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Sample records for acoustic playback experiments

  1. Bioacoustic field research: a primer to acoustic analyses and playback experiments with primates.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Julia; Noser, Rahel; Hammerschmidt, Kurt

    2013-07-01

    Acoustic analyses of primate vocalizations as well as playback experiments are staple methods in primatology. Acoustic analyses have been used to investigate the influence of factors such as individuality, context, sex, age, and size on variation in calls. More recent studies have expanded our knowledge on the effects of phylogenetic relatedness and the structure of primate vocal repertoires in general. Complementary playback experiments allow direct testing of hypotheses regarding the attribution of meaning to calls, the cognitive mechanisms underpinning responses, and/or the adaptive value of primate behavior. After briefly touching on the historical background of this field of research, we first provide an introduction to recording primate vocalizations and discuss different approaches to describe primate calls in terms of their temporal and spectral properties. Second, we present a tutorial regarding the preparation, execution, and interpretation of field playback experiments, including a review of studies that have used such approaches to investigate the responses to acoustic variation in calls including the integration of contextual and acoustic information, recognition of kin and social relationships, and social knowledge. Based on the review of the literature and our own experience, we make a number of recommendations regarding the most common problems and pitfalls. The power of acoustic analyses typically hinges on the quality of the recordings and the number of individuals represented in the sample. Playback experiments require profound knowledge of the natural behavior of the animals for solid interpretation; experiments should be conducted sparingly, to avoid habituation of the subjects to the occurrence of the calls; experimenter-blind designs chosen whenever possible; and researchers should brace themselves for long periods of waiting times until the appropriate moments to do the experiment arise. If all these aspects are considered, acoustic analyses

  2. Bioacoustic Field Research: A Primer to Acoustic Analyses and Playback Experiments With Primates

    PubMed Central

    FISCHER, JULIA; NOSER, RAHEL; HAMMERSCHMIDT, KURT

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic analyses of primate vocalizations as well as playback experiments are staple methods in primatology. Acoustic analyses have been used to investigate the influence of factors such as individuality, context, sex, age, and size on variation in calls. More recent studies have expanded our knowledge on the effects of phylogenetic relatedness and the structure of primate vocal repertoires in general. Complementary playback experiments allow direct testing of hypotheses regarding the attribution of meaning to calls, the cognitive mechanisms underpinning responses, and/or the adaptive value of primate behavior. After briefly touching on the historical background of this field of research, we first provide an introduction to recording primate vocalizations and discuss different approaches to describe primate calls in terms of their temporal and spectral properties. Second, we present a tutorial regarding the preparation, execution, and interpretation of field playback experiments, including a review of studies that have used such approaches to investigate the responses to acoustic variation in calls including the integration of contextual and acoustic information, recognition of kin and social relationships, and social knowledge. Based on the review of the literature and our own experience, we make a number of recommendations regarding the most common problems and pitfalls. The power of acoustic analyses typically hinges on the quality of the recordings and the number of individuals represented in the sample. Playback experiments require profound knowledge of the natural behavior of the animals for solid interpretation; experiments should be conducted sparingly, to avoid habituation of the subjects to the occurrence of the calls; experimenter-blind designs chosen whenever possible; and researchers should brace themselves for long periods of waiting times until the appropriate moments to do the experiment arise. If all these aspects are considered, acoustic analyses

  3. Playback Experiments for Noise Exposure.

    PubMed

    Holles, Sophie; Simpson, Stephen D; Lecchini, David; Radford, Andrew N

    2016-01-01

    Playbacks are a useful tool for conducting well-controlled and replicated experiments on the effects of anthropogenic noise, particularly for repeated exposures. However, playbacks are unlikely to fully reproduce original sources of anthropogenic noise. Here we examined the sound pressure and particle acceleration of boat noise playbacks in a field experiment and reveal that although there remain recognized limitations, the signal-to-noise ratios of boat playbacks to ambient noise do not exceed those of a real boat. The experimental setup tested is therefore of value for use in experiments on the effects of repeated exposure of aquatic animals to boat noise.

  4. Perception of Male Caller Identity in Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus): Acoustic Analysis and Playback Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Benjamin D.; Ellis, William A. H.; McKinnon, Allan J.; Brumm, Jacqui; Nilsson, Karen; Fitch, W. Tecumseh

    2011-01-01

    The ability to signal individual identity using vocal signals and distinguish between conspecifics based on vocal cues is important in several mammal species. Furthermore, it can be important for receivers to differentiate between callers in reproductive contexts. In this study, we used acoustic analyses to determine whether male koala bellows are individually distinctive and to investigate the relative importance of different acoustic features for coding individuality. We then used a habituation-discrimination paradigm to investigate whether koalas discriminate between the bellow vocalisations of different male callers. Our results show that male koala bellows are highly individualized, and indicate that cues related to vocal tract filtering contribute the most to vocal identity. In addition, we found that male and female koalas habituated to the bellows of a specific male showed a significant dishabituation when they were presented with bellows from a novel male. The significant reduction in behavioural response to a final rehabituation playback shows this was not a chance rebound in response levels. Our findings indicate that male koala bellows are highly individually distinctive and that the identity of male callers is functionally relevant to male and female koalas during the breeding season. We go on to discuss the biological relevance of signalling identity in this species' sexual communication and the potential practical implications of our findings for acoustic monitoring of male population levels. PMID:21633499

  5. Perception of male caller identity in Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus): acoustic analysis and playback experiments.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Benjamin D; Ellis, William A H; McKinnon, Allan J; Brumm, Jacqui; Nilsson, Karen; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2011-01-01

    The ability to signal individual identity using vocal signals and distinguish between conspecifics based on vocal cues is important in several mammal species. Furthermore, it can be important for receivers to differentiate between callers in reproductive contexts. In this study, we used acoustic analyses to determine whether male koala bellows are individually distinctive and to investigate the relative importance of different acoustic features for coding individuality. We then used a habituation-discrimination paradigm to investigate whether koalas discriminate between the bellow vocalisations of different male callers. Our results show that male koala bellows are highly individualized, and indicate that cues related to vocal tract filtering contribute the most to vocal identity. In addition, we found that male and female koalas habituated to the bellows of a specific male showed a significant dishabituation when they were presented with bellows from a novel male. The significant reduction in behavioural response to a final rehabituation playback shows this was not a chance rebound in response levels. Our findings indicate that male koala bellows are highly individually distinctive and that the identity of male callers is functionally relevant to male and female koalas during the breeding season. We go on to discuss the biological relevance of signalling identity in this species' sexual communication and the potential practical implications of our findings for acoustic monitoring of male population levels.

  6. Female rhesus macaques discriminate unfamiliar paternal sisters in playback experiments: support for acoustic phenotype matching

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferle, Dana; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V.; Widdig, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Widespread evidence exists that when relatives live together, kinship plays a central role in shaping the evolution of social behaviour. Previous studies showed that female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) recognize familiar maternal kin using vocal cues. Recognizing paternal kin might, however, be more difficult as rhesus females mate promiscuously during the possible conception period, most probably concealing paternity. Behavioural observations indicate that semi free-ranging female rhesus macaques prefer to associate with their paternal half-sisters in comparison to unrelated females within the same group, particularly when born within the same age cohort. However, the cues and mechanism/s used in paternal kin discrimination remain under debate. Here, we investigated whether female rhesus macaques use the acoustic modality to discriminate between paternal half-sisters and non-kin, and tested familiarity and phenotype matching as the underlying mechanisms. We found that test females responded more often to calls of paternal half-sisters compared with calls of unrelated females, and that this discrimination ability was independent of the level of familiarity between callers and test females, which provides, to our knowledge, the first evidence for acoustic phenotype matching. Our study strengthens the evidence that female rhesus macaques can recognize their paternal kin, and that vocalizations are used as a cue. PMID:24225452

  7. Changes in acoustic startle reflex in rats induced by playback of 22-kHz calls.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Ushida, Takahiro

    2017-02-01

    In aversive or dangerous situations, adult rats emit long characteristic ultrasonic calls, often termed "22-kHz calls," which have been suggested to play a role of alarm calls. Although the playback experiment is one of the most effective ways to investigate the alarming properties of 22-kHz calls, clear behavioral evidence showing the anxiogenic effects of these playback stimuli has not been directly obtained to date. In this study, we investigated whether playback of 22-kHz calls or synthesized sine tones could change the acoustic startle reflex (ASR), enhancement of which is widely considered to be a reliable index of anxiety-related negative affective states in rats. Playback of 22-kHz calls significantly enhanced the ASR in rats. Enhancement effects caused by playback of 22-kHz calls from young rats were relatively weak compared to those after calls from adult rats. Playback of synthesized 25-kHz sine tones enhanced ASR in subjects, but not synthesized 60-kHz tones. Further, shortening the individual call duration of synthesized 25-kHz sine tones also enhanced the ASR. Accordingly, it is suggested that 22-kHz calls induce anxiety by socially communicated alarming signals in rats. The results also demonstrated that call frequency, i.e., of 22kHz, appears important for ultrasonic alarm-signal communication in rats.

  8. Vocal learning in a social mammal: Demonstrated by isolation and playback experiments in bats.

    PubMed

    Prat, Yosef; Taub, Mor; Yovel, Yossi

    2015-03-01

    The evolution of human language is shrouded in mystery as it is unparalleled in the animal kingdom. Whereas vocal learning is crucial for the development of speech in humans, it seems rare among nonhuman animals. Songbirds often serve as a model for vocal learning, but the lack of a mammalian model hinders our quest for the origin of this capability. We report the influence of both isolation and playback experiments on the vocal development of a mammal, the Egyptian fruit bat. We continuously recorded pups from birth to adulthood and found that, when raised in a colony, pups acquired the adult repertoire, whereas when acoustically isolated, they exhibited underdeveloped vocalizations. Isolated pups that heard bat recordings exhibited a repertoire that replicated the playbacks they were exposed to. These findings demonstrate vocal learning in a social mammal, and suggest bats as a model for language acquisition.

  9. The two parts of the blackcap song: Acoustic analysis and male responses to playbacks.

    PubMed

    Linossier, Juliette; Courvoisier, Hélène; Aubin, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Bird songs are complex manifold acoustic signals serving two main functions: mate attraction and territorial defense. The way information is encoded in the song often reflects adaptation to proximate and ultimate constraints. Male blackcaps, Sylvia atricapilla, display versatile songs with two parts, a warble and a whistle, whose functions remain unclear. We showed that the two parts of songs differ in terms of intensity, frequency and temporal parameters. They also contain totally different sets of syllables. Furthermore, the warble is versatile whereas the whistle part shows syllable sharing between individuals leaving closeby. Altogether, the results of our analysis suggest that the two parts encode different information potentially directed to different audiences. In order to test the potential function of these two parts, we performed playback experiments by broadcasting entire songs and each part separately. Warble and whistle alone are sufficient to trigger male responses and males sing both parts in responses to all stimuli, showing that both parts of the song are used in male-male competition. It is suggested that the segregation of information in the blackcap song could be related to public versus private communication, used in both intra- and intersexual contexts, rather than directed to male versus female audiences only.

  10. Methodological considerations of acoustic playbacks to test the behavioral significance of call directionality in male northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Marla M.; Insley, Stephen J.; Southall, Brandon L.; Schusterman, Ronald J.

    2005-09-01

    While attempting to gain access to receptive females, male northern elephant seals form dominance hierarchies through multiple dyadic interactions involving visual and acoustic signals. These signals are both highly stereotyped and directional. Previous behavioral observations suggested that males attend to the directional cues of these signals. We used in situ vocal playbacks to test whether males attend to directional cues of the acoustic components of a competitors calls (i.e., variation in call spectra and source levels). Here, we will focus on playback methodology. Playback calls were multiple exemplars of a marked dominant male from an isolated area, recorded with a directional microphone and DAT recorder and edited into a natural sequence that controlled call amplitude. Control calls were recordings of ambient rookery sounds with the male calls removed. Subjects were 20 marked males (10 adults and 10 subadults) all located at An~o Nuevo, CA. Playback presentations, calibrated for sound-pressure level, were broadcast at a distance of 7 m from each subject. Most responses were classified into the following categories: visual orientation, postural change, calling, movement toward or away from the loudspeaker, and re-directed aggression. We also investigated developmental, hierarchical, and ambient noise variables that were thought to influence male behavior.

  11. Pattern Playback revisited: Unvoiced stop consonant perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefte, Michael; Kluender, Keith R.

    2005-10-01

    Among the most influential publications in speech perception is Liberman, Delattre, and Cooper's [Am. J. Phys. 65, 497-516 (1952)] report on the identification of synthetic, voiceless stops generated by the Pattern Playback. Their map of stop consonant identification shows a highly complex relationship between acoustics and perception. This complex mapping poses a challenge to many classes of relatively simple pattern recognition models which are unable to capture the original finding of Liberman et al. that identification of /k/ was bimodal for bursts preceding front vowels but otherwise unimodal. A replication of this experiment was conducted in an attempt to reproduce these identification patterns using a simulation of the Pattern Playback device. Examination of spectrographic data from stimuli generated by the Pattern Playback revealed additional spectral peaks that are consistent with harmonic distortion characteristic of tube amplifiers of that era. Only when harmonic distortion was introduced did bimodal /k/ responses in front-vowel context emerge. The acoustic consequence of this distortion is to add, e.g., a high-frequency peak to midfrequency bursts or a midfrequency peak to a low-frequency burst. This likely resulted in additional /k/ responses when the second peak approximated the second formant of front vowels. Although these results do not challenge the main observations made by Liberman et al. that perception of stop bursts is context dependent, they do show that the mapping from acoustics to perception is much less complex without these additional distortion products.

  12. The roles of vocal and visual interactions in social learning zebra finches: A video playback experiment.

    PubMed

    Guillette, Lauren M; Healy, Susan D

    2016-12-30

    The transmission of information from an experienced demonstrator to a naïve observer often depends on characteristics of the demonstrator, such as familiarity, success or dominance status. Whether or not the demonstrator pays attention to and/or interacts with the observer may also affect social information acquisition or use by the observer. Here we used a video-demonstrator paradigm first to test whether video demonstrators have the same effect as using live demonstrators in zebra finches, and second, to test the importance of visual and vocal interactions between the demonstrator and observer on social information use by the observer. We found that female zebra finches copied novel food choices of male demonstrators they saw via live-streaming video while they did not consistently copy from the demonstrators when they were seen in playbacks of the same videos. Although naive observers copied in the absence of vocalizations by the demonstrator, as they copied from playback of videos with the sound off, females did not copy where there was a mis-match between the visual information provided by the video and vocal information from a live male that was out of sight. Taken together these results suggest that video demonstration is a useful methodology for testing social information transfer, at least in a foraging context, but more importantly, that social information use varies according to the vocal interactions, or lack thereof, between the observer and the demonstrator.

  13. Notes on some experiments on the application of subtractive compensation to USGS seismic magnetic tape recording and playback systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, Jerry P.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of these experiments is to lay the groundwork for the implementation of subtractive compensation of the USGS seismic network tape playbacks utilizing the Develco model 6203 discriminators at a x1 playback speed. Although the Develco discriminators were designed for this application and a matching Develco compensation discriminator was purchased, effective use of this system for subtractive compensation has been blocked by the inadequate (frequency dependent) matching of the phase of the compensation signal to that of the data signal at the point compensation is carried out in the data discriminators. John Van Schaack has ameliorated the phase mismatch problem by an empirical alteration of the compensation discriminator input bandpass filter. We have selected a set (of eight) Develco discriminators and adjusted their compensation signal input levels to minimize spurious signals (noise) originating from tape speed irregularities. The sensitivity of the data discriminators was adjusted so that deviations of +125 Hz and -125 Hz produced output signals of +2.00 volts and -2.00 volts, respectively. The eight data discriminators are driven by a multiplex signal on a single tape track (subcarriers 680, 1020, 1360, 1700, 2040, 2380, 2720, and 3060 Hz). The Develco-supplied compensation discriminator requires an unmodulated 3125 Hz signal on a separate tape track.

  14. Divergence in mating signals correlates with genetic distance and behavioural responses to playback.

    PubMed

    Sosa-López, J R; Martínez Gómez, J E; Mennill, D J

    2016-02-01

    Animals use acoustic signals to defend resources against rivals and attract breeding partners. As with many biological traits, acoustic signals may reflect ancestry; closely related species often produce more similar signals than do distantly related species. Whether this similarity in acoustic signals is biologically relevant to animals is poorly understood. We conducted a playback experiment to measure the physical and vocal responses of male songbirds to the songs of both conspecific and allopatric-congeneric animals that varied in their acoustic and genetic similarity. Our subjects were territorial males of four species of neotropical Troglodytes wrens: Brown-throated Wrens (Troglodytes brunneicollis), Cozumel Wrens (T. beani), Clarion Wrens (T. tanneri) and Socorro Wrens (T. sissonii). Our results indicate that birds respond to playback of both conspecific and allopatric-congeneric animals; that acoustic differences increase with genetic distance; and that genetic divergence predicts the strength of behavioural responses to playback, after removing the effects of acoustic similarity between subjects' songs and playback stimuli. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the most distantly related species have the most divergent songs; that male wrens perceive divergence in fine structural characteristics of songs; and that perceptual differences between species reflect evolutionary history. This study offers novel insight into the importance of acoustic divergence of learned signals and receiver responses in species recognition.

  15. Size-dependent physiological responses of shore crabs to single and repeated playback of ship noise.

    PubMed

    Wale, Matthew A; Simpson, Stephen D; Radford, Andrew N

    2013-04-23

    Anthropogenic noise has fundamentally changed the acoustics of terrestrial and aquatic environments, and there is growing empirical evidence that even a single noise exposure can affect behaviour in a variety of vertebrate organisms. Here, we use controlled experiments to investigate how the physiology of a marine invertebrate, the shore crab (Carcinus maenas), is affected by both single and repeated exposure to ship-noise playback. Crabs experiencing ship-noise playback consumed more oxygen, indicating a higher metabolic rate and potentially greater stress, than those exposed to ambient-noise playback. The response to single ship-noise playback was size-dependent, with heavier crabs showing a stronger response than lighter individuals. Repeated exposure to ambient-noise playback led to increased oxygen consumption (probably due to handling stress), whereas repeated exposure to ship-noise playback produced no change in physiological response; explanations include the possibility that crabs exhibited a maximal response on first exposure to ship-noise playback, or that they habituated or become tolerant to it. These results highlight that invertebrates, like vertebrates, may also be susceptible to the detrimental impacts of anthropogenic noise and demonstrate the tractability for more detailed investigations into the effects of this pervasive global pollutant.

  16. Effects of personality on territory defence in communication networks: a playback experiment with radio-tagged great tits.

    PubMed

    Amy, Mathieu; Sprau, Philipp; de Goede, Piet; Naguib, Marc

    2010-12-07

    Individuals often differ consistently in behaviour across time and contexts, and such consistent behavioural differences are commonly described as personality. Personality can play a central role in social behaviour both in dyadic interactions and in social networks. We investigated whether explorative behaviour, as proxy of personality of territorial male great tits (Parus major), predicts their own and their neighbours' territorial responses towards simulated intruders. Several weeks prior to playback, subjects were taken from the wild to test their exploratory behaviour in a standard context in the laboratory. Exploratory behaviour provides a proxy of personality along a slow-fast explorer continuum. Upon release, males were radio-tracked and subsequently exposed to interactive playback simulating a more or a less aggressive territorial intruder (by either overlapping or alternating broadcast songs with the subjects' songs). At the same time, we radio-tracked a neighbour of the playback subject. Male vocal responses during playback and spatial movements after playback varied according to male explorative behaviour and playback treatment. Males with lower exploration scores approached the loudspeaker less, and sang more songs, shorter songs and songs with slower element rates than did males with higher exploration scores. Moreover, neighbour responses were related to the explorative behaviour of the subject receiving the playback but not to their own explorative behaviour. Our overall findings reveal for the first time how personality traits affect resource defence within a communication network providing new insights on the cause of variation in resource defence behaviour.

  17. You talkin' to me? Interactive playback is a powerful yet underused tool in animal communication research.

    PubMed

    King, Stephanie L

    2015-07-01

    Over the years, playback experiments have helped further our understanding of the wonderful world of animal communication. They have provided fundamental insights into animal behaviour and the function of communicative signals in numerous taxa. As important as these experiments are, however, there is strong evidence to suggest that the information conveyed in a signal may only have value when presented interactively. By their very nature, signalling exchanges are interactive and therefore, an interactive playback design is a powerful tool for examining the function of such exchanges. While researchers working on frog and songbird vocal interactions have long championed interactive playback, it remains surprisingly underused across other taxa. The interactive playback approach is not limited to studies of acoustic signalling, but can be applied to other sensory modalities, including visual, chemical and electrical communication. Here, I discuss interactive playback as a potent yet underused technique in the field of animal behaviour. I present a concise review of studies that have used interactive playback thus far, describe how it can be applied, and discuss its limitations and challenges. My hope is that this review will result in more scientists applying this innovative technique to their own study subjects, as a means of furthering our understanding of the function of signalling interactions in animal communication systems.

  18. You talkin’ to me? Interactive playback is a powerful yet underused tool in animal communication research

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephanie L.

    2015-01-01

    Over the years, playback experiments have helped further our understanding of the wonderful world of animal communication. They have provided fundamental insights into animal behaviour and the function of communicative signals in numerous taxa. As important as these experiments are, however, there is strong evidence to suggest that the information conveyed in a signal may only have value when presented interactively. By their very nature, signalling exchanges are interactive and therefore, an interactive playback design is a powerful tool for examining the function of such exchanges. While researchers working on frog and songbird vocal interactions have long championed interactive playback, it remains surprisingly underused across other taxa. The interactive playback approach is not limited to studies of acoustic signalling, but can be applied to other sensory modalities, including visual, chemical and electrical communication. Here, I discuss interactive playback as a potent yet underused technique in the field of animal behaviour. I present a concise review of studies that have used interactive playback thus far, describe how it can be applied, and discuss its limitations and challenges. My hope is that this review will result in more scientists applying this innovative technique to their own study subjects, as a means of furthering our understanding of the function of signalling interactions in animal communication systems. PMID:26136047

  19. The binaural performance of a cross-talk cancellation system with matched or mismatched setup and playback acoustics

    PubMed Central

    Akeroyd, Michael A.; Chambers, John; Bullock, David; Palmer, Alan R.; Summerfield, A. Quentin; Nelson, Philip A.; Gatehouse, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Cross-talk cancellation is a method for synthesising virtual auditory space using loudspeakers. One implementation is the “Optimal Source Distribution” technique [T. Takeuchi and P. Nelson, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112, 2786-2797 (2002)], in which the audio bandwidth is split across three pairs of loudspeakers, placed at azimuths of ±90°, ±15°, and ±3°, conveying low, mid and high frequencies, respectively. A computational simulation of this system was developed and verified against measurements made on an acoustic system using a manikin. Both the acoustic system and the simulation gave a wideband average cancellation of almost 25 dB. The simulation showed that when there was a mismatch between the head-related transfer functions used to set up the system and those of the final listener, the cancellation was reduced to an average of 13 dB. Moreover, in this case the binaural ITDs and ILDs delivered by the simulation of the OSD system often differed from the target values. It is concluded that only when the OSD system is set up with “matched” head-related transfer functions can it deliver accurate binaural cues. PMID:17348528

  20. Simulated Birdwatchers’ Playback Affects the Behavior of Two Tropical Birds

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J. Berton C.; Haskell, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Although recreational birdwatchers may benefit conservation by generating interest in birds, they may also have negative effects. One such potentially negative impact is the widespread use of recorded vocalizations, or “playback,” to attract birds of interest, including range-restricted and threatened species. Although playback has been widely used to test hypotheses about the evolution of behavior, no peer-reviewed study has examined the impacts of playback in a birdwatching context on avian behavior. We studied the effects of simulated birdwatchers’ playback on the vocal behavior of Plain-tailed Wrens Thryothorus euophrys and Rufous Antpittas Grallaria rufula in Ecuador. Study species’ vocal behavior was monitored for an hour after playing either a single bout of five minutes of song or a control treatment of background noise. We also studied the effects of daily five minute playback on five groups of wrens over 20 days. In single bout experiments, antpittas made more vocalizations of all types, except for trills, after playback compared to controls. Wrens sang more duets after playback, but did not produce more contact calls. In repeated playback experiments, wren responses were strong at first, but hardly detectable by day 12. During the study, one study group built a nest, apparently unperturbed, near a playback site. The playback-induced habituation and changes in vocal behavior we observed suggest that scientists should consider birdwatching activity when selecting research sites so that results are not biased by birdwatchers’ playback. Increased vocalizations after playback could be interpreted as a negative effect of playback if birds expend energy, become stressed, or divert time from other activities. In contrast, the habituation we documented suggests that frequent, regular birdwatchers’ playback may have minor effects on wren behavior. PMID:24147094

  1. Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, Benny L.; Olsen, Robert O.; Kennedy, Bruce W.

    1993-01-01

    The Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE), performed under the auspices of NATO and the Acoustics Working Group, was conducted at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, USA, during the period 11-28 Jul. 1991. JAPE consisted of 220 trials using various acoustic sources including speakers, propane cannon, various types of military vehicles, helicopters, a 155mm howitzer, and static high explosives. Of primary importance to the performance of these tests was the intensive characterization of the atmosphere before and during the trials. Because of the wide range of interests on the part of the participants, JAPE was organized in such a manner to provide a broad cross section of test configurations. These included short and long range propagation from fixed and moving vehicles, terrain masking, and vehicle detection. A number of independent trials were also performed by individual participating agencies using the assets available during JAPE. These tests, while not documented in this report, provided substantial and important data to those groups. Perhaps the most significant feature of JAPE is the establishment of a permanent data base which can be used by not only the participants but by others interested in acoustics. A follow-on test was performed by NASA LaRC during the period 19-29 Aug. 1991 at the same location. These trials consisted of 59 overflights of supersonic aircraft in order to establish the relationship between atmospheric turbulence and the received sonic boom energy at the surface.

  2. Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) singers in Hawaii are attracted to playback of similar song (L).

    PubMed

    Darling, James D; Jones, Meagan E; Nicklin, Charles P

    2012-11-01

    The use of playback experiments to study humpback whale song was assessed. Singers clearly detected playback song while singing and with other singers in the distance. Singers approached or joined song similar to their own from as far as 800 m but did not do so for a different (foreign) song. In one compound trial, on the playback of different song, the singer moved away and continued singing; when the playback was changed to similar song, it stopped singing and joined the playback speaker. Song playback experiments on the breeding grounds are viable and may provide insight into song function.

  3. Callback response of dugongs to conspecific chirp playbacks.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Kotaro; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Shinke, Tomio; Adulyanukosol, Kanjana; Arai, Nobuaki

    2011-06-01

    Dugongs (Dugong dugon) produce bird-like calls such as chirps and trills. The vocal responses of dugongs to playbacks of several acoustic stimuli were investigated. Animals were exposed to four different playback stimuli: a recorded chirp from a wild dugong, a synthesized down-sweep sound, a synthesized constant-frequency sound, and silence. Wild dugongs vocalized more frequently after playback of broadcast chirps than that after constant-frequency sounds or silence. The down-sweep sound also elicited more vocal responses than did silence. No significant difference was found between the broadcast chirps and the down-sweep sound. The ratio of wild dugong chirps to all calls and the dominant frequencies of the wild dugong calls were significantly higher during playbacks of broadcast chirps, down-sweep sounds, and constant-frequency sounds than during those of silence. The source level and duration of dugong chirps increased significantly as signaling distance increased. No significant correlation was found between signaling distance and the source level of trills. These results show that dugongs vocalize to playbacks of frequency-modulated signals and suggest that the source level of dugong chirps may be manipulated to compensate for transmission loss between the source and receiver. This study provides the first behavioral observations revealing the function of dugong chirps.

  4. Experiments on the Acoustics of Whistling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadle, Christine H.

    1983-01-01

    The acoustics of speech production allows the prediction of resonances for a given vocal tract configuration. Combining these predictions with aerodynamic theory developed for mechanical whistles makes theories about human whistling more complete. Several experiments involving human whistling are reported which support the theory and indicate new…

  5. Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE-91) Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr. (Compiler); Chestnutt, David (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    The Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE), was conducted at the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, USA, during the period 11-28 Jul. 1991. JAPE consisted of various short and long range propagation experiments using various acoustic sources including speakers, propane cannons, helicopters, a 155 mm howitzer, and static high explosives. Of primary importance to the performance of theses tests was the extensive characterization of the atmosphere during these tests. This atmospheric characterization included turbulence measurements. A workshop to disseminate the results of JAPE-91 was held in Hampton, VA, on 28 Apr. 1993. This report is a compilation of the presentations made at the workshop along with a list of attendees and the agenda.

  6. Vehicular sources in acoustic propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Fitzgerald, James; Arruda, Anthony; Parides, George

    1990-01-01

    One of the most important uses of acoustic propagation models lies in the area of detection and tracking of vehicles. Propagation models are used to compute transmission losses in performance prediction models and to analyze the results of past experiments. Vehicles can also provide the means for cost effective experiments to measure acoustic propagation conditions over significant ranges. In order to properly correlate the information provided by the experimental data and the propagation models, the following issues must be taken into consideration: the phenomenology of the vehicle noise sources must be understood and characterized; the vehicle's location or 'ground truth' must be accurately reproduced and synchronized with the acoustic data; and sufficient meteorological data must be collected to support the requirements of the propagation models. The experimental procedures and instrumentation needed to carry out propagation experiments are discussed. Illustrative results are presented for two cases. First, a helicopter was used to measure propagation losses at a range of 1 to 10 Km. Second, a heavy diesel-powered vehicle was used to measure propagation losses in the 300 to 2200 m range.

  7. Radiosurgery for acoustic neurinomas: Early experience

    SciTech Connect

    Linskey, M.E.; Lunsford, L.D.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1990-05-01

    We reviewed our early experience with the first 26 patients with acoustic neurinomas (21 unilateral, 5 bilateral) treated by stereotactic radiosurgery using the first North American 201-source cobalt-60 gamma knife. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 19 months (median, 13 months). Serial postoperative imaging showed either a decrease in tumor size (11 patients) or growth arrest (15 patients). Loss of central contrast enhancement was a characteristic change (18 patients). Seven patients had good or serviceable hearing preoperatively. In all 7 the preoperative hearing status was retained immediately after radiosurgery. At follow-up, 3 had preserved hearing, 1 had reduced hearing, and 3 had lost all hearing in the treated ear. Hearing in 1 patient that was nonserviceable preoperatively later improved to a serviceable hearing level. Delayed facial paresis developed in 6 patients, and delayed trigeminal sensory loss developed in 7 patients, none of whom had significant deficits before radiosurgery. Both facial and trigeminal deficits tended to improve within 3 to 6 months of onset with excellent recovery anticipated. Lower cranial nerve dysfunction was not observed. All 26 patients remain at their preoperative employment or functional status. At present, stereotactic radiosurgery is an alternative treatment for acoustic neurinomas in patients who are elderly, have significant concomitant medical problems, have a tumor in their only hearing ear, have bilateral acoustic neurinomas, refuse microsurgical excision, or have recurrent tumor despite surgical resection. Although longer and more extensive follow-up is required, the control of tumor growth and the acceptable rate of complications in this early experience testifies to the future expanding role of this technique in the management of selected acoustic neurinomas.

  8. Tagging and Playback Studies to Toothed Whales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    whales react strongly to sonar, killer whale calls, and bandlimited noise by ceasing echolocation and completing an unusually slow, directional ascent...the research cruises funded under this project. The data obtained in this study on responses of pilot whales to playback of killer whale sounds were...award number N000140810661, so that they could boost their sample size of playbacks of killer whale sounds to pilot whales , and to add playbacks that

  9. The North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory deep-water acoustic propagation experiments in the Philippine Sea.

    PubMed

    Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Mercer, James A; Andrew, Rex K; Dushaw, Brian D; Baggeroer, Arthur B; Heaney, Kevin D; D'Spain, Gerald L; Colosi, John A; Stephen, Ralph A; Kemp, John N; Howe, Bruce M; Van Uffelen, Lora J; Wage, Kathleen E

    2013-10-01

    A series of experiments conducted in the Philippine Sea during 2009-2011 investigated deep-water acoustic propagation and ambient noise in this oceanographically and geologically complex region: (i) the 2009 North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory (NPAL) Pilot Study/Engineering Test, (ii) the 2010-2011 NPAL Philippine Sea Experiment, and (iii) the Ocean Bottom Seismometer Augmentation of the 2010-2011 NPAL Philippine Sea Experiment. The experimental goals included (a) understanding the impacts of fronts, eddies, and internal tides on acoustic propagation, (b) determining whether acoustic methods, together with other measurements and ocean modeling, can yield estimates of the time-evolving ocean state useful for making improved acoustic predictions, (c) improving our understanding of the physics of scattering by internal waves and spice, (d) characterizing the depth dependence and temporal variability of ambient noise, and (e) understanding the relationship between the acoustic field in the water column and the seismic field in the seafloor. In these experiments, moored and ship-suspended low-frequency acoustic sources transmitted to a newly developed distributed vertical line array receiver capable of spanning the water column in the deep ocean. The acoustic transmissions and ambient noise were also recorded by a towed hydrophone array, by acoustic Seagliders, and by ocean bottom seismometers.

  10. Detection probability of vocalizing dugongs during playback of conspecific calls.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Kotaro; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Shinke, Tomio; Sasamori, Kotoe; Miyauchi, Yukio; Abe, Yuki; Adulyanukosol, Kanjana; Arai, Nobuaki

    2009-10-01

    Dugongs (Dugong dugon) were monitored using simultaneous passive acoustic methods and visual observations in Thai waters during January 2008. Chirp and trill calls were detected by a towed stereo hydrophone array system. Two teams of experienced observers conducted standard visual observations on the same boat. Comparisons of detection probabilities of acoustic and visual monitoring between two independent observers were calculated. Acoustic and visual detection probabilities were 15.1% and 15.7%, respectively, employing a 300 s matching time interval. When conspecific chirp calls were broadcast from an underwater speaker deployed on the side of the observation boat, the detection probability of acoustic monitoring rose to 19.2%. The visual detection probability was 12.5%. Vocal hot spots characterized by frequent acoustic detection of calls were suggested by dispersion analysis, while dugongs were visually observed constantly throughout the focal area (p<0.001). Passive acoustic monitoring assisted the survey since detection performance similar to that of experienced visual observers was shown. Playback of conspecific chirps appeared to increase the detection probability, which could be beneficial for future field surveys using passive acoustics in order to ensure the attendance of dugongs in the focal area.

  11. Mate preference in the painted goby: the influence of visual and acoustic courtship signals.

    PubMed

    Amorim, M Clara P; da Ponte, Ana Nunes; Caiano, Manuel; Pedroso, Silvia S; Pereira, Ricardo; Fonseca, Paulo J

    2013-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that females of a small vocal marine fish with exclusive paternal care, the painted goby, prefer high parental-quality mates such as large or high-condition males. We tested the effect of male body size and male visual and acoustic courtship behaviour (playback experiments) on female mating preferences by measuring time spent near one of a two-choice stimuli. Females did not show preference for male size but preferred males that showed higher levels of courtship, a trait known to advertise condition (fat reserves). Also, time spent near the preferred male depended on male courtship effort. Playback experiments showed that when sound was combined with visual stimuli (a male confined in a small aquarium placed near each speaker), females spent more time near the male associated with courtship sound than with the control male (associated with white noise or silence). Although male visual courtship effort also affected female preference in the pre-playback period, this effect decreased during playback and disappeared in the post-playback period. Courtship sound stimuli alone did not elicit female preference in relation to a control. Taken together, the results suggest that visual and mainly acoustic courtship displays are subject to mate preference and may advertise parental quality in this species. Our results indicate that visual and acoustic signals interplay in a complex fashion and highlight the need to examine how different sensory modalities affect mating preferences in fish and other vertebrates.

  12. Behavioral Responses of Nave Cuvier’s Beaked Whales in the Ligurian Sea to Playback of Anthropogenic and Natural Sounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    di Bioacustica e Ricerche Ambientali (CIBRA) supplied the towed hydrophone arrays, amplifiers, and computers required for passive acoustic monitoring...of Ziphius clicks, along with skilled passive acoustic monitoring personnel. Massimiliano Rosso (CIMA Research Foundation) provided detailed life...both historical Ziphius sighting and weather data to provide the highest number of tagging and playback opportunities. A 24 m schooner, the RV Aleph

  13. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    the ocean from wind and solar forcing and preserving the stable Arctic acoustic channel. Ice conditions are not the only environmental changes in...measurements: • Temperature and salinity from Sea- Bird MicroCATs and Temperature Recorders on the DVLA and the acoustic transceiver moorings (J. Colosi

  14. Acoustical experiment of yogurt fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, H; Mizutani, K; Ohbuchi, T; Nakamura, T

    2006-12-22

    One of the important factors through food manufacturing is hygienic management. Thus, food manufactures prove their hygienic activities by taking certifications like a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP). This concept also applies to food monitoring. Acoustical measurements have advantage for other measurement in food monitoring because they make it possible to measure with noncontact and nondestructive. We tried to monitor lactic fermentation of yogurt by a probing sensor using a pair of acoustic transducers. Temperature of the solution changes by the reaction heat of fermentation. Consequently the sound velocity propagated through the solution also changes depending on the temperature. At the same time, the solution change its phase from liquid to gel. The transducers usage in the solution indicates the change of the temperature as the change of the phase difference between two transducers. The acoustic method has advantages of nondestructive measurement that reduces contamination of food product by measuring instrument. The sensor was inserted into milk with lactic acid bacterial stain of 19 degrees C and monitored phase retardation of propagated acoustic wave and its temperature with thermocouples in the mild. The monitoring result of fermentation from milk to Caspian Sea yogurt by the acoustic transducers with the frequency of 3.7 MHz started to show gradient change in temperature caused by reaction heat of fermentation but stop the gradient change at the end although the temperature still change. The gradient change stopped its change because of phase change from liquid to gel. The present method will be able to measure indirectly by setting transducers outside of the measuring object. This noncontact sensing method will have great advantage of reduces risk of food contamination from measuring instrument because the measurement probes are set out of fermentation reactor or food containers. Our proposed method will contribute to the

  15. Duet function in the yellow-naped amazon, Amazona auropalliata: evidence from playbacks of duets and solos.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Christine R; Wright, Timothy F

    2012-01-01

    The question of why animals participate in duets is an intriguing one, as many such displays appear to be more costly to produce than individual signals. Mated pairs of yellow-naped amazons, Amazona auropalliata, give duets on their nesting territories. We investigated the function of those duets with a playback experiment. We tested two hypotheses for the function of those duets: the joint territory defense hypothesis and the mate-guarding hypothesis, by presenting territorial pairs with three types of playback treatments: duets, male solos, and female solos. The joint territory defense hypothesis suggests that individuals engage in duets because they appear more threatening than solos and are thus more effective for the establishment, maintenance and/or defense of territories. It predicts that pairs will be coordinated in their response (pair members approach speakers and vocalize together) and will either respond more strongly (more calls and/or more movement) to duet treatments than to solo treatments, or respond equally to all treatments. Alternatively, the mate-guarding hypothesis suggests that individuals participate in duets because they allow them to acoustically guard their mate, and predicts uncoordinated responses by pairs, with weak responses to duet treatments and stronger responses by individuals to solos produced by the same sex. Yellow-naped amazon pairs responded to all treatments in an equivalently aggressive and coordinated manner by rapidly approaching speakers and vocalizing more. These responses generally support the joint territory defense hypothesis and further suggest that all intruders are viewed as a threat by resident pairs.

  16. Collaborative Control of Media Playbacks in SCDNs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortino, Giancarlo; Russo, Wilma; Palau, Carlos E.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present a CDN-based system, namely the COMODIN system, which is a media on-demand platform for synchronous cooperative work which supports an explicitly-formed cooperative group of distributed users with the following integrated functionalities: request of an archived multimedia session, sharing of its playback, and collaboration…

  17. Transducer Design Experiments for Ground-Penetrating Acoustic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    subsurface imaging experiments have utilized a source (Tx) and receiver (Rx) configuration in which signals produced by a transmitter at the soil surface...development in the field of acoustic subsurface imaging are as follows. First, a transmitter designed to minimize the emission of surface waves, while

  18. Can video playback provide social information for foraging blue tits?

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Hannah M.; Mappes, Johanna; Thorogood, Rose

    2017-01-01

    Video playback is becoming a common method for manipulating social stimuli in experiments. Parid tits are one of the most commonly studied groups of wild birds. However, it is not yet clear if tits respond to video playback or how their behavioural responses should be measured. Behaviours may also differ depending on what they observe demonstrators encountering. Here we present blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) videos of demonstrators discovering palatable or aversive prey (injected with bitter-tasting Bitrex) from coloured feeding cups. First we quantify variation in demonstrators’ responses to the prey items: aversive prey provoked high rates of beak wiping and head shaking. We then show that focal blue tits respond differently to the presence of a demonstrator on a video screen, depending on whether demonstrators discover palatable or aversive prey. Focal birds faced the video screen more during aversive prey presentations, and made more head turns. Regardless of prey type, focal birds also hopped more frequently during the presence of a demonstrator (compared to a control video of a different coloured feeding cup in an empty cage). Finally, we tested if demonstrators’ behaviour affected focal birds’ food preferences by giving individuals a choice to forage from the same cup as a demonstrator, or from the cup in the control video. We found that only half of the individuals made their choice in accordance to social information in the videos, i.e., their foraging choices were not different from random. Individuals that chose in accordance with a demonstrator, however, made their choice faster than individuals that chose an alternative cup. Together, our results suggest that video playback can provide social cues to blue tits, but individuals vary greatly in how they use this information in their foraging decisions. PMID:28344901

  19. Can video playback provide social information for foraging blue tits?

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Liisa; Rowland, Hannah M; Mappes, Johanna; Thorogood, Rose

    2017-01-01

    Video playback is becoming a common method for manipulating social stimuli in experiments. Parid tits are one of the most commonly studied groups of wild birds. However, it is not yet clear if tits respond to video playback or how their behavioural responses should be measured. Behaviours may also differ depending on what they observe demonstrators encountering. Here we present blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) videos of demonstrators discovering palatable or aversive prey (injected with bitter-tasting Bitrex) from coloured feeding cups. First we quantify variation in demonstrators' responses to the prey items: aversive prey provoked high rates of beak wiping and head shaking. We then show that focal blue tits respond differently to the presence of a demonstrator on a video screen, depending on whether demonstrators discover palatable or aversive prey. Focal birds faced the video screen more during aversive prey presentations, and made more head turns. Regardless of prey type, focal birds also hopped more frequently during the presence of a demonstrator (compared to a control video of a different coloured feeding cup in an empty cage). Finally, we tested if demonstrators' behaviour affected focal birds' food preferences by giving individuals a choice to forage from the same cup as a demonstrator, or from the cup in the control video. We found that only half of the individuals made their choice in accordance to social information in the videos, i.e., their foraging choices were not different from random. Individuals that chose in accordance with a demonstrator, however, made their choice faster than individuals that chose an alternative cup. Together, our results suggest that video playback can provide social cues to blue tits, but individuals vary greatly in how they use this information in their foraging decisions.

  20. Tagging and Playback Studies to Toothed Whales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    stranding has not been elucidated. We now know that beaked whales react strongly to sonar, killer whale , and bandlimited noise by ceasing echolocation and...follows and attempts at tagging these animals, no tags were successfully deployed. In 2011, playbacks of both mammal-eating killer whale calls and...Right: Stereotyped calls consist of two independently modulated frequency contours similar to killer whale calls. Low and high frequency contours

  1. Parallels between playbacks and Pleistocene tar seeps suggest sociality in an extinct sabretooth cat, Smilodon.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Chris; Maddox, Tom; Funston, Paul J; Mills, Michael G L; Grether, Gregory F; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2009-02-23

    Inferences concerning the lives of extinct animals are difficult to obtain from the fossil record. Here we present a novel approach to the study of extinct carnivores, using a comparison between fossil records (n=3324) found in Late Pleistocene tar seeps at Rancho La Brea in North America and counts (n=4491) from playback experiments used to estimate carnivore abundance in Africa. Playbacks and tar seep deposits represent competitive, potentially dangerous encounters where multiple predators are lured by dying herbivores. Consequently, in both records predatory mammals and birds far outnumber herbivores. In playbacks, two large social species, lions, Panthera leo, and spotted hyenas, Crocuta crocuta, actively moved towards the sounds of distressed prey and made up 84 per cent of individuals attending. Small social species (jackals) were next most common and solitary species of all sizes were rare. In the La Brea record, two species dominated, the presumably social dire wolf Canis dirus (51%), and the sabretooth cat Smilodon fatalis (33%). As in the playbacks, a smaller social canid, the coyote Canis latrans, was third most common (8%), and known solitary species were rare (<4%). The predominance of Smilodon and other striking similarities between playbacks and the fossil record support the conclusion that Smilodon was social.

  2. Analysis of passive acoustic ranging of helicopters from the joint acoustic propagation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, Benny L.; Morgan, John C.

    1993-01-01

    For more than twenty years, personnel of the U.S.A.E. Waterways Experiment Station (WES) have been performing research dealing with the application of sensors for detection of military targets. The WES research has included the use of seismic, acoustic, magnetic, and other sensors to detect, track, and classify military ground targets. Most of the WES research has been oriented toward the employment of such sensors in a passive mode. Techniques for passive detection are of particular interest in the Army because of the advantages over active detection. Passive detection methods are not susceptible to interception, detection, jamming, or location of the source by the threat. A decided advantage for using acoustic and seismic sensors for detection in tactical situations is the non-line-of-sight capability; i.e., detection of low flying helicopters at long distances without visual contact. This study was conducted to analyze the passive acoustic ranging (PAR) concept using a more extensive data set from the Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE).

  3. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  4. Playback of multimedia data in low-power mobile drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jungwan; Won, Youjip

    2002-07-01

    In this paper, we present the novel scheduling algorithm of the multimedia data retrieval for the mobile disk drive. Our algorithm is focused on minimizing the power consumption in multimedia data retrieval. While the disk based storage devices, e.g. hard disk and optical disk becomes small enough to be used in mobile devices, the practical usage of which leaves much to be desired due to the stringent power consumption restriction of the mobile device. The playback of multimedia data requires that data blocks are delivered to the destination in periodic fashion. The major issue here has been how to guarantee the continuous flow of data. Most of preceding works assume that the disk drive always operates in the steady state. However, this does not hold in modern disk drive for the mobile device. Modern low power disk drive for mobile device goes into standby state when it is not in use. While this feature can significantly extend the battery life, it adds another dimension of complexity in scheduling of the multimedia data retrieval. We elaborately model the power consumption behavior of the low power mobile drive and develop an Adaptive Round Merge(ARM) scheduling algorithm which guarantees a certain disk bandwidth for the multimedia playback while minimizing the power consumption of the storage device. According to our simulation based experiment, the ARM algorithm reduces the power consumption by as much as 23%. It manifests itself when the video clip is relatively short, typically less than 30 sec.

  5. Low cost audiovisual playback and recording triggered by radio frequency identification using Raspberry Pi

    PubMed Central

    Akçay, Çağlar; Weiss, Talia; Haussmann, Mark F.; Moore, Ignacio T.; Bonier, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Playbacks of visual or audio stimuli to wild animals is a widely used experimental tool in behavioral ecology. In many cases, however, playback experiments are constrained by observer limitations such as the time observers can be present, or the accuracy of observation. These problems are particularly apparent when playbacks are triggered by specific events, such as performing a specific behavior, or are targeted to specific individuals. We developed a low-cost automated playback/recording system, using two field-deployable devices: radio-frequency identification (RFID) readers and Raspberry Pi micro-computers. This system detects a specific passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag attached to an individual, and subsequently plays back the stimuli, or records audio or visual information. To demonstrate the utility of this system and to test one of its possible applications, we tagged female and male tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) from two box-nesting populations with PIT tags and carried out playbacks of nestling begging calls every time focal females entered the nestbox over a six-hour period. We show that the RFID-Raspberry Pi system presents a versatile, low-cost, field-deployable system that can be adapted for many audio and visual playback purposes. In addition, the set-up does not require programming knowledge, and it easily customized to many other applications, depending on the research questions. Here, we discuss the possible applications and limitations of the system. The low cost and the small learning curve of the RFID-Raspberry Pi system provides a powerful new tool to field biologists. PMID:25870771

  6. Low cost audiovisual playback and recording triggered by radio frequency identification using Raspberry Pi.

    PubMed

    Lendvai, Ádám Z; Akçay, Çağlar; Weiss, Talia; Haussmann, Mark F; Moore, Ignacio T; Bonier, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Playbacks of visual or audio stimuli to wild animals is a widely used experimental tool in behavioral ecology. In many cases, however, playback experiments are constrained by observer limitations such as the time observers can be present, or the accuracy of observation. These problems are particularly apparent when playbacks are triggered by specific events, such as performing a specific behavior, or are targeted to specific individuals. We developed a low-cost automated playback/recording system, using two field-deployable devices: radio-frequency identification (RFID) readers and Raspberry Pi micro-computers. This system detects a specific passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag attached to an individual, and subsequently plays back the stimuli, or records audio or visual information. To demonstrate the utility of this system and to test one of its possible applications, we tagged female and male tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) from two box-nesting populations with PIT tags and carried out playbacks of nestling begging calls every time focal females entered the nestbox over a six-hour period. We show that the RFID-Raspberry Pi system presents a versatile, low-cost, field-deployable system that can be adapted for many audio and visual playback purposes. In addition, the set-up does not require programming knowledge, and it easily customized to many other applications, depending on the research questions. Here, we discuss the possible applications and limitations of the system. The low cost and the small learning curve of the RFID-Raspberry Pi system provides a powerful new tool to field biologists.

  7. Tagging and Playback Studies to Toothed Whales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    using two lasers collimated at a separation of 10 cm (Webster et al. 2010). Finally, we tested low-amplitude playbacks of a high- frequency chirp that...Journal of Animal Ecology 77:936– 947 Webster T, Dawson S, Slooten E. 2010. A simple laser photogrammetry technique for measuring Hector’s... dolphins (Cephalorhynchus hectori) in the field Marine Mammal Science, 26(2): 296–308 (April 2010) DOI: 10.1111/j.1748-7692.2009.00326.x 7 8

  8. Lion, ungulate, and visitor reactions to playbacks of lion roars at Zoo Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Kelling, Angela S; Allard, Stephanie M; Kelling, Nicholas J; Sandhaus, Estelle A; Maple, Terry L

    2012-01-01

    Felids in captivity are often inactive and elusive in zoos, leading to a frustrating visitor experience. Eight roars were recorded from an adult male lion and played back over speakers as auditory enrichment to benefit the lions while simultaneously enhancing the zoo visitor experience. In addition, ungulates in an adjacent exhibit were observed to ensure that the novel location and increased frequency of roars did not lead to a stress or fear response. The male lion in this study roared more in the playback phase than in the baseline phases while not increasing any behaviors that would indicate compromised welfare. In addition, zoo visitors remained at the lion exhibit longer during playback. The nearby ungulates never exhibited any reactions stronger than orienting to playbacks, identical to their reactions to live roars. Therefore, naturalistic playbacks of lion roars are a potential form of auditory enrichment that leads to more instances of live lion roars and enhances the visitor experience without increasing the stress levels of nearby ungulates or the lion themselves, who might interpret the roar as that of an intruder.

  9. Acoustic processing method for MS/MS experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whymark, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustical methods in which intense sound beams can be used to control the position of objects are considered. The position control arises from the radiation force experienced when a body is placed in a sound field. A description of the special properties of intense sound fields useful for position control is followed by a discussion of the more obvious methods of position, namely the use of multiple sound beams. A new type of acoustic position control device is reported that has advantages of simplicity and reliability and utilizes only a single sound beam. Finally a description is given of an experimental single beam levitator, and the results obtained in a number of key levitation experiments.

  10. Theory and experiment research of two-dimension acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongwei; Li, JianFeng; Li, Zhiming; Li, Ying

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents modeling and analysis methods for design of a acoustic metamaterial panel consisting of two isotropic plates and small membrane-mass subsystems for absorption of low frequencies transverse elastic waves. Two models of a unit cell are derived and used to demonstrate the existence of negative effective material properties. Moreover, the design of experiment sample confirms that the model and analysis methods are valid. (1) The frequency of the membrane-mass subsystems are uniform distribution in whole acoustic metamaterial panel have two vibration models. (2) The different distributions of membrane-mass subsystems and their resonance frequencies result in different vibration isolation characteristics. (3) PSV is used to test and the result show that a low frequency wave absorber does not require nano-manufacturing techniques. (4) If we design the frequency of the membrane-mass subsystems different it can change the character of the metamaterial panel.

  11. The influence of motion quality on responses towards video playback stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Emma; Saunders, Daniel R.; Troje, Nikolaus F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Visual motion, a critical cue in communication, can be manipulated and studied using video playback methods. A primary concern for the video playback researcher is the degree to which objects presented on video appear natural to the non-human subject. Here we argue that the quality of motion cues on video, as determined by the video's image presentation rate (IPR), are of particular importance in determining a subject's social response behaviour. We present an experiment testing the effect of variations in IPR on pigeon (Columbia livia) response behaviour towards video images of courting opposite sex partners. Male and female pigeons were presented with three video playback stimuli, each containing a different social partner. Each stimulus was then modified to appear at one of three IPRs: 15, 30 or 60 progressive (p) frames per second. The results showed that courtship behaviour became significantly longer in duration as IPR increased. This finding implies that the IPR significantly affects the perceived quality of motion cues impacting social behaviour. In males we found that the duration of courtship also depended on the social partner viewed and that this effect interacted with the effects of IPR on behaviour. Specifically, the effect of social partner reached statistical significance only when the stimuli were displayed at 60 p, demonstrating the potential for erroneous results when insufficient IPRs are used. In addition to demonstrating the importance of IPR in video playback experiments, these findings help to highlight and describe the role of visual motion processing in communication behaviour. PMID:25964659

  12. The influence of motion quality on responses towards video playback stimuli.

    PubMed

    Ware, Emma; Saunders, Daniel R; Troje, Nikolaus F

    2015-05-11

    Visual motion, a critical cue in communication, can be manipulated and studied using video playback methods. A primary concern for the video playback researcher is the degree to which objects presented on video appear natural to the non-human subject. Here we argue that the quality of motion cues on video, as determined by the video's image presentation rate (IPR), are of particular importance in determining a subject's social response behaviour. We present an experiment testing the effect of variations in IPR on pigeon (Columbia livia) response behaviour towards video images of courting opposite sex partners. Male and female pigeons were presented with three video playback stimuli, each containing a different social partner. Each stimulus was then modified to appear at one of three IPRs: 15, 30 or 60 progressive (p) frames per second. The results showed that courtship behaviour became significantly longer in duration as IPR increased. This finding implies that the IPR significantly affects the perceived quality of motion cues impacting social behaviour. In males we found that the duration of courtship also depended on the social partner viewed and that this effect interacted with the effects of IPR on behaviour. Specifically, the effect of social partner reached statistical significance only when the stimuli were displayed at 60 p, demonstrating the potential for erroneous results when insufficient IPRs are used. In addition to demonstrating the importance of IPR in video playback experiments, these findings help to highlight and describe the role of visual motion processing in communication behaviour.

  13. Device for acoustic pulse echo experiments in the subterahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, R.; Huynh, A.; Vincent, S.; Perrin, B.; Lemaître, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present experimental results on the light-to-sound transduction by a superlattice embedded in an optical microcavity, using picosecond ultrasonics. Experiments on the ability to generate and detect phonons at 0.3 and 0.6 THz were performed at low temperature. Finally, we demonstrate that such a device can detect the acoustic burst that it has generated and which has propagated through the substrate, been reflected on the backside of the substrate, and has returned to the device. We study the efficiency of this detection by varying independently the laser wavelength of the pump and probe, by means of asynchronous optical sampling.

  14. An Acoustic Demonstration Model for CW and Pulsed Spectrosocopy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starck, Torben; Mäder, Heinrich; Trueman, Trevor; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2009-06-01

    High school and undergraduate students have often difficulties if new concepts are introduced in their physics or chemistry lectures. Lecture demonstrations and references to more familiar analogues can be of great help to the students in such situations. We have developed an experimental setup to demonstrate the principles of cw absorption and pulsed excitation - emission spectroscopies, using acoustical analogues. Our radiation source is a speaker and the detector is a microphone, both controlled by a computer sound card. The acoustical setup is housed in a plexiglas box, which serves as a resonator. It turns out that beer glasses are suitable samples; this also helps to keep the students interested! The instrument is controlled by a LabView program. In a cw experiment, the sound frequency is swept through a certain frequency range and the microphone response is recorded simultaneously as function of frequency. A background signal without sample is recorded, and background subtraction yields the beer glass spectrum. In a pulsed experiment, a short sound pulse is generated and the microphone is used to record the resulting emission signal of the beer glass. A Fourier transformation of the time domain signal gives then the spectrum. We will discuss the experimental setup and show videos of the experiments.

  15. Parametric Acoustic Receiving Array (Parray) Research and Experiments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-06

    AD-AC83 704 TEXAS UNIV AT AUSTIN APPLIED RESEARCH LABS FIG 17/1 PARAMETRIC ACOUSTIC RECEIVING ARRAY ( PARRAY ) RESEARCH AND EXPER-CTC(U) FEB 80 T G...TITLE anld Subtitle) ,__t, I -1rilUl tT :. 40441" ,APT19* .... ,. L PARAMETRIC ACOUSTIC RECEIVING ARRAY ( PARRAY ) inal technical re. m , LIESEARCH AND...WORDS (Continue on reverse side it necaesary and Identify by block number) PARRAY parametric acoustic receiver nonlinear acoustics parametric acoustic

  16. Array Receivers and Sound Sources for Three Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustic Field Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-06

    Water Acoustic Field Experiments NOOO 14-15-1-2893 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER Ying Tsong-Lin 132893SP Se. TASK...testing. 1S. SUBJECT TERMS acoustics, shallow water , Arctic Ocean , 3-D acoustic propagation, shelfbreak 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: R b...Approved f or public release; distribution is unlimited. Array Receivers and Sound Sources for Three-Dimensional Shallow- Water Acoustic Field

  17. Oscillating load-induced acoustic emission in laboratory experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponomarev, Alexander; Lockner, David A.; Stroganova, S.; Stanchits, S.; Smirnov, V.

    2010-01-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of acoustic emission (AE) were studied. A pre-fractured cylinder of granite was loaded in a triaxial machine at 160 MPa confining pressure until stick-slip events occurred. The experiments were conducted at a constant strain rate of 10−7 s−1 that was modulated by small-amplitude sinusoidal oscillations with periods of 175 and 570 seconds. Amplitude of the oscillations was a few percent of the total load and was intended to simulate periodic loading observed in nature (e.g., earth tides or other sources). An ultrasonic acquisition system with 13 piezosensors recorded acoustic emissions that were generated during deformation of the sample. We observed a correlation between AE response and sinusoidal loading. The effect was more pronounced for higher frequency of the modulating force. A time-space spectral analysis for a “point” process was used to investigate details of the periodic AE components. The main result of the study was the correlation of oscillations of acoustic activity synchronized with the applied oscillating load. The intensity of the correlated AE activity was most pronounced in the “aftershock” sequences that followed large-amplitude AE events. We suggest that this is due to the higher strain-sensitivity of the failure area when the sample is in a transient, unstable mode. We also found that the synchronization of AE activity with the oscillating external load nearly disappeared in the period immediately after the stick-slip events and gradually recovered with further loading.

  18. Playback of colony sound alters the breeding schedule and clutch size in zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) colonies.

    PubMed

    Waas, Joseph R; Colgan, Patrick W; Boag, Peter T

    2005-02-22

    The hypothesis that social stimulation, derived from the presence and activities of conspecifics, can hasten and synchronize breeding in colonies of birds was tested. A modified playback/recorder system was used to continuously exaggerate the amount of colony sound available to zebra finches throughout their courtship period. Males that heard 'sound supplements' generated from their own colony sang more than males in control colonies that did not receive playback; males that heard samples from a different colony, sang at an intermediate level. Females that were exposed to the vocalizations of their mate and playback from a colony other than their own, laid eggs earlier and more synchronously than females in control colonies. Females that heard the vocalizations of their mate along with playback samples generated from their own colony, laid eggs more synchronously but not earlier than control females. Both acoustic treatments caused females to lay larger clutches. Social stimulation influences the breeding schedule and clutch size in zebra finch colonies. If there are advantages associated with these effects, social stimulation may contribute to the maintenance of colonial breeding systems.

  19. Playback of colony sound alters the breeding schedule and clutch size in zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) colonies

    PubMed Central

    Waas, Joseph R.; Colgan, Patrick W.; Boag, Peter T.

    2005-01-01

    The hypothesis that social stimulation, derived from the presence and activities of conspecifics, can hasten and synchronize breeding in colonies of birds was tested. A modified playback/recorder system was used to continuously exaggerate the amount of colony sound available to zebra finches throughout their courtship period. Males that heard ‘sound supplements’ generated from their own colony sang more than males in control colonies that did not receive playback; males that heard samples from a different colony, sang at an intermediate level. Females that were exposed to the vocalizations of their mate and playback from a colony other than their own, laid eggs earlier and more synchronously than females in control colonies. Females that heard the vocalizations of their mate along with playback samples generated from their own colony, laid eggs more synchronously but not earlier than control females. Both acoustic treatments caused females to lay larger clutches. Social stimulation influences the breeding schedule and clutch size in zebra finch colonies. If there are advantages associated with these effects, social stimulation may contribute to the maintenance of colonial breeding systems. PMID:15734692

  20. Multi-Resolution Playback of Network Trace Files

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS MULTI-RESOLUTION PLAYBACK OF NETWORK TRACE FILES by Scott Fortner June 2015 Thesis Co-Advisors...PLAYBACK OF NETWORK TRACE FILES 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Scott Fortner 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School...put forth a requirement for a non-proprietary network traffic replay system that is user friendly and can provide both replay of a network trace file as

  1. Effects of Previous Acoustic Experience on Behavioral Responses to Experimental Sound Stimuli and Implications for Research.

    PubMed

    Voellmy, Irene K; Purser, Julia; Simpson, Stephen D; Radford, Andrew N

    2016-01-01

    Ambient noise differs considerably between habitats. Increased ambient noise can affect the physiology and behavior in a variety of taxa. Previous acoustic experience can modify behavior and potentially affect research conclusions in natural and laboratory environments. Acoustic conditions should thus be accounted for, especially in experiments involving experimental sound stimuli. Methods sections should contain acoustic specifications, and a consensus should be achieved over which measurements to include for comparability between researchers. Further investigation of how previous and repeated exposure to sound affects behavior and research conclusions is needed to improve our knowledge of acoustic long-term effects in animal welfare and conservation.

  2. Acoustic emissions verification testing of International Space Station experiment racks at the NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, James C.; Passe, Paul J.; Cooper, Beth A.

    2005-09-01

    The Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) at the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH, provides acoustic emission testing and noise control engineering services for a variety of specialized customers, particularly developers of equipment and science experiments manifested for NASA's manned space missions. The ATL's primary customer has been the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF), a multirack microgravity research facility being developed at GRC for the USA Laboratory Module of the International Space Station (ISS). Since opening in September 2000, ATL has conducted acoustic emission testing of components, subassemblies, and partially populated FCF engineering model racks. The culmination of this effort has been the acoustic emission verification tests on the FCF Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) and Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR), employing a procedure that incorporates ISO 11201 (``Acoustics-Noise emitted by machinery and equipment-Measurement of emission sound pressure levels at a work station and at other specified positions-Engineering method in an essentially free field over a reflecting plane''). This paper will provide an overview of the test methodology, software, and hardware developed to perform the acoustic emission verification tests on the CIR and FIR flight racks and lessons learned from these tests.

  3. Anthropogenic noise playback impairs embryonic development and increases mortality in a marine invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Sophie L; Radford, Andrew N; Simpson, Stephen D; Nedelec, Brendan; Lecchini, David; Mills, Suzanne C

    2014-07-31

    Human activities can create noise pollution and there is increasing international concern about how this may impact wildlife. There is evidence that anthropogenic noise may have detrimental effects on behaviour and physiology in many species but there are few examples of experiments showing how fitness may be directly affected. Here we use a split-brood, counterbalanced, field experiment to investigate the effect of repeated boat-noise playback during early life on the development and survival of a marine invertebrate, the sea hare Stylocheilus striatus at Moorea Island (French Polynesia). We found that exposure to boat-noise playback, compared to ambient-noise playback, reduced successful development of embryos by 21% and additionally increased mortality of recently hatched larvae by 22%. Our work, on an understudied but ecologically and socio-economically important taxon, demonstrates that anthropogenic noise can affect individual fitness. Fitness costs early in life have a fundamental influence on population dynamics and resilience, with potential implications for community structure and function.

  4. Anthropogenic noise playback impairs embryonic development and increases mortality in a marine invertebrate

    PubMed Central

    Nedelec, Sophie L.; Radford, Andrew N.; Simpson, Stephen D.; Nedelec, Brendan; Lecchini, David; Mills, Suzanne C.

    2014-01-01

    Human activities can create noise pollution and there is increasing international concern about how this may impact wildlife. There is evidence that anthropogenic noise may have detrimental effects on behaviour and physiology in many species but there are few examples of experiments showing how fitness may be directly affected. Here we use a split-brood, counterbalanced, field experiment to investigate the effect of repeated boat-noise playback during early life on the development and survival of a marine invertebrate, the sea hare Stylocheilus striatus at Moorea Island (French Polynesia). We found that exposure to boat-noise playback, compared to ambient-noise playback, reduced successful development of embryos by 21% and additionally increased mortality of recently hatched larvae by 22%. Our work, on an understudied but ecologically and socio-economically important taxon, demonstrates that anthropogenic noise can affect individual fitness. Fitness costs early in life have a fundamental influence on population dynamics and resilience, with potential implications for community structure and function. PMID:25080997

  5. Why do Chinese alligators (Alligator sinensis) form bellowing choruses: a playback approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianyan; Wang, Ding; Zhang, Song; Wang, Chaolin; Wang, Renping; Wu, Xiaobing

    2009-10-01

    Crocodilians are quite vocal relative to other reptile groups, and the alligators are among the most vocal of the crocodilians. The Chinese alligator, Alligator sinensis, is usually solitary but engages in bellowing choruses in certain waters during the mating season. This paper reports the organization of Chinese alligator's bellowing choruses based upon field observations and playback experiments. Alligators of both genders engaged in the choruses, remaining immobile throughout and inclining toward bellowing synchronously (i.e., starting and finishing at about the same time). The choruses lasted about 10 min with abrupt onset and offset. Moreover, playback experiments revealed that both male and female alligators responded equally to bellowing stimuli from the same and opposite sexes and that none of the tested alligators approached the loudspeaker in spite of playback of male or female stimuli. These suggest that Chinese alligators may not bellow to compete for or attract mates during the choruses. Instead, when their ecological behaviors, namely, dispersed inhabitation, multi-copulation, restricted mating season, etc., are considered, we hypothesize that they may synchronize bellows to enhance group detectability for assembling individuals into certain waters for subsequent copulations.

  6. Anthropogenic noise playback impairs embryonic development and increases mortality in a marine invertebrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelec, Sophie L.; Radford, Andrew N.; Simpson, Stephen D.; Nedelec, Brendan; Lecchini, David; Mills, Suzanne C.

    2014-07-01

    Human activities can create noise pollution and there is increasing international concern about how this may impact wildlife. There is evidence that anthropogenic noise may have detrimental effects on behaviour and physiology in many species but there are few examples of experiments showing how fitness may be directly affected. Here we use a split-brood, counterbalanced, field experiment to investigate the effect of repeated boat-noise playback during early life on the development and survival of a marine invertebrate, the sea hare Stylocheilus striatus at Moorea Island (French Polynesia). We found that exposure to boat-noise playback, compared to ambient-noise playback, reduced successful development of embryos by 21% and additionally increased mortality of recently hatched larvae by 22%. Our work, on an understudied but ecologically and socio-economically important taxon, demonstrates that anthropogenic noise can affect individual fitness. Fitness costs early in life have a fundamental influence on population dynamics and resilience, with potential implications for community structure and function.

  7. Long range acoustic imaging of the continental shelf environment: the Acoustic Clutter Reconnaissance Experiment 2001.

    PubMed

    Ratilal, Purnima; Lai, Yisan; Symonds, Deanelle T; Ruhlmann, Lilimar A; Preston, John R; Scheer, Edward K; Garr, Michael T; Holland, Charles W; Goff, John A; Makris, Nicholas C

    2005-04-01

    An active sonar system is used to image wide areas of the continental shelf environment by long-range echo sounding at low frequency. The bistatic system, deployed in the STRATAFORM area south of Long Island in April-May of 2001, imaged a large number of prominent clutter events over ranges spanning tens of kilometers in near real time. Roughly 3000 waveforms were transmitted into the water column. Wide-area acoustic images of the ocean environment were generated in near real time for each transmission. Between roughly 10 to more than 100 discrete and localized scatterers were registered for each image. This amounts to a total of at least 30000 scattering events that could be confused with those from submerged vehicles over the period of the experiment. Bathymetric relief in the STRATAFORM area is extremely benign, with slopes typically less than 0.5 degrees according to high resolution (30 m sampled) bathymetric data. Most of the clutter occurs in regions where the bathymetry is locally level and does not coregister with seafloor features. No statistically significant difference is found in the frequency of occurrence per unit area of repeatable clutter inside versus outside of areas occupied by subsurface river channels.

  8. An extended framework for adaptive playback-based video summarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peker, Kadir A.; Divakaran, Ajay

    2003-11-01

    In our previous work, we described an adaptive fast playback framework for video summarization where we changed the playback rate using the motion activity feature so as to maintain a constant "pace." This method provides an effective way of skimming through video, especially when the motion is not too complex and the background is mostly still, such as in surveillance video. In this paper, we present an extended summarization framework that, in addition to motion activity, uses semantic cues such as face or skin color appearance, speech and music detection, or other domain dependent semantically significant events to control the playback rate. The semantic features we use are computationally inexpensive and can be computed in compressed domain, yet are robust, reliable, and have a wide range of applicability across different content types. The presented framework also allows for adaptive summaries based on preference, for example, to include more dramatic vs. action elements, or vice versa. The user can switch at any time between the skimming and the normal playback modes. The continuity of the video is preserved, and complete omission of segments that may be important to the user is avoided by using adaptive fast playback instead of skipping over long segments. The rule-set and the input parameters can be further modified to fit a certain domain or application. Our framework can be used by itself, or as a subsequent presentation stage for a summary produced by any other summarization technique that relies on generating a sub-set of the content.

  9. Tagging and Playback Studies to Toothed Whales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    Alboran Sea . There was a mid-cruise crew change in Malaga Spain followed by more work in the Alboran Sea , then a transit to the Tyrrhenian Sea before... Tyrrhenian Sea yielded 22 sightings of 27 Balaenoptera physalus, 18 sightings of 24 Physeter macrocephalus (4h40min of acoustic detections), 6 sightings of...habitat modeling APPROACH This study involves a research cruise divided into two three-week field efforts in 2009 in the Mediterranean Sea . We had

  10. Acoustic emissions in rock deformation experiments under micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, Nicola; Goodfellow, Sebastian D.; Moulas, Evangelos; Di Toro, Giulio; Young, Paul; Grasselli, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The study of acoustic emissions (AE) generated by rocks undergoing deformation has become, in the last decades, one of the most powerful tools for boosting our understanding of the mechanisms which are responsible for rock failures. AE are elastic waves emitted by the local failure of micro- or milli-metric portions of the tested specimen. At the same time, X-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) has become an affordable, reliable and powerful tool for imaging the internal structure of rock samples. In particular, micro-CT coupled with a deformation apparatus offers the unique opportunity for observing, without perturbing, the sample while the deformation and the formation of internal structures, such as shear bands, is ongoing. Here we present some preliminary results gathered with an innovative apparatus formed by the X-ray transparent pressure vessel called ERDμ equipped with AE sensors, an AE acquisition system and a micro-CT apparatus available at the University of Toronto. The experiment was performed on a 12 mm diameter 36 mm long porous glass sample which was cut on a 60 deg inclined plane (i.e. saw-cut sample). Etna basaltic sand with size ~1 mm was placed between the two inclined faces forming an inclined fault zone with ~2 mm thickness. The sample assembly was jacketed with a polyefin shrink tube and two AE sensors were glued onto the glass samples above and below the fault zone. The sample was then enclosed in the pressure vessel and confined with compressed air up to 3 MPa. A third AE sensor was placed outside the vessel. The sample was saturated with water and AE were generated by varying the fluid and confining pressure or the vertical force, causing deformations concentrated in the fault zone. Mechanical data and AE traces were collected throughout the entire experiment which lasted ~24 hours. At the same time multiple micro-CT 3D datasets and 2D movie-radiographies were collected, allowing the 3D reconstruction of the deformed sample at

  11. Physical oceanography and acoustic propagation during LADC experiment in the Gulf of Mexico in 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Sergey; Caruthers, Jerald W.; Rayborn, Grayson H.; Udovydchenkov, Ilya A.; Sidorovskaia, Natalia A.; Rypina, Irina I.; Newcomb, Joal J.; Fisher, Robert A.; Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.

    2003-04-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) deployed three environmental and acoustic moorings in a downslope line just off the Mississippi River Delta in the northern Gulf of Mexico in an area of a large concentration of sperm whales in July 2001. The measurement of whale vocalizations and, more generally, ambient noise, were the objectives of the experiment. Each mooring had a single hydrophone autonomously recording Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS) obtained from the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office and modified to recorded signals up to 5859 Hz continuously for 36 days. Also, self-recording, environmental sensors were attached to the moorings to obtain profiles of time series data of temperature and salinity. Satellite imagery and NOAA mooring data were gathered for an analysis of eddy formations and movement in the Gulf. This paper will discuss the possible environmental impact of two events that occurred during the experiment: the passage of Tropical Storm Barry and the movement of the remnants of an eddy in the area. Discussed also will be the expected effects of these events on acoustic propagation based on modeling, which are carried out for long range and low frequency (300 km and 500 Hz) using the normal-mode acoustic model SWAMP (Shallow Water Acoustic Modal Propagation by M. F. Werby and N. A. Sidorovskaia) and for short range and high frequency (10 km and 5000 Hz) using the parabolic-equation acoustic model RAM (Range-dependent Acoustic model by M. Collins). [Work supported by ONR.

  12. NATO TG-53: acoustic detection of weapon firing joint field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Dale N.; Pham, Tien; Scanlon, Michael V.; Srour, Nassy; Reiff, Christian G.; Sim, Leng K.; Solomon, Latasha; Thompson, Dorothea F.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss the NATO Task Group 53 (TG-53) acoustic detection of weapon firing field joint experiment at Yuma Proving Ground during 31 October to 4 November 2005. The participating NATO countries include France, the Netherlands, UK and US. The objectives of the joint experiments are: (i) to collect acoustic signatures of direct and indirect firings from weapons such as sniper, mortar, artillery and C4 explosives and (ii) to share signatures among NATO partners from a variety of acoustic sensing platforms on the ground and in the air distributed over a wide area.

  13. Ray dynamics in a long-range acoustic propagation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beron-Vera, Francisco J.; Brown, Michael G.; Colosi, John A.; Tomsovic, Steven; Virovlyansky, Anatoly L.; Wolfson, Michael A.; Zaslavsky, George M.

    2003-09-01

    A ray-based wave-field description is employed in the interpretation of broadband basin-scale acoustic propagation measurements obtained during the Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate program's 1994 Acoustic Engineering Test. Acoustic observables of interest are wavefront time spread, probability density function (PDF) of intensity, vertical extension of acoustic energy in the reception finale, and the transition region between temporally resolved and unresolved wavefronts. Ray-based numerical simulation results that include both mesoscale and internal-wave-induced sound-speed perturbations are shown to be consistent with measurements of all the aforementioned observables, even though the underlying ray trajectories are predominantly chaotic, that is, exponentially sensitive to initial and environmental conditions. Much of the analysis exploits results that relate to the subject of ray chaos; these results follow from the Hamiltonian structure of the ray equations. Further, it is shown that the collection of the many eigenrays that form one of the resolved arrivals is nonlocal, both spatially and as a function of launch angle, which places severe restrictions on theories that are based on a perturbation expansion about a background ray.

  14. Ray dynamics in a long-range acoustic propagation experiment.

    PubMed

    Beron-Vera, Francisco J; Brown, Michael G; Colosi, John A; Tomsovic, Steven; Virovlyansky, Anatoly L; Wolfson, Michael A; Zaslavsky, George M

    2003-09-01

    A ray-based wave-field description is employed in the interpretation of broadband basin-scale acoustic propagation measurements obtained during the Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate program's 1994 Acoustic Engineering Test. Acoustic observables of interest are wavefront time spread, probability density function (PDF) of intensity, vertical extension of acoustic energy in the reception finale, and the transition region between temporally resolved and unresolved wavefronts. Ray-based numerical simulation results that include both mesoscale and internal-wave-induced sound-speed perturbations are shown to be consistent with measurements of all the aforementioned observables, even though the underlying ray trajectories are predominantly chaotic, that is, exponentially sensitive to initial and environmental conditions. Much of the analysis exploits results that relate to the subject of ray chaos; these results follow from the Hamiltonian structure of the ray equations. Further, it is shown that the collection of the many eigenrays that form one of the resolved arrivals is nonlocal, both spatially and as a function of launch angle, which places severe restrictions on theories that are based on a perturbation expansion about a background ray.

  15. Quantitative Analysis Of Acoustic Emission From Rock Fracture Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, Sebastian David

    This thesis aims to advance the methods of quantitative acoustic emission (AE) analysis by calibrating sensors, characterizing sources, and applying the results to solve engi- neering problems. In the first part of this thesis, we built a calibration apparatus and successfully calibrated two commercial AE sensors. The ErgoTech sensor was found to have broadband velocity sensitivity and the Panametrics V103 was sensitive to surface normal displacement. These calibration results were applied to two AE data sets from rock fracture experiments in order to characterize the sources of AE events. The first data set was from an in situ rock fracture experiment conducted at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL). The Mine-By experiment was a large scale excavation response test where both AE (10 kHz - 1 MHz) and microseismicity (MS) (1 Hz - 10 kHz) were monitored. Using the calibration information, magnitude, stress drop, dimension and energy were successfully estimated for 21 AE events recorded in the tensile region of the tunnel wall. Magnitudes were in the range -7.5 < Mw < -6.8, which is consistent with other laboratory AE results, and stress drops were within the range commonly observed for induced seismicity in the field (0.1 - 10 MPa). The second data set was AE collected during a true-triaxial deformation experiment, where the objectives were to characterize laboratory AE sources and identify issues related to moving the analysis from ideal in situ conditions to more complex laboratory conditions in terms of the ability to conduct quantitative AE analysis. We found AE magnitudes in the range -7.8 < Mw < -6.7 and as with the in situ data, stress release was within the expected range of 0.1 - 10 MPa. We identified four major challenges to quantitative analysis in the laboratory, which in- hibited our ability to study parameter scaling (M0 ∝ fc -3 scaling). These challenges were 0c (1) limited knowledge of attenuation which we proved was continuously evolving, (2

  16. Narrative Power: Playback Theatre as Cultural Resistance in Occupied Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivers, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes The Freedom Theatre's Freedom Bus initiative and its use of Playback Theatre for community mobilisation and cultural activism within Occupied Palestine. Utilising a conflict transformation perspective, conventional dialogue-oriented initiatives are contrasted against interventions that pursue concientisation and alliance…

  17. Basin Acoustic Seamount Scattering Experiment (BASSEX) Data Analysis and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Kauai source at various ranges and bearings . OBJECTIVES The primary objective of this work is to measure aspects of acoustic propagation that...horizontal plane, arriving at the array from a different bearing . Further analysis will include processing all of the BASSEX KNPAL receptions and

  18. Video playback demonstrates episodic personality in the gloomy octopus.

    PubMed

    Pronk, R; Wilson, D R; Harcourt, R

    2010-04-01

    Coleoid cephalopods, including octopuses, cuttlefish and squid, rely mainly on visual signals when interacting with conspecifics, predators and prey. Presenting visual stimuli, such as models, photographs, mirrors and live conspecifics, can thus provide insight into cephalopod behaviour. These methods, however, have limitations - mirrors and live animals lack experimental control, whereas models and photographs sacrifice motion-based information. Video playback addresses these issues by presenting controlled, moving and realistic stimuli but, to date, video playback has not been used successfully with any cephalopod. Here, we developed a video playback technique for the gloomy octopus (Octopus tetricus) that incorporated recent advances in video technology. We then used this technique to test for personality, which we defined as behavioural differences between individuals that are consistent over time and across ecologically important contexts. We captured wild octopuses and tested them on 3 separate days over a 10 day period. On each test day, subjects were presented with videos of a food item, a novel object and a conspecific. These represented a foraging, novel and threatening context, respectively. A fourth video without a moving stimulus controlled for the playback monitor itself and potential artifacts associated with video playback. Experimental stimuli evoked unambiguous and biologically appropriate responses from the subjects. Furthermore, individuals' responses to the three experimental contexts were highly correlated within a given test day. However, within a given context, individuals behaved inconsistently across the 3 test days. The reordering of ranks suggests that rather than fulfilling the criteria for personality, gloomy octopus show temporal discontinuities, and hence display episodic personality.

  19. Construction of an anechoic chamber for aeroacoustic experiments and examination of its acoustic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopiev, V. F.; Palchikovskiy, V. V.; Belyaev, I. V.; Bersenev, Yu. V.; Makashov, S. Yu.; Khramtsov, I. V.; Korin, I. A.; Sorokin, E. V.; Kustov, O. Yu.

    2017-01-01

    The acoustic parameters of a new anechoic chamber constructed at Perm National Research Polytechnic University (PNRPU) are presented. This chamber is designed to be used, among other things, for measuring noise from aerodynamic sources. Sound-absorbing wedges lining the walls of the chamber were studied in an interferometer with normal wave incidence. The results are compared to the characteristics of sound-absorbing wedges of existing anechoic facilities. Metrological examination of the acoustic parameters of the PNRPU anechoic chamber demonstrates that free field conditions are established in it, which will make it possible to conduct quantitative acoustic experiments.

  20. Fan Acoustic Issues in the NASA Space Flight Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher S.; Goodman, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Emphasis needs to be placed on choosing quiet fans compatible with systems design and specifications that control spec levels: a) Sound power; b) Choose quiet fan or plan to quiet it, early in program; c) Plan early verification that fan source allocations are met. Airborne noise: a) System design should function/play together with fans used (flow passages, restrictions, bends, expansions & contractions, and acoustics) vs. fan speed understood (nominal, worst case, & unplanned variances); b) Fan inlets treated, as required; c) Fan Outlets treated, as required; d) Ducted system inlets are outlets designed for acoustic compliance compatibility & designed so some late required modifications can be made without significant impacts. Structure Borne Noise: a) Structure borne noise dealt with as part of fan package or installation; b) Duct attachments and lines isolated. Case Radiated Noise: - Treatment added as much as possible to fan package (see example).

  1. Shipboard Acoustic Current Profiling during the Coastal Ocean Dynamics Experiment,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    Fig. 2.2 Range Gated Shipboard Doppler System . Four beams (fore. aft. port ard starboard) equally inclined from the ship’s vertical axis acousticallN...sarne cannot be said, however, for other beam geometries, such as the three-bean Jlanus system . M\\oreover. the effects, of finite beam width. side... System . Four beams (fore, aft, port and Sstarboard) equally inclined from the ship’s vertical axis acoustically probe the ocean. The Doppler shift in

  2. San Clemente Island Undersea Range Acoustic Experiment, July 2002

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    sonic amplifier, FM modulator, VHF transmitter, and antenna (see Figure 15). Ocean acoustic pressure waves create movement in the sonobuoy hydrophone...The hydrophone creates a resultant voltage out, the preamp amplifies the hydrophone voltage, the sonic 16 amplifier shapes and pre-whitens the...frequency will create distorted signals, or a non-linear output. The FM bandwidth approximations are determined by: • 2 x peak deviation + 2 x highest

  3. Acoustic Modal Patterns and Striations (AMPS) experiment G-325, Norfolk Public Schools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Joy W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper will describe how high school students with the guidance of volunteer mentors were able to successfully complete an acoustics space experiment. Some of the NORSTAR program strategies used to effectively accomplish this goal will be discussed. The experiment and present status of results will be explained.

  4. Designing an Acoustic Suspension Speaker System in the General Physics Laboratory: A Divergent experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Philip B.

    1969-01-01

    Describes a student laboratory project involving the design of an "acoustic suspension speaker system. The characteristics of the loudspeaker used are measured as an extension of the inertia-balance experiment. The experiment may be extended to a study of Stelmholtz resonators, coupled oscillators, electromagnetic forces, thermodynamics and…

  5. The Development of Acoustic Experiments for Off-Campus Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, Graham; Swan, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we show the implementation of a computer-based digital storage oscilloscope (DSO) and function generator (FG) using the computer's soundcard for off-campus acoustic experiments. The microphone input is used for the DSO, and a speaker jack is used as the FG. In an effort to reduce the cost of implementing the experiment, we examine…

  6. Reproducibility experiments on measuring acoustical properties of rigid-frame porous media (round-robin tests).

    PubMed

    Horoshenkov, Kirill V; Khan, Amir; Bécot, François-Xavier; Jaouen, Luc; Sgard, Franck; Renault, Amélie; Amirouche, Nesrine; Pompoli, Francesco; Prodi, Nicola; Bonfiglio, Paolo; Pispola, Giulio; Asdrubali, Francesco; Hübelt, Jörn; Atalla, Noureddine; Amédin, Celse K; Lauriks, Walter; Boeckx, Laurens

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports the results of reproducibility experiments on the interlaboratory characterization of the acoustical properties of three types of consolidated porous media: granulated porous rubber, reticulated foam, and fiberglass. The measurements are conducted in several independent laboratories in Europe and North America. The studied acoustical characteristics are the surface complex acoustic impedance at normal incidence and plane wave absorption coefficient which are determined using the standard impedance tube method. The paper provides detailed procedures related to sample preparation and installation and it discusses the dispersion in the acoustical material property observed between individual material samples and laboratories. The importance of the boundary conditions, homogeneity of the porous material structure, and stability of the adopted signal processing method are highlighted.

  7. Cruise Report: Long-Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment (LOAPEX)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    starboard side was used. Both ends of the slip line shown ran through the crane hook to keep them vertical; a strip of masking tape was put around the...2150-3550 m nominal) with a 20-element, 700-in long array (3570- 4270 m nominal) to span the lower caustics in the acoustic arrival pattern with a...during the cruise. The critical equipment belonging to the ship included the stem A-frame, starboard A-frame, both of the ship’s cranes , CTD/rosette

  8. Exhaust System Experiments at NASA's AeroAcoustic Propulsion Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2011-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the planned testing in the AeroAcoustic Propulsion Lab (AAPL) in the coming 15 months. It was stressed in the presentation that these are plans that are subject to change due to changes in funding and/or programmatic direction. The first chart shows a simplified schedule of test entries with funding sponsor and dates for each. In subsequent charts are pages devoted to the Objectives and Issues with each test entry, along with a graphic intended to represent the test activity. The chart for each test entry also indicates sponsorship of the activity, and a contact person.!

  9. Acoustic monopoles, dipoles, and quadrupoles: An experiment revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Daniel A.; Titlow, Joseph P.; Bemmen, Ya-Juan

    1999-08-01

    A simple and inexpensive demonstration of acoustic monopole, dipole, and quadrupole sources utilizes four 4-in. boxed loudspeakers and a homemade switch box. The switch box allows the speakers to be driven in any combination of phase relationships. Placing the speakers on a rotating stool allows students to measure directivity patterns for monopole, dipole, and quadrupole speaker combinations. Stacking the speakers in a square, all facing the same direction, allows students to aurally compare the frequency and amplitude dependence of sound radiation from monopoles, dipoles, and quadrupoles.

  10. Application of Flight Simulator Record/Playback Feature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    complex visual flying task in ASPT under one of three instructional conditions which differed in their use of an automated record/playback feature. The...Advanced Instructional Features and Methods in ASPT . The work unit supports project 1123, Flying Training Development; task 112302, Ivstructional...cloverleaf maneuver flown in the present study. Appwffaa. The study was conducted on the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ) located at the Flying

  11. Automated interactive video playback for studies of animal communication.

    PubMed

    Butkowski, Trisha; Yan, Wei; Gray, Aaron M; Cui, Rongfeng; Verzijden, Machteld N; Rosenthal, Gil G

    2011-02-09

    Video playback is a widely-used technique for the controlled manipulation and presentation of visual signals in animal communication. In particular, parameter-based computer animation offers the opportunity to independently manipulate any number of behavioral, morphological, or spectral characteristics in the context of realistic, moving images of animals on screen. A major limitation of conventional playback, however, is that the visual stimulus lacks the ability to interact with the live animal. Borrowing from video-game technology, we have created an automated, interactive system for video playback that controls animations in response to real-time signals from a video tracking system. We demonstrated this method by conducting mate-choice trials on female swordtail fish, Xiphophorus birchmanni. Females were given a simultaneous choice between a courting male conspecific and a courting male heterospecific (X. malinche) on opposite sides of an aquarium. The virtual male stimulus was programmed to track the horizontal position of the female, as courting males do in the wild. Mate-choice trials on wild-caught X. birchmanni females were used to validate the prototype's ability to effectively generate a realistic visual stimulus.

  12. Radiometric and photometric design for an Acoustic Containerless Experiment System. [for space processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    The design of an optical system for a high temperature Acoustic Containerless Experiment System is examined. The optical system provides two-axis video, cine and infrared images of an acoustically positioned sample over a temperature range of 20 to 1200 C. Emphasis is placed on the radiometric and photometric characterization of the elements in the optical system and the oven to assist image data determination. Sample visibility due to wall radiance is investigated along with visibility due to strobe radiance. The optical system is designed for operation in Spacelab, and is used for a variety of materials processing experiments.

  13. Acoustic Propagation Studies For Sperm Whale Phonation Analysis During LADC Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorovskaia, Natalia A.; Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.; Caruthers, Jerald W.

    2004-11-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) conducted a series of passive acoustic experiments in the Northern Gulf of Mexico and the Ligurian Sea in 2001 and 2002. Environmental and acoustic moorings were deployed in areas of large concentrations of marine mammals (mainly, sperm whales). Recordings and analysis of whale phonations are among the objectives of the project. Each mooring had a single autonomously recording hydrophone (Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS)) obtained from the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office after modification to record signals up to 5,859 Hz in the Gulf of Mexico and up to 12,500 Hz in the Ligurian Sea. Self-recording environmental sensors, attached to the moorings, and concurrent environmental ship surveys provided the environmental data for the experiments. The results of acoustic simulations of long-range propagation of the broad-band (500-6,000 Hz) phonation pulses from a hypothetical whale location to the recording hydrophone in the experimental environments are presented. The utilization of the simulation results for an interpretation of the spectral features observed in whale clicks and for the development of tracking algorithms from single hydrophone recordings based on the identification of direct and surface and bottom reflected arrivals are discussed. [Research supported by ONR.

  14. Ground-based acoustic parametric generator impact on the atmosphere and ionosphere in an active experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapoport, Yuriy G.; Cheremnykh, Oleg K.; Koshovy, Volodymyr V.; Melnik, Mykola O.; Ivantyshyn, Oleh L.; Nogach, Roman T.; Selivanov, Yuriy A.; Grimalsky, Vladimir V.; Mezentsev, Valentyn P.; Karataeva, Larysa M.; Ivchenko, Vasyl. M.; Milinevsky, Gennadi P.; Fedun, Viktor N.; Tkachenko, Eugen N.

    2017-01-01

    We develop theoretical basics of active experiments with two beams of acoustic waves, radiated by a ground-based sound generator. These beams are transformed into atmospheric acoustic gravity waves (AGWs), which have parameters that enable them to penetrate to the altitudes of the ionospheric E and F regions where they influence the electron concentration of the ionosphere. Acoustic waves are generated by the ground-based parametric sound generator (PSG) at the two close frequencies. The main idea of the experiment is to design the output parameters of the PSG to build a cascade scheme of nonlinear wave frequency downshift transformations to provide the necessary conditions for their vertical propagation and to enable penetration to ionospheric altitudes. The PSG generates sound waves (SWs) with frequencies f1 = 600 and f2 = 625 Hz and large amplitudes (100-420 m s-1). Each of these waves is modulated with the frequency of 0.016 Hz. The novelty of the proposed analytical-numerical model is due to simultaneous accounting for nonlinearity, diffraction, losses, and dispersion and inclusion of the two-stage transformation (1) of the initial acoustic waves to the acoustic wave with the difference frequency Δf = f2 - f1 in the altitude ranges 0-0.1 km, in the strongly nonlinear regime, and (2) of the acoustic wave with the difference frequency to atmospheric acoustic gravity waves with the modulational frequency in the altitude ranges 0.1-20 km, which then reach the altitudes of the ionospheric E and F regions, in a practically linear regime. AGWs, nonlinearly transformed from the sound waves, launched by the two-frequency ground-based sound generator can increase the transparency of the ionosphere for the electromagnetic waves in HF (MHz) and VLF (kHz) ranges. The developed theoretical model can be used for interpreting an active experiment that includes the PSG impact on the atmosphere-ionosphere system, measurements of electromagnetic and acoustic fields, study of

  15. Variation in butterfly larval acoustics as a strategy to infiltrate and exploit host ant colony resources.

    PubMed

    Sala, Marco; Casacci, Luca Pietro; Balletto, Emilio; Bonelli, Simona; Barbero, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    About 10,000 arthropods live as ants' social parasites and have evolved a number of mechanisms allowing them to penetrate and survive inside the ant nests. Many of them can intercept and manipulate their host communication systems. This is particularly important for butterflies of the genus Maculinea, which spend the majority of their lifecycle inside Myrmica ant nests. Once in the colony, caterpillars of Maculinea "predatory species" directly feed on the ant larvae, while those of "cuckoo species" are fed primarily by attendance workers, by trophallaxis. It has been shown that Maculinea cuckoo larvae are able to reach a higher social status within the colony's hierarchy by mimicking the acoustic signals of their host queen ants. In this research we tested if, when and how myrmecophilous butterflies may change sound emissions depending on their integration level and on stages of their life cycle. We studied how a Maculinea predatory species (M. teleius) can acoustically interact with their host ants and highlighted differences with respect to a cuckoo species (M. alcon). We recorded sounds emitted by Maculinea larvae as well as by their Myrmica hosts, and performed playback experiments to assess the parasites' capacity to interfere with the host acoustic communication system. We found that, although varying between and within butterfly species, the larval acoustic emissions are more similar to queens' than to workers' stridulations. Nevertheless playback experiments showed that ant workers responded most strongly to the sounds emitted by the integrated (i.e. post-adoption) larvae of the cuckoo species, as well as by those of predatory species recorded before any contact with the host ants (i.e. in pre-adoption), thereby revealing the role of acoustic signals both in parasite integration and in adoption rituals. We discuss our findings in the broader context of parasite adaptations, comparing effects of acoustical and chemical mimicry.

  16. Variation in Butterfly Larval Acoustics as a Strategy to Infiltrate and Exploit Host Ant Colony Resources

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Marco; Casacci, Luca Pietro; Balletto, Emilio; Bonelli, Simona; Barbero, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    About 10,000 arthropods live as ants' social parasites and have evolved a number of mechanisms allowing them to penetrate and survive inside the ant nests. Many of them can intercept and manipulate their host communication systems. This is particularly important for butterflies of the genus Maculinea, which spend the majority of their lifecycle inside Myrmica ant nests. Once in the colony, caterpillars of Maculinea “predatory species” directly feed on the ant larvae, while those of “cuckoo species” are fed primarily by attendance workers, by trophallaxis. It has been shown that Maculinea cuckoo larvae are able to reach a higher social status within the colony's hierarchy by mimicking the acoustic signals of their host queen ants. In this research we tested if, when and how myrmecophilous butterflies may change sound emissions depending on their integration level and on stages of their life cycle. We studied how a Maculinea predatory species (M. teleius) can acoustically interact with their host ants and highlighted differences with respect to a cuckoo species (M. alcon). We recorded sounds emitted by Maculinea larvae as well as by their Myrmica hosts, and performed playback experiments to assess the parasites' capacity to interfere with the host acoustic communication system. We found that, although varying between and within butterfly species, the larval acoustic emissions are more similar to queens' than to workers' stridulations. Nevertheless playback experiments showed that ant workers responded most strongly to the sounds emitted by the integrated (i.e. post-adoption) larvae of the cuckoo species, as well as by those of predatory species recorded before any contact with the host ants (i.e. in pre-adoption), thereby revealing the role of acoustic signals both in parasite integration and in adoption rituals. We discuss our findings in the broader context of parasite adaptations, comparing effects of acoustical and chemical mimicry. PMID:24718496

  17. Experiments in Molecular Physics with an Acoustic Interferometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossing, Thomas D.

    1973-01-01

    A device which provides an inexpensive means for making precise studies of the kinetics of gas molecules is discussed. Two experiments are described: (1) Measurement of the vibrational relaxation time of gas molecules and (2) determination of intermolecular forces in molecules. (Author/DF)

  18. GLider Acoustics Sensing of Sediments (GLASS): Experiments and Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    to 8◦. Numerical mod- eling of the impact of vertical array tilt on seabed characterization was performed using OASES [11]. The input parameters to...been deployed in two different shallow-water environments during the GLASS’12 (soft bottom) and GLASS’13 (hard bottom) experiments. The OASES noise...from ambient noise is modeled by OASES [11], and the fitness of the modeling result to the experimen- tal data is measured by a least-mean-square error

  19. LOAPEX: The Long-Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    C. Eriksen, T. J. Osse, R. D. Light, T. Wen, T. W. Lehman, P. L. Sabin, J. W. Ballard, and A. M . Chiodi , “Seaglider: A long range autonomous...Propagation EXperiment James A. Mercer, John A. Colosi, Bruce M . Howe, Matthew A. Dzieciuch, Ralph Stephen, and Peter F. Worcester Abstract—This paper...from various depths to a pair of vertical hydrophone arrays covering 3500 m of the water column, and to several bottom-mounted horizontal line arrays

  20. Development and Evaluation of a Feedback Support System with Audio and Playback Strokes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Kai; Akahori, Kanji

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of a handwritten correction support system with audio and playback strokes used to teach Japanese writing. The study examined whether audio and playback strokes have a positive effect on students using honorific expressions in Japanese writing. The results showed that error feedback with audio…

  1. Music behind Scores: Case Study of Learning Improvisation with "Playback Orchestra" Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juntunen, P.; Ruokonen, I.; Ruismäki, H.

    2015-01-01

    For music students in the early stages of learning, the music may seem to be hidden behind the scores. To support home practising, Juntunen has created the "Playback Orchestra" method with which the students can practise with the support of the notation program playback of the full orchestra. The results of testing the method with…

  2. An investigation into the effect of playback environment on perception of sonic booms when heard indoors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Daniel; Davies, Patricia

    2015-10-01

    Aircraft manufacturers are interested in designing and building a new generation of supersonic aircraft that produce shaped sonic booms of lower peak amplitude than booms created by current supersonic aircraft. To determine if the noise exposure from these "low"booms is more acceptable to communities, new laboratory testing to evaluate people's responses must occur. To guide supersonic aircraft design, objective measures that predict human response to modified sonic boom waveforms and other impulsive sounds are needed. The present research phase is focused on understanding people's reactions to booms when heard inside, and therefore includes consideration of the effects of house type and the indoor acoustic environment. A test was conducted in NASA Langley's Interior Effects Room (IER), with the collaboration of NASA Langley engineers. This test was focused on the effects of low-frequency content and of vibration, and subjects sat in a small living room environment. A second test was conducted in a sound booth at Purdue University, using similar sounds played back over earphones. The sounds in this test contained less very-low-frequency energy due to limitations in the playback, and the laboratory setting is a less natural environment. For the purpose of comparison, and to improve the robustness of the model, both sonic booms and other more familiar transient sounds were used in the tests. The design of the tests and the signals are briefly described, and the results of both tests will be presented.

  3. Numerical investigation of the seismo-acoustic responses of the Source Physics Experiment underground explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoun, T.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Vorobiev, O.; Glenn, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    We have performed three-dimensional high resolution simulations of underground explosions conducted recently in jointed rock outcrop as part of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) being conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The main goal of the current study is to investigate the effects of the structural and geomechanical properties on the spall phenomena due to underground explosions and its subsequent effect on the seismo-acoustic signature at far distances. Two parametric studies have been undertaken to assess the impact of different 1) conceptual geological models including a single layer and two layers model, with and without joints and with and without varying geomechanical properties, and 2) depth of bursts of the explosions and explosion yields. Through these investigations we have explored not only the near-field response of the explosions but also the far-field responses of the seismic and the acoustic signatures. The near-field simulations were conducted using the Eulerian and Lagrangian codes, GEODYN and GEODYN -L, respectively, while the far-field seismic simulations were conducted using the elastic wave propagation code, WPP, and the acoustic response using the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz-Rayleigh time-dependent approximation code, KHR. Though a series of simulations, we have recorded the velocity field histories a) at the ground surface on an acoustic-source-patch for the acoustic simulations, and 2) on a seismic-source-box for the seismic simulations. We first analyzed the SPE3 and SPE4-prime experimental data and simulated results, and then simulated SPE5, SPE6/7 to anticipate their seismo-acoustic responses given conditions of uncertainties. SPE experiments were conducted in a granitic formation; we have extended the parametric study to include other geological settings such dolomite and alluvial formations. These parametric studies enabled us 1) investigating the geotechnical and geophysical key parameters that impact the seismo-acoustic

  4. Thermomagnetic recording and magnetic-optic playback system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, G. W.; Guisinger, J. E. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A magnetic recording and magneto-optic playback system is disclosed wherein thermomagnetic recording is employed. A transparent isotropic film is heated along a continuous path by a focused laser beam. As each successive area of the path is heated locally to the vicinity of its Curie point in the presence of an applied magnetic field, a magneto-optic density is established proportional to the magnetic field and fixed in place as the area cools once the laser beam moves on to an adjacent area. To play back the recorded data, the intensity of the laser beam is reduced to avoid reaching the vicinity of the Curie point of the film as it is scanned by the laser beam in the same manner as for recording. A Faraday effect analyzer and photo detector are employed as a transducer for producing an output signal.

  5. The effect of boundaries on the ion acoustic beam-plasma instability in experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rapson, Christopher; Grulke, Olaf; Matyash, Konstantin; Klinger, Thomas

    2014-05-15

    The ion acoustic beam-plasma instability is known to excite strong solitary waves near the Earth's bow shock. Using a double plasma experiment, tightly coupled with a 1-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, the results presented here show that this instability is critically sensitive to the experimental conditions. Boundary effects, which do not have any counterpart in space or in most simulations, unavoidably excite parasitic instabilities. Potential fluctuations from these instabilities lead to an increase of the beam temperature which reduces the growth rate such that non-linear effects leading to solitary waves are less likely to be observed. Furthermore, the increased temperature modifies the range of beam velocities for which an ion acoustic beam plasma instability is observed.

  6. Early acoustic discrimination experience ameliorates auditory processing deficits in male rats with cortical developmental disruption

    PubMed Central

    Threlkeld, Steven W.; Hill, Courtney A.; Rosen, Glenn D.; Fitch, R. Holly

    2014-01-01

    Auditory temporal processing deficits have been suggested to play a causal role in language learning impairments, and evidence of cortical developmental anomalies (microgyria (MG), ectopia) has been reported for language-impaired populations. Rodent models have linked these features, by showing deficits in auditory temporal discrimination for rats with neuronal migration anomalies (MG, ectopia). Since evidence from human studies suggests that training with both speech and non-speech acoustic stimuli may improve language performance in developmentally language-disabled populations, we were interested in whether/how maturation and early experience might influence auditory processing deficits seen in male rats with induced focal cortical MG. Results showed that for both simple (Normal single tone), as well as increasingly complex auditory discrimination tasks (Silent gap in white noise and FM sweep), prior experience significantly improved acoustic discrimination performance -- in fact, beyond improvements seen with maturation only. Further, we replicated evidence that young adult rats with MG were significantly impaired at discriminating FM sweeps compared to shams. However, these MG effects were no longer seen when experienced subjects were retested in adulthood (even though deficits in short duration FM sweep detection were seen for adult MG rats with no early experience). Thus while some improvements in auditory processing were seen with normal maturation, the effects of early experience were even more profound, in fact resulting in amelioration of MG effects seen at earlier ages. These findings support the clinical view that early training intervention with appropriate acoustic stimuli could similarly ameliorate long-term processing impairments seen in some language-impaired children. PMID:19460626

  7. The development of acoustic experiments for off-campus teaching and learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Graham; Swan, Geoff

    2011-05-01

    In this article, we show the implementation of a computer-based digital storage oscilloscope (DSO) and function generator (FG) using the computer's soundcard for off-campus acoustic experiments. The microphone input is used for the DSO, and a speaker jack is used as the FG. In an effort to reduce the cost of implementing the experiment, we examine software available for free, online. A small number of applications were compared in terms of their interface and functionality, for both the DSO and the FG. The software was then used to investigate standing waves in pipes using the computer-based DSO. Standing wave theory taught in high school and in first year physics is based on a one-dimensional model. With the use of the DSO's fast Fourier transform function, the experimental uncertainly alone was not sufficient to account for the difference observed between the measure and the calculated frequencies. Hence the original experiment was expanded upon to include the end correction effect. The DSO was also used for other simple acoustics experiments, in areas such as the physics of music.

  8. Acoustic interference and recognition space within a complex assemblage of dendrobatid frogs.

    PubMed

    Amézquita, Adolfo; Flechas, Sandra Victoria; Lima, Albertina Pimentel; Gasser, Herbert; Hödl, Walter

    2011-10-11

    In species-rich assemblages of acoustically communicating animals, heterospecific sounds may constrain not only the evolution of signal traits but also the much less-studied signal-processing mechanisms that define the recognition space of a signal. To test the hypothesis that the recognition space is optimally designed, i.e., that it is narrower toward the species that represent the higher potential for acoustic interference, we studied an acoustic assemblage of 10 diurnally active frog species. We characterized their calls, estimated pairwise correlations in calling activity, and, to model the recognition spaces of five species, conducted playback experiments with 577 synthetic signals on 531 males. Acoustic co-occurrence was not related to multivariate distance in call parameters, suggesting a minor role for spectral or temporal segregation among species uttering similar calls. In most cases, the recognition space overlapped but was greater than the signal space, indicating that signal-processing traits do not act as strictly matched filters against sounds other than homospecific calls. Indeed, the range of the recognition space was strongly predicted by the acoustic distance to neighboring species in the signal space. Thus, our data provide compelling evidence of a role of heterospecific calls in evolutionarily shaping the frogs' recognition space within a complex acoustic assemblage without obvious concomitant effects on the signal.

  9. An undergraduate experiment demonstrating the physics of metamaterials with acoustic waves and soda cans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, James T.; Whitehouse, Christopher B.; Oulton, Rupert F.; Gennaro, Sylvain D.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel undergraduate research project that highlights the physics of metamaterials with acoustic waves and soda cans. We confirm the Helmholtz resonance nature of a single can by measuring its amplitude and phase response to a sound wave. Arranging multiple cans in arrays smaller than the wavelength, we then design an antenna that redirects sound into a preferred direction. The antenna can be thought of as a new resonator, composed of artificially engineered meta-atoms, similar to a metamaterial. These experiments are illustrative, tactile, and open ended so as to enable students to explore the physics of matter/wave interaction.

  10. Acoustic Experiment to Measure the Bulk Viscosity of Near-Critical Xenon in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, K. A.; Shinder, I.; Moldover, M. R.; Zimmerli, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    We plan a rigorous test of the theory of dynamic scaling by accurately measuring the bulk viscosity of xenon in microgravity 50 times closer to the critical temperature T(sub c) than previous experiments. The bulk viscosity zeta (or "second viscosity" or "dilational viscosity") will be determined by measuring the attenuation length of sound alpha lambda and also measuring the frequency-dependence of the speed of sound. For these measurements, we developed a unique Helmholtz resonator and specialized electro-acoustic transducers. We describe the resonator, the transducers, their performance on Earth, and their expected performance in microgravity.

  11. Optimization of Capacitive Acoustic Resonant Sensor Using Numerical Simulation and Design of Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Loussert, Christophe; Sergent, Michelle; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Optimization of the acoustic resonant sensor requires a clear understanding of how the output responses of the sensor are affected by the variation of different factors. During this work, output responses of a capacitive acoustic transducer, such as membrane displacement, quality factor, and capacitance variation, are considered to evaluate the sensor design. The six device parameters taken into consideration are membrane radius, backplate radius, cavity height, air gap, membrane tension, and membrane thickness. The effects of factors on the output responses of the transducer are investigated using an integrated methodology that combines numerical simulation and design of experiments (DOE). A series of numerical experiments are conducted to obtain output responses for different combinations of device parameters using finite element methods (FEM). Response surface method is used to identify the significant factors and to develop the empirical models for the output responses. Finally, these results are utilized to calculate the optimum device parameters using multi-criteria optimization with desirability function. Thereafter, the validating experiments are designed and deployed using the numerical simulation to crosscheck the responses. PMID:25894937

  12. Acoustic interactions between an altitude test facility and jet engine plumes: Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Jones, R. R., III; Tam, C. K.; Massey, K. C.; Fleming, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the described effort was to develop an understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in the flow/acoustic interactions experienced in full-scale altitude engine test facilities. This is done by conducting subscale experiments and through development of a theoretical model. Model cold jet experiments with an axisymmetric convergent nozzle are performed in a test setup that stimulates a supersonic jet exhausting into a cylindrical diffuser. The measured data consist of detailed flow visualization data and acoustic spectra for a free and a ducted plume. It is shown that duct resonance is most likely responsible by theoretical calculations. Theoretical calculations also indicate that the higher discrete tones observed in the measurements are related to the screech phenomena. Limited experiments on the sensitivity of a free 2-D, C-D nozzle to externally imposed sound are also presented. It is shown that a 2-D, C-D nozzle with a cutback is less excitable than a 2-D C-D nozzle with no cutback. At a pressure ratio of 1.5 unsteady separation from the diverging walls of the nozzle is noticed. This separation switches from one wall to the opposite wall thus providing an unsteady deflection of the plume. It is shown that this phenomenon is related to the venting provided by the cutback section.

  13. Scintillation recording and playback in free-space optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, William S.; Mahon, Rita; Ferraro, Mike S.; Murphy, James L.; Moore, Christopher I.

    2016-11-01

    The performance of a free-space optical (FSO) communication system is strongly affected by optical scintillation. Scintillation fades can cause errors when the power on a detector falls below its noise floor while surges can overload a detector. The very long time scale of scintillation compared to a typical bit in an FSO link means that error-correcting protocols designed for fiber optic links are inappropriate for FSO links. Comparing the performance effects of different components, such as photodetectors or protocols, such as forward error correction, in the field is difficult because conditions are constantly changing. On the other hand, laboratory-based turbulence simulators may not really simulate the effects of long-range propagation through the atmosphere. We have investigated a different approach. Scintillation has been measured during field tests using FSO terminals by sending a continuous wave beam through the atmosphere. A high dynamic range photodetector was digitized at a 5-KHz rate and files of the intensity variations were saved. Many hours of scintillation data under different environmental conditions and at different sites have been combined into a library of data. A fiber-optic-based scintillation playback system was then used in the laboratory to test modems and protocols with the recorded irradiance files. This enabled comparisons using the same atmospheric conditions allowing optimization of such parameters as detector dynamic range. It also allowed comparison and optimization of different error correcting protocols.

  14. Behavioral Responses of Odontocetes to Playback of Anthropogenic and Natural Sounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    to natural sounds such as those from killer whales ; and to measure exposure parameters for sounds that evoke a behavioral response. APPROACH The...then measuring post-exposure behavioral data. For beaked whales , playbacks were started when the whales started producing echolocation clicks during...a deep foraging dive, and were stopped when they ceased echolocating . Playbacks to other species had timing similar to those for beaked whales

  15. Behavioral Responses of Odontocetes to Playback of Anthropogenic and Natural Sounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    frequency active (MFA) sonar, to a control noise stimulus with similar timing and bandwidth, and to natural sounds such as those from killer whales ; and...beaked whales , playbacks were started when the whales started producing echolocation clicks during a deep foraging dive, and were stopped when they...ceased echolocating . Playbacks to other species had timing similar to those for beaked whales . Working at AUTEC requires close collaboration with

  16. Alarming features: birds use specific acoustic properties to identify heterospecific alarm calls

    PubMed Central

    Fallow, Pamela M.; Pitcher, Benjamin J.; Magrath, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Vertebrates that eavesdrop on heterospecific alarm calls must distinguish alarms from sounds that can safely be ignored, but the mechanisms for identifying heterospecific alarm calls are poorly understood. While vertebrates learn to identify heterospecific alarms through experience, some can also respond to unfamiliar alarm calls that are acoustically similar to conspecific alarm calls. We used synthetic calls to test the role of specific acoustic properties in alarm call identification by superb fairy-wrens, Malurus cyaneus. Individuals fled more often in response to synthetic calls with peak frequencies closer to those of conspecific calls, even if other acoustic features were dissimilar to that of fairy-wren calls. Further, they then spent more time in cover following calls that had both peak frequencies and frequency modulation rates closer to natural fairy-wren means. Thus, fairy-wrens use similarity in specific acoustic properties to identify alarms and adjust a two-stage antipredator response. Our study reveals how birds respond to heterospecific alarm calls without experience, and, together with previous work using playback of natural calls, shows that both acoustic similarity and learning are important for interspecific eavesdropping. More generally, this study reconciles contrasting views on the importance of alarm signal structure and learning in recognition of heterospecific alarms. PMID:23303539

  17. Comprehensive comparisons of geodesic acoustic mode characteristics and dynamics between Tore Supra experiments and gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Storelli, A. Vermare, L.; Hennequin, P.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; Singh, Rameswar; Morel, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Grandgirard, V.; Ghendrih, P.; Görler, T.

    2015-06-15

    In a dedicated collisionality scan in Tore Supra, the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is detected and identified with the Doppler backscattering technique. Observations are compared to the results of a simulation with the gyrokinetic code GYSELA. We found that the GAM frequency in experiments is lower than predicted by simulation and theory. Moreover, the disagreement is higher in the low collisionality scenario. Bursts of non harmonic GAM oscillations have been characterized with filtering techniques, such as the Hilbert-Huang transform. When comparing this dynamical behaviour between experiments and simulation, the probability density function of GAM amplitude and the burst autocorrelation time are found to be remarkably similar. In the simulation, where the radial profile of GAM frequency is continuous, we observed a phenomenon of radial phase mixing of the GAM oscillations, which could influence the burst autocorrelation time.

  18. Features of CO2 fracturing deduced from acoustic emission and microscopy in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Chen, Youqing; Bennour, Ziad; Yamashita, Hiroto; Inui, Shuhei; Nagaya, Yuya; Naoi, Makoto; Chen, Qu; Nakayama, Yoshiki; Nagano, Yu

    2016-11-01

    We conducted hydraulic fracturing (HF) experiments on 170 mm cubic granite specimens with a 20 mm diameter central hole to investigate how fluid viscosity affects HF process and crack properties. In experiments using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2), liquid carbon dioxide (L-CO2), water, and viscous oil with viscosity of 0.051-336.6 mPa · s, we compared the results for breakdown pressure, the distribution and fracturing mechanism of acoustic emission, and the microstructure of induced cracks revealed by using an acrylic resin containing a fluorescent compound. Fracturing with low-viscosity fluid induced three-dimensionally sinuous cracks with many secondary branches, which seem to be desirable pathways for enhanced geothermal system, shale gas recovery, and other processes.

  19. Acoustic-hydrophysical experiments in the coastal zone of the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akulichev, V. A.; Golov, A. A.; Morgunov, Yu. N.; Strobykin, D. S.; Kim, Kiseon; Kim, Chansan

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the results of a pilot experiment on determination of the possibility for effective application of the navigational systems of autonomous robots and remote tools of water structure and dynamics monitoring in shallow water areas. The experiment was based on investigation of the regularities of formation and interaction between hydroacoustic and hydrophysical fields when sounded by complex phase-shift keyed signals with the central frequency of 2500 Hz. The possibility of monitoring of temperature and current fields by acoustic tomography methods in the water area of several square kilometers in size and no more than 10 m in depth, at depth changes up to several meters due to tidal effects, was studied. Additionally, the possibility and precision of solution of navigational problems for underwater objects at such shallow depths was studied. For this purpose a hardware-software complex, equipped with two sources of navigational signals and an imitator of the submersible receiver path, was used.

  20. Role of transient water pressure in quarrying: A subglacial experiment using acoustic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, D.; Hooyer, T. S.; Iverson, N. R.; Thomason, J. F.; Jackson, M.

    2006-09-01

    Probably the most important mechanism of glacial erosion is quarrying: the growth and coalescence of cracks in subglacial bedrock and dislodgement of resultant rock fragments. Although evidence indicates that erosion rates depend on sliding speed, rates of crack growth in bedrock may be enhanced by changing stresses on the bed caused by fluctuating basal water pressure in zones of ice-bed separation. To study quarrying in real time, a granite step, 12 cm high with a crack in its stoss surface, was installed at the bed of Engabreen, Norway. Acoustic emission sensors monitored crack growth events in the step as ice slid over it. Vertical stresses, water pressure, and cavity height in the lee of the step were also measured. Water was pumped to the lee of the step several times over 8 days. Pumping initially caused opening of a leeward cavity, which then closed after pumping was stopped and water pressure decreased. During cavity closure, acoustic emissions emanating mostly from the vicinity of the base of the crack in the step increased dramatically. With repeated pump tests this crack grew with time until the step's lee surface was quarried. Our experiments indicate that fluctuating water pressure caused stress thresholds required for crack growth to be exceeded. Natural basal water pressure fluctuations should also concentrate stresses on rock steps, increasing rates of crack growth. Stress changes on the bed due to water pressure fluctuations will increase in magnitude and duration with cavity size, which may help explain the effect of sliding speed on erosion rates.

  1. Axial vibrations of brass wind instrument bells and their acoustical influence: Experiments.

    PubMed

    Moore, Thomas R; Gorman, Britta R; Rokni, Michelle; Kausel, Wilfried; Chatziioannou, Vasileios

    2015-08-01

    It has recently been proposed that the effects of structural vibrations on the radiated sound of brass wind instruments may be attributable to axial modes of vibration with mode shapes that contain no radial nodes [Kausel, Chatziioannou, Moore, Gorman, and Rokni, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 137, 3149-3162 (2015)]. Results of experiments are reported that support this theory. Mechanical measurements of a trumpet bell demonstrate that these axial modes do exist in brass wind instruments. The quality factor of the mechanical resonances can be on the order of 10 or less, making them broad enough to encompass the frequency range of previously reported effects attributed to bell vibrations. Measurements of the input impedance show that damping bell vibrations can result in impedance changes of up to 5%, in agreement with theory. Measurements of the acoustic transfer function demonstrate that the axial vibrations couple to the internal sound field as proposed, resulting in changes in the transfer function of approximately 1 dB. In agreement with theory, a change in the sign of the effect is observed at the frequency of the structural resonance.

  2. Investigation of the Acoustic Source Characteristics of High Energy Laser Pulses: Models and Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    consistent with the expected approximately 1/r relationship for pressure amplitudes under 100MPa. The modeling effort employed AUTODYN , a finite...agreed with Vogel’s measured values. The efficiency, pulse length, pulse shape, and variation of pressure amplitude with range achieved with AUTODYN ...Nonlinear Acoustics, AUTODYN , Acoustic Modeling, Shock Acoustics 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY

  3. Ultrasonic power transfer from a spherical acoustic wave source to a free-free piezoelectric receiver: Modeling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-03-01

    Contactless powering of small electronic components has lately received growing attention for wireless applications in which battery replacement or tethered charging is undesired or simply impossible, and ambient energy harvesting is not a viable solution. As an alternative to well-studied methods of contactless energy transfer, such as the inductive coupling method, the use of ultrasonic waves transmitted and received by piezoelectric devices enables larger power transmission distances, which is critical especially for deep-implanted electronic devices. Moreover, energy transfer by means of acoustic waves is well suited in situations where no electromagnetic fields are allowed. The limited literature of ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer is mainly centered on proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this method, lacking experimentally validated modeling efforts for the resulting multiphysics problem that couples the source and receiver dynamics with domain acoustics. In this work, we present fully coupled analytical, numerical, and experimental multiphysics investigations for ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer from a spherical wave source to a piezoelectric receiver bar that operates in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity. The fluid-loaded piezoelectric receiver under free-free mechanical boundary conditions is shunted to an electrical load for quantifying the electrical power output for a given acoustic source strength of the transmitter. The analytical acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling framework is validated experimentally, and the effects of system parameters are reported along with optimal electrical loading and frequency conditions of the receiver.

  4. Ultrasonic power transfer from a spherical acoustic wave source to a free-free piezoelectric receiver: Modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-03-14

    Contactless powering of small electronic components has lately received growing attention for wireless applications in which battery replacement or tethered charging is undesired or simply impossible, and ambient energy harvesting is not a viable solution. As an alternative to well-studied methods of contactless energy transfer, such as the inductive coupling method, the use of ultrasonic waves transmitted and received by piezoelectric devices enables larger power transmission distances, which is critical especially for deep-implanted electronic devices. Moreover, energy transfer by means of acoustic waves is well suited in situations where no electromagnetic fields are allowed. The limited literature of ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer is mainly centered on proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this method, lacking experimentally validated modeling efforts for the resulting multiphysics problem that couples the source and receiver dynamics with domain acoustics. In this work, we present fully coupled analytical, numerical, and experimental multiphysics investigations for ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer from a spherical wave source to a piezoelectric receiver bar that operates in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity. The fluid-loaded piezoelectric receiver under free-free mechanical boundary conditions is shunted to an electrical load for quantifying the electrical power output for a given acoustic source strength of the transmitter. The analytical acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling framework is validated experimentally, and the effects of system parameters are reported along with optimal electrical loading and frequency conditions of the receiver.

  5. Behavioral Responses of Naive Cuvier’s Beaked Whales in the Ligurian Sea to Playback of Anthropogenic and Natural Sounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    cavirostris) to MFA sonar signals. Secondary goals included conducting a killer whale playback that has not been preceded by a sonar playback (as in Tyack...beaked whale’s movement response to playback of killer whale vocalizations. Marine Mammal Science. doi: 10.1111/mms.12028 [published, refereed...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Behavioral Responses of Naïve Cuvier’s Beaked Whales in

  6. Playback Theatre as a tool to enhance communication in medical education.

    PubMed

    Salas, Ramiro; Steele, Kenya; Lin, Amy; Loe, Claire; Gauna, Leslie; Jafar-Nejad, Paymaan

    2013-12-23

    Playback Theatre (PT) is an improvisational form of theatre in which a group of actors "play back" real life stories told by audience members. In PT, a conductor elicits moments, feelings and stories from audience members, and conducts mini-interviews with those who volunteer a moment of their lives to be re-enacted or "played" for the audience. A musician plays music according to the theme of each story, and 4-5 actors listen to the interview and perform the story that has just been told. PT has been used in a large number of settings as a tool to share stories in an artistic manner. Despite its similarities to psychodrama, PT does not claim to be a form of therapy. We offered two PT performances to first year medical students at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, to bring the students a safe and fun environment, conducive to sharing feelings and moments related to being a medical student. Through the moments and stories shared by students, we conclude that there is an enormous need in this population for opportunities to communicate the many emotions associated with medical school and with healthcare-related personal experiences, such as anxiety, pride, or anger. PT proved a powerful tool to help students communicate.

  7. Playback Theatre as a tool to enhance communication in medical education.

    PubMed

    Salas, Ramiro; Steele, Kenya; Lin, Amy; Loe, Claire; Gauna, Leslie; Jafar-Nejad, Paymaan

    2013-01-01

    Playback Theatre (PT) is an improvisational form of theatre in which a group of actors "play back" real life stories told by audience members. In PT, a conductor elicits moments, feelings and stories from audience members, and conducts mini-interviews with those who volunteer a moment of their lives to be re-enacted or "played" for the audience. A musician plays music according to the theme of each story, and 4-5 actors listen to the interview and perform the story that has just been told. PT has been used in a large number of settings as a tool to share stories in an artistic manner. Despite its similarities to psychodrama, PT does not claim to be a form of therapy. We offered two PT performances to first year medical students at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, to bring the students a safe and fun environment, conducive to sharing feelings and moments related to being a medical student. Through the moments and stories shared by students, we conclude that there is an enormous need in this population for opportunities to communicate the many emotions associated with medical school and with healthcare-related personal experiences, such as anxiety, pride, or anger. PT proved a powerful tool to help students communicate.

  8. Development of sound localization mechanisms in the mongolian gerbil is shaped by early acoustic experience.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Armin H; Grothe, Benedikt

    2005-08-01

    Sound localization is one of the most important tasks performed by the auditory system. Differences in the arrival time of sound at the two ears are the main cue to localize low-frequency sound in the azimuth. In the mammalian brain, such interaural time differences (ITDs) are encoded in the auditory brain stem; first by the medial superior olive (MSO) and then transferred to higher centers, such as the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (DNLL), a brain stem nucleus that gets a direct input from the MSO. Here we demonstrate for the first time that ITD sensitivity in gerbils undergoes a developmental maturation after hearing onset. We further show that this development can be disrupted by altering the animal's acoustic experience during a critical period. In animals that had been exposed to omnidirectional white noise during a restricted time period right after hearing onset, ITD tuning did not develop normally. Instead, it was similar to that of juvenile animals 3 days after hearing onset, with the ITD functions not adjusted to the physiological range. Animals that had been exposed to omnidirectional noise as adults did not show equivalent abnormal ITD tuning. The development presented here is in contrast to that of the development of neuronal representation of ITDs in the midbrain of barn owls and interaural intensity differences in ferrets, where the representations are adjusted by an interaction of auditory and visual inputs. The development of ITD tuning presented here most likely depends on normal acoustic experience and may be related to the maturation of inhibitory inputs to the ITD detector itself.

  9. Efficiency of playback for assessing the occurrence of five bird species in Brazilian Atlantic Forest fragments.

    PubMed

    Boscolo, Danilo; Metzger, Jean Paul; Vielliard, Jacques M E

    2006-12-01

    Playback of bird songs is a useful technique for species detection; however, this method is usually not standardized. We tested playback efficiency for five Atlantic Forest birds (White-browed Warbler Basileuterus leucoblepharus, Giant Antshrike Batara cinerea, Swallow-tailed Manakin Chiroxiphia caudata, Whiteshouldered Fire-eye Pyriglena leucoptera and Surucua Trogon Trogon surrucura) for different time of the day, season of the year and species abundance at the Morro Grande Forest Reserve (South-eastern Brazil) and at thirteen forest fragments in a nearby landscape. Vocalizations were broadcasted monthly at sunrise, noon and sunset, during one year. For B. leucoblepharus, C. caudata and T. surrucura, sunrise and noon were more efficient than sunset. Batara cinerea presented higher efficiency from July to October. Playback expanded the favourable period for avifaunal surveys in tropical forest, usually restricted to early morning in the breeding season. The playback was efficient in detecting the presence of all species when the abundance was not too low. But only B. leucoblepharus and T. surrucura showed abundance values significantly related to this efficiency. The present study provided a precise indication of the best daily and seasonal periods and a confidence interval to maximize the efficiency of playback to detect the occurrence of these forest species.

  10. Digital playback and improved trap design enhance capture of migrant soras and Virginia rails

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kearns, G.D.; Kwartin, N.B.; Brinker, D.F.; Haramis, G.M.

    1998-01-01

    We used playback of rail vocalizations and improved trap design to enhance capture of fall migrant Soras (Porzana carolina) and Virginia Rails (Rallus limicola) in marshes bordering the tidal Patuxent River, Maryland. Custom-fabricated microchip message repeating sound systems provided digitally recorded sound for long-life, high-quality playback. A single sound system accompanied each 30-45 m long drift fence trap line fitted with 1-3 cloverleaf traps. Ramped funnel entrances improved retention of captured rails and deterred raccoon (Procyon lotor) predation. Use of playback and improved trap design increased trap success by over an order of magnitude and resulted in capture and banding of 2315 Soras and 276 Virginia Rails during September and October 1993-1997. The Sora captures more than doubled the banding records for the species in North America. This capture success demonstrates the efficacy of banding large numbers of Soras and Virginia Rails on migration and winter concentration areas.

  11. Call transmission efficiency in native and invasive anurans: competing hypotheses of divergence in acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Llusia, Diego; Gómez, Miguel; Penna, Mario; Márquez, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are a leading cause of the current biodiversity decline, and hence examining the major traits favouring invasion is a key and long-standing goal of invasion biology. Despite the prominent role of the advertisement calls in sexual selection and reproduction, very little attention has been paid to the features of acoustic communication of invasive species in nonindigenous habitats and their potential impacts on native species. Here we compare for the first time the transmission efficiency of the advertisement calls of native and invasive species, searching for competitive advantages for acoustic communication and reproduction of introduced taxa, and providing insights into competing hypotheses in evolutionary divergence of acoustic signals: acoustic adaptation vs. morphological constraints. Using sound propagation experiments, we measured the attenuation rates of pure tones (0.2-5 kHz) and playback calls (Lithobates catesbeianus and Pelophylax perezi) across four distances (1, 2, 4, and 8 m) and over two substrates (water and soil) in seven Iberian localities. All factors considered (signal type, distance, substrate, and locality) affected transmission efficiency of acoustic signals, which was maximized with lower frequency sounds, shorter distances, and over water surface. Despite being broadcast in nonindigenous habitats, the advertisement calls of invasive L. catesbeianus were propagated more efficiently than those of the native species, in both aquatic and terrestrial substrates, and in most of the study sites. This implies absence of optimal relationship between native environments and propagation of acoustic signals in anurans, in contrast to what predicted by the acoustic adaptation hypothesis, and it might render these vertebrates particularly vulnerable to intrusion of invasive species producing low frequency signals, such as L. catesbeianus. Our findings suggest that mechanisms optimizing sound transmission in native habitat can play a less

  12. Call Transmission Efficiency in Native and Invasive Anurans: Competing Hypotheses of Divergence in Acoustic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Llusia, Diego; Gómez, Miguel; Penna, Mario; Márquez, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are a leading cause of the current biodiversity decline, and hence examining the major traits favouring invasion is a key and long-standing goal of invasion biology. Despite the prominent role of the advertisement calls in sexual selection and reproduction, very little attention has been paid to the features of acoustic communication of invasive species in nonindigenous habitats and their potential impacts on native species. Here we compare for the first time the transmission efficiency of the advertisement calls of native and invasive species, searching for competitive advantages for acoustic communication and reproduction of introduced taxa, and providing insights into competing hypotheses in evolutionary divergence of acoustic signals: acoustic adaptation vs. morphological constraints. Using sound propagation experiments, we measured the attenuation rates of pure tones (0.2–5 kHz) and playback calls (Lithobates catesbeianus and Pelophylax perezi) across four distances (1, 2, 4, and 8 m) and over two substrates (water and soil) in seven Iberian localities. All factors considered (signal type, distance, substrate, and locality) affected transmission efficiency of acoustic signals, which was maximized with lower frequency sounds, shorter distances, and over water surface. Despite being broadcast in nonindigenous habitats, the advertisement calls of invasive L. catesbeianus were propagated more efficiently than those of the native species, in both aquatic and terrestrial substrates, and in most of the study sites. This implies absence of optimal relationship between native environments and propagation of acoustic signals in anurans, in contrast to what predicted by the acoustic adaptation hypothesis, and it might render these vertebrates particularly vulnerable to intrusion of invasive species producing low frequency signals, such as L. catesbeianus. Our findings suggest that mechanisms optimizing sound transmission in native habitat can play a

  13. The Production and Recognition of Acoustic Frequency Cues in Chickadees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohr, Bernard Stephen

    1995-01-01

    The production and recognition of songs with appropriate species-typical features underlies a songbird's success in defending a breeding territory. The ability to recognize a song that is characteristic of one's own species presents an interesting problem, given the variety of types of information often encoded in song. Information in song may involve cues for individual identity, neighbor/stranger recognition, reproductive status, and motivational state. This thesis is concerned with the use of acoustic frequency as a cue for species-recognition of birdsong, and the various forms of frequency production and perception that may provide such cues. Carolina chickadees (Parus carolinensis) sing songs characterized by a succession of unmodulated, pure -tonal notes that alternate between high (approximately 5400-7000 Hz) and low (approximately 3000-4200 Hz) frequencies. Mechanisms of acoustic frequency perception in male territorial Carolina chickadees were evaluated using playback experiments designed to vary specific note frequencies, note frequency ranges, and the frequency range of the entire song type. Note frequency ranges provide the primary acoustic frequency cues for song recognition in this species. A gap between note frequency ranges exists in this species. Tones in this intermediate frequency range do not receive responses in the context of territorial song recognition. This kind of gap in frequency perception has not been demonstrated for other songbirds. Song playback experiments also were designed to vary systematically the contours (inter-note frequency sequences) of notes in song. Note frequency ranges provide the principal cues for song recognition, while the contour between note frequencies plays a supplementary role. The presence of a single descending interval between notes in the appropriate note frequency ranges of Carolina chickadee song generates full species-typical responses to song. Additionally, response to a descending contour between note

  14. Role of transient water pressure in quarrying: A subglacial experiment using acoustic emissions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, D.; Hooyer, T.S.; Iverson, N.R.; Thomason, J.F.; Jackson, M.

    2006-01-01

    Probably the most important mechanism of glacial erosion is quarrying: the growth and coalescence of cracks in subglacial bedrock and dislodgement of resultant rock fragments. Although evidence indicates that erosion rates depend on sliding speed, rates of crack growth in bedrock may be enhanced by changing stresses on the bed caused by fluctuating basal water pressure in zones of ice-bed separation. To study quarrying in real time, a granite step, 12 cm high with a crack in its stoss surface, was installed at the bed of Engabreen, Norway. Acoustic emission sensors monitored crack growth events in the step as ice slid over it. Vertical stresses, water pressure, and cavity height in the lee of the step were also measured. Water was pumped to the lee of the step several times over 8 days. Pumping initially caused opening of a leeward cavity, which then closed after pumping was stopped and water pressure decreased. During cavity closure, acoustic emissions emanating mostly from the vicinity of the base of the crack in the step increased dramatically. With repeated pump tests this crack grew with time until the step's lee surface was quarried. Our experiments indicate that fluctuating water pressure caused stress thresholds required for crack growth to be exceeded. Natural basal water pressure fluctuations should also concentrate stresses on rock steps, increasing rates of crack growth. Stress changes on the bed due to water pressure fluctuations will increase in magnitude and duration with cavity size, which may help explain the effect of sliding speed on erosion rates. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Producing acoustic 'Frozen Waves': simulated experiments with diffraction/attenuation resistant beams in lossy media.

    PubMed

    Prego-Borges, José L; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Recami, Erasmo; Costa, Eduardo Tavares

    2014-08-01

    The so-called Localized Waves (LW), and the "Frozen Waves" (FW), have raised significant attention in the areas of Optics and Ultrasound, because of their surprising energy localization properties. The LWs resist the effects of diffraction for large distances, and possess an interesting self-reconstruction -self-healing- property (after obstacles with size smaller than the antenna's); while the FWs, a sub-class of LWs, offer the possibility of arbitrarily modeling the longitudinal field intensity pattern inside a prefixed interval, for instance 0⩽z⩽L, of the wave propagation axis. More specifically, the FWs are localized fields "at rest", that is, with a static envelope (within which only the carrier wave propagates), and can be endowed moreover with a high transverse localization. In this paper we investigate, by simulated experiments, various cases of generation of ultrasonic FW fields, with the frequency of f0=1 MHz in a water-like medium, taking account of the effects of attenuation. We present results of FWs for distances up to L=80 mm, in attenuating media with absorption coefficient α in the range 70⩽α⩽170 dB/m. Such simulated FW fields are constructed by using a procedure developed by us, via appropriate finite superpositions of monochromatic ultrasonic Bessel beams. We pay due attention to the selection of the FW parameters, constrained by the rather tight restrictions imposed by experimental Acoustics, as well as to some practical implications of the transducer design. The energy localization properties of the Frozen Waves can find application even in many medical apparatus, such as bistouries or acoustic tweezers, as well as for treatment of diseased tissues (in particular, for the destruction of tumor cells, without affecting the surrounding tissues; also for kidney stone shuttering, etc.).

  16. Playback Station #2 for Cal Net and 5-day-recorder tapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, Jerry P.

    1978-01-01

    A second system (Playback Station #2) has been set up to play back Cal Net 1" tapes and 5-day-recorder 1/2" tapes. As with the first playback system (Playback Station #1) the tapes are played back on a Bell and Howell VR3700B tape deck and the records are written out on a 16-channel direct-writing Siemens "0scillomink." Separate reproduce heads, tape guides, and tape tension sensor rollers are required for playing back 111 tapes and 1/2" tapes, but changing these tape deck components is a simple task that requires only a few minutes. The discriminators, patch panels, selector switches, filters, time code translators, and signal conditioning circuits for the time code translators and for the tape-speed-compensation signal are all mounted in an equipment rack that stands beside the playback tape deck. Changing playback speeds (15/16 ips or 3 3/4 ips) or changing from Cal Net tapes to 5-day-recorder tapes requires only flipping a few switches and/or changing a few patch cables on the patch panel (in addition to changing the reproduce heads, etc., to change from 1" tape to 1/2" tape). For the Cal Net tapes, the system provides for playback of 9 data channels (680 Hz thru 3060 Hz plus 400 Hz) and 3 time signals (IRIG-E, IRIG-C, and WWVB) at both 15/16 ips (x1 speed) and 3 3/4 ips (x4 speed). Available modes of compensation (using either a 4688 Hz reference or a 3125 Hz reference) are subtractive, capstan, capstan plus subtractive, or no compensation.

  17. Acoustic resonances in microfluidic chips: full-image micro-PIV experiments and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Hagsäter, S M; Jensen, T Glasdam; Bruus, H; Kutter, J P

    2007-10-01

    We show that full-image micro-PIV analysis in combination with images of transient particle motion is a powerful tool for experimental studies of acoustic radiation forces and acoustic streaming in microfluidic chambers under piezo-actuation in the MHz range. The measured steady-state motion of both large 5 microm and small 1 microm particles can be understood in terms of the acoustic eigenmodes or standing ultra-sound waves in the given experimental microsystems. This interpretation is supported by numerical solutions of the corresponding acoustic wave equation.

  18. Method of and means for testing a tape record/playback system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, G. R.; Salter, W. E.; Weathers, G. D.; Gussow, S. S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A tape record/playback system was tested by first deriving an analog test signal and a band-limited digital reference signal from a pseudo-noise sequence generator driven by a clock signal. It recorded the signals on respective tracks of the system during operation in a record mode. During the playback mode of operation of the system, a delayed analog reference signal without time base variations was reconstructed from the played back reference signal. It was compared with the played back test signal in order to obtain an error signal that was a measure of the performance of the system.

  19. Wide-range adjustment technique of playback wavelength of MBDCG Lippmann hologram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhua; Dong, Guangxing; Li, Jiangfeng; Du, Jinglei

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, a new technique is presented for adjusting the playback wavelength of Lippmann holograms recorded in methylene-blue sensitized dichromated gelatin (MBDCG). The main feature of this technique is introducing a water-soluble organic reagent into MBDCG photosensitive layer as preswelling reagent and wavelength adjuster. This method has wide wavelength adjustment range and high signal-to-noise ratio, can be applied to adjust the playback wavelength of reflection hologram quantitatively by changing the concentration of preswelling reagent. Its possible applications include color image display, holographic optical elements, and optical anti-counterfeiting.

  20. Elephants can determine ethnicity, gender, and age from acoustic cues in human voices

    PubMed Central

    McComb, Karen; Shannon, Graeme; Sayialel, Katito N.; Moss, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Animals can accrue direct fitness benefits by accurately classifying predatory threat according to the species of predator and the magnitude of risk associated with an encounter. Human predators present a particularly interesting cognitive challenge, as it is typically the case that different human subgroups pose radically different levels of danger to animals living around them. Although a number of prey species have proved able to discriminate between certain human categories on the basis of visual and olfactory cues, vocalizations potentially provide a much richer source of information. We now use controlled playback experiments to investigate whether family groups of free-ranging African elephants (Loxodonta africana) in Amboseli National Park, Kenya can use acoustic characteristics of speech to make functionally relevant distinctions between human subcategories differing not only in ethnicity but also in sex and age. Our results demonstrate that elephants can reliably discriminate between two different ethnic groups that differ in the level of threat they represent, significantly increasing their probability of defensive bunching and investigative smelling following playbacks of Maasai voices. Moreover, these responses were specific to the sex and age of Maasai presented, with the voices of Maasai women and boys, subcategories that would generally pose little threat, significantly less likely to produce these behavioral responses. Considering the long history and often pervasive predatory threat associated with humans across the globe, it is likely that abilities to precisely identify dangerous subcategories of humans on the basis of subtle voice characteristics could have been selected for in other cognitively advanced animal species. PMID:24616492

  1. Characterization of blocks impacts from acoustic emissions: insights from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farin, Maxime; Mangeney, Anne; de Rosny, Julien; Toussaint, Renaud; Shapiro, Nikolaï

    2014-05-01

    Rockfalls, debris flows and rock avalanches represent a major natural hazard for the population in mountainous, volcanic and coastal areas but their direct observation on the field is very dangerous. Recent studies showed that gravitational instabilities can be detected and characterized (volume, duration,...) thanks to the seismic signal they generate. In an avalanche, individual block bouncing and rolling on the ground are expected to generated signals of higher frequencies than the main flow spreading. The identification of the time/frequency signature of individual blocks in the recorded signal remains however difficult. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the acoustic signature of diverse simple sources corresponding to grains falling over thin plates of plexiglas and glass and over rock blocks. The elastic energy emitted by a single bouncing bead into the support was first quantitatively estimated and compared to the potential energy of fall and to the potential energy change during the shock. We obtained simple scaling laws relating the impactor characteristics (size, height of fall, material,...) to the elastic energy and spectral content. Next, we consider the collapse of granular columns made of steel spherical beads onto hard substrates. Initially, these columns were held by a magnetic field allowing to suppress suddenly the cohesion between the beads, and thus to minimize friction effects that would arise from side walls. We varied systematically the column volume, the column aspect ratio (height over length) and the grain size. This is shown to affect the signal envelope and frequency content. In the experiments, accelerometers (1 Hz to 56 kHz) were used to record the signals in a wide frequency range. The experiments were also monitored optically using fast cameras. Eventually, we looked at what types of features in the signal are affected by individual impacts, rolling of beads or by the large scale geometry of the avalanche.

  2. Inclusive Democracy: A Consideration of Playback Theatre with Refugee and Asylum Seekers in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Rea

    2007-01-01

    Community-based performance often facilitates participation through story-based processes and in this way could be seen as enacting a form of inclusive democracy. This paper examines a playback theater performance with a refugee and asylum seeker audience and questions whether inclusive, democratic participation can be fostered. It presents a…

  3. Behavioral Change as a Result of Videotaped Playback: An Examination of Two Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronchi, Don; Ripple, Richard E.

    The literature on the behavior effects of videotaped playback reveals that little theoretical formulation has been offered to explain the positive results which have been reported. Two theoretical models are considered in regard to these results. The first, a reinforcement model, suggests that some behaviors are reinforced positively and some…

  4. Relative threat and recognition ability in the responses of tropical mockingbirds to song playback

    PubMed Central

    BOTERO, CARLOS A.; RIVEROS, JIMENA M.; VEHRENCAMP, SANDRA L.

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that individual recognition based on song may be constrained by repertoire size in songbirds with very large song repertoires. This hypothesis has been difficult to test because there are few studies on species with very large repertoires and because traditional experiments based on the dear enemy effect do not provide evidence against recognition. The tropical mockingbird, Mimus gilvus, is a cooperative breeder with very large song repertoires and stable territorial neighbourhoods. The social system of this species allowed us to test individual recognition based on song independently from the dear enemy effect by evaluating male response to playback of strangers, neighbours (from shared and unshared boundaries), co-males (i.e. other males in the same social group) and own songs. Although subjects did not show a dear enemy effect, they were less aggressive to co-males than to all other singers. Our results suggest that recognition in tropical mockingbirds (1) does not simply distinguish between familiar and unfamiliar singers, (2) requires a small sample of both songs and song types, (3) does not rely on individual-specific sequences of song types and (4) is not likely to rely on group-specific vocal signatures potentially available in cooperatively breeding groups. We conclude that this is a case of true recognition and suggest that the lack of a dear enemy effect in this and other species with large repertoires may relate to the role of song in mate attraction and the perception of neighbours as a threat to future paternity. PMID:18079978

  5. Relative threat and recognition ability in the responses of tropical mockingbirds to song playback.

    PubMed

    Botero, Carlos A; Riveros, Jimena M; Vehrencamp, Sandra L

    2007-04-01

    It has been suggested that individual recognition based on song may be constrained by repertoire size in songbirds with very large song repertoires. This hypothesis has been difficult to test because there are few studies on species with very large repertoires and because traditional experiments based on the dear enemy effect do not provide evidence against recognition. The tropical mockingbird, Mimus gilvus, is a cooperative breeder with very large song repertoires and stable territorial neighbourhoods. The social system of this species allowed us to test individual recognition based on song independently from the dear enemy effect by evaluating male response to playback of strangers, neighbours (from shared and unshared boundaries), co-males (i.e. other males in the same social group) and own songs. Although subjects did not show a dear enemy effect, they were less aggressive to co-males than to all other singers. Our results suggest that recognition in tropical mockingbirds (1) does not simply distinguish between familiar and unfamiliar singers, (2) requires a small sample of both songs and song types, (3) does not rely on individual-specific sequences of song types and (4) is not likely to rely on group-specific vocal signatures potentially available in cooperatively breeding groups. We conclude that this is a case of true recognition and suggest that the lack of a dear enemy effect in this and other species with large repertoires may relate to the role of song in mate attraction and the perception of neighbours as a threat to future paternity.

  6. Effect of Anisotropic Velocity Structure on Acoustic Emission Source Location during True-Triaxial Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofrani Tabari, Mehdi; Goodfellow, Sebastian; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    Although true-triaxial testing (TTT) of rocks is now more extensive worldwide, stress-induced heterogeneity due to the existence of several loading boundary effects is not usually accounted for and simplified anisotropic models are used. This study focuses on the enhanced anisotropic velocity structure to improve acoustic emission (AE) analysis for an enhanced interpretation of induced fracturing. Data from a TTT on a cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone is used in this study to evaluate the methodology. At different stages of the experiment the True-Triaxial Geophysical Imaging Cell (TTGIC), armed with an ultrasonic and AE monitoring system, performed several velocity surveys to image velocity structure of the sample. Going beyond a hydrostatic stress state (poro-elastic phase), the rock sample went through a non-dilatational elastic phase, a dilatational non-damaging elasto-plastic phase containing initial AE activity and finally a dilatational and damaging elasto-plastic phase up to the failure point. The experiment was divided into these phases based on the information obtained from strain, velocity and AE streaming data. Analysis of the ultrasonic velocity survey data discovered that a homogeneous anisotropic core in the center of the sample is formed with ellipsoidal symmetry under the standard polyaxial setup. Location of the transducer shots were improved by implementation of different velocity models for the sample starting from isotropic and homogeneous models going toward anisotropic and heterogeneous models. The transducer shot locations showed a major improvement after the velocity model corrections had been applied especially at the final phase of the experiment. This location improvement validated our velocity model at the final phase of the experiment consisting lower-velocity zones bearing partially saturated fractures. The ellipsoidal anisotropic velocity model was also verified at the core of the cubic rock specimen by AE event location of

  7. Acoustic flight test experience with the XV-15 Tiltrotor aircraft with the Advanced Technology Blade (ATB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoad, Danny R.; Conner, David A.; Rutledge, Charles K.

    1992-01-01

    An acoustic model that predicts the discrete frequency noise characteristics of helicopter rotors has been utilized in an analysis to help identify source characteristics. This technique incorporated a NASA Langley developed acoustic prediction technique, and a simplified flow field model to account for rotor wake reingestion in hover. The vehicle rotor system was modified to include the ATBs that were designed to provide for higher operating weights and improved maneuver load factor in helicopter and transition modes of operation.

  8. PoroTomo Subtask 3.2 Data files from the Distributed Acoustic Sensing experiment at Garner Valley, California

    DOE Data Explorer

    Chelsea Lancelle

    2013-09-11

    In September 2013, an experiment using Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) was conducted at Garner Valley, a test site of the University of California Santa Barbara (Lancelle et al., 2014). This submission includes all DAS data recorded during the experiment. The sampling rate for all files is 1000 samples per second. Any files with the same filename but ending in _01, _02, etc. represent sequential files from the same test. Locations of the sources are plotted on the basemap in GDR submission 481, titled: "PoroTomo Subtask 3.2 Sample data from a Distributed Acoustic Sensing experiment at Garner Valley, California (PoroTomo Subtask 3.2)." Lancelle, C., N. Lord, H. Wang, D. Fratta, R. Nigbor, A. Chalari, R. Karaulanov, J. Baldwin, and E. Castongia (2014), Directivity and Sensitivity of Fiber-Optic Cable Measuring Ground Motion using a Distributed Acoustic Sensing Array (abstract # NS31C-3935), AGU Fall Meeting. 
https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm1/meetingapp.cgi#Paper/19828 The e-poster is available at: https://agu.confex.com/data/handout/agu/fm14/Paper_19828_handout_696_0.pdf

  9. The ecological and evolutionary consequences of noise-induced acoustic habitat loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennessen, Jennifer Beissinger

    Anthropogenic threats are facilitating rapid environmental change and exerting novel pressures on the integrity of ecological patterns and processes. Currently, habitat loss is the leading factor contributing to global biodiversity loss. Noise created by human activities is nearly ubiquitous in terrestrial and marine systems, and causes acoustic habitat loss by interfering with species' abilities to freely send and receive critical acoustic biological information. My dissertation investigates how novel sounds from human activities affect ecological and evolutionary processes in space and time in marine and terrestrial systems, and how species may cope with this emerging novel pressure. Using species from both marine and terrestrial systems, I present results from a theoretical investigation, and four acoustic playback experiments combining laboratory studies and field trials, that reveal a range of eco-evolutionary consequences of noiseinduced acoustic habitat loss. First, I use sound propagation modeling to assess how marine shipping noise reduces communication space between mother-calf pairs of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis ), an important unit of an endangered species. I show that shipping noise poses significant challenges for mother-calf pairs, but that vocal compensation strategies can substantially improve communication space. Next, in a series of acoustic playback experiments I show that road traffic noise impairs breeding migration behavior and physiology of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus ). This work reveals the first evidence that traffic noise elicits a physiological stress response and suppresses production of antimicrobial peptides (a component of the innate immune response) in anurans. Further, wood frogs from populations with a history of inhabiting noisy sites mounted reduced physiological stress responses to continuous traffic noise exposure. This research using wood frogs suggests that chronic traffic noise exposure has

  10. Acoustic simulations with a ray-tracing program: Reporting an experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granado, Milton V., Jr.

    2002-11-01

    The possibility of exporting to ray-tracing type programs the geometry generated by Auto-Cad, is very appealing for the architect who wishes to simulate the acoustic behavior of a room. It was found that a good knowledge of room acoustic is necessary for the selection of the program parameters and the objective acoustical measures outputted by the program for the assessment of the required acoustical quality. There is scarce information on the absorption coefficients of lining materials, but it is on the choice of the diffusion coefficients where lie the greatest uncertainties. Because of the considerable impact that these data have on the computational results, the user may feel insecure about the results of his efforts. Therefore it is advisable that trained personnel participate in the efficient use of this computational tool. It was found however that one form of the output of the program, that in which the acoustical parameters are color mapped, have qualitatively corroborated speech intelligibility results objectively measured in the field. (To be presented in Portuguese.)

  11. Sample data from a Distributed Acoustic Sensing experiment at Garner Valley, California (PoroTomo Subtask 3.2)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Lancelle, Chelsea

    2013-09-10

    In September 2013, an experiment using Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) was conducted at Garner Valley, a test site of the University of California Santa Barbara (Lancelle et al., 2014). This submission includes one 45 kN shear shaker (called “large shaker” on the basemap) test for three different measurement systems. The shaker swept from a rest, up to 10 Hz, and back down to a rest over 60 seconds. Lancelle, C., N. Lord, H. Wang, D. Fratta, R. Nigbor, A. Chalari, R. Karaulanov, J. Baldwin, and E. Castongia (2014), Directivity and Sensitivity of Fiber-Optic Cable Measuring Ground Motion using a Distributed Acoustic Sensing Array (abstract # NS31C-3935), AGU Fall Meeting. https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm1/meetingapp.cgi#Paper/19828 The e-poster is available at: https://agu.confex.com/data/handout/agu/fm14/Paper_19828_handout_696_0.pdf

  12. Investigation of acoustic gravity waves created by anomalous heat sources: experiments and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, R.; Lee, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    We have been investigating high-power radio wave-induced acoustic gravity waves (AGWs) at Gakona, Alaska, using the High-frequency Active Aurora Research Program (HAARP) heating facility (i.e. HF heater) and extensive diagnostic instruments. This work was aimed at performing a controlled study of the space plasma turbulence triggered by the AGWs originating from anomalous heat sources, as observed in our earlier experiments at Arecibo, Puerto Rico (Pradipta 2007 MS Thesis MIT Press, Cambridge, MA). The HF heater operated in continuous wave (CW) O-mode can heat ionospheric plasmas effectively to yield a depleted magnetic flux tube as rising plasma bubbles (Lee et al 1998 Geophys. Res. Lett. 25 579). Two processes are responsible for the depletion of the magnetic flux tube: (i) thermal expansion and (ii) chemical reactions caused by heated ions. The depleted plasmas create large density gradients that can augment spread F processes via generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (Lee et al 1999 Geophys. Res. Lett. 26 37). It is thus expected that the temperature of neutral particles in the heated ionospheric region can be increased. Such a heat source in the neutral atmosphere may potentially generate AGWs in the form of traveling ionospheric plasma disturbances (TIPDs). We should point out that these TIPDs have features distinctively different from electric and magnetic field (ExB) drifts of HF wave-induced large-scale non-propagating plasma structures. Moreover, it was noted in our recent study of naturally occurring AGW-induced TIDs that only large-scale AGWs can propagate upward to reach higher altitudes. Thus, in our Gakona experiments we select optimum heating schemes for HF wave-induced AGWs that can be distinguished from the naturally occurring ones. The generation and propagation of AGWs are monitored by MUIR (Modular Ultra high-frequency Ionospheric Radar), Digisonde and GPS/low-earth-orbit satellites. Our theoretical and experimental studies have shown that

  13. Acoustic Characterization of Fluorinert FC-43 Liquid with Helium Gas Bubbles: Numerical Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Vanhille, Christian; Pantea, Cristian; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we define the acoustic characteristics of a biphasic fluid consisting of static helium gas bubbles in liquid Fluorinert FC-43 and study the propagation of ultrasound of finite amplitudes in this medium. Very low sound speed and high sound attenuation are found, in addition to a particularly high acoustic nonlinear parameter. This result suggests the possibility of using this medium as a nonlinear enhancer in various applications. In particular, parametric generation of low ultrasonic frequencies is studied in a resonator cavity as a function of driving pressure showing high conversion efficiency. This work suggests that this medium couldmore » be used for applications such as parametric arrays, nondestructive testing, diagnostic medicine, sonochemistry, underwater acoustics, and ultrasonic imaging and to boost the shock formation in fluids.« less

  14. Thermo acoustic study of carbon nanotubes in near and far field: Theory, simulation, and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadzadeh, S. S.; Moosavi, A.; Huynh, C.; Saleki, O.

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotube webs exhibit interesting properties when used as thermo-acoustic projectors. This work studies thermo-acoustic effect of these sound sources both in near and far field regions. Based on two alternative forms of the energy equation, we have developed a straightforward formula for calculation of pressure field, which is consistent with experimental data in far field. Also we have solved full 3-D governing equations using numerical methods. Our three-dimensional simulation and experimental data show pressure waves are highly affected by dimensions of sound sources in near field due to interference effects. However, generation of sound waves in far field is independent of projectors area surface. Energy analysis for free standing Thermo-Acoustic (TA) sound sources show that aerogel TA sound sources like CNT based projectors could act more efficiently compared to the other sources in delivering more than 75% of alternative input energy to the medium gas up to a frequency of 1 MHz.

  15. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of a Helmholtz resonator: Discrete vortex model compared to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiwen; Jing, Xiaodong Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-15

    The acoustic resonance in a Helmholtz resonator excited by a low Mach number grazing flow is studied theoretically. The nonlinear numerical model is established by coupling the vortical motion at the cavity opening with the cavity acoustic mode through an explicit force balancing relation between the two sides of the opening. The vortical motion is modeled in the potential flow framework, in which the oscillating motion of the thin shear layer is described by an array of convected point vortices, and the unsteady vortex shedding is determined by the Kutta condition. The cavity acoustic mode is obtained from the one-dimensional acoustic propagation model, the time-domain equivalent of which is given by means of a broadband time-domain impedance model. The acoustic resistances due to radiation and viscous loss at the opening are also taken into account. The physical processes of the self-excited oscillations, at both resonance and off-resonance states, are simulated directly in the time domain. Results show that the shear layer exhibits a weak flapping motion at the off-resonance state, whereas it rolls up into large-scale vortex cores when resonances occur. Single and dual-vortex patterns are observed corresponding to the first and second hydrodynamic modes. The simulation also reveals different trajectories of the two vortices across the opening when the first and second hydrodynamic modes co-exist. The strong modulation of the shed vorticity by the acoustic feedback at the resonance state is demonstrated. The model overestimates the pressure pulsation amplitude by a factor 2, which is expected to be due to the turbulence of the flow which is not taken into account. The model neglects vortex shedding at the downstream and side edges of the cavity. This will also result in an overestimation of the pulsation amplitude.

  16. An impulsive source with variable output and stable bandwidth for underwater acoustic experiments.

    PubMed

    McNeese, Andrew R; Wilson, Preston S; Sagers, Jason D; Knobles, David P

    2014-07-01

    The Combustive Sound Source (CSS) is being developed as an environmentally friendly source to be used in ocean acoustics research and surveys. It has the ability to maintain the same wide bandwidth signal over a 20 dB drop in source level. The CSS consists of a submersible combustion chamber filled with a fuel/oxidizer mixture. The mixture is ignited and the ensuing combustion and bubble activity radiates an impulsive, thus broadband, acoustic pulse. The ability to control pulse amplitude while maintaining bandwidth is demonstrated.

  17. Baseline Behavior of Pilot Whales and their Responses to Playback of Anthropogenic and Natural Sounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Playback of Anthropogenic and Natural Sounds Peter Tyack Senior Scientist Emeritus Biology Department Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution 266...Woods Hole Road, MS#50 Woods Hole , MA 02543, USA phone: (508) 289-2818 fax: (508) 457-2041 email: ptyack@whoi.edu Award Number...ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Woods Hole

  18. Robust behavioral effects of song playback in the absence of testosterone or corticosterone release.

    PubMed

    Rosvall, Kimberly A; Reichard, Dustin G; Ferguson, Stephen M; Whittaker, Danielle J; Ketterson, Ellen D

    2012-09-01

    Some species of songbirds elevate testosterone in response to territorial intrusions while others do not. The search for a general explanation for this interspecific variation in hormonal response to social challenges has been impeded by methodological differences among studies. We asked whether song playback alone is sufficient to bring about elevation in testosterone or corticosterone in the dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis), a species that has previously demonstrated significant testosterone elevation in response to a simulated territorial intrusion when song was accompanied by a live decoy. We studied two populations of juncos that differ in length of breeding season (6-8 vs. 14-16 weeks), and conducted playbacks of high amplitude, long-range song. In one population, we also played low amplitude, short-range song, a highly potent elicitor of aggression in juncos and many songbirds. We observed strong aggressive responses to both types of song, but no detectable elevation of plasma testosterone or corticosterone in either population. We also measured rise in corticosterone in response to handling post-playback, and found full capacity to elevate corticosterone but no effect of song class (long-range or short-range) on elevation. Collectively, our data suggest that males can mount an aggressive response to playback without a change in testosterone or corticosterone, despite the ability to alter these hormones during other types of social interactions. We discuss the observed decoupling of circulating hormones and aggression in relation to mechanisms of behavior and the cues that may activate the HPA and HPG axes.

  19. Comparison of Computational Aeroacoustics Prediction of Acoustic Transmission Through a 3D Stator with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, Ray; Envia, Edmane; Dahl, Milo; Sutliff, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, numerical predictions of acoustic transmission through a 3D stator obtained using the NASA BASS code are compared with experimentally measured data. The influence of vane count and stagger as well as frequency and mode order on the transmission loss is investigated. The data-theory comparisons indicate that BASS can predict all the important trends observed in the experimental data.

  20. Comparison of Computational Aeroacoustics Prediction of Acoustic Transmission Through a 3D Stator With Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, Ray; Envia, Edmane; Dahl, Milo; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, numerical predictions of acoustic transmission through a 3D stator obtained using the NASA BASS code are compared with experimentally measured data. The influence of vane count and stagger as well as frequency and mode order on the transmission loss is investigated. The data-theory comparisons indicate that BASS can predict all the important trends observed in the experimental data.

  1. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor; Hearing loss - acoustic; Tinnitus - acoustic ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  2. Behavioral Responses of Naive Cuvier’s Beaked Whales in the Ligurian Sea to Playback of Anthropogenic and Natural Sounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    cavirostris) to MFA sonar signals. A secondary goal of conducting a killer whale playback that has not been preceded by a sonar playback (as in Tyack et al...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Behavioral Responses of Naïve Cuvier’s Beaked Whales in...Award Number: N000141210418 LONG-TERM GOALS The principle goal of this project was to study responses of Cuvier’s beaked whales (Ziphius

  3. Tutorial on the Psychophysics and Technology of Virtual Acoustic Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Null, Cynthia (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Virtual acoustics, also known as 3-D sound and auralization, is the simulation of the complex acoustic field experienced by a listener within an environment. Going beyond the simple intensity panning of normal stereo techniques, the goal is to process sounds so that they appear to come from particular locations in three-dimensional space. Although loudspeaker systems are being developed, most of the recent work focuses on using headphones for playback and is the outgrowth of earlier analog techniques. For example, in binaural recording, the sound of an orchestra playing classical music is recorded through small mics in the two "ear canals" of an anthropomorphic artificial or "dummy" head placed in the audience of a concert hall. When the recorded piece is played back over headphones, the listener passively experiences the illusion of hearing the violins on the left and the cellos on the right, along with all the associated echoes, resonances, and ambience of the original environment. Current techniques use digital signal processing to synthesize the acoustical properties that people use to localize a sound source in space. Thus, they provide the flexibility of a kind of digital dummy head, allowing a more active experience in which a listener can both design and move around or interact with a simulated acoustic environment in real time. Such simulations are being developed for a variety of application areas including architectural acoustics, advanced human-computer interfaces, telepresence and virtual reality, navigation aids for the visually-impaired, and as a test bed for psychoacoustical investigations of complex spatial cues. The tutorial will review the basic psychoacoustical cues that determine human sound localization and the techniques used to measure these cues as Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs) for the purpose of synthesizing virtual acoustic environments. The only conclusive test of the adequacy of such simulations is an operational one in which

  4. Localization of short-range acoustic and seismic wideband sources: Algorithms and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafsudd, J. Z.; Asgari, S.; Hudson, R.; Yao, K.; Taciroglu, E.

    2008-04-01

    We consider the determination of the location (source localization) of a disturbance source which emits acoustic and/or seismic signals. We devise an enhanced approximate maximum-likelihood (AML) algorithm to process data collected at acoustic sensors (microphones) belonging to an array of, non-collocated but otherwise identical, sensors. The approximate maximum-likelihood algorithm exploits the time-delay-of-arrival of acoustic signals at different sensors, and yields the source location. For processing the seismic signals, we investigate two distinct algorithms, both of which process data collected at a single measurement station comprising a triaxial accelerometer, to determine direction-of-arrival. The direction-of-arrivals determined at each sensor station are then combined using a weighted least-squares approach for source localization. The first of the direction-of-arrival estimation algorithms is based on the spectral decomposition of the covariance matrix, while the second is based on surface wave analysis. Both of the seismic source localization algorithms have their roots in seismology; and covariance matrix analysis had been successfully employed in applications where the source and the sensors (array) are typically separated by planetary distances (i.e., hundreds to thousands of kilometers). Here, we focus on very-short distances (e.g., less than one hundred meters) instead, with an outlook to applications in multi-modal surveillance, including target detection, tracking, and zone intrusion. We demonstrate the utility of the aforementioned algorithms through a series of open-field tests wherein we successfully localize wideband acoustic and/or seismic sources. We also investigate a basic strategy for fusion of results yielded by acoustic and seismic arrays.

  5. Ultrasound imparted air-recoil resonance (UIAR) method for acoustic power estimation: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Kaiplavil, Sreekumar; Rivens, Ian; ter Haar, Gail

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasound imparted air-recoil resonance (UIAR), a new method for acoustic power estimation, is introduced with emphasis on therapeutic high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) monitoring applications. Advantages of this approach over existing practices include fast response; electrical and magnetic inertness, and hence MRI compatibility; portability; high damage threshold and immunity to vibration and interference; low cost; etc. The angle of incidence should be fixed for accurate measurement. However, the transducer-detector pair can be aligned in any direction with respect to the force of gravity. In this sense, the operation of the device is orientation independent. The acoustic response of a pneumatically coupled pair of Helmholtz resonators, with one of them acting as the sensor head, is used for the estimation of acoustic power. The principle is valid in the case of pulsed/ burst as well as continuous ultrasound exposure, the former being more sensitive and accurate. An electro-acoustic theory has been developed for describing the dynamics of pressure flow and resonance in the system considering various thermo- viscous loss mechanisms. Experimental observations are found to be in agreement with theoretical results. Assuming the window damage threshold (~10 J·mm(-2)) and accuracy of RF power estimation are the upper and lower scale-limiting factors, the performance of the device was examined for an RF power range of 5 mW to 100 W with a HIFU transducer operating at 1.70 MHz, and an average nonlinearity of ~1.5% was observed. The device is also sensitive to sub-milliwatt powers. The frequency response was analyzed at 0.85, 1.70, 2.55, and 3.40 MHz and the results are presented with respective theoretical estimates. Typical response time is in the millisecond regime. Output drift is about 3% for resonant and 5% for nonresonant modes. The principle has been optimized to demonstrate a general-purpose acoustic power meter.

  6. The Ability to Structure Acoustic Material as a Measure of Musical Aptitude. 4. Experiences with Modifications of the Acoustic Structuring Test. Research Bulletin. No. 51.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karma, Kai

    Four new versions of an acoustic structuring test were developed, administered, and analyzed in order to produce better tests and to contribute to better understanding of the abilities measured by these tests. The tests consist of tape recordings of patterns of musical notes played on an electric organ or an acoustic guitar. Item analyses and…

  7. Significance of temporal and spectral acoustic cues for sexual recognition in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Vignal, Clémentine; Kelley, Darcy

    2006-01-01

    As in many anurans, males of the totally aquatic species, Xenopus laevis, advertise their sexual receptivity using vocalizations. Unusually for anurans, X. laevis females also advertise producing a fertility call that results in courtship duets between partners. Although all X. laevis calls consist of repetitive click trains, male and female calls exhibit sex-specific acoustic features that might convey sexual identity. We tested the significance of the carrier frequency and the temporal pattern of calls using underwater playback experiments in which modified calls were used to evoke vocal responses in males. Since males respond differently to male and female calls, the modification of a key component of sexual identity in calls should change the male's response. We found that a female-like slow call rhythm triggers more vocal activity than a male-like fast rhythm. A call containing both a female-like temporal pattern and a female-like carrier frequency elicits higher levels of courtship display than either feature alone. In contrast, a male-like temporal pattern is sufficient to trigger typical male–male encounter vocalizations regardless of spectral cues. Thus, our evidence supports a role for temporal acoustic cues in sexual identity recognition and for spectral acoustic cues in conveying female attractiveness in X. laevis. PMID:17476767

  8. Analysis of an existing experiment on the interaction of acoustic waves with a laminar boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schopper, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    The hot-wire anemometer amplitude data contained in the 1977 report of P. J. Shapiro entitled, ""The Influence of Sound Upon Laminar Boundary'' were reevaluated. Because the low-Reynolds number boundary layer disturbance data were misinterpreted, an effort was made to improve the corresponding disturbance growth rate curves. The data are modeled as the sum of upstream and downstream propagating acoustic waves and a wave representing the Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave. The amplitude and phase velocity of the latter wave were then adjusted so that the total signal reasonably matched the amplitude and phase angle hot-wire data along the plate laminar boundary layer. The revised rates show growth occurring further upstream than Shapiro found. It appears that the premature growth is due to the adverse pressure gradient created by the shape of the plate. Basic elements of sound propagation in ducts and the experimental and theoretical acoustic-stability literature are reviewed.

  9. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of residual stresses in ceramics: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu

    1992-01-01

    Several reviews have highlighted a number of applications of scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) to metals and semiconductors which show that SEAM can provide new information on surface and near-surface features of such materials, but there have been few studies attempting to determine the capabilities of SEAM for characterizing ceramic materials. We have recently observed image contrast in SEAM from residual stress fields induced in brittle materials by Vickers indentations that is strongly dependent on the electron beam chopping frequency. We have also recently developed a three-dimensional mathematical model of signal generation and contrast in SEAM, appropriate to the brittle materials studied, that we use as a starting point in this paper for modeling the effect of residual stress fields on the generated electron acoustic signal. The influence of the electron beam chopping frequency is also considered under restrictive assumptions.

  10. Horizontal Anisotropy and Seasonal Variation of Acoustic Fluctuations Observed During the 20102011 Philippine Sea Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    No. 0704–0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for...22202- 4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0704-0188) Washington, DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank...ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) The anisotropic ocean environment will lead to variability of ocean acoustic travel time . The variability of

  11. Acoustic Behavior of Halobacterium salinarum Gas Vesicles in the High-Frequency Range: Experiments and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Cherin, Emmanuel; Melis, Johan M; Bourdeau, Raymond W; Yin, Melissa; Kochmann, Dennis M; Foster, F Stuart; Shapiro, Mikhail G

    2017-03-01

    Gas vesicles (GVs) are a new and unique class of biologically derived ultrasound contrast agents with sub-micron size whose acoustic properties have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the acoustic collapse pressure and behavior of Halobacterium salinarum gas vesicles at transmit center frequencies ranging from 12.5 to 27.5 MHz. The acoustic collapse pressure was found to be above 550 kPa at all frequencies, nine-fold higher than the critical pressure observed under hydrostatic conditions. We illustrate that gas vesicles behave non-linearly when exposed to ultrasound at incident pressure ranging from 160 kPa to the collapse pressure and generate second harmonic amplitudes of -2 to -6 dB below the fundamental in media with viscosities ranging from 0.89 to 8 mPa·s. Simulations performed using a Rayleigh-Plesset-type model accounting for buckling and a dynamic finite-element analysis suggest that buckling is the mechanism behind the generation of harmonics. We found good agreement between the level of second harmonic relative to the fundamental measured at 20 MHz and the Rayleigh-Plesset model predictions. Finite-element simulations extended these findings to a non-spherical geometry, confirmed that the acoustic buckling pressure corresponds to the critical pressure under hydrostatic conditions and support the hypothesis of limited gas flow across the GV shell during the compression phase in the frequency range investigated. From simulations, estimates of GV bandwidth-limited scattering indicate that a single GV has a scattering cross section comparable to that of a red blood cell. These findings will inform the development of GV-based contrast agents and pulse sequences to optimize their detection with ultrasound.

  12. Sound propagation in and radiation from acoustically lined flow ducts: A comparison of experiment and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumblee, H. E., Jr.; Dean, P. D.; Wynne, G. A.; Burrin, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an experimental and theoretical study of many of the fundamental details of sound propagation in hard wall and soft wall annular flow ducts are reported. The theory of sound propagation along such ducts and the theory for determining the complex radiation impedance of higher order modes of an annulus are outlined, and methods for generating acoustic duct modes are developed. The results of a detailed measurement program on propagation in rigid wall annular ducts with and without airflow through the duct are presented. Techniques are described for measuring cut-on frequencies, modal phase speed, and radial and annular mode shapes. The effects of flow velocity on cut-on frequencies and phase speed are measured. Comparisons are made with theoretical predictions for all of the effects studies. The two microphone method of impedance is used to measure the effects of flow on acoustic liners. A numerical study of sound propagation in annular ducts with one or both walls acoustically lined is presented.

  13. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of residual stresses in ceramics - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a three-dimensional mathematical model of signal generation and contrast in brittle materials and uses the model to simulate the effect of residual stress fields on the scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM)-generated electron acoustic signal. According to the model, a positive (tensile) strain produces an increase in the output signal, whereas a negative (compressive) strain produces a decrease in the ouput signal. Dark field contrast conditions occur at a chopping frequency at which V2 - V1 is greater than 0 (where V2 = V is the SEAM output in a region of residual stresses, and V1 is the output in a stress-free region of the sample). Under ideal conditions (maximum contrast) V1 approaches zero. It was found that tensile strains of the order 0.2-0.3 percent, possible in brittle materials, would produce a variation of the acoustic output signal of the order 10 nV (about 1 percent), well within the image contrast and signal processing capability of the SEAM electronics.

  14. Considerations in video playback design: using optic flow analysis to examine motion characteristics of live and computer-generated animation sequences.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kevin L; Rieucau, Guillaume

    2008-07-01

    The increasing use of the video playback technique in behavioural ecology reveals a growing need to ensure better control of the visual stimuli that focal animals experience. Technological advances now allow researchers to develop computer-generated animations instead of using video sequences of live-acting demonstrators. However, care must be taken to match the motion characteristics (speed and velocity) of the animation to the original video source. Here, we presented a tool based on the use of an optic flow analysis program to measure the resemblance of motion characteristics of computer-generated animations compared to videos of live-acting animals. We examined three distinct displays (tail-flick (TF), push-up body rock (PUBR), and slow arm wave (SAW)) exhibited by animations of Jacky dragons (Amphibolurus muricatus) that were compared to the original video sequences of live lizards. We found no significant differences between the motion characteristics of videos and animations across all three displays. Our results showed that our animations are similar the speed and velocity features of each display. Researchers need to ensure that similar motion characteristics in animation and video stimuli are represented, and this feature is a critical component in the future success of the video playback technique.

  15. Acoustic data analysis and scenario over watch from an aerostat at the NATO SET-153 field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, Christian; Scanlon, Michael

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the NATO SET-153 field experiment was to provide an opportunity to demonstrate multiple sensor technologies in an urban environment and determine integration capabilities for future development. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) experimental aerostat was used primarily as a persistent over watch capability as a substitute for a UAV. Continuous video was recorded on the aerostat and segments of video were captured of the scenarios on the ground that the camera was following manually. Some of the segments showing scenario activities will be presented. The captured pictures and video frames have telemetry in the headers that provides the UTM time and the Inertial Navigation System (INS) GPS location and the inertial roll, pitch, and yaw as well as the camera gimbal pan and tilt angles. The timing is useful to synchronize the images with the scenario events providing activity ground truth. The INS, GPS, and camera gimbal angle values can be used with the acoustic solution for the location of a sound source to determine the relative accuracy of the solution if the camera is pointed at the sound source. This method will be confirmed by the use of a propane cannon whose GPS location is logged. During the field experiment, other interesting acoustic events such as vehicle convoys, platoon level firefights with vehicles using blanks, and a UAV helicopter were recorded and will be presented in a quick analysis.

  16. Digital magnetic recording systems utilizing magnetoresistive (MR) playback technology: Theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, Eric Justin

    1997-11-01

    The use of magnetoresistive playback technology in high density magnetic recording systems poses special challenges for the hard drive designer. The MR sensor is an intrinsically nonlinear device which must be biased into a region of linear response with respect to the external field. Additional magnetic structures are required to stabilize the sensor against domain formation. These structures result in complicated magnetization processes during the playback of recorded information. The spatial variation of the MR head replay voltage is complicated and has asymmetries due to the magnetic structure of the device. These issues require sophisticated modeling to properly characterize the system performance. This dissertation presents studies of several key problems involved with integrating MR heads into hard disk drives. Models of varying levels of sophistication have been developed for this work. These range from simple linear reciprocity analyses to large scale numerical energy minimization techniques. The spatial variation of the MR playback voltage is studied as a function of the system geometry using a linear theory. The response is found to depend strongly on both the head and medium parameters. Instabilities are investigated using a large scale numerical model for a particular head fabrication geometry. The interface between the stabilizing magnetic structures and the head material produces repeatable hysteretic effects in the voltage response. The saturation of MR heads is characterized using numerical modeling. This is important for estimates of the error rate in the drive. The results show that the saturation characteristics can vary significantly between different head designs and as a function of the spatial position of the device. The issues involved with the use of MR heads as positioning sensors are also addressed. The servo system stability is a strong function of the recording parameters and the head spatial symmetry. Optimization of the servo system

  17. Biological Significance of Acoustic Impacts on Marine Mammals: Examples Using an Acoustic Recording tag to Define Acoustic Exposure of Sperm Whales, Physeter catodon, Exposed to Airgun Sounds in Controlled Exposure Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyack, P. L.; Johnson, M. P.; Madsen, P. T.; Miller, P. J.; Lynch, J.

    2006-05-01

    There has been considerable debate about how to regulate behavioral disruption in marine mammals. The U.S. Marine Mammal Protection Act prohibits "taking" marine mammals, including harassment, which is defined as injury or disruption of behavioral patterns. A 2005 report by the National Academy of Sciences focuses on the need to analyze acoustic impacts on marine mammal behavior in terms of biological significance. The report develops a model for predicting population consequences of acoustic impacts. One of the key data gaps involves methods to estimate the impact of disruption on an animal's ability to complete life functions critical for growth, survival, and reproduction. One of the few areas where theory and data are available involves foraging energetics. Patrick Miller in the next talk and I will discuss an example study designed to evaluate the impact of exposure to seismic survey on the foraging energetics of sperm whales. As petroleum exploration moves offshore to deep water, there is increasing overlap between seismic exploration and deep diving toothed whales such as the sperm whale which is listed by the US as an endangered species. With support from the US Minerals Management Service and the Industry Research Funding Coalition, we tagged sperm whales with tags that can record sound, orientation, acceleration, temperature and depth. Eight whales tagged in the Gulf of Mexico during 2002-2003 were subjects in 5 controlled experiments involving exposure to sounds of an airgun array. One critical component of evaluating effects involves quantifying exposure at the animal. While the on-axis signature of airgun arrays has been well quantified, there are few broadband calibrated measurements in the water column displaced horizontally away from the downward-directed beam. The acoustic recording tags provide direct data on sounds as received at the animals. Due to multipath propagation, multiple sound pulses were recorded on the tagged whales for each firing of

  18. Nonlinear acoustic experiments involving landmine detection: Connections with mesoscopic elasticity and slow dynamics in geomaterials, Part III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korman, Murray S.; Sabatier, James M.

    2005-09-01

    In nonlinear acoustic detection schemes, airborne sound at two primary tones, f1, f2 (closely spaced near an 80-Hz resonance) excites the soil surface over a buried landmine. Due to soil wave interactions with the landmine, a scattered surface profile can be measured by a geophone. Profiles at f1, f2, f1-(f2-f1) and f2+(f2-f1) exhibit single peaks; those at 2f1-(f2-f1), f1+f2 and 2f2+(f2-f1) involve higher order mode shapes for a VS 2.2 plastic, inert, anti-tank landmine, buried at 3.6 cm in sifted loess soil [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116, 3354-3369 (2004)]. Near resonance, the bending (softening) of a family of increasing amplitude tuning curves, involving the vibration over the landmine, exhibits a linear relationship between the peak particle velocity and corresponding frequency. Results are similar to nonlinear mesoscopic/nanoscale effects that are observed in granular solids like Berea sandstone. New experiments show that first sweeping up through resonance and then immediately sweeping back down result in different tuning curve behavior that might be explained by ``slow dynamics'' where an effective modulus reduction persists following periods of high strain. Results are similar to those described by TenCate et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1020-1023 (2000)]. [Work supported by U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC, NVESD.

  19. Experiments on the flow and acoustic properties of a moderate-Reynolds-number supersonic jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troutt, T. R.; Mclaughlin, D. K.

    1982-01-01

    Flow and acoustic properties of a jet at Reynolds number of 70,000 were studied at Mach 2.1. Measurements in a free jet test facility were made with pitot tubes and hot-wire anemometry. Center-line Mach number distributions for natural and excited jets were obtained. A slow initial growth rate was in the potential core region of the jet, indicating a transition from laminar to turbulent flow in moderate Reynolds number jets. The transition occurred within the first 2-3 diameters. Spectral components were calculated for the fluctuating flowfield, and sound pressure levels were measured for the overall near-field noise. The centroid of noise was located about 8 nozzle diameters downstream. The growth rates of instabilities were determined to be in agreement with linear stability theory predictions over a broad frequency range.

  20. Binaural Simulation Experiments in the NASA Langley Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Silcox, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A location and positioning system was developed and implemented in the anechoic chamber of the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility to accurately determine the coordinates of points in three-dimensional space. Transfer functions were measured between a shaker source at two different panel locations and the vibrational response distributed over the panel surface using a scanning laser vibrometer. The binaural simulation test matrix included test runs for several locations of the measuring microphones, various attitudes of the mannequin, two locations of the shaker excitation and three different shaker inputs including pulse, broadband random, and pseudo-random. Transfer functions, auto spectra, and coherence functions were acquired for the pseudo-random excitation. Time histories were acquired for the pulse and broadband random input to the shaker. The tests were repeated with a reflective surface installed. Binary data files were converted to universal format and archived on compact disk.

  1. Reproducible Data Processing Research for the CABRI R.I.A. experiments Acoustic Emission signal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pantera, Laurent

    2015-07-01

    The CABRI facility is an experimental nuclear reactor of the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) designed to study the behaviour of fuel rods at high burnup under Reactivity Initiated Accident (R.I.A.) conditions such as the scenario of a control rod ejection. During the experimental phase, the behaviour of the fuel element generates acoustic waves which can be detected by two microphones placed upstream and downstream from the test device. Studies carried out on the last fourteen tests showed the interest in carrying out temporal and spectral analyses on these signals by showing the existence of signatures which can be correlated with physical phenomena. We want presently to return to this rich data in order to have a new point of view by applying modern signal processing methods. Such an antecedent works resumption leads to some difficulties. Although all the raw data are accessible in the form of text files, analyses and graphics representations were not clear in reproducing from the former studies since the people who were in charge of the original work have left the laboratory and it is not easy when time passes, even with our own work, to be able to remember the steps of data manipulations and the exact setup. Thus we decided to consolidate the availability of the data and its manipulation in order to provide a robust data processing workflow to the experimentalists before doing any further investigations. To tackle this issue of strong links between data, treatments and the generation of documents, we adopted a Reproducible Research paradigm. We shall first present the tools chosen in our laboratory to implement this workflow and, then we shall describe the global perception carried out to continue the study of the Acoustic Emission signals recorded by the two microphones during the last fourteen CABRI R.I.A. tests. (authors)

  2. Response of red deer stags ( Cervus elaphus) to playback of harsh versus common roars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Maxime; Wyman, Megan T.; Charlton, Benjamin D.; Tecumseh Fitch, W.; Reby, David

    2014-10-01

    Red deer stags ( Cervus elaphus) give two distinct types of roars during the breeding season, the "common roar" and the "harsh roar." Harsh roars are more frequent during contexts of intense competition, and characterized by a set of features that increase their perceptual salience, suggesting that they signal heightened arousal. While common roars have been shown to encode size information and mediate both male competition and female choice, to our knowledge, the specific function of harsh roars during male competition has not yet been studied. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that the specific structure of male harsh roars signals high arousal to competitors. We contrast the behavioral responses of free ranging, harem-holding stags to the playback of harsh roars from an unfamiliar competitor with their response to the playback of common roars from the same animal. We show that males react less strongly to sequences of harsh roars than to sequences of common roars, possibly because they are reluctant to escalate conflicts with highly motivated and threatening unfamiliar males in the absence of visual information. While future work should investigate the response of stags to harsh roars from familiar opponents, our observations remain consistent with the hypothesis that harsh roars may signal motivation during male competition, and illustrate how intrasexual selection can contribute to the diversification of male vocal signals.

  3. Experimental study of playback giant magnetic resonance head nonlinearity in perpendicular recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, P.; Stoev, K.; Liu, F.; Vadde, A.; Gibbons, M.; Lederman, M.; Re, M.

    2003-05-01

    In this article, nonlinear distortions of the playback giant magnetic resonance (GMR) sensor in perpendicular recording are characterized in both time and frequency domains. We use three perpendicular media with different Mrt (0.46, 0.6, and 0.8 emu/cm2) and two groups of similar magnetic-read width (MRW) but different junction type [contiguous junction (CJ) and lead-over-lay (LOL)] GMR heads. Square-wave patterns at moderate densities are recorded to minimize NLTS, partial erasure, and transition broadening effects. Both time- and frequency-domain measurements indicate that the LOL-type GMR heads show playback nonlinearity (7%-23%), while the CJ-type GMR heads do not. Micromagnetic simulation is utilized to understand the hard bias field with different junction designs. The result indicates that the hard bias (HB) field in LOL type (HB field ˜6.9 Oe) at the air bearing surface (ABS) and stripe center is much lower than that in CJ type (HB field ˜54.0 Oe). Therefore, the free layer with large HB-HB distance will be more susceptible to saturation.

  4. Extended amplification of acoustic signals by amphibian burrows.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Matías I; Penna, Mario

    2016-07-01

    Animals relying on acoustic signals for communication must cope with the constraints imposed by the environment for sound propagation. A resource to improve signal broadcast is the use of structures that favor the emission or the reception of sounds. We conducted playback experiments to assess the effect of the burrows occupied by the frogs Eupsophus emiliopugini and E. calcaratus on the amplitude of outgoing vocalizations. In addition, we evaluated the influence of these cavities on the reception of externally generated sounds potentially interfering with conspecific communication, namely, the vocalizations emitted by four syntopic species of anurans (E. emiliopugini, E. calcaratus, Batrachyla antartandica, and Pleurodema thaul) and the nocturnal owls Strix rufipes and Glaucidium nanum. Eupsophus advertisement calls emitted from within the burrows experienced average amplitude gains of 3-6 dB at 100 cm from the burrow openings. Likewise, the incoming vocalizations of amphibians and birds were amplified on average above 6 dB inside the cavities. The amplification of internally broadcast Eupsophus vocalizations favors signal detection by nearby conspecifics. Reciprocally, the amplification of incoming conspecific and heterospecific signals facilitates the detection of neighboring males and the monitoring of the levels of potentially interfering biotic noise by resident frogs, respectively.

  5. Testicular microlithiasis and preliminary experience of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Osther, Palle Jørn Sloth; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Elastography of the testis can be used as a part of multiparametric examination of the scrotum. Purpose To determine the testicular stiffness using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) technique in men with testicular microlithiasis (TML). Material and Methods In 2013, 12 patients with diagnosed testicular microlithiasis in 2008 (mean age, 51 years; age range, 25–76 years) underwent a 5-year follow-up B-mode ultrasonography with three ARFI elastography measurements of each testis. We used a Siemens Acuson S3000 machine. Results No malignancy was found at the 5-year follow-up B-mode and elastography in 2013. However, we found an increase in TML; in the previous ultrasonography in 2008, eight men had bilateral TML, whereas in 2013, 10 men were diagnosed with bilateral TML. The mean elasticity of testicles with TML was 0.82 m/s (interquartile range [IQR], 0.72–0.88 m/s; range, 65–1.08 m/s). Conclusion Elastography velocity of testis with TML seems to be in the same velocity range as in men with normal testis tissue. PMID:27504193

  6. Determination of acoustic nonlinearity parameter (β) using nonlinear resonance ultrasound spectroscopy: Theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Barnard, Daniel J

    2017-02-01

    The present article investigates the possibility of using nonlinear resonance ultrasound spectroscopy to determine the acoustic nonlinearity parameter (β) and third order elastic constant by developing an inverse problem. A theoretical framework was developed for nonlinear forced vibration of a cantilever beam using material nonlinearity (stress-strain nonlinearity). The resulting nonlinear equation was solved using method of multiple time scales to obtain the nonlinear frequency shifts. The present works focuses only on classical nonlinearity and, therefore, a diverse group of intact, classic nonlinear materials were chosen. The samples were tested using nonlinear resonance ultrasound spectroscopy, and the developed theory was used to invert the experimental frequency shifts to obtain the nonlinearity parameters. The third order elastic constants and β were calculated using their analytical relationship with the nonlinearity parameter. The experimentally determined C111 and β values for all various materials agree well with literature values. In addition to determining β, determination of the sign, or phase of β was also explored theoretically and experimentally.

  7. Nasal temperature drop in response to a playback of conspecific fights in chimpanzees: A thermo-imaging study.

    PubMed

    Kano, Fumihiro; Hirata, Satoshi; Deschner, Tobias; Behringer, Verena; Call, Josep

    2016-03-01

    Emotion is one of the central topics in animal studies and is likely to attract attention substantially in the coming years. Recent studies have developed a thermo-imaging technique to measure the facial skin temperature in the studies of emotion in humans and macaques. Here we established the procedures and techniques needed to apply the same technique to great apes. We conducted two experiments respectively in the two established research facilities in Germany and Japan. Total twelve chimpanzees were tested in three conditions in which they were presented respectively with the playback sounds (Exp. 1) or the videos (Exp. 2) of fighting conspecifics, control sounds/videos (allospecific display call: Exp. 1; resting conspecifics: Exp. 2), and no sound/image. Behavioral, hormonal (salivary cortisol) and heart-rate responses were simultaneously recorded. The nasal temperature of chimpanzees linearly dropped up to 1.5 °C in 2 min, and recovered to the baseline in 2 min, in the experimental but not control conditions. We found the related changes in excitement behavior and heart-rate variability, but not in salivary cortisol, indicating that overall responses were involved with the activities of sympathetic nervous system but not with the measureable activities of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The influence of general activity (walking, eating) was not negligible but controllable in experiments. We propose several techniques to control those confounding factors. Overall, thermo-imaging is a promising technique that should be added to the traditional physiological and behavioral measures in primatology and comparative psychology.

  8. Rapid recovery following short-term acoustic disturbance in two fish species

    PubMed Central

    Bruintjes, Rick; Purser, Julia; Everley, Kirsty A.; Mangan, Stephanie; Simpson, Stephen D.; Radford, Andrew N.

    2016-01-01

    Noise from human activities is known to impact organisms in a variety of taxa, but most experimental studies on the behavioural effects of noise have focused on examining responses associated with the period of actual exposure. Unlike most pollutants, acoustic noise is generally short-lived, usually dissipating quickly after the source is turned off or leaves the area. In a series of experiments, we use established experimental paradigms to examine how fish behaviour and physiology are affected, both during short-term (2 min) exposure to playback of recordings of anthropogenic noise sources and in the immediate aftermath of noise exposure. We considered the anti-predator response and ventilation rate of juvenile European eels (Anguilla anguilla) and ventilation rate of juvenile European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax). As previously found, additional-noise exposure decreased eel anti-predator responses, increased startle latency and increased ventilation rate relative to ambient-noise-exposed controls. Our results show for the first time that those effects quickly dissipated; eels showed rapid recovery of startle responses and startle latency, and rapid albeit incomplete recovery of ventilation rate in the 2 min after noise cessation. Seabass in both laboratory and open-water conditions showed an increased ventilation rate during playback of additional noise compared with ambient conditions. However, within 2 min of noise cessation, ventilation rate showed complete recovery to levels equivalent to ambient-exposed control individuals. Care should be taken in generalizing these rapid-recovery results, as individuals might have accrued other costs during noise exposure and other species might show different recovery times. Nonetheless, our results from two different fish species provide tentative cause for optimism with respect to recovery following short-duration noise exposure, and suggest that considering periods following noise exposures could be important

  9. A direct method for measuring acoustic ground impedance in long-range propagation experiments.

    PubMed

    Soh, Jin H; Gilbert, Kenneth E; Frazier, W M Garth; Talmadge, Carrick L; Waxler, Roger

    2010-11-01

    A method is reported for determining ground impedance in long-range propagation experiments by using the definition of impedance directly. The method is envisioned as way of measuring the impedence at multiple locations along the propagation path, using the signals broadcast during the experiment itself. In a short-range (10 m) test, the direct method was in good agreement with a more conventional model-based least-squares method. The utility of the direct method was demonstrated in a 400 m propagation experiment in a agricultural field. The resulting impedance was consistent with the impedance measured previously in the same field.

  10. Thermomagnetic recording and magneto-optic playback system having constant intensity laser beam control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, G. W.; Guisinger, J. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A system is developed for maintaining the intensity of a laser beam at a constant level in a thermomagnetic recording and magneto-optic playback system in which an isotropic film is heated along a continuous path by the laser beam for recording. As each successive area of the path is heated locally to the vicinity of its Curie point in the presence of a controlled magnetic field, a magneto-optic density is produced proportional to the amplitude of the controlled magnetic field. To play back the recorded signal, the intensity of the laser beam is reduced and a Faraday or Kerr effect analyzer is used, with a photodetector, as a transducer for producing an output signal.

  11. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... search IRSA's site Unique Hits since January 2003 Acoustic Neuroma Click Here for Acoustic Neuroma Practice Guideline ... to microsurgery. One doctor's story of having an acoustic neuroma In August 1991, Dr. Thomas F. Morgan ...

  12. MR playback characteristics and thermal stability of thin film media in high-density magnetic recording systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun

    1999-07-01

    Current high-density magnetic recording systems utilize magnetoresistive (MR) playback heads and polycrystalline thin film media. In this dissertation, several key problems in such systems are studied both experimentally and theoretically. Playback characteristics of MR heads are studied using a linear theory. A simple model is developed to derive analytical expressions for the longitudinal surface fields from several types of MR heads. Analytical formulas for PW 50, D50 and peak playback voltage are also obtained. These results are useful for analyzing the effect of recording geometry on playback properties. A theoretical study of nonlinear transition shift is conducted. An analytical formula for nonlinear transition shift is derived and utilized to study the dependence of nonlinear transition shift on recording parameters. The write precompensation levels for transitions in a series are calculated. Thermal stability of recorded bits in thin film media consisting of small grains is studied. This issue is crucial to the development of longitudinal media for ultra-high density recording. An experimental technique is developed to accurately measure the time dependence of playback signal amplitude and noise level due to the decay of recorded magnetization patterns. This technique is applied to a systematic investigation of the dependence of signal and noise decay on recording density and magnetic layer thickness in longitudinal thin film media. A NEel-Arrhenius type model is developed to calculate the time evolution of a square wave magnetization transition pattern subject to thermal agitation. Further, noise decay is calculated based on the magnetization decay results through a simplified model. The calculation results of signal and noise degradation with time agree well with the measurement data.

  13. Classical Experiments Revisited: Smartphones and Tablet PCs as Experimental Tools in Acoustics and Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, P.; Hirth, M.; Gröber, S.; Kuhn, J.; Müller, A.

    2014-01-01

    Smartphones and tablets are used as experimental tools and for quantitative measurements in two traditional laboratory experiments for undergraduate physics courses. The Doppler effect is analyzed and the speed of sound is determined with an accuracy of about 5% using ultrasonic frequency and two smartphones, which serve as rotating sound emitter…

  14. A note on acoustic measurements of turbulence, suspended sediment, and bed forms in mobile bed experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the challenges of hydraulic experimentation is designing experiments that are complex enough to capture relevant processes while retaining the simplicity necessary for useful, accurate measurements. The intricacy of the interactions between turbulent flows and mobile beds in rivers and stream...

  15. Acoustic and Oceanographic Observations and Configuration Information for the WHOI Moorings from the SW06 Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    application ............................................................................................................... 43 6.0 Shark HLA VVLA...Oceanographic Observations and Configuration Information for the WHOI moorings from the SW06 Experiment 2 6.1 Shark m ooring configuration...46 6.2 Shark 48 Channel HLA/VLA data acquisition system and data

  16. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics (DWOA): The Philippine Sea, OBSANP, and THAAW Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    enabling advanced signal processing techniques to capitalize on the three-dimensional character of the sound and noise fields. OBJECTIVES...scattering by internal waves and spice (density- compensated temperature and salinity variations), (iv) characterizing the depth dependence and temporal...relationship between deep ocean ambient noise and sea surface processes that generate sound (Stephen et al., 2014). The experiment was motivated in part

  17. Classical experiments revisited: smartphones and tablet PCs as experimental tools in acoustics and optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, P.; Hirth, M.; Gröber, S.; Kuhn, J.; Müller, A.

    2014-07-01

    Smartphones and tablets are used as experimental tools and for quantitative measurements in two traditional laboratory experiments for undergraduate physics courses. The Doppler effect is analyzed and the speed of sound is determined with an accuracy of about 5% using ultrasonic frequency and two smartphones, which serve as rotating sound emitter and stationary sound detector. Emphasis is put on the investigation of measurement errors in order to judge experimentally derived results and to sensitize undergraduate students to the methods of error estimates. The distance dependence of the illuminance of a light bulb is investigated using an ambient light sensor of a mobile device. Satisfactory results indicate that the spectrum of possible smartphone experiments goes well beyond those already published for mechanics.

  18. Hypothesis: the sound of the individual metabolic phenotype? Acoustic detection of NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Cacciatore, Stefano; Saccenti, Edoardo; Piccioli, Mario

    2015-03-01

    We present here an innovative hypothesis and report preliminary evidence that the sound of NMR signals could provide an alternative to the current representation of the individual metabolic fingerprint and supply equally significant information. The NMR spectra of the urine samples provided by four healthy donors were converted into audio signals that were analyzed in two audio experiments by listeners with both musical and non-musical training. The listeners were first asked to cluster the audio signals of two donors on the basis of perceived similarity and then to classify unknown samples after having listened to a set of reference signals. In the clustering experiment, the probability of obtaining the same results by pure chance was 7.04% and 0.05% for non-musicians and musicians, respectively. In the classification experiment, musicians scored 84% accuracy which compared favorably with the 100% accuracy attained by sophisticated pattern recognition methods. The results were further validated and confirmed by analyzing the NMR metabolic profiles belonging to two other different donors. These findings support our hypothesis that the uniqueness of the metabolic phenotype is preserved even when reproduced as audio signal and warrants further consideration and testing in larger study samples.

  19. Offshore exposure experiments on cuttlefish indicate received sound pressure and particle motion levels associated with acoustic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Marta; Sigray, Peter; Lenoir, Marc; van der Schaar, Mike; Lalander, Emilia; André, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Recent findings on cephalopods in laboratory conditions showed that exposure to artificial noise had a direct consequence on the statocyst, sensory organs, which are responsible for their equilibrium and movements in the water column. The question remained about the contribution of the consequent near-field particle motion influence from the tank walls, to the triggering of the trauma. Offshore noise controlled exposure experiments (CEE) on common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis), were conducted at three different depths and distances from the source and particle motion and sound pressure measurements were performed at each location. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed injuries in statocysts, which severity was quantified and found to be proportional to the distance to the transducer. These findings are the first evidence of cephalopods sensitivity to anthropogenic noise sources in their natural habitat. From the measured received power spectrum of the sweep, it was possible to determine that the animals were exposed at levels ranging from 139 to 142 dB re 1 μPa2 and from 139 to 141 dB re 1 μPa2, at 1/3 octave bands centred at 315 Hz and 400 Hz, respectively. These results could therefore be considered a coherent threshold estimation of noise levels that can trigger acoustic trauma in cephalopods. PMID:28378762

  20. Offshore exposure experiments on cuttlefish indicate received sound pressure and particle motion levels associated with acoustic trauma.

    PubMed

    Solé, Marta; Sigray, Peter; Lenoir, Marc; van der Schaar, Mike; Lalander, Emilia; André, Michel

    2017-04-05

    Recent findings on cephalopods in laboratory conditions showed that exposure to artificial noise had a direct consequence on the statocyst, sensory organs, which are responsible for their equilibrium and movements in the water column. The question remained about the contribution of the consequent near-field particle motion influence from the tank walls, to the triggering of the trauma. Offshore noise controlled exposure experiments (CEE) on common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis), were conducted at three different depths and distances from the source and particle motion and sound pressure measurements were performed at each location. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed injuries in statocysts, which severity was quantified and found to be proportional to the distance to the transducer. These findings are the first evidence of cephalopods sensitivity to anthropogenic noise sources in their natural habitat. From the measured received power spectrum of the sweep, it was possible to determine that the animals were exposed at levels ranging from 139 to 142 dB re 1 μPa(2) and from 139 to 141 dB re 1 μPa(2), at 1/3 octave bands centred at 315 Hz and 400 Hz, respectively. These results could therefore be considered a coherent threshold estimation of noise levels that can trigger acoustic trauma in cephalopods.

  1. Shipboard acoustic doppler current profiler data collected during the Western Tropical Atlantic Experiment (WESTRAX) 1991. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Routt, J.A.; Wilson, W.D.

    1992-11-01

    The long-term goal of ongoing and future research in the western tropical Atlantic is to estimate the cross-equatorial transport of water and heat. The overall goals of those involved in the Western Tropical Atlantic Experiment (WESTRAX) are (a) to describe the annual cycle in the large-scale structure of the velocity and hydrographic properties over the full water column in the western tropical Atlantic Ocean between the equator and 15 degrees N, and (b) to compare data and models in order to better understand the physics of the regional circulation in the broader context of Atlantic basin thermohaline circulation. The results of this combined effort will greatly improve our understanding of this complex boundary current region and establish the basis for efficient long-term climatic monitoring of the critical meridional fluxes of mass and heat across the tropical Atlantic. This report presents the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data obtained during (ACCP) Atlantic Climate Change Program cruises in the western subtropical and tropical Atlantic in January, June and September 1991.

  2. [Reactions of caudate nucleus neurons to presentation of acoustic clicks to cats in a chronic experiment].

    PubMed

    Litvinova, A N; Lukhanina, E P

    1980-01-01

    Background and evoked activities of the caudate nucleus neurons to repetitive auditory clicks were recorded extracellularly in chronic experiments with partial restrained cats. Four types of background neuronal activity were distinguished. 44% of recorded units altered their background activity during auditory click applications. Five types of neuronal responses were found: phasic activation, phasic inhibition, tonic activation, tonic inhibition, mixed tonic reactions. Tonic activation was predominant. The phasic responses persisted under prolonged presentation of clicks. Partial or total attenuation of tonic responses during frequent repetition of clicks occurred in 33% of responding units. The question is discussed on the convergence of specific and unspecific influences on the caudate nucleus neurons.

  3. Acoustic measurements from a rotor blade-vortex interaction noise experiment in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Ruth M.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Elliott, J. W.; Schultz, K.-J.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic data are presented from a 40 percent scale model of the 4-bladed BO-105 helicopter main rotor, measured in the large European aeroacoustic wind tunnel, the DNW. Rotor blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise data in the low speed flight range were acquired using a traversing in-flow microphone array. The experimental apparatus, testing procedures, calibration results, and experimental objectives are fully described. A large representative set of averaged acoustic signals is presented.

  4. Generation of Acoustic-Gravity Waves in Ionospheric HF Heating Experiments: Simulating Large-Scale Natural Heat Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, Rezy

    In this thesis, we investigate the potential role played by large-scale anomalous heat sources (e.g. prolonged heat wave events) in generating acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) that might trigger widespread plasma turbulence in the ionospheric layer. The main hypothesis is that, the thermal gradients associated with the heat wave fronts could act as a source of powerful AGW capable of triggering ionospheric plasma turbulence over extensive areas. In our investigations, first we are going to examine a case study of the summer 2006 North American heat wave event. Our examination of GPS-derived total electron content (TEC) data over the North American sector reveals a quite noticeable increase in the level of daily plasma density fluctuations during the summer 2006 heat wave period. Comparison with the summer 2005 and summer 2007 data further confirms that the observed increase of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) during the summer 2006 heat wave period was not simply a regular seasonal phenomenon. Furthermore, a series of field experiments had been carried out at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in order to physically simulate the process of AGW/TID generation by large-scale thermal gradients in the ionosphere. In these ionospheric HF heating experiments, we create some time-varying artificial thermal gradients at an altitude of 200--300 km above the Earth's surface using vertically-transmitted amplitude-modulated 0-mode HF heater waves. For our experiments, a number of radio diagnostic instruments had been utilized to detect the characteristic signatures of heater-generated AGW/TID. So far, we have been able to obtain several affirmative indications that some artificial AGW/TID are indeed being radiated out from the heated plasma volume during the HAARP-AGW experiments. Based on the experimental evidence, we may conclude that it is certainly quite plausible for large-scale thermal gradients associated with severe heat wave

  5. Evaluation of a scale-model experiment to investigate long-range acoustic propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Mcaninch, Gerry L.; Carlberg, Ingrid A.

    1987-01-01

    Tests were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using a scale-model experiment situated in an anechoic facility to investigate long-range sound propagation over ground terrain. For a nominal scale factor of 100:1, attenuations along a linear array of six microphones colinear with a continuous-wave type of sound source were measured over a wavelength range from 10 to 160 for a nominal test frequency of 10 kHz. Most tests were made for a hard model surface (plywood), but limited tests were also made for a soft model surface (plywood with felt). For grazing-incidence propagation over the hard surface, measured and predicted attenuation trends were consistent for microphone locations out to between 40 and 80 wavelengths. Beyond 80 wavelengths, significant variability was observed that was caused by disturbances in the propagation medium. Also, there was evidence of extraneous propagation-path contributions to data irregularities at more remote microphones. Sensitivity studies for the hard-surface and microphone indicated a 2.5 dB change in the relative excess attenuation for a systematic error in source and microphone elevations on the order of 1 mm. For the soft-surface model, no comparable sensitivity was found.

  6. Acoustic emission monitoring of hydraulic fracturing laboratory experiment with supercritical and liquid CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Aoyagi, Kazuhei; Niwa, Tomoya; Chen, Youqing; Murata, Sumihiko; Chen, Qu; Nakayama, Yoshiki

    2012-08-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is often used for enhanced oil recovery in depleted petroleum reservoirs, and its behavior in rock is also of interest in CO2 capture and storage projects. CO2 usually becomes supercritical (SC-CO2) at depths greater than 1,000 m, while it is liquid (L-CO2) at low temperatures. The viscosity of L-CO2 is one order lower than that of normal liquid water, and that of SC-CO2 is much lower still. To clarify fracture behavior induced with injection of the low viscosity fluids, we conducted hydraulic fracturing experiments using 17 cm cubic granite blocks. The AE sources with the SC- and L-CO2 injections tend to distribute in a larger area than those with water injection, and furthermore, SC-CO2 tended to generate cracks extending more three dimensionally rather than along a flat plane than L-CO2. It was also found that the breakdown pressures for SC- and L-CO2 injections are expected to be considerably lower than for water.

  7. Modeling the Infrasound Acoustic Signal Generation of Underground Explosions at the Source Physics Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, R. W.; Jones, K. R.; Arrowsmith, S.

    2013-12-01

    One of the primary goals of the Source Physics Experiment is to improve upon and develop new physics based models for underground nuclear explosions using scaled, underground chemical explosions as proxies. Jones et. al, (AGU 2012) previously presented results describing the use of the Rayleigh integral (RI) to model the source region of the SPE explosions. While these results showed that the source region could be modeled using the RI, there were some complexities in the produced, synthetic waveforms that were unaccounted for when compared to the observed data. To gain insight into these complexities and to verify the results of the RI method, we used CAVEAT, a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics, time-domain finite-difference code developed at Los Alamos National Labs (LANL). CAVEAT has been used in the solution of high speed and low speed fluid problems. While the RI uses the observed acceleration records from the 12 vertical surface accelerometers installed above ground zero, CAVEAT employs a synthetic source-time function, based on the acceleration records, that varies with range and time. This model provides a velocity boundary condition at the bottom boundary of the CAVEAT computation mesh that drives the atmospheric pressure wave into the atmosphere.

  8. Results From a Parametric Acoustic Liner Experiment Using P and W GEN1 HSR Mixer/Ejector Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Kathleen C.; Wolter, John D.

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results of an acoustic liner test performed using a Gen 1 HSR mixer/ejector model installed on the Jet Exit Rig in the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig in the Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory or NASA Glenn Research Center. Acoustic liner effectiveness and single-component thrust performance results are discussed. Results from 26 different types of single-degree-of-freedom and bulk material liners are compared with each other and against a hardwall baseline. Design parameters involving all aspects of the facesheet, the backing cavity, and the type of bulk material were varied in order to study the effects of these design features on the acoustic impedance, acoustic effectiveness and on nozzle thrust performance. Overall, the bulk absorber liners are more effective at reducing the jet noise than the single-degree-of-freedom liners. Many of the design parameters had little effect on acoustic effectiveness, such as facesheeet hole diameter and honeycomb cell size. A relatively large variation in the impedance of the bulk absorber in a bulk liner is required to have a significant impact on the noise reduction. The thrust results exhibit a number of consistent trends, supporting the validity of this new addition to the facility. In general, the thrust results indicate that thrust performance benefits from increased facesheet thickness and decreased facesheet porosity.

  9. The African cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni uses acoustic communication for reproduction: sound production, hearing, and behavioral significance.

    PubMed

    Maruska, Karen P; Ung, Uyhun S; Fernald, Russell D

    2012-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in all animals depends on effective communication between signalers and receivers. Many fish species, especially the African cichlids, are well known for their bright coloration and the importance of visual signaling during courtship and mate choice, but little is known about what role acoustic communication plays during mating and how it contributes to sexual selection in this phenotypically diverse group of vertebrates. Here we examined acoustic communication during reproduction in the social cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni. We characterized the sounds and associated behaviors produced by dominant males during courtship, tested for differences in hearing ability associated with female reproductive state and male social status, and then tested the hypothesis that female mate preference is influenced by male sound production. We show that dominant males produce intentional courtship sounds in close proximity to females, and that sounds are spectrally similar to their hearing abilities. Females were 2-5-fold more sensitive to low frequency sounds in the spectral range of male courtship sounds when they were sexually-receptive compared to during the mouthbrooding parental phase. Hearing thresholds were also negatively correlated with circulating sex-steroid levels in females but positively correlated in males, suggesting a potential role for steroids in reproductive-state auditory plasticity. Behavioral experiments showed that receptive females preferred to affiliate with males that were associated with playback of courtship sounds compared to noise controls, indicating that acoustic information is likely important for female mate choice. These data show for the first time in a Tanganyikan cichlid that acoustic communication is important during reproduction as part of a multimodal signaling repertoire, and that perception of auditory information changes depending on the animal's internal physiological state. Our results highlight the

  10. Evaluation of Wave Propagation Properties during a True-Triaxial Rock Fracture Experiment using Acoustic Emission Frequency Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, S. D.; Ghofrani Tabari, M.; Nasseri, M. B.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    A true-triaxial deformation experiment was conducted to study the evolution of wave propagation properties by using frequency characteristics of AE waveforms to diagnose the state of fracturing in a sample of sandstone. Changes in waveform frequency content has been interpreted as either the generation of progressively larger fractures or the relative attenuation of high-frequency wave components as a result of micro-crack formation. A cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone was initially loaded to a stress state of σ1 = σ2 = 35 MPa, σ3 = 5 MPa at which point σ1¬ was increased until failure. Acoustic emission (AE) activity was monitored by 18 PZT transducers, three embedded in each platen. The sensor amplitude response spectrum was determined by following an absolute source calibration procedure and showed a relatively constant sensitivity in the frequency range between 20 kHz and 1200 kHz. Amplified waveforms were continuously recorded at a sampling rate of 10 MHz and 12-bit resolution. Continuous acoustic emission waveforms were harvested to extract discrete events. Using a time-varying transverse isotropic velocity model, 48,502 events were locatable inside the sample volume. Prior to peak-stress, AE activity was associated with stable quasi-static growth of fractures coplanar with σ1 and σ2 located near the platen boundaries. In the post peak-stress regime, fracture growth displays unstable ¬dynamic propagation. Analysis of waveform frequency characteristics was limited to the pre peak-stress regime. Analysis of AE frequency characteristics was conducted on all 48,502 located AE events; each event file containing 18 waveforms of varied quality. If the signal to noise ratio was greater than 5, the waveforms power spectrum was estimated and the source-receiver raypath vector was calculated. The power spectrum of each waveform was divided into three frequency bands (Low: 100 - 300 kHz, Medium: 300 - 600 kHz and High: 600 - 1000 kHz) and the power in each

  11. Social Ecology and Group Cohesion in Pilot Whales and their Responses to Playback of Anthropogenic and Natural Sounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Social Ecology and Group Cohesion in Pilot Whales and their...N000141410410 LONG-TERM GOALS This project investigates the social ecology and cohesion of long-finned pilot whales as part of a broad multi...Social Ecology and Group Cohesion in Pilot Whales and their Responses to Playback of Anthropogenic and Natural Sounds 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  12. Evaluating the maximum playback sound levels from portable digital audio players.

    PubMed

    Keith, Stephen E; Michaud, David S; Chiu, Vincent

    2008-06-01

    To assess the maximum sound levels that may be experienced by young people in Canada from modern digital audio players, this study measured nine recent models of players and 20 earphones. Measurement methodology followed European standard BS EN 50332. Playback levels ranged from 101 to 107 dBA at maximum volume level. Estimated listener sound levels could vary from 79 to 125 dBA due to the following factors: (i) earphone seal against the ear, (ii) player output voltage, (iii) earphone sensitivity, and (iv) recorded music levels. There was a greater potential for high sound levels if intra-concha "earbud" earphones were used due to the effect of earphone seal. Simpler measurement techniques were explored as field test methods; the best results were obtained by sealing the microphone of a sound level meter to the earphone using a cupped hand and correcting for the free field response of the ear. Measurement of noise levels 0.25 m from the earphone showed that a bystander is unlikely to accurately judge listener sound levels.

  13. Characterization of modems and error correcting protocols using a scintillation playback system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, William S.; Mahon, Rita; Ferraro, Mike S.; Murphy, James L.; Moore, Christopher I.

    2016-03-01

    The performance of free space optical (FSO) communication systems is strongly affected by optical scintillation. Scintillation fades can cause errors when the power on a detector falls below its noise floor, while surges can overload a detector. The very long time scale of scintillation compared to a typical bit in an FSO link means that error-correcting protocols designed for fiber optic links are inappropriate for FSO links. Comparing the performance effects of different components, such as photodetectors, or protocols, such as forward error correction, in the field is difficult because conditions are constantly changing. On the other hand, laboratory-based turbulence simulators, often using hot plates and fans, do not really simulate the effects of long-range propagation through the atmosphere. We have investigated a different approach. Scintillation has been measured during field tests using FSO terminals by sending a continuous wave beam through the atmosphere. A high dynamic range photodetector was digitized at a 10 KHz rate and files of the intensity variations were saved. Many hours of scintillation data under different environmental conditions and at different sites have been combined into a library of data. A fiber-optic based scintillation playback system was then used in the laboratory to test modems and protocols with the recorded files. This allowed comparisons using the same atmospheric conditions allowing optimization of such parameters as detector dynamic range. It also allowed comparison and optimization of different error correcting protocols.

  14. Silent katydid females are at higher risk of bat predation than acoustically signalling katydid males.

    PubMed

    Raghuram, Hanumanthan; Deb, Rittik; Nandi, Diptarup; Balakrishnan, Rohini

    2015-01-07

    Males that produce conspicuous mate attraction signals are often at high risk of predation from eavesdropping predators. Females of such species typically search for signalling males and their higher motility may also place them at risk. The relative predation risk faced by males and females in the context of mate-finding using long-distance signals has rarely been investigated. In this study, we show, using a combination of diet analysis and behavioural experiments, that katydid females, who do not produce acoustic signals, are at higher risk of predation from a major bat predator, Megaderma spasma, than calling males. Female katydids were represented in much higher numbers than males in the culled remains beneath roosts of M. spasma. Playback experiments using katydid calls revealed that male calls were approached in only about one-third of the trials overall, whereas tethered, flying katydids were always approached and attacked. Our results question the idea that necessary costs of mate-finding, including risk of predation, are higher in signalling males than in searching females.

  15. Analysis of existing data from a Distributed Acoustic Sensing experiment at Garner Valley, California using noise correlation functions (PoroTomo Substask 3.2)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zeng, Xiangfang

    2015-03-26

    In September 2013, an experiment using Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) was conducted at Garner Valley, a test site of the University of California Santa Barbara (Lancelle et al., 2014). This submission includes noise cross-correlation functions (NCF) . Each file includes a NCF between two channels. The name of each channel denotes the distance in meters from starting point of the fiber-optic cable. Lancelle, C., N. Lord, H. Wang, D. Fratta, R. Nigbor, A. Chalari, R. Karaulanov, J. Baldwin, and E. Castongia (2014), Directivity and Sensitivity of Fiber-Optic Cable Measuring Ground Motion using a Distributed Acoustic Sensing Array (abstract # NS31C-3935), AGU Fall Meeting. https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm14/meetingapp.cgi#Paper/19828 The e-poster is available at: https://agu.confex.com/data/handout/agu/fm14/Paper_19828_handout_696_0.pdf

  16. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  17. Acoustic Seaglider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-07

    a national naval responsibility. Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial...problem and acoustic navigation and communications within the context of distributed autonomous persistent undersea surveillance sensor networks...Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial coherence and the description of ambient

  18. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  19. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  20. Ocean Acoustic Observatory Federation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    J., C. G. Fox, and F. K. Duennebier, Hydroacoustic detection of submarine landslides on Kilauea volcano , Geophys. Res. Lett., vol. 28, 1811-1814...acoustic tomography experiments in the vicinity of coastal North America, • Monitor, in real time, marine mammals, earthquakes and volcanoes in the...distances, coastal tomography and thermometry, and earthquakes and volcanoes in the northern Pacific. APPROACH The members of the Ocean Acoustic

  1. Acoustic field modulation in regenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. Y.; Wang, W.; Luo, E. C.; Chen, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The regenerator is a key component that transfers energy between heat and work. The conversion efficiency is significantly influenced by the acoustic field in the regenerator. Much effort has been spent to quantitatively determine this influence, but few comprehensive experimental verifications have been performed because of difficulties in modulating and measuring the acoustic field. In this paper, a method requiring two compressors is introduced and theoretically investigated that achieves acoustic field modulation in the regenerator. One compressor outputs the acoustic power for the regenerator; the other acts as a phase shifter. A RC load dissipates the acoustic power out of both the regenerator and the latter compressor. The acoustic field can be modulated by adjusting the current in the two compressors and opening the RC load. The acoustic field is measured with pressure sensors instead of flow-field imaging equipment, thereby greatly simplifying the experiment.

  2. Ultrasonic communication in rats: effects of morphine and naloxone on vocal and behavioral responses to playback of 50-kHz vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Wöhr, Markus; Schwarting, Rainer K W

    2009-12-01

    Rats emit ultrasonic vocalizations and it was hypothesized that these vocalizations have an important role in intra-specific communication. Recently, we demonstrated that playback of 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations can induce social approach, indicating that 50-kHz calls can serve to (re)establish or to maintain social contact. It is known that endogenous opioids are implicated in the regulation of social behavior, particularly in rough and tumble play. Here, we tested whether administration of opioid ligands can affect social approach in response to playback of 50-kHz calls in juvenile and adult rats. Rats were either treated with 1mg/kg naloxone, 1mg/kg morphine, or with saline vehicle. Administration of opioid ligands affected social approach at both ages. Specifically, in juvenile and adult rats, social approach displayed in response to playback of 50-kHz calls was reduced in case of naloxone treatment, but enhanced with morphine. Furthermore, juvenile rats treated with saline or morphine emitted a substantial amount of ultrasonic vocalizations in response to the playback of 50-kHz calls. Such ultrasonic calling was not seen in naloxone treated rats. Importantly, these drug-dependent differences were stimulus-specific, i.e. seen only in response to playback of 50-kHz calls and not in response to playback of background noise. The present finding that opioid ligands can affect social approach and ultrasonic vocalizations induced by playback of 50-kHz calls, indicates that an important feature of social interaction in rats, namely ultrasonic communication, is at least partially regulated by endogenous opioids.

  3. Can humans discriminate between dogs on the base of the acoustic parameters of barks?

    PubMed

    Molnár, Csaba; Pongrácz, Péter; Dóka, Antal; Miklósi, Adám

    2006-07-01

    In this study we tested the often suggested claim that people are able to recognize their dogs by their barks. Earlier studies in other species indicated that reliable discrimination between individuals cannot be made by listening to chaotically noisy vocalizations. As barking is typically such a chaotic noisy vocalization, we have hypothesized that reliable discrimination between individuals is not possible by listening to barks. In this study, playback experiments were conducted to explore (1) how accurately humans discriminate between dogs by hearing only their barks, (2) the impact of the eliciting context of calls on these discrimination performances, and (3) how much such discrimination depends on acoustic parameters (tonality and frequency of barks, and the intervals between the individual barks). Our findings were consistent with the previous studies: human performances did not pass the empirical threshold of reliable discrimination in most cases. But a significant effect of tonality was found: discrimination between individuals was more successful when listeners were listening to low harmonic-to-noise ratio (HNR) barks. The contexts in which barks were recorded affected significantly the listeners' performances: if the dog barked at a stranger, listeners were able to discriminate the vocalizations better than if they were listening to sounds recorded when the dog was separated from its owner. It is rendered probable that the bark might be a more efficient communication system between humans and dogs for communicating the motivational state of an animal than for discrimination among strange individuals.

  4. Acoustics of a Nonhomogeneous Moving Medium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blokhintsev, D I

    1956-01-01

    Theoretical basis of the acoustics of a moving nonhomogeneous medium is considered in this report. Experiments that illustrate or confirm some of the theoretical explanation or derivation of these acoustics are also included.

  5. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  6. Pacific Hake Characteristics Affecting the Conduct of an Acoustic Clutter Experiment off the West Coast of the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-04

    the assessment process. Echo sounder /trawl surveys of hake have been conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) since 1977 to assess...3] There will be an NMFS hake survey in 2012. [20] The echo sounder /trawl method uses echo sounders to measure the total acoustic backscattering...NMFS echo sounder /trawl surveys have focused on fish age two or greater. Age-1 hake are generally more southerly and closer to shore than adults and

  7. Cortisol levels in hair reflect behavioural reactivity of dogs to acoustic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Siniscalchi, M; McFarlane, J R; Kauter, K G; Quaranta, A; Rogers, L J

    2013-02-01

    Cortisol levels in hair samples were examined in fourteen domestic dogs and related to the dogs' responses to different acoustic stimuli. Stimuli were playbacks of species-typical vocalizations recorded during three different situations ("disturbance", "isolation" and "play" barks) and the sounds of a thunderstorm. Hair samples were collected at 9:00 h and 17:00 h two weeks after the behavioural tests. Results showed that behavioural reactivity to playback of the various stimuli correlates with cortisol levels in hair samples collected at 9:00 h, and the same was the case for the separate measures of behaviour (i.e. hiding, running away, seeking attention from the tester, panting and lowering of the body posture). Hence, levels of cortisol in hair appear to reflect the dog's chronic state of emotional reactivity, or temperament.

  8. Wavelet Preprocessing of Acoustic Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    wavelet transform to preprocess acoustic broadband signals in a system that discriminates between different classes of acoustic bursts. This is motivated by the similarity between the proportional bandwidth filters provided by the wavelet transform and those found in biological hearing systems. The experiment involves comparing statistical pattern classifier effects of wavelet and FFT preprocessed acoustic signals. The data used was from the DARPA Phase I database, which consists of artificially generated signals with real ocean background. The

  9. A Brief History of Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossing, Thomas

    Although there are certainly some good historical treatments of acoustics in the literature, it still seems appropriate to begin a handbook of acoustics with a brief history of the subject. We begin by mentioning some important experiments that took place before the 19th century. Acoustics in the 19th century is characterized by describing the work of seven outstanding acousticians: Tyndall, von Helmholtz, Rayleigh, Stokes, Bell, Edison, and Koenig. Of course this sampling omits the mention of many other outstanding investigators.

  10. Award 1 Title: Acoustic Communications 2011 Experiment: Deployment Support and Post Experiment Data Handling and Analysis. Award 2 Title: Exploiting Structured Dependencies in the Design of Adaptive Algorithms for Underwater Communication Award. 3 Title: Coupled Research in Ocean Acoustics and Signal Processing for the Next Generation of Underwater Acoustic Communication Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Exploiting Structured Dependencies in the Design of Adaptive Algorithms for Underwater Communication Award #3 Title Coupled Research in Ocean Acoustics...depend on the physical oceanography and pushing the state of the art in our understanding of adaptive signal processing algorithms relevant to...deployable VHF acoustic data transmission and acquisition system. 3. Develop signal models and processing algorithms that reduce to the extent

  11. Introducing DIASCoPE: Directly Integrated Acoustic System Combined with Pressure Experiments — Changing the Paradigm from Product to Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, M. L.; Baldwin, K. J.; Huebsch, W. B.; Tercé, N.; Bejina, F.; Bystricky, M.; Chen, H.; Vaughan, M. T.; Weidner, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the properties and behaviors of materials and multi-phase aggregates under conditions of high pressure and temperature is vital to unraveling the mysteries that lie beneath the surface of the planet. Advances in in situexperimental techniques using synchrotron radiation at these extreme conditions have helped to provide answers to fundamental questions that were previously unattainable. Synchrotron-based ultrasonic interferometry measurements have proven to be especially important in determining acoustic velocities and thermoelastic properties of materials at high pressures and temperatures. However, due to relatively slow data collection times, it has been difficult to measure the effects of processes as they occur, and instead the measurement is made on the end product of these processes. DIASCoPE is an important step toward addressing this problem.Over the last three years, we have designed and developed an on-board ultrasonic acoustic velocity measurement system that cuts data collection time down by over an order of magnitude. We can now measure P- and S-wave travel times in samples at extreme conditions in less than one second. Moreover, the system has been fully integrated with the multi-anvil apparatus and the EPICS control system at beamline X17B2 of the National Synchrotron Light Source, allowing for greater ease of control andfull automation of experimental data collection. The DIASCoPE has completed the testing and commissioning phase, and the first data collected using this powerful new system will be presented here.DIASCoPE represents a major step forward in acoustic velocity collection time reduction that will finally allow us to begin to witness what effects various processes in the deep Earth may have on the physical properties of materials at extreme conditions as they occur. These new capabilities will allow us to change the focus of study from the product to the process itself and will lead to a greater understanding of the

  12. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  13. Baseline Behavior of Pilot Whales and their Responses to Playback of Anthropogenic and Natural Sounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    Información y Estudio sobre Cetáceos). This field site is unique in that the year-round resident population of pilot whales (de Stephanis et al., 2008a...E75-E92. Curé, C., Antunes, R ., Samarra, F., Alves, A. C., Visser, F., Kvadsheim, P. H. and Miller, P. J. O. (2012). Pilot Whales Attracted to Killer...Whale Sounds: Acoustically-Mediated Interspecific Interactions in Cetaceans. PLoS ONE 7, e52201. de Stephanis, R ., Cornulier, T., Verborgh, P

  14. Observations of premonitory acoustic emission and slip nucleation during a stick slip experiment in smooth faulted Westerly granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, B.D.; Young, R.P.; Lockner, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate laboratory earthquakes, stick-slip events were induced on a saw-cut Westerly granite sample by triaxial loading at 150 MPa confining pressure. Acoustic emissions (AE) were monitored using an innovative continuous waveform recorder. The first motion of each stick slip was recorded as a large-amplitude AE signal. These events source locate onto the saw-cut fault plane, implying that they represent the nucleation sites of the dynamic failure stick-slip events. The precise location of nucleation varied between events and was probably controlled by heterogeneity of stress or surface conditions on the fault. The initial nucleation diameter of each dynamic instability was inferred to be less than 3 mm. A small number of AE were recorded prior to each macro slip event. For the second and third slip events, premonitory AE source mechanisms mimic the large scale fault plane geometry. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Opto-acoustic diagnostics of the thermal action of high-intensity focused ultrasound on biological tissues: the possibility of its applications and model experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Khokhlova, Tanya D; Pelivanov, Ivan M; Solomatin, Vladimir S; Karabutov, Aleksander A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A

    2006-12-31

    The possibility of using the opto-acoustic (OA) method for monitoring high-intensity ultrasonic therapy is studied. The optical properties of raw and boiled liver samples used as the undamaged model tissue and tissue destroyed by ultrasound, respectively, are measured. Experiments are performed with samples consisting of several alternating layers of raw and boiled liver of different thickness. The position and transverse size of the thermal lesion were determined from the temporal shape of the OA signals. The results of measurements are compared with the real size and position of the thermal lesion determined from the subsequent cuts of the sample. It is shown that the OA method permits the diagnostics of variations in biological tissues upon ultrasonic therapy. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  16. Multi-Mission Simulation and Visualization for Real-Time Telemetry Display, Playback and EDL Event Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomerantz, M. I.; Lim, C.; Myint, S.; Woodward, G.; Balaram, J.; Kuo, C.

    2012-01-01

    he Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) Reconstruction Task has developed a software system that provides mission operations personnel and analysts with a real time telemetry-based live display, playback and post-EDL reconstruction capability that leverages the existing high-fidelity, physics-based simulation framework and modern game engine-derived 3D visualization system developed in the JPL Dynamics and Real Time Simulation (DARTS) Lab. Developed as a multi-mission solution, the EDL Telemetry Visualization (ETV) system has been used for a variety of projects including NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), NASA'S Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) and JPL's MoonRise Lunar sample return proposal.

  17. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  18. Advantages of laser-acoustical leak testing for construction and operation of low-temperature installations and superconducting experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herz, W.

    2002-09-01

    At the Institute of Technical Physics of the Research Center Karlsruhe, superconducting magnets for nuclear fusion applications have been tested in the vacuum tank TOSKA for more than 20 years. A crucial test parameter of the magnet coils (mass up to 120 metric tons) as well as of the peripheral components, such as current leads (up to 80 kA), helium refrigerators (2 kW), and low-temperature transfer lines (length approx200 m), is their vacuum tightness at operating conditions (minimum temperature approx2 K, maximum refrigerant pressure 25 bar). Because the final tests at cryotemperature are costly and time consuming, intermediate tests at room temperature have already been performed at the stages of manufacturing, certification, and assembling, and prior to cooldown. So far, these tightness tests have been performed with probe gas helium employing a conventional mass spectrometer leak detector, whereby the smallest detectable leakage is limited by the He partial pressure in the surrounding air. Therefore, a new technique of leak measurement was investigated using the probe gas sulfur hexafluoride SF6, which does not occur in natural air, and which can be sensitively detected by a laser-acoustical leak detector. The obtained experimental results reveal the substantial advantages of the new method with respect to detection sensitivity, testing expenditure, and costs. The results can be transferred to tightness tests in other fields of technology. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  19. Architectural-acoustics consulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Anthony K.

    2004-05-01

    Consulting involves both the science of acoustics and the art of communication, requiring an array of inherent and created skills. Perhaps because consulting on architectural acoustics is a relatively new field, there is a remarkable variety of career paths, all influenced by education, interest, and experience. Many consultants juggle dozens of chargeable projects at a time, not to mention proposals, seminars, teaching, articles, business concerns, and professional-society activities. This paper will discuss various aspects of career paths, projects, and clients as they relate to architectural-acoustics consulting. The intended emphasis will be considerations for those who may be interested in such a career, noting that consultants generally seem to thrive on the numerous challenges.

  20. Twenty years' experience in the treatment of acoustic neuromas with fractionated radiotherapy: A review of 45 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Maire, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: jean-philippe.maire@chu-bordeaux.fr; Huchet, Aymeri; Milbeo, Yann; Darrouzet, Vincent; Causse, Nicole; Celerier, Denis; Liguoro, Dominique; Bebear, Jean-Pierre

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate very long-term results of fractionated radiotherapy (FRT) of acoustic neuromas (AN). Methods and Materials: From January 1986 to January 2004, FRT was performed in 45 consecutive patients (46 AN). Indications were as follows: poor general condition contraindicating surgery, hearing preservation in bilateral neuromas, partial resection, nonsurgical recurrence. A 3-field to 5-field technique with static beams was used. A mean total dose of 51 Gy was given (1.80 Gy/fraction). The median tumor diameter was 31 mm (range, 11-55 mm). The median follow-up from FRT was 80 months (range, 4-227 months). Results: The particularity of our series consists of a very long-term follow-up of FRT given to selected patients. Nineteen patients died, two with progressive disease, and 17 from non-AN causes. A serviceable level of hearing was preserved in 7/9 hearing patients. No patient had facial or trigeminal neuropathy. Tumor shrinkage was observed in 27 (59%) and stable disease in 16 (35%). Tumor progression occurred in three patients, 12 to 15 months after FRT. Two additional tumors recurred after shrinkage 20 and 216 months after treatment and were operated on. Actuarial local tumor control rates at 5 and 15 years were 86%. For the patient who had a tumor recurrence at 216 months, histologic examination documented transformation to a low-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Conclusion: Very long-term efficacy of FRT is well documented in this series. However, our results suggest that malignant transformation can occur many years after FRT so we advocate caution when using this treatment for young patients.

  1. Forensic acoustics: An overview of the process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissenburger, J. T.

    2003-10-01

    There is a potential role for the acoustical expert in litigation. The technical issues may involve aeroacoustics, underwater acoustics, physical effects of sound, environmental acoustics, noise, architectural acoustics, physiological acoustics, speech and hearing, music, psychoacoustics and/or bioacoustics. This brief paper offers an overview of the process of being an expert, the qualifications to be an expert and what is expected of an expert. The six general phases of an expert's involvement-retention, investigation, discovery, deposition, preparation, trial-are addressed. Some antidotal experiences are presented.

  2. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  3. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors.

  4. Female Túngara Frogs do not Experience the Continuity Illusion

    PubMed Central

    Baugh, Alexander T.; Ryan, Michael J.; Bernal, Ximena E.; Rand, A. Stanley; Bee, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    In humans and some non-human vertebrates, a sound containing brief silent gaps can be rendered perceptually continuous by inserting noise into the gaps. This so-called ‘continuity illusion’ arises from a phenomenon known as ‘auditory induction’ and results in the perception of complete auditory objects despite fragmentary or incomplete acoustic information. Previous studies of auditory induction in gray treefrogs (Hyla versicolor and H. chrysoscelis) have demonstrated an absence of this phenomenon. These treefrog species produce pulsatile (non-continuous) vocalizations, whereas studies of auditory induction in other taxa, including humans, often present continuous sounds (e.g., frequency-modulated sweeps). This study investigated the continuity illusion in a frog (Physalaemus pustulosus) with an advertisement vocalization that is naturally continuous and thus similar to the tonal sweeps used in human psychophysical studies of auditory induction. In a series of playback experiments, female subjects were presented with sets of stimuli that included complete calls, calls with silent gaps, and calls with silent gaps filled with noise. The results failed to provide evidence of auditory induction. Current evidence, therefore, suggests that mammals and birds experience auditory induction, but frogs may not. This emerging pattern of taxonomic differences is considered in light of potential methodological, neurophysiological, and functional explanations. PMID:26692450

  5. A Brief History of Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossing, Thomas D.

    Although there are certainly some good historical treatments of acoustics in the literature, it still seems appropriate to begin a handbook of history acoustics with a brief history of the subject. We begin by mentioning some important experiments that took place before the 19th century. Acoustics in the 19th century is characterized by describing the work of seven outstanding acousticians: Tyndall, von Helmholtz, Rayleigh, Stokes, Bell, Edison, and Koenig. Of course this sampling omits the mention of many other outstanding investigators.

  6. The Simplest Demonstration on Acoustic Beats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Alessio; Ganci, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The classical demonstration experiment on acoustic beats using two signal generators and a dual trace oscilloscope is an important ingredient in teaching the subject. This short laboratory note aims to point out what may be the simplest demonstrative experiment on acoustic beats to carry out in a classroom without employing any lab apparatus.

  7. Low-Frequency Acoustic Propagation Loss in the Arctic Ocean: Results of the Arctic Climate Observations using Underwater Sound Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-05

    experiment on the Turpan-SIMI path, but much smaller than those measured on the Turpan- Narwhal path which was almost coincident with the 1000-km section of...the ACOUS path from the Nansen Basin to the Lincoln Sea. The integral propagation loss on the path to Narwhal was about 30 dB for mode 1 and 10-13 dB

  8. Acoustically-driven microfluidic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A W; Benett, W J; Tarte, L R

    2000-06-23

    We have demonstrated a non-contact method of concentrating and mixing particles in a plastic microfluidic chamber employing acoustic radiation pressure. A flaw cell package has also been designed that integrates liquid sample interconnects, electrical contacts and a removable sample chamber. Experiments were performed on 1, 3, 6, and 10 {micro}m polystyrene beads. Increased antibody binding to a solid-phase substrate was observed in the presence of acoustic mixing due to improve mass transport.

  9. Nonlinear Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-02-14

    Wester- velt. [60] Streaming. In 1831, Michael Faraday [61] noted that currents of air were set up in the neighborhood of vibrating plates-the first... ducei in the case of a paramettc amy (from Berktay an Leahy 141). C’ "". k•, SEC 10.1 NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS 345 The principal results of their analysis

  10. Low-frequency target strength and abundance of shoaling Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in the Gulf of Maine during the Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing 2006 Experiment.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Andrews, Mark; Jagannathan, Srinivasan; Patel, Ruben; Jech, J Michael; Makris, Nicholas C; Ratilal, Purnima

    2010-01-01

    The low-frequency target strength of shoaling Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in the Gulf of Maine during Autumn 2006 spawning season is estimated from experimental data acquired simultaneously at multiple frequencies in the 300-1200 Hz range using (1) a low-frequency ocean acoustic waveguide remote sensing (OAWRS) system, (2) areal population density calibration with several conventional fish finding sonar (CFFS) systems, and (3) low-frequency transmission loss measurements. The OAWRS system's instantaneous imaging diameter of 100 km and regular updating enabled unaliased monitoring of fish populations over ecosystem scales including shoals of Atlantic herring containing hundreds of millions of individuals, as confirmed by concurrent trawl and CFFS sampling. High spatial-temporal coregistration was found between herring shoals imaged by OAWRS and concurrent CFFS line-transects, which also provided fish depth distributions. The mean scattering cross-section of an individual shoaling herring is found to consistently exhibit a strong, roughly 20 dB/octave roll-off with decreasing frequency in the range of the OAWRS survey over all days of the roughly 2-week experiment, consistent with the steep roll-offs expected for sub-resonance scattering from fish with air-filled swimbladders.

  11. Structural-acoustic model of a rectangular plate-cavity system with an attached distributed mass and internal sound source: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirnat, Miha; Čepon, Gregor; Boltežar, Miha

    2014-03-01

    In this paper three approaches are combined to develop a structural-acoustic model of a rectangular plate-cavity system with an attached distributed mass and internal sound source. The first approach results from a recently presented analysis based on the Rayleigh-Ritz method and is used to circumvent the difficulties in obtaining the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a plate with an attached, distributed mass. Furthermore, different plate boundary conditions can be accommodated. The resulting mode shapes are defined as continuous functions; this is advantageous as they can be directly used in the second approach, i.e., the classic modal-interaction approach in order to obtain the coupled equations of the system. Finally, in the third approach a group of point sources emitting a pressure pulse in the time domain is used to model an internal sound source. For the validation of the developed model an experiment was conducted in two configurations using a simply supported aluminium plate and a clamped plate coupled with a plexiglas box containing a loudspeaker. Good agreement was found between the analytical and experimental data.

  12. Acoustic asymmetric transmission based on time-dependent dynamical scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Yang; Ni, Xu; Xu, Ye-Long; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Chen, Ze-Guo; Feng, Liang; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2015-06-01

    An acoustic asymmetric transmission device exhibiting unidirectional transmission property for acoustic waves is extremely desirable in many practical scenarios. Such a unique property may be realized in various configurations utilizing acoustic Zeeman effects in moving media as well as frequency-conversion in passive nonlinear acoustic systems and in active acoustic systems. Here we demonstrate a new acoustic frequency conversion process in a time-varying system, consisting of a rotating blade and the surrounding air. The scattered acoustic waves from this time-varying system experience frequency shifts, which are linearly dependent on the blade’s rotating frequency. Such scattering mechanism can be well described theoretically by an acoustic linear time-varying perturbation theory. Combining such time-varying scattering effects with highly efficient acoustic filtering, we successfully develop a tunable acoustic unidirectional device with 20 dB power transmission contrast ratio between two counter propagation directions at audible frequencies.

  13. Acoustic asymmetric transmission based on time-dependent dynamical scattering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Yang; Ni, Xu; Xu, Ye-Long; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Chen, Ze-Guo; Feng, Liang; Liu, Xiao-ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic asymmetric transmission device exhibiting unidirectional transmission property for acoustic waves is extremely desirable in many practical scenarios. Such a unique property may be realized in various configurations utilizing acoustic Zeeman effects in moving media as well as frequency-conversion in passive nonlinear acoustic systems and in active acoustic systems. Here we demonstrate a new acoustic frequency conversion process in a time-varying system, consisting of a rotating blade and the surrounding air. The scattered acoustic waves from this time-varying system experience frequency shifts, which are linearly dependent on the blade’s rotating frequency. Such scattering mechanism can be well described theoretically by an acoustic linear time-varying perturbation theory. Combining such time-varying scattering effects with highly efficient acoustic filtering, we successfully develop a tunable acoustic unidirectional device with 20 dB power transmission contrast ratio between two counter propagation directions at audible frequencies. PMID:26038886

  14. Deco-video: video editing and viewing browser enables to playback movie contents reproduced by using scene scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Sakamoto, Kunio

    2008-03-01

    The authors developed a prototype video viewing browser. Our video viewer has a function to playback movies on the WWW according to the playing scenario. This scenario makes new scenes from original movies. Our video browser features this scene scenario where you can arrange movie's video clips, insert transition effects, apply colored backgrounds, or add captions and titles. The video movie contents on the WWW are copyrighted. The browser cannot alter web's movie contents owing to its copyright like that a conventional video editing software adds effects to the original. The editing software produces reproductions, but our browser doesn't. The browser adds effects according to the scenario and only shows us a new scene. The scene scenario is written in an XML-like script. The video browser has a function to give effect according to operations of the scenario. In addition, our video viewing browser can provide us with an interactive video art. For example, suppose that a small stream runs down among the rocks. On the browser, if you chose an icon which shows maple leafs and drop it into the stream, a maple leaf starts floating down along the stream.

  15. Advanced Broadband Acoustic Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-31

    7, 18]). Key result: despite some claims to the contrary in the ocean acoustics community, sub-bottom clutter can and does occur in shallow water ...propagation, and clutter in both theory and measurements. This is important because in some shallow water areas (especially those with significant riverine...Abraham, data from Clutter󈧋 Experiment) to examine dependence of clutter statistics on multipath (Ref [8]). Key result: in the shallow water

  16. Chronic playback of boat noise does not impact hatching success or post-hatching larval growth and survival in a cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Andrew N.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic (man-made) noise has been shown to have a negative impact on the behaviour and physiology of a range of terrestrial and aquatic animals. However, direct assessments of fitness consequences are rare. Here we examine the effect of additional noise on early life stages in the model cichlid fish, Neolamprologus pulcher. Many fishes use and produce sounds, they are crucial elements of aquatic ecosystems, and there is mounting evidence that they are vulnerable to anthropogenic noise; adult N. pulcher have recently been shown to change key behaviours during playback of motor boat noise. Using a split-brood design to eliminate potential genetic effects, we exposed half of the eggs and fry from each clutch to four weeks of playbacks of noise originally recorded from small motor boats with the other half acting as a control (receiving no noise playback). There was no significant effect of additional noise on hatching success or fry survival, length or weight at the end of the exposure period. Although care should be taken not to generalize these findings on a single species from a laboratory study, our data suggest that moderate noise increases do not necessarily have direct negative impacts on early-life survival and growth. Further studies on a range of species in natural conditions are urgently needed to inform conservation efforts and policy decisions about the consequences of anthropogenic noise. PMID:25276507

  17. Phonotactic selectivity in two cryptic species of gray treefrogs: effects of differences in pulse-rate, carrier frequency, and playback level

    PubMed Central

    Gerhardt, H. Carl

    2008-01-01

    Summary The two main spectral components of the advertisement calls of two species of North American gray treefrogs (Hyla chrysoscelis and H. versicolor) overlap broadly in frequency, and each matches the sensitivity of one of the two different auditory inner ear organs. The calls of the two species differ in the shape and repetition-rate (pulse rate) of sound pulses within trills. A standard synthetic call with one of these spectral peaks and the pulse rate typical of conspecific calls was tested against synthetic alternatives that had the same spectral peak but a different pulse rate. The results were generalized over a wide range of playback levels. Selectivity based on differences in pulse rate depended on which spectral peak was used in some tests, and greater pulse-rate selectivity was usually observed when the low-frequency rather than the high-frequency peak was used. This effect was more pronounced and occurred over a wider range of playback levels in H. versicolor than in H. chrysoscelis when the pulse rate of the alternative was higher than that of the standard call. In tests using the high-frequency peak at high playback levels, however, females of H. versicolor showed greater selectivity for the standard call than did H. chrysoscelis when the pulse rate of the alternative was modestly lower than that of the standard call. This last result may reflect the different ways in which females of the two species assess trains of pulses. PMID:18689414

  18. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  19. Turbofan Acoustic Propagation and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    2000-01-01

    This document describes progress in the development of finite element codes for the prediction of near and far field acoustic radiation from the inlet and aft fan ducts of turbofan engines. The report consists of nine papers which have appeared in archival journals and conference proceedings, or are presently in review for publication. Topics included are: 1. Aft Fan Duct Acoustic Radiation; 2. Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements for Acoustic Radiation in a Uniformly Moving Medium; 3. A Reflection Free Boundary Condition for Propagation in Uniform Flow Using Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements; 4. A Numerical Comparison Between Multiple-Scales and FEM Solution for Sound Propagation in Lined Flow Ducts; 5. Acoustic Propagation at High Frequencies in Ducts; 6. The Boundary Condition at an Impedance Wall in a Nonuniform Duct with Potential Flow; 7. A Reverse Flow Theorem and Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows; 8. Reciprocity and Acoustics Power in One Dimensional Compressible Potential Flows; and 9. Numerical Experiments on Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows.

  20. West Texas array experiment: Noise and source characterization of short-range infrasound and acoustic signals, along with lab and field evaluation of Intermountain Laboratories infrasound microphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Aileen

    The term infrasound describes atmospheric sound waves with frequencies below 20 Hz, while acoustics are classified within the audible range of 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Infrasound and acoustic monitoring in the scientific community is hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and a limited number of studies on regional and short-range noise and source characterization. The JASON Report (2005) suggests the infrasound community focus on more broad-frequency, observational studies within a tactical distance of 10 km. In keeping with that recommendation, this paper presents a study of regional and short-range atmospheric acoustic and infrasonic noise characterization, at a desert site in West Texas, covering a broad frequency range of 0.2 to 100 Hz. To spatially sample the band, a large number of infrasound gauges was needed. A laboratory instrument analysis is presented of the set of low-cost infrasound sensors used in this study, manufactured by Inter-Mountain Laboratories (IML). Analysis includes spectra, transfer functions and coherences to assess the stability and range of the gauges, and complements additional instrument testing by Sandia National Laboratories. The IMLs documented here have been found reliably coherent from 0.1 to 7 Hz without instrument correction. Corrections were built using corresponding time series from the commercially available and more expensive Chaparral infrasound gauge, so that the corrected IML outputs were able to closely mimic the Chaparral output. Arrays of gauges are needed for atmospheric sound signal processing. Our West Texas experiment consisted of a 1.5 km aperture, 23-gauge infrasound/acoustic array of IMLs, with a compact, 12 m diameter grid-array of rented IMLs at the center. To optimize signal recording, signal-to-noise ratio needs to be quantified with respect to both frequency band and coherence length. The higher-frequency grid array consisted of 25 microphones arranged in a five by five pattern with 3 meter spacing, without

  1. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  2. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  3. Measurements of Low-Frequency Acoustic Attenuation in Soils.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Engineering Research Laboratory to design an acoustic subsurface imaging system, a set of experiments was conducted in which the attenuation and the velocity...support of the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory’s efforts to design an acoustic subsurface imaging system which would ideally be...of acoustic waves such as those generated by a subsurface imaging system. An experiment reported in the literature characterized the acoustic

  4. Studies of depredating sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) off Sitka, AK, using videocameras, tags, and long-range passive acoustic tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathias, Delphine

    This dissertation uses videocameras, tags and acoustic recorders to investigate the diving and acoustic behavior of sperm whales in the Gulf of Alaska during natural and depredation foraging conditions. First, underwater videocamera footage of a sperm whale attacking a fisherman's longline at 100 m depth was used to examine its acoustic behavior at close range and to estimate its size both acoustically and visually. Second, bioacoustic tagging data demonstrated that the same individuals displayed different acoustic behaviors during natural and depredation foraging states. Two broad categories of depredation, "shallow" and "deep," were also identified. These results suggest that passive acoustic monitoring at close ranges may yield useful metrics for quantifying depredation activity. Third, the behavioral reactions of depredating sperm whales to a variety of acoustic playbacks generated at relatively low source levels were investigated using bioacoustic tags. Finally, bioacoustic and satellite tag data were used to develop passive acoustic techniques for tracking sperm whales with a short-aperture two-element vertical array. When numeric sound propagation models were exploited, localization ranges up to 35 km were obtained. The tracking methods were also used to estimate the source levels of sperm whale "clicks" and "creaks", predict the maximum detection range of the signals as a function of sea state, and measure the drift of several whales away from a visual decoy.

  5. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  7. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    While loading different specimens, acoustic emissions appear due to micro crack formation or friction of already existing crack edges. These acoustic emissions can be recorded using suitable ultrasonic transducers and transient recorders. The analysis of acoustic emissions can be used to investigate the mechanical behavior of different specimens under load. Our working group has undertaken several experiments, monitored with acoustic emission techniques. Different materials such as natural stone, concrete, wood, steel, carbon composites and bone were investigated. Also the experimental setup has been varied. Fire-spalling experiments on ultrahigh performance concrete and pullout experiments on bonded anchors have been carried out. Furthermore uniaxial compression tests on natural stone and animal bone had been conducted. The analysis tools include not only the counting of events but the analysis of full waveforms. Powerful localization algorithms and automatic onset picking techniques (based on Akaikes Information Criterion) were established to handle the huge amount of data. Up to several thousand events were recorded during experiments of a few minutes. More sophisticated techniques like moment tensor inversion have been established on this relatively small scale as well. Problems are related to the amount of data but also to signal-to-noise quality, boundary conditions (reflections) sensor characteristics and unknown and changing Greens functions of the media. Some of the acoustic emissions recorded during these experiments had been transferred into audio range. The transformation into the audio range was done using Matlab. It is the aim of the sonification to establish a tool that is on one hand able to help controlling the experiment in-situ and probably adjust the load parameters according to the number and intensity of the acoustic emissions. On the other hand sonification can help to improve the understanding of acoustic emission techniques for training

  8. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  9. Using Digital Acoustic Recording Tags to Detect Marine Mammals on Navy Ranges and Study their Responses to Naval Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    7 Materials and Methods………………………………….. 12 Results and Discussion………………………………….. 20 Conclusions and Implications for Future Research/Implementation...beaked whales exposed to playback of sound, and has developed and validated a method to associate acoustic exposure with a safe response. The... safe exposure levels for beaked and other whales when they are exposed to military sonars. The DTAG was designed not only to record sounds produced by

  10. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  11. Acoustic Doppler velocimeter-induced acoustic streaming and its implications for measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C. M.; Rusello, P. J.; Variano, E. A.

    2011-05-01

    The acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) is widely used for the characterization of fluid flow. Secondary flows ("acoustic streaming") generated by the ADV's acoustic pulses may affect the accuracy of measurements in experiments with small velocities. We assessed the impact of acoustic streaming on flow measurement using particle image velocimetry. The probes of two different ADVs were successively mounted in a tank of quiescent water. The probes' ultrasound emitters were aligned with a laser light sheet. Observed flow was primarily in the axial direction, accelerating from the ultrasound emitter and peaking within centimeters of the velocimeter sampling volume before dropping off. We measured the dependence of acoustic streaming velocity on ADV configuration, finding that different settings induce streaming ranging from negligible to more than 2.0 cm s-1. From these results, we describe cases where acoustic streaming affects velocity measurements and also cases where ADVs accurately measure their own acoustic streaming.

  12. Spectrum analysis for introductory musical acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedley, John E.

    1998-02-01

    A "real time" fast Fourier transform spectrum analyzer facilitates several experiments for an introductory course in musical acoustics. With its rapidly updated display, the time-dependent vibrations of an aluminum bar are easily studied. Using longer time acquisitions and correspondingly higher resolution facilitates the study of string inharmonicities, resonant energy transfer, and sound radiation patterns in guitar acoustics.

  13. Acoustic Emphasis in Four Year Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wonnacott, Elizabeth; Watson, Duane G.

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic emphasis may convey a range of subtle discourse distinctions, yet little is known about how this complex ability develops in children. This paper presents a first investigation of the factors which influence the production of acoustic prominence in young children's spontaneous speech. In a production experiment, SVO sentences were…

  14. Strong acoustic coupling to a superconducting qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Martin; Aref, Thomas; Frisk Kockum, Anton; Ekström, Maria; Johansson, Göran; Delsing, Per

    2014-03-01

    Micromechanical resonators can be used to store quantum information, as shown in several recent experiments. These resonators typically have the form of membranes or beams, and phonons are localized to their vibrational eigenmodes. We present a different kind of mechanical quantum device, where propagating phonons serve as carriers for quantum information. At the core of our device is a superconducting qubit, designed to couple to Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW) in the underlying substrate through the piezoelectric effect. This type of coupling can be very strong, and in our case exceeds the coupling to any external electromagnetic modes. The acoustic waves propagate freely on the surface of the substrate, and we use a remote electro-acoustic transducer to address the qubit acoustically and listen to its emission of phonons. This presentation focuses on the basic properties of our acoustic quantum system, and we include experimental data that demonstrate the quantized coupling between the qubit and the propagating acoustic waves.

  15. Shallow Water Acoustic Experiment Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    KNORR as it towed a J-15-1 source that emitted four tonals in the 50-250 Hz band, and the deployment locations of two Combustive Sound Source (CSS) events...collected on Array 2 in the 50-250 Hz band. The geoacoustic parameter that is best defined is the sound speed ratio at the water sediment interface... pulse length of the simulated and measured time series agree is an independent confirmation that the attenuation values deduced in Ref. 1 are

  16. Acoustic Seaglider: Philippine Sea Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    of 516 km and glider depth of 668 m. Vertical lines indicate alignment with predicted eigenrays . Stars mark the intersection of the predicted...identified eigenrays are indicated. Given large depth-dependent tidal velocities (e.g., as observed with moored ADCPs, J. Colosi, personel

  17. Acoustic iridescence.

    PubMed

    Cox, Trevor J

    2011-03-01

    An investigation has been undertaken into acoustic iridescence, exploring how a device can be constructed which alter sound waves, in a similar way to structures in nature that act on light to produce optical iridescence. The main construction had many thin perforated sheets spaced half a wavelength apart for a specified design frequency. The sheets create the necessary impedance discontinuities to create backscattered waves, which then interfere to create strongly reflected sound at certain frequencies. Predictions and measurements show a set of harmonics, evenly spaced in frequency, for which sound is reflected strongly. And the frequency of these harmonics increases as the angle of observation gets larger, mimicking the iridescence seen in natural optical systems. Similar to optical systems, the reflections become weaker for oblique angles of reflection. A second construction was briefly examined which exploited a metamaterial made from elements and inclusions which were much smaller than the wavelength. Boundary element method predictions confirmed the potential for creating acoustic iridescence from layers of such a material.

  18. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  19. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  20. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Kar M.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ˜ 106 Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ˜ 10-9 m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ˜ 10-8 m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10-8 m with 106 Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  1. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  2. Acoustically enhanced heat transport.

    PubMed

    Ang, Kar M; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10(6) Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ∼ 10(-9) m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ∼ 10(-8) m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10(-8) m with 10(6) Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  3. Dynamic acoustic tractor beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-03-07

    Pulling a sphere and vibrating it around an equilibrium position by amplitude-modulation in the near-field of a single finite circular piston transducer is theoretically demonstrated. Conditions are found where a fluid hexane sphere (with arbitrary radius) chosen as an example, centered on the axis of progressive propagating waves and submerged in non-viscous water, experiences an attractive (steady) force pulling it towards the transducer, as well as an oscillatory force forcing it to vibrate back-and-forth. Numerical predictions for the dynamic force illustrate the theory and suggest an innovative method in designing dynamic acoustical tractor beams.

  4. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  5. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  6. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  7. Acoustical Properties of Mud Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    transmission loss and array response in shallow water over mud sediments and of acoustic detection, localization, and classification of objects buried...classification of objects buried in mud; and improvement of shallow water sonar systems and predictions with mud sediments. RELATED PROJECTS...Characterization Experiment. Collaboration is planned with colleagues at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (Jim Lynch, Tim Duda, and Ying-Tsong Lin

  8. Electro-acoustic stimulation. Acoustic and electric pitch comparisons.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Hugh; Sucher, Catherine; Simpson, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    For simultaneous acoustic and electric stimulation to be perceived as complementary, it may be beneficial for hearing aids and cochlear implants (CI) to be adjusted to provide compatible pitch sensations. To this end, estimates of the pitch perceived for a set of acoustic and electric stimuli were obtained from 14 CI users who had usable low-frequency hearing, either in the non-implanted ear or in both ears. The subjects assigned numerical pitch estimates to each of 5 acoustic pure tones and 5 single-electrode electric pulse trains. On average, the acoustic frequency that corresponded in pitch to stimulation on the most apical electrode was approximately 480 Hz. This was about 1 octave lower than the frequency expected from Greenwood's frequency-place function applied to estimates of the electrode insertion angle based on X-ray images. Furthermore, evidence was found suggesting that pitch decreased with increasing duration of CI use. Pitch estimates from 5 subjects who completed the experiment before experiencing any other sounds through their CI were generally close to the values expected from a recently published frequency map for the cochlear spiral ganglion. Taken together, these findings suggest that some perceptual adaptation may occur that would compensate in part for the apparent mismatch between the intracochlear position of the electrodes and the acoustic frequencies assigned to them in the sound processor.

  9. Developments and field tests of low-frequency portable acoustic transducers for a mobile exploration and time lapse experiment of a sea-bottom reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruga, K.; Kasahara, J.; Hasada, Y.; Kondo, H.

    2013-12-01

    Depth, scale and resolutions of geophysical explorations for mineral resources are controlled by transmitted seismic energy and wavelength (frequency range). Most explorations in marine have been conducted by survey ship system with arrayed acoustic sources whose dominant frequency range is about 10 to 500 Hz. On the other hand, for shallow parts of sea bottom structure survey, some sub-bottom profilers with frequency range around 3.5kHz are used. To monitor a time lapse of a sea bottom reservoir such as an oil, gas, or methane hydrate reservoir as well as to exploit a mobile survey near a sea bottom by AUVs, it is necessary to use a broadband portable acoustic transducer with a dominant frequency range of 500 Hz to 5 kHz. We have been developing several types of portable acoustic transducers and a transmitting and recording system which is accurately controlled by a GPS clock (Tsuruga et al., 2012). In this pater, we report the new broadband acoustic portable transducers which have larger power than the original cylindrical acoustic transducers in a low frequency range (<5 kHz), partly funded by JOGMEC, and show the preliminary results of field tests at the shallow sea bottom around 32 m deep by means of the transducers and hydrophone receivers array. Each transducer repeatedly transmitted Chirp signals with a unit period of 500 msec in two frequency ranges of 0.5k-4.5kHz and 4k-16kHz . We stacked 500-ms data by 28 times to obtain a transfer function of each source-receiver pair in the time and frequency domains. The preliminary results suggest as the follows: (i) it is successful to broaden the frequency bandwidth (i.e., 2k-10kHz) by extending a geometrical resonance length of a cylindrical acoustic transducers, and (ii) the observation at the sea bottom with accurately controlled timing systems of transmitter and data-logger is very useful to identify the stable and/or unstable seismic phases, that is, waves propagating in a underground and/or in a sea water as

  10. Studies of Ion Acoustic Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P.; Bauer, B.S.; Baker, K.L. |

    1994-03-07

    In this project, we advanced knowledge of Ion Acoustic Decay on several fronts. In this project, we have developed and demonstrated the capability to perform experimental and theoretical studies of the Ion Acoustic Decay Instability. We have at the same time demonstrated an improved capability to do multichannel spectroscopy and Thomson scattering. We made the first observations of the time-resolved second harmonic emission at several angles simultaneously, and the first observations of the emission both parallel and perpendicular to the electric field of the laser light. We used Thomson scattering to make the first observations of the plasma waves driven by acoustic decay in a warm plasma with long density scale lengths. We also advanced both the linear and the nonlinear theory of this instability. We are thus prepared to perform experiments to address this mechanism as needed for applications.

  11. Conceptual architectural/acoustical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, A. Harold

    2004-05-01

    The thinking which characterizes acoustics as a branch of physics and engineering has difficulty with the architectural design process-the process that generates a room concept in the imagination and experience of the architect. The architect has learned to ``sense'' the visual properties of a room as the design develops in the interaction between mind and media. Phrases such as ``wanting to be'' express the architectural intention but too often such intentions are dismissed as arbitrary; acoustics may then be about fixing the design with acoustical add-ons. Occasionally there is a true meeting of minds-a creative and receptive architect and an acoustician able to communicate at the level of the architectural intention. There is evidently an auditory dimension of wanting to be which is one with the visual. This paper explores the idea in several examples and concludes with suggestions for the training of acousticians.

  12. Wavelet preprocessing of acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W. Y.; Solorzano, M. R.

    1991-12-01

    This paper describes results using the wavelet transform to preprocess acoustic broadband signals in a system that discriminates between different classes of acoustic bursts. This is motivated by the similarity between the proportional bandwidth filters provided by the wavelet transform and those found in biological hearing systems. The experiment involves comparing statistical pattern classifier effects of wavelet and FFT preprocessed acoustic signals. The data used was from the DARPA Phase 1 database, which consists of artificially generated signals with real ocean background. The results show that the wavelet transform did provide improved performance when classifying in a frame-by-frame basis. The DARPA Phase 1 database is well matched to proportional bandwidth filtering; i.e., signal classes that contain high frequencies do tend to have shorter duration in this database. It is also noted that the decreasing background levels at high frequencies compensate for the poor match of the wavelet transform for long duration (high frequency) signals.

  13. Mother-lamb acoustic recognition in sheep: a frequency coding.

    PubMed Central

    Searby, Amanda; Jouventin, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Ewes of the domestic sheep ( Ovis aries ) display selective maternal investment by restricting care to their own offspring and rejecting alien young. This trait relies on individual recognition processes between ewes and lambs. Whereas identification at the udder is only olfactory, distance recognition is performed through visual and acoustic cues. We studied the effectiveness and modalities of mutual acoustic recognition between ewes and lambs by spectrographic analysis of their vocal signatures and by playbacks of modified calls in the field. Our results show that ewes and their lambs can recognize each other based solely on their calls. The coding of identity within the vocal signatures, previously unknown in sheep, is similar in lamb and ewe: it uses the mean frequency and the spectral energy distribution of the call, namely the timbre of the call. These results point out a simple signature system in sheep that uses only the frequency domain. This engenders a signal with low information content, as opposed to some highly social birds and mammal species that may integrate information both in the temporal and spectral domains. The simplicity of this system is linked to the roles played by vision and olfaction that corroborate the information brought by the vocal signature. PMID:12964977

  14. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  15. The functionality of female reciprocal calls in the Iberian midwife toad (Alytes cisternasii): female-female acoustic competition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Jaime

    2002-11-01

    Female midwife toads (genus Alytes) emit highly variable reciprocal calls of unclear function prior to and during courtship. In some species, female-female competition, expressed as physical fighting, has been reported. Males of Majorcan midwife toads (Alytes muletensis) show phonotactic response to female calls, and females of Iberian midwife toads (Alytes cisternasii) respond differently according to the male call characteristics. In this study, I test the hypothesis of female-female acoustic competition as an additional function of female reciprocal calls. Playback tests indicate that female calls are not clearly involved in female acoustic competition in the Iberian midwife toad, therefore female calls could be directed at males rather than towards competitive females.

  16. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  17. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... ANAUSA.org Connect with us! What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Each heading slides to reveal information. Important ... Acoustic Neuroma Important Points To Know About an Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular ...

  18. Functional coupling of acoustic and chemical signals in the courtship behaviour of the male Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, F; Sureau, G; Aubin, T

    2002-01-01

    During courtship, the male Drosophila melanogaster sends signals to the female through two major sensory channels: chemical and acoustic. These signals are involved in the stimulation of the female to accept copulation. In order to determine the respective importance in the courtship of these signals, their production was controlled using genetical and surgical techniques. Males deprived of the ability to emit both signals are unable to mate, demonstrating that other (e.g. visual or tactile) signals are not sufficient to stimulate the female. If either acoustic or chemical signals are lacking, the courtship success is strongly reduced, the lack of the former having significantly more drastic effects. However, the accelerated matings of males observed with males bearing wild-type hydrocarbons compared with defective ones, whichever the modality of acoustic performance (wing vibration or playback), strongly support the role of cuticular compounds to stimulate females. We can conclude that among the possible factors involved in communication during courtship, acoustic and chemical signals may act in a synergistic way and not separately in D. melanogaster. PMID:11934360

  19. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  20. NPL closes acoustics department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Extance, Andy

    2016-11-01

    The UK's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has withdrawn funding for its acoustics, polymer and thermoelectrics groups, triggering concern among airborne acoustics specialists that the move could undermine the country's noise-management policies.

  1. Identifying the Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  2. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  3. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-17

    under-ice scattering , bathymetric diffraction and the application of the ocean acoustic Parabolic Equation to infrasound. 2. Tasks a. Task 1...QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Figure 10. Estimated reflection coefficient as a function of frequency by taking the difference of downgoing and...OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

  4. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-19

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-093015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...number. 1. REPORT DATE OCT 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2015 to 30-09-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to develop

  5. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies James F. Lynch MS #12...N00014-14-1-0040 http://acoustics.whoi.edu/sw06/ LONG TERM GOALS The long term goals of our shallow water acoustics work are to: 1) understand the...nature of low frequency (10-1500 Hz) acoustic propagation, scattering and noise in shallow water when strong oceanic variability is present in the

  6. Virtual acoustics for music practice rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiheit, Ron

    2003-04-01

    The use of virtual acoustics has provided a new level of practice experience for the musician. By integrating the sound isolation of music practice rooms with the signal processing of an active acoustic system (with time variant-gain before feedback) musicians can now benefit from the experience of practicing in multiple acoustic environments. Musicians select from various acoustics environments from a typical small practice room to that of a large space such as a sports arena. The variability of the acoustic environment allows the musician to hear clearly their intonation and articulation, which may be difficult to discern in a small practice room. To effectively communicate the various acoustics environments, the musicians must be immersed in the sound field of the active acoustics without being able to discern source locations of the speakers. The system must also be able to support the dynamic range of the musicians without presenting artifacts of its own such as system noise or audible distortion. This paper deals with the design constraints needed to meet these requirements as well the antidotal responses from musicians who have used these environments for practice.

  7. Coding Acoustic Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Xie, Boyang; Tang, Kun; Cheng, Hua; Liu, Zhengyou; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Jianguo

    2017-02-01

    Coding acoustic metasurfaces can combine simple logical bits to acquire sophisticated functions in wave control. The acoustic logical bits can achieve a phase difference of exactly π and a perfect match of the amplitudes for the transmitted waves. By programming the coding sequences, acoustic metasurfaces with various functions, including creating peculiar antenna patterns and waves focusing, have been demonstrated.

  8. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  9. Measuring the acoustic response of Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Martín; Marti, Arturo C.; Vogt, Patrik; Kasper, Lutz; Quarthal, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    Many experiments have been proposed to investigate acoustic phenomena in college and early undergraduate levels, in particular the speed of sound,1-9 by means of different methods, such as time of flight, transit time, or resonance in tubes. In this paper we propose to measure the acoustic response curves of a glass beaker filled with different gases, used as an acoustic resonator. We show that these curves expose many interesting peaks and features, one of which matches the resonance peak predicted for a Helmholtz resonator fairly well, and gives a decent estimate for the speed of sound in some cases. The measures are obtained thanks to the capabilities of smartphones.

  10. How Listeners Weight Acoustic Cues to Intonational Phrase Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaohong; Shen, Xiangrong; Li, Weijun; Yang, Yufang

    2014-01-01

    The presence of an intonational phrase boundary is often marked by three major acoustic cues: pause, final lengthening, and pitch reset. The present study investigates how these three acoustic cues are weighted in the perception of intonational phrase boundaries in two experiments. Sentences that contained two intonational phrases with a critical boundary between them were used as the experimental stimuli. The roles of the three acoustic cues at the critical boundary were manipulated in five conditions. The first condition featured none of the acoustic cues. The following three conditions featured only one cue each: pause, final lengthening, and pitch reset, respectively. The fifth condition featured both pause duration and pre-final lengthening. A baseline condition was also included in which all three acoustic cues were preserved intact. Listeners were asked to detect the presence of the critical boundaries in Experiment 1 and judge the strength of the critical boundaries in Experiment 2. The results of both experiments showed that listeners used all three acoustic cues in the perception of prosodic boundaries. More importantly, these acoustic cues were weighted differently across the two experiments: Pause was a more powerful perceptual cue than both final lengthening and pitch reset, with the latter two cues perceptually equivalent; the effect of pause and the effects of the other two acoustic cues were not additive. These results suggest that the weighting of acoustic cues contributes significantly to the perceptual differences of intonational phrase boundary. PMID:25019156

  11. Acoustic emission from composite materials. [nondestructive tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visconti, I. C.; Teti, R.

    1979-01-01

    The two basic areas where the acoustic emission (AE) technique can be applied are materials research and the evaluation of structural reliability. This experimental method leads to a better understanding of fracture mechanisms and is an NDT technique particularly well suited for the study of propagating cracks. Experiments are described in which acoustic emissions were unambiguously correlated with microstructural fracture mechanisms. The advantages and limitations of the AE technique are noted.

  12. Computational and experimental techniques for coupled acoustic/structure interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumali, Anton Hartono; Pierson, Kendall Hugh; Walsh, Timothy Francis; Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn; Reese, Garth M.; Day, David Minot

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results obtained during a one-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative aimed at investigating coupled structural acoustic interactions by means of algorithm development and experiment. Finite element acoustic formulations have been developed based on fluid velocity potential and fluid displacement. Domain decomposition and diagonal scaling preconditioners were investigated for parallel implementation. A formulation that includes fluid viscosity and that can simulate both pressure and shear waves in fluid was developed. An acoustic wave tube was built, tested, and shown to be an effective means of testing acoustic loading on simple test structures. The tube is capable of creating a semi-infinite acoustic field due to nonreflecting acoustic termination at one end. In addition, a micro-torsional disk was created and tested for the purposes of investigating acoustic shear wave damping in microstructures, and the slip boundary conditions that occur along the wet interface when the Knudsen number becomes sufficiently large.

  13. Indoor acoustic gain design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha-Abarca, Justo Andres

    2002-11-01

    The design of sound reinforcement systems includes many variables and usually some of these variables are discussed. There are criteria to optimize the performance of the sound reinforcement systems under indoor conditions. The equivalent acoustic distance, the necessary acoustic gain, and the potential acoustic gain are parameters which must be adjusted with respect to the loudspeaker array, electric power and directionality of loudspeakers, the room acoustics conditions, the distance and distribution of the audience, and the type of the original sources. The design and installation of front of the house and monitoring systems have individual criteria. This article is about this criteria and it proposes general considerations for the indoor acoustic gain design.

  14. 78 FR 19652 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Office of Naval Research Acoustic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... Specified Activities; Office of Naval Research Acoustic Technology Experiments in the Western North Pacific... Acoustic Technology Experiments (ATE) in the western North Pacific Ocean. The Navy's activities are... underwater active acoustic sources are likely to result in the take of marine mammals. Take, by Level...

  15. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J. H.; Teva, J.; Boisen, A.; Davis, Z. J.

    2009-07-20

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10{sup -15} g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise in the currently applied measurement system allows for a minimum detectable mass of 0.5 fg in air.

  16. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, J. H.; Teva, J.; Boisen, A.; Davis, Z. J.

    2009-07-01

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10-15 g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise in the currently applied measurement system allows for a minimum detectable mass of 0.5 fg in air.

  17. Planetary surface research with acoustic sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, C.; Seidensticker, K. J.

    2007-08-01

    Planetary space missions like Rosetta and ExoMars put more and more emphasis on the in-situ investigation of planetary surfaces. The use of mechanical vibrations in the audible frequency range provide a new means to study the structure and properties of the surface layers of terrestrial planets and minor bodies like comets. As the first of this new type of instruments, the Comet Acoustic Surface Sounding Experiment (CASSE) on the Rosetta Lander Philae intends to determine elastic parameters and the structure of the surface layer of the target comet. One drawback of CASSE is unknown possibly weak coupling to the cometary surface. A DFG project is being conducted at the DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt - to test the applicability of planetary penetration instruments like PLUTO, planetary sampling tool, developed for the Mars Express lander Beagle 2, or MUPUS, a heat probe instrument also on Philae, as stronger acoustic sources as well as to develop new methods for the analysis of acoustic data. From the analysis of the polarisation of the recorded acoustic signals it is possible to separate the mixture of different propagating wave types. These identified waves can be used for the determination of mechanical soil properties and near-surface layering. We also will present how acoustic receivers can be used to locate acoustic penetrators or nearby seismic sources using the travel time and/or the polarisation of the acoustic waves.

  18. Acoustic sensor networks for woodpecker localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Chen, C. E.; Ali, A.; Asgari, S.; Hudson, R. E.; Yao, K.; Estrin, D.; Taylor, C.

    2005-08-01

    Sensor network technology can revolutionize the study of animal ecology by providing a means of non-intrusive, simultaneous monitoring of interaction among multiple animals. In this paper, we investigate design, analysis, and testing of acoustic arrays for localizing acorn woodpeckers using their vocalizations. Each acoustic array consists of four microphones arranged in a square. All four audio channels within the same acoustic array are finely synchronized within a few micro seconds. We apply the approximate maximum likelihood (AML) method to synchronized audio channels of each acoustic array for estimating the direction-of-arrival (DOA) of woodpecker vocalizations. The woodpecker location is estimated by applying least square (LS) methods to DOA bearing crossings of multiple acoustic arrays. We have revealed the critical relation between microphone spacing of acoustic arrays and robustness of beamforming of woodpecker vocalizations. Woodpecker localization experiments using robust array element spacing in different types of environments are conducted and compared. Practical issues about calibration of acoustic array orientation are also discussed.

  19. International Space Station Acoustics - A Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    It is important to control acoustic noise aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to provide a satisfactory environment for voice communications, crew productivity, alarm audibility, and restful sleep, and to minimize the risk for temporary and permanent hearing loss. Acoustic monitoring is an important part of the noise control process on ISS, providing critical data for trend analysis, noise exposure analysis, validation of acoustic analyses and predictions, and to provide strong evidence for ensuring crew health and safety, thus allowing Flight Certification. To this purpose, sound level meter (SLM) measurements and acoustic noise dosimetry are routinely performed. And since the primary noise sources on ISS include the environmental control and life support system (fans and airflow) and active thermal control system (pumps and water flow), acoustic monitoring will reveal changes in hardware noise emissions that may indicate system degradation or performance issues. This paper provides the current acoustic levels in the ISS modules and sleep stations and is an update to the status presented in 2011. Since this last status report, many payloads (science experiment hardware) have been added and a significant number of quiet ventilation fans have replaced noisier fans in the Russian Segment. Also, noise mitigation efforts are planned to reduce the noise levels of the T2 treadmill and levels in Node 3, in general. As a result, the acoustic levels on the ISS continue to improve.

  20. Acoustics and Oceanographic Observations Collected During the QPE Experiment by Research Vessels OR1, OR2 and OR3 in the East China Sea in the Summer of 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    OR1, OR2 and OR3 in the East China Sea in the Summer of 2009 by Arthur E. Newhall1, James F. Lynch1, Glen G. Gawarkiewicz1, Timothy F. Duda1, Neil M...Vessels OR1, OR2, and OR3 in the East China Sea in the Summer of 2009 Arthur E. Newhall, James F. Lynch, Glen G. Gawarkiewicz,  Timothy F. Duda, Neil M...number: N00014­08­1­0763 Keywords:   QPE experiment and mooring information   acoustic and oceanography data in the East China  Sea   quantifying

  1. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  2. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  3. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius.

  4. Acoustic Seaglider: PhilSea10 Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    understanding that the navigation and the ocean sound speed and currents be jointly determined. LONG-TERM GOALS Within the Ocean Acoustics Deep Water... temperature and salinity were deployed (Figure 1). General objectives of the experiment are to understand the acoustic propagation in the...an acoustic recording system (ARS) to record the moored source transmissions, as well as temperature , salinity and pressure sensors (from which

  5. Acoustic Microfluidics for Bioanalytical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Gabriel

    2013-03-01

    This talk will present new methods the use of ultrasonic standing waves in microfluidic systems to manipulate microparticles for the purpose of bioassays and bioseparations. We have recently developed multi-node acoustic focusing flow cells that can position particles into many parallel flow streams and have demonstrated the potential of such flow cells in the development of high throughput, parallel flow cytometers. These experiments show the potential for the creation of high throughput flow cytometers in applications requiring high flow rates and rapid detection of rare cells. This talk will also present the development of elastomeric capture microparticles and their use in acoustophoretic separations. We have developed simple methods to form elastomeric particles that are surface functionalized with biomolecular recognition reagents. These compressible particles exhibit negative acoustic contrast in ultrasound when suspended in aqueous media, blood serum or diluted blood. These particles can be continuously separated from cells by flowing them through a microfluidic device that uses an ultrasonic standing wave to align the blood cells, which exhibit positive acoustic contrast, at a node in the acoustic pressure distribution while aligning the negative acoustic contrast elastomeric particles at the antinodes. Laminar flow of the separated particles to downstream collection ports allows for collection of the separated negative contrast particles and cells. Separated elastomeric particles were analyzed via flow cytometry to demonstrate nanomolar detection for prostate specific antigen in aqueous buffer and picomolar detection for IgG in plasma and diluted blood samples. This approach has potential applications in the development of rapid assays that detect the presence of low concentrations of biomarkers (including biomolecules and cells) in a number of biological sample types. We acknowledge support through the NSF Research Triangle MRSEC.

  6. Broadband acoustic cloak for ultrasound waves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Xia, Chunguang; Fang, Nicholas

    2011-01-14

    Invisibility devices based on coordinate transformation have opened up a new field of considerable interest. We present here the first practical realization of a low-loss and broadband acoustic cloak for underwater ultrasound. This metamaterial cloak is constructed with a network of acoustic circuit elements, namely, serial inductors and shunt capacitors. Our experiment clearly shows that the acoustic cloak can effectively bend the ultrasound waves around the hidden object, with reduced scattering and shadow. Because of the nonresonant nature of the building elements, this low-loss (∼6  dB/m) cylindrical cloak exhibits invisibility over a broad frequency range from 52 to 64 kHz. Furthermore, our experimental study indicates that this design approach should be scalable to different acoustic frequencies and offers the possibility for a variety of devices based on coordinate transformation.

  7. Reconfigurable origami-inspired acoustic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Babaee, Sahab; Overvelde, Johannes T B; Chen, Elizabeth R; Tournat, Vincent; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-11-01

    We combine numerical simulations and experiments to design a new class of reconfigurable waveguides based on three-dimensional origami-inspired metamaterials. Our strategy builds on the fact that the rigid plates and hinges forming these structures define networks of tubes that can be easily reconfigured. As such, they provide an ideal platform to actively control and redirect the propagation of sound. We design reconfigurable systems that, depending on the externally applied deformation, can act as networks of waveguides oriented along one, two, or three preferential directions. Moreover, we demonstrate that the capability of the structure to guide and radiate acoustic energy along predefined directions can be easily switched on and off, as the networks of tubes are reversibly formed and disrupted. The proposed designs expand the ability of existing acoustic metamaterials and exploit complex waveguiding to enhance control over propagation and radiation of acoustic energy, opening avenues for the design of a new class of tunable acoustic functional systems.

  8. Drag Measurements of Porous Plate Acoustic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolter, John D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of direct drag measurements on a variety of porous plate acoustic liners. The existing literature describes numerous studies of drag on porous walls with injection or suction, but relatively few of drag on porous plates with neither injection nor suction. Furthermore, the porosity of the porous plate in existing studies is much lower than typically used in acoustic liners. In the present work, the acoustic liners consisted of a perforated face sheet covering a bulk acoustic absorber material. Factors that were varied in the experiment were hole diameter, hole pattern, face sheet thickness, bulk material type, and size of the gap (if any) between the face sheet and the absorber material.

  9. Reconfigurable origami-inspired acoustic waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Babaee, Sahab; Overvelde, Johannes T. B.; Chen, Elizabeth R.; Tournat, Vincent; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    We combine numerical simulations and experiments to design a new class of reconfigurable waveguides based on three-dimensional origami-inspired metamaterials. Our strategy builds on the fact that the rigid plates and hinges forming these structures define networks of tubes that can be easily reconfigured. As such, they provide an ideal platform to actively control and redirect the propagation of sound. We design reconfigurable systems that, depending on the externally applied deformation, can act as networks of waveguides oriented along one, two, or three preferential directions. Moreover, we demonstrate that the capability of the structure to guide and radiate acoustic energy along predefined directions can be easily switched on and off, as the networks of tubes are reversibly formed and disrupted. The proposed designs expand the ability of existing acoustic metamaterials and exploit complex waveguiding to enhance control over propagation and radiation of acoustic energy, opening avenues for the design of a new class of tunable acoustic functional systems. PMID:28138527

  10. Development of the seafloor acoustic ranging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Y.; Kido, M.; Fujimoto, H.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a seafloor acoustic ranging system, which simulates an operation with the DONET (Development of Dense Ocean-floor Network System for Earthquake and Tsunami) cable, to monitor seafloor crustal movement. The seafloor acoustic ranging system was based on the precise acoustic transponder (PXP). We have a few problems for the improvement of the resolution. One thing is the variation of sound speed. Another is the bending of ray path. A PXP measures horizontal distances on the seafloor from the round trip travel times of acoustic pulses between pairs of PXP. The PXP was equipped with the pressure, temperature gauge and tilt-meter. The variation of sound speed in seawater has a direct effect on the measurement. Therefore we collect the data of temperature and pressure. But we don't collect the data of salinity because of less influence than temperature and pressure. Accordingly a ray path of acoustic wave tends to be bent upward in the deep sea due to the Snell's law. As the acoustic transducer of each PXPs held about 3.0m above the seafloor, the baseline is too long for altitude from the seafloor. In this year we carried out the experiment for the seafloor acoustic ranging system. We deployed two PXPs at about 750m spacing on Kumano-nada. The water depth is about 2050m. We collected the 660 data in this experiment during one day. The round trip travel time show the variation with peak-to-peak amplitude of about 0.03msec. It was confirmed to explain the majority in this change by the change in sound speed according to the temperature and pressure. This results shows the resolution of acoustic measurements is +/-2mm. Acknowledgement This study is supported by 'DONET' of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

  11. Nearfield Acoustical Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Sabih I.

    Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is a method by which a set of acoustic pressure measurements at points located on a specific surface (called a hologram) can be used to image sources on vibrating surfaces on the acoustic field in three-dimensional space. NAH data are processed to take advantage of the evanescent wavefield to image sources that are separated less that one-eighth of a wavelength.

  12. Deep Water Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-28

    Estimates of basin-wide sound speed ( temperature ) fields obtained by the combination of acoustic, altimetry, and other data types with ocean...of acoustic coherence at long ranges in the ocean. Estimates of basin-wide sound speed ( temperature ) fields obtained by the combination of acoustic...index.html Award Number N00014-13-1-0053 LONG-TERM GOALS The ultimate limitations to the performance of long-range sonar are due to ocean sound speed

  13. Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-14

    Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD Tam Nguyen 2531 Jefferson Davis Hwy Arlington, VA 22242 phone: (703) 604-6013 ext 520 fax: (703) 604-6056...email: NguyenTL@navsea.navy.mil Award # N0001499PD30007 LONG-TERM GOALS The goal of the recently completed Acoustic Communications Advanced...Technology Demonstration program (ACOMMS ATD) was to demonstrate long range and moderate data rate underwater acoustic communications between a submarine

  14. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-043016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to...improve our understanding. During the past few years, the physics effects studied have been three-dimensional propagation on global scales, deep water

  15. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  16. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-07

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  17. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  18. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  19. An acoustic emission study of plastic deformation in polycrystalline aluminium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Frederick, J. R.; Felbeck, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic emission experiments were performed on polycrystalline and single crystal 99.99% aluminum while undergoing tensile deformation. It was found that acoustic emission counts as a function of grain size showed a maximum value at a particular grain size. Furthermore, the slip area associated with this particular grain size corresponded to the threshold level of detectability of single dislocation slip events. The rate of decline in acoustic emission activity as grain size is increased beyond the peak value suggests that grain boundary associated dislocation sources are giving rise to the bulk of the detected acoustic emissions.

  20. Hemispheric specialization in dogs for processing different acoustic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Siniscalchi, Marcello; Quaranta, Angelo; Rogers, Lesley J

    2008-01-01

    Considerable experimental evidence shows that functional cerebral asymmetries are widespread in animals. Activity of the right cerebral hemisphere has been associated with responses to novel stimuli and the expression of intense emotions, such as aggression, escape behaviour and fear. The left hemisphere uses learned patterns and responds to familiar stimuli. Although such lateralization has been studied mainly for visual responses, there is evidence in primates that auditory perception is lateralized and that vocal communication depends on differential processing by the hemispheres. The aim of the present work was to investigate whether dogs use different hemispheres to process different acoustic stimuli by presenting them with playbacks of a thunderstorm and their species-typical vocalizations. The results revealed that dogs usually process their species-typical vocalizations using the left hemisphere and the thunderstorm sounds using the right hemisphere. Nevertheless, conspecific vocalizations are not always processed by the left hemisphere, since the right hemisphere is used for processing vocalizations when they elicit intense emotion, including fear. These findings suggest that the specialisation of the left hemisphere for intraspecific communication is more ancient that previously thought, and so is specialisation of the right hemisphere for intense emotions.

  1. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy for the advanced undergraduate laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Villafañe, J. A.; Flores-Olmedo, E.; Báez, G.; Gandarilla-Carrillo, O.; Méndez-Sánchez, R. A.

    2012-11-01

    We present a simple experiment that allows advanced undergraduates to learn the principles and applications of spectroscopy. The technique, known as acoustic resonance spectroscopy, is applied to study a vibrating rod. The setup includes electromagnetic-acoustic transducers, an audio amplifier and a vector network analyzer. Typical results of compressional, torsional and bending waves are analyzed and compared with analytical results.

  2. Ocean Dynamics and Acoustic Variability in East China Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Ocean ...N00014-13-1-0510 http://scrippsscholars.ucsd.edu/hcsong LONG TERM GOALS Study the effects of ocean dynamics on acoustic propagation and underwater...communication in the region of East China Sea (ECS). OBJECTIVE Conduct a joint shallow water acoustic experiment with KIOST (Korea Institute of Ocean

  3. Humanitarian mine detection by acoustic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-03-01

    The JASON Committee at MITRE Corp. was tasked by DARPA to inquire into suitable technologies for humanitarian mine detection. Acoustic resonance was one of the very few technologies that the JASONs determined might be promising for the task, but was as yet unexplored at the time that they conducted their inquiry. The objective of this Seed Money investigation into acoustic resonance was to determine if it would be feasible to use acoustic resonance to provide an improvement to present methods for humanitarian mine detection. As detailed in this report, acoustic resonance methods do not appear to be feasible for this task. Although acoustic resonant responses are relatively easy to detect when they exist, they are very difficult to excite by the non-contact means that must be used for buried objects. Despite many different attempts, this research did not discover any practical means of using sound to excite resonant responses in objects known to have strong resonances. The shaker table experiments did see an effect that might be attributable to the resonance of the object under test, but the effect was weak, and exploited the a priori knowledge of the resonant frequency of the object under test to distinguish it from the background. If experiments that used objects known to have strong acoustic resonances produced such marginal results, this does not seem to be a practical method to detect objects with weak resonances or non-existent resonances. The results of this work contribute to the ORNL countermine initiative. ORNL is exploring several unconventional mine detection technologies, and is proposed to explore others. Since this research has discovered some major pitfalls in non-metallic mine detection, this experience will add realism to other strategies proposed for mine detection technologies. The experiment provided hands-on experience with inert plastic mines under field conditions, and gives ORNL additional insight into the problems of developing practical

  4. Bioeffects due to acoustic droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulated micro- and nano-droplets can be vaporized via ultrasound, a process termed acoustic droplet vaporization. Our interest is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular microdroplets. Additionally, the microdroplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Early timescale vaporization events, including phase change, are directly visualized using ultra-high speed imaging, and the influence of acoustic parameters on droplet/bubble dynamics is discussed. Acoustic and fluid mechanics parameters affecting the severity of endothelial cell bioeffects are explored. These findings suggest parameter spaces for which bioeffects may be reduced or enhanced, depending on the objective of the therapy. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  5. The Acoustical Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melissa

    Asserting that without an adequate acoustical environment, learning activities can be hindered, this paper reviews the literature on classroom acoustics, particularly noise, reverberation, signal-to-noise ratio, task performance, and recommendations for improvement. Through this review, the paper seeks to determine whether portable classrooms…

  6. Cystic acoustic schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, P; Missori, P; Mastronardi, L; Fortuna, A

    1991-01-01

    Three cases with large space-occupying cysts in the cerebellopontine angle are reported. CT and MRI findings were not typical for acoustic schwannomas but at operation, besides the large cysts, small acoustic schwannomas could be detected and removed. The clinical and neuroradiological features of this unusual variety and the CT and MRI differential diagnosis of cerebellopontine angle lesions are discussed.

  7. Acoustic Noise Prediction of the Amine Swingbed ISS ExPRESS Rack Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, David; Smith, Holly; Wang, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Acoustics plays a vital role in maintaining the health, safety, and comfort of crew members aboard the International Space Station (ISS). In order to maintain this livable and workable environment, acoustic requirements have been established to ensure that ISS hardware and payload developers account for the acoustic emissions of their equipment and develop acoustic mitigations as necessary. These requirements are verified by an acoustic emissions test of the integrated hardware. The Amine Swingbed ExPRESS (Expedite the PRocessing of ExperimentS to Space) rack payload creates a unique challenge to the developers in that the payload hardware is transported to the ISS in phases, making an acoustic emissions test on the integrated flight hardware impossible. In addition, the payload incorporates a high back pressure fan and a diaphragm vacuum pump, which are recognized as significant and complex noise sources. In order to accurately predict the acoustic emissions of the integrated payload, the individual acoustic noise sources and paths are first characterized. These characterizations are conducted though a series of acoustic emissions tests on the individual payload components. Secondly, the individual acoustic noise sources and paths are incorporated into a virtual model of the integrated hardware. The virtual model is constructed with the use of hybrid method utilizing the Finite Element Acoustic (FEA) and Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) techniques, which predict the overall acoustic emissions. Finally, the acoustic model is validated though an acoustic characterization test performed on an acoustically similar mock-up of the flight unit. The results of the validated acoustic model are then used to assess the acoustic emissions of the flight unit and define further acoustic mitigation efforts.

  8. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  9. Acoustic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic levitation system is described, with single acoustic source and a small reflector to stably levitate a small object while the object is processed as by coating or heating it. The system includes a concave acoustic source which has locations on opposite sides of its axis that vibrate towards and away from a focal point to generate a converging acoustic field. A small reflector is located near the focal point, and preferably slightly beyond it, to create an intense acoustic field that stably supports a small object near the reflector. The reflector is located about one-half wavelength from the focal point and is concavely curved to a radius of curvature (L) of about one-half the wavelength, to stably support an object one-quarter wavelength (N) from the reflector.

  10. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  11. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  12. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  13. Direct Field Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Paul; Goldstein, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the methods and procedures used in Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT). The paper will discuss some of the recent techniques and developments that are currently being used and the future publication of a reference standard. Acoustic testing using commercial sound system components is becoming a popular and cost effective way of generating a required acoustic test environment both in and out of a reverberant chamber. This paper will present the DFAT test method, the usual setup and procedure and the development and use of a closed-loop, narrow-band control system. Narrow-band control of the acoustic PSD allows all standard techniques and procedures currently used in random control to be applied to acoustics and some examples are given. The paper will conclude with a summary of the development of a standard practice guideline that is hoped to be available in the first quarter of next year.

  14. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-03-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  15. Distributed acoustic sensing with Michelson interferometer demodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Chen; Shang, Ying; Wang, Chang; Zhao, Wenan; Peng, Gangding; Wang, Hongzhong

    2016-12-01

    The distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) has been extensively studied and widely used. A distributed acoustic sensing system based on the unbalanced Michelson interferometer with phase generated carrier (PGC) demodulation was designed and tested. The system could directly obtain the phase, amplitude, frequency response, and location information of sound wave at the same time and measurement at all points along the sensing fiber simultaneously. Experiments showed that the system successfully measured the acoustic signals with a phase-pressure sensitivity about-148 dB (re rad/μPa) and frequency response ripple less than 1.5 dB. The further field experiment showed that the system could measure signals at all points along the sensing fiber simultaneously.

  16. Particle Cloud Flames in Acoustic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlad, A. L.; Tangirala, V.; Ross, H.; Facca, L.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on a study of flames supported by clouds of particles suspended in air, at pressures about 100 times lower than normal. In the experiment, an acoustic driver (4-in speaker) placed at one end of a closed tube, 0.75-m long and 0.05 m in diameter, disperses a cloud of lycopodium particles during a 0.5-sec powerful acoustic burst. Properties of the particle cloud and the flame were recorded by high-speed motion pictures and optical transmission detectors. Novel flame structures were observed, which owe their features to partial confinement, which encourages flame-acoustic interactions, segregation of particle clouds into laminae, and penetration of the flame's radiative flux density into the unburned particle-cloud regimes. Results of these experiments imply that, for particles in confined spaces, uncontrolled fire and explosion may be a threat even if the Phi(0) values are below some apparent lean limit.

  17. Design and evaluation of a higher-order spherical microphone/ambisonic sound reproduction system for the acoustical assessment of concert halls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Samuel W.

    Previous studies of the perception of concert hall acoustics have generally employed two methods for soliciting listeners' judgments. One method is to have listeners rate the sound in a hall while physically present in that hall. The other method is to make recordings of different halls and seat positions, and then recreate the environment for listeners in a laboratory setting via loudspeakers or headphones. In situ evaluations offer a completely faithful rendering of all aspects of the concert hall experience. However, many variables cannot be controlled and the short duration of auditory memory precludes an objective comparison of different spaces. Simulation studies allow for more control over various aspects of the evaluations, as well as A/B comparisons of different halls and seat positions. The drawback is that all simulation methods suffer from limitations in the accuracy of reproduction. If the accuracy of the simulation system is improved, then the advantages of the simulation method can be retained, while mitigating its disadvantages. Spherical microphone array technology has received growing interest in the acoustics community in recent years for many applications including beamforming, source localization, and other forms of three-dimensional sound field analysis. These arrays can decompose a measured sound field into its spherical harmonic components, the spherical harmonics being a set of spatial basis functions on the sphere that are derived from solving the wave equation in spherical coordinates. Ambisonics is a system for two- and three-dimensional spatialized sound that is based on recreating a sound field from its spherical harmonic components. Because of these shared mathematical underpinnings, ambisonics provides a natural way to present fully spatialized renderings of recordings made with a spherical microphone array. Many of the previously studied applications of spherical microphone arrays have used a narrow frequency range where the array

  18. Considerations on the acoustic energy radiated by toothed gears. [model for calculating noise intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popinceanu, N. G.; Kremmer, I.

    1974-01-01

    A mechano-acoustic model is reported for calculating acoustic energy radiated by a working gear. According to this model, a gear is an acoustic coublet formed of the two wheels. The wheel teeth generate cylindrical acoustic waves while the front surfaces of the teeth behave like vibrating pistons. Theoretical results are checked experimentally and good agreement is obtained with open gears. The experiments show that the air noise effect is negligible as compared with the structural noise transmitted to the gear box.

  19. Comparison of multi-microphone transfer matrix measurements with acoustic network models of swirl burners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, A.; Hirsch, C.; Sattelmayer, T.

    2006-11-01

    Utilizing the close analogy between electronic circuits and ducted acoustic systems, mathematical methods originally developed for the characterization of electronic networks are applied to the experimental acoustic plane wave characterization of swirl burners with complex geometries. The experiments presented in the paper show that the acoustic behavior of swirl generators can be quantitatively evaluated treating them as acoustic two-ports. Such acoustic two-ports are presented in forms of transfer-, scattering- and mobility matrices of the element. In the acoustic burner study dynamic pressure measurements were made at several locations of a tubular combustor test rig for two acoustically independent states, which were generated by forcing with sirens at the opposite ends of the setup. The technique for the experimental evaluation of acoustic transfer matrices of complex geometries on the basis of these dynamic pressure measurements is illustrated. As an alternative to the experiment, the evaluation of the acoustic behavior of acoustic systems is assessed using acoustic networks consisting of simple acoustic elements like ducts, bends, junctions and sudden area changes with transfer matrices, which are derived from first principles. In the paper, a network model representing the transfer characteristics of swirl burners is presented and compared with the previously measured transfer matrices. Although the burner geometry is rather complex, its acoustic behavior can be successfully mapped to a network consisting of a serial connection of nine elements with only minor adjustment of one parameter.

  20. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  1. Acoustic sniper localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  2. Nonlinear acoustic fields in acoustic metamaterial based on a cylindrical pipe with periodically arranged side holes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Ge, Huan; Zhang, Shu-yi; Gao, Hai-fei; Liu, Yong-hui; Zhang, Hui

    2013-06-01

    Nonlinear acoustic fields in transmission-line acoustic metamaterials based on a cylindrical pipe with periodically arranged side holes are studied, in which the dispersions and characteristic parameters of the nonlinear acoustic waves are obtained with the Bloch theory, and meanwhile the distributions of the fundamental wave (FW) and second harmonic wave (SHW) in the metamaterial are simulated. Three characteristic frequency bands are defined according to the relations between the frequencies of the FW, SHW, and the low-frequency forbidden band (LFB) in the metamaterial. Especially, when the FW is in the LFB while the SHW is outside the LFB, the SHW can transmit through the metamaterial although the FW is blocked, which exhibits the possibility to extract the information from the SHW instead of the FW. In addition, experiments are carried out to measure the distributions of the acoustic pressures for the FW and SHW along the metamaterial and the experimental results are in agreement with the theory.

  3. The acoustic monopole in motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norum, T. D.; Liu, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    The results of an experiment are presented in which a small monochromatic source which behaves like an acoustic monopole when stationary is moved at a constant speed over an asphalt surface past stationary microphones. An analysis of the monopole moving above a finite impedance reflecting plane is given. The theoretical and experimental results are compared for different ground to observer heights, source frequencies, and source velocities. A computation of the effects of source acceleration on the noise radiated by the monopole is also presented.

  4. OpenSesame: an open-source, graphical experiment builder for the social sciences.

    PubMed

    Mathôt, Sebastiaan; Schreij, Daniel; Theeuwes, Jan

    2012-06-01

    In the present article, we introduce OpenSesame, a graphical experiment builder for the social sciences. OpenSesame is free, open-source, and cross-platform. It features a comprehensive and intuitive graphical user interface and supports Python scripting for complex tasks. Additional functionality, such as support for eyetrackers, input devices, and video playback, is available through plug-ins. OpenSesame can be used in combination with existing software for creating experiments.

  5. The room acoustic rendering equation.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Lokki, Tapio; Kiminki, Sami; Savioja, Lauri

    2007-09-01

    An integral equation generalizing a variety of known geometrical room acoustics modeling algorithms is presented. The formulation of the room acoustic rendering equation is adopted from computer graphics. Based on the room acoustic rendering equation, an acoustic radiance transfer method, which can handle both diffuse and nondiffuse reflections, is derived. In a case study, the method is used to predict several acoustic parameters of a room model. The results are compared to measured data of the actual room and to the results given by other acoustics prediction software. It is concluded that the method can predict most acoustic parameters reliably and provides results as accurate as current commercial room acoustic prediction software. Although the presented acoustic radiance transfer method relies on geometrical acoustics, it can be extended to model diffraction and transmission through materials in future.

  6. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  7. Acoustic well cleaner

    DOEpatents

    Maki, Jr., Voldi E.; Sharma, Mukul M.

    1997-01-21

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

  8. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  9. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  10. Magneto-acoustic imaging by continuous-wave excitation.

    PubMed

    Shunqi, Zhang; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Tao, Yin; Zhipeng, Liu

    2017-04-01

    The electrical characteristics of tissue yield valuable information for early diagnosis of pathological changes. Magneto-acoustic imaging is a functional approach for imaging of electrical conductivity. This study proposes a continuous-wave magneto-acoustic imaging method. A kHz-range continuous signal with an amplitude range of several volts is used to excite the magneto-acoustic signal and improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The magneto-acoustic signal amplitude and phase are measured to locate the acoustic source via lock-in technology. An optimisation algorithm incorporating nonlinear equations is used to reconstruct the magneto-acoustic source distribution based on the measured amplitude and phase at various frequencies. Validation simulations and experiments were performed in pork samples. The experimental and simulation results agreed well. While the excitation current was reduced to 10 mA, the acoustic signal magnitude increased up to 10(-7) Pa. Experimental reconstruction of the pork tissue showed that the image resolution reached mm levels when the excitation signal was in the kHz range. The signal-to-noise ratio of the detected magneto-acoustic signal was improved by more than 25 dB at 5 kHz when compared to classical 1 MHz pulse excitation. The results reported here will aid further research into magneto-acoustic generation mechanisms and internal tissue conductivity imaging.

  11. Advances in Geometric Acoustic Propagation Modeling Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, P. S.; Arrowsmith, S.

    2013-12-01

    Geometric acoustics provides an efficient numerical method to model propagation effects. At leading order, one can identify ensonified regions and calculate celerities of the predicted arrivals. Beyond leading order, the solution of the transport equation provides a means to estimate the amplitude of individual acoustic phases. The auxiliary parameters introduced in solving the transport equation have been found to provide a means of identifying ray paths connecting source and receiver, or eigenrays, for non-planar propagation. A detailed explanation of the eigenray method will be presented as well as an application to predicting azimuth deviations for infrasonic data recorded during the Humming Roadrunner experiment of 2012.

  12. Omnidirectional broadband acoustic deflector based on metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Liang, Bin; Zou, Xin-ye; Yang, Jing; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2017-02-01

    We report a theoretical, numerical, and experimental work on the design of an omnidirectional acoustic deflector capable of redirecting an incident wave to propagate along a predesigned direction over a broad frequency range, regardless of the incidence angle. An implementation by metamaterials is demonstrated both in simulation and experiment, with both showing the effectiveness of our scheme as long as the effective medium approximation stands. With the capability of omnidirectional broadband deflection and the flexibility of a controllable tuning angle, our design opens a route to the development of wave-steering devices and has great application potentials in various situations such as on-chip acoustic manipulations.

  13. Acoustic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  14. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  15. Acoustic borehole logging

    SciTech Connect

    Medlin, W.L.; Manzi, S.J.

    1990-10-09

    This patent describes an acoustic borehole logging method. It comprises traversing a borehole with a borehole logging tool containing a transmitter of acoustic energy having a free-field frequency spectrum with at least one characteristic resonant frequency of vibration and spaced-apart receiver, repeatedly exciting the transmitter with a swept frequency tone burst of a duration sufficiently greater than the travel time of acoustic energy between the transmitter and the receiver to allow borehole cavity resonances to be established within the borehole cavity formed between the borehole logging tool and the borehole wall, detecting acoustic energy amplitude modulated by the borehole cavity resonances with the spaced-apart receiver, and recording an amplitude verses frequency output of the receiver in correlation with depth as a log of the borehole frequency spectrum representative of the subsurface formation comprising the borehole wall.

  16. Acoustic imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Tool detects noise sources by scanning sound "scene" and displaying relative location of noise-producing elements in area. System consists of ellipsoidal acoustic mirror and microphone and a display device.

  17. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  18. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  19. Acoustic bubble traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Reinhard; Kurz, Thomas; Lauterborn, Werner

    2000-07-01

    A small, oscillating bubble in a liquid can be trapped in the antinode of an acoustic standing wave field. Bubble stability is required for the study of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). The properties of the acoustic resonator are essential for the stable trapping of sonoluminescing bubbles. Resonators can be chosen according to the intended application: size and geometry can be varied in a wide range. In this work, the acoustic responses of different resonators were measured by means of holographic interferometry, hydrophones and a laser vibrometer. Also, high-speed photography was used to observe the bubble dynamics. Several single, stable sonoluminescent bubbles were trapped simultaneously within an acoustic resonator in the pressure antinodes of a higher harmonic mode (few bubble sonoluminescence, FBSL).

  20. Department of Cybernetic Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The development of the theory, instrumentation and applications of methods and systems for the measurement, analysis, processing and synthesis of acoustic signals within the audio frequency range, particularly of the speech signal and the vibro-acoustic signal emitted by technical and industrial equipments treated as noise and vibration sources was discussed. The research work, both theoretical and experimental, aims at applications in various branches of science, and medicine, such as: acoustical diagnostics and phoniatric rehabilitation of pathological and postoperative states of the speech organ; bilateral ""man-machine'' speech communication based on the analysis, recognition and synthesis of the speech signal; vibro-acoustical diagnostics and continuous monitoring of the state of machines, technical equipments and technological processes.

  1. Basic Linear Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Alan D.

    This chapter deals with the physical and mathematical aspects of sound when the disturbances are, in some sense, small. Acoustics is usually concerned with small-amplitude phenomena, and consequently a linear description is usually acoustics applicable. Disturbances are governed by the properties of the medium in which they occur, and the governing equations are the equations of continuum mechanics, which apply equally to gases, liquids, and solids. These include the mass, momentum, and energy equations, as well as thermodynamic principles. The viscosity and thermal conduction enter into the versions of these equations that apply to fluids. Fluids of typical great interest are air and sea water, and consequently this chapter includes a summary of their relevant acoustic properties. The foundation is also laid for the consideration of acoustic waves in elastic solids, suspensions, bubbly liquids, and porous media.

  2. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  3. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... this sponsor... Platinum Sponsor More from this sponsor... Gold Sponsor University of Colorado Acoustic Neuroma Program Rocky Mountain Gamma Knife Center More from this sponsor... Gold Sponsor NYU Langone Medical Center Departments of Neurosurgery ...

  4. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-11-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell’s law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  5. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-11-24

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  6. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  7. The neonatal acoustic reflex.

    PubMed

    Weatherby, L A; Bennett, M J

    1980-01-01

    Probe tones from 220 Hz to 2 000 Hz were used to measure the static and dynamic acoustic impedance of 44 neonates. Acoustic reflex thresholds to broad band noise were obtained from every neonate tested when employing the higher frequency probe tones. The reflex threshold levels measured are similar to those of adults. The static impedance values are discussed to give a possible explanation of why reflex thresholds cannot be detected using conventional 220 Hz impedance bridges.

  8. Directional Acoustic Density Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-13

    fluctuations of fluid density at a point . (2) DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART [0004] Conventional vector sensors measure particle velocity, v (vx,Vytvz...dipole-type or first order sensor that is realized by measuring particle velocity at a point , (which is the vector sensor sensing approach for...underwater sensors), or by measuring the gradient of the acoustic pressure at two closely spaced (less than the wavelength of an acoustic wave) points as it

  9. Low Frequency Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    with NOAA , ONR is providing technical services that will help establish a baseline for assessment of long- term VLF acoustic trends in selected...ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 sponsored by NOAA , was added to the...with NOAA (NMFS) and other parties has dealt with ocean acoustics related to issues stimulated by the Marine Mammal Protection Act. A focal point has

  10. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  11. Scaling and dimensional analysis of acoustic streaming jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moudjed, B.; Botton, V.; Henry, D.; Ben Hadid, H.; Garandet, J.-P.

    2014-09-01

    This paper focuses on acoustic streaming free jets. This is to say that progressive acoustic waves are used to generate a steady flow far from any wall. The derivation of the governing equations under the form of a nonlinear hydrodynamics problem coupled with an acoustic propagation problem is made on the basis of a time scale discrimination approach. This approach is preferred to the usually invoked amplitude perturbations expansion since it is consistent with experimental observations of acoustic streaming flows featuring hydrodynamic nonlinearities and turbulence. Experimental results obtained with a plane transducer in water are also presented together with a review of the former experimental investigations using similar configurations. A comparison of the shape of the acoustic field with the shape of the velocity field shows that diffraction is a key ingredient in the problem though it is rarely accounted for in the literature. A scaling analysis is made and leads to two scaling laws for the typical velocity level in acoustic streaming free jets; these are both observed in our setup and in former studies by other teams. We also perform a dimensional analysis of this problem: a set of seven dimensionless groups is required to describe a typical acoustic experiment. We find that a full similarity is usually not possible between two acoustic streaming experiments featuring different fluids. We then choose to relax the similarity with respect to sound attenuation and to focus on the case of a scaled water experiment representing an acoustic streaming application in liquid metals, in particular, in liquid silicon and in liquid sodium. We show that small acoustic powers can yield relatively high Reynolds numbers and velocity levels; this could be a virtue for heat and mass transfer applications, but a drawback for ultrasonic velocimetry.

  12. Scaling and dimensional analysis of acoustic streaming jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moudjed, B.; Botton, V.; Henry, D.; Ben Hadid, H.

    2014-09-15

    This paper focuses on acoustic streaming free jets. This is to say that progressive acoustic waves are used to generate a steady flow far from any wall. The derivation of the governing equations under the form of a nonlinear hydrodynamics problem coupled with an acoustic propagation problem is made on the basis of a time scale discrimination approach. This approach is preferred to the usually invoked amplitude perturbations expansion since it is consistent with experimental observations of acoustic streaming flows featuring hydrodynamic nonlinearities and turbulence. Experimental results obtained with a plane transducer in water are also presented together with a review of the former experimental investigations using similar configurations. A comparison of the shape of the acoustic field with the shape of the velocity field shows that diffraction is a key ingredient in the problem though it is rarely accounted for in the literature. A scaling analysis is made and leads to two scaling laws for the typical velocity level in acoustic streaming free jets; these are both observed in our setup and in former studies by other teams. We also perform a dimensional analysis of this problem: a set of seven dimensionless groups is required to describe a typical acoustic experiment. We find that a full similarity is usually not possible between two acoustic streaming experiments featuring different fluids. We then choose to relax the similarity with respect to sound attenuation and to focus on the case of a scaled water experiment representing an acoustic streaming application in liquid metals, in particular, in liquid silicon and in liquid sodium. We show that small acoustic powers can yield relatively high Reynolds numbers and velocity levels; this could be a virtue for heat and mass transfer applications, but a drawback for ultrasonic velocimetry.

  13. Student design projects in applied acoustics.

    PubMed

    Bös, Joachim; Moritz, Karsten; Skowronek, Adam; Thyes, Christian; Tschesche, Johannes; Hanselka, Holger

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a series of student projects which are intended to complement theoretical education in acoustics and engineering noise control with practical experience. The projects are also intended to enhance the students' ability to work in a team, to manage a project, and to present their results. The projects are carried out in close cooperation with industrial partners so that the students can get a taste of the professional life of noise control engineers. The organization of such a project, its execution, and some of the results from the most recent student project are presented as a demonstrative example. This latest project involved the creation of noise maps of a production hall, the acoustic analysis of a packaging machine, and the acoustic analysis of a spiral vibratory conveyor. Upon completion of the analysis, students then designed, applied, and verified some simple preliminary noise reduction measures to demonstrate the potential of these techniques.

  14. Experiments with Ultrasonic Transducers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas R., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the use of 40 kHz ultrasonic transducers to study wave phenomena. Determines that the resulting wavelength of 9 mm allows acoustic experiments to be performed on a tabletop. Includes transducer characteristics and activities on speed of sound, reflection, double- and single-slit diffraction, standing waves, acoustical zone plate, and…

  15. The Japanese containerless experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azuma, Hisao

    1990-01-01

    There are three sets of Japanese containerless experiments. The first is Drop dynamics research. It consists of acoustic levitation and large amplitude drop oscillation. The second is Optical materials processing in an acoustic levitation furnace. And the third is Electrostatic levitator development by two different Japanese companies.

  16. Acoustic and Categorical Dissimilarity of Musical Timbre: Evidence from Asymmetries Between Acoustic and Chimeric Sounds.

    PubMed

    Siedenburg, Kai; Jones-Mollerup, Kiray; McAdams, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of acoustic and categorical information in timbre dissimilarity ratings. Using a Gammatone-filterbank-based sound transformation, we created tones that were rated as less familiar than recorded tones from orchestral instruments and that were harder to associate with an unambiguous sound source (Experiment 1). A subset of transformed tones, a set of orchestral recordings, and a mixed set were then rated on pairwise dissimilarity (Experiment 2A). We observed that recorded instrument timbres clustered into subsets that distinguished timbres according to acoustic and categorical properties. For the subset of cross-category comparisons in the mixed set, we observed asymmetries in the distribution of ratings, as well as a stark decay of inter-rater agreement. These effects were replicated in a more robust within-subjects design (Experiment 2B) and cannot be explained by acoustic factors alone. We finally introduced a novel model of timbre dissimilarity based on partial least-squares regression that compared the contributions of both acoustic and categorical timbre descriptors. The best model fit (R (2) = 0.88) was achieved when both types of descriptors were taken into account. These findings are interpreted as evidence for an interplay of acoustic and categorical information in timbre dissimilarity perception.

  17. Acoustic and Categorical Dissimilarity of Musical Timbre: Evidence from Asymmetries Between Acoustic and Chimeric Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Siedenburg, Kai; Jones-Mollerup, Kiray; McAdams, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of acoustic and categorical information in timbre dissimilarity ratings. Using a Gammatone-filterbank-based sound transformation, we created tones that were rated as less familiar than recorded tones from orchestral instruments and that were harder to associate with an unambiguous sound source (Experiment 1). A subset of transformed tones, a set of orchestral recordings, and a mixed set were then rated on pairwise dissimilarity (Experiment 2A). We observed that recorded instrument timbres clustered into subsets that distinguished timbres according to acoustic and categorical properties. For the subset of cross-category comparisons in the mixed set, we observed asymmetries in the distribution of ratings, as well as a stark decay of inter-rater agreement. These effects were replicated in a more robust within-subjects design (Experiment 2B) and cannot be explained by acoustic factors alone. We finally introduced a novel model of timbre dissimilarity based on partial least-squares regression that compared the contributions of both acoustic and categorical timbre descriptors. The best model fit (R2 = 0.88) was achieved when both types of descriptors were taken into account. These findings are interpreted as evidence for an interplay of acoustic and categorical information in timbre dissimilarity perception. PMID:26779086

  18. Microparticle column geometry in acoustic stationary fields.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Andrew; Insana, Michael F; Allen, John S

    2003-01-01

    Particles suspended in a fluid will experience forces from stationary acoustic fields. The magnitude of the force depends on the time-averaged energy density of the field and the material properties of the particles and fluid. Forces acting on known particles smaller than 20 microm were studied. Within a 500 kHz acoustic beam generated by a plane-piston circular source, observations were made of the geometry of the particle column that is formed. Varying the acoustic energy altered the column width in a manner predicted by equations for the primary acoustic radiation force from scattering of particles in the long-wavelength limit. The minimum pressures required to trap gas, solid, and liquid particles in a water medium at room temperature were also estimated to within 12%. These results highlight the ability of stationary acoustic fields from a plane-piston radiator to impose nano-Newton-scale forces onto fluid particles with properties similar to biological cells, and suggest that it is possible to accurately quantify these forces.

  19. Data Management Techniques for Acoustical Planetary Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, Hans; Prattes, Gustav; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Tokano, T.; Jernej, I.; Stachel, Manfred; Besser, B. P.; Aydogar, Oe.

    We discuss data management techniques for acoustical data obtained from future atmospheric planetary in-situ probes with the aim of event oriented scientific analysis. The immediate objec-tive is the localisation (acoustic wave telescope) and characterisation of acoustic phenomena of atmospheres and surfaces, e.g. in the frame of the proposed NASA/ESA Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) with the Acoustic Sensor Package (ACU) multi-microphone array. Contrary to huge amounts of source data obtained through the electromagnetic windows, acoustical sig-nals are seldom recorded and few files exist. One example is pressure sensor data from the instrument HASI/PWA during Huygens descent, mission Cassini-Huygens. Nevertheless, a lot of acoustic point and noise sources, e.g. caused by rain, drizzle or wind abound in Titan's atmosphere. In almost all cases, due to limitations in telemetry rate, a careful strategy for onboard event handling and data reduction -the first step in data management -has to be selected, e.g. sampling rates in kHz range or averaging in the frequency domain. This pre-processing together with complementary investigations at the space segment directly influences the scientific data return in terms of long-term continuous or short-term event based studies. The database at the ground segment with science data and metadata entries after final calibra-tion has to support the combined investigations with other instruments. This second step in data management fully explores the acoustic environment of planetary atmospheres in terms of background noise and spacecraft generated disturbances, location and characterisation of source regions and correlation between the experiments. Currently we're running databases for magnetic field data from various ground-based and satellite related experiments, historical balloon data included. Comparisons of data between experiments are possible. This framework based on dependability considerations with several different

  20. Mate vocal recognition in the Scopoli's shearwater Calonectris diomedea: do females and males share the same acoustic code?

    PubMed

    Curé, Charlotte; Mathevon, Nicolas; Aubin, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    Vocal recognition is an important process allowing partners' reunion in most seabirds. Although the acoustic basis of this recognition has been explored in several species, only a few studies have experimentally tested the acoustic coding-decoding strategy used for mate identification. Here, we investigated mate recognition in the Scopoli's shearwater (Calonectris diomedea) by conducting playbacks of calls with modified acoustic features. We showed that females and males in a seabird species with a moderate vocal dimorphism are likely to share the same coding-decoding rule for vocal mate identification. Specifically, a disruption of call temporal structure prevented mate recognition in both sexes, in line with the parameters previously identified as supporting an individual signature. Modifications of spectral cues and envelope structure also impaired recognition, but at a lesser extent: almost half of the tested males and females were still able to recognise their partner. It is likely that this equal ability of female and male Scopoli's shearwaters to vocally recognise their partner could be found in other seabirds.

  1. Soft 3D acoustic metamaterial with negative index.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Thomas; Merlin, Aurore; Mascaro, Benoit; Zimny, Kevin; Leng, Jacques; Poncelet, Olivier; Aristégui, Christophe; Mondain-Monval, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to the design and achievement of negative-refractive-index metamaterials since the 2000s. One of the challenges at present is to extend that field beyond electromagnetism by realizing three-dimensional (3D) media with negative acoustic indices. We report a new class of locally resonant ultrasonic metafluids consisting of a concentrated suspension of macroporous microbeads engineered using soft-matter techniques. The propagation of Gaussian pulses within these random distributions of 'ultra-slow' Mie resonators is investigated through in situ ultrasonic experiments. The real part of the acoustic index is shown to be negative (up to almost - 1) over broad frequency bandwidths, depending on the volume fraction of the microbeads as predicted by multiple-scattering calculations. These soft 3D acoustic metamaterials open the way for key applications such as sub-wavelength imaging and transformation acoustics, which require the production of acoustic devices with negative or zero-valued indices.

  2. Excavation Equipment Recognition Based on Novel Acoustic Statistical Features.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiuwen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jianzhong; Wang, Ruirong

    2016-09-30

    Excavation equipment recognition attracts increasing attentions in recent years due to its significance in underground pipeline network protection and civil construction management. In this paper, a novel classification algorithm based on acoustics processing is proposed for four representative excavation equipments. New acoustic statistical features, namely, the short frame energy ratio, concentration of spectrum amplitude ratio, truncated energy range, and interval of pulse are first developed to characterize acoustic signals. Then, probability density distributions of these acoustic features are analyzed and a novel classifier is presented. Experiments on real recorded acoustics of the four excavation devices are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. Comparisons with two popular machine learning methods, support vector machine and extreme learning machine, combined with the popular linear prediction cepstral coefficients are provided to show the generalization capability of our method. A real surveillance system using our algorithm is developed and installed in a metro construction site for real-time recognition performance validation.

  3. CO2 leak detection through acoustic sensing and infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiwang; Yan, Yong; Ma, Lin; Ma, Yifan; Han, Xiaojuan

    2014-04-01

    When CO2 leakage occurs from a high pressure enclosure, the CO2 jet formed can produce fierce turbulent flow generating acoustic emission with possible phase change, depending on the pressure of the enclosure, and a significant temperature drop in the region close to the releasing point. Acoustic Emission (AE) and infrared imaging technologiesare promising methods for on-line monitoring of such accidental leakage. In this paper, leakage experiments were carried out with a CO2 container under well controlled conditions in a laboratory. Acoustic signals and temperature distribution at the leakage area were acquired using an acoustic sensor and an infraredthermalimaging camera. The acoustic signal was analyzed in both time and frequency domains. The characteristics of the signal frequencies areidentified, and their suitability for leakage detectionis investigated. The location of the leakage can be identified by seeking the lowest temperature area or point in the infrared image.

  4. Laser-induced acoustic imaging of underground objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen; DiMarzio, Charles A.; McKnight, Stephen W.; Sauermann, Gerhard O.; Miller, Eric L.

    1999-02-01

    This paper introduces a new demining technique based on the photo-acoustic interaction, together with results from photo- acoustic experiments. We have buried different types of targets (metal, rubber and plastic) in different media (sand, soil and water) and imaged them by measuring reflection of acoustic waves generated by irradiation with a CO2 laser. Research has been focused on the signal acquisition and signal processing. A deconvolution method using Wiener filters is utilized in data processing. Using a uniform spatial distribution of laser pulses at the ground's surface, we obtained 3D images of buried objects. The images give us a clear representation of the shapes of the underground objects. The quality of the images depends on the mismatch of acoustic impedance of the buried objects, the bandwidth and center frequency of the acoustic sensors and the selection of filter functions.

  5. Shape-adaptable hyperlens for acoustic magnifying imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongkuan; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hu, Gengkai

    2016-11-01

    Previous prototypes of acoustic hyperlens consist of rigid channels, which are unable to adapt in shape to the object under detection. We propose to overcome this limitation by employing soft plastic tubes that could guide acoustics with robustness against bending deformation. Based on the idea of soft-tube acoustics, acoustic magnifying hyperlens with planar input and output surfaces has been fabricated and validated experimentally. The shape-adaption capability of the soft-tube hyperlens is demonstrated by a controlled experiment, in which the magnifying super-resolution images remain stable when the lens input surface is curved. Our study suggests a feasible route toward constructing the flexible channel-structured acoustic metamaterials with the shape-adaption capability, opening then an additional degree of freedom for full control of sound.

  6. Measuring acoustic habitats.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies.

  7. Measuring acoustic habitats

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies. PMID:25954500

  8. Improving Fidelity of Launch Vehicle Liftoff Acoustic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liever, Peter; West, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Launch vehicles experience high acoustic loads during ignition and liftoff affected by the interaction of rocket plume generated acoustic waves with launch pad structures. Application of highly parallelized Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis tools optimized for application on the NAS computer systems such as the Loci/CHEM program now enable simulation of time-accurate, turbulent, multi-species plume formation and interaction with launch pad geometry and capture the generation of acoustic noise at the source regions in the plume shear layers and impingement regions. These CFD solvers are robust in capturing the acoustic fluctuations, but they are too dissipative to accurately resolve the propagation of the acoustic waves throughout the launch environment domain along the vehicle. A hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) modeling framework has been developed to improve such liftoff acoustic environment predictions. The framework combines the existing highly-scalable NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with a high-order accurate discontinuous Galerkin (DG) solver, Loci/THRUST, developed in the same computational framework. Loci/THRUST employs a low dissipation, high-order, unstructured DG method to accurately propagate acoustic waves away from the source regions across large distances. The DG solver is currently capable of solving up to 4th order solutions for non-linear, conservative acoustic field propagation. Higher order boundary conditions are implemented to accurately model the reflection and refraction of acoustic waves on launch pad components. The DG solver accepts generalized unstructured meshes, enabling efficient application of common mesh generation tools for CHEM and THRUST simulations. The DG solution is coupled with the CFD solution at interface boundaries placed near the CFD acoustic source regions. Both simulations are executed simultaneously with coordinated boundary condition data exchange.

  9. NASA Rat Acoustic Tolerance Test 1994-1995: 8 kHz, 16 kHz, 32 kHz Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mele, Gary D.; Holley, Daniel C.; Naidu, Sujata

    1996-01-01

    Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to chronic applied sound (74 to 79 dB, SPL) with octave band center frequencies of either 8, 16 or 32 kHz for up to 60 days. Control cages had ambient sound levels of about 62 dB (SPL). Groups of rats (test vs. control; N=9 per group) were euthanized after 0. 5. 14, 30, and 60 days. On each euthanasia day, objective evaluation of their physiology and behavior was performed using a Stress Assessment Battery (SAB) of measures. In addition, rat hearing was assessed using the brain stem auditory evoked potential (BAER) method after 60 days of exposure. No statistically significant differences in mean daily food use could be attributed to the presence of the applied test sound. Test rats used 5% more water than control rats. In the 8 kHz and 32 kHz tests this amount was statistically significant(P less than .05). This is a minor difference of questionable physiological significance. However, it may be an indication of a small reaction to the constant applied sound. Across all test frequencies, day 5 test rats had 6% larger spleens than control rats. No other body or organ weight differences were found to be statistically significant with respect to the application of sound. This spleen effect may be a transient adaptive process related to adaptation to the constant applied noise. No significant test effect on differential white blood cell counts could be demonstrated. One group demonstrated a low eosinophil count (16 kHz experiment, day 14 test group). However this was highly suspect. Across all test frequencies studied, day 5 test rats had 17% fewer total leukocytes than day 5 control rats. Sound exposed test rats exhibited 44% lower plasma corticosterone concentrations than did control rats. Note that the plasma corticosterone concentration was lower in the sound exposed test animals than the control animals in every instance (frequency exposure and number of days exposed).

  10. Characterization of the Acoustic Field in Marine Environments with Anthropogenic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Shane

    playbacks. The results show strong band-limited elevation (13--24 dB) of sound pressure levels for over half of the inter-ping intervals above the natural background levels. These three studies provide insights on the dynamics of marine soundscape and how anthropogenic activities can change the acoustic habitat by elevating the overall sound field levels.

  11. Acoustical properties of drill strings

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01

    The recovery of petrochemical and geothermal resources requires extensive drilling of wells to increasingly greater depths. Real-time collection and telemetry of data about the drilling process while it occurs thousands of feet below the surface is an effective way of improving the efficiency of drilling operations. Unfortunately, due to hostile down-hole environments, telemetry of this data is an extremely difficult problem. Currently, commercial systems transmit data to the surface by producing pressure pulses within the portion of the drilling mud enclosed in the hollow steel drill string. Transmission rates are between two and four data bits per second. Any system capable of raising data rates without increasing the complexity of the drilling process will have significant economic impact. One alternative system is based upon acoustical carrier waves generated within the drill string itself. If developed, this method would accommodate data rates up to 100 bits per second. Unfortunately, the drill string is a periodic structure of pipe and threaded tool joints, the transmission characteristics are very complex and exhibit a banded and dispersive structure. Over the past forty years, attempts to field systems based upon this transmission method have resulted in little success. This paper examines this acoustical transmission problem in great detail. The basic principles of acoustic wave propagation in the periodic structure of the drill string are examined through theory, laboratory experiment, and field test. The results indicate the existence of frequency bands which are virtually free of attenuation and suitable for data transmission at high bit rates. 9 refs., 38 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. An overview of acoustic telemetry

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    Acoustic telemetry has been a dream of the drilling industry for the past 50 years. It offers the promise of data rates which are one-hundred times greater than existing technology. Such a system would open the door to true logging-while-drilling technology and bring enormous profits to its developers. The basic idea is to produce an encoded sound wave at the bottom of the well, let it propagate up the steel drillpipe, and extract the data from the signal at the surface. Unfortunately, substantial difficulties arise. The first difficult problem is to produce the sound wave. Since the most promising transmission wavelengths are about 20 feet, normal transducer efficiencies are quire low. Compounding this problem is the structural complexity of the bottomhole assembly and drillstring. For example, the acoustic impedance of the drillstring changes every 30 feet and produces an unusual scattering pattern in the acoustic transmission. This scattering pattern causes distortion of the signal and is often confused with signal attenuation. These problems are not intractable. Recent work has demonstrated that broad frequency bands exist which are capable of transmitting data at rates up to 100 bits per second. Our work has also identified the mechanism which is responsible for the observed anomalies in the patterns of signal attenuation. Furthermore in the past few years a body of experience has been developed in designing more efficient transducers for application to metal waveguides. The direction of future work is clear. New transducer designs which are more efficient and compatible with existing downhole power supplies need to be built and tested; existing field test data need to be analyzed for transmission bandwidth and attenuation; and the new and less expensive methods of collecting data on transmission path quality need to be incorporated into this effort. 11 refs.

  13. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  14. The Acoustic Emission signal acquired by the microphones placed in the CABRI test device along the fourteen last R.I.A. experiments: an example of reproducible research in nuclear science

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent Pantera, Oumar Traore

    2015-07-01

    graphics representations were not straightforward to reproduce from the ancient studies since that, on one hand, people who were in charge of the original work left the laboratory and on the other hand because it is not easy when the time passes, even with our own work, to be able to remember the steps of data manipulations and the exact setup: - During the ancient experiments the use of analog data acquisition systems required to digitize tapes to be able to realize computer treatments. That had had for consequence to lose the initial dating. This one must be correctly edited to do temporal comparisons. - Analyses require functions for calculations whose parameters has to be well-known to reach the same results. We thus wished to manage our workflow in the idea that it can be easily reproducible on all the experiments. The object of the work presented in this article was to put in practice this strong bind between the data, treatments and generation of the document in order not to hesitate to do the iteration principle in action. We do not have to be afraid by the data driven analyses. According to the philosophy of the literate programming, the text of the technical document is woven with the computer code that produces all the printed output as tables, graphs for the study eliminating hence the unrealistic cut and paste. This difficulty is not specific to the nuclear domain. For many years, researchers have been worked out solutions to this mundane issue. And, presently, new technologies and high-level programming languages offer us actual answers. We will firstly present the tools applied in our laboratory to implement this workflow, then we will describe the global perception carried out to continue the study of the Acoustic Emission signals recorded by the two microphones during the fourteen last CABRI R.I.A. test.

  15. ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOELLE, LESLIE L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

  16. Microgravity acoustic mixing for particle cloud combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic; Rubinstein, Robert I.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations of acoustic mixing procedures designed to uniformly distribute fuel particles in a combustion tube for application in the proposed Particle Cloud Combustion Experiment (PCCE) are described. Two acoustic mixing methods are investigated: mixing in a cylindrical tube using high frequency spinning modes generated by suitably phased, or quadrature speakers, and acoustic premixing in a sphere. Quadrature mixing leads to rapid circumferential circulation of the powder around the tube. Good mixing is observed in the circulating regions. However, because axial inhomogeneities are necessarily present in the acoustic field, this circulation does not extend throughout the tube. Simultaneous operation of the quadrature-speaker set and the axial-speaker was observed to produce considerably enhanced mixing compared to operation of the quadrature-speaker set alone. Mixing experiments using both types of speakers were free of the longitudinal powder drift observed using axial-speakers alone. Vigorous powder mixing was obtained in the sphere for many normal modes: however, in no case was the powder observed to fill the sphere entirely. Theoretical analysis indicated that mixing under steady conditions cannot fill more than a hemisphere except under very unusual conditions. Premixing in a hemisphere may be satisfactory; otherwise, complete mixing in microgravity might be possible by operating the speaker in short bursts. A general conclusion is that acoustic transients are more likely to produce good mixing than steady state conditions. The reason is that in steady conditions, flow structures like nodal planes are possible and often even unavoidable. These tend to separate the mixing region into cells across which powder cannot be transferred. In contrast, transients not only are free of such structures, they also have the characteristics, desirable for mixing, of randomness and disorder. This conclusion is corroborated by mixing

  17. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  18. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  19. High temperature acoustic levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically levitating an object within a portion of a chamber that is heated to a high temperature, while a driver at the opposite end of the chamber is maintained at a relatively low temperature. The cold end of the chamber is constructed so it can be telescoped to vary the length (L sub 1) of the cold end portion and therefore of the entire chamber, so that the chamber remains resonant to a normal mode frequency, and so that the pressure at the hot end of the chamber is maximized. The precise length of the chamber at any given time, is maintained at an optimum resonant length by a feedback loop. The feedback loop includes an acoustic pressure sensor at the hot end of the chamber, which delivers its output to a control circuit which controls a motor that varies the length (L) of the chamber to a level where the sensed acoustic pressure is a maximum.

  20. Basic Linear Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Alan

    This chapter deals with the physical and mathematical aspects of sound when the disturbances are, in some sense, small. Acoustics is usually concerned with small-amplitude phenomena, and consequently a linear description is usually applicable. Disturbances are governed by the properties of the medium in which they occur, and the governing equations are the equations of continuum mechanics, which apply equally to gases, liquids, and solids. These include the mass, momentum, and energy equations, as well as thermodynamic principles. The viscosity and thermal conduction enter into the versions of these equations that apply to fluids. Fluids of typical great interest are air and sea water, and consequently this chapter includes a summary of their relevant acoustic properties. The foundation is also laid for the consideration of acoustic waves in elastic solids, suspensions, bubbly liquids, and porous media.

  1. Acoustic Liners for Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G (Inventor); Grady, Joseph E (Inventor); Kiser, James D. (Inventor); Miller, Christopher (Inventor); Heidmann, James D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An improved acoustic liner for turbine engines is disclosed. The acoustic liner may include a straight cell section including a plurality of cells with straight chambers. The acoustic liner may also include a bent cell section including one or more cells that are bent to extend chamber length without increasing the overall height of the acoustic liner by the entire chamber length. In some cases, holes are placed between cell chambers in addition to bending the cells, or instead of bending the cells.

  2. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher; Chu, S. Reynold

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles to ensure compliance with acoustic requirements and thus provide a safe and habitable acoustic environment for the crews, and to validate developed models via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements.

  3. Coherent entropy induced and acoustic noise separation in compact nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wenjie; Schuller, Thierry; Huet, Maxime; Richecoeur, Franck

    2017-04-01

    A method to separate entropy induced noise from an acoustic pressure wave in an harmonically perturbed flow through a nozzle is presented. It is tested on an original experimental setup generating simultaneously acoustic and temperature fluctuations in an air flow that is accelerated by a convergent nozzle. The setup mimics the direct and indirect noise contributions to the acoustic pressure field in a confined combustion chamber by producing synchronized acoustic and temperature fluctuations, without dealing with the complexity of the combustion process. It allows generating temperature fluctuations with amplitude up to 10 K in the frequency range from 10 to 100 Hz. The noise separation technique uses experiments with and without temperature fluctuations to determine the relative level of acoustic and entropy fluctuations in the system and to identify the nozzle response to these forcing waves. It requires multi-point measurements of acoustic pressure and temperature. The separation method is first validated with direct numerical simulations of the nonlinear Euler equations. These simulations are used to investigate the conditions for which the separation technique is valid and yield similar trends as the experiments for the investigated flow operating conditions. The separation method then gives successfully the acoustic reflection coefficient but does not recover the same entropy reflection coefficient as predicted by the compact nozzle theory due to the sensitivity of the method to signal noises in the explored experimental conditions. This methodology provides a framework for experimental investigation of direct and indirect combustion noises originating from synchronized perturbations.

  4. Two-dimensional acoustic metamaterial structure for potential image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongwei; Han, Yu; Li, Ying; Pai, Frank

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents modeling, analysis techniques and experiment of for two-Dimensional Acoustic metamaterial Structure for filtering acoustic waves. For a unit cell of an infinite two-Dimensional Acoustic metamaterial Structure, governing equations are derived using the extended Hamilton principle. The concepts of negative effective mass and stiffness and how the spring-mass-damper subsystems create a stopband are explained in detail. Numerical simulations reveal that the actual working mechanism of the proposed acoustic metamaterial structure is based on the concept of conventional mechanical vibration absorbers. It uses the incoming wave in the structure to resonate the integrated membrane-mass-damper absorbers to vibrate in their optical mode at frequencies close to but above their local resonance frequencies to create shear forces and bending moments to straighten the panel and stop the wave propagation. Moreover, a two-dimension acoustic metamaterial structure consisting of lumped mass and elastic membrane is fabricated in the lab. We do experiments on the model and The results validate the concept and show that, for two-dimension acoustic metamaterial structure do exist two vibration modes. For the wave absorption, the mass of each cell should be considered in the design. With appropriate design calculations, the proposed two-dimension acoustic metamaterial structure can be used for absorption of low-frequency waves. Hence this special structure can be used in filtering the waves, and the potential using can increase the ultrasonic imaging quality.

  5. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  6. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  7. Broadband Acoustic Hyperbolic Metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen; Xie, Yangbo; Sui, Ni; Wang, Wenqi; Cummer, Steven A; Jing, Yun

    2015-12-18

    In this Letter, we report on the design and experimental characterization of a broadband acoustic hyperbolic metamaterial. The proposed metamaterial consists of multiple arrays of clamped thin plates facing the y direction and is shown to yield opposite signs of effective density in the x and y directions below a certain cutoff frequency, therefore, yielding a hyperbolic dispersion. Partial focusing and subwavelength imaging are experimentally demonstrated at frequencies between 1.0 and 2.5 kHz. The proposed metamaterial could open up new possibilities for acoustic wave manipulation and may find usage in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  8. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  9. Electromechanical acoustic liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Cattafesta, III, Louis N. (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikazu (Inventor); Horowitz, Stephen Brian (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A multi-resonator-based system responsive to acoustic waves includes at least two resonators, each including a bottom plate, side walls secured to the bottom plate, and a top plate disposed on top of the side walls. The top plate includes an orifice so that a portion of an incident acoustical wave compresses gas in the resonators. The bottom plate or the side walls include at least one compliant portion. A reciprocal electromechanical transducer coupled to the compliant portion of each of the resonators forms a first and second transducer/compliant composite. An electrical network is disposed between the reciprocal electromechanical transducer of the first and second resonator.

  10. Broadband Acoustic Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    fluidized mud, which has sound speeds at (or sometimes below) the sound speed of the water column, here 1512 m/s. Interestingly, there is a sound speed...data. 3 specular 25m Figure 1. The map shows the AUV track (red line) overlaid on multibeam bathymetry. Mean water depth is about 165m...Preston, and D.A. Abraham, Long-range acoustic scattering from a shallow- water mud volcano cluster J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 122, 1946-1958, 2007. [3

  11. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  12. Volumetric Acoustic Vector Intensity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    A new measurement tool capable of imaging the acoustic intensity vector throughout a large volume is discussed. This tool consists of an array of fifty microphones that form a spherical surface of radius 0.2m. A simultaneous measurement of the pressure field across all the microphones provides time-domain near-field holograms. Near-field acoustical holography is used to convert the measured pressure into a volumetric vector intensity field as a function of frequency on a grid of points ranging from the center of the spherical surface to a radius of 0.4m. The volumetric intensity is displayed on three-dimensional plots that are used to locate noise sources outside the volume. There is no restriction on the type of noise source that can be studied. The sphere is mobile and can be moved from location to location to hunt for unidentified noise sources. An experiment inside a Boeing 757 aircraft in flight successfully tested the ability of the array to locate low-noise-excited sources on the fuselage. Reference transducers located on suspected noise source locations can also be used to increase the ability of this device to separate and identify multiple noise sources at a given frequency by using the theory of partial field decomposition. The frequency range of operation is 0 to 1400Hz. This device is ideal for the study of noise sources in commercial and military transportation vehicles in air, on land and underwater.

  13. Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator - MSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    A room temperature sapphire acoustics resonator incorporated into an oscillator represents a possible opportunity to improve on quartz ultrastable oscillator (USO) performance, which has been a staple for NASA missions since the inception of spaceflight. Where quartz technology is very mature and shows a performance improvement of perhaps 1 dB/decade, these sapphire acoustic resonators when integrated with matured quartz electronics could achieve a frequency stability improvement of 10 dB or more. As quartz oscillators are an essential element of nearly all types of frequency standards and reference systems, the success of MSAR would advance the development of frequency standards and systems for both groundbased and flight-based projects. Current quartz oscillator technology is limited by quartz mechanical Q. With a possible improvement of more than x 10 Q with sapphire acoustic modes, the stability limit of current quartz oscillators may be improved tenfold, to 10(exp -14) at 1 second. The electromagnetic modes of sapphire that were previously developed at JPL require cryogenic temperatures to achieve the high Q levels needed to achieve this stability level. However sapphire fs acoustic modes, which have not been used before in a high-stability oscillator, indicate the required Q values (as high as Q = 10(exp 8)) may be achieved at room temperature in the kHz range. Even though sapphire is not piezoelectric, such a high Q should allow electrostatic excitation of the acoustic modes with a combination of DC and AC voltages across a small sapphire disk (approximately equal to l mm thick). The first evaluations under this task will test predictions of an estimated input impedance of 10 kilohms at Q = 10(exp 8), and explore the Q values that can be realized in a smaller resonator, which has not been previously tested for acoustic modes. This initial Q measurement and excitation demonstration can be viewed similar to a transducer converting electrical energy to

  14. Post Treatment of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Identifying an AN Symptoms Acoustic Neuroma Keywords Educational Video Pre-Treatment Treatment Options Summary Treatment Options Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions ...

  15. Speaker verification using combined acoustic and EM sensor signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, L C; Gable, T J; Holzrichter, J F

    2000-11-10

    Low Power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference. This greatly enhances the quality and quantity of information for many speech related applications. See Holzrichter, Burnett, Ng, and Lea, J. Acoustic. SOC. Am . 103 ( 1) 622 (1998). By combining the Glottal-EM-Sensor (GEMS) with the Acoustic-signals, we've demonstrated an almost 10 fold reduction in error rates from a speaker verification system experiment under a moderate noisy environment (-10dB).

  16. Propellant injection strategy for suppressing acoustic combustion instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Qina

    Shear-coaxial injector elements are often used in liquid-propellant-rocket thrust chambers, where combustion instabilities remain a significant problem. A conventional solution to the combustion instability problem relies on passive control techniques that use empirically-developed hardware such as acoustic baffles and tuned cavities. In addition to adding weight and decreasing engine performance, these devices are designed using trial-and-error methods, which do not provide the capability to predict the overall system stability characteristics in advance. In this thesis, two novel control strategies that are based on propellant fluid dynamics were investigated for mitigating acoustic instability involving shear-coaxial injector elements. The new control strategies would use a set of controlled injectors allowing local adjustment of propellant flow patterns for each operating condition, particularly when instability could become a problem. One strategy relies on reducing the oxidizer-fuel density gradient by blending heavier methane with the main fuel, hydrogen. Another strategy utilizes modifying the equivalence ratio to affect the acoustic impedance through mixing and reaction rate changes. The potential effectiveness of these strategies was assessed by conducting unit-physics experiments. Two different model combustors, one simulating a single-element injector test and the other a double-element injector test, were designed and tested for flame-acoustic interaction. For these experiments, the Reynolds number of the central oxygen jet was kept between 4700 and 5500 making the injector flames sufficiently turbulent. A compression driver, mounted on one side of the combustor wall, provided controlled acoustic excitation to the injector flames, simulating the initial phase of flame-acoustic interaction. Acoustic excitation was applied either as band-limited white noise forcing between 100 Hz and 5000 Hz or as single-frequency, fixed-amplitude forcing at 1150 Hz

  17. On the acoustic director interaction in the smectic A phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlo, Josefina; Aguirre, Luis E.; Revelli, Jorge; Anoardo, Esteban

    2007-12-01

    A model was previously proposed for the interaction energy between an acoustic field and the local nematic director. The consistency of this model was verified through nuclear magnetic relaxation and optical experiments. The model was later extended to the smectic A phase, despite the fact that the smectic essence of the problem was never included in the interaction process. In this work we investigate details of this interaction through the inclusion of elemental features of the smectic phase. We show that the acoustic-director interaction can be enhanced if the external acoustic field matches an eigenmode of the smectic system.

  18. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  19. Is dust acoustic wave a new plasma acoustic mode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, C. B.

    1997-09-01

    In this Brief Communication, the claim of the novelty of the dust acoustic wave in a dusty plasma within the constant dust charge model is questioned. Conceptual lacunas behind the claim have been highlighted and appropriate physical arguments have been forwarded against the claim. It is demonstrated that the so-called dust acoustic wave could better be termed as a general acoustic fluctuation response with a dominant characteristic feature of the acoustic-like mode (ALM) fluctuation response reported by Dwivedi et al. [J. Plasma Phys. 41, 219 (1989)]. It is suggested that both correct and more usable nomenclature of the ALM should be the so-called acoustic mode.

  20. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic resonant metalens

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun; Zhou, Chen; Wei, Qi; Wu, DaJian

    2013-11-25

    Early research into acoustic metamaterials has shown the possibility of achieving subwavelength near-field acoustic imaging. However, a major restriction of acoustic metamaterials is that the imaging objects must be placed in close vicinity of the devices. Here, we present an approach for acoustic imaging of subsurface objects far below the diffraction limit. An acoustic metalens made of holey-structured metamaterials is used to magnify evanescent waves, which can rebuild an image at the central plane. Without changing the physical structure of the metalens, our proposed approach can image objects located at certain distances from the input surface, which provides subsurface signatures of the objects with subwavelength spatial resolution.

  1. Relation between near field and far field acoustic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bies, D. A.; Scharton, T. D.

    1974-01-01

    Several approaches to the problem of determining the far field directivity of an acoustic source located in a reverberant environment, such as a wind tunnel, are investigated analytically and experimentally. The decrease of sound pressure level with distance is illustrated; and the spatial extent of the hydrodynamic and geometric near fields, the far field, and the reverberant field are described. A previously-prosposed analytical technique for predicting the far field directivity of the acoustic source on the basis of near field data is investigated. Experiments are conducted with small acoustic sources and an analysis is performed to determine the variation with distance from the source of the directionality of the sound field. A novel experiment is conducted in which the sound pressure measured at various distances from an acoustic driver located in the NASA Ames 40 x 80 ft wind tunnel is crosscorrelated with the driver excitation voltage.

  2. Continuous Surveillance Technique for Flow Accelerated Corrosion of Pipe Wall Using Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, F.; Kosaka, D.; Umetani, K.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a on-line monitoring technique using electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT). In the series of laboratory experiments, carbon steel pipes were used and each sample was fabricated to simulate FAC. Electromagnetic acoustic resonance method (EMAR) is successfully tested for pipe wall thickness measurements. The validity and the feasibility of our method are also demonstrated through the laboratory experiments.

  3. Numerical methods for large eddy simulation of acoustic combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Clifton T.

    Acoustic combustion instabilities occur when interaction between the combustion process and acoustic modes in a combustor results in periodic oscillations in pressure, velocity, and heat release. If sufficiently large in amplitude, these instabilities can cause operational difficulties or the failure of combustor hardware. In many situations, the dominant instability is the result of the interaction between a low frequency acoustic mode of the combustor and the large scale hydrodynamics. Large eddy simulation (LES), therefore, is a promising tool for the prediction of these instabilities, since both the low frequency acoustic modes and the large scale hydrodynamics are well resolved in LES. Problems with the tractability of such simulations arise, however, due to the difficulty of solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations efficiently at low Mach number and due to the large number of acoustic periods that are often required for such instabilities to reach limit cycles. An implicit numerical method for the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations has been developed which avoids the acoustic CFL restriction, allowing for significant efficiency gains at low Mach number, while still resolving the low frequency acoustic modes of interest. In the limit of a uniform grid the numerical method causes no artificial damping of acoustic waves. New, non-reflecting boundary conditions have also been developed for use with the characteristic-based approach of Poinsot and Lele (1992). The new boundary conditions are implemented in a manner which allows for significant reduction of the computational domain of an LES by eliminating the need to perform LES in regions where one-dimensional acoustics significantly affect the instability but details of the hydrodynamics do not. These new numerical techniques have been demonstrated in an LES of an experimental combustor. The new techniques are shown to be an efficient means of performing LES of acoustic combustion

  4. Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustic Modeling From Experiments (FRAME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Eric

    2011-01-01

    A new methodology is developed for the construction of helicopter source noise models for use in mission planning tools from experimental measurements of helicopter external noise radiation. The models are constructed by employing a parameter identification method to an assumed analytical model of the rotor harmonic noise sources. This new method allows for the identification of individual rotor harmonic noise sources and allows them to be characterized in terms of their individual non-dimensional governing parameters. The method is applied to both wind tunnel measurements and ground noise measurements of two-bladed rotors. The method is shown to match the parametric trends of main rotor harmonic noise, allowing accurate estimates of the dominant rotorcraft noise sources to be made for operating conditions based on a small number of measurements taken at different operating conditions. The ability of this method to estimate changes in noise radiation due to changes in ambient conditions is also demonstrated.

  5. The Bjerknes instability during crystal nucleation by acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Amar, Martine

    2004-05-01

    The instability of position of a growing spherical crystal in an acoustic field is studied. Due to the Bjerknes force, a spherical crystal, whose position is shifted from an antinode of pressure, moves in the acoustic field. This displacement, stable in the case of bubbles in a cavitation experiment, turns out to be unstable in the case of crystallization. This effect is studied for an arbitrary Atwood number. To cite this article: M. Ben Amar, C. R. Mecanique 332 (2004).

  6. Nonlinear Acoustics in Cicada Mating Calls Enhance Sound Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    NUWC-NPT Reprint Report 11,907 1 March 2009 Nonlinear Acoustics in Cicada Mating Calls Enhance Sound Propagation Derke R. Hughes Albert H...vol. 125, no. 2, February 2009. Nonlinear acoustics in cicada mating calls enhance sound propagation Derke R. Hughes,3 Albert H. Nuttall,h Richard A...2008; revised 31 October 2008; accepted 15 November 2008) An analysis of cicada mating calls, measured in field experiments, indicates that the very

  7. Acoustic properties of a porous glass (vycor) at hypersonic frequencies.

    PubMed

    Levelut, C; Pelous, J

    2007-10-17

    Brillouin scattering experiments have been performed from 5 to 1600 K in vycor, a porous silica glass. The acoustic velocity and attenuation at hypersonic frequencies are compared to those of bulk silica and others porous silica samples. The experimental evidence for the influence of porosity on the scattering by acoustic waves is compared to calculations. The correlation between internal friction and thermal conductivity at low temperature is discussed.

  8. Acoustic Bloch oscillations in a two-dimensional phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaojian; Peng, Shasha; Cai, Feiyan; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2007-11-01

    We report the observation of acoustic Bloch oscillations at megahertz frequency in a two-dimensional phononic crystal. By creating periodically arrayed cavities with a decreasing gradient in width along one direction in the phononic crystal, acoustic Wannier-Stark ladders are created in the frequency domain. The oscillatory motion of an incident Gaussian pulse inside the sample is demonstrated by both simulation and experiment.

  9. Acoustics- Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-13

    This package contains modules that model acoustic sensors and acoustic sources (hearable) in Umbra. It is typically used to represent hearing in characters within Umbra. Typically, the acoustic sensors detect acoustic sources at a given point; however, it also contains the capability to detect bullet cracks by detecting the sound along the bullet path that is closest to the sensor. A memory module, acoustic memory, represents remembered sounds within a given character. Over time, the sounds are removed, as a character forgets what it has heard.

  10. Acoustic visualizations using surface mapping.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Robinson, Philip W; Saarelma, Jukka; Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Savioja, Lauri; Lokki, Tapio

    2014-06-01

    Sound visualizations have been an integral part of room acoustics studies for more than a century. As acoustic measurement techniques and knowledge of hearing evolve, acousticians need more intuitive ways to represent increasingly complex data. Microphone array processing now allows accurate measurement of spatio-temporal acoustic properties. However, the multidimensional data can be a challenge to display coherently. This letter details a method of mapping visual representations of acoustic reflections from a receiver position to the surfaces from which the reflections originated. The resulting animations are presented as a spatial acoustic analysis tool.

  11. Intelligent Engine Systems: Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojno, John; Martens, Steve; Simpson, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    An extensive study of new fan exhaust nozzle technologies was performed. Three new uniform chevron nozzles were designed, based on extensive CFD analysis. Two new azimuthally varying variants were defined. All five were tested, along with two existing nozzles, on a representative model-scale, medium BPR exhaust nozzle. Substantial acoustic benefits were obtained from the uniform chevron nozzle designs, the best benefit being provided by an existing design. However, one of the azimuthally varying nozzle designs exhibited even better performance than any of the uniform chevron nozzles. In addition to the fan chevron nozzles, a new technology was demonstrated, using devices that enhance mixing when applied to an exhaust nozzle. The acoustic benefits from these devices applied to medium BPR nozzles were similar, and in some cases superior to, those obtained from conventional uniform chevron nozzles. However, none of the low noise technologies provided equivalent acoustic benefits on a model-scale high BPR exhaust nozzle, similar to current large commercial applications. New technologies must be identified to improve the acoustics of state-of-the-art high BPR jet engines.

  12. Concert hall acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Manfred

    2004-05-01

    I will review some work at Bell Laboratories on artificial reverberation and concert hall acoustics including Philharmonic Hall (Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, New York). I will also touch on sound diffusion by number-theoretic surfaces and the measurement of reverberation time using the music as played in the hall as a ``test'' signal.

  13. Acoustics in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Miriam J.

    This paper explores the issues associated with poor acoustics within schools. Additionally, it suggests remedies for existing buildings and those under renovation, as well as concerns for new construction. The paper discusses the effects of unwanted noise on students in terms of physiological, motivational, and cognitive influences. Issues are…

  14. Micro acoustic spectrum analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Schubert, W. Kent; Butler, Michael A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Anderson, Larry F.

    2004-11-23

    A micro acoustic spectrum analyzer for determining the frequency components of a fluctuating sound signal comprises a microphone to pick up the fluctuating sound signal and produce an alternating current electrical signal; at least one microfabricated resonator, each resonator having a different resonant frequency, that vibrate in response to the alternating current electrical signal; and at least one detector to detect the vibration of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can further comprise a mixer to mix a reference signal with the alternating current electrical signal from the microphone to shift the frequency spectrum to a frequency range that is a better matched to the resonant frequencies of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can be designed specifically for portability, size, cost, accuracy, speed, power requirements, and use in a harsh environment. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer is particularly suited for applications where size, accessibility, and power requirements are limited, such as the monitoring of industrial equipment and processes, detection of security intrusions, or evaluation of military threats.

  15. Detecting Contaminant Particles Acoustically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus "listens" for particles in interior of complex turbomachinery. Contact microphones are attached at several points on pump housing. Acoustic transducer also attached to housing to excite entire pump with sound. Frequency of sound is slowly raised until pump resonates. Microphones detect noise of loose particles scraping against pump parts. Such as machining chips in turbopumps or other machinery without disassembly.

  16. Indigenous Acoustic Detection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-26

    considerable distances, and they act as good sensors of human presence. Though singing insects are ubiquitous in warm areas, even in the desert ( Nevo and...methodology. DTIC. CD-58-PL. Lloyd, J. E. 1981. Personnel communication. Nevo , E. and S. A. Blondheim. 1972. Acoustic isolation in the speciation of

  17. Numerical Simulations of Acoustically Driven, Burning Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.-C.; Karagozian, A. R.; Smith, O. I.; Urban, Dave (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This computational study focuses on understanding and quantifying the effects of external acoustical perturbations on droplet combustion. A one-dimensional, axisymmetric representation of the essential diffusion and reaction processes occurring in the vicinity of the droplet stagnation point is used here in order to isolate the effects of the imposed acoustic disturbance. The simulation is performed using a third order accurate, essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) numerical scheme with a full methanol-air reaction mechanism. Consistent with recent microgravity and normal gravity combustion experiments, focus is placed on conditions where the droplet is situated at a velocity antinode in order for the droplet to experience the greatest effects of fluid mechanical straining of flame structures. The effects of imposed sound pressure level and frequency are explored here, and conditions leading to maximum burning rates are identified.

  18. Acoustic radiation force on a heated sphere including effects of heat transfer and acoustic streaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chun P.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1988-01-01

    A previous theoretical result on the subject of the acoustic radiation force on a heated sphere (Lee and Wang, 1984) is reexamined. For a more complete understanding, effects of heat transfer and acoustic streaming are taken into consideration. Essentially, it was found that, at high sound-pressure levels in a steady situation, the force is not affected significantly by the temperature profile, consistent with the result of an experimental work (Leung and Wang, 1985). This resolves the earlier apparent contradiction between the theory and the experiment. If excessive hot air is accumulated around the sphere, which can happen in transient situations, the force can be weakened or reversed in sign. A heat transfer model due to acoustic streaming was also found.

  19. Holograms for acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G.; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  20. Acoustic solitons: A robust tool to investigate the generation and detection of ultrafast acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péronne, Emmanuel; Chuecos, Nicolas; Thevenard, Laura; Perrin, Bernard

    2017-02-01

    Solitons are self-preserving traveling waves of great interest in nonlinear physics but hard to observe experimentally. In this report an experimental setup is designed to observe and characterize acoustic solitons in a GaAs(001) substrate. It is based on careful temperature control of the sample and an interferometric detection scheme. Ultrashort acoustic solitons, such as the one predicted by the Korteweg-de Vries equation, are observed and fully characterized. Their particlelike nature is clearly evidenced and their unique properties are thoroughly checked. The spatial averaging of the soliton wave front is shown to account for the differences between the theoretical and experimental soliton profile. It appears that ultrafast acoustic experiments provide a precise measurement of the soliton velocity. It allows for absolute calibration of the setup as well as the response function analysis of the detection layer. Moreover, the temporal distribution of the solitons is also analyzed with the help of the inverse scattering method. It shows how the initial acoustic pulse profile which gives birth to solitons after nonlinear propagation can be retrieved. Such investigations provide a new tool to probe transient properties of highly excited matter through the study of the emitted acoustic pulse after laser excitation.

  1. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameter values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emission associated with (a) crack propagation, (b) ball dropping on a plate, (c) spark discharge, and (d) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train is shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  2. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis, and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameters values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emissions associated with: (1) crack propagation, (2) ball dropping on a plate, (3) spark discharge and (4) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train are shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  3. Adaptive significance of synchronous chorusing in an acoustically signalling wolf spider.

    PubMed

    Kotiaho, Janne S; Alatalo, Rauno V; Mappes, Johanna; Parri, Silja

    2004-09-07

    Synchronous sexual signalling is a behavioural phenomenon that has received considerable theoretical interest, but surprisingly few empirical tests have been conducted. Here, we present a set of experiments designed to determine (i) whether the sexual signalling of the drumming wolf spider Hygrolycosa rubrofasciata is synchronous, and (ii) whether the synchrony may have evolved through female preference. Using controlled playback experiments, we found that males actively synchronized their drumming bouts with other males and females significantly preferred closely synchronized drumming clusters compared with loose clusters. In loose clusters, the first drumming signals attracted the most female responses, whereas in close clusters, the last drumming signals were the most heeded. We suggest that this female preference for the last drummer can maintain male synchronous signalling in H. rubrofasciata.

  4. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  5. A Theoretical Investigation of Acoustic Cavitation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-15

    dynamics known as the Rayleigh - Plesset equation. This equation was shown to work quite well under some conditions. , Recent experiments have shown...that when the acoustic driving frequency is near one of A-Oe bubble’s harmonic resonances, the theoretical values predicted by the Rayleigh - Plesset ...equation are inconsistent with observed values. This inconsistency lead Prosperetti to consider the internal pressure term in the Rayleigh - Plesset

  6. Scattering of Acoustic Waves from Ocean Boundaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    of buried mines and improve SONAR performance in shallow water. OBJECTIVES 1) Determination of the correct physical model of acoustic propagation...Measurements for Range Dependent Geoacoustic Parameters: Bottom loss data from 5 – 30 kHz were collected as part of the Target and Reverberation Experiment...2013 (TREX13). These data were analyzed and range dependent geoacoustic parameters were derived for the TREX reverberation site including bottom loss

  7. Basin Acoustics in the Arctic Ocean.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    covered in a companion paper [ Hielscher , 1985). within the axis of the SOFAR channel which leads to dispersive propagation [Kutschale, 1966]. The ice...executing the experiment are described itoring enable scientists in the field to track the in a companion paper [ Hielscher , 1985]. interesting feature...multichannel data aquisition system for . 1964 seismic and acoustic applications, Proc. of Oceans’ 81, pp. 43-47, IEEE Press, 1981 *- Hielscher , A. and

  8. Suppression of Helmholtz resonance using inside acoustic liner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Zhiliang; Dai, Xiwen; Zhou, Nianfa; Sun, Xiaofeng; Jing, Xiaodong

    2014-08-01

    When a Helmholtz resonator is exposed to grazing flow, an unstable shear layer at the opening can cause the occurrence of acoustic resonance under appropriate conditions. In this paper, in order to suppress the flow-induced resonance, the effects of inside acoustic liners placed on the side wall or the bottom of a Helmholtz resonator are investigated. Based on the one-dimensional sound propagation theory, the time domain impedance model of a Helmholtz resonator with inside acoustic liner is derived, and then combined with a discrete vortex model the resonant behavior of the resonator under grazing flow is simulated. Besides, an experiment is conducted to validate the present model, showing significant reduction of the peak sound pressure level achieved by the use of the side-wall liners. And the simulation results match reasonably well with the experimental data. The present results reveal that the inside acoustic liner can not only absorb the resonant sound pressure, but also suppress the fluctuation motion of the shear layer over the opening of the resonator. In all, the impact of the acoustic liners is to dampen the instability of the flow-acoustic coupled system. This demonstrates that it is a convenient and effective method for suppressing Helmholtz resonance by using inside acoustic liner.

  9. Optical and acoustical dynamics of microbubble contrast agents inside neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Dayton, P A; Chomas, J E; Lum, A F; Allen, J S; Lindner, J R; Simon, S I; Ferrara, K W

    2001-01-01

    Acoustically active microbubbles are used for contrast-enhanced ultrasound assessment of organ perfusion. In regions of inflammation, contrast agents are captured and phagocytosed by activated neutrophils adherent to the venular wall. Using direct optical observation with a high-speed camera and acoustical interrogation of individual bubbles and cells, we assessed the physical and acoustical responses of both phagocytosed and free microbubbles. Optical analysis of bubble radial oscillations during insonation demonstrated that phagocytosed microbubbles experience viscous damping within the cytoplasm and yet remain acoustically active and capable of large volumetric oscillations during an acoustic pulse. Fitting a modified version of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation that describes mechanical properties of thin shells to optical radius-time data of oscillating bubbles provided estimates of the apparent viscosity of the intracellular medium. Phagocytosed microbubbles experienced a viscous damping approximately sevenfold greater than free microbubbles. Acoustical comparison between free and phagocytosed microbubbles indicated that phagocytosed microbubbles produce an echo with a higher mean frequency than free microbubbles in response to a rarefaction-first single-cycle pulse. Moreover, this frequency increase is predicted using the modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation. We conclude that contrast-enhanced ultrasound can detect distinct acoustic signals from microbubbles inside of neutrophils and may provide a unique tool to identify activated neutrophils at sites of inflammation. PMID:11222315

  10. Acoustic assessment of erygmophonic speech of Moroccan laryngectomized patients

    PubMed Central

    Ouattassi, Naouar; Benmansour, Najib; Ridal, Mohammed; Zaki, Zouheir; Bendahhou, Karima; Nejjari, Chakib; Cherkaoui, Abdeljabbar; El Alami, Mohammed Nouredine El Amine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acoustic evaluation of alaryngeal voices is among the most prominent issues in speech analysis field. In fact, many methods have been developed to date to substitute the classic perceptual evaluation. The Aim of this study is to present our experience in erygmophonic speech objective assessment and to discuss the most widely used methods of acoustic speech appraisal. through a prospective case-control study we have measured acoustic parameters of speech quality during one year of erygmophonic rehabilitation therapy of Moroccan laryngectomized patients. Methods We have assessed acoustic parameters of erygmophonic speech samples of eleven laryngectomized patients through the speech rehabilitation therapy. Acoustic parameters were obtained by perturbation analysis method and linear predictive coding algorithms also through the broadband spectrogram. Results Using perturbation analysis methods, we have found erygmophonic voice to be significantly poorer than normal speech and it exhibits higher formant frequency values. However, erygmophonic voice shows also higher and extremely variable Error values that were greater than the acceptable level. And thus, live a doubt on the reliability of those analytic methods results. Conclusion Acoustic parameters for objective evaluation of alaryngeal voices should allow a reliable representation of the perceptual evaluation of the quality of speech. This requirement has not been fulfilled by the common methods used so far. Therefore, acoustical assessment of erygmophonic speech needs more investigations. PMID:26587121

  11. Preliminary Observations from the 2014 Sand Dunes Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    oceanographic experiment sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (Ocean Acoustics , Physical Oceanography, and ONR Global). This was the primary...experiment, following the 2013 pilot effort, designed to focus on acoustic propagation, reverberation, and fluctuations of sound intensity of nonlinear...during this field effort. Further analysis and results will be published as scientific journal articles. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ocean Acoustics

  12. Education in acoustics in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyara, Federico

    2002-11-01

    Over the last decades, education in acoustics (EA) in Argentina has experienced ups and downs due to economic and political issues interfering with long term projects. Unlike other countries, like Chile, where EA has reached maturity in spite of the acoustical industry having shown little development, Argentina has several well-established manufacturers of acoustic materials and equipment but no specific career with a major in acoustics. At the university level, acoustics is taught as a complementary--often elective--course for careers such as architecture, communication engineering, or music. In spite of this there are several research centers with programs covering environmental and community noise, effects of noise on man, acoustic signal processing, musical acoustics and acoustic emission, and several national and international meetings are held each year in which results are communicated and discussed. Several books on a variety of topics such as sound system, architectural acoustics, and noise control have been published as well. Another chapter in EA is technical and vocational education, ranging between secondary and postsecondary levels, with technical training on sound system operation or design. Over the last years there have been several attempts to implement master degrees in acoustics or audio engineering, with little or no success.

  13. Acoustic energy harvesting based on a planar acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuibao; Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically report on an innovative and practical acoustic energy harvester based on a defected acoustic metamaterial (AMM) with piezoelectric material. The idea is to create suitable resonant defects in an AMM to confine the strain energy originating from an acoustic incidence. This scavenged energy is converted into electrical energy by attaching a structured piezoelectric material into the defect area of the AMM. We show an acoustic energy harvester based on a meta-structure capable of producing electrical power from an acoustic pressure. Numerical simulations are provided to analyze and elucidate the principles and the performances of the proposed system. A maximum output voltage of 1.3 V and a power density of 0.54 μW/cm3 are obtained at a frequency of 2257.5 Hz. The proposed concept should have broad applications on energy harvesting as well as on low-frequency sound isolation, since this system acts as both acoustic insulator and energy harvester.

  14. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Mei, Jun; Aljahdali, Rasha

    We design a type of acoustic metasurface, which is composed of carefully designed slits in a rigid thin plate. The effective refractive indices of different slits are different but the impedances are kept the same as that of the host medium. Numerical simulations show that such a metasurface can redirect or reflect a normally incident wave at different frequencies, even though it is impedance matched to the host medium. We show that the underlying mechanisms can be understood by using the generalized Snell's law, and a unified analytic model based on mode-coupling theory. We demonstrate some simple realization of such acoustic metasurface with real materials. The principle is also extended to the design of planar acoustic lens which can focus acoustic waves. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces.

  15. Effect of electron heating on femtosecond laser-induced coherent acoustic phonons in noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jincheng; Guo, Chunlei

    2007-05-01

    We employ a surface plasmon technique to resolve the dynamics of femtosecond-laser-induced coherent acoustic phonons in noble metals. Clear acoustic oscillations are observed in our experiments. We further study the dependence of the initial phase of the oscillations on pump fluence, and we find that the initial phase decreases linearly with pump fluence. Our model calculations show that hot electrons instantaneously excited by femtosecond pulses contribute to the generation of coherent acoustic phonons in metals.

  16. Detection of impulsive sources from an aerostat-based acoustic array data collection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Wayne E.; Clark, Robert C.; Strickland, Joshua; Frazier, Wm. Garth; Singleton, Jere

    2009-05-01

    An aerostat based acoustic array data collection system was deployed at the NATO TG-53 "Acoustic Detection of Weapon Firing" Joint Field Experiment conducted in Bourges, France during the final two weeks of June 2008. A variety of impulsive sources including mortar, artillery, gunfire, RPG, and explosive devices were fired during the test. Results from the aerostat acoustic array will be presented against the entire range of sources.

  17. Influence of sound absorbing surfaces on acoustic oscillations and flame acceleration in hydrogen-air mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobov, A. E.; Volodin, V. V.; Golovastov, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The frequency spectrum of acoustic disturbances that are emitted by accelerating flame front in an air-hydrogen mixture within an axially symmetric channel with a uniform cross section is experimentally determined. The effect of acoustic disturbances that are reflected from the closed end of the combustion chamber on the flame front acceleration is studied. It is revealed that the frequency spectrum of generated acoustic disturbances under experiment conditions has maximums at frequencies close to 250, 800, and 1500 Hz.

  18. Acoustic Environment Simulation Study; Acoustic Intrusion Sensor Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    RD-R149 245 ACOUSTIC ENVIRONMENT SIMULATION STUDY; ACOUSTIC is INTRUSION SENSOR PERFORMANCE(U) TIME SERIES ASSOCIATES PALO ALTO CA L ENOCHSON ET AL...ACOUSTIC ENVIRONMENT SIMULATION STUDY PREPARED BY: LOREN ENOCHSON TIME SERIES ASSOCIATES 920 WEST 33RD AVENUE SPOKANE, WA 99203 PREPARED FOR: NAVAL... TIME COVERED 5A0pA OF 1 jeamonth, Day) S, 54 ( 4UNT ,inal; .. na, F ROM TO o . !L,,Nv; REJa- ,GE U -. ,16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION COSATI CODES 18

  19. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  20. A Martian acoustic anemometer.

    PubMed

    Banfield, Don; Schindel, David W; Tarr, Steve; Dissly, Richard W

    2016-08-01

    An acoustic anemometer for use on Mars has been developed. To understand the processes that control the interaction between surface and atmosphere on Mars, not only the mean winds, but also the turbulent boundary layer, the fluxes of momentum, heat and molecular constituents between surface and atmosphere must be measured. Terrestrially this is done with acoustic anemometers, but the low density atmosphere on Mars makes it challenging to adapt such an instrument for use on Mars. This has been achieved using capacitive transducers and pulse compression, and was successfully demonstrated on a stratospheric balloon (simulating the Martian environment) and in a dedicated Mars Wind Tunnel facility. This instrument achieves a measurement accuracy of ∼5 cm/s with an update rate of >20 Hz under Martian conditions.

  1. Acoustic methodology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    It is important for industry and NASA to assess the status of acoustic design technology for predicting and controlling helicopter external noise in order for a meaningful research program to be formulated which will address this problem. The prediction methodologies available to the designer and the acoustic engineer are three-fold. First is what has been described as a first principle analysis. This analysis approach attempts to remove any empiricism from the analysis process and deals with a theoretical mechanism approach to predicting the noise. The second approach attempts to combine first principle methodology (when available) with empirical data to formulate source predictors which can be combined to predict vehicle levels. The third is an empirical analysis, which attempts to generalize measured trends into a vehicle noise prediction method. This paper will briefly address each.

  2. Radiosurgery of acoustic neurinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Flickinger, J.C.; Lunsford, L.D.; Coffey, R.J.; Linskey, M.E.; Bissonette, D.J.; Maitz, A.H.; Kondziolka, D. )

    1991-01-15

    Eighty-five patients with acoustic neurinomas underwent stereotactic radiosurgery with the gamma unit at the University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA) during its first 30 months of operation. Neuroimaging studies performed in 40 patients with more than 1 year follow-up showed that tumors were smaller in 22 (55%), unchanged in 17 (43%), and larger in one (2%). The 2-year actuarial rates for preservation of useful hearing and any hearing were 46% and 62%, respectively. Previously undetected neuropathies of the trigeminal (n = 12) and facial nerves (n = 14) occurred 1 week to 1 year after radiosurgery (median, 7 and 6 months, respectively), and improved at median intervals of 13 and 8 months, respectively, after onset. Hearing loss was significantly associated with increasing average tumor diameter (P = 0.04). No deterioration of any cranial nerve function has yet developed in seven patients with average tumor diameters less than 10 mm. Radiosurgery is an important treatment alternative for selected acoustic neurinoma patients.

  3. Acoustics Discipline Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane; Thomas, Russell

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Annual Review, a summary of the progress made in 2007 in acoustics research under the Subsonic Fixed Wing project is given. The presentation describes highlights from in-house and external activities including partnerships and NRA-funded research with industry and academia. Brief progress reports from all acoustics Phase 1 NRAs are also included as are outlines of the planned activities for 2008 and all Phase 2 NRAs. N+1 and N+2 technology paths outlined for Subsonic Fixed Wing noise targets. NRA Round 1 progressing with focus on prediction method advancement. NRA Round 2 initiating work focused on N+2 technology, prediction methods, and validation. Excellent partnerships in progress supporting N+1 technology targets and providing key data sets.

  4. Acoustic absorption by sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, D. C.; Labonte, B. J.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the initial results of a series of observations designed to probe the nature of sunspots by detecting their influence on high-degree p-mode oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The analysis decomposes the observed oscillations into radially propagating waves described by Hankel functions in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the sunspot. From measurements of the differences in power between waves traveling outward and inward, it is demonstrated that sunspots appear to absorb as much as 50 percent of the incoming acoustic waves. It is found that for all three sunspots observed, the amount of absorption increases linearly with horizontal wavenumber. The effect is present in p-mode oscillations with wavelengths both significantly larger and smaller than the diameter of the sunspot umbrae. Actual absorption of acoustic energy of the magnitude observed may produce measurable decreases in the power and lifetimes of high-degree p-mode oscillations during periods of high solar activity.

  5. Electromagnetic acoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Jane F; Chang, David B; McNaughton, Stuart; Jeong, Jong Seob; Shung, K K; Cerwin, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    Electromagnetic acoustic imaging (EMAI) is a new imaging technique that uses long-wavelength RF electromagnetic (EM) waves to induce ultrasound emission. Signal intensity and image contrast have been found to depend on spatially varying electrical conductivity of the medium in addition to conventional acoustic properties. The resultant conductivity- weighted ultrasound data may enhance the diagnostic performance of medical ultrasound in cancer and cardiovascular applications because of the known changes in conductivity of malignancy and blood-filled spaces. EMAI has a potential advantage over other related imaging techniques because it combines the high resolution associated with ultrasound detection with the generation of the ultrasound signals directly related to physiologically important electrical properties of the tissues. Here, we report the theoretical development of EMAI, implementation of a dual-mode EMAI/ultrasound apparatus, and successful demonstrations of EMAI in various phantoms designed to establish feasibility of the approach for eventual medical applications.

  6. Suppression through acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Kevin D.; Short, Kenneth R.; VanMeenen, Kirsten M.; Servatius, Richard J.

    2006-05-01

    This paper reviews research conducted by our laboratory exploring the possible use of acoustical stimuli as a tool for influencing behavior. Over the course of several programs, different types of acoustic stimuli have been evaluated for their effectiveness in disrupting targeting, balance, and high-order cognitive processes in both humans and animals. Escape responses are of particular use in this regard. An escape response serves not only as an objective measure of aversion, but as a potential substitute for ongoing behavior. We have also assessed whether the level of performance changes if the individual does not perform an escape response. In general these studies have both suggested certain types of sounds are more aversive or distracting than others. Although the laboratory development of additional stimuli needs to continue, we are taking the next step by testing some of the more effective stimuli in more applied experimental scenarios including those involving group dynamics.

  7. FY 89 Acoustics Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-11

    small. (=0.3%) a result which exhibits qualitative agreemnent with the results of Korobko and Chernobaiŕ . We saw no detectable change in...Senlis, France, (1990). 5. A Practical Sensor for Acoustic Detection of Larvae and Insects in Harvested Commodities, R. Hickling, S.T. Chang , J.C. Webb...to detect or gene;rate ;Couste ,,vc’-. "hcsc mater;als are unitiue in that thcv can he formed into largecxihlc sheet. lhmrelut, it is possible to

  8. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    1999-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported are a synopsis of the work and accomplishments reported by the Division during the 1996 calendar year. A bibliography containing 42 citations is provided.

  9. Ocean acoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornuelle, Bruce D.; Worcester, Peter F.; Dzieciuch, Matthew A.

    2008-10-01

    Ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) was proposed in 1979 by Walter Munk and Carl Wunsch as an analogue to x-ray computed axial tomography for the oceans. The oceans are opaque to most electromagnetic radiation, but there is a strong acoustic waveguide, and sound can propagate for 10 Mm and more with distinct multiply-refracted ray paths. Transmitting broadband pulses in the ocean leads to a set of impulsive arrivals at the receiver which characterize the impulse response of the sound channel. The peaks observed at the receiver are assumed to represent the arrival of energy traveling along geometric ray paths. These paths can be distinguished by arrival time, and by arrival angle when a vertical array of receivers is available. Changes in ray arrival time can be used to infer changes in ocean structure. Ray travel time measurements have been a mainstay of long-range acoustic measurements, but the strong sensitivity of ray paths to range-dependent sound speed perturbations makes the ray sampling functions uncertain in real cases. In the ray approximation travel times are sensitive to medium changes only along the corresponding eigenrays. Ray theory is an infinite-frequency approximation, and its eikonal equation has nonlinearities not found in the acoustic wave equation. We build on recent seismology results (kernels for body wave arrivals in the earth) to characterize the kernel for converting sound speed change in the ocean to travel time changes using more complete propagation physics. Wave-theoretic finite frequency kernels may show less sensitivity to small-scale sound speed structure.

  10. Broadband Acoustic Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    shallow water 1 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to...claims to the contrary in the ocean acoustics community, sub-bottom clutter can and does occur in shallow water environments. A step-by-step detailed...that of the overlying water column and hence there is no critical angle. Thus, the reflection, scattering, propagation and reverberation are

  11. Acoustics Local Area Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-31

    contract was to provide a shared computing i : resource - the acou tics local area network (ALAN) - to support ocean acoustic and related oceanographic...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. UMITATION OF ABSTRACT OF REPORT: THIS PAGE OF ABSTRACT Unclassified I I ONRCtI COMPUTER V 10 11/94 STANDARD FORM 233 (REV 241) oo 0 90 " VLNV1LV HNO Og6OuLtOI, CT:tT 96/OT/0

  12. Acoustic Communications for UUVs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Acoustic Communications for UUVs Josko Catipovic Lee Freitag Naval Undersea Warfare Center Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Newport, RI 02841... Woods Hole, MA 02543 (401) 832-3259 (508) 289-3285 catipovicj@npt.nuwc.navy.mil lfreitag@whoi.edu Dan Nagle Sam Smith Naval Undersea Warfare Center...positioned within a streamlined flow shield which reduces drag and protects them from damage. While the HF transducers are placed on the structure and the

  13. Acoustic Characterization of Soil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    modified SAR imaging algorithm. Page 26 Final Report In the acoustic subsurface imaging scenario, the "object" to be imaged (i.e., cultural artifacts... subsurface imaging scenario. To combat this potential difficulty we can utilize a new SAR imaging algorithm (Lee et al., 1996) derived from a geophysics...essentially a transmit plane wave. This is a cost-effective means to evaluate the feasibility of subsurface imaging . A more complete (and costly

  14. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  15. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    2001-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of the NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included in this report are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported is a synopsis of the work and accomplishments completed by the Division during the 1997, 1998, and 1999 calendar years. A bibliography containing 93 citations is provided.

  16. Experimental study on inter-particle acoustic forces.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sabaté, Anna; Castro, Angélica; Hoyos, Mauricio; González-Cinca, Ricard

    2014-03-01

    A method for the experimental measurement of inter-particle forces (secondary Bjerknes force) generated by the action of an acoustic field in a resonator micro-channel is presented. The acoustic radiation force created by an ultrasonic standing wave moves suspended particles towards the pressure nodes and the acoustic pressure induces particle volume oscillations. Once particles are in the levitation plane, transverse and secondary Bjerknes forces become important. Experiments were carried out in a resonator filled with a suspension composed of water and latex particles of different size (5-15 μm) at different concentrations. Ultrasound was generated by means of a 2.5 MHz nominal frequency transducer. For the first time the acoustic force generated by oscillating particles acting on other particles has been measured, and the critical interaction distance in various cases has been determined. Inter-particle forces on the order of 10(-14) N have been measured by using this method.

  17. Acoustic droplet vaporization of vascular droplets in gas embolotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    This work is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular droplets. Additionally, micro- or nano-droplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Functionalized droplets that are targeted to tumor vasculature are examined. The influence of fluid mechanical and acoustic parameters, as well as droplet functionalization, is explored. This work was supported by NIH Grant R01EB006476.

  18. Possibilities of acoustic thermometry for controlling targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Nemchenko, O. Yu.; Less, Yu. A.; Kazanskii, A. S.; Mansfel'd, A. D.

    2015-07-01

    Model acoustic thermometry experiments were conducted during heating of an aqueous liposome suspension. Heating was done to achieve the liposome phase transition temperature. At the moment of the phase transition, the thermal acoustic signal achieved a maximum and decreased, despite continued heating. During subsequent cooling of the suspension, when lipids again passed through the phase transition point, the thermal acoustic signal again increased, despite a reduction in temperature. This effect is related to an increase in ultrasound absorption by the liposome suspension at the moment of the lipid phase transition. The result shows that acoustic thermography can be used to control targeted delivery of drugs mixed in thermally sensitive liposomes, the integrity of which is violated during heating to the phase transition temperature.

  19. Effect of Forcing Function on Nonlinear Acoustic Standing Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkheiner, Joshua R.; Li, Xiao-Fan; Raman, Ganesh; Daniels, Chris; Steinetz, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear acoustic standing waves of high amplitude have been demonstrated by utilizing the effects of resonator shape to prevent the pressure waves from entering saturation. Experimentally, nonlinear acoustic standing waves have been generated by shaking an entire resonating cavity. While this promotes more efficient energy transfer than a piston-driven resonator, it also introduces complicated structural dynamics into the system. Experiments have shown that these dynamics result in resonator forcing functions comprised of a sum of several Fourier modes. However, previous numerical studies of the acoustics generated within the resonator assumed simple sinusoidal waves as the driving force. Using a previously developed numerical code, this paper demonstrates the effects of using a forcing function constructed with a series of harmonic sinusoidal waves on resonating cavities. From these results, a method will be demonstrated which allows the direct numerical analysis of experimentally generated nonlinear acoustic waves in resonators driven by harmonic forcing functions.

  20. Acoustic markers of syllabic stress in Spanish excellent oesophageal speakers.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, María Heliodora; Barrio, Marina M; Anaya, Pablo; Establier, Carmelo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to explore the use by Spanish excellent oesophageal speakers of acoustic cues to mark syllabic stress. The speech material has consisted of five pairs of disyllabic words which only differed in stress position. Total 44 oesophageal and 9 laryngeal speakers were recorded and a computerised designed ad hoc perceptual test was run in order to assess the accurate realisation of stress. The items produced by eight excellent oesophageal speakers with highest accuracy levels in the perception experiment were analysed acoustically with Praat, to be compared with the laryngeal control group. Measures of duration, fundamental frequency, spectral balance and overall intensity were taken for each target vowel and syllable. Results revealed that Spanish excellent oesophageal speakers were able to retain appropriate acoustic relations between stressed and unstressed syllables. Although spectral balance revealed as a strong cue for syllabic stress in the two voicing modes, a different hierarchy of acoustic cues in each voicing mode was found.