. The average patch was small, approximately four nucleotides long. In control experiments with the denV1 excision-deficient mutant, we encountered an artifact, a protein(s) which remained bound to phenol-extracted DNA and prevented nicking by the UV-specific endonucleases of Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4.

  6. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsen, Jonas T.; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems, the theory predicts a relocation of the inhomogeneities into stable field-dependent configurations, which are qualitatively different from the horizontally layered configurations due to gravity. Experimental validation is obtained by confocal imaging of aqueous solutions in a glass-silicon microchip.

  7. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Kar M.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ˜ 106 Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ˜ 10-9 m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ˜ 10-8 m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10-8 m with 106 Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  8. Virtual acoustic prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marty

    2003-10-01

    In this paper the re-creation of 3-D sound fields so the full psycho-acoustic impact of sound sources can be assessed before the manufacture of a product or environment is examined. Using head related transfer functions (HRTFs) coupled with a head tracked set of headphones the sound field at the left and right ears of a listener can be re-created for a set of sound sources. However, the HRTFs require that sources have a defined location and this is not the typical output from numerical codes which describe the sound field as a set of distributed modes. In this paper a method of creating a set of equivalent sources is described such that the standard set of HRTFs can be applied in real time. A structural-acoustic model of a cylinder driving an enclosed acoustic field will be used as an example. It will be shown that equivalent sources can be used to recreate all of the reverberation of the enclosed space. An efficient singular value decomposition technique allows the large number of sources required to be simulated in real time. An introduction to the requirements necessary for 3-D virtual prototyping using high frequency Statistical Energy Analysis models will be presented. [Work supported by AuSim and NASA.

  9. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  10. Acoustically enhanced heat transport.

    PubMed

    Ang, Kar M; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10(6) Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ∼ 10(-9) m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ∼ 10(-8) m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10(-8) m with 10(6) Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  11. Acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William B.

    1988-01-01

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in geological formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth3 s magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation . The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be preformed in open boreholes and in cased well bores.

  12. Confocal mosaicing microscopy in skin excisions: a demonstration of rapid surgical pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gareau, D.S.; Patel, Y.G.; Li, Y.; Aranda, I.; Halpern, A.C.; Nehal, K.S.; Rajadhyaksha, M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Precise micro-surgical removal of tumour with minimal damage to the surrounding normal tissue requires a series of excisions, each guided by an examination of frozen histology of the previous. An example is Mohs surgery for the removal of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) in skin. The preparation of frozen histology is labour-intensive and slow. Confocal microscopy may enable rapid detection of tumours directly in surgical excisions with minimal need for frozen histology. Mosaicing of images enables observation of nuclear and cellular morphology in large areas of surgically excised tissue. In skin, the use of 10–1% acetic acid as a reflectance contrast agent brightens nuclei in 0.5–5 min and enhances nuclear-to-dermis contrast and detectability of BCCs. A tissue fixture was engineered for precisely mounting surgical excisions to enable mosaicing of 36 × 36 images to create a field of view of 12 × 12 mm. This large field of view displays the excision at 2× magnification, similar to that routinely used by Mohs surgeons when examining frozen histology. Comparison of mosaics to histology demonstrates detectability of BCCs. Confocal mosaicing presently requires 9 min, instead of 20–45 min per excision for preparing frozen histology, and thus may provide a means for rapid pathology-at-the-bedside to expedite and guide surgery. PMID:19196421

  13. No Scalpel Vasectomy (NSV) with Ligation and Excision: A Single Centre Experience.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, K; Ali, I; Sarma, G; Das, U

    2015-12-01

    No scalpel vasectomy (NSV) has proved to be a safe and simple procedure for permanent sterilization for men. Ligation and excision of the vas deferens followed by fascial interposition is the procedure of choice. It is believed that vas excision without fascial interposition has a risk of failure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the technique of NSV with ligation and excision only. No scalpel vasectomy performed in an urban centre was taken for this prospective study. Only ligation and excision procedure was applied in its execution. It was demonstrated and performed under the supervision of an expert. Information regarding early and late complications including failure was gathered. A total number of 3,392 NSVs were performed in an urban training centre between Apr' 2009 to Mar' 2013. The procedure applied was only excision and ligation of the vas deferens. The fascial interposition was not included in the procedure. Haematoma (1), bleeding (3), foreign body granuloma (1), scrotal pain (3), epididymitis (1) and sinus formations (1) were encountered. There was only one failure in the whole group of acceptors. NSV with ligation and excision is a simple and easy procedure to learn and perform. Complications and failures are negligible. The additional fascial interposition needs more surgical skill and is time-consuming, hence can be avoided where a large number of acceptors need to undergo NSV in a rural camp.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of shear wave propagation in excised tissue.

    PubMed

    Bishop, J; Poole, G; Leitch, M; Plewes, D B

    1998-01-01

    The propagation of shear waves in ex vivo tissue samples, agar/gel phantoms, and human volunteers was investigated. A moving coil apparatus was constructed to generate low acoustic frequency shear perturbations of 50 to 400 Hz. Oscillating gradients phase-locked with the shear stimulus were used to generate a series of phase contrast images of the shear waves at different time-points throughout the wave cycle. Quantitative measurements of wave velocity and attenuation were obtained to evaluate the effects of temperature, frequency, and tissue anisotropy. Results of these experiments demonstrate significant variation in shear wave behavior with tissue type, whereas frequency and anisotropic behavior was mixed. Temperature-dependent behavior related mainly to the presence of fat. Propagation velocities ranged from 1 to 5 m/sec, and attenuation coefficients of from 1 to 3 nepers/unit wavelength, depending on tissue type. These results confirm the potential of elastic imaging attributable to the intrinsic variability of elastic properties observed in normal tissue, although some difficulty may be experienced in clinical implementation because of viscous attenuation in fat.

  15. Magnetomechanical Acoustic Emission - A Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Nickel Alloys Ferromagnetic Materials LA Acoustic Emission Barkhausen noise O-A Residual Stress ’~20 ABSTWA 7- ontinue reverse ad. Ii nedceeory and...also called magneto-acoustic emission [13], or acoustic Barkhausen effect [1]. When a ferromagnetic sample is placed in an alternating magnetic field...transducer, which should be insensitive to a magnetic field, was attached to a sample. A flux sensing coil and a Barkhausen noise (BN) probe are also

  16. Acoustic Imaging of Combustion Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K. N.; Seshan, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Elliposidal acoustic mirror used to measure sound emitted at discrete points in burning turbulent jets. Mirror deemphasizes sources close to target source and excludes sources far from target. At acoustic frequency of 20 kHz, mirror resolves sound from region 1.25 cm wide. Currently used by NASA for research on jet flames. Produces clearly identifiable and measurable variation of acoustic spectral intensities along length of flame. Utilized in variety of monitoring or control systems involving flames or other reacting flows.

  17. Wavelet Preprocessing of Acoustic Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    wavelet transform to preprocess acoustic broadband signals in a system that discriminates between different classes of acoustic bursts. This is motivated by the similarity between the proportional bandwidth filters provided by the wavelet transform and those found in biological hearing systems. The experiment involves comparing statistical pattern classifier effects of wavelet and FFT preprocessed acoustic signals. The data used was from the DARPA Phase I database, which consists of artificially generated signals with real ocean background. The

  18. Acoustic actuation of bioinspired microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Kaynak, Murat; Ozcelik, Adem; Nourhani, Amir; Lammert, Paul E; Crespi, Vincent H; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-31

    Acoustic actuation of bioinspired microswimmers is experimentally demonstrated. Microswimmers are fabricated in situ in a microchannel. Upon acoustic excitation, the flagellum of the microswimmer oscillates, which in turn generates linear or rotary movement depending on the swimmer design. The speed of these bioinspired microswimmers is tuned by adjusting the voltage amplitude applied to the acoustic transducer. Simple microfabrication and remote actuation are promising for biomedical applications.

  19. A Brief History of Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossing, Thomas

    Although there are certainly some good historical treatments of acoustics in the literature, it still seems appropriate to begin a handbook of acoustics with a brief history of the subject. We begin by mentioning some important experiments that took place before the 19th century. Acoustics in the 19th century is characterized by describing the work of seven outstanding acousticians: Tyndall, von Helmholtz, Rayleigh, Stokes, Bell, Edison, and Koenig. Of course this sampling omits the mention of many other outstanding investigators.

  20. APL - North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-04

    Acoustic Lab” Encl: (1) Final Technical Report for Subject Grant (2) SF298 for Enclosure Enclosure (1) is the Final Technical Report for the subject...Laboratory (hard copy with SF 298) Defense Technical Information Center (electronic files with SF298) APL - North Pacific Acoustic ...speed perturbations and the characteristics of the ambient acoustic noise field. Scattering and diffraction resulting from internal waves and other

  1. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, S. Reynold; Allen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles. The use of such a model will help ensure compliance with acoustic requirements. Also, this project includes modeling validation and development feedback via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements to compare with the predictions.

  2. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  3. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  4. Acoustic confinement in superlattice cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sanchez, Daniel; Déleglise, Samuel; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Atkinson, Paola; Lagoin, Camille; Perrin, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    The large coupling rate between the acoustic and optical fields confined in GaAs/AlAs superlattice cavities makes them appealing systems for cavity optomechanics. We have developed a mathematical model based on the scattering matrix that allows the acoustic guided modes to be predicted in nano and micropillar superlattice cavities. We demonstrate here that the reflection at the surface boundary considerably modifies the acoustic quality factor and leads to significant confinement at the micropillar center. Our mathematical model also predicts unprecedented acoustic Fano resonances on nanopillars featuring small mode volumes and very high mechanical quality factors, making them attractive systems for optomechanical applications.

  5. Double-negative acoustic metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Li, Jensen; Chan, C T

    2004-11-01

    We show here the existence of acoustic metamaterial, in which both the effective density and bulk modulus are simultaneously negative, in the true and strict sense of an effective medium. Our double-negative acoustic system is an acoustic analogue of Veselago's medium in electromagnetism, and shares many unique consequences, such as negative refractive index. The double negativity in acoustics is derived from low-frequency resonances, as in the case of electromagnetism, but the negative density and modulus are derived from a single resonance structure as distinct from electromagnetism in which the negative permeability and negative permittivity originates from different resonance mechanisms.

  6. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  7. Truck acoustic data analyzer system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Howard D.; Akerman, Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2006-07-04

    A passive vehicle acoustic data analyzer system having at least one microphone disposed in the acoustic field of a moving vehicle and a computer in electronic communication the microphone(s). The computer detects and measures the frequency shift in the acoustic signature emitted by the vehicle as it approaches and passes the microphone(s). The acoustic signature of a truck driving by a microphone can provide enough information to estimate the truck speed in miles-per-hour (mph), engine speed in rotations-per-minute (RPM), turbocharger speed in RPM, and vehicle weight.

  8. Transition section for acoustic waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, H.H.B.

    1975-10-28

    A means of facilitating the transmission of acoustic waves with minimal reflection between two regions having different specific acoustic impedances is described comprising a region exhibiting a constant product of cross-sectional area and specific acoustic impedance at each cross-sectional plane along the axis of the transition region. A variety of structures that exhibit this feature is disclosed, the preferred embodiment comprising a nested structure of doubly reentrant cones. This structure is useful for monitoring the operation of nuclear reactors in which random acoustic signals are generated in the course of operation.

  9. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  10. The acoustic mechanics of stick slip friction in the California spiny lobster (Panulirus interruptus).

    PubMed

    Patek, S N; Baio, J E

    2007-10-01

    The dynamic interplay between static and sliding friction is fundamental to many animal movements. One interesting example of stick-slip friction is found in the sound-producing apparatus of many spiny lobster species (Palinuridae). The acoustic movements of the spiny lobster's plectrum over the file are generated by stick-slip friction between the two surfaces. We examined the microscopic anatomy, kinematics, acoustics and frictional properties of the California spiny lobster (Panulirus interruptus) toward the goal of quantitatively characterizing the frictional and acoustic mechanics of this system. Using synchronous high-speed video and sound recordings, we tested whether plectrum kinematics are correlated with acoustic signal features and found that plectrum velocity is positively correlated with acoustic amplitude. To characterize the frictional mechanics of the system, we measured frictional forces during sound production using excised plectrums and files. Similar to rubber materials sliding against hard surfaces, the static coefficient of friction in this system was on average 1.7. The change in the coefficient of friction across each stick-slip cycle varied substantially with an average change of 1.1. Although driven at a constant speed, the plectrum slipped at velocities that were positively correlated with the normal force between the two surfaces. Studies of friction in biological systems have focused primarily on adhesion and movement, while studies of stick-slip acoustics have remained under the purview of musical acoustics and engineering design. The present study offers an integrative analysis of an unusual bioacoustic mechanism and contrasts its physical parameters with other biological and engineered systems.

  11. Is dust acoustic wave a new plasma acoustic mode?

    SciTech Connect

    Dwivedi, C.B.

    1997-09-01

    In this Brief Communication, the claim of the novelty of the dust acoustic wave in a dusty plasma within the constant dust charge model is questioned. Conceptual lacunas behind the claim have been highlighted and appropriate physical arguments have been forwarded against the claim. It is demonstrated that the so-called dust acoustic wave could better be termed as a general acoustic fluctuation response with a dominant characteristic feature of the acoustic-like mode (ALM) fluctuation response reported by Dwivedi {ital et al.} [J. Plasma Phys. {bold 41}, 219 (1989)]. It is suggested that both correct and more usable nomenclature of the ALM should be the so-called acoustic mode. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Increased Risk of Surgical Site Infection Among Breast-Conserving Surgery Re-Excisions

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Margaret A.; Nickel, Katelin B.; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Wallace, Anna E.; Mines, Daniel; Miller, J. Philip; Fraser, Victoria J.; Warren, David K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after primary breast-conserving surgery (BCS) versus re-excision among women with carcinoma in situ or invasive breast cancer. Methods We established a retrospective cohort of women aged 18–64 years with ICD-9-CM procedure or CPT-4 codes for BCS from 6/29/2004–12/31/2010. Prior insurance plan enrollment of at least 180 days was required to establish the index BCS; subsequent re-excisions within 180 days were identified. SSIs occurring 2–90 days after BCS were identified by ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes. The attributable surgery was defined based on SSI onset compared to the BCS date(s). A chi-square test and generalized estimating equations model were used to compare the incidence of SSI after index and re-excision BCS procedures. Results 23,001 women with 28,827 BCS were identified; 23.2% of women had >1 BCS. The incidence of SSI was 1.82% (418/23,001) for the index BCS and 2.44% (142/5,826) for re-excision BCS (p=0.002). The risk of SSI after re-excision remained significantly higher after accounting for multiple procedures within a woman (odds ratio 1.34, 95% confidence interval, 1.07–1.68). Conclusions Surgeons need to be aware of the increased risk of SSI after re-excision BCS compared to the initial procedure. Our results suggest that risk adjustment of SSI rates for re-excision would allow for better comparison of BCS SSI rates between institutions. PMID:25358666

  13. IS26-Mediated Precise Excision of the IS26-aphA1a Translocatable Unit

    PubMed Central

    Harmer, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently showed that, in the absence of RecA-dependent homologous recombination, the Tnp26 transposase catalyzes cointegrate formation via a conservative reaction between two preexisting IS26, and this is strongly preferred over replicative transposition to a new site. Here, the reverse reaction was investigated by assaying for precise excision of the central region together with a single IS26 from a compound transposon bounded by IS26. In a recA mutant strain, Tn4352, a kanamycin resistance transposon carrying the aphA1a gene, was stable. However, loss of kanamycin resistance due to precise excision of the translocatable unit (TU) from the closely related Tn4352B, leaving behind the second IS26, occurred at high frequency. Excision occurred when Tn4352B was in either a high- or low-copy-number plasmid. The excised circular segment, known as a TU, was detected by PCR. Excision required the IS26 transposase Tnp26. However, the Tnp26 of only one IS26 in Tn4352B was required, specifically the IS26 downstream of the aphA1a gene, and the excised TU included the active IS26. The frequency of Tn4352B TU loss was influenced by the context of the transposon, but the critical determinant of high-frequency excision was the presence of three G residues in Tn4352B replacing a single G in Tn4352. These G residues are located immediately adjacent to the two G residues at the left end of the IS26 that is upstream of the aphA1a gene. Transcription of tnp26 was not affected by the additional G residues, which appear to enhance Tnp26 cleavage at this end. PMID:26646012

  14. RSL Fusion with Excision of Distal Scaphoid and Triquetrum: A Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory Ian; Sood, Aman; Yeo, Chong Jin

    2014-02-01

    Radioscapholunate (RSL) fusion has been utilized for treatment of radiocarpal arthritis for patients with an intact midcarpal joint. This preserves midcarpal joint motion while alleviating pain. Dart thrower's motion (DTM), which has been emphasized recently, is mainly a midcarpal joint motion. Question A cadaveric study was designed to measure and compare the range of motion (ROM) of the human wrist before and after an RSL fusion, followed by distal scaphoid excision, and finally excision of the triquetrum. Methods Twelve embalmed adult cadaveric upper limbs were assessed. The wrist motion was measured with an electrogoniometer. Measurements of the flexion-extension plane and radial-ulnar deviation plane were obtained for baseline after capsulotomy, after simulated RSL fusion with memory staples, after distal scaphoidectomy, and after excision of the triquetrum. Results The effects of scaphoid and triquetrum excision were expressed as improvements in movement over that of the preceding step. RSL fusion alone resulted in a decrease of the flexion-extension (F-E) arc by 36% and the radioulnar deviation (R-U) arc by 30%. Excision of the distal scaphoid with RSL improved the F-E arc by 34% and the R-U arc by 34%. With excision of the triquetrum, the F-E arc improved further by 13% and the R-U arc by 21%. The ROM of the simulated RSL fusion with distal scaphoidectomy is improved with excising the triquetrum, mainly through an increase in ulnar deviation motion. RSL fusion with distal scaphoidectomy and triquetrectomy can be an alternative to total wrist arthrodesis for patients with an intact midcarpal joint.

  15. Acoustic mechanical feedthroughs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-04-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  16. Acoustic Mechanical Feedthroughs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  17. The acoustics of snoring.

    PubMed

    Pevernagie, Dirk; Aarts, Ronald M; De Meyer, Micheline

    2010-04-01

    Snoring is a prevalent disorder affecting 20-40% of the general population. The mechanism of snoring is vibration of anatomical structures in the pharyngeal airway. Flutter of the soft palate accounts for the harsh aspect of the snoring sound. Natural or drug-induced sleep is required for its appearance. Snoring is subject to many influences such as body position, sleep stage, route of breathing and the presence or absence of sleep-disordered breathing. Its presentation may be variable within or between nights. While snoring is generally perceived as a social nuisance, rating of its noisiness is subjective and, therefore, inconsistent. Objective assessment of snoring is important to evaluate the effect of treatment interventions. Moreover, snoring carries information relating to the site and degree of obstruction of the upper airway. If evidence for monolevel snoring at the site of the soft palate is provided, the patient may benefit from palatal surgery. These considerations have inspired researchers to scrutinize the acoustic characteristics of snoring events. Similarly to speech, snoring is produced in the vocal tract. Because of this analogy, existing techniques for speech analysis have been applied to evaluate snoring sounds. It appears that the pitch of the snoring sound is in the low-frequency range (<500 Hz) and corresponds to a fundamental frequency with associated harmonics. The pitch of snoring is determined by vibration of the soft palate, while nonpalatal snoring is more 'noise-like', and has scattered energy content in the higher spectral sub-bands (>500 Hz). To evaluate acoustic properties of snoring, sleep nasendoscopy is often performed. Recent evidence suggests that the acoustic quality of snoring is markedly different in drug-induced sleep as compared with natural sleep. Most often, palatal surgery alters sound characteristics of snoring, but is no cure for this disorder. It is uncertain whether the perceived improvement after palatal surgery, as

  18. Acoustic studies of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Granato, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic technique have proven to be very useful in getting basic information on the configuration and dynamics of defects. Although the technique is indirect, the sensitivity is such that it often competes very favorably with more direct techniques such as neutron, x-ray, or phonon scattering. The symmetry information that comes directly from polarization control often also proves decisive in determining configurations. Many of the concepts that have been developed in explaining the various effects that have been seen in dislocation and point defect studies have proven also to be very useful when taken over almost directly into other areas of physics. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Dynamic acoustic tractor beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-03-07

    Pulling a sphere and vibrating it around an equilibrium position by amplitude-modulation in the near-field of a single finite circular piston transducer is theoretically demonstrated. Conditions are found where a fluid hexane sphere (with arbitrary radius) chosen as an example, centered on the axis of progressive propagating waves and submerged in non-viscous water, experiences an attractive (steady) force pulling it towards the transducer, as well as an oscillatory force forcing it to vibrate back-and-forth. Numerical predictions for the dynamic force illustrate the theory and suggest an innovative method in designing dynamic acoustical tractor beams.

  20. Wind turbine acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1990-01-01

    Available information on the physical characteristics of the noise generated by wind turbines is summarized, with example sound pressure time histories, narrow- and broadband frequency spectra, and noise radiation patterns. Reviewed are noise measurement standards, analysis technology, and a method of characterizing wind turbine noise. Prediction methods are given for both low-frequency rotational harmonics and broadband noise components. Also included are atmospheric propagation data showing the effects of distance and refraction by wind shear. Human perception thresholds, based on laboratory and field tests, are given. Building vibration analysis methods are summarized. The bibliography of this report lists technical publications on all aspects of wind turbine acoustics.

  1. Quantum positron acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Metref, Hassina; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear quantum positron-acoustic (QPA) waves are investigated for the first time, within the theoretical framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model. In the small but finite amplitude limit, both deformed Korteweg-de Vries and generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations governing, respectively, the dynamics of QPA solitary waves and double-layers are derived. Moreover, a full finite amplitude analysis is undertaken, and a numerical integration of the obtained highly nonlinear equations is carried out. The results complement our previously published results on this problem.

  2. Broadband Acoustic Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    height above the seabed of 18 m ( water depth was ~165m) in an area where there were few/no seabed features. Due to the proximity of the source and...understanding of the mechanisms associated with sonar clutter in shallow water . The statistical characterization of these features will lead to clutter...3285, 2007. 5 6 [5] Holland C.W., J.R. Preston, and D.A. Abraham, Long-range acoustic scattering from a shallow- water mud volcano cluster J

  3. Coffee roasting acoustics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Preston S

    2014-06-01

    Cracking sounds emitted by coffee beans during the roasting process were recorded and analyzed to investigate the potential of using the sounds as the basis for an automated roast monitoring technique. Three parameters were found that could be exploited. Near the end of the roasting process, sounds known as "first crack" exhibit a higher acoustic amplitude than sounds emitted later, known as "second crack." First crack emits more low frequency energy than second crack. Finally, the rate of cracks appearing in the second crack chorus is higher than the rate in the first crack chorus.

  4. Investigation of pulmonary acoustic simulation: comparing airway model generation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Brian; Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Mansy, Hansen A.; Sandler, Richard H.; Royston, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Alterations in the structure and function of the pulmonary system that occur in disease or injury often give rise to measurable spectral, spatial and/or temporal changes in lung sound production and transmission. These changes, if properly quantified, might provide additional information about the etiology, severity and location of trauma, injury, or pathology. With this in mind, the authors are developing a comprehensive computer simulation model of pulmonary acoustics, known as The Audible Human Project™. Its purpose is to improve our understanding of pulmonary acoustics and to aid in interpreting measurements of sound and vibration in the lungs generated by airway insonification, natural breath sounds, and external stimuli on the chest surface, such as that used in elastography. As a part of this development process, finite element (FE) models were constructed of an excised pig lung that also underwent experimental studies. Within these models, the complex airway structure was created via two methods: x-ray CT image segmentation and through an algorithmic means called Constrained Constructive Optimization (CCO). CCO was implemented to expedite the segmentation process, as airway segments can be grown digitally. These two approaches were used in FE simulations of the surface motion on the lung as a result of sound input into the trachea. Simulation results were compared to experimental measurements. By testing how close these models are to experimental measurements, we are evaluating whether CCO can be used as a means to efficiently construct physiologically relevant airway trees.

  5. Electronic dummy for acoustical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, B. B.; Di Mattia, A. L.; Rosencheck, A. J.; Stern, M.; Torick, E. L.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic Dummy /ED/ used for acoustical testing represents the average male torso from the Xiphoid process upward and includes an acoustic replica of the human head. This head simulates natural flesh, and has an artificial voice and artificial ears that measure sound pressures at the eardrum or the entrance to the ear canal.

  6. Sound Advice on Classroom Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of acoustic standards in classroom design, presenting an interview with the Acoustical Society of America's (ASA's) standards manager which focuses on reasons for the new ASA standards, the standards document (which was written for K-12 classroom but applies to college classrooms), the need to avoid echo and be able to…

  7. Automated Acoustic Identification of Bats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    discrimination for such acoustically similar and cryptic species. Quantitative methods depend upon automatically extracting call descriptive parameters...constructing a dichotomous key, we iterated the highest performing classification choices at each step in a hierarchical classification scheme to...prevents unambiguous discrimination (Figure 31). For such acoustically cryptic species, identification remains in the realm of calculating a statistical

  8. Giving acoustics a fairer hearing.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Ken

    2012-05-01

    Ken Marriott, an independent acoustics consultant with Industrial Commercial & Technical Consultants (ICTC), outlines some of the key acoustics considerations for those planning new hospital build or refurbishment schemes, cautioning that, all too often, this important area is not properly considered at a sufficiently early project stage.

  9. Acoustic Ground-Impedance Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Helmoltz resonator used in compact, portable meter measures acoustic impedance of ground or other surfaces. Earth's surface is subject of increasing acoustical investigations because of its importance in aircraft noise prediction and measurment. Meter offers several advantages. Is compact and portable and set up at any test site, irrespective of landscape features, weather or other environmental condition.

  10. APL - North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    been spread over adjacent depths in the same manner as in the plots of the measured data in Figures 2 and 3. Histograms of intensity normalized...Mercer, J. A., Colosi, J. A., and Howe, B. M., “Deep seafloor arrivals in long range ocean acoustic propagation,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am., in press

  11. Improving Acoustics in American Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Peggy B.

    2000-01-01

    This introductory article to a clinical forum describes the following seven articles that discuss the problem of noisy classrooms and resulting reduction in learning, basic principles of noise and reverberation measurements in classrooms, solutions to the problem of poor classroom acoustics, and the development of a classroom acoustics standard.…

  12. Shallow-Water Mud Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Shallow- Water Mud Acoustics William L. Siegmann...shallow water over mud sediments and of acoustic detection, localization, and classification of objects buried in mud. OBJECTIVES • Develop...including long-range conveyance of information; detection, localization, and classification of objects buried in mud; and improvement of shallow water

  13. Pathogenicity Island Cross Talk Mediated by Recombination Directionality Factors Facilitates Excision from the Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Megan R.; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pathogenicity islands (PAIs) are mobile integrated genetic elements (MIGEs) that contain a diverse range of virulence factors and are essential in the evolution of pathogenic bacteria. PAIs are widespread among bacteria and integrate into the host genome, commonly at a tRNA locus, via integrase-mediated site-specific recombination. The excision of PAIs is the first step in the horizontal transfer of these elements and is not well understood. In this study, we examined the role of recombination directionality factors (RDFs) and their relationship with integrases in the excision of two PAIs essential for Vibrio cholerae host colonization: Vibrio pathogenicity island 1 (VPI-1) and VPI-2. VPI-1 does not contain an RDF, which allowed us to answer the question of whether RDFs are an absolute requirement for excision. We found that an RDF was required for efficient excision of VPI-2 but not VPI-1 and that RDFs can induce excision of both islands. Expression data revealed that the RDFs act as transcriptional repressors to both VPI-1- and VPI-2-encoded integrases. We demonstrated that the RDFs Vibrio excision factor A (VefA) and VefB bind at the attachment sites (overlapping the int promoter region) of VPI-1 and VPI-2, thus supporting this mode of integrase repression. In addition, V. cholerae RDFs are promiscuous due to their dual functions of promoting excision of both VPI-1 and VPI-2 and acting as negative transcriptional regulators of the integrases. This is the first demonstration of cross talk between PAIs mediated via RDFs which reveals the complex interactions that occur between separately acquired MIGEs. IMPORTANCE Deciphering the mechanisms of pathogenicity island excision is necessary for understanding the evolution and spread of these elements to their nonpathogenic counterparts. Such mechanistic insight would assist in predicting the mobility of uncharacterized genetic elements. This study identified extensive RDF-mediated cross talk between two

  14. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.

  15. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  16. High resolution mapping of modified DNA nucleobases using excision repair enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, D. Suzi; Ransom, Monica; Adane, Biniam; York, Kerri

    2014-01-01

    The incorporation and creation of modified nucleobases in DNA have profound effects on genome function. We describe methods for mapping positions and local content of modified DNA nucleobases in genomic DNA. We combined in vitro nucleobase excision with massively parallel DNA sequencing (Excision-seq) to determine the locations of modified nucleobases in genomic DNA. We applied the Excision-seq method to map uracil in E. coli and budding yeast and discovered significant variation in uracil content, wherein uracil is excluded from the earliest and latest replicating regions of the genome, possibly driven by changes in nucleotide pool composition. We also used Excision-seq to identify sites of pyrimidine dimer formation induced by UV light exposure, where the method could distinguish between sites of cyclobutane and 6-4 photoproduct formation. These UV mapping data enabled analysis of local sequence bias around pyrimidine dimers and suggested a preference for an adenosine downstream from 6-4 photoproducts. The Excision-seq method is broadly applicable for high precision, genome-wide mapping of modified nucleobases with cognate repair enzymes. PMID:25015380

  17. Application of cerium nitrate-silver sulphadiazine allows for postponement of excision and grafting.

    PubMed

    Vehmeyer-Heeman, M; Tondu, T; Van den Kerckhove, E; Boeckx, W

    2006-02-01

    Early excision and grafting cannot always be performed due to patient's medical status, and the lack of adequate donor sites. The use of cerium nitrate-silver sulphadiazine cream, which causes the formation of a leather-like eschar with excellent resistance to infection, is an alternative method. In order to postpone operations by using cerium nitrate-silver sulphadiazine, we compared the differences in contamination of the grafted areas between early and delayed excision. Eighteen patients underwent excision and grafting within 5 days post burn and nineteen patients were surgically treated after 5 days. Twelve months later the grafted areas were evaluated. Contamination of the grafted area occurred in 17 patients. No differences in contamination occurred between the early and delayed excision group, 8 versus 9. Also no differences in type of organism cultured and follow-up results were found between the early and delayed excision group. Cerium nitrate-silver sulphadiazine allows surgical treatment to be delayed without an increase of contamination of the grafted area and does not adversely affect the long-term outcome.

  18. Autobiographical memory of the recent past following frontal cortex or temporal lobe excisions.

    PubMed

    Thaiss, Laila; Petrides, Michael

    2008-08-01

    Previous research has raised questions regarding the necessity of the frontal cortex in autobiographical memory and the role that it plays in actively retrieving contextual information associated with personally relevant events. Autobiographical memory was studied in patients with unilateral excisions restricted to the frontal cortex or temporal lobe involving the amygdalo-hippocampal region and in normal controls using an event-sampling method. We examined accuracy of free recall, use of strategies during retrieval and memory for specific aspects of the autobiographical events, including temporal order. Patients with temporal lobe excisions were impaired in autobiographical recall. By contrast, patients with frontal cortical excisions exhibited normal autobiographical recall but were less likely to use temporal order spontaneously to organize event retrieval. Instruction to organize retrieval by temporal order failed to improve recall in temporal lobe patients and increased the incidence of plausible intrusion errors in left temporal patients. In contrast, patients with frontal cortical excisions now surpassed control subjects in recall of autobiographical events. Furthermore, the retrieval accuracy for the temporal order of diary events was not impaired in these patients. In a subsequent cued recall test, temporal lobe patients were impaired in their memory for the details of the diary events and their context. In conclusion, a basic impairment in autobiographical memory (including memory for temporal context) results from damage to the temporal lobe and not the frontal cortex. Patients with frontal excisions fail to use organizational strategies spontaneously to aid retrieval but can use these effectively if instructed to do so.

  19. Escherichia coli DNA photolyase stimulates uvrABC excision nuclease in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sancar, A; Franklin, K A; Sancar, G B

    1984-01-01

    Pyrimidine dimers are the major photoproducts produced in cellular DNA upon UV irradiation. In Escherichia coli there are dark and photorepair mechanisms that eliminate the dimers from DNA and prevent their lethal and mutagenic effects. To determine whether these repair mechanisms act cooperatively or competitively in repairing DNA, we investigated the effects upon one another of DNA photolyase, which mediates photorepair, and uvrABC excision nuclease, an enzyme complex of the uvrABC gene products, which catalyzes nucleotide excision repair. We found that photolyase stimulates the removal of pyrimidine dimers but not other DNA adducts by uvrABC excision nuclease. The two subunits of uvrABC excision nuclease, the uvrA and uvrB proteins which together bind to the dimer region of DNA, had no effect on the activity of photolyase. T4 endonuclease V, which like photolyase is specific for pyrimidine dimers, was inhibited by photolyase, suggesting that these two proteins recognize the same or similar chemical structures in UV-irradiated DNA that are different from those recognized by uvrABC excision nuclease. Images PMID:6390436

  20. Early excision and grafting of face and neck burns in patients over 20 years.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jana K; Engrav, Loren H; Heimbach, David M; Gibran, Nicole S; Costa, Beth A; Nakamura, Dana Y; Moore, Merilyn L; Blayney, Carolyn B; Hoover, Carolyn L

    2002-04-01

    Although excision and grafting of burns has become common and standard, many surgeons have been reluctant to excise and graft face burns. In fact, we could find photographic results at 1 year after grafting of only eight patients in the English literature. We began excision and grafting of face burns in 1979 and presented our first 16 patients in 1986 in this journal. With encouragement from Janzekovic and Jackson, we continued and have now used essentially the same procedure for more than 20 years in approximately 100 patients and, from this large series, are able to present outcomes. From January of 1979 to May of 1999, we performed excision and grafting on 91 patients with deep face burns. Data were recorded and 35-mm photographs were obtained throughout the 20-year period. We reviewed that database and the slide files of these patients. We found 45 patients with complete photographic sets including 1-year follow-up. Since, in our opinion, there is no useful, objective measure of appearance, we decided to simply publish all 45 sets of complete photographs, permitting the reader to subjectively form an opinion of the outcome of this procedure. The results are all shown as "full" face burns and two "partial" face burns. We continue to believe that early excision and grafting is indicated for face burns that will not heal within 3 weeks and that the procedure yields results that permit the burn victims to return to society and minimizes the time off work or out of school.