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Sample records for acoustic positioning system

  1. In-ice acoustic positioning system for the Enceladus Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Ruth; EnEx Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    The IceMole, a combination of melting and drilling probe, which is able to move and steer through ice and take samples while doing so, can be used to install instruments in ice. In addition to the inertial navigation system, the ice-craft will be equipped with an acoustic positioning system, composed of receivers in the probe itself and several emitters (pinger) on the glacier surface. It will determine the position of the IceMole by measuring the signal propagation time and trilateration, which requires a solid knowledge of the propagation of acoustic signals in ice. A method to determine these properties during the operation of the IceMole will be developed. Here we will give an overview over the goals of the project and the design of the IceMole. We will present the status of the development of the acoustic positioning system and show the results of simulations on the positioning accuracy.

  2. Modeling the Behavior of an Underwater Acoustic Relative Positioning System Based on Complementary Set of Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Joaquín; Jiménez, Ana; Álvarez, Fernando J.; Ureña, Jesús; De Marziani, Carlos; Diego, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The great variability usually found in underwater media makes modeling a challenging task, but helpful for better understanding or predicting the performance of future deployed systems. In this work, an underwater acoustic propagation model is presented. This model obtains the multipath structure by means of the ray tracing technique. Using this model, the behavior of a relative positioning system is presented. One of the main advantages of relative positioning systems is that only the distances between all the buoys are needed to obtain their positions. In order to obtain the distances, the propagation times of acoustic signals coded by Complementary Set of Sequences (CSS) are used. In this case, the arrival instants are obtained by means of correlation processes. The distances are then used to obtain the position of the buoys by means of the Multidimensional Scaling Technique (MDS). As an early example of an application using this relative positioning system, a tracking of the position of the buoys at different times is performed. With this tracking, the surface current of a particular region could be studied. The performance of the system is evaluated in terms of the distance from the real position to the estimated one. PMID:22247661

  3. Variable-Position Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Stoneburner, J. D.; Jacobi, N.; Wang, T. G.

    1983-01-01

    Method of acoustic levitation supports objects at positions other than acoustic nodes. Acoustic force is varied so it balances gravitational (or other) force, thereby maintaining object at any position within equilibrium range. Levitation method applicable to containerless processing. Such objects as table-tennis balls, hollow plastic spheres, and balsa-wood spheres levitated in laboratory by new method.

  4. Underwater acoustic positioning system for the SMO and KM3NeT - Italia projects

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, S.; Barbagallo, G.; Cacopardo, G.; Calí, C.; Cocimano, R.; Coniglione, R.; Costa, M.; Cuttone, G.; D'Amato, C.; D'Amato, V.; D'Amico, A.; De Luca, V.; Del Tevere, F.; Distefano, C.; Ferrera, F.; Gmerk, A.; Grasso, R.; Imbesi, M.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; and others

    2014-11-18

    In the underwater neutrino telescopes, the positions of the Cherenkov light sensors and their movements must be known with an accuracy of few tens of centimetres. In this work, the activities of the SMO and KM3NeT-Italia teams for the development of an acoustic positioning system for KM3NeT-Italia project are presented. The KM3NeT-Italia project foresees the construction, within two years, of 8 towers in the view of the several km{sup 3}-scale neutrino telescope KM3NeT.

  5. Design and Experimental Validation of a USBL Underwater Acoustic Positioning System.

    PubMed

    Reis, Joel; Morgado, Marco; Batista, Pedro; Oliveira, Paulo; Silvestre, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the steps for developing a low-cost POrtableNavigation Tool for Underwater Scenarios (PONTUS) to be used as a localization device for subsea targets. PONTUS consists of an integrated ultra-short baseline acoustic positioning system aided by an inertial navigation system. Built on a practical design, it can be mounted on an underwater robotic vehicle or be operated by a scuba diver. It also features a graphical user interface that provides information on the tracking of the designated target, in addition to some details on the physical properties inside PONTUS. A full disclosure of the architecture of the tool is first presented, followed by thorough technical descriptions of the hardware components ensemble and the software development process. A series of experiments was carried out to validate the developed prototype, and the results are presented herein, which allow assessing its overall performance. PMID:27649181

  6. Design and Experimental Validation of a USBL Underwater Acoustic Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Joel; Morgado, Marco; Batista, Pedro; Oliveira, Paulo; Silvestre, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the steps for developing a low-cost POrtableNavigation Tool for Underwater Scenarios (PONTUS) to be used as a localization device for subsea targets. PONTUS consists of an integrated ultra-short baseline acoustic positioning system aided by an inertial navigation system. Built on a practical design, it can be mounted on an underwater robotic vehicle or be operated by a scuba diver. It also features a graphical user interface that provides information on the tracking of the designated target, in addition to some details on the physical properties inside PONTUS. A full disclosure of the architecture of the tool is first presented, followed by thorough technical descriptions of the hardware components ensemble and the software development process. A series of experiments was carried out to validate the developed prototype, and the results are presented herein, which allow assessing its overall performance. PMID:27649181

  7. Design and Experimental Validation of a USBL Underwater Acoustic Positioning System.

    PubMed

    Reis, Joel; Morgado, Marco; Batista, Pedro; Oliveira, Paulo; Silvestre, Carlos

    2016-09-14

    This paper presents the steps for developing a low-cost POrtableNavigation Tool for Underwater Scenarios (PONTUS) to be used as a localization device for subsea targets. PONTUS consists of an integrated ultra-short baseline acoustic positioning system aided by an inertial navigation system. Built on a practical design, it can be mounted on an underwater robotic vehicle or be operated by a scuba diver. It also features a graphical user interface that provides information on the tracking of the designated target, in addition to some details on the physical properties inside PONTUS. A full disclosure of the architecture of the tool is first presented, followed by thorough technical descriptions of the hardware components ensemble and the software development process. A series of experiments was carried out to validate the developed prototype, and the results are presented herein, which allow assessing its overall performance.

  8. Acoustic positioning and orientation prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Aveni, Glenn; Putterman, Seth; Rudnick, Joseph

    1990-10-01

    A method is described for use with an acoustic positioner, which enables a determination of the equilibrium position and orientation which an object assumes in a zero gravity environment, as well as restoring forces and torques of an object in an acoustic standing wave field. An acoustic standing wave field is established in the chamber, and the object is held at several different positions near the expected equilibrium position. While the object is held at each position, the center resonant frequency of the chamber is determined, by noting which frequency results in the greatest pressure of the acoustic field. The object position which results in the lowest center resonant frequency is the equilibrium position. The orientation of a nonspherical object is similarly determined, by holding the object in a plurality of different orientations at its equilibrium position, and noting the center resonant frequency for each orientation. The orientation which results in the lowest center resonant frequency is the equilibrium orientation. Where the acoustic frequency is constant, but the chamber length is variable, the equilibrium position or orientation is that which results in the greatest chamber length at the center resonant frequency.

  9. Acoustic positioning and orientation prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Aveni, Glenn (Inventor); Putterman, Seth (Inventor); Rudnick, Joseph (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for use with an acoustic positioner, which enables a determination of the equilibrium position and orientation which an object assumes in a zero gravity environment, as well as restoring forces and torques of an object in an acoustic standing wave field. An acoustic standing wave field is established in the chamber, and the object is held at several different positions near the expected equilibrium position. While the object is held at each position, the center resonant frequency of the chamber is determined, by noting which frequency results in the greatest pressure of the acoustic field. The object position which results in the lowest center resonant frequency is the equilibrium position. The orientation of a nonspherical object is similarly determined, by holding the object in a plurality of different orientations at its equilibrium position, and noting the center resonant frequency for each orientation. The orientation which results in the lowest center resonant frequency is the equilibrium orientation. Where the acoustic frequency is constant, but the chamber length is variable, the equilibrium position or orientation is that which results in the greatest chamber length at the center resonant frequency.

  10. Acoustic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  11. The multipath propagation effect in gunshot acoustics and its impact on the design of sniper positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, António L. L.; Holm, Sverre; Gudvangen, Sigmund; Otterlei, Ragnvald

    2013-06-01

    Counter sniper systems rely on the detection and parameter estimation of the shockwave and the muzzle blast in order to determine the sniper location. In real-world situations, these acoustical signals can be disturbed by natural phenomena like weather and climate conditions, multipath propagation effect, and background noise. While some of these issues have received some attention in recent publications with application to gunshot acoustics, the multipath propagation phenomenon whose effect can not be neglected, specially in urban environments, has not yet been discussed in details in the technical literature in the same context. Propagating sound waves can be reflected at the boundaries in the vicinity of sound sources or receivers, whenever there is a difference in acoustical impedance between the reflective material and the air. Therefore, the received signal can be composed of a direct-path signal plus N scaled delayed copies of that signal. This paper presents a discussion on the multipath propagation effect and its impact on the performance and reliability of sniper positioning systems. In our formulation, propagation models for both the shockwave and the muzzle blast are considered and analyzed. Conclusions following the theoretical analysis of the problem are fully supported by actual gunshots acoustical signatures.

  12. Monitoring the Lateral Gradient of Sound Speed in Ocean Toward Fast GPS/Acoustic Seafloor Positioning for the Cabled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, M.; Osada, Y.; Fujimoto, H.; Kaneda, Y.

    2007-12-01

    The GPS/acoustic technique is now in practical use for seafloor positioning to monitor crustal deformation beneath the ocean, where land-based GPS networks are not available. To achieve semi-realtime monitoring of the strain accumulation and possible precursor for the expected Nankai earthquake in Japan, JAMSTEC and others have started so called DONET project (Development of Dense Ocean-floor Network System for Earthquakes and Tsunamis), funded by MEXT Japan, where numerous seismometers, pressure gauges, and acoustic ranging instruments are going to be equipped through the planing seafloor cables at Kumano-nada. A GPS/acoustic system will be combined in part of the cable system. The present GPS/acoustic survey, which acoustically measures slant ranges between a surface transducer and three seafloor transponders, has a fault to get position in semi-realtime. The problem setting supposes a laterally stratified sound speed structure. Violation of this condition with lateral gradient in sound speed results in the deviation of apparent position of the transponders. At present, ~5~cm of accuracy is achieved after taking time-average more than 1~day to cancel-out the time-varying direction of the gradient. In addition, if a long-lived gradient appeared, we have no way to distinguish seafloor displacement from the gradient. To overcome the present status, we propose a new survey style which actively estimates the sound speed gradient and makes its correction on apparent positioning by using five transponders. This rather complicated survey style requires severe layout of the transponders and observing position to stably resolve five unknowns: the horizontal displacement vector, stratified sound speed, and its gradient vector. We numerically investigated the best arrangement by evaluating the condition number of the observation equations. For further application, we also diagnosed the case of the reduced number of the unknowns and transponders for lower-cost construction of

  13. Determining Equilibrium Position For Acoustical Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Aveni, G.; Putterman, S.; Rudnick, J.

    1989-01-01

    Equilibrium position and orientation of acoustically-levitated weightless object determined by calibration technique on Earth. From calibration data, possible to calculate equilibrium position and orientation in presence of Earth gravitation. Sample not levitated acoustically during calibration. Technique relies on Boltzmann-Ehrenfest adiabatic-invariance principle. One converts resonant-frequency-shift data into data on normalized acoustical potential energy. Minimum of energy occurs at equilibrium point. From gradients of acoustical potential energy, one calculates acoustical restoring force or torque on objects as function of deviation from equilibrium position or orientation.

  14. A Connection Model between the Positioning Mechanism and Ultrasonic Measurement System via a Web Browser to Assess Acoustic Target Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Ken; Imaizumi, Tomohito; Abe, Koki; Takao, Yoshimi; Tamura, Shuko

    This paper details a network-controlled measurement system for use in fisheries engineering. The target strength (TS) of fish is important in order to convert acoustic integration values obtained during acoustic surveys into estimates of fish abundance. The target strength pattern is measured with the combination of the rotation system for the aspect of the sample and the echo data acquisition system using the underwater supersonic wave. The user interface of the network architecture is designed for collaborative use with researchers in other organizations. The flexible network architecture is based on the web direct-access model for the rotation mechanism. The user interface is available for monitoring and controlling via a web browser that is installed in any terminal PC (personal computer). Previously the combination of two applications was performed not by a web browser but by the exclusive interface program. So a connection model is proposed between two applications by indirect communication via the DCOM (Distributed Component Object Model) server and added in the web direct-access model. A prompt report system in the TS measurement system and a positioning and measurement system using an electric flatcar via a web browser are developed. By a secure network architecture, DCOM communications via both Intranet and LAN are successfully certificated.

  15. Acoustic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic levitation system is described, with single acoustic source and a small reflector to stably levitate a small object while the object is processed as by coating or heating it. The system includes a concave acoustic source which has locations on opposite sides of its axis that vibrate towards and away from a focal point to generate a converging acoustic field. A small reflector is located near the focal point, and preferably slightly beyond it, to create an intense acoustic field that stably supports a small object near the reflector. The reflector is located about one-half wavelength from the focal point and is concavely curved to a radius of curvature (L) of about one-half the wavelength, to stably support an object one-quarter wavelength (N) from the reflector.

  16. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  17. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  18. Free-field acoustic stimulation: a reliable, inexpensive system for positioning loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Presswell, D; Caidan, S; Palmer, A R

    1985-01-01

    We describe a single mechanical system for locating a sound source anywhere on the surface of an imaginary sphere centred on an animal subject. The system has been used in neurophysiological studies of localization in guinea-pig and example neural data are shown.

  19. Acoustic sniper localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  20. Comparison of bottom-track to global positioning system referenced discharges measured using an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, C.R.; Mueller, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    A negative bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be caused by the movement of sediment on or near the streambed. The integration of a global positioning system (GPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic negative bias associated with a moving streambed. More than 500 discharge transects from 63 discharge measurements with GPS data were collected at sites throughout the US, Canada, and New Zealand with no moving bed to compare GPS and bottom-track-referenced discharges. Although the data indicated some statistical bias depending on site conditions and type of GPS data used, these biases were typically about 0.5% or less. An assessment of differential correction sources was limited by a lack of data collected in a range of different correction sources and different GPS receivers at the same sites. Despite this limitation, the data indicate that the use of Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) corrected positional data is acceptable for discharge measurements using GGA as the boat-velocity reference. The discharge data based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the VTG data string, which does not require differential correction, were comparable to the discharges based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the differentially-corrected GGA data string. Spatial variability of measure discharges referenced to GGA, VTG and bottom-tracking is higher near the channel banks. The spatial variability of VTG-referenced discharges is correlated with the spatial distribution of maximum Horizontal Dilution of Precision (HDOP) values and the spatial variability of GGA-referenced discharges is correlated with proximity to channel banks. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Determination of the viscous acoustic field for liquid drop positioning/forcing in an acoustic levitation chamber in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyell, Margaret J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of acoustic levitation systems has provided a technology with which to undertake droplet studies as well as do containerless processing experiments in a microgravity environment. Acoustic levitation chambers utilize radiation pressure forces to position/manipulate the drop. Oscillations can be induced via frequency modulation of the acoustic wave, with the modulated acoustic radiation vector acting as the driving force. To account for tangential as well as radial forcing, it is necessary that the viscous effects be included in the acoustic field. The method of composite expansions is employed in the determination of the acoustic field with viscous effects.

  2. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  3. Acoustic positioning for space processing experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whymark, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    An acoustic positioning system is described that is adaptable to a range of processing chambers and furnace systems. Operation at temperatures exceeding 1000 C is demonstrated in experiments involving the levitation of liquid and solid glass materials up to several ounces in weight. The system consists of a single source of sound that is beamed at a reflecting surface placed a distance away. Stable levitation is achieved at a succession of discrete energy minima contained throughout the volume between the reflector and the sound source. Several specimens can be handled at one time. Metal discs up to 3 inches in diameter can be levitated, solid spheres of dense material up to 0.75 inches diameter, and liquids can be freely suspended in l-g in the form of near-spherical droplets up to 0.25 inch diameter, or flattened liquid discs up to 0.6 inches diameter. Larger specimens may be handled by increasing the size of the sound source or by reducing the sound frequency.

  4. Bathymetric surveys of Morse and Geist Reservoirs in central Indiana made with acoustic Doppler current profiler and global positioning system technology, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, J.T.; Morlock, S.E.; Baker, N.T.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler, global positioning system, and geographic information system technology were used to map the bathymetry of Morse and Geist Reservoirs, two artificial lakes used for public water supply in central Indiana. The project was a pilot study to evaluate the use of the technologies for bathymetric surveys. Bathymetric surveys were last conducted in 1978 on Morse Reservoir and in 1980 on Geist Reservoir; those surveys were done with conventional methods using networks of fathometer transects. The 1996 bathymetric surveys produced updated estimates of reservoir volumes that will serve as base-line data for future estimates of storage capacity and sedimentation rates.An acoustic Doppler current profiler and global positioning system receiver were used to collect water-depth and position data from April 1996 through October 1996. All water-depth and position data were imported to a geographic information system to create a data base. The geographic information system then was used to generate water-depth contour maps and to compute the volumes for each reservoir.The computed volume of Morse Reservoir was 22,820 acre-feet (7.44 billion gallons), with a surface area of 1,484 acres. The computed volume of Geist Reservoir was 19,280 acre-feet (6.29 billion gallons), with a surface area of 1,848 acres. The computed 1996 reservoir volumes are less than the design volumes and indicate that sedimentation has occurred in both reservoirs. Cross sections were constructed from the computer-generated surfaces for 1996 and compared to the fathometer profiles from the 1978 and 1980 surveys; analysis of these cross sections also indicates that some sedimentation has occurred in both reservoirs.The acoustic Doppler current profiler, global positioning system, and geographic information system technologies described in this report produced bathymetric maps and volume estimates more efficiently and with comparable or greater resolution than conventional

  5. Acoustic leak detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, M.J.

    1993-08-03

    An acoustic leak detection system is described for determining the location of leaks in storage tanks, comprising: (a) sensor means for detecting a leak signal; (b) data acquisition means for digitizing and storing leak signals meeting preset criterion; and (c) analysis means for analyzing the digitized signals and computing the location of the source of the leak signals.

  6. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  7. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  8. Truck acoustic data analyzer system

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.; Akerman, Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2006-07-04

    A passive vehicle acoustic data analyzer system having at least one microphone disposed in the acoustic field of a moving vehicle and a computer in electronic communication the microphone(s). The computer detects and measures the frequency shift in the acoustic signature emitted by the vehicle as it approaches and passes the microphone(s). The acoustic signature of a truck driving by a microphone can provide enough information to estimate the truck speed in miles-per-hour (mph), engine speed in rotations-per-minute (RPM), turbocharger speed in RPM, and vehicle weight.

  9. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  10. Acoustic Levitation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.; Wang, T. G.; Croonquist, A.; Lee, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    Dense materials, such as steel balls, continuously levitated with energy provided by efficient high-powered siren in combination with shaped reflector. Reflector system, consisting of curved top reflector and flat lower reflector, eliminates instability in spatial positioning of sample.

  11. Acoustic Doppler discharge-measurement system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.; Oltmann, Richard N.; ,

    1990-01-01

    A discharge-measurement system that uses a vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler has been developed and tested by the U.S. Geological Survey. Discharge measurements using the system require a fraction of the time needed for conventional current-meter discharge measurements and do not require shore-based navigational aids or tag lines for positioning the vessel.

  12. Intelligent Engine Systems: Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojno, John; Martens, Steve; Simpson, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    An extensive study of new fan exhaust nozzle technologies was performed. Three new uniform chevron nozzles were designed, based on extensive CFD analysis. Two new azimuthally varying variants were defined. All five were tested, along with two existing nozzles, on a representative model-scale, medium BPR exhaust nozzle. Substantial acoustic benefits were obtained from the uniform chevron nozzle designs, the best benefit being provided by an existing design. However, one of the azimuthally varying nozzle designs exhibited even better performance than any of the uniform chevron nozzles. In addition to the fan chevron nozzles, a new technology was demonstrated, using devices that enhance mixing when applied to an exhaust nozzle. The acoustic benefits from these devices applied to medium BPR nozzles were similar, and in some cases superior to, those obtained from conventional uniform chevron nozzles. However, none of the low noise technologies provided equivalent acoustic benefits on a model-scale high BPR exhaust nozzle, similar to current large commercial applications. New technologies must be identified to improve the acoustics of state-of-the-art high BPR jet engines.

  13. Performance assessment of two whole-lake acoustic positional telemetry systems--is reality mining of free-ranging aquatic animals technologically possible?

    PubMed

    Baktoft, Henrik; Zajicek, Petr; Klefoth, Thomas; Svendsen, Jon C; Jacobsen, Lene; Pedersen, Martin Wæver; March Morla, David; Skov, Christian; Nakayama, Shinnosuke; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic positional telemetry systems (APTs) represent a novel approach to study the behaviour of free ranging aquatic animals in the wild at unprecedented detail. System manufactures promise remarkably high temporal and spatial resolution. However, the performance of APTs has rarely been rigorously tested at the level of entire ecosystems. Moreover, the effect of habitat structure on system performance has only been poorly documented. Two APTs were deployed to cover two small lakes and a series of standardized stationary tests were conducted to assess system performance. Furthermore, a number of tow tests were conducted to simulate moving fish. Based on these data, we quantified system performance in terms of data yield, accuracy and precision as a function of structural complexity in relation to vegetation. Mean data yield of the two systems was 40% (Lake1) and 60% (Lake2). Average system accuracy (acc) and precision (prec) were Lake1: acc = 3.1 m, prec = 1.1 m; Lake2: acc = 1.0 m, prec = 0.2 m. System performance was negatively affected by structural complexity, i.e., open water habitats yielded far better performance than structurally complex vegetated habitats. Post-processing greatly improved data quality, and sub-meter accuracy and precision were, on average, regularly achieved in Lake2 but remained the exception in the larger and structurally more complex Lake1. Moving transmitters were tracked well by both systems. Whereas overestimation of moved distance is inevitable for stationary transmitters due to accumulation of small tracking errors, moving transmitters can result in both over- and underestimation of distances depending on circumstances. Both deployed APTs were capable of providing high resolution positional data at the scale of entire lakes and are suitable systems to mine the reality of free ranging fish in their natural environment. This opens important opportunities to advance several fields of study such as movement ecology and animal social

  14. Performance Assessment of Two Whole-Lake Acoustic Positional Telemetry Systems - Is Reality Mining of Free-Ranging Aquatic Animals Technologically Possible?

    PubMed Central

    Baktoft, Henrik; Zajicek, Petr; Klefoth, Thomas; Svendsen, Jon C.; Jacobsen, Lene; Pedersen, Martin Wæver; March Morla, David; Skov, Christian; Nakayama, Shinnosuke; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic positional telemetry systems (APTs) represent a novel approach to study the behaviour of free ranging aquatic animals in the wild at unprecedented detail. System manufactures promise remarkably high temporal and spatial resolution. However, the performance of APTs has rarely been rigorously tested at the level of entire ecosystems. Moreover, the effect of habitat structure on system performance has only been poorly documented. Two APTs were deployed to cover two small lakes and a series of standardized stationary tests were conducted to assess system performance. Furthermore, a number of tow tests were conducted to simulate moving fish. Based on these data, we quantified system performance in terms of data yield, accuracy and precision as a function of structural complexity in relation to vegetation. Mean data yield of the two systems was 40 % (Lake1) and 60 % (Lake2). Average system accuracy (acc) and precision (prec) were Lake1: acc = 3.1 m, prec = 1.1 m; Lake2: acc = 1.0 m, prec = 0.2 m. System performance was negatively affected by structural complexity, i.e., open water habitats yielded far better performance than structurally complex vegetated habitats. Post-processing greatly improved data quality, and sub-meter accuracy and precision were, on average, regularly achieved in Lake2 but remained the exception in the larger and structurally more complex Lake1. Moving transmitters were tracked well by both systems. Whereas overestimation of moved distance is inevitable for stationary transmitters due to accumulation of small tracking errors, moving transmitters can result in both over- and underestimation of distances depending on circumstances. Both deployed APTs were capable of providing high resolution positional data at the scale of entire lakes and are suitable systems to mine the reality of free ranging fish in their natural environment. This opens important opportunities to advance several fields of study such as movement ecology and animal social

  15. Acoustics Research of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Ximing; Houston, Janice D.

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces some of the highest acoustic loading over a broad frequency for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are used in the prediction of the internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle but there are challenges. Present liftoff vehicle acoustic environment prediction methods utilize stationary data from previously conducted hold-down tests; i.e. static firings conducted in the 1960's, to generate 1/3 octave band Sound Pressure Level (SPL) spectra. These data sets are used to predict the liftoff acoustic environments for launch vehicles. To facilitate the accuracy and quality of acoustic loading, predictions at liftoff for future launch vehicles such as the Space Launch System (SLS), non-stationary flight data from the Ares I-X were processed in PC-Signal in two forms which included a simulated hold-down phase and the entire launch phase. In conjunction, the Prediction of Acoustic Vehicle Environments (PAVE) program was developed in MATLAB to allow for efficient predictions of sound pressure levels (SPLs) as a function of station number along the vehicle using semiempirical methods. This consisted, initially, of generating the Dimensionless Spectrum Function (DSF) and Dimensionless Source Location (DSL) curves from the Ares I-X flight data. These are then used in the MATLAB program to generate the 1/3 octave band SPL spectra. Concluding results show major differences in SPLs between the hold-down test data and the processed Ares IX flight data making the Ares I-X flight data more practical for future vehicle acoustic environment predictions.

  16. Accurate recovery of articulator positions from acoustics: New conclusions based on human data

    SciTech Connect

    Hogden, J.; Lofqvist, A.; Gracco, V.; Zlokarnik, I.; Rubin, P.; Saltzman, E.

    1996-09-01

    Vocal tract models are often used to study the problem of mapping from the acoustic transfer function to the vocal tract area function (inverse mapping). Unfortunately, results based on vocal tract models are strongly affected by the assumptions underlying the models. In this study, the mapping from acoustics (digitized speech samples) to articulation (measurements of the positions of receiver coils placed on the tongue, jaw, and lips) is examined using human data from a single speaker: Simultaneous acoustic and articulator measurements made for vowel-to-vowel transitions, /g/ closures, and transitions into and out of /g/ closures. Articulator positions were measured using an EMMA system to track coils placed on the lips, jaw, and tongue. Using these data, look-up tables were created that allow articulator positions to be estimated from acoustic signals. On a data set not used for making look-up tables, correlations between estimated and actual coil positions of around 94{percent} and root-mean-squared errors around 2 mm are common for coils on the tongue. An error source evaluation shows that estimating articulator positions from quantized acoustics gives root-mean-squared errors that are typically less than 1 mm greater than the errors that would be obtained from quantizing the articulator positions themselves. This study agrees with and extends previous studies of human data by showing that for the data studied, speech acoustics can be used to accurately recover articulator positions. {copyright} {ital 1996 Acoustical Society of America.}

  17. Effect of body position on vocal tract acoustics: Acoustic pharyngometry and vowel formants.

    PubMed

    Vorperian, Houri K; Kurtzweil, Sara L; Fourakis, Marios; Kent, Ray D; Tillman, Katelyn K; Austin, Diane

    2015-08-01

    The anatomic basis and articulatory features of speech production are often studied with imaging studies that are typically acquired in the supine body position. It is important to determine if changes in body orientation to the gravitational field alter vocal tract dimensions and speech acoustics. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of body position (upright versus supine) on (1) oral and pharyngeal measurements derived from acoustic pharyngometry and (2) acoustic measurements of fundamental frequency (F0) and the first four formant frequencies (F1-F4) for the quadrilateral point vowels. Data were obtained for 27 male and female participants, aged 17 to 35 yrs. Acoustic pharyngometry showed a statistically significant effect of body position on volumetric measurements, with smaller values in the supine than upright position, but no changes in length measurements. Acoustic analyses of vowels showed significantly larger values in the supine than upright position for the variables of F0, F3, and the Euclidean distance from the centroid to each corner vowel in the F1-F2-F3 space. Changes in body position affected measurements of vocal tract volume but not length. Body position also affected the aforementioned acoustic variables, but the main vowel formants were preserved.

  18. Effect of body position on vocal tract acoustics: Acoustic pharyngometry and vowel formants

    PubMed Central

    Vorperian, Houri K.; Kurtzweil, Sara L.; Fourakis, Marios; Kent, Ray D.; Tillman, Katelyn K.; Austin, Diane

    2015-01-01

    The anatomic basis and articulatory features of speech production are often studied with imaging studies that are typically acquired in the supine body position. It is important to determine if changes in body orientation to the gravitational field alter vocal tract dimensions and speech acoustics. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of body position (upright versus supine) on (1) oral and pharyngeal measurements derived from acoustic pharyngometry and (2) acoustic measurements of fundamental frequency (F0) and the first four formant frequencies (F1–F4) for the quadrilateral point vowels. Data were obtained for 27 male and female participants, aged 17 to 35 yrs. Acoustic pharyngometry showed a statistically significant effect of body position on volumetric measurements, with smaller values in the supine than upright position, but no changes in length measurements. Acoustic analyses of vowels showed significantly larger values in the supine than upright position for the variables of F0, F3, and the Euclidean distance from the centroid to each corner vowel in the F1-F2-F3 space. Changes in body position affected measurements of vocal tract volume but not length. Body position also affected the aforementioned acoustic variables, but the main vowel formants were preserved. PMID:26328699

  19. Acoustic counter-sniper system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Gregory L.; Gilbert, Douglas C.; Barger, James E.

    1997-02-01

    BBN has developed, tested, and fielded pre-production versions of a versatile acoustics-based counter-sniper system. This system was developed by BBN for the DARPA Tactical Technology Office to provide a low cost and accurate sniper detection and localization system. The system uses observations of the shock wave from supersonic bullets to estimate the bullet trajectory, Mach number, and caliber. If muzzle blast observations are also available from unsilenced weapons, the exact sniper location along the trajectory is also estimated. A newly developed and very accurate model of the bullet ballistics and acoustic radiation is used which includes bullet deceleration. This allows the use of very flexible acoustic sensor types and placements, since the system can model the bullet's flight, and hence the acoustic observations, over a wide area very accurately. System sensor configurations can be as simple as two small four element tetrahedral microphone arrays on either side of the area to be protected, or six omnidirectional microphones spread over the area to be monitored. Increased performance can be obtained by expanding the sensor field in size or density, and the system software is easily reconfigured to accommodate this at deployment time. Sensor nodes can be added using wireless network telemetry or hardwired cables to the command node processing and display computer. The system has been field tested in three government sponsored tests in both rural and simulated urban environments at the Camp Pendleton MOUT facility. Performance was characterized during these tests for various shot geometries and bullet speeds and calibers.

  20. Acoustic positioning using multiple microphone arrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Milios, Evangelos

    2005-05-01

    Passive acoustic techniques are presented to solve the localization problem of a sound source in three-dimensional space using off-the-shelf hardware. Multiple microphone arrays are employed, which operate independently, in estimating the direction of arrival of sound, or, equivalently, a direction vector from the array's geometric center towards the source. Direction vectors and array centers are communicated to a central processor, where the source is localized by finding the intersection of the direction lines defined by the direction vectors and the associated array centers. The performance of the method in the air is demonstrated experimentally and compared with a state-of-the-art method that requires centralized digitization of the signals from the microphones of all the arrays. PMID:15957748

  1. Electret Acoustic Transducer Array For Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation System

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Thomas L.; Fisher, Karl A.

    2005-08-09

    An electret-based acoustic transducer array is provided and may be used in a system for examining tissue. The acoustic transducer array is formed with a substrate that has a multiple distinct cells formed therein. Within each of the distinct cells is positioned an acoustic transducing element formed of an electret material. A conductive membrane is formed over the distinct cells and may be flexible.

  2. YO-3A acoustics research aircraft systems manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    The flight testing techniques, equipment, and procedures employed during air-to-air acoustic testing of helicopters using the NASA YO-3A Acoustic Research Aircraft are discussed. The research aircraft instrumentation system is described as well as hardware installation on the test aircraft and techniques used during the tests. Emphasis is placed on formation flying, position locations, test matrices, and test procedures.

  3. A synthetic aperture acoustic prototype system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, Robert H.; Bishop, Steven S.; Chan, Aaron M.; Gugino, Peter M.; Donzelli, Thomas P.; Soumekh, Mehrdad

    2015-05-01

    A novel quasi-monostatic system operating in a side-scan synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) imaging mode is presented. This research project's objectives are to explore the military utility of outdoor continuous sound imaging of roadside foliage and target detection. The acoustic imaging method has several military relevant advantages such as being immune to RF jamming, superior spatial resolution as compared to 0.8-2.4 GHz ground penetrating radar (GPR), capable of standoff side and forward-looking scanning, and relatively low cost, weight and size when compared to GPR technologies. The prototype system's broadband 2-17 kHz LFM chirp transceiver is mounted on a manned all-terrain vehicle. Targets are positioned within the acoustic main beam at slant ranges of two to seven meters and on surfaces such as dirt, grass, gravel and weathered asphalt and with an intervening metallic chain link fence. Acoustic image reconstructions and signature plots result in means for literal interpretation and quantifiable analyses.

  4. Solar system positioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I.; Chui, Talso

    2006-01-01

    Power-rich spacecraft envisioned in Prometheus initiative open up possibilities for long-range high-rate communication. A constellation of spacecraft on orbits several A.U. from the Sun, equipped with laser transponders and precise clocks can be configured to measure their mutual distances to within few cm. High on-board power can create substantial non-inertial contribution to the spacecraft trajectory. We propose to alleviate this contribution by employing secondary ranging to a passive daughter spacecraft. Such constellation can form the basis of it navigation system capable of providing position information anywhere in the soIar system with similar accuracy. Apart from obvious Solar System exploration implications, this system can provide robust reference for GPS and its successors.

  5. Study on Acoustic Catheter of Boiler Tube Leakage Monitoring Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yongxing; Feng, Qiang

    Boiler tube leakage is the major reason of affecting the safe operation of the unit now, there are 3 methods of the "four tube" leakage detection: Traditional method, filtering method and acoustic spectrum analysis, acoustic spectrum analysis is the common method, but this method have low sensitivity and the sensor damage easily. Therewith, designed the special acoustic catheter with acoustic resonance cavity type, proved by experiments, the acoustic catheter with acoustic resonance cavity type can enhance leakage sound, can accurately extract leakage signals, has high sensitivity, and can avoid the effect of sensor by fire and hot-gas when the furnace is in positive pressure situation, reduce the installation and maintenance costs of the boiler tube leakage monitor system.

  6. Optimization of a Biometric System Based on Acoustic Images

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo Fuente, Alberto; Del Val Puente, Lara; Villacorta Calvo, Juan J.; Raboso Mateos, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of an acoustic biometric system that captures 16 acoustic images of a person for 4 frequencies and 4 positions, a study was carried out to improve the performance of the system. On a first stage, an analysis to determine which images provide more information to the system was carried out showing that a set of 12 images allows the system to obtain results that are equivalent to using all of the 16 images. Finally, optimization techniques were used to obtain the set of weights associated with each acoustic image that maximizes the performance of the biometric system. These results improve significantly the performance of the preliminary system, while reducing the time of acquisition and computational burden, since the number of acoustic images was reduced. PMID:24616643

  7. Optimization of a biometric system based on acoustic images.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo Fuente, Alberto; Del Val Puente, Lara; Villacorta Calvo, Juan J; Raboso Mateos, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of an acoustic biometric system that captures 16 acoustic images of a person for 4 frequencies and 4 positions, a study was carried out to improve the performance of the system. On a first stage, an analysis to determine which images provide more information to the system was carried out showing that a set of 12 images allows the system to obtain results that are equivalent to using all of the 16 images. Finally, optimization techniques were used to obtain the set of weights associated with each acoustic image that maximizes the performance of the biometric system. These results improve significantly the performance of the preliminary system, while reducing the time of acquisition and computational burden, since the number of acoustic images was reduced.

  8. Acoustic system for material transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Trinh, E. H.; Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Jacobi, N. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An object within a chamber is acoustically moved by applying wavelengths of different modes to the chamber to move the object between pressure wells formed by the modes. In one system, the object is placed in one end of the chamber while a resonant mode, applied along the length of the chamber, produces a pressure well at the location. The frequency is then switched to a second mode that produces a pressure well at the center of the chamber, to draw the object. When the object reaches the second pressure well and is still traveling towards the second end of the chamber, the acoustic frequency is again shifted to a third mode (which may equal the first model) that has a pressure well in the second end portion of the chamber, to draw the object. A heat source may be located near the second end of the chamber to heat the sample, and after the sample is heated it can be cooled by moving it in a corresponding manner back to the first end of the chamber. The transducers for levitating and moving the object may be all located at the cool first end of the chamber.

  9. Evaluating a topographical mapping from speech acoustics to tongue positions

    SciTech Connect

    Hogden, J.; Heard, M.

    1995-05-01

    The {ital continuity} {ital mapping} algorithm---a procedure for learning to recover the relative positions of the articulators from speech signals---is evaluated using human speech data. The advantage of continuity mapping is that it is an unsupervised algorithm; that is, it can potentially be trained to make a mapping from speech acoustics to speech articulation without articulator measurements. The procedure starts by vector quantizing short windows of a speech signal so that each window is represented (encoded) by a single number. Next, multidimensional scaling is used to map quantization codes that were temporally close in the encoded speech to nearby points in a {ital continuity} {ital map}. Since speech sounds produced sufficiently close together in time must have been produced by similar articulator configurations, and speech sounds produced close together in time are close to each other in the continuity map, sounds produced by similar articulator positions should be mapped to similar positions in the continuity map. The data set used for evaluating the continuity mapping algorithm is comprised of simultaneously collected articulator and acoustic measurements made using an electromagnetic midsagittal articulometer on a human subject. Comparisons between measured articulator positions and those recovered using continuity mapping will be presented.

  10. Acoustically induced structural fatigue of piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, F.L.; Francis, J.T.

    1999-11-01

    Piping systems handling high-pressure and high-velocity steam and various process and hydrocarbon gases through a pressure-reducing device can produce severe acoustic vibration and metal fatigue in the system. It has been previously shown that the acoustic fatigue of the piping system is governed by the relationship between fluid pressure drop and downstream Mach number, and the dimensionless pipe diameter/wall thickness geometry parameter. In this paper, the devised relationship is extended to cover acoustic fatigue considerations of medium and smaller-diameter piping systems.

  11. Acoustically-driven microfluidic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A W; Benett, W J; Tarte, L R

    2000-06-23

    We have demonstrated a non-contact method of concentrating and mixing particles in a plastic microfluidic chamber employing acoustic radiation pressure. A flaw cell package has also been designed that integrates liquid sample interconnects, electrical contacts and a removable sample chamber. Experiments were performed on 1, 3, 6, and 10 {micro}m polystyrene beads. Increased antibody binding to a solid-phase substrate was observed in the presence of acoustic mixing due to improve mass transport.

  12. Acoustics Research of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Ximing; Houston, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces high acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are used in the prediction of the internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components. Present liftoff vehicle acoustic environment prediction methods utilize stationary data from previously conducted hold-down tests to generate 1/3 octave band Sound Pressure Level (SPL) spectra. In an effort to update the accuracy and quality of liftoff acoustic loading predictions, non-stationary flight data from the Ares I-X were processed in PC-Signal in two flight phases: simulated hold-down and liftoff. In conjunction, the Prediction of Acoustic Vehicle Environments (PAVE) program was developed in MATLAB to allow for efficient predictions of sound pressure levels (SPLs) as a function of station number along the vehicle using semi-empirical methods. This consisted of generating the Dimensionless Spectrum Function (DSF) and Dimensionless Source Location (DSL) curves from the Ares I-X flight data. These are then used in the MATLAB program to generate the 1/3 octave band SPL spectra. Concluding results show major differences in SPLs between the hold-down test data and the processed Ares I-X flight data making the Ares I-X flight data more practical for future vehicle acoustic environment predictions.

  13. Copper vapor laser acoustic thermometry system

    DOEpatents

    Galkowski, Joseph J.

    1987-01-01

    A copper vapor laser (CVL) acoustic thermometry system is disclosed. The invention couples an acoustic pulse a predetermined distance into a laser tube by means of a transducer and an alumina rod such that an echo pulse is returned along the alumina rod to the point of entry. The time differential between the point of entry of the acoustic pulse into the laser tube and the exit of the echo pulse is related to the temperature at the predetermined distance within the laser tube. This information is processed and can provide an accurate indication of the average temperature within the laser tube.

  14. Acoustic Test Characterization of Melamine Foam for Usage in NASA's Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The external acoustic liftoff levels predicted for NASA's future heavy lift launch vehicles are expected to be significantly higher than the environment created by today's commercial launch vehicles. This creates a need to develop an improved acoustic attenuation system for future NASA payload fairings. NASA Glenn Research Center initiated an acoustic test series to characterize the acoustic performance of melamine foam, with and without various acoustic enhancements. This testing was denoted as NEMFAT, which stands for NESC Enhanced Melamine Foam Acoustic Test, and is the subject of this paper. Both absorption and transmission loss testing of numerous foam configurations were performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory in July 2013. The NEMFAT test data provides an initial acoustic characterization and database of melamine foam for NASA. Because of its acoustic performance and lighter mass relative to fiberglass blankets, melamine foam is being strongly considered for use in the acoustic attenuation systems of NASA's future launch vehicles.

  15. Using Berrys phase for position-sensitive acoustical and stress detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2002-10-01

    Berry showed that a quantum system, upon an excursion around a closed path in phase space, can lead to a geometric phase. The polarization state of light in a fiber is a classical analog that is called the Pancharantnam phase. While most experiments have focused on esoteric issues, I show that, in theory, Berrys phase (or Pancharantnams phase) can be used to make a position-sensitive acoustical or stress sensor. 2002 Optical Society of America

  16. Development of the seafloor acoustic ranging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Y.; Kido, M.; Fujimoto, H.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a seafloor acoustic ranging system, which simulates an operation with the DONET (Development of Dense Ocean-floor Network System for Earthquake and Tsunami) cable, to monitor seafloor crustal movement. The seafloor acoustic ranging system was based on the precise acoustic transponder (PXP). We have a few problems for the improvement of the resolution. One thing is the variation of sound speed. Another is the bending of ray path. A PXP measures horizontal distances on the seafloor from the round trip travel times of acoustic pulses between pairs of PXP. The PXP was equipped with the pressure, temperature gauge and tilt-meter. The variation of sound speed in seawater has a direct effect on the measurement. Therefore we collect the data of temperature and pressure. But we don't collect the data of salinity because of less influence than temperature and pressure. Accordingly a ray path of acoustic wave tends to be bent upward in the deep sea due to the Snell's law. As the acoustic transducer of each PXPs held about 3.0m above the seafloor, the baseline is too long for altitude from the seafloor. In this year we carried out the experiment for the seafloor acoustic ranging system. We deployed two PXPs at about 750m spacing on Kumano-nada. The water depth is about 2050m. We collected the 660 data in this experiment during one day. The round trip travel time show the variation with peak-to-peak amplitude of about 0.03msec. It was confirmed to explain the majority in this change by the change in sound speed according to the temperature and pressure. This results shows the resolution of acoustic measurements is +/-2mm. Acknowledgement This study is supported by 'DONET' of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

  17. Local positioning system

    SciTech Connect

    Kyker, R.

    1995-07-25

    Navigation systems have been vital to transportation ever since man took to the air and sea. Early navigation systems utilized the sextant to navigate by starlight as well as the magnetic needle compass. As electronics and communication technologies improved, inertial navigation systems were developed for use in ships and missile delivery. These systems consisted of electronic compasses, gyro-compasses, accelerometers, and various other sensors. Recently, systems such as LORAN and the Global Positioning System (GPS) have utilized the properties of radio wave propagation to triangulate position. The Local Positioning System (LPS), described in this paper, is an implementation of a limited inertial navigation system designed to be used on a bicycle. LPS displays a cyclist`s current position relative to a starting location. This information is displayed in Cartesian-like coordinates. To accomplish this, LPS relies upon two sensors, an electronic compass sensor and a distance sensor. The compass sensor provides directional information while the distance sensor provides the distance traveled. This information yields a distance vector for each point in time which when summed produces the cyclist`s current position. LPS is microprocessor controlled and is designed for a range of less than 90 miles.

  18. Acoustic vs VHF Lightning Location Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arechiga, R. O.; Lapierre, J. L.; Stock, M.; Erives, H.; Edens, H. E.; Stringer, A.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    A single acoustic array can determine the 3-D location of lightning sources by using time of arrival differences arriving at the microphones and ranging techniques. The range is obtained from the time difference between the electromagnetic emission (detected by the acoustic data logger) and the acoustic signal produced by lightning. Audio frequency acoustic location systems are sensitive to the gas dynamic expansion of portions of a rapidly heating lightning channel, and so acoustic signatures are produced by a wide variety of different lightning discharge processes including: return strokes, K changes, M components, leader stepping and more. Infrasonic frequency range acoustic sensors are also sensitive to gas dynamic expansion, and in addition are also sensitive to processes which are electro-static in nature. RF location systems such as the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and the Continuous Sampling Broadband VHF Digital Interferometer (DITF) from New Mexico Tech (NMT) produce high quality maps of lightning discharges; however, they are sensitive to breakdown processes only and can not locate sources originating in already well conducting channels. During the summer of 2013 an acoustic audio-range array and an infrasound array were co-located with the NMT DITF in the Magdalena mountains of central New Mexico, where an LMA is also operating. The audio-range acoustic array consists of custom-designed GPS-synced data loggers with a 50 kHz sampling rate and audio range omnidirectional dynamic microphones. The infrasound array uses GPS time-synced data logger and custom-designed broadband microphones with flat response in the band of 0.01 to 500 Hz. The DITF uses flat plate dE/dt antennas bandpass filtered to 20 to 80 MHz, providing 2D maps of lightning emissions with very high (sub-microsecond) timing resolution. Both acoustic and interferometric arrays of antennas determine location of sources by coherently comparing the signals arriving at the antennas (or

  19. AUV Positioning Method Based on Tightly Coupled SINS/LBL for Underwater Acoustic Multipath Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Shi, Hongfei; Chen, Liping; Li, Yao; Tong, Jinwu

    2016-01-01

    This paper researches an AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) positioning method based on SINS (Strapdown Inertial Navigation System)/LBL (Long Base Line) tightly coupled algorithm. This algorithm mainly includes SINS-assisted searching method of optimum slant-range of underwater acoustic propagation multipath, SINS/LBL tightly coupled model and multi-sensor information fusion algorithm. Fuzzy correlation peak problem of underwater LBL acoustic propagation multipath could be solved based on SINS positional information, thus improving LBL positional accuracy. Moreover, introduction of SINS-centered LBL locating information could compensate accumulative AUV position error effectively and regularly. Compared to loosely coupled algorithm, this tightly coupled algorithm can still provide accurate location information when there are fewer than four available hydrophones (or within the signal receiving range). Therefore, effective positional calibration area of tightly coupled system based on LBL array is wider and has higher reliability and fault tolerance than loosely coupled. It is more applicable to AUV positioning based on SINS/LBL. PMID:26978361

  20. AUV Positioning Method Based on Tightly Coupled SINS/LBL for Underwater Acoustic Multipath Propagation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Shi, Hongfei; Chen, Liping; Li, Yao; Tong, Jinwu

    2016-03-11

    This paper researches an AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) positioning method based on SINS (Strapdown Inertial Navigation System)/LBL (Long Base Line) tightly coupled algorithm. This algorithm mainly includes SINS-assisted searching method of optimum slant-range of underwater acoustic propagation multipath, SINS/LBL tightly coupled model and multi-sensor information fusion algorithm. Fuzzy correlation peak problem of underwater LBL acoustic propagation multipath could be solved based on SINS positional information, thus improving LBL positional accuracy. Moreover, introduction of SINS-centered LBL locating information could compensate accumulative AUV position error effectively and regularly. Compared to loosely coupled algorithm, this tightly coupled algorithm can still provide accurate location information when there are fewer than four available hydrophones (or within the signal receiving range). Therefore, effective positional calibration area of tightly coupled system based on LBL array is wider and has higher reliability and fault tolerance than loosely coupled. It is more applicable to AUV positioning based on SINS/LBL.

  1. AUV Positioning Method Based on Tightly Coupled SINS/LBL for Underwater Acoustic Multipath Propagation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Shi, Hongfei; Chen, Liping; Li, Yao; Tong, Jinwu

    2016-01-01

    This paper researches an AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) positioning method based on SINS (Strapdown Inertial Navigation System)/LBL (Long Base Line) tightly coupled algorithm. This algorithm mainly includes SINS-assisted searching method of optimum slant-range of underwater acoustic propagation multipath, SINS/LBL tightly coupled model and multi-sensor information fusion algorithm. Fuzzy correlation peak problem of underwater LBL acoustic propagation multipath could be solved based on SINS positional information, thus improving LBL positional accuracy. Moreover, introduction of SINS-centered LBL locating information could compensate accumulative AUV position error effectively and regularly. Compared to loosely coupled algorithm, this tightly coupled algorithm can still provide accurate location information when there are fewer than four available hydrophones (or within the signal receiving range). Therefore, effective positional calibration area of tightly coupled system based on LBL array is wider and has higher reliability and fault tolerance than loosely coupled. It is more applicable to AUV positioning based on SINS/LBL. PMID:26978361

  2. System for controlled acoustic rotation of objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is described for use with acoustically levitated objects, which enables close control of rotation of the object. One system includes transducers that propagate acoustic waves along the three dimensions (X, Y, Z) of a chamber of rectangular cross section. Each transducers generates one wave which is resonant to a corresponding chamber dimension to acoustically levitate an object, and additional higher frequency resonant wavelengths for controlling rotation of the object. The three chamber dimensions and the corresponding three levitation modes (resonant wavelengths) are all different, to avoid degeneracy, or interference, of waves with one another, that could have an effect on object rotation. Only the higher frequencies, with pairs of them having the same wavelength, are utilized to control rotation, so that rotation is controlled independently of levitation and about any arbitrarily chosen axis.

  3. System for controlled acoustic rotation of objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmatz, M. B.

    1983-07-01

    A system is described for use with acoustically levitated objects, which enables close control of rotation of the object. One system includes transducers that propagate acoustic waves along the three dimensions (X, Y, Z) of a chamber of rectangular cross section. Each transducers generates one wave which is resonant to a corresponding chamber dimension to acoustically levitate an object, and additional higher frequency resonant wavelengths for controlling rotation of the object. The three chamber dimensions and the corresponding three levitation modes (resonant wavelengths) are all different, to avoid degeneracy, or interference, of waves with one another, that could have an effect on object rotation. Only the higher frequencies, with pairs of them having the same wavelength, are utilized to control rotation, so that rotation is controlled independently of levitation and about any arbitrarily chosen axis.

  4. Nuclear core positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Garkisch, Hans D.; Yant, Howard W.; Patterson, John F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural support system for the core of a nuclear reactor which achieves relatively restricted clearances at operating conditions and yet allows sufficient clearance between fuel assemblies at refueling temperatures. Axially displaced spacer pads having variable between pad spacing and a temperature compensated radial restraint system are utilized to maintain clearances between the fuel elements. The core support plates are constructed of metals specially chosen such that differential thermal expansion produces positive restraint at operating temperatures.

  5. Deep Space Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Andrew T. (Inventor); Riedel, Joseph E. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A single, compact, lower power deep space positioning system (DPS) configured to determine a location of a spacecraft anywhere in the solar system, and provide state information relative to Earth, Sun, or any remote object. For example, the DPS includes a first camera and, possibly, a second camera configured to capture a plurality of navigation images to determine a state of a spacecraft in a solar system. The second camera is located behind, or adjacent to, a secondary reflector of a first camera in a body of a telescope.

  6. Acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Parent, P.; Reinholdtsen, P.A.

    1991-02-26

    An acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method are described in which pulses of high frequency electrical energy are applied to a transducer which forms and focuses acoustic energy onto a selected location on the surface of an object and receives energy from the location and generates electrical pulses. The phase of the high frequency electrical signal pulses are stepped with respect to the phase of a reference signal at said location. An output signal is generated which is indicative of the surface of said selected location. The object is scanned to provide output signals representative of the surface at a plurality of surface locations. 7 figures.

  7. Acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Parent, Philippe; Reinholdtsen, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method in which pulses of high frequency electrical energy are applied to a transducer which forms and focuses acoustic energy onto a selected location on the surface of an object and receives energy from the location and generates electrical pulses. The phase of the high frequency electrical signal pulses are stepped with respected to the phase of a reference signal at said location. An output signal is generated which is indicative of the surface of said selected location. The object is scanned to provide output signals representative of the surface at a plurality of surface locations.

  8. Continuous and Discrete Space Particle Filters for Predictions in Acoustic Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Will; Kim, Surrey; Kouritzin, Michael A.

    2002-12-01

    Predicting the future state of a random dynamic signal based on corrupted, distorted, and partial observations is vital for proper real-time control of a system that includes time delay. Motivated by problems from Acoustic Positioning Research Inc., we consider the continual automated illumination of an object moving within a bounded domain, which requires object location prediction due to inherent mechanical and physical time lags associated with robotic lighting. Quality computational predictions demand high fidelity models for the coupled moving object signal and observation equipment pair. In our current problem, the signal represents the vector position, orientation, and velocity of a stage performer. Acoustic observations are formed by timing ultrasonic waves traveling from four perimeter speakers to a microphone attached to the performer. The goal is to schedule lighting movements that are coordinated with the performer by anticipating his/her future position based upon these observations using filtering theory. Particle system based methods have experienced rapid development and have become an essential technique of contemporary filtering strategies. Hitherto, researchers have largely focused on continuous state particle filters, ranging from traditional weighted particle filters to adaptive refining particle filters, readily able to perform path-space estimation and prediction. Herein, we compare the performance of a state-of-the-art refining particle filter to that of a novel discrete-space particle filter on the acoustic positioning problem. By discrete space particle filter we mean a Markov chain that counts particles in discretized cells of the signal state space in order to form an approximated unnormalized distribution of the signal state. For both filters mentioned above, we will examine issues like the mean time to localize a signal, the fidelity of filter estimates at various signal to noise ratios, computational costs, and the effect of signal

  9. Position feedback control system

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    Disclosed is a system and method for independently evaluating the spatial positional performance of a machine having a movable member, comprising an articulated coordinate measuring machine comprising: a first revolute joint; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the first joint, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto, wherein the probe tip is pivotally mounted to the movable machine member; a second revolute joint; a first support arm serially connecting the first joint to the second joint; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the first and second revolute joints, for calculating the spatial coordinates of the probe tip; means for kinematically constraining the articulated coordinate measuring machine to a working surface; and comparator means, in operative association with the coordinate processing means and with the movable machine, for comparing the true position of the movable machine member, as measured by the true position of the probe tip, with the desired position of the movable machine member.

  10. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Combustion instability in solid rocket motors and liquid engines has long been a subject of concern. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. Recent advances in energy based modeling of combustion instabilities require accurate determination of acoustic frequencies and mode shapes. Of particular interest is the acoustic mean flow interactions within the converging section of a rocket nozzle, where gradients of pressure, density, and velocity become large. The expulsion of unsteady energy through the nozzle of a rocket is identified as the predominate source of acoustic damping for most rocket systems. Recently, an approach to address nozzle damping with mean flow effects was implemented by French [1]. This new approach extends the work originated by Sigman and Zinn [2] by solving the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) formulated by perturbing the Euler equations [3]. The present study aims to implement the French model within the COMSOL Multiphysiscs framework and analyzes one of the author's presented test cases.

  11. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  12. Computational dynamics of acoustically driven microsphere systems.

    PubMed

    Glosser, Connor; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Li, Jie; Dault, Dan; Shanker, B

    2016-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the interparticle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of nondissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation of the system, though we also observe both expansion and contraction of the cloud determined by the initial system geometry. PMID:26871188

  13. Computational dynamics of acoustically driven microsphere systems.

    PubMed

    Glosser, Connor; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Li, Jie; Dault, Dan; Shanker, B

    2016-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the interparticle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of nondissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation of the system, though we also observe both expansion and contraction of the cloud determined by the initial system geometry.

  14. Acoustic analysis of anisotropic poroelastic multilayered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra Martinez, Juan Pablo; Dazel, Olivier; Göransson, Peter; Cuenca, Jacques

    2016-02-01

    The proposed method allows for an extended analysis of the wave analysis, internal powers, and acoustic performance of anisotropic poroelastic media within semi-infinite multilayered systems under arbitrary excitation. Based on a plane wave expansion, the solution is derived from a first order partial derivative as proposed by Stroh. This allows for an in-depth analysis of the mechanisms controlling the acoustic behaviour in terms of internal powers and wave properties in the media. In particular, the proposed approach is used to highlight the influence of the phenomena intrinsic to anisotropic poroelastic media, such as compression-shear coupling related to the material alignment, the frequency shift of the fundamental resonance, or the appearance of particular geometrical coincidences in multilayered systems with such materials.

  15. Accuracy in GPS/Acoustic positioning on a moored buoy moving around far from the optimal position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imano, M.; Kido, M.; Ohta, Y.; Takahashi, N.; Fukuda, T.; Ochi, H.; Hino, R.

    2015-12-01

    For detecting the seafloor crustal deformation and Tsunami associated with large earthquakes in real-time, it is necessary to monitor them just above the possible source region. For this purpose, we have been dedicated in developing a real-time continuous observation system using a multi-purpose moored buoy. Sea-trials of the system have been carried out near the Nanakai trough in 2013 and 2014 (Takahashi et al., 2014). We especially focused on the GPS/Acoustic measurement (GPS/A) in the system for horizontal crustal movement. The GPS/A on a moored buoy has a critical drawback compared to the traditional ones, in which the data can be stacked over ranging points fixed at an optimal position. Accuracy in positioning with a single ranging from an arbitrary point is the subject to be improved in this study. Here, we report the positioning results in the buoy system using data in the 2014 sea-trial and demonstrate the improvement of the result. We also address the potential resolving power in the positioning using synthetic tests. The target GPS/A site consists of six seafloor transponders (PXPs) forming a small inner- and a large outer-triangles. The bottom of the moored cable is anchored nearly the center of the triangles. In the sea-trial, 11 times successive ranging was scheduled once a week, and we plotted positioning results from different buoy position. We confirmed that scatter in positioning using six PXPs simultaneously is ten times smaller than that using individual triangle separately. Next, we modified the definition of the PXP array geometry using data obtained in a campaign observation. Definition of an array geometry is insensitive as far as ranging is made in the same position, however, severely affects the positioning when ranging is made from various positions like the moored buoy. The modified PXP array is slightly smaller and 2m deeper than the original one. We found that the scatter of positioning results in the sea-trial is reduced from 4m to 1

  16. A cutaneous positioning system.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bernard J; Lee, Beom-Chan; Sienko, Kathleen H

    2015-04-01

    Our previous work revealed that torso cutaneous information contributes to the internal representation of the torso and plays a role in postural control. Hence, the aims of this study were to assess whether posture could be manipulated by patterns of vibrotactile stimulation and to determine whether resulting modified postures were associated with specific and consistent spatial attitudes. Ten healthy young adults stood in normal and Romberg stances with six vibrating actuators positioned on the torso in contact with the skin over the anatomical locations corresponding to left and right external oblique, internal oblique and erector spinae muscles at the L4/L5 vertebrae level. A 250-Hz tactile vibration was applied for 5 s either at a single location or consecutively at each location in clockwise or counterclockwise sequences. Kinematic analysis of the body segments indicated that postural responses observed in response to single and sequential stimulation patterns were similar, while the center of pressure remained unaltered in any situations. Moreover, torso inclinations followed rectilinear-like path segments chartered by stimuli loci during sequential stimulations. Comparison of torso attitudes with previous results obtained with co-vibration patterns of the same duration showed that torso inclination amplitudes are equivalent for single (one location) and co-vibration (pairs of locations) patterns inducing the same directional effect. Hence, torso cutaneous information exhibits kinesthetic properties, appears to provide a map of upper body spatial configuration, and could assume the role of an internal positioning system for the upper body. PMID:25600816

  17. The Global Positioning System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a constellation of navigation satellites called Navigation Satellite Timing And Ranging (NAVSTAR), maintained by the U.S. Department of Defense. Many outdoor enthusiasts recognize that a handheld GPS receiver can be an accurate tool for determining their location on the terrain. The GPS receiver helps determine locations on the Earth's surface by collecting signals from three or more satellites through a process called triangulation. Identifying a location on the Earth is more useful if you also know about the surrounding topographic conditions. Using a topographic map with the GPS receiver provides important information about features of the surrounding terrain and can help you plot an effective route from one location to another.

  18. A unified acquisition system for acoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Holmes, H. K.

    1977-01-01

    A multichannel, acoustic AM carrier system was developed for a wide variety of applications, particularly for aircraft noise and sonic boom measurements. Each data acquisition channel consists of a condenser microphone, an acoustic signal converter, and a Zero Drive amplifier, along with peripheral supporting equipment. A control network insures continuous optimal tuning of the converter and permits remote calibration of the condenser microphone. With a 12.70-mm (1/2-in.) condenser microphone, the converter/Zero Drive amplifier combination has a frequency response from 0 Hz to 20 kHz (-3 db), a dynamic range exceeding 70 db, and a minimum noise floor of 50 db ref. 20 micro Pa) in the band 22.4 Hz to 22.4 kHz. The system requires no external impedance matching networks and is insensitive to cable length, at least up to 900 m (3,000 ft). System gain varies only + or - 1 db over the temperature range 4 to 54 C (40 to 130 F). Adapters are available to accommodate 23.77-mm (1-in.) and 6.35-mm (1/4-in.) microphones and to provide 30-db attenuation. A field test to obtain the acoustical time history of a helicopter flyover proved successful.

  19. Rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS): a fatigue crack detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.

    1996-05-01

    The Rotor Acoustic Monitoring System (RAMS) is an embedded structural health monitoring system to demonstrate the ability to detect rotor head fatigue cracks and provide early warning of propagating fatigue cracks in rotor components of Navy helicopters. The concept definition effort was performed to assess the feasibility of detecting rotor head fatigue cracks using bulk- wave wide-bandwidth acoustic emission technology. A wireless piezo-based transducer system is being designed to capture rotor fatigue data in real time and perform acoustic emission (AE) event detection, feature extraction, and classification. A flight test effort will be performed to characterize rotor acoustic background noise and flight environment characteristics. The long- term payoff of the RAMS technology includes structural integrity verification and leak detection for large industrial tanks, and nuclear plant cooling towers could be performed using the RAMS AE technology. A summary of the RAMS concept, bench-level AE fatigue testing, and results are presented.

  20. Acoustic streaming in resonant viscous microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Bruus, Henrik

    2007-11-01

    Within the field of lab-on-a-chip systems large efforts are devoted to the development of onchip tools for particle handling and mixing in viscosity-dominated microflows. One technology involves ultrasound with frequencies in the MHz range, which leads to wavelengths of the order of 10-4-10-3 m suitable for mm-sized microchambers. Due to the nonlinearity of the governing acoustofluidic equations, second-order effects will induce steady forces to fluids and suspended particles through the effects known as acoustic streaming and acoustic radiation pressure. We present the basic perturbation approach for treating these effects in systems at resonance, where the amplitudes are maximized. The first-order eigenmodes are used as source terms for the time-averaged viscous second-order equations. The theory is applied to explain experimental results on aqueous microbead solutions in silicon-glass microchips [1].[1] S. M. Hags"ater, T. Glasdam Jensen, H. Bruus and J. P. Kutter.Acoustic resonances in microfluidic chips: full-image micro-PIV experiments and numerical simulations. Lab Chip, 2007, DOI: 10.1039/b704864e.

  1. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2014-01-01

    Oscillatory motion in solid rocket motors and liquid engines has long been a subject of concern. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. The customary approach to modeling acoustic waves inside a rocket chamber is to apply the classical inhomogeneous wave equation to the combustion gas. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while the acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The converging section of a rocket nozzle, where gradients in pressure, density, and velocity become large, is a notable region where this approach is not applicable. The expulsion of unsteady energy through the nozzle of a rocket is identified as the predominate source of acoustic damping for most rocket systems. An accurate model of the acoustic behavior within this region where acoustic modes are influenced by the presence of a steady mean flow is required for reliable stability predictions. Recently, an approach to address nozzle damping with mean flow effects was implemented by French [1]. This new approach extends the work originated by Sigman and Zinn [2] by solving the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) formulated by perturbing the Euler equations [3]. The acoustic velocity potential (psi) describing the acoustic wave motion in the presence of an inhomogeneous steady high-speed flow is defined by, (del squared)(psi) - (lambda/c)(exp 2)(psi) - M(dot)[M(dot)(del)(del(psi))] - 2(lambda(M/c) + (M(dot)del(M))(dot)del(psi)-2(lambda)(psi)[M(dot)del(1/c)]=0 (1) with M as the Mach vector, c as the speed of sound, and lambda as the complex eigenvalue. French apply the finite volume method to solve the steady flow field within the combustion chamber and nozzle with inviscid walls. The complex eigenvalues and eigenvector are determined with the use of the ARPACK eigensolver. The

  2. Ray chaos in an architectural acoustic semi-stadium system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojian; Zhang, Yu

    2013-03-01

    The semi-stadium system is composed of a semicircular cap and a rectilinear platform. In this study, a dynamic model of the side, position, and angle variables is applied to investigate the acoustic ray chaos of the architectural semi-stadium system. The Lyapunov exponent is calculated in order to quantitatively describe ray instability. The model can be reduced to the semi-circular and rectilinear platform systems when the rectilinear length is sufficiently small and large. The quasi-rectilinear platform and the semicircular systems both produce regular trajectories with the maximal Lyapunov exponent approaching zero. Ray localizations, such as flutter-echo and sound focusing, are found in these two systems. However, the semi-stadium system produces chaotic ray behaviors with positive Lyapunov exponents and reduces ray localizations. Furthermore, as the rectilinear length increases, the scaling laws of the Lyapunov exponent of the semi-stadium system are revealed and compared with those of the stadium system. The results suggest the potential application of the proposed model to simulate chaotic dynamics of acoustic ray in architectural enclosed systems.

  3. Acoustic Test Results of Melamine Foam with Application to Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    A spacecraft at launch is subjected to a harsh acoustic and vibration environment resulting from the passage of acoustic energy, created during the liftoff of a launch vehicle, through the vehicle's payload fairing. In order to ensure the mission success of the spacecraft it is often necessary to reduce the resulting internal acoustic sound pressure levels through the usage of acoustic attenuation systems. Melamine foam, lining the interior walls of the payload fairing, is often utilized as the main component of such a system. In order to better understand the acoustic properties of melamine foam, with the goal of developing improved acoustic attenuation systems, NASA has recently performed panel level testing on numerous configurations of melamine foam acoustic treatments at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory. Parameters assessed included the foam's thickness and density, as well as the effects of a top outer cover sheet material and mass barriers embedded within the foam. This testing followed the ASTM C423 standard for absorption and the ASTM E90 standard for transmission loss. The acoustic test data obtained and subsequent conclusions are the subjects of this paper.

  4. Speaker verification system using acoustic data and non-acoustic data

    DOEpatents

    Gable, Todd J.; Ng, Lawrence C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.

    2006-03-21

    A method and system for speech characterization. One embodiment includes a method for speaker verification which includes collecting data from a speaker, wherein the data comprises acoustic data and non-acoustic data. The data is used to generate a template that includes a first set of "template" parameters. The method further includes receiving a real-time identity claim from a claimant, and using acoustic data and non-acoustic data from the identity claim to generate a second set of parameters. The method further includes comparing the first set of parameters to the set of parameters to determine whether the claimant is the speaker. The first set of parameters and the second set of parameters include at least one purely non-acoustic parameter, including a non-acoustic glottal shape parameter derived from averaging multiple glottal cycle waveforms.

  5. Combustion instability coupling with feed system acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priem, Richard J.; Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1988-01-01

    High frequency combustion instability has recently been observed by Rocketdyne in a 40K thrust methane/LOX combustion chamber. The oscillations had frequencies as high as 14,000 Hz with pressure amplitudes in the LOX dome of 500 psi at a chamber pressures of 2,000 psi. At this frequency the wave length associated with a period of oscillation is 2.3 inches in LOX and 1.4 inches in methane. These distances are comparable to the lengths of the injector elements which requires that acoustic waves be considered in the feed systems rather than using lumped parameters as is normally considered for feed system coupled oscillations. To expand the capability of existing models, the Feiler and Heidmann feed system coupled instability model was modified to include acoustic oscillations in the feed system. Similarly the vaporization controlled instability model of Heidmann and Wieber was modified to include flow oscillations that would be produced by feed system coupling. The major elements that control oscillations in a rocket combustion chamber are shown and discussed.

  6. Acoustic Flow Monitor System - User Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaHusen, Richard

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Acoustic Flow Monitor (AFM) is a portable system that was designed by the U.S. Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory to detect and monitor debris flows associated with volcanoes. It has been successfully used internationally as part of real-time warning systems in valleys threatened by such flows (Brantley, 1990; Marcial and others, 1996; Lavigne and others, 2000). The AFM system has also been proven to be an effective tool for monitoring some non-volcanic debris flows. This manual is intended to serve as a basic guide for the installation, testing, and maintenance of AFM systems. An overview of how the system works, as well as instructions for installation and guidelines for testing, is included. Interpretation of data is not covered in this manual; rather, the user should refer to the references provided for published examples of AFM data.

  7. Turbine nozzle positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, Paul F.; Shaffer, James E.

    1996-01-30

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes an outer shroud having a mounting leg with an opening defined therein, a tip shoe ring having a mounting member with an opening defined therein, a nozzle support ring having a plurality of holes therein and a pin positioned in the corresponding opening in the outer shroud, opening in the tip shoe ring and the hole in the nozzle support ring. A rolling joint is provided between metallic components of the gas turbine engine and the nozzle guide vane assembly. The nozzle guide vane assembly is positioned radially about a central axis of the gas turbine engine and axially aligned with a combustor of the gas turbine engine.

  8. Turbine nozzle positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1996-01-30

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes an outer shroud having a mounting leg with an opening defined therein, a tip shoe ring having a mounting member with an opening defined therein, a nozzle support ring having a plurality of holes therein and a pin positioned in the corresponding opening in the outer shroud, opening in the tip shoe ring and the hole in the nozzle support ring. A rolling joint is provided between metallic components of the gas turbine engine and the nozzle guide vane assembly. The nozzle guide vane assembly is positioned radially about a central axis of the gas turbine engine and axially aligned with a combustor of the gas turbine engine. 9 figs.

  9. Acoustic telemetry: The new MWD system

    SciTech Connect

    Tochikawa, T.; Sakai, T.; Taniguchi, R.; Shimada, T.

    1996-12-31

    A new MWD system utilizing acoustic telemetry system has been researched, based on the principle of elastic wave propagation and magnetostrictive technology. The system is intended for data transmission through jointed drill strings with much higher reliability and transmitting efficiency. In order to achieve a good acoustical propagation characteristics through the drillstring the elastic wave signal requirements have had to be less than 1 kHz. The development of an optimum oscillator that generates such a low elastic wave frequency under harsh drilling conditions has been one of the technical breakthroughs. In this regard, one of the features of the system is the use of a magnetostrictive material as an oscillator in the transmitter. Utilzing the phenomena in which a magnetostrictive material as an oscillator in the transmitter. Utilizing the phenomena in which a magnetostrictive material drastically distorts by applying magnetic field to it, the oscillator generates and elastic wave for propagation and transmission through the drill strings. Several field tests have proven that the system could transmit canned data from the depth of 1914 meters and data demodulation at the surface free from troubles while drilling forty nine (49) degrees deviated well. These results provide a comprehensive understanding of wave propagation characteristics which the authors are assured that practical MWD equipment with higher than normal transmission rates can be developed and commercialized. Since the system can offer several unique features especially in terms of miniaturization and non-dependence on drilling fluids it can be applied to the emerging technologies such as slim-hole drilling, coiled tubing drilling, local communication on the bottom hole assembly. Furthermore it can offer wider application for the drilling environment such as underbalanced drilling.

  10. A maximum likelihood approach to estimating articulator positions from speech acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Hogden, J.

    1996-09-23

    This proposal presents an algorithm called maximum likelihood continuity mapping (MALCOM) which recovers the positions of the tongue, jaw, lips, and other speech articulators from measurements of the sound-pressure waveform of speech. MALCOM differs from other techniques for recovering articulator positions from speech in three critical respects: it does not require training on measured or modeled articulator positions, it does not rely on any particular model of sound propagation through the vocal tract, and it recovers a mapping from acoustics to articulator positions that is linearly, not topographically, related to the actual mapping from acoustics to articulation. The approach categorizes short-time windows of speech into a finite number of sound types, and assumes the probability of using any articulator position to produce a given sound type can be described by a parameterized probability density function. MALCOM then uses maximum likelihood estimation techniques to: (1) find the most likely smooth articulator path given a speech sample and a set of distribution functions (one distribution function for each sound type), and (2) change the parameters of the distribution functions to better account for the data. Using this technique improves the accuracy of articulator position estimates compared to continuity mapping -- the only other technique that learns the relationship between acoustics and articulation solely from acoustics. The technique has potential application to computer speech recognition, speech synthesis and coding, teaching the hearing impaired to speak, improving foreign language instruction, and teaching dyslexics to read. 34 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Improving acoustic streaming effects in fluidic systems by matching SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane layers.

    PubMed

    Catarino, S O; Minas, G; Miranda, J M

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the use of acoustic waves for promoting and improving streaming in tridimensional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cuvettes of 15mm width×14mm height×2.5mm thickness. The acoustic waves are generated by a 28μm thick poly(vinylidene fluoride) - PVDF - piezoelectric transducer in its β phase, actuated at its resonance frequency: 40MHz. The acoustic transmission properties of two materials - SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) - were numerically compared. It was concluded that PDMS inhibits, while SU-8 allows, the transmission of the acoustic waves to the propagation medium. Therefore, by simulating the acoustic transmission properties of different materials, it is possible to preview the acoustic behavior in the fluidic system, which allows the optimization of the best layout design, saving costs and time. This work also presents a comparison between numerical and experimental results of acoustic streaming obtained with that β-PVDF transducer in the movement and in the formation of fluid recirculation in tridimensional closed domains. Differences between the numerical and experimental results are credited to the high sensitivity of acoustic streaming to the experimental conditions and to limitations of the numerical method. The reported study contributes for the improvement of simulation models that can be extremely useful for predicting the acoustic effects of new materials in fluidic devices, as well as for optimizing the transducers and matching layers positioning in a fluidic structure. PMID:27044029

  12. Improving acoustic streaming effects in fluidic systems by matching SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane layers.

    PubMed

    Catarino, S O; Minas, G; Miranda, J M

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the use of acoustic waves for promoting and improving streaming in tridimensional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cuvettes of 15mm width×14mm height×2.5mm thickness. The acoustic waves are generated by a 28μm thick poly(vinylidene fluoride) - PVDF - piezoelectric transducer in its β phase, actuated at its resonance frequency: 40MHz. The acoustic transmission properties of two materials - SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) - were numerically compared. It was concluded that PDMS inhibits, while SU-8 allows, the transmission of the acoustic waves to the propagation medium. Therefore, by simulating the acoustic transmission properties of different materials, it is possible to preview the acoustic behavior in the fluidic system, which allows the optimization of the best layout design, saving costs and time. This work also presents a comparison between numerical and experimental results of acoustic streaming obtained with that β-PVDF transducer in the movement and in the formation of fluid recirculation in tridimensional closed domains. Differences between the numerical and experimental results are credited to the high sensitivity of acoustic streaming to the experimental conditions and to limitations of the numerical method. The reported study contributes for the improvement of simulation models that can be extremely useful for predicting the acoustic effects of new materials in fluidic devices, as well as for optimizing the transducers and matching layers positioning in a fluidic structure.

  13. Role of positively charged dust grains on dust acoustic wave propagation in presence of nonthermal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Susmita; Maity, Saumyen

    2013-08-15

    An expression for ion current flowing to the dust grains is proposed, when dust charge is positive and the ions are nonthermal. Secondary electron emission has been considered as the source of positive charging of the dust grains. Investigation shows that presence of positively charged dust grains along with thermal electrons and nonthermal ions generate purely growing dust acoustic waves for both the cases of ion nonthermal parameter greater than one and less than one. In the later case, the growth is conditional.

  14. A POSITIONAL DATA SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Forster, G.A.

    1963-09-24

    between master and slave synchros is described. A threephase a-c power source is connected to the stators of the synchros and an error detector is connected to the rotors of the synchros to measure the phasor difference therebetween. A phase shift network shifts the phase of one of the rotors 90 degrees and a demodulator responsive thereto causes the phasor difference signal of the rotors to shift phase 180 degrees whenever the 90 degree phase shifted signal goes negative. The phase shifted difference signal has a waveform which, with the addition of small values of resistance and capacitance, gives a substantially pure d-c output whose amplitude and polarity is proportional to the magnitude and direction of the difference in the angular positions of the synchro's rotors. (AEC)

  15. Acoustic systems for the measurement of streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Smith, Winchell

    1982-01-01

    Very little information is available concerning acoustic velocity meter (AVM) operation, performance, and limitations. This report provides a better understanding about the application of AVM instrumentation to streamflow measurment. Operational U.S. Geological Survey systems have proven that AVM equipment is accurate and dependable. AVM equipment has no practical upper limit of measureable velocity if sonic transducers are securely placed and adequately protected, and will measure velocitites as low as 0.1 meter per second which is normally less than the threshold level for mechanical or head-loss meters. In some situations the performance of AVM equipment may be degraded by multipath interference, signal bending, signal attenuation, and variable streamline orientation. Smaller, less-expensive, more conveniently operable microprocessor equipment is now available which should increase use of AVM systems in streamflow applications. (USGS)

  16. A blind algorithm for recovering articulator positions from acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Hogden, John E

    2009-01-01

    MIMICRI is a signal-processing algorithm that has been shown to blindly infer and invert memoryless nonlinear functions of unobservable bandlimited signals, such as the mapping from the unobservable positions of the speech articulators to observable speech sounds. We review results of using MIMICRI on toy problems and on human speech data. We note that MIMICRI requires that the user specify two parameters: the dimensionality and pass-band of the unobservable signals. We show how to use cross-validation to help estimate the passband. An unexpected consequence of this work is that it helps separate signals with overlapping frequency bands.

  17. Infants' Discrimination of Consonants: Interplay between Word Position and Acoustic Saliency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Stephanie L.; Zamuner, Tania; Engel, Kathleen; Fais, Laurel; Curtin, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that young infants use contrasting acoustic information to distinguish consonants. This has been used to argue that by 12 months, infants have homed in on their native language sound categories. However, this ability seems to be positionally constrained, with contrasts at the beginning of words (onsets) discriminated earlier.…

  18. Electromechanical transducer for acoustic telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1993-01-01

    An improved electromechanical transducer is provided for use in an acoustic telemetry system. The transducer of this invention comprises a stack of ferroelectric ceramic disks interleaved with a plurality of spaced electrodes which are used to electrically pole the ceramic disks. The ceramic stack is housed in a metal tubular drill collar segment. The electrodes are preferably alternatively connected to ground potential and driving potential. This alternating connection of electrodes to ground and driving potential subjects each disk to an equal electric field; and the direction of the field alternates to match the alternating direction of polarization of the ceramic disks. Preferably, a thin metal foil is sandwiched between electrodes to facilitate the electrical connection. Alternatively, a thicker metal spacer plate is selectively used in place of the metal foil in order to promote thermal cooling of the ceramic stack.

  19. Electromechanical transducer for acoustic telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1993-06-22

    An improved electromechanical transducer is provided for use in an acoustic telemetry system. The transducer of this invention comprises a stack of ferroelectric ceramic disks interleaved with a plurality of spaced electrodes which are used to electrically pole the ceramic disks. The ceramic stack is housed in a metal tubular drill collar segment. The electrodes are preferably alternatively connected to ground potential and driving potential. This alternating connection of electrodes to ground and driving potential subjects each disk to an equal electric field; and the direction of the field alternates to match the alternating direction of polarization of the ceramic disks. Preferably, a thin metal foil is sandwiched between electrodes to facilitate the electrical connection. Alternatively, a thicker metal spacer plate is selectively used in place of the metal foil in order to promote thermal cooling of the ceramic stack.

  20. Extreme low frequency acoustic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is an extremely low frequency (ELF) microphone and acoustic measurement system capable of infrasound detection in a portable and easily deployable form factor. In one embodiment of the invention, an extremely low frequency electret microphone comprises a membrane, a backplate, and a backchamber. The backchamber is sealed to allow substantially no air exchange between the backchamber and outside the microphone. Compliance of the membrane may be less than ambient air compliance. The backplate may define a plurality of holes and a slot may be defined between an outer diameter of the backplate and an inner wall of the microphone. The locations and sizes of the holes, the size of the slot, and the volume of the backchamber may be selected such that membrane motion is substantially critically damped.

  1. Accounting for false-positive acoustic detections of bats using occupancy models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clement, Matthew J.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.; Ormsbee, Patricia C.; Szewczak, Joseph M.; Nichols, James D.

    2014-01-01

    4. Synthesis and applications. Our results suggest that false positives sufficient to affect inferences may be common in acoustic surveys for bats. We demonstrate an approach that can estimate occupancy, regardless of the false-positive rate, when acoustic surveys are paired with capture surveys. Applications of this approach include monitoring the spread of White-Nose Syndrome, estimating the impact of climate change and informing conservation listing decisions. We calculate a site-specific probability of occupancy, conditional on survey results, which could inform local permitting decisions, such as for wind energy projects. More generally, the magnitude of false positives suggests that false-positive occupancy models can improve accuracy in research and monitoring of bats and provide wildlife managers with more reliable information.

  2. Acoustic systems for the measurement of streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Smith, Winchell

    1983-01-01

    The acoustic velocity meter (AVM), also referred to as an ultrasonic flowmeter, has been an operational tool for the measurement of streamflow since 1965. Very little information is available concerning AVM operation, performance, and limitations. The purpose of this report is to consolidate information in such a manner as to provide a better understanding about the application of this instrumentation to streamflow measurement. AVM instrumentation is highly accurate and nonmechanical. Most commercial AVM systems that measure streamflow use the time-of-travel method to determine a velocity between two points. The systems operate on the principle that point-to-point upstream travel-time of sound is longer than the downstream travel-time, and this difference can be monitored and measured accurately by electronics. AVM equipment has no practical upper limit of measurable velocity if sonic transducers are securely placed and adequately protected. AVM systems used in streamflow measurement generally operate with a resolution of ?0.01 meter per second but this is dependent on system frequency, path length, and signal attenuation. In some applications the performance of AVM equipment may be degraded by multipath interference, signal bending, signal attenuation, and variable streamline orientation. Presently used minicomputer systems, although expensive to purchase and maintain, perform well. Increased use of AVM systems probably will be realized as smaller, less expensive, and more conveniently operable microprocessor-based systems become readily available. Available AVM equipment should be capable of flow measurement in a wide variety of situations heretofore untried. New signal-detection techniques and communication linkages can provide additional flexibility to the systems so that operation is possible in more river and estuary situations.

  3. Microcontroller-based underwater acoustic ECG telemetry system.

    PubMed

    Istepanian, R S; Woodward, B

    1997-06-01

    This paper presents a microcontroller-based underwater acoustic telemetry system for digital transmission of the electrocardiogram (ECG). The system is designed for the real time, through-water transmission of data representing any parameter, and it was used initially for transmitting in multiplexed format the heart rate, breathing rate and depth of a diver using self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA). Here, it is used to monitor cardiovascular reflexes during diving and swimming. The programmable capability of the system provides an effective solution to the problem of transmitting data in the presence of multipath interference. An important feature of the paper is a comparative performance analysis of two encoding methods, Pulse Code Modulation (PCM) and Pulse Position Modulation (PPM).

  4. SAIC SENTINEL acoustic counter-sniper system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoughton, Roland B.

    1997-02-01

    An acoustic surveillance system tailored to the detection and location of sniper fire was designed and a prototype built and tested. The SENTINEL system by Science Applications International Corporation exploits 100 kHz 16- bit digitization of signals from 16 condenser microphones in two volumetric arrays to make robust determinations of bearing, range, bullet trajectory, weapon caliber, and muzzle velocity. Signal processing is accomplished on VME hardware with C40 DSPs. Solutions are displayed within three seconds of a detected event on a ruggedized full-daylight- readable color laptop console. Typical accuracies are 1 degree to 2 degrees in azimuth and 2% to 10% in range, depending on range and environmental conditions. The large bandwidth and dynamic range, and exploitation of shock waveform period and amplitude estimates, give the system good capability even in difficult geometries and highly reverberant environments. In-depth study of the phenomenology of the ballistic shock wave was undertaken during the design phase. Results of this study are summarized.

  5. Development of net cage acoustic alarm system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Shih-Wei; Wei, Ruey-Chang

    2001-05-01

    In recent years, the fishery production has been drastically decreased in Taiwan, mainly due to overfishing and coast pollution; therefore, fishermen and corporations are encouraged by government to invest in ocean net cage aquaculture. However, the high-price fishes in the net cage are often coveted, so incidences of fish stealing and net cage breaking were found occasionally, which cause great economical loss. Security guards or a visual monitoring system has limited effect, especially in the night when these intrusions occur. This study is based on acoustic measure to build a net cage alarm system, which includes the sonobuoy and monitor station on land. The sonobuoy is a passive sonar that collects the sounds near the net cage and transmits the suspected signal to the monitor station. The signals are analyzed by the control program on the personal computer in the monitor station, and the alarms at different stages could be activated by the sound levels and durations of the analyzed data. To insure long hours of surveillance, a solar panel is applied to charge the battery, and a photodetector is used to activate the system.

  6. Radiometric and photometric design for an Acoustic Containerless Experiment System. [for space processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    The design of an optical system for a high temperature Acoustic Containerless Experiment System is examined. The optical system provides two-axis video, cine and infrared images of an acoustically positioned sample over a temperature range of 20 to 1200 C. Emphasis is placed on the radiometric and photometric characterization of the elements in the optical system and the oven to assist image data determination. Sample visibility due to wall radiance is investigated along with visibility due to strobe radiance. The optical system is designed for operation in Spacelab, and is used for a variety of materials processing experiments.

  7. A theoretical study of structural acoustic silencers for hydraulic systems.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Grosh, Karl; Dodson, John M

    2002-05-01

    Theoretical studies show that the introduction of an in-line structural acoustic silencer into a hydraulic system can achieve broadband quieting (i.e., high transmission loss). Strategies for using structural acoustic filters for simultaneously reducing reflection and transmission by tailoring the material properties are studied. A structural acoustic silencer consists of a flexible layer inserted into nominally rigid hydraulic piping. Transmission loss is achieved by two mechanisms--reflection of energy due to an impedance mismatch, and coupling of the incoming acoustic fluctuations to structural vibrations thereby allowing for the extraction of energy through losses in the structure. Structural acoustic finite element simulations are used to determine the transmission loss and evaluate designs. Results based on the interaction of orthotropic and isotropic plates with variable geometry, operating in heavy fluids like water and oil, are presented.

  8. Navstar/Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ananda, M.

    1982-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) was developed to provide highly precise position, velocity, and time information to users anywhere in the area of the Earth and at any time. The GPS, when fully operational, will consist of 18 satellites in six orbital planes. Any GPS user, by receiving and processing the radio signals from the satellite network can instantaneously determine navigation information to an accuracy of about 15 m in position and 0.1 m/s in velocity. The GPS is compared with other systems such as Loran-C, Omega, TACAN and Transit.

  9. On the stability of horizontal positions of acoustic transponders for seafloor geodesy deployed on thick sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, H.; Sweeney, A. D.; Uchida, N.; Miura, S.; Koizumi, K.

    2002-12-01

    The Japan Trench east of northeastern Japan is an appropriate site for the study of seismic coupling in subduction zones. The Pacific plate is subducted there at an average convergence rate of 85 mm/year, and large earthquakes occur there at relatively short intervals. For example, earthquakes off Miyagi Prefecture in northeastern Japan occur at intervals of 26 to 42 years with an average of 37 years between events. The seismic coupling, however, has been estimated to be less than 40 percent (Kawasaki et al., 2001). Leveling data support the hypothesis that post-seismic deformation is an important contributor to the low seismic coupling (Uyeda, 2002). Planning to make in situ observations of seismic coupling and motion of the Pacific Plate near the Japan Trench (about 200 km from the coast), we deployed three precision acoustic transponders (PXPs) in 2001 on both the Pacific plate (70 km from the trench axis at a depth of 5450 m) and the landward slope (70 km from the axis at a depth of 2800 m). The PXP system was developed for the full ocean depth in collaboration with a group at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Fujimoto et al., 2001). We have also demonstrated an accuracy of 2-3 cm for the sea-surface kinematic GPS positioning at a baseline length of 350 km (Miura et al., 2002). One of the remaining questions is how well the acoustic transponders are anchored to the old oceanic crust underlying thick sediment. The acoustic transducer is mounted one meter above the seafloor. If the transponder frame tilts by 1 degree due to differential settling, the horizontal position of the transducer shifts by 1.7 cm. Horizontal motion of the transponder independent of real crustal motion is undesirable. We have confirmed the anchor stability through visual inspection of PXPs deployed on the Pacific Plate seaward of the Japan Trench. We recently replaced the original PXPs with new ones due to a hardware problem in the old design. Three new PXPs were deployed from the

  10. Preliminary characterization of a one-axis acoustic system. [acoustic levitation for space processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oran, W. A.; Reiss, D. A.; Berge, L. H.; Parker, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    The acoustic fields and levitation forces produced along the axis of a single-axis resonance system were measured. The system consisted of a St. Clair generator and a planar reflector. The levitation force was measured for bodies of various sizes and geometries (i.e., spheres, cylinders, and discs). The force was found to be roughly proportional to the volume of the body until the characteristic body radius reaches approximately 2/k (k = wave number). The acoustic pressures along the axis were modeled using Huygens principle and a method of imaging to approximate multiple reflections. The modeled pressures were found to be in reasonable agreement with those measured with a calibrated microphone.

  11. Investigation of a stall deterrent system utilizing an acoustic stall sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, A. G.; Owens, J. K.; Harris, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    A simple rugged acoustic stall sensor which has an output proportional to angle of attack near wing stall has been evaluated on a Cessna 319 aircraft. A sensor position has been found on the wing where the sensor output is only slightly affected by engine power level, yaw angle, flap position and wing roughness. The NASA LRC General Aviation Simulator has been used to evaluate the acoustic sensor output as a control signal for active stall deterrent systems. It has been found that a simple control algorithm is sufficient for stall deterrence.

  12. Aeroelastic-Acoustics Simulation of Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, kajal K.; Choi, S.; Ibrahim, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the details of a numerical finite element (FE) based analysis procedure and a resulting code for the simulation of the acoustics phenomenon arising from aeroelastic interactions. Both CFD and structural simulations are based on FE discretization employing unstructured grids. The sound pressure level (SPL) on structural surfaces is calculated from the root mean square (RMS) of the unsteady pressure and the acoustic wave frequencies are computed from a fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the unsteady pressure distribution as a function of time. The resulting tool proves to be unique as it is designed to analyze complex practical problems, involving large scale computations, in a routine fashion.

  13. Effects of atmospheric variations on acoustic system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nation, Robert; Lang, Stephen; Olsen, Robert; Chintawongvanich, Prasan

    1993-01-01

    Acoustic propagation over medium to long ranges in the atmosphere is subject to many complex, interacting effects. Of particular interest at this point is modeling low frequency (less than 500 Hz) propagation for the purpose of predicting ranges and bearing accuracies at which acoustic sources can be detected. A simple means of estimating how much of the received signal power propagated directly from the source to the receiver and how much was received by turbulent scattering was developed. The correlations between the propagation mechanism and detection thresholds, beamformer bearing estimation accuracies, and beamformer processing gain of passive acoustic signal detection systems were explored.

  14. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Wright, Kenneth D.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Smith, Charlie D.

    2000-01-01

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) has for years been a leader in field acoustic array measurement technique. Two field-deployable digital measurement systems have been developed to support acoustic research programs at LaRC. For several years, LaRC has used the Digital Acoustic Measurement System (DAMS) for measuring the acoustic noise levels from rotorcraft and tiltrotor aircraft. Recently, a second system called Remote Acquisition and Storage System (RASS) was developed and deployed for the first time in the field along with DAMS system for the Community Noise Flight Test using the NASA LaRC-757 aircraft during April, 2000. The test was performed at Airborne Airport in Wilmington, OH to validate predicted noise reduction benefits from alternative operational procedures. The test matrix was composed of various combinations of altitude, cutback power, and aircraft weight. The DAMS digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone site and can be located up to 2000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 10 microphones is recorded on a Jaz disk and is analyzed post-test by microcomputer system. The RASS digitizes and stores acoustic inputs at the microphone site that can be located up to three miles from the base station and can compose a 3 mile by 3 mile array of microphones. 16-bit digitized data from the microphones is stored on removable Jaz disk and is transferred through a high speed array to a very large high speed permanent storage device. Up to 30 microphones can be utilized in the array. System control and monitoring is accomplished via Radio Frequency (RF) link. This paper will present a detailed description of both systems, along with acoustic data analysis from both systems.

  15. An approach for filtering hyperbolically positioned underwater acoustic telemetry data with position precision estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meckley, Trevor D.; Holbrook, Christopher M.; Wagner, C. Michael; Binder, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The use of position precision estimates that reflect the confidence in the positioning process should be considered prior to the use of biological filters that rely on a priori expectations of the subject’s movement capacities and tendencies. Position confidence goals should be determined based upon the needs of the research questions and analysis requirements versus arbitrary selection, in which filters of previous studies are adopted. Data filtering with this approach ensures that data quality is sufficient for the selected analyses and presents the opportunity to adjust or identify a different analysis in the event that the requisite precision was not attained. Ignoring these steps puts a practitioner at risk of reporting errant findings.

  16. Relativistic positioning systems: Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchades Colmenero, Neus

    The position of users located on the Earth's surface or near it may be found with the classic positioning systems (CPS). Certain information broadcast by satellites of global navigation systems, as GPS and GALILEO, may be used for positioning. The CPS are based on the Newtonian formalism, although relativistic post-Newtonian corrections are done when they are necessary. This thesis contributes to the development of a different positioning approach, which is fully relativistic from the beginning. In the relativistic positioning systems (RPS), the space-time position of any user (ship, spacecraft, and so on) can be calculated with the help of four satellites, which broadcast their proper times by means of codified electromagnetic signals. In this thesis, we have simulated satellite 4-tuples of the GPS and GALILEO constellations. If a user receives the signals from four satellites simultaneously, the emission proper times read -after decoding- are the user "emission coordinates". In order to find the user "positioning coordinates", in an appropriate almost inertial reference system, there are two possibilities: (a) the explicit relation between positioning and emission coordinates (broadcast by the satellites) is analytically found or (b) numerical codes are designed to calculate the positioning coordinates from the emission ones. Method (a) is only viable in simple ideal cases, whereas (b) allows us to consider realistic situations. In this thesis, we have designed numerical codes with the essential aim of studying two appropriate RPS, which may be generalized. Sometimes, there are two real users placed in different positions, which receive the same proper times from the same satellites; then, we say that there is bifurcation, and additional data are needed to choose the real user position. In this thesis, bifurcation is studied in detail. We have analyzed in depth two RPS models; in both, it is considered that the satellites move in the Schwarzschild's space

  17. Acoustic emission structural health management systems (AE-SHMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, Richard D.; Friesel, Mark A.; Carlos, Mark F.; Miller, Ronnie K.; Godinez, Valery

    2000-05-01

    Many of today's methods of inspecting structures are very time consuming, labor intensive and in many cases (due to limited access), impractical. In addition, long shutdown times are required to perform the inspections, thus creating tremendous expenses associated with manpower, materials and lost production. With continuing advances in signal processing and communications a significant interest has been shown in developing new diagnostic technologies for monitoring the integrity of structures with known defects, or for detecting new defects, in real time with minimum human involvement. The continued use of aging structures, especially in regard to the airworthiness of aging aircraft, is a major area of concern. Recent developments in both active and passive Acoustic Emission monitoring as an advanced tool for 'Structural Health Management Systems (SHMS),' are illustrated by using two recently developed acoustic emission systems; the Acoustic Emission-Health and Usage Monitoring System (AE-HUMS) helicopter drivetrain health monitoring system, and the Acoustic Emission Flight Instrument System (AEFIS) composite health monitoring system. The data collected with these types of systems is processed with advanced data screening and classification techniques, which are employed to take full advantage of parametric and waveform-based acoustic emission.

  18. A field-deployable digital acoustic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, David L.; Wright, Kenneth D., II; Rowland, Wayne D.

    1991-01-01

    A field deployable digital acoustic measurement system was developed to support acoustic research programs at the Langley Research Center. The system digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone, which can be located up to 1000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage, and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 12 microphones is recorded on high density 8mm tape and is analyzed post-test by a microcomputer system. Synchronous and nonsynchronous sampling is available with maximum sample rates of 12,500 and 40,000 samples per second respectively. The high density tape storage system is capable of storing 5 gigabytes of data at transfer rates up to 1 megabyte per second. System overall dynamic range exceeds 83 dB.

  19. An explosive acoustic telemetry system for seabed penetrators

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, G.C.; Hickerson, J.

    1988-04-01

    This report discusses the design and past applications of an explosive acoustic telemetry system (EATS) for gathering and transmitting data from seabed penetrators. The system was first fielded in 1982 and has since been used to measure penetrator performance on three other occasions. Descriptions are given of the mechanical hardware, system electronics, and software.

  20. Method for rapid localization of seafloor petroleum contamination using concurrent mass spectrometry and acoustic positioning.

    PubMed

    Camilli, R; Bingham, B; Reddy, C M; Nelson, R K; Duryea, A N

    2009-10-01

    Locating areas of seafloor contamination caused by heavy oil spills is challenging, in large part because of observational limitations in aquatic subsurface environments. Accepted methods for surveying and locating sunken oil are generally slow, labor intensive and spatially imprecise. This paper describes a method to locate seafloor contamination caused by heavy oil fractions using in situ mass spectrometry and concurrent acoustic navigation. We present results of laboratory sensitivity tests and proof-of-concept evaluations conducted at the US Coast Guard OHMSETT national oil spill response test facility. Preliminary results from a robotic seafloor contamination survey conducted in deep water using the mass spectrometer and a geo-referenced acoustic navigation system are also described. Results indicate that this technological approach can accurately localize seafloor oil contamination in real-time at spatial resolutions better than a decimeter.

  1. Response of a thermal barrier system to acoustic excitation in a gas turbine nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, W.S. Jr.; Blevins, R.D.

    1980-11-01

    A gas turbine located within a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) induces high acoustic sound pressure levels into the primary coolant (helium). This acoustic loading induces high cycle fatigue stresses which may control the design of the thermal barrier system. This study examines the dynamic response of a thermal barrier configuration consisting of a fibrous insulation compressed against the reactor vessel by a coverplate which is held in position by a central attachment fixture. The results of dynamic vibration analyses indicate the effect of the plate size and curvature and the attachment size on the response of the thermal barrier.

  2. Inertial Pointing and Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Robert (Inventor); Robbins, Fred (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An inertial pointing and control system and method for pointing to a designated target with known coordinates from a platform to provide accurate position, steering, and command information. The system continuously receives GPS signals and corrects Inertial Navigation System (INS) dead reckoning or drift errors. An INS is mounted directly on a pointing instrument rather than in a remote location on the platform for-monitoring the terrestrial position and instrument attitude. and for pointing the instrument at designated celestial targets or ground based landmarks. As a result. the pointing instrument and die INS move independently in inertial space from the platform since the INS is decoupled from the platform. Another important characteristic of the present system is that selected INS measurements are combined with predefined coordinate transformation equations and control logic algorithms under computer control in order to generate inertial pointing commands to the pointing instrument. More specifically. the computer calculates the desired instrument angles (Phi, Theta. Psi). which are then compared to the Euler angles measured by the instrument- mounted INS. and forms the pointing command error angles as a result of the compared difference.

  3. Performance evaluation of an acoustic indoor localization system based on a fingerprinting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloui, Nadia; Raoof, Kosai; Bouallegue, Ammar; Letourneur, Stephane; Zaibi, Sonia

    2014-12-01

    We present an acoustic location system that adopts the time of arrival of the path of maximum amplitude as a signature and estimates the target position through nonparametric kernel regression. The system was evaluated in experiments for two main configurations: a privacy-oriented configuration with code division multiple access operation and a centralized configuration with time division multiple access operation. The effects of the number and positions of sources on the performance of the privacy-oriented system was studied. Moreover, the effect of the number of fingerprint positions on the performance of both systems was investigated. Results showed that our privacy-oriented scheme provides an accuracy of 8.5 cm with 87% precision, whereas our centralized system provides an accuracy of 2.7 cm for 93% of measurements. A comparison between our privacy-oriented system and another acoustic location system based on code division multiple access operation and lateration was conducted on our test bench and revealed that the cumulative error distribution function of the fingerprint-based system is better than that of the lateration-based system. This result is similar to that found for Wi-Fi radio-based localization. However, our experiments are the first to demonstrate the detrimental effect that reverberation has on naive acoustic localization approaches.

  4. Development of a portable passive-acoustic bedload monitoring system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A hydrophone-based passive acoustic bedload-monitoring system was designed, tested and deployed by researchers at the University of Mississippi and the National Sedimentation Laboratory in Oxford, MS. The hydrophone system was designed to be easily deployed and operated by non-experts. In addition, ...

  5. Position and orientation tracking system

    DOEpatents

    Burks, B.L.; DePiero, F.W.; Armstrong, G.A.; Jansen, J.F.; Muller, R.C.; Gee, T.F.

    1998-05-05

    A position and orientation tracking system presents a laser scanning apparatus having two measurement pods, a control station, and a detector array. The measurement pods can be mounted in the dome of a radioactive waste storage silo. Each measurement pod includes dual orthogonal laser scanner subsystems. The first laser scanner subsystem is oriented to emit a first line laser in the pan direction. The second laser scanner is oriented to emit a second line laser in the tilt direction. Both emitted line lasers scan planes across the radioactive waste surface to encounter the detector array mounted on a target robotic vehicle. The angles of incidence of the planes with the detector array are recorded by the control station. Combining measurements describing each of the four planes provides data for a closed form solution of the algebraic transform describing the position and orientation of the target robotic vehicle. 14 figs.

  6. Position and orientation tracking system

    DOEpatents

    Burks, Barry L.; DePiero, Fred W.; Armstrong, Gary A.; Jansen, John F.; Muller, Richard C.; Gee, Timothy F.

    1998-01-01

    A position and orientation tracking system presents a laser scanning appaus having two measurement pods, a control station, and a detector array. The measurement pods can be mounted in the dome of a radioactive waste storage silo. Each measurement pod includes dual orthogonal laser scanner subsystems. The first laser scanner subsystem is oriented to emit a first line laser in the pan direction. The second laser scanner is oriented to emit a second line laser in the tilt direction. Both emitted line lasers scan planes across the radioactive waste surface to encounter the detector array mounted on a target robotic vehicle. The angles of incidence of the planes with the detector array are recorded by the control station. Combining measurements describing each of the four planes provides data for a closed form solution of the algebraic transform describing the position and orientation of the target robotic vehicle.

  7. Positively regulated bacterial expression systems

    PubMed Central

    Brautaset, Trygve; Lale, Rahmi; Valla, Svein

    2009-01-01

    Summary Regulated promoters are useful tools for many aspects related to recombinant gene expression in bacteria, including for high‐level expression of heterologous proteins and for expression at physiological levels in metabolic engineering applications. In general, it is common to express the genes of interest from an inducible promoter controlled either by a positive regulator or by a repressor protein. In this review, we discuss established and potentially useful positively regulated bacterial promoter systems, with a particular emphasis on those that are controlled by the AraC‐XylS family of transcriptional activators. The systems function in a wide range of microorganisms, including enterobacteria, soil bacteria, lactic bacteria and streptomycetes. The available systems that have been applied to express heterologous genes are regulated either by sugars (l‐arabinose, l‐rhamnose, xylose and sucrose), substituted benzenes, cyclohexanone‐related compounds, ε‐caprolactam, propionate, thiostrepton, alkanes or peptides. It is of applied interest that some of the inducers require the presence of transport systems, some are more prone than others to become metabolized by the host and some have been applied mainly in one or a limited number of species. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the AraC‐XylS family of regulators contains a large number of different members (currently over 300), but only a small fraction of these, the XylS/Pm, AraC/PBAD, RhaR‐RhaS/rhaBAD, NitR/PnitA and ChnR/Pb regulator/promoter systems, have so far been explored for biotechnological applications. PMID:21261879

  8. Positively regulated bacterial expression systems.

    PubMed

    Brautaset, Trygve; Lale, Rahmi; Valla, Svein

    2009-01-01

    Regulated promoters are useful tools for many aspects related to recombinant gene expression in bacteria, including for high-level expression of heterologous proteins and for expression at physiological levels in metabolic engineering applications. In general, it is common to express the genes of interest from an inducible promoter controlled either by a positive regulator or by a repressor protein. In this review, we discuss established and potentially useful positively regulated bacterial promoter systems, with a particular emphasis on those that are controlled by the AraC-XylS family of transcriptional activators. The systems function in a wide range of microorganisms, including enterobacteria, soil bacteria, lactic bacteria and streptomycetes. The available systems that have been applied to express heterologous genes are regulated either by sugars (L-arabinose, L-rhamnose, xylose and sucrose), substituted benzenes, cyclohexanone-related compounds, ε-caprolactam, propionate, thiostrepton, alkanes or peptides. It is of applied interest that some of the inducers require the presence of transport systems, some are more prone than others to become metabolized by the host and some have been applied mainly in one or a limited number of species. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the AraC-XylS family of regulators contains a large number of different members (currently over 300), but only a small fraction of these, the XylS/Pm, AraC/P(BAD), RhaR-RhaS/rhaBAD, NitR/PnitA and ChnR/Pb regulator/promoter systems, have so far been explored for biotechnological applications.

  9. Equilibrium shape and location of a liquid drop acoustically positioned in a resonant rectangular chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, H. W.; Barmatz, M.; Shipley, C.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a standing wave field in a rectangular chamber on the shape and location of an acoustically positioned drop or bubble is calculated. The sample deformation and equilibrium position are obtained from an analysis of the spherical harmonic projections of the total surface stress tensor. The method of calculation relies on the assumed condition that the sample is only slightly distorted from a spherical form. The equilibrium location of a levitated drop is combined with a formula introduced by Hasegawa (1979) to calcualte the ka dependence of the radiation force function. The present theory is valid for large as well as small ka values. Calculations in the small ka limit agree with previous theories and experimental results. Examples are presented for nonplane-wave modes as well as plane-wave rectangular modes.

  10. Equilibrium shape and location of a liquid drop acoustically positioned in a resonant rectangular chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, H. W.; Barmatz, M.; Shipley, C.

    1988-11-01

    The effect of a standing wave field in a rectangular chamber on the shape and location of an acoustically positioned drop or bubble is calculated. The sample deformation and equilibrium position are obtained from an analysis of the spherical harmonic projections of the total surface stress tensor. The method of calculation relies on the assumed condition that the sample is only slightly distorted from a spherical form. The equilibrium location of a levitated drop is combined with a formula introduced by Hasegawa (1979) to calcualte the ka dependence of the radiation force function. The present theory is valid for large as well as small ka values. Calculations in the small ka limit agree with previous theories and experimental results. Examples are presented for nonplane-wave modes as well as plane-wave rectangular modes.

  11. System and method for sonic wave measurements using an acoustic beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2015-08-11

    A method and system for investigating structure near a borehole are described herein. The method includes generating an acoustic beam by an acoustic source; directing at one or more azimuthal angles the acoustic beam towards a selected location in a vicinity of a borehole; receiving at one or more receivers an acoustic signal, the acoustic signal originating from a reflection or a refraction of the acoustic wave by a material at the selected location; and analyzing the received acoustic signal to characterize features of the material around the borehole.

  12. A novel sample-positioning system for microgravity application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method for sample positioning in containerless processing at microgravity, using a system based on pulsed lasers. The method has two attributes. First, by generating beams that cancel out vectorially, the suspended material can be heated without being accelerated, a feature that can be used in melting and heat-treatment applications. Second, the specimen can be positioned within a fairly large work space. It is emphasized that this method can service a regime unfulfilled by the other levitation methods, such as electromagnetic levitation, active magnetic suspension, acoustic levitation, of electrostatic suspension.

  13. Effect of mouthpiece, noseclips, and head position on airway area measured by acoustic reflections.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, I; McClean, P A; Boucher, R; Zamel, N; Fredberg, J J; Hoffstein, V

    1987-10-01

    To investigate whether it is possible to simplify the methodology of measuring airway area by acoustic reflections, we measured upper airway area in 10 healthy subjects during tidal breathing according to seven different protocols. Three protocols employed custom-made bulky mouthpiece with or without nose-clips, two protocols used a scuba-diving mouthpiece and cotton balls placed in the nostrils instead of noseclips, and two protocols employed neck flexion and extension. We found no significant difference in average pharyngeal, glottic, and tracheal areas for any of the protocols except for neck flexion, which was associated with a significantly lower mean pharyngeal area. Intraindividual variabilities were comparable for all protocols, except for protocol employing the customary bulky mouthpiece and no noseclips, which consistently resulted in the most variable measurements of area for all three airway segments: pharynx, glottis, and trachea. Furthermore, we found that the protocol employing the scuba-diving mouthpiece with or without cotton balls in the nostrils resulted in the lowest number of unacceptable measurements. We conclude that measurements of airway area by acoustic reflections may be further simplified by using a scuba-diving mouthpiece without noseclips; furthermore, control of head position during measurements is not critical provided there is no obvious neck flexion.

  14. Acoustic FMRI noise: linear time-invariant system model.

    PubMed

    Rizzo Sierra, Carlos V; Versluis, Maarten J; Hoogduin, Johannes M; Duifhuis, Hendrikus Diek

    2008-09-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For auditory system studies, however, the acoustic noise generated by the scanner tends to interfere with the assessments of this activation. Understanding and modeling fMRI acoustic noise is a useful step to its reduction. To study acoustic noise, the MR scanner is modeled as a linear electroacoustical system generating sound pressure signals proportional to the time derivative of the input gradient currents. The transfer function of one MR scanner is determined for two different input specifications: 1) by using the gradient waveform calculated by the scanner software and 2) by using a recording of the gradient current. Up to 4 kHz, the first method is shown as reliable as the second one, and its use is encouraged when direct measurements of gradient currents are not possible. Additionally, the linear order and average damping properties of the gradient coil system are determined by impulse response analysis. Since fMRI is often based on echo planar imaging (EPI) sequences, a useful validation of the transfer function prediction ability can be obtained by calculating the acoustic output for the EPI sequence. We found a predicted sound pressure level (SPL) for the EPI sequence of 104 dB SPL compared to a measured value of 102 dB SPL. As yet, the predicted EPI pressure waveform shows similarity as well as some differences with the directly measured EPI pressure waveform.

  15. Design of an acoustic telemetry system for rebreathers.

    PubMed

    Egi, S M

    2009-01-01

    Despite the abundance of telemetric applications for ecology, behavior and physiology of marine life, few efforts were reported about the use of acoustic telemetry for SCUBA divers. The objective of this study is to design and test an acoustic telemetry system for monitoring breathing gases of a Dräger Dolphin semi-closed circuit rebreather as well as the depth of the diver. The system is designed around a PC based surface unit and a microcontroller based diver carried module that digitizes the output of CO2 and O2 sensors located in the inhalation side of the canister. One pair of acoustic modems establishes the data link between the microcontroller and the topside PC. The graphical user interface is written in C# and enables the recording of the diving session as well. The system is calibrated in a hyperbaric chamber and tested successfully with four dives in three different environments using 100% O2 and Nitrox (47.9% O2 - 52.1% N2) up to 15 m depth and a distance of 40 m between acoustic modems. The telemetry data cannot be used only for recording physiological data but also provides an important operational safety tool to monitor the rebreather user. The future designs will include actuators for controlling the diluent and oxygen flow to closed circuit mix gas rebreathers.

  16. Broadband time reversed acoustic focusing and steering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, Alexander; Sarvazyan, Armen; Montaldo, Gabriel; Palacio, Delphine; Bercoff, Jeremy; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias

    2001-05-01

    We present results of experimental testing and theoretical modeling of a time reversal acoustic (TRA) focusing system based on a multifaceted aluminum resonator with 15 piezoceramic transducers glued to the resonator facets. One of the facets of the resonator, a pentagon with characteristic dimension of about 30 mm, was submerged into a water tank and served as a virtual phased array which provided ultrasound focusing and beam steering in a wide frequency band (0.7-3 MHz). Ultrasonic pulses with different carrier frequencies and various complex waveforms were focused; the focal length was varied in the range of 10-55 mm and the focused beam was steered in a range of angles of +/-60 deg. The amplitude of the signal in the focal region reached 40 MPa. A theoretical model was based on an assumption that the radiating part of the resonator works as a phase conjugation screen for a spherical wave radiated from the focal point. Theoretical dependencies of the field structure on the position of the focus point and ultrasound frequency are in a good agreement with experimental results. TRA based focusing of ultrasound has numerous applications in medical diagnostics, surgery and therapy. [Work supported by NIH grant.

  17. Resonant acoustic transducer and driver system for a well drilling string communication system

    DOEpatents

    Chanson, Gary J.; Nicolson, Alexander M.

    1981-01-01

    The acoustic data communication system includes an acoustic transmitter and receiver wherein low frequency acoustic waves, propagating in relatively loss free manner in well drilling string piping, are efficiently coupled to the drill string and propagate at levels competitive with the levels of noise generated by drilling machinery also present in the drill string. The transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring piezoelectric transmitter and amplifier combination that permits self-oscillating resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  18. Acoustic design criteria in a general system for structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brama, Torsten

    1990-01-01

    Passenger comfort is of great importance in most transport vehicles. For instance, in the new generation of regional turboprop aircraft, a low noise level is vital to be competitive on the market. The possibilities to predict noise levels analytically has improved rapidly in recent years. This will make it possible to take acoustic design criteria into account in early project stages. The development of the ASKA FE-system to include also acoustic analysis has been carried out at Saab Aircraft Division and the Aeronautical Research Institute of Sweden in a joint project. New finite elements have been developed to model the free fluid, porous damping materials, and the interaction between the fluid and structural degrees of freedom. The FE approach to the acoustic analysis is best suited for lower frequencies up to a few hundred Hz. For accurate analysis of interior cabin noise, large 3-D FE-models are built, but 2-D models are also considered to be useful for parametric studies and optimization. The interest is here focused on the introduction of an acoustic design criteria in the general structural optimization system OPTSYS available at the Saab Aircraft Division. The first implementation addresses a somewhat limited class of problems. The problems solved are formulated: Minimize the structural weight by modifying the dimensions of the structure while keeping the noise level in the cavity and other structural design criteria within specified limits.

  19. Sound attenuation using microelectromechanical systems fabricated acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, William N.; Stevens, Colin B.; Flowers, George T.; Dean, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike traditional rotational gyroscopes, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) gyroscopes use a vibrating proof mass rather than a rotational mass to sense changes in angular rate. They are also smaller and less expensive than traditional gyroscopes. MEMS gyroscopes are known to be susceptible to the effects of acoustic noise, in particular high frequency and high power acoustic noise. Most notably, this has been proven true in aerospace applications where the noise can reach levels in excess of 120 dB and the noise frequency can exceed 20 kHz. The typical resonant frequency for the proof mass of a MEMS gyroscope is between 3 and 20 kHz. High power, high frequency acoustic noise can disrupt the output signal of the gyroscope to the point that the output becomes unreliable. In recent years, considerable research has focused on the fascinating properties found in metamaterials. A metamaterial is an artificially fabricated device or structure that is engineered to produce desired material responses that can either mimic known behaviors or produce responses that do not occur naturally in materials found in nature. Acoustic metamaterials, in particular, have shown great promise in the field of sound attenuation. This paper proposes a method to mitigate the performance degradation of the MEMS gyroscope in the presence of high power, high frequency acoustic noise by using a new acoustic metamaterial in the form of a two-dimensional array of micromachined Helmholtz resonators. The Helmholtz resonators are fabricated in a silicon wafer using standard MEMS manufacturing techniques and are designed to attenuate sound at the resonant frequency of the gyroscope proof mass. The resonator arrays were diced from the silicon wafer in one inch squares and assembled into a box open on one end in a manner to attenuate sound on all sides of the gyroscope, and to seal the gyroscope inside the box. The resulting acoustic metamaterial device was evaluated in an acoustic chamber and was

  20. Positioning performance of a maglev fine positioning system

    SciTech Connect

    Wronosky, J.B.; Smith, T.G.; Jordan, J.D.; Darnold, J.R.

    1996-12-01

    A wafer positioning system was recently developed by Sandia National Laboratories for an Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) research tool. The system, which utilizes a magnetically levitated fine stage to provide ultra-precise positioning in all six degrees of freedom, incorporates technological improvements resulting from four years of prototype development experience. System enhancements, implemented on a second generation design for an ARPA National Center for Advanced Information Component Manufacturing (NCAICM) project, introduced active structural control for the levitated structure of the system. Magnetic levitation (maglev) is emerging as an important technology for wafer positioning systems in advanced lithography applications. The advantages of maglev stem from the absence of physical contact. The resulting lack of friction enables accurate, fast positioning. Maglev systems are mechanically simple, accomplishing full six degree-of-freedom suspension and control with a minimum of moving parts. Power-efficient designs, which reduce the possibility of thermal distortion of the platen, are achievable. Manufacturing throughput will be improved in future systems with the addition of active structural control of the positioning stages. This paper describes the design, implementation, and functional capability of the maglev fine positioning system. Specifics regarding performance design goals and test results are presented.

  1. The positioning system of the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ageron, M.; Aguilar, J. A.; Samarai, I. Al; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigi, A.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Hartman, J.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Keller, P.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Le Van Suu, A.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Niess, V.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payet, K.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Real, D.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Rivière, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2012-08-01

    The ANTARES neutrino telescope, located 40 km off the coast of Toulon in the Mediterranean Sea at a mooring depth of about 2475 m, consists of twelve detection lines equipped typically with 25 storeys. Every storey carries three optical modules that detect Cherenkov light induced by charged secondary particles (typically muons) coming from neutrino interactions. As these lines are flexible structures fixed to the sea bed and held taut by a buoy, sea currents cause the lines to move and the storeys to rotate. The knowledge of the position of the optical modules with a precision better than 10 cm is essential for a good reconstruction of particle tracks. In this paper the ANTARES positioning system is described. It consists of an acoustic positioning system, for distance triangulation, and a compass-tiltmeter system, for the measurement of the orientation and inclination of the storeys. Necessary corrections are discussed and the results of the detector alignment procedure are described.

  2. Indoor Positioning - An Ad-Hoc Positioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautz, Rainer

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the development of an automatic, low-cost system that exploits current or near future wireless communications technology to enable continuous tracking of the location of devices in all environments. The development of such a wireless sensor network involves system design, digital signal processing, protocol development, extraction of ranges and localisation. This paper focuses on the user requirements, system architecture and network positioning. The user requirements are presented with a focus on applications in geodesy. A high level strategy for the positioning function is presented based on an ad-hoc geodetic network positioning method including issues of accuracy, quality and reliability of the node positions. Results show that it is possible to achieve a position deviation that is of the size of the ranging error.

  3. Influence of the vibro-acoustic sensor position on cavitation detection in a Kaplan turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, H.; Kirschner, O.; Riedelbauch, S.; Necker, J.; Kopf, E.; Rieg, M.; Arantes, G.; Wessiak, M.; Mayrhuber, J.

    2014-03-01

    Hydraulic turbines can be operated close to the limits of the operating range to meet the demand of the grid. When operated close to the limits, the risk increases that cavitation phenomena may occur at the runner and / or at the guide vanes of the turbine. Cavitation in a hydraulic turbine can cause material erosion on the runner and other turbine parts and reduce the durability of the machine leading to required outage time and related repair costs. Therefore it is important to get reliable information about the appearance of cavitation during prototype operation. In this experimental investigation the high frequency acoustic emissions and vibrations were measured at 20 operating points with different cavitation behaviour at different positions in a large prototype Kaplan turbine. The main goal was a comparison of the measured signals at different sensor positions to identify the sensitivity of the location for cavitation detection. The measured signals were analysed statistically and specific values were derived. Based on the measured signals, it is possible to confirm the cavitation limit of the examined turbine. The result of the investigation shows that the position of the sensors has a significant influence on the detection of cavitation.

  4. Designing piping systems against acoustically-induced structural fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, F.L.

    1996-12-01

    Piping systems adapted for handling fluids such as steam and various process and hydrocarbon gases through a pressure-reducing device at high pressure and velocity conditions can produce severe acoustic vibration and metal fatigue in the system. It has been determined that such vibrations and fatigue are minimized by relating the acoustic power level (PWL) to being a function of the ratio of downstream pipe inside diameter D{sub 2} to its thickness t{sub 2}. Additionally, such vibration and fatigue can be further minimized by relating the fluid pressure drop and downstream mach number to a function of the ratio of downstream piping inside diameter to the pipe wall thickness, as expressed by M{sub 2} {Delta}p = f(D{sub 2}/t{sub 2}). Pressure-reducing piping systems designed according to these criteria exhibit minimal vibrations and metal fatigue failures and have long operating life.

  5. Directional radiation pattern in structural-acoustic coupled system.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hee-Seon; Kim, Yang-Hann

    2005-07-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the possibility of designing a radiator using structural-acoustic interaction by predicting the pressure distribution and radiation pattern of a structural-acoustic coupling system that is composed by a wall and two spaces. If a wall separates spaces, then the wall's role in transporting the acoustic characteristics of the spaces is important. The spaces can be categorized as bounded finite space and unbounded infinite space. The wall considered in this study composes two plates and an opening, and the wall separates one space that is highly reverberant and the other that is unbounded without any reflection. This rather hypothetical circumstance is selected to study the general coupling problem between the finite and infinite acoustic domains. We developed an equation that predicts the energy distribution and energy flow in the two spaces separated by a wall, and its computational examples are presented. Three typical radiation patterns that include steered, focused, and omnidirected are presented. A designed radiation pattern is also presented by using the optimal design algorithm.

  6. Directional radiation pattern in structural-acoustic coupled system.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hee-Seon; Kim, Yang-Hann

    2005-07-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the possibility of designing a radiator using structural-acoustic interaction by predicting the pressure distribution and radiation pattern of a structural-acoustic coupling system that is composed by a wall and two spaces. If a wall separates spaces, then the wall's role in transporting the acoustic characteristics of the spaces is important. The spaces can be categorized as bounded finite space and unbounded infinite space. The wall considered in this study composes two plates and an opening, and the wall separates one space that is highly reverberant and the other that is unbounded without any reflection. This rather hypothetical circumstance is selected to study the general coupling problem between the finite and infinite acoustic domains. We developed an equation that predicts the energy distribution and energy flow in the two spaces separated by a wall, and its computational examples are presented. Three typical radiation patterns that include steered, focused, and omnidirected are presented. A designed radiation pattern is also presented by using the optimal design algorithm. PMID:16119333

  7. Geodetic positioning using a global positioning system of satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fell, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    Geodetic positioning using range, integrated Doppler, and interferometric observations from a constellation of twenty-four Global Positioning System satellites is analyzed. A summary of the proposals for geodetic positioning and baseline determination is given which includes a description of measurement techniques and comments on rank deficiency and error sources. An analysis of variance comparison of range, Doppler, and interferometric time delay to determine their relative geometric strength for baseline determination is included. An analytic examination to the effect of a priori constraints on positioning using simultaneous observations from two stations is presented. Dynamic point positioning and baseline determination using range and Doppler is examined in detail. Models for the error sources influencing dynamic positioning are developed. Included is a discussion of atomic clock stability, and range and Doppler observation error statistics based on random correlated atomic clock error are derived.

  8. Multi buoy system observation for GPS/A seafloor positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukaiyama, H.; Ikuta, R.; Tadokoro, K.; Yasuda, K.; Watanabe, T.; Chiba, H.; Sayanagi, K.

    2014-12-01

    We are developing a method for observation of seafloor crustal deformation using kinematic GPS and acoustic ranging system. The system measures seafloor crustal deformation by determining position of benchmarks on the seafloor using a vessel which link-up GPS and acoustic signals. Acoustic ranging is used to measure distance between the vessel and the seafloor benchmarks. And kinematic GPS is used to locate the moving vessel every 0.2 seconds. Now we have deployed 4 seafloor benchmark units at Suruga Bay and 4 units at Kumano Basin both off-pacific coast Japan. At each survey site, three seafloor transponders are settled to define a benchmark unit. In this system, each measurement takes about ten hours and both sound speed structure and the benchmark unit positions were determined simultaneously for the each measurement using a tomographic technique. This tomographic technique was adopted based on assumption that the sound speed structure is horizontally layered and changes only in time, not in space. However, when sound speed structure has a heterogeneity, the assumption of a horizontal layering causes systematic error in the determination of seafloor benchmarks(Ikuta et al 2009AGU). So we are developing a new system using multi-buoy. Multi-buoy plays the role of vessel. Conducting observation using the buoys, we can estimate spatial variation of sound speed structures as a sloped structure every moment. With the single vessel system, we solve a kind of average sound speed over the different paths to the three seafloor transponders. Using the multi-buoy system, they can detect the lateral variation as difference of the average sound speeds obtained by different buoys, which improve the accuracy of the benchmark locations. In November 2013, Observation of seafloor crustal deformation using the buoys was held in Suruga Bay. In this study, we report the result of estimations of heterogeneous sound speed structures.

  9. Acoustic system for communication in pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, II, Louis Peter; Cooper, John F.

    2008-09-09

    A system for communication in a pipe, or pipeline, or network of pipes containing a fluid. The system includes an encoding and transmitting sub-system connected to the pipe, or pipeline, or network of pipes that transmits a signal in the frequency range of 3-100 kHz into the pipe, or pipeline, or network of pipes containing a fluid, and a receiver and processor sub-system connected to the pipe, or pipeline, or network of pipes containing a fluid that receives said signal and uses said signal for a desired application.

  10. Doppler compensated underwater acoustic communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Anand; George, Binu; Supiya, M. H.; Kurian, James; Pillai, P. R. Saseendran

    2001-05-01

    Spread spectrum methods are used in communication systems to provide a low probability of intercept in hostile environments and multiple access capability in systems shared by many users as well as to provide high processing gain in channels where the transmitted signal is distorted by multipath effects. Such systems serve to be an effective tool for underwater telemetry environments, where multipath propagation effect and Doppler spreading is seen to be more predominant. This paper describes the implementation of a Doppler compensated underwater telemetry system based on CDMA technique. The system consists of multiple CDMA transmitters and a phase locked loop based carrier recoverable CDMA receiver. The effects of the Doppler shift can be compensated by the carrier recovery subsystem in the demodulator, based on PLL technique, which extracts the carrier frequency/phase and simultaneously demodulates the signal. The decision device in the receiver consists of a PN sequence generator as well as a bank of correlators, which are used to determine the data transmitted. The system simulation has been implemented in MATLAB. The advantage of this system is that multiple transmitting stations can transmit simultaneously to a central receiver, thereby increasing the system throughput.

  11. Study on demodulated signal distribution and acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ying; Yang, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Chen; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2016-06-01

    We propose a demodulated signal distribution theory for a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system. The distribution region of Rayleigh backscattering including the acoustic sensing signal in the sensing fiber is investigated theoretically under different combinations of both the path difference and pulse width Additionally we determine the optimal solution between the path difference and pulse width to obtain the maximum phase change per unit length. We experimentally test this theory and realize a good acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of  -150 dB re rad/(μPa·m) of fiber in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 1 kHz.

  12. Early Forest Fire Detection Using Radio-Acoustic Sounding System

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Yasar Guneri; Ince, Turker

    2009-01-01

    Automated early fire detection systems have recently received a significant amount of attention due to their importance in protecting the global environment. Some emergent technologies such as ground-based, satellite-based remote sensing and distributed sensor networks systems have been used to detect forest fires in the early stages. In this study, a radio-acoustic sounding system with fine space and time resolution capabilities for continuous monitoring and early detection of forest fires is proposed. Simulations show that remote thermal mapping of a particular forest region by the proposed system could be a potential solution to the problem of early detection of forest fires. PMID:22573967

  13. Acoustic module of the Acquabona (Italy) debris flow monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgaro, A.; Tecca, P. R.; Genevois, R.; Deganutti, A. M.

    2005-02-01

    Monitoring of debris flows aimed to the assessment of their physical parameters is very important both for theoretical and practical purposes. Peak discharge and total volume of debris flows are crucial for designing effective countermeasures in many populated mountain areas where losses of lives and property damage could be avoided. This study quantifies the relationship between flow depth, acoustic amplitude of debris flow induced ground vibrations and front velocity in the experimental catchment of Acquabona, Eastern Dolomites, Italy. The analysis of data brought about the results described in the following. Debris flow depth and amplitude of the flow-induced ground vibrations show a good positive correlation. Estimation of both mean front velocity and peak discharge can be simply obtained monitoring the ground vibrations, through geophones installed close to the flow channel; the total volume of debris flow can be so directly estimated from the integral of the ground vibrations using a regression line. The application of acoustic technique to debris flow monitoring seems to be of the outmost relevance in risk reduction policies and in the correct management of the territory. Moreover this estimation is possible in other catchments producing debris flows of similar characteristics by means of their acoustic characterisation through quick and simple field tests (Standard Penetration Tests and seismic refraction surveys).

  14. Radiation force produced by time reversal acoustic focusing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Sutin, Alexander

    2003-10-01

    An ultrasonic induced radiation force is an efficient tool for remote probing of internal anatomical structures and evaluating tissue viscoelastic properties, which are closely related to tissue functional state and abnormalities. Time Reversal Acoustic Focusing System (TRA FS) can provide efficient ultrasound focusing in highly inhomogeneous media. Furthermore, numerous reflections from boundaries, which distort focusing in conventional ultrasound focusing systems and are viewed as a significant technical hurdle, lead to an improvement of the focusing ability of the TRA system. In this work the TRA FS field structure and radiation force in a transcranial phantom were investigated. A simple TRA FS comprising a plane piezoceramic transducer attached to an external resonator such as an aluminum block was acoustically coupled to the tested transcranial phantom. A custom-designed compact electronic unit for TRA FS provided receiving, digitizing, storing, time reversing and transmitting of acoustic signals in a wide frequency range from 0.01 to 10 MHz. The radiation force produced by ultrasonic pulses was investigated as a function of the transmitted ultrasound temporal parameters. The simplest TRA FS provided focusing of 500 kHz ultrasound pulses and the generation of a radiation force with an efficacy hardly achievable using conventional sophisticated phased array transmitters. [Work supported by NIH.

  15. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability in solid rocket motors and liquid engines is a complication that continues to plague designers and engineers. Many rocket systems experience violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. During sever cases of combustion instability fluctuation amplitudes can reach values equal to or greater than the average chamber pressure. Large amplitude oscillations lead to damaged injectors, loss of rocket performance, damaged payloads, and in some cases breach of case/loss of mission. Historic difficulties in modeling and predicting combustion instability has reduced most rocket systems experiencing instability into a costly fix through testing paradigm or to scrap the system entirely.

  16. Use of acoustic monitoring system for debris flow discharge evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgaro, A. G.; Tecca, P. R.; Genevois, R.; Deganutti, A. M.

    2003-04-01

    In 1997 an automated system for monitoring of debris flows has been installed in the Acquabona channel Dolomites, Italy. Induction geophones, with a specific frequency of 10 Hz, measure the amplitude of vertical ground vibrations generated by the passage of a flowing mass along the channel. Continuous acoustic logs and ultrasonic hydrograph recorded at the lower-channel measurement station for the debris flow of August 17, 1998, show a striking correspondence. This correspondence, already observed in different flow sites, is represented by the best fit between flow depth and flow sensor amplitude. Average front velocity for surges, calculated from the signal peak time shift and the distance between the sensors along the flow path, range between 2.00 and 7.7 m/s. As the ultrasonic sensor provides a way to measure the variation of the flow section area with the flow depth, the debris flow peak discharge may be estimated; obtained values of debris flow peak discharge range from 4 and 30 m3/s. Volumes were calculated by integrating instantaneous discharges through the hydrograph and by integrating the geophone log (acoustic flux). Volumes of 13700 m3 and 15500 m3 have been respectively obtained. The slight difference between the two values may result from the fact that acoustic records: i) are sensitive to the high frequencies, typical of the debris flow tails; ii) sum up the contributions sent by the whole flowing mass, while the ecometer detect the flow depth at every time at only one section. As a consequence the rising of the whole geophone log gives a higher value at the integration result. This only acoustic system can give a reasonably proxy for discharge and total volumes involved, which are among the most important parameters for debris flow hazard assessment and planning countermeasures. This methodology can be used in other debris flow sites if they are calibrated by the acoustic characterization of debris, obtained by both seismic surveys and SPT tests, and

  17. Optimal flushing agents for integrated optical and acoustic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    An increasing number of integrated optical and acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been developed and hold great promise for accurately diagnosing vulnerable plaques and guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, the vascular lumen is filled with blood, a high-scattering source for optical and high-frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to provide clearer images. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent for combined optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions as potential flushing agents for their image-enhancing effects: mannitol, dextran, and iohexol. Testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed-loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits. We found that a high concentration of dextran was the most useful for simultaneous intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging.

  18. Ideal flushing agents for integrated optical acoustic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav M.; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-02-01

    An increased number of integrated optical acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been researched and hold great hope for accurate diagnosing of vulnerable plaques and for guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, vascular lumen is filled with blood, which is a high-scattering source for optical and high frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to make images clear. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent that works for both optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions, mannitol, dextran and iohexol, as flushing agents because of their image-enhancing effects and low toxicities. Quantitative testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits.

  19. Optimal flushing agents for integrated optical and acoustic imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. An increasing number of integrated optical and acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been developed and hold great promise for accurately diagnosing vulnerable plaques and guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, the vascular lumen is filled with blood, a high-scattering source for optical and high-frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to provide clearer images. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent for combined optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions as potential flushing agents for their image-enhancing effects: mannitol, dextran, and iohexol. Testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed-loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits. We found that a high concentration of dextran was the most useful for simultaneous intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging. PMID:25985096

  20. Kinetic instability of the dust acoustic mode in inhomogeneous, partially magnetized plasma with both positively and negatively charged grains

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.; Poedts, S.

    2010-08-15

    A purely kinetic instability of the dust acoustic mode in inhomogeneous plasmas is discussed. In the presence of a magnetic field, electrons and ions may be magnetized while at the same time dust grains may remain unmagnetized. Although the dynamics of the light species is strongly affected by the magnetic field, the dust acoustic mode may still propagate in practically any direction. The inhomogeneity implies a source of free energy for an instability that develops through the diamagnetic drift effects of the magnetized species. It is shown that this may be a powerful mechanism for the excitation of dust acoustic waves. The analysis presented in the work is also directly applicable to plasmas containing both positive and negative ions and electrons, provided that at least one of the two ion species is unmagnetized.

  1. Low-flying target position finding with a seismic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cechak, Jaroslav; Hubacek, Petr; Vesely, Jiri

    2009-06-01

    The development of new sensor systems able to detect, identify and find position of the targets equipped with STEALTH technology began early in 1990s. Some of the sensor systems utilise acoustic, magnetic, seismic and/or other physical effects of target activity. A reason motivating the development of new sensor systems based on other than radar or optical principal of operation in detecting targets is that the systems usually emit no electromagnetic energy during operation. Thanks to their passive principle they provide the users with the advantages of hidden positioning and difficult discovery with reconnaissance tools. Therefore, some of the new UGS systems also allow detecting low-flying targets, such as helicopters, propeller or jet aircraft, etc., in the detection range of up to several kilometres. The information of flight direction is usually estimated and deduced from spatiotemporal sequence detections by multiple interlinked UGS systems. The submitted paper analyses low-flying target position finding principle on Time Direction Of Arrival (TDOA) basis. It presents the qualities of found UGS arrangement topologies and the characteristics of the unambiguous position determination of low-flying targets. It also contains mathematical description of signal digital processing intended to find low-flying target's position. The processed results are presented in table and diagram forms created in Matlab mathematical environment. All the presented detection and identification results were obtained from real recorded signals.

  2. Acoustic spectroscopy of colloids dispersed in a polymer gel system.

    PubMed

    Bhosale, Prasad S; Berg, John C

    2010-09-21

    The technique of acoustic spectroscopy offers some significant advantages over conventional techniques, such as dynamic light scattering and differential sedimentation (centrifugation), for the characterization of colloidal dispersions in that it does not require that the systems be highly dilute and transparent. Another advantage of the method may derived from the fact that in applications, the relative motion between any particle and the medium is very small, at the most being comparable to the particle size. It may thus be suited, within limits, to the study of dispersions in polymer gels, without the additional limitation of conventional methods to transparent media (matching refractive index of polymer and liquid). The present work seeks to probe experimentally the limits of the technique and its current theory for the determination of particle size distributions in gel media. Experiments measuring acoustic attenuation have been conducted on dispersions of silica particles of varying size in aqueous hydroxylpropyl cellulose (HPC) gels of varying cross-link density. The particle size distribution (PSD) was successfully measured by acoustic attenuation theory for dispersions in Newtonian media provided that the hydrodynamic particle diameter was less than the hydrodynamic mesh size of the gel, as given by simple rubber elasticity theory (mesh size/particle size ≳1.5). The same results were obtained at particle loadings of up to 15 wt %. If the particles are larger than the mesh size, then a viscoelastic response from the gel matrix is observed that cannot be interpreted to yield the particle size using the existing theoretical framework.

  3. Electromagnetic-acoustic-transducer synthetic-aperture system for thick-weld inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunko, C. M.; Schramm, R. E.; Moulder, J. C.; McColskey, J. D.

    1984-05-01

    A system is described based on electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) as an approach to automated nondestructive evaluation of thick weldments. Applications include a new type of ultrasonic inspection system for thick, butt welds used in ship construction. A minicomputer controlled transducer positioned and acquired the digitized ultrasonic waveforms for synthetic aperture processing. The synthetic aperture technique further improved signal quality and yielded flaw localization through the weld thickness. Details include the design of the transducers and electronics, as well as the mechanical positioner, signal processing algorithms, and complete computer program listings.

  4. 76 FR 63899 - Positive Train Control Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... regulations requiring certain railroads to implement PTC systems. See 76 FR 52918 (Aug. 24, 2011). Interested... Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Part 236 RIN 2130-AC27 Positive Train Control Systems AGENCY... meet certain risk-based criteria in order to avoid positive train control (PTC) system...

  5. Constrained tri-sphere kinematic positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Viola, Robert J

    2010-12-14

    A scalable and adaptable, six-degree-of-freedom, kinematic positioning system is described. The system can position objects supported on top of, or suspended from, jacks comprising constrained joints. The system is compatible with extreme low temperature or high vacuum environments. When constant adjustment is not required a removable motor unit is available.

  6. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-08-08

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  7. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  8. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-02-14

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  9. System And Method For Characterizing Voiced Excitations Of Speech And Acoustic Signals, Removing Acoustic Noise From Speech, And Synthesizi

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-04-25

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  10. Advantages of time reversal acoustic focusing system in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, Alexander; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2005-09-01

    The development and biomedical applications of time reversal acoustics (TRA) systems for focusing and manipulating ultrasound beams are reviewed. The TRA focusing system (TRA FS) is capable to deliver ultrasound energy to the chosen region in highly inhomogeneous medium (including soft tissues and bones) with focusing efficacy hardly achievable using conventional phased array transmitters. TRA FS is able to focus and stir ultrasound beams in a 3-D volume using just a few piezoceramic transducers glued to the facets an aluminum block. Another advantage of TRA FS is its ability to produce pulses with arbitrary waveforms in a wide frequency band. A custom-designed compact multichannel TRA system operating in a wide frequency range from 0.01 to 10 MHz has been developed. Measurements of TRA field structure were conducted in a large variety of inhomogeneous tissue phantoms and ex vivo bones and soft tissues. Principles of TRA focusing optimization based on acoustical properties of the resonator material, parameters of the sonicated medium, and the coupling of the TRA resonator with the medium were developed and applied in the tested TRA systems. [Work was supported by NIH.

  11. Renewable Energy Positioning System: Energy Positioning: Control and Economics

    SciTech Connect

    2012-03-01

    GENI Project: The University of Washington and the University of Michigan are developing an integrated system to match well-positioned energy storage facilities with precise control technologies so the electric grid can more easily include energy from renewable power sources like wind and solar. Because renewable energy sources provide intermittent power, it is difficult for the grid to efficiently allocate those resources without developing solutions to store their energy for later use. The two universities are working with utilities, regulators, and the private sector to position renewable energy storage facilities in locations that optimize their ability to provide and transmit electricity where and when it is needed most. Expanding the network of transmission lines is prohibitively expensive, so combining well-placed storage facilities with robust control systems to efficiently route their power will save consumers money and enable the widespread use of safe, renewable sources of power.

  12. Acoustic ray chaos and billiard system in Hamiltonian formalism (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabe, Tetsuji; Aono, Keisuke; Shin-Ya, Masakazu

    2003-02-01

    The acoustic ray model with a strong connection to the billiard problem is presented within the framework of the Hamiltonian form. Introducing the background function into the sound-speed profile to confine all rays in a closed space, we obtain the ray trajectories consistent with a billiard picture. The ray chaos is observed when the perturbation due to inhomogeneity of the medium is taken into account. Based on the Poincaré surface of section and the Lyapunov exponents, we confirm that the chaos is characterized by almost the same structure as one observed in many Hamiltonian systems with two degrees of freedom.

  13. Fuel Line Based Acoustic Flame-Out Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puster, Richard L. (Inventor); Franke, John M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic flame-out detection system that renders a large high pressure combustor safe in the event of a flame-out and possible explosive reignition. A dynamic pressure transducer is placed in the fuel and detects the stabilizing fuel pressure oscillations, caused by the combustion process. An electric circuit converts the signal from the combustion vortices, and transmitted to the fuel flow to a series of pulses. A missing pulse detector counts the pulses and continuously resets itself. If three consecutive pulses are missing, the circuit closes the fuel valve. With fuel denied the combustor is shut down or restarted under controlled conditions.

  14. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  15. Acoustic Predictions of Manned and Unmanned Rotorcraft Using the Comprehensive Analytical Rotorcraft Model for Acoustics (CARMA) Code System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Burley, Casey L.; Conner, David A.

    2005-01-01

    The Comprehensive Analytical Rotorcraft Model for Acoustics (CARMA) is being developed under the Quiet Aircraft Technology Project within the NASA Vehicle Systems Program. The purpose of CARMA is to provide analysis tools for the design and evaluation of efficient low-noise rotorcraft, as well as support the development of safe, low-noise flight operations. The baseline prediction system of CARMA is presented and current capabilities are illustrated for a model rotor in a wind tunnel, a rotorcraft in flight and for a notional coaxial rotor configuration; however, a complete validation of the CARMA system capabilities with respect to a variety of measured databases is beyond the scope of this work. For the model rotor illustration, predicted rotor airloads and acoustics for a BO-105 model rotor are compared to test data from HART-II. For the flight illustration, acoustic data from an MD-520N helicopter flight test, which was conducted at Eglin Air Force Base in September 2003, are compared with CARMA full vehicle flight predictions. Predicted acoustic metrics at three microphone locations are compared for limited level flight and descent conditions. Initial acoustic predictions using CARMA for a notional coaxial rotor system are made. The effect of increasing the vertical separation between the rotors on the predicted airloads and acoustic results are shown for both aerodynamically non-interacting and aerodynamically interacting rotors. The sensitivity of including the aerodynamic interaction effects of each rotor on the other, especially when the rotors are in close proximity to one another is initially examined. The predicted coaxial rotor noise is compared to that of a conventional single rotor system of equal thrust, where both are of reasonable size for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

  16. Acoustic dispersion in a two-dimensional dipole system

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, Kenneth I.; Kalman, Gabor J.; Donko, Zoltan; Hartmann, Peter

    2008-07-15

    We calculate the full density response function and from it the long-wavelength acoustic dispersion for a two-dimensional system of strongly coupled point dipoles interacting through a 1/r{sup 3} potential at arbitrary degeneracy. Such a system has no random-phase-approximation (RPA) limit and the calculation has to include correlations from the outset. We follow the quasilocalized charge (QLC) approach, accompanied by molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations. Similarly to what has been recently reported for the closely spaced classical electron-hole bilayer [G. J. Kalman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 236801 (2007)] and in marked contrast to the RPA, we report a long-wavelength acoustic phase velocity that is wholly maintained by particle correlations and varies linearly with the dipole moment p. The oscillation frequency, calculated both in an extended QLC approximation and in the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander approximation [Phys. Rev. 176, 589 (1968)], is invariant in form over the entire classical to quantum domains all the way down to zero temperature. Based on our classical MD-generated pair distribution function data and on ground-state energy data generated by recent quantum Monte Carlo simulations on a bosonic dipole system [G. E. Astrakharchik et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 060405 (2007)], there is a good agreement between the QLC approximation kinetic sound speeds and the standard thermodynamic sound speeds in both the classical and quantum domains.

  17. Synthetic gauge flux and Weyl points in acoustic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Meng; Chen, Wen-Jie; He, Wen-Yu; Chan, C. T.

    We consider acoustic systems comprising a honeycomb lattice in the xy plane and periodic along the z direction. As kz is a good quantum number here, for each fixed kz, this system can be treated as a reduced two-dimensional system. By engineering the interlayer coupling in the z-direction, we show that we can realize effective inversion symmetry breaking and synthetic staggered gauge flux in the reduced two-dimensional system. The realizations of chiral edge states for fixed values of kz are direct consequences of the staggered gauge flux. And we then show that the synthetic gauge flux is closely related to the Weyl points in the three-dimensional band structure. This work was supported by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council (Grant No. AoE/P-02/12).

  18. Toward bias minimization in acoustic feedback cancellation systems.

    PubMed

    Boukis, Christos; Mandic, Danilo P; Constantinides, Anthony G

    2007-03-01

    A novel technique for bias suppression within acoustic feedback cancellation systems is proposed. This is achieved based on the use of all-pass filters in the forward part of the hearing aid. The poles of these filters are made time-varying, which results in a frequency response with constant magnitude and varying phase. This is a desired feature of the proposed approach, since the results from human psychoacoustics show that the human ear is not sensitive to moderate phase perturbations. The derivation of the proposed algorithms for the time variation of the location of the poles of all pass filters is based on a rigorous analysis of the phenomenon of bias in acoustic systems. Practical issues, such as the dependence of the steady-state error on the order of the all-pass filter, the number of varying poles, and their standard deviation are examined and strategies for the variation of the poles are introduced. Results obtained from a simulated hearing aid are provided to support the analysis. The quality of the processed audio signals is evaluated through subjective tests. PMID:17407890

  19. Advancements in the development of a directional-position sensing fast neutron detector using acoustically tensioned metastable fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, Brian C.; Webster, Jeffrey A.; Grimes, Thomas F.; Fischer, Kevin F.; Hagen, Alex R.; Taleyakhan, Rusi P.

    2015-06-01

    Advancements in the development of a direction and position sensing fast neutron detector which utilizes the directional acoustic tensioned metastable fluid detector (D-ATMFD) are described. The resulting D-ATMFD sensor is capable of determining the direction of neutron radiation with a single compact detector versus use of arrays of detectors in conventional directional systems. Directional neutron detection and source positioning offer enhanced detection speeds in comparison to traditional proximity searching; including enabling determination of the neutron source shape, size, and strength in near real time. This paper discusses advancements that provide the accuracy and precision of ascertaining directionality and source localization information utilizing enhanced signal processing-cum-signal analysis, refined computational algorithms, and on-demand enlargement capability of the detector sensitive volume. These advancements were accomplished utilizing experimentation and theoretical modeling. Benchmarking and qualifications studies were successfully conducted with random and fission based special nuclear material (SNM) neutron sources (239Pu-Be and 252Cf). These results of assessments have indicated that the D-ATMFD compares well in technical performance with banks of competing directional fast neutron detector technologies under development worldwide, but it does so with a single detector unit, an unlimited field of view, and at a significant reduction in both cost and size while remaining completely blind to common background (e.g., beta-gamma) radiation. Rapid and direct SNM neutron source imaging with two D-ATMFD sensors was experimentally demonstrated, and furthermore, validated via multidimensional nuclear particle transport simulations utilizing MCNP-PoliMi. Characterization of a scaled D-ATMFD based radiation portal monitor (RPM) as a cost-effective and efficient 3He sensor replacement was performed utilizing MCNP-PoliMi simulations, the results of which

  20. Tests Of A Differential Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, F. G.; Hegary, D. M.; Turner, R. N.; Van Graas, F.; Sharma, S.

    1990-01-01

    Paper describes validation tests of global positioning system (GPS) for low-flying helicopters. Configured as differential GPS, in which components in both aircraft and ground station compute position errors relative to known location using satellite navigational data. Corrections computed from differences between computed and measured ranges to four satellites being tracked by receiver in both aircraft and ground systems. Tests conducted to determine whether equipment and computer programs of system operated correctly and consistently.

  1. The Impact of System Latency on Dynamic Performance In Virtual Acoustic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Ahumada, Albert (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Engineering constraints that may be encountered when implementing interactive virtual acoustic displays are examined In particular, system parameters such as the update rate and total system latency are defined and the impact they may have on perception is discussed. For example, examination of the head motions that listeners used to aid localization in a previous study suggests that some head motions may be as fast as about 400 degrees/sec for short time periods. Analysis of latencies in virtual acoustic environments (VAEs) suggests that: (1) commonly-specified parameters such as the audio update rate determine only the "best-case" latency possible in a VAE, (2) total system latency and individual latencies of system components, including head-trackers, are frequently not measured by VAE developers, and (3) typical system latencies may result in under-sampling of relative listener-source motion of 400 degrees/sec as well as positional "jitter" in the simulated source. To clearly specify the dynamic performance of a particular VAE, users and developers need to make measurements of average system latency, update rate, and their variability using standardized rendering scenarios. a parameters such as the minimum audible movement angle can then be used as target guidelines to assess whether a given system meets perceptual requirements.

  2. Changes in zooplankton habitat, behavior, and acoustic scattering characteristics across glider-resolved fronts in the Southern California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Jesse R.; Ohman, Mark D.

    2015-05-01

    We report cross-frontal changes in the characteristics of plankton proxy variables measured by autonomous Spray ocean gliders operating within the Southern California Current System (SCCS). A comparison of conditions across the 154 positive frontal gradients (i.e., where density of the surface layer decreased in the offshore direction) identified from six years of continuous measurements showed that waters on the denser side of the fronts typically showed higher Chl-a fluorescence, shallower euphotic zones, and higher acoustic backscatter than waters on the less dense side. Transitions between these regions were relatively abrupt. For positive fronts the amplitude of Diel Vertical Migration (DVM), inferred from a 3-beam 750 kHz acoustic Doppler profiler, increased offshore of fronts and covaried with optical transparency of the water column. Average interbeam variability in acoustic backscatter also changed across many positive fronts within 3 depth strata (0-150 m, 150-400 m, and 400-500 m), revealing a front-related change in the acoustic scattering characteristics of the assemblages. The extent of vertical stratification of distinct scattering assemblages was also more pronounced offshore of positive fronts. Depth-stratified zooplankton samples collected by Mocness nets corroborated the autonomous measurements, showing copepod-dominated assemblages and decreased zooplankton body sizes offshore and euphausiid-dominated assemblages with larger median body sizes inshore of major frontal features.

  3. Field installation of an acoustic slug-detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Dhulesia, H.; Bernicot, M.; Romanet, T.

    1997-02-01

    A pipeline operating in the slug flow regime creates high fluctuations in gas and liquid flow rates at the outlet. The detection of slugs and the estimation of their length and velocity are necessary to minimize the upsets in the operation of downstream process facilities. A new method based on the acoustic principle has been developed by Total and Syminex with two variants--passive and active. The passive method gives the slug length and velocity, whereas the active method also gives the fluid density. The prototype of this system has been installed permanently on a 20-in. multiphase pipeline in Argentina. As this system detects the slugs and determines their characteristics approximately 2 minutes before they arrive at the first-stage separator, the operators take appropriate action in the case of arrival of an excessively long slug and, thus, avoid possible shutdowns. At a later stage, an automatic adjustment of the process control valves will be realized.

  4. Acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB)

    DOEpatents

    O'Donnell, Matthew; Ye, Jing Yong; Norris, Theodore B.; Baker, Jr., James R.; Balogh, Lajos P.; Milas, Susanne M.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.; Hollman, Kyle W.

    2008-05-06

    An acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB) provides information which characterize material which is broken down, microbubbles in the material, and/or the microenvironment of the microbubbles. In one embodiment of the invention, femtosecond laser pulses are focused just inside the surface of a volume of aqueous solution which may include dendrimer nanocomposite (DNC) particles. A tightly focused, high frequency, single-element ultrasonic transducer is positioned such that its focus coincides axially and laterally with this laser focus. When optical breakdown occurs, a microbubble forms and a shock or pressure wave is emitted (i.e., acoustic emission). In addition to this acoustic signal, the microbubble may be actively probed with pulse-echo measurements from the same transducer. After the microbubble forms, received pulse-echo signals have an extra pulse, describing the microbubble location and providing a measure of axial microbubble size. Wavefield plots of successive recordings illustrate the generation, growth, and collapse of microbubbles due to optical breakdown. These same plots can also be used to quantify LIOB thresholds.

  5. Global positioning system missile test range applications

    SciTech Connect

    Partridge, M.E.

    1986-06-01

    Using the Global Positioning System (GPS), a missile under test could transmit its own position, reducing radar tracking requirements while still providing three-dimensional position and velocity data with the required accuracy. This study investigated minimum package size requirements for GPS implementation on the SRAM II missile as part of the joint test assembly telemetry system. Reported GPS missile test range applications are reviewed. The two missile tracking system implementations considered are a complete GPS package onboard the missile and onboard frequency translator that retransmits the GPS satellite signals. Accuracy and operation of the two methods are compared. A functional description of the GPS is provided.

  6. Effects of Systemic Hydration on Vocal Acoustics of 18- to 35-Year-Old Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franca, Maria Claudia; Simpson, Kenneth O.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of body hydration and vocal acoustics was investigated in this study. Effects of two levels of hydration on objective measures of vocal acoustics were explored. In an attempt to reduce variability in the degree of systemic hydration and to induce a state of systemic dehydration, participants were instructed to refrain from ingestion…

  7. Automatic Positioning System of Small Agricultural Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momot, M. V.; Proskokov, A. V.; Natalchenko, A. S.; Biktimirov, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The present article discusses automatic positioning systems of agricultural robots used in field works. The existing solutions in this area have been analyzed. The article proposes an original solution, which is easy to implement and is characterized by high- accuracy positioning.

  8. Positional reference system for ultraprecision machining

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, J.B.; Burleson, R.R.; Pardue, R.M.

    1980-09-12

    A stable positional reference system for use in improving the cutting tool-to-part contour position in numerical controlled-multiaxis metal turning machines is provided. The reference system employs a plurality of interferometers referenced to orthogonally disposed metering bars which are substantially isolated from machine strain induced position errors for monitoring the part and tool positions relative to the metering bars. A microprocessor-based control system is employed in conjunction with the plurality of positions interferometers and part contour description data input to calculate error components for each axis of movement and output them to corresponding axis driven with appropriate scaling and error compensation. Real-time position control, operating in combination with the reference system, makes possible the positioning of the cutting points of a tool along a part locus with a substantially greater degree of accuracy than has been attained previously in the art by referencing and then monitoring only the tool motion relative to a reference position located on the machine base.

  9. Positional reference system for ultraprecision machining

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jones B.; Burleson, Robert R.; Pardue, Robert M.

    1982-01-01

    A stable positional reference system for use in improving the cutting tool-to-part contour position in numerical controlled-multiaxis metal turning machines is provided. The reference system employs a plurality of interferometers referenced to orthogonally disposed metering bars which are substantially isolated from machine strain induced position errors for monitoring the part and tool positions relative to the metering bars. A microprocessor-based control system is employed in conjunction with the plurality of position interferometers and part contour description data inputs to calculate error components for each axis of movement and output them to corresponding axis drives with appropriate scaling and error compensation. Real-time position control, operating in combination with the reference system, makes possible the positioning of the cutting points of a tool along a part locus with a substantially greater degree of accuracy than has been attained previously in the art by referencing and then monitoring only the tool motion relative to a reference position located on the machine base.

  10. The Mathematics of the Global Positioning System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nord, Gail D.; Jabon, David; Nord, John

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity that illustrates the application of mathematics to modern navigation and utilizes the Global Positioning System (GPS). GPS is a constellation of 24 satellites that enables receivers to compute their position anywhere on the earth with great accuracy. (DDR)

  11. Damping of thermal acoustic oscillations in hydrogen systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, Youfan; Timmerhaus, Klaus D.

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic waves initiated by a large temperature gradient along a tube are defined as thermal acoustic oscillations (TAOs). These oscillations have been damped by introducing such sound absorbing techniques as acoustic filters, resonators, etc.. These devices serve as an acoustic sink that is used to absorb or dissipate the acoustic energy thereby eliminating or damping such oscillations. Several empirical damping techniques, such as attaching a resonator as a side branch or inserting a wire in the tube, have been developed in the past and have provided reasonable success. However, the effect of connecting tube radius, length, and resonator volume on the damping of thermal acoustic oscillations has not been evaluated quantitatively. Further, these methods have not been effective when the oscillating tube radius was relatively large. Detailed theoretical analyses of these techniques including a newly developed method for damping oscillations in a tube of relatively large radius are provided in this presentation.

  12. Damping of thermal acoustic oscillations in hydrogen systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Youfan; Timmerhaus, Klaus D.

    Acoustic waves initiated by a large temperature gradient along a tube are defined as thermal acoustic oscillations (TAOs). These oscillations have been damped by introducing such sound absorbing techniques as acoustic filters, resonators, etc.. These devices serve as an acoustic sink that is used to absorb or dissipate the acoustic energy thereby eliminating or damping such oscillations. Several empirical damping techniques, such as attaching a resonator as a side branch or inserting a wire in the tube, have been developed in the past and have provided reasonable success. However, the effect of connecting tube radius, length, and resonator volume on the damping of thermal acoustic oscillations has not been evaluated quantitatively. Further, these methods have not been effective when the oscillating tube radius was relatively large. Detailed theoretical analyses of these techniques including a newly developed method for damping oscillations in a tube of relatively large radius are provided in this presentation.

  13. Acoustical standards in engineering acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhard, Mahlon D.

    2001-05-01

    The Engineering Acoustics Technical Committee is concerned with the evolution and improvement of acoustical techniques and apparatus, and with the promotion of new applications of acoustics. As cited in the Membership Directory and Handbook (2002), the interest areas include transducers and arrays; underwater acoustic systems; acoustical instrumentation and monitoring; applied sonics, promotion of useful effects, information gathering and transmission; audio engineering; acoustic holography and acoustic imaging; acoustic signal processing (equipment and techniques); and ultrasound and infrasound. Evident connections between engineering and standards are needs for calibration, consistent terminology, uniform presentation of data, reference levels, or design targets for product development. Thus for the acoustical engineer standards are both a tool for practices, for communication, and for comparison of his efforts with those of others. Development of many standards depends on knowledge of the way products are put together for the market place and acoustical engineers provide important input to the development of standards. Acoustical engineers and members of the Engineering Acoustics arm of the Society both benefit from and contribute to the Acoustical Standards of the Acoustical Society.

  14. A Dual Communication and Imaging Underwater Acoustic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tricia C.

    A dual communication and imaging underwater acoustic system is proposed and developed throughout this dissertation. Due to the wide variation in underwater channel characteristics, the research here focuses more on robustness to multipath in the shallow underwater acoustic environment, rather than high bit-rate applications and signaling schemes. Lower bit-rate (in the hundreds of bits per second (bps) to low kbps), applications such as the transfer of ecological telemetry data, e.g. conductivity or temperature data, are the primary focus of this dissertation. The parallels between direct sequence spread spectrum in digital communication and pulse-echo with pulse compression in imaging, and channel estimation in communication and range profile estimation in imaging are drawn, leading to a unified communications and imaging platform. A digital communication algorithm for channel order and channel coefficient estimation and symbol demodulation using Matching Pursuit (MP) with Generalized Multiple Hypothesis Testing (GMHT) is implemented in programmable DSP in real time with field experiment results in varying underwater environments for the single receiver (Rx), single transmitter (Tx) case. The custom and off-the-shelf hardware used in the single receiver, single transmitter set of experiments are detailed as well. This work is then extended to the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) case, and then to the full multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) case. The results of channel estimation are used for simple range profile imaging reconstructions. Successful simulated and experimental results for both transducer array configurations are presented and analyzed. Non-real-time symbol demodulation and channel estimation is performed using experimental data from a scaled testing environment. New hardware based on cost-effective fish-finder transducers for a 6 Rx--1 Tx and 6 Rx--4 Tx transducer array is detailed. Lastly, in an application that is neither communication nor

  15. Vibrations of three-dimensional pipe systems with acoustic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Raheb, M.

    1981-09-01

    A general algorithm is developed for estimating the beam type dynamic response of three dimensional multiplane pipe systems consisting of elbows and straight segments with smooth interface. The transfer matrix approach is adopted in modeling the elastodynamics of each duct with allowance for distributed loads. The formulation includes the acoustic coupling of a plane wave and elbow curvature. Secondary loads from plane wave distortion are considered from a modal solution of the Helmholtz equation in an equivalent rigid waveguide with square cross section. The effect of path imperfection is introduced as a perturbation from the hypothetical perfectly straight pipe. The one dimensional plane wave assumption is valid for frequencies below half the first cut-off frequency. Wave asymmetry from elbow curvature produces substantial increase in response level near and above cut-off.

  16. Acoustic Filtration, Fractionation, and Mixing in Microfluidic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A; Fisher, K

    2002-02-04

    This project is concerned with the research and development of a technique to manipulate small particles using acoustic energy coupled into a fluid filled plastic or glass sample chamber. These resulting miniaturized systems combine high functionality with an inexpensive, disposable sample chamber. Our approach to this problem is based on a combination of sophisticated modeling tools in conjunction with laboratory experiments. The design methodology is summarized in Figure 1. The process begins by investigating a wide range of device parameters using a one-dimensional analytical approximation. The results of these initial parameter studies are incorporated into a sophisticated three-dimensional multi-physics finite element code. From these simulations the optimized designs are prototyped and experimentally tested. The results of the experimental observations are then used to improve analytical approximations and the process is repeated as necessary.

  17. Position Sensitive Detection System for Charged Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coello, E. A.; Favela, F.; Curiel, Q.; Chavez, E; Huerta, A.; Varela, A.; Shapira, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The position sensitive detection system presented in this work employs the Anger logic algorithm to determine the position of the light spark produced by the passage of charged particles on a 170 x 170 x 10 mm3 scintillator material (PILOT-U). The detection system consists of a matrix of nine photomultipliers, covering a fraction of the back area of the scintillators. Tests made with a non-collimated alpha particle source together with a Monte Carlo simulation that reproduces the data, suggest an intrinsic position resolution of up to 6 mm is achieved.

  18. Calibration of an acoustic system for measuring 2-D temperature distribution around hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Chen, Ying

    2013-04-01

    One of the fundamental purposes of quantitative acoustic surveys of seafloor hydrothermal vents is to measure their 2-D temperature distributions. Knowing the system latencies and the acoustic center-to-center distances between the underwater transducers in an acoustic tomography system is fundamental to the overall accuracy of the temperature reconstruction. However, commercial transducer sources typically do not supply the needed data. Here we present a novel calibration algorithm to automatically determine the system latencies and the acoustic center-to-center distances. The possible system latency error and the resulting temperature error are derived and analyzed. We have also developed the experimental setup for calibration. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed calibration method, an experimental study was performed on acoustic imaging of underwater temperature fields in Lake Qiezishan, located at Longling County, Yunnan Province, China. Using the calibrated data, the reconstructed temperature distributions closely resemble the actual distributions measured with thermocouples, thus confirming the effectiveness of our algorithm.

  19. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald; Liever, Peter; Nielsen, Tanner

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test, conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center. The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  20. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald K.; Liever, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT), conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  1. Acoustic and Thermal Testing of an Integrated Multilayer Insulation and Broad Area Cooling Shield System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Jessica J.; Foster, Lee W.

    2013-01-01

    A Multilayer Insulation (MLI) and Broad Area Cooling (BAC) shield thermal control system shows promise for long-duration storage of cryogenic propellant. The NASA Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) project is investigating the thermal and structural performance of this tank-applied integrated system. The MLI/BAC Shield Acoustic and Thermal Test was performed to evaluate the MLI/BAC shield's structural performance by subjecting it to worst-case launch acoustic loads. Identical thermal tests using Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) were performed before and after the acoustic test. The data from these tests was compared to determine if any degradation occurred in the thermal performance of the system as a result of exposure to the acoustic loads. The thermal test series consisted of two primary components: a passive boil-off test to evaluate the MLI performance and an active cooling test to evaluate the integrated MLI/BAC shield system with chilled vapor circulating through the BAC shield tubes. The acoustic test used loads closely matching the worst-case envelope of all launch vehicles currently under consideration for CPST. Acoustic test results yielded reasonable responses for the given load. The thermal test matrix was completed prior to the acoustic test and successfully repeated after the acoustic test. Data was compared and yielded near identical results, indicating that the MLI/BAC shield configuration tested in this series is an option for structurally implementing this thermal control system concept.

  2. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOEpatents

    Kent, William H.; Mitchell, Peter G.

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propagated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  3. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOEpatents

    Nardi, Anthony P.

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting a resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  4. Shuttle Global Positioning (GPS) System design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsen, P.; Huth, G. K.

    1980-01-01

    Investigations of certain aspects and problems of the shuttle global positioning system GPS, are presented. Included are: test philosophy and test outline; development of a phase slope specification for the shuttle GPS antenna; an investigation of the shuttle jamming vulnerability; and an expression for the GPS signal to noise density ratio for the thermal protection system.

  5. Shuttle Global Positioning System (GPS) design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsen, P. W.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of oscillator noise on Shuttle Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver performance, GPS navigation system self-test, GPS ground transmitter design to augment shuttle navigation, the effect of ionospheric delay modelling on GPS receiver design, and GPS receiver tracking of Shuttle transient maneuvers were investigated.

  6. Modular Track System For Positioning Mobile Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Conceptual system for positioning mobile robotic manipulators on large main structure includes modular tracks and ancillary structures assembled easily along with main structure. System, called "tracked robotic location system" (TROLS), originally intended for application to platforms in outer space, but TROLS concept might also prove useful on Earth; for example, to position robots in factories and warehouses. T-cross-section rail keeps mobile robot on track. Bar codes mark locations along track. Each robot equipped with bar-code-recognizing circuitry so it quickly finds way to assigned location.

  7. Towards an Automated Acoustic Detection System for Free Ranging Elephants

    PubMed Central

    Zeppelzauer, Matthias; Hensman, Sean; Stoeger, Angela S.

    2015-01-01

    The human-elephant conflict is one of the most serious conservation problems in Asia and Africa today. The involuntary confrontation of humans and elephants claims the lives of many animals and humans every year. A promising approach to alleviate this conflict is the development of an acoustic early warning system. Such a system requires the robust automated detection of elephant vocalizations under unconstrained field conditions. Today, no system exists that fulfills these requirements. In this paper, we present a method for the automated detection of elephant vocalizations that is robust to the diverse noise sources present in the field. We evaluate the method on a dataset recorded under natural field conditions to simulate a real-world scenario. The proposed method outperformed existing approaches and robustly and accurately detected elephants. It thus can form the basis for a future automated early warning system for elephants. Furthermore, the method may be a useful tool for scientists in bioacoustics for the study of wildlife recordings. PMID:25983398

  8. Field performance of an acoustic scour-depth monitoring system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, Jr., Robert R.; Sheppard, D. Max

    1994-01-01

    The Herbert C. Bonner Bridge over Oregon Inlet serves as the only land link between Bodie and Hatteras Islands, part of the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Periodic soundings over the past 30 years have documented channel migration, local scour, and deposition at several pilings that support the bridge. In September 1992, a data-collection system was installed to permit the off-site monitoring of scour at 16 bridge pilings. The system records channel-bed elevations at 15-minute intervals and transmits the data to a satellite receiver. A cellular phone connection also permits downloading and reviewing of the data as they are being collected. A digitally recording, acoustic fathometer is the main component of the system. In November 1993, current velocity, water-surface elevation, wave characteristics, and water temperature measuring instruments were also deployed at the site. Several performance problems relating to the equipment and to the harsh marine environment have not been resolved, but the system has collected and transmitted reliable scour-depth and water-level data.

  9. Methods And Systems For Using Reference Images In Acoustic Image Processing

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Thomas L.; Barter, Robert Henry

    2005-01-04

    A method and system of examining tissue are provided in which a field, including at least a portion of the tissue and one or more registration fiducials, is insonified. Scattered acoustic information, including both transmitted and reflected waves, is received from the field. A representation of the field, including both the tissue and the registration fiducials, is then derived from the received acoustic radiation.

  10. Systems and methods for biometric identification using the acoustic properties of the ear canal

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Ann Marie; Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    1998-01-01

    The present invention teaches systems and methods for verifying or recognizing a person's identity based on measurements of the acoustic response of the individual's ear canal. The system comprises an acoustic emission device, which emits an acoustic source signal s(t), designated by a computer, into the ear canal of an individual, and an acoustic response detection device, which detects the acoustic response signal f(t). A computer digitizes the response (detected) signal f(t) and stores the data. Computer-implemented algorithms analyze the response signal f(t) to produce ear-canal feature data. The ear-canal feature data obtained during enrollment is stored on the computer, or some other recording medium, to compare the enrollment data with ear-canal feature data produced in a subsequent access attempt, to determine if the individual has previously been enrolled. The system can also be adapted for remote access applications.

  11. Systems and methods for biometric identification using the acoustic properties of the ear canal

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, A.M.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1998-07-28

    The present invention teaches systems and methods for verifying or recognizing a person`s identity based on measurements of the acoustic response of the individual`s ear canal. The system comprises an acoustic emission device, which emits an acoustic source signal s(t), designated by a computer, into the ear canal of an individual, and an acoustic response detection device, which detects the acoustic response signal f(t). A computer digitizes the response (detected) signal f(t) and stores the data. Computer-implemented algorithms analyze the response signal f(t) to produce ear-canal feature data. The ear-canal feature data obtained during enrollment is stored on the computer, or some other recording medium, to compare the enrollment data with ear-canal feature data produced in a subsequent access attempt, to determine if the individual has previously been enrolled. The system can also be adapted for remote access applications. 5 figs.

  12. Damping criteria for thermal acoustic oscillations in slush and liquid hydrogen systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. F.; Timmerhaus, K. D.

    Techniques for damping thermal acoustic oscillations in cryogenic systems are analyzed with emphasis on a number of the damping criteria. Theoretically, thermal acoustic oscillations can be damped by either reducing or increasing the radius of the tube, i.e., by increasing either the viscous or inertial resistance in the oscillation. It is found that increasing the tube radius will only provide the desired damping if the temperature ratio for the system is lower than the asymptotic value of the right-hand stability curve. Thermal acoustic oscillations may be damped by changing the temperature ratio along the tube. A minimum temperature ratio for initiating thermal acoustic oscillations in both normal boiling point and triple-point parahydrogen systems is about 5 when the open end of the tube is located above the liquid surface. Changing the length ratio of the warm section to the cold section is another option for damping thermal acoustic oscillations.

  13. Airborne Relay-Based Regional Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyuman; Noh, Hongjun; Lim, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    Ground-based pseudolite systems have some limitations, such as low vertical accuracy, multipath effects and near-far problems. These problems are not significant in airborne-based pseudolite systems. However, the monitoring of pseudolite positions is required because of the mobility of the platforms on which the pseudolites are mounted, and this causes performance degradation. To address these pseudolite system limitations, we propose an airborne relay-based regional positioning system that consists of a master station, reference stations, airborne relays and a user. In the proposed system, navigation signals are generated from the reference stations located on the ground and are relayed via the airborne relays. Unlike in conventional airborne-based systems, the user in the proposed system sequentially estimates both the locations of airborne relays and his/her own position. Therefore, a delay due to monitoring does not occur, and the accuracy is not affected by the movement of airborne relays. We conducted several simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed system. Based on the simulation results, we demonstrated that the proposed system guarantees a higher accuracy than airborne-based pseudolite systems, and it is feasible despite the existence of clock offsets among reference stations. PMID:26029953

  14. Load positioning system with gravity compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollow, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    A load positioning system with gravity compensation has a servomotor, position sensing feedback potentiometer and velocity sensing tachometer in a conventional closed loop servo arrangement to cause a lead screw and a ball nut to vertically position a load. Gravity compensating components comprise the DC motor, gears, which couple torque from the motor to the lead screw, and constant current power supply. The constant weight of the load applied to the lead screw via the ball nut tend to cause the lead screw to rotate, the constant torque of which is opposed by the constant torque produced by the motor when fed from the constant current source. The constant current is preset as required by the potentiometer to effect equilibration of the load which thereby enables the positioning servomotor to see the load as weightless under both static and dynamic conditions. Positioning acceleration and velocity performance are therefore symmetrical.

  15. Digital position determination system for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hohmann-Marriott, Martin F; Sharp, William P; Roberson, Robert W; Blankenship, Robert E

    2005-06-01

    The precise determination of object positions within a specimen grid is important for many applications in electron microscopy. For example, real-time position determination is necessary for current statistical approaches and the efficient mapping and relocation of objects. Unfortunately, precise real-time position determination is not available on many older electron microscopes with manual stage controls. This report demonstrates the cost-effective and flexible implementation of a digital position determination system that can be adapted to many hand-operated electron microscopes. A customized solution that includes the hardware and software to accomplish position determination is presented. Lists of required parts, instructions for building the hardware, and descriptions of the developed programs are included. Two LED-photodiode assemblies detect x and y movements via an optical wheel that is in physical contact with the mechanical x and y stage control elements. These detector assemblies are interfaced with an integrated circuit that converts movement information into serial port-compatible signals, which are interpreted by a computer with specialized software. Two electron microscopes, a Philips CM12 (S)TEM and a Philips 201 TEM, were equipped with the described digital position determination system. The position fidelity and position fidelity after reloading of grids were determined for both microscopes. The determined position deviation was 1.06 microm in the x axis and 0.565 microm in the y axis for the Philips CM12 (S)TEM, and 0.303 microm in the x axis and 0.545 microm in the y axis for the Philips 201 TEM. After reloading and computational realigning, the determined average position variation was 2.66 microm in the x axis and 2.61 microm in the y axis for the Philips CM12 (S)TEM, and 1.13 microm in the x axis and 1.27 microm in the y axis for the Philips 201 TEM.

  16. Nondynamic Tracking Using The Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, T. P.; Wu, Sien-Chong

    1988-01-01

    Report describes technique for using Global Positioning System (GPS) to determine position of low Earth orbiter without need for dynamic models. Differential observing strategy requires GPS receiver on user vehicle and network of six ground receivers. Computationally efficient technique delivers decimeter accuracy on orbits down to lowest altitudes. New technique nondynamic long-arc strategy having potential for accuracy of best dynamic techniques while retaining much of computational simplicity of geometric techniques.

  17. A Prototype Wire Position Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei

    2010-12-07

    The Wire Position Monitoring System (WPM) will track changes in the transverse position of LCLS Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) to 1{micro}m over several weeks. This position information will be used between applications of beam based alignment to correct for changes in component alignment. The WPM system has several requirements. The sensor range must be large enough so that precision sensor positioning is not required. The resolution needs to be small enough so that the signal can be used to monitor motion to 1{micro}m. The system must be stable enough so that system drift does not mimic motion of the component being monitored. The WPM sensor assembly consists of two parts, the magnetic sensor and an integrated lock-in amplifier. The magnetic sensor picks up a signal from the alternating current in a stretched wire. The voltage v induced in the sensor is proportional to the wire displacement from the center of the sensor. The integrated lock-in amplifier provides a DC output whose magnitude is proportional to the AC signal from the magnetic sensor. The DC output is either read on a digital voltmeter or digitized locally and communicated over a computer interface.

  18. Spectral properties of a mixed system using an acoustical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neicu, T.; Schaadt, K.; Kudrolli, A.

    2001-02-01

    We experimentally study the spectral properties of a mixed system using the flexural modes of a clover shaped plate. The system is called mixed because the corresponding ray dynamics has both chaotic and integrable regions in its phase space. The eigenvalue statistics show intermediate properties between the universal statistics corresponding to chaotic geometries which show Gaussian orthogonal ensemble statistics and integrable geometries that show Poisson statistics. We further investigate the Fourier transform of the peaks to study the influence of the length scales of the plate on the properties of the acoustic resonances. We observe a weak signal of the periodic orbits in the experimental data. Although some of the peaks in the Fourier transform of the eigenvalue spectrum correspond to the shortest stable periodic orbits, other strong peaks are also observed. To understand the role of symmetries, we start with a clover shaped plate belonging to the C4v point symmetry group, and progressively reduce the symmetry by sanding one of the edges. A Shnirelman peak in P(s) is observed for the highly symmetric situation due to level clustering.

  19. Development of the Acoustic Ranging System Toward the Cable Network System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Y.; Kido, M.; Fujimoto, H.; Tadokoro, K.; Kaneda, Y.

    2008-12-01

    We have developed a short-range seafloor ranging system as a possible future application to the DONET (Dense Oceanfloor Network System for Earthquakes and Tsunamis) cable system. Direct acoustic ranging is a simple way to monitor local crustal deformation, and various groups have successfully detected deformation on the seafloor using such a system. We aim to monitor the splay faults in the rupture area of the Tonankai earthquake in Nankai subduction zone (Park et al, 2002). Slip along the active splay faults may be an important mechanism that accommodates the elastic strain caused by relative plate motion. We plan to deploy PXPs (precise acoustic transponder) across the splay faults in the Kumano-nada area to measure the horizontal crustal movement to the accuracy required to detect VLF (Very Low Frequency) earthquakes. On the first step we collected 660 ranging data in this one-day experiment. The round trip travel time shows a variation with peak-to-peak amplitude of about 25 mm in the range. It was confirmed that most of the variation could be explained by the change in sound speed estimated from measured temperature and pressure. The remaining fluctuation in the acoustic measurements is +/-2 mm. On the next step, we carried out the experiment to estimate the accuracy of the long period. It collected the data during four month because it had made a trouble. Therefore we can recovery only two slave PXPs. We try to recovery two master PXPs using Hyper dolphin on September 2008. We report on the experiment with a direct acoustic ranging system and estimate the accuracy of the acoustic measurements for the middle period.

  20. Effect of positive end-expiratory pressure on acoustic wave propagation in experimental porcine lung injury.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Jukka; Nemergut, Michael E; Gavriely, Noam

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on sound propagation through injured lungs, we injected a multifrequency broad-band sound signal into the airway of eight anesthetized, intubated and mechanically ventilated pigs, while recording transmitted sound at three locations bilaterally on the chest wall. Oleic acid injections effected a severe pulmonary oedema predominately in the dependent lung regions, with an average increase in venous admixture from 19 ± 15 to 59 ± 14% (P < 0.001), and a reduction in dynamic respiratory system compliance from 34 ± 7 to 14 ± 4 ml cmH2 O(-1) (P < 0.001). A concomitant decrease in sound transit time was seen in the dependent lung regions (P < 0.05); no statistically significant change occurred in the lateral or non-dependent areas. The application of PEEP resulted in a decrease in venous admixture, increase in respiratory system compliance and return of the sound transit time to pre-injury levels in the dependent lung regions. Our results indicate that sound transmission velocity increases in lung tissue affected by permeability-type pulmonary oedema in a manner reversible during alveolar recruitment with PEEP.

  1. Direct-field acoustic testing of a flight system : logistics, challenges, and results.

    SciTech Connect

    Stasiunas, Eric Carl; Gurule, David Joseph; Babuska, Vit; Skousen, Troy J.

    2010-10-01

    Before a spacecraft can be considered for launch, it must first survive environmental testing that simulates the launch environment. Typically, these simulations include vibration testing performed using an electro-dynamic shaker. For some spacecraft however, acoustic excitation may provide a more severe loading environment than base shaker excitation. Because this was the case for a Sandia Flight System, it was necessary to perform an acoustic test prior to launch in order to verify survival due to an acoustic environment. Typically, acoustic tests are performed in acoustic chambers, but because of scheduling, transportation, and cleanliness concerns, this was not possible. Instead, the test was performed as a direct field acoustic test (DFAT). This type of test consists of surrounding a test article with a wall of speakers and controlling the acoustic input using control microphones placed around the test item, with a closed-loop control system. Obtaining the desired acoustic input environment - proto-flight random noise input with an overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 146.7 dB-with this technique presented a challenge due to several factors. An acoustic profile with this high OASPL had not knowingly been obtained using the DFAT technique prior to this test. In addition, the test was performed in a high-bay, where floor space and existing equipment constrained the speaker circle diameter. And finally, the Flight System had to be tested without contamination of the unit, which required a contamination bag enclosure of the test unit. This paper describes in detail the logistics, challenges, and results encountered while performing a high-OASPL, direct-field acoustic test on a contamination-sensitive Flight System in a high-bay environment.

  2. Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) Munition Classification System enhancements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vela, O.A.; Huggard, J.C.

    1997-09-18

    Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) is a non-destructive evaluation technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technology has resulted in three generations of instrumentation, funded by the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), specifically designed for field identification of chemical weapon (CW) munitions. Each generation of ARS instrumentation was developed with a specific user in mind. The ARS1OO was built for use by the U.N. Inspection Teams going into Iraq immediately after the Persian Gulf War. The ARS200 was built for use in the US-Russia Bilateral Chemical Weapons Treaty (the primary users for this system are the US Onsite Inspection Agency (OSIA) and their Russian counterparts). The ARS300 was built with the requirements of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in mind. Each successive system is an improved version of the previous system based on learning the weaknesses of each and, coincidentally, on the fact that more time was available to do a requirements analysis and the necessary engineering development. The ARS300 is at a level of development that warrants transferring the technology to a commercial vendor. Since LANL will supply the computer software to the selected vendor, it is possible for LANL to continue to improve the decision algorithms, add features where necessary, and adjust the user interface before the final transfer occurs. This paper describes the current system, ARS system enhancements, and software enhancements. Appendices contain the Operations Manual (software Version 3.01), and two earlier reports on enhancements.

  3. Global positioning system supported pilot's display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Marshall M., Jr.; Erdogan, Temel; Schwalb, Andrew P.; Curley, Charles H.

    1991-01-01

    The hardware, software, and operation of the Microwave Scanning Beam Landing System (MSBLS) Flight Inspection System Pilot's Display is discussed. The Pilot's Display is used in conjunction with flight inspection tests that certify the Microwave Scanning Beam Landing System used at Space Shuttle landing facilities throughout the world. The Pilot's Display was developed for the pilot of test aircraft to set up and fly a given test flight path determined by the flight inspection test engineers. This display also aids the aircraft pilot when hazy or cloud cover conditions exist that limit the pilot's visibility of the Shuttle runway during the flight inspection. The aircraft position is calculated using the Global Positioning System and displayed in the cockpit on a graphical display.

  4. Global Positioning System Instruction in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wikle, Thomas A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Provides an overview of satellite-based global positioning system (GPS) technology and includes some illustrations of how GPS is introduced in field-based exercises in the educational setting. Highlights forestry and geography classes, but also discusses archeology, geology, and wildlife science. Benefits include affordability, flexibility,…

  5. Optical Blade Position Tracking System Test

    SciTech Connect

    Fingersh, L. J.

    2006-01-01

    The Optical Blade Position Tracking System Test measures the blade deflection along the span of the blade using simple off-the-shelf infrared security cameras along with blade-mounted retro-reflective tape and video image processing hardware and software to obtain these measurements.

  6. Towards a Decentralized Magnetic Indoor Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Kasmi, Zakaria; Norrdine, Abdelmoumen; Blankenbach, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Decentralized magnetic indoor localization is a sophisticated method for processing sampled magnetic data directly on a mobile station (MS), thereby decreasing or even avoiding the need for communication with the base station. In contrast to central-oriented positioning systems, which transmit raw data to a base station, decentralized indoor localization pushes application-level knowledge into the MS. A decentralized position solution has thus a strong feasibility to increase energy efficiency and to prolong the lifetime of the MS. In this article, we present a complete architecture and an implementation for a decentralized positioning system. Furthermore, we introduce a technique for the synchronization of the observed magnetic field on the MS with the artificially-generated magnetic field from the coils. Based on real-time clocks (RTCs) and a preemptive operating system, this method allows a stand-alone control of the coils and a proper assignment of the measured magnetic fields on the MS. A stand-alone control and synchronization of the coils and the MS have an exceptional potential to implement a positioning system without the need for wired or wireless communication and enable a deployment of applications for rescue scenarios, like localization of miners or firefighters. PMID:26690145

  7. Two women with multiple disabilities sharing an acoustic orientation system and traveling together to indoor destinations.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, G E; Mantini, M

    1998-12-01

    This study assessed whether two women with total blindness and profound intellectual disability could share an acoustic orientation system and travel together simultaneously to common indoor destinations to perform occupational and vocational activities. The orientation system provided acoustic cues which indicated the direction to the destinations. Analysis of data indicated that the women were successful in sharing the system and could reach the destinations independently. PMID:10052076

  8. Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System Transmitter Downsize Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Myjak, Mitchell J.

    2010-04-30

    At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated the use of an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) to reduce the weight and volume of Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitters while retaining current functionality. Review of the design of current JSATS transmitters identified components that could be replaced by an ASIC while retaining the function of the current transmitter and offering opportunities to extend function if desired. ASIC design alternatives were identified that could meet transmitter weight and volume targets of 200 mg and 100 mm3. If alternatives to the cylindrical batteries used in current JSATS transmitters can be identified, it could be possible to implant ASIC-based JSATS transmitters by injection rather than surgery. Using criteria for the size of fish suitable for surgical implantation of current JSATS transmitters, it was concluded that fish as small as 70 mm in length could be implanted with an ASIC-based transmitter, particularly if implantation by injection became feasible.

  9. An Alignment Method for the Integration of Underwater 3D Data Captured by a Stereovision System and an Acoustic Camera.

    PubMed

    Lagudi, Antonio; Bianco, Gianfranco; Muzzupappa, Maurizio; Bruno, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The integration of underwater 3D data captured by acoustic and optical systems is a promising technique in various applications such as mapping or vehicle navigation. It allows for compensating the drawbacks of the low resolution of acoustic sensors and the limitations of optical sensors in bad visibility conditions. Aligning these data is a challenging problem, as it is hard to make a point-to-point correspondence. This paper presents a multi-sensor registration for the automatic integration of 3D data acquired from a stereovision system and a 3D acoustic camera in close-range acquisition. An appropriate rig has been used in the laboratory tests to determine the relative position between the two sensor frames. The experimental results show that our alignment approach, based on the acquisition of a rig in several poses, can be adopted to estimate the rigid transformation between the two heterogeneous sensors. A first estimation of the unknown geometric transformation is obtained by a registration of the two 3D point clouds, but it ends up to be strongly affected by noise and data dispersion. A robust and optimal estimation is obtained by a statistical processing of the transformations computed for each pose. The effectiveness of the method has been demonstrated in this first experimentation of the proposed 3D opto-acoustic camera. PMID:27089344

  10. An Alignment Method for the Integration of Underwater 3D Data Captured by a Stereovision System and an Acoustic Camera.

    PubMed

    Lagudi, Antonio; Bianco, Gianfranco; Muzzupappa, Maurizio; Bruno, Fabio

    2016-04-14

    The integration of underwater 3D data captured by acoustic and optical systems is a promising technique in various applications such as mapping or vehicle navigation. It allows for compensating the drawbacks of the low resolution of acoustic sensors and the limitations of optical sensors in bad visibility conditions. Aligning these data is a challenging problem, as it is hard to make a point-to-point correspondence. This paper presents a multi-sensor registration for the automatic integration of 3D data acquired from a stereovision system and a 3D acoustic camera in close-range acquisition. An appropriate rig has been used in the laboratory tests to determine the relative position between the two sensor frames. The experimental results show that our alignment approach, based on the acquisition of a rig in several poses, can be adopted to estimate the rigid transformation between the two heterogeneous sensors. A first estimation of the unknown geometric transformation is obtained by a registration of the two 3D point clouds, but it ends up to be strongly affected by noise and data dispersion. A robust and optimal estimation is obtained by a statistical processing of the transformations computed for each pose. The effectiveness of the method has been demonstrated in this first experimentation of the proposed 3D opto-acoustic camera.

  11. An Alignment Method for the Integration of Underwater 3D Data Captured by a Stereovision System and an Acoustic Camera

    PubMed Central

    Lagudi, Antonio; Bianco, Gianfranco; Muzzupappa, Maurizio; Bruno, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The integration of underwater 3D data captured by acoustic and optical systems is a promising technique in various applications such as mapping or vehicle navigation. It allows for compensating the drawbacks of the low resolution of acoustic sensors and the limitations of optical sensors in bad visibility conditions. Aligning these data is a challenging problem, as it is hard to make a point-to-point correspondence. This paper presents a multi-sensor registration for the automatic integration of 3D data acquired from a stereovision system and a 3D acoustic camera in close-range acquisition. An appropriate rig has been used in the laboratory tests to determine the relative position between the two sensor frames. The experimental results show that our alignment approach, based on the acquisition of a rig in several poses, can be adopted to estimate the rigid transformation between the two heterogeneous sensors. A first estimation of the unknown geometric transformation is obtained by a registration of the two 3D point clouds, but it ends up to be strongly affected by noise and data dispersion. A robust and optimal estimation is obtained by a statistical processing of the transformations computed for each pose. The effectiveness of the method has been demonstrated in this first experimentation of the proposed 3D opto-acoustic camera. PMID:27089344

  12. A Permanent Automated Real-Time Passive Acoustic Monitoring System for Bottlenose Dolphin Conservation in the Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Brunoldi, Marco; Bozzini, Giorgio; Casale, Alessandra; Corvisiero, Pietro; Grosso, Daniele; Magnoli, Nicodemo; Alessi, Jessica; Bianchi, Carlo Nike; Mandich, Alberta; Morri, Carla; Povero, Paolo; Wurtz, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Christian; Viano, Gianni; Cappanera, Valentina; Fanciulli, Giorgio; Bei, Massimiliano; Stasi, Nicola; Taiuti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the EU Life+ project named LIFE09 NAT/IT/000190 ARION, a permanent automated real-time passive acoustic monitoring system for the improvement of the conservation status of the transient and resident population of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) has been implemented and installed in the Portofino Marine Protected Area (MPA), Ligurian Sea. The system is able to detect the simultaneous presence of dolphins and boats in the area and to give their position in real time. This information is used to prevent collisions by diffusing warning messages to all the categories involved (tourists, professional fishermen and so on). The system consists of two gps-synchronized acoustic units, based on a particular type of marine buoy (elastic beacon), deployed about 1 km off the Portofino headland. Each one is equipped with a four-hydrophone array and an onboard acquisition system which can record the typical social communication whistles emitted by the dolphins and the sound emitted by boat engines. Signals are pre-filtered, digitized and then broadcast to the ground station via wi-fi. The raw data are elaborated to get the direction of the acoustic target to each unit, and hence the position of dolphins and boats in real time by triangulation. PMID:26789265

  13. A Permanent Automated Real-Time Passive Acoustic Monitoring System for Bottlenose Dolphin Conservation in the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Brunoldi, Marco; Bozzini, Giorgio; Casale, Alessandra; Corvisiero, Pietro; Grosso, Daniele; Magnoli, Nicodemo; Alessi, Jessica; Bianchi, Carlo Nike; Mandich, Alberta; Morri, Carla; Povero, Paolo; Wurtz, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Christian; Viano, Gianni; Cappanera, Valentina; Fanciulli, Giorgio; Bei, Massimiliano; Stasi, Nicola; Taiuti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the EU Life+ project named LIFE09 NAT/IT/000190 ARION, a permanent automated real-time passive acoustic monitoring system for the improvement of the conservation status of the transient and resident population of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) has been implemented and installed in the Portofino Marine Protected Area (MPA), Ligurian Sea. The system is able to detect the simultaneous presence of dolphins and boats in the area and to give their position in real time. This information is used to prevent collisions by diffusing warning messages to all the categories involved (tourists, professional fishermen and so on). The system consists of two gps-synchronized acoustic units, based on a particular type of marine buoy (elastic beacon), deployed about 1 km off the Portofino headland. Each one is equipped with a four-hydrophone array and an onboard acquisition system which can record the typical social communication whistles emitted by the dolphins and the sound emitted by boat engines. Signals are pre-filtered, digitized and then broadcast to the ground station via wi-fi. The raw data are elaborated to get the direction of the acoustic target to each unit, and hence the position of dolphins and boats in real time by triangulation.

  14. A Permanent Automated Real-Time Passive Acoustic Monitoring System for Bottlenose Dolphin Conservation in the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Brunoldi, Marco; Bozzini, Giorgio; Casale, Alessandra; Corvisiero, Pietro; Grosso, Daniele; Magnoli, Nicodemo; Alessi, Jessica; Bianchi, Carlo Nike; Mandich, Alberta; Morri, Carla; Povero, Paolo; Wurtz, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Christian; Viano, Gianni; Cappanera, Valentina; Fanciulli, Giorgio; Bei, Massimiliano; Stasi, Nicola; Taiuti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the EU Life+ project named LIFE09 NAT/IT/000190 ARION, a permanent automated real-time passive acoustic monitoring system for the improvement of the conservation status of the transient and resident population of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) has been implemented and installed in the Portofino Marine Protected Area (MPA), Ligurian Sea. The system is able to detect the simultaneous presence of dolphins and boats in the area and to give their position in real time. This information is used to prevent collisions by diffusing warning messages to all the categories involved (tourists, professional fishermen and so on). The system consists of two gps-synchronized acoustic units, based on a particular type of marine buoy (elastic beacon), deployed about 1 km off the Portofino headland. Each one is equipped with a four-hydrophone array and an onboard acquisition system which can record the typical social communication whistles emitted by the dolphins and the sound emitted by boat engines. Signals are pre-filtered, digitized and then broadcast to the ground station via wi-fi. The raw data are elaborated to get the direction of the acoustic target to each unit, and hence the position of dolphins and boats in real time by triangulation. PMID:26789265

  15. Impulse position control algorithms for nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sesekin, A. N.; Nepp, A. N.

    2015-11-30

    The article is devoted to the formalization and description of impulse-sliding regime in nonlinear dynamical systems that arise in the application of impulse position controls of a special kind. The concept of trajectory impulse-sliding regime formalized as some limiting network element Euler polygons generated by a discrete approximation of the impulse position control This paper differs from the previously published papers in that it uses a definition of solutions of systems with impulse controls, it based on the closure of the set of smooth solutions in the space of functions of bounded variation. The need for the study of such regimes is the fact that they often arise when parry disturbances acting on technical or economic control system.

  16. Global positioning system recorder and method

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, D.W.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Eakle, R.F. Jr.; Reeves, G.E.

    1998-12-22

    A global positioning system recorder (GPSR) is disclosed in which operational parameters and recorded positional data are stored on a transferable memory element. Through this transferrable memory element, the user of the GPSR need have no knowledge of GPSR devices other than that the memory element needs to be inserted into the memory element slot and the GPSR must be activated. The use of the data element also allows for minimal downtime of the GPSR and the ability to reprogram the GPSR and download data therefrom, without having to physically attach it to another computer. 4 figs.

  17. Global Positioning System receiver evaluation results

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, R.H.

    1993-09-01

    A Sandia project currently uses an outdated Magnavox 6400 Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver as the core of its navigation system. The goal of this study was to analyze the performance of the current GPS receiver compared to newer, less expensive models and to make recommendations on how to improve the performance of the overall navigation system. This paper discusses the test methodology used to experimentally analyze the performance of different GPS receivers, the test results, and recommendations on how an upgrade should proceed. Appendices contain detailed information regarding the raw data, test hardware, and test software.

  18. Lunar rovers and local positioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, James; Su, Renjeng

    1991-01-01

    Telerobotic rovers equipped with adequate actuators and sensors are clearly necessary for extraterrestrial construction. They will be employed as substitutes for humans, to perform jobs like surveying, sensing, signaling, manipulating, and the handling of small materials. Important design criteria for these rovers include versatility and robustness. They must be easily programmed and reprogrammed to perform a wide variety of different functions, and they must be robust so that construction work will not be jeopardized by parts failures. The key qualities and functions necessary for these rovers to achieve the required versatility and robustness are modularity, redundancy, and coordination. Three robotic rovers are being built by CSC as a test bed to implement the concepts of modularity and coordination. The specific goal of the design and construction of these robots is to demonstrate the software modularity and multirobot control algorithms required for the physical manipulation of constructible elements. Each rover consists of a transporter platform, bus manager, simple manipulator, and positioning receivers. These robots will be controlled from a central control console via a radio-frequency local area network (LAN). To date, one prototype transporter platform frame was built with batteries, motors, a prototype single-motor controller, and two prototype internal LAN boards. Software modules were developed in C language for monitor functions, i/o, and parallel port usage in each computer board. Also completed are the fabrication of half of the required number of computer boards, the procurement of 19.2 Kbaud RF modems for inter-robot communications, and the simulation of processing requirements for positioning receivers. In addition to the robotic platform, the fabrication of a local positioning system based on infrared signals is nearly completed. This positioning system will make the rovers into a moving reference system capable of performing site surveys. In

  19. Lunar rovers and local positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, James; Su, Renjeng

    1991-11-01

    Telerobotic rovers equipped with adequate actuators and sensors are clearly necessary for extraterrestrial construction. They will be employed as substitutes for humans, to perform jobs like surveying, sensing, signaling, manipulating, and the handling of small materials. Important design criteria for these rovers include versatility and robustness. They must be easily programmed and reprogrammed to perform a wide variety of different functions, and they must be robust so that construction work will not be jeopardized by parts failures. The key qualities and functions necessary for these rovers to achieve the required versatility and robustness are modularity, redundancy, and coordination. Three robotic rovers are being built by CSC as a test bed to implement the concepts of modularity and coordination. The specific goal of the design and construction of these robots is to demonstrate the software modularity and multirobot control algorithms required for the physical manipulation of constructible elements. Each rover consists of a transporter platform, bus manager, simple manipulator, and positioning receivers. These robots will be controlled from a central control console via a radio-frequency local area network (LAN). To date, one prototype transporter platform frame was built with batteries, motors, a prototype single-motor controller, and two prototype internal LAN boards. Software modules were developed in C language for monitor functions, i/o, and parallel port usage in each computer board. Also completed are the fabrication of half of the required number of computer boards, the procurement of 19.2 Kbaud RF modems for inter-robot communications, and the simulation of processing requirements for positioning receivers. In addition to the robotic platform, the fabrication of a local positioning system based on infrared signals is nearly completed. This positioning system will make the rovers into a moving reference system capable of performing site surveys. In

  20. An in-flight data system for chordwise turbulence measurements during acoustic disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calloway, Raymond S.; Massie, Jeffery J.

    1987-01-01

    An in-flight data system for chordwise turbulence measurements has been developed by NASA to investigate laminar flow stability in the presence of acoustic disturbances. Flight tests were performed with an OV-1B turboprop with a JT-15D engine in order to establish the feasibility of utilizing natural laminar flow (NLF) nacelles to reduce drag and to determine the extent of NLF over a range of controlled acoustic frequencies. The data system consisted of PCM and FM data acquisition subsystems, dual wide-band magnetic flight recorders, and acoustic generating and measuring subsystems.

  1. Nonplanar ion-acoustic two-soliton systems in quantum electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Pankaj Kumar; Ghorui, Malay Kumar; Saha, Asit; Chatterjee, Prasanta

    2015-01-01

    The basic features of planar and nonplanar time dependent ion-acoustic two-soliton systems have been studied in a three component unmagnetized, collisionless quantum plasma consisting of inertialess electrons and positrons. Using the reductive perturbation technique (RPT), we have derived the Korteweg-de Vries equation for our model. The effects of several parameters on the properties of ion-acoustic two-soliton systems in quantum electron-positron-ion plasmas have been discussed in planar and nonplanar geometries. It has been shown that the properties of ion-acoustic two-soliton systems are affected significantly due to cylindrical and spherical geometries. The amplitude of the cylindrical two-soliton system is smaller than that of the spherical two-soliton system for small values of | τ|. The propagation of ion-acoustic two-soliton systems is quite different from the propagation of ion-acoustic two-soliton systems in a nonplanar geometry. The present investigation may have relevance in the study of the propagation of ion-acoustic two-soliton systems in space and laboratory plasmas.

  2. Design and Instrumentation of a Measurement and Calibration System for an Acoustic Telemetry System

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, M. B.

    2010-03-31

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) is an active sensing technology developed by Portland District, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used at hydroelectric projects and in the laboratory for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a measurement and calibration system for evaluating the JSATS component, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The system consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated system has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. It provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The measurement and calibration system has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS.

  3. Two-dimensional Inductive Position Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Starr, Stanley O. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional inductive position sensing system uses four drive inductors arranged at the vertices of a parallelogram and a sensing inductor positioned within the parallelogram. The sensing inductor is movable within the parallelogram and relative to the drive inductors. A first oscillating current at a first frequency is supplied to a first pair of the drive inductors located at ends of a first diagonal of the parallelogram. A second oscillating current at a second frequency is supplied to a second pair of the drive inductors located at ends of a second diagonal of the parallelogram. As a result, the sensing inductor generates a first output voltage at the first frequency and a second output voltage at the second frequency. A processor determines a position of the sensing inductor relative to the drive inductors using the first output voltage and the second output voltage.

  4. A review of underwater acoustic systems and methods for locating objects lost at sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelady, R. W.; Ferguson, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Information related to the location of objects lost at sea is presented. Acoustic devices attached to an object prior to being transported is recommended as a homing beacon. Minimum requirements and some environmental constraints are defined. Methods and procedures for search and recovery are also discussed. Both an interim system and a more advanced system are outlined. Controlled acoustic emission to enhance security is the theme followed.

  5. Analysis of the Role of Update Rate and System Latency in Interactive Virtual Acoustic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Ahumada, Albert (Technical Monitor); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Technical Monitor); Johnson, Gerald (Technical Monitor); Frey, Mary Anne (Technical Monitor); Schneider, Victor S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The ultimate goal of virtual acoustics is to simulate the complex acoustic field experienced by a listener freely moving around within an environment. This paper discusses some of the engineering constraints that may be faced during implementation and the perceptual consequences of these constraints. In particular, the perceptual impact of parameters like the update rate and overall system latency of interactive spatial audio systems is addressed.

  6. Implant positioning system using mutual inductance.

    PubMed

    Zou, You; O'Driscoll, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Surgical placement of implantable medical devices (IMDs) has limited precision and post-implantation the device can move over time. Accurate knowledge of the position of IMDs allows better interpretation of data gathered by the devices and may allow wireless power to be focused on the IMD thereby increasing power transfer efficiency. Existing positioning methods require device sizes and/or power consumptions which exceed the limits of in-vivo mm-sized IMDs applications. This paper describes a novel implant positioning system which replaces the external transmitting (TX) coil of a wireless power transfer link by an array of smaller coils, measures the mutual inductance between each coil in the TX array and the implanted receiving (RX) coil, and uses the spatial variation in those mutual inductances to estimate the location of the implanted device. This method does not increase the hardware or power consumption in the IMD. Mathematical analysis and electromagnetic simulations are presented which explain the theory underlying this scheme and show its feasibility. A particle swarm based algorithm is used to estimate the position of the RX coil from the measured mutual inductance values. MATLAB simulations show the positioning estimation accuracy on the order of 1 mm.

  7. Beam Position Monitor System for PEP II

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Stephen R.; Aiello, G.Roberto; Hendrickson, Linda J.; Johnson, Ronald G.; Mills, Mark R.; Olsen, Jeff J.; /SLAC

    2011-09-12

    We describe the beam position monitor system built for PEP-II, the B-factory at SLAC. The system reports beam position for bunches of between 5 x 10{sup 8} and 8 x 10{sup 10} electron charges, either singly or as continuous streams of bunches every 4.2 ns. Resolution at full charge is to be better than 10 microns in a single turn. Higher resolution is available via on-board multi-turn averaging. The position signal is processed in a 20 MHz bandwidth around 952 MHz. This bandwidth, rather broader than that typical of RF position monitors, allows good resolution for low charge single bunches. Additional novel features include stringent control of return losses in order to minimize cross-talk between nearby bunches which may contain very different charges. The digitizing electronics is multiplexed between the two PEP-II storage rings. Design, construction, and installation experience, as well as first results with beam are presented.

  8. Time and timing in the acoustic recognition system of crickets

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, R. Matthias; Heller, Klaus-Gerhard; Clemens, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The songs of many insects exhibit precise timing as the result of repetitive and stereotyped subunits on several time scales. As these signals encode the identity of a species, time and timing are important for the recognition system that analyzes these signals. Crickets are a prominent example as their songs are built from sound pulses that are broadcast in a long trill or as a chirped song. This pattern appears to be analyzed on two timescales, short and long. Recent evidence suggests that song recognition in crickets relies on two computations with respect to time; a short linear-nonlinear (LN) model that operates as a filter for pulse rate and a longer integration time window for monitoring song energy over time. Therefore, there is a twofold role for timing. A filter for pulse rate shows differentiating properties for which the specific timing of excitation and inhibition is important. For an integrator, however, the duration of the time window is more important than the precise timing of events. Here, we first review evidence for the role of LN-models and integration time windows for song recognition in crickets. We then parameterize the filter part by Gabor functions and explore the effects of duration, frequency, phase, and offset as these will correspond to differently timed patterns of excitation and inhibition. These filter properties were compared with known preference functions of crickets and katydids. In a comparative approach, the power for song discrimination by LN-models was tested with the songs of over 100 cricket species. It is demonstrated how the acoustic signals of crickets occupy a simple 2-dimensional space for song recognition that arises from timing, described by a Gabor function, and time, the integration window. Finally, we discuss the evolution of recognition systems in insects based on simple sensory computations. PMID:25161622

  9. Acoustic challenges of the A400M for active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitbach, Harald; Sachau, Delf; Böhme, Sten

    2006-03-01

    In some types of aircraft tonal interior noise with high sound pressure level (up to 110 dB(A)) occurs at low frequencies (f < 500 Hz). Typical examples are propeller driven aircraft, for which the excitation frequencies are given by the blade passage frequency (BPF) and its higher harmonics. The high tonal noise levels at these frequencies can occur due to the fact that the blades' profiles are only optimized in terms of aerodynamics. The acoustic properties are usually not taken into account. In order to obtain an acceptable interior noise level, and to guarantee both work-safety and comfort in the aircraft interiors, passive methods are commonly used - e.g. adding material with high damping or vibration absorbing qualities. Especially when low frequency noise has to be reduced, adding material results in a lot of unwanted additional weight. In order to avoid this extra weight, the concept of active noise reduction (ANR) and tunable vibration absorber systems (TVA), which focus on the unwanted tonal noise, are a good compromise of treating noise and the amount of additional weight in aircraft design. This paper briefly discusses two different possible methods to reduce the low frequency noise. The noise reduction of tuned vibration absorbers (TVA) mounted on the airframe are nowadays commonly used in propeller driven aircraft and can be predicted by vibroacoustic finite element calculations, which is described in this paper. In order to abide to industrial safety regulations, the noise level inside the semi closed loadmaster area (LMA) must be reduced down to a noise level, which is even 8 dB(A) below the specified cargo hold noise level. The paper describes also the phases of development of an ANR system that could be used to control the sound pressure level inside the LMA. The concept is verified by experimental investigations within a mock up of the LMA.

  10. A rail system for circular synthetic aperture sonar imaging and acoustic target strength measurements: Design/operation/preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J. L.; Marston, T. M.; Lee, K.; Lopes, J. L.; Lim, R.

    2014-01-01

    A 22 m diameter circular rail, outfitted with a mobile sonar tower trolley, was designed, fabricated, instrumented with underwater acoustic transducers, and assembled on a 1.5 m thick sand layer at the bottom of a large freshwater pool to carry out sonar design and target scattering response studies. The mobile sonar tower translates along the rail via a drive motor controlled by customized LabVIEW software. The rail system is modular and assembly consists of separately deploying eight circular arc sections, measuring a nominal center radius of 11 m and 8.64 m arc length each, and having divers connect them together in the underwater environment. The system enables full scale measurements on targets of interest with 0.1° angular resolution over a complete 360° aperture, without disrupting target setup, and affording a level of control over target environment conditions and noise sources unachievable in standard field measurements. In recent use, the mobile cart carrying an instrumented sonar tower was translated along the rail in 720 equal position increments and acoustic backscatter data were acquired at each position. In addition, this system can accommodate both broadband monostatic and bistatic scattering measurements on targets of interest, allowing capture of target signature phenomena under diverse configurations to address current scientific and technical issues encountered in mine countermeasure and unexploded ordnance applications. In the work discussed here, the circular rail apparatus is used for acoustic backscatter testing, but this system also has the capacity to facilitate the acquisition of magnetic and optical sensor data from targets of interest. A brief description of the system design and operation will be presented along with preliminary processed results for data acquired from acoustic measurements conducted at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division Test Pond Facility. [Work Supported by the U.S. Office of Naval Research and

  11. A rail system for circular synthetic aperture sonar imaging and acoustic target strength measurements: design/operation/preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, J L; Marston, T M; Lee, K; Lopes, J L; Lim, R

    2014-01-01

    A 22 m diameter circular rail, outfitted with a mobile sonar tower trolley, was designed, fabricated, instrumented with underwater acoustic transducers, and assembled on a 1.5 m thick sand layer at the bottom of a large freshwater pool to carry out sonar design and target scattering response studies. The mobile sonar tower translates along the rail via a drive motor controlled by customized LabVIEW software. The rail system is modular and assembly consists of separately deploying eight circular arc sections, measuring a nominal center radius of 11 m and 8.64 m arc length each, and having divers connect them together in the underwater environment. The system enables full scale measurements on targets of interest with 0.1° angular resolution over a complete 360° aperture, without disrupting target setup, and affording a level of control over target environment conditions and noise sources unachievable in standard field measurements. In recent use, the mobile cart carrying an instrumented sonar tower was translated along the rail in 720 equal position increments and acoustic backscatter data were acquired at each position. In addition, this system can accommodate both broadband monostatic and bistatic scattering measurements on targets of interest, allowing capture of target signature phenomena under diverse configurations to address current scientific and technical issues encountered in mine countermeasure and unexploded ordnance applications. In the work discussed here, the circular rail apparatus is used for acoustic backscatter testing, but this system also has the capacity to facilitate the acquisition of magnetic and optical sensor data from targets of interest. A brief description of the system design and operation will be presented along with preliminary processed results for data acquired from acoustic measurements conducted at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division Test Pond Facility. [Work Supported by the U.S. Office of Naval Research and

  12. Local Positioning Systems in (Game) Sports

    PubMed Central

    Leser, Roland; Baca, Arnold; Ogris, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Position data of players and athletes are widely used in sports performance analysis for measuring the amounts of physical activities as well as for tactical assessments in game sports. However, positioning sensing systems are applied in sports as tools to gain objective information of sports behavior rather than as components of intelligent spaces (IS). The paper outlines the idea of IS for the sports context with special focus to game sports and how intelligent sports feedback systems can benefit from IS. Henceforth, the most common location sensing techniques used in sports and their practical application are reviewed, as location is among the most important enabling techniques for IS. Furthermore, the article exemplifies the idea of IS in sports on two applications. PMID:22163725

  13. Position Ring System using Anger Type Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Joel S. Karp, principal investigator

    2004-12-14

    The overall objective of our project was to develop PET scanners and imaging techniques that achieve high performance and excellent image quality. Our approach was based upon 3-D imaging (no septa) with position-sensitive Anger-logic detectors, whereby the encoding ratio of resolution elements to number of photo-multiplier tube channels is very high. This design led to a series of PET systems that emphasized cost-effectiveness and practicality in a clinical environment.

  14. A 2-DOF MEMS positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, Ganapathy; Mathews, James; Dallas, Tim E.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the design, fabrication, and testing of a 2 degree of freedom MEMS positioning system. Sandia National Laboratories' MEMS foundry process was utilized for the fabrication of the device; this process incorporates five layers of polysilicon and four sacrificial layers of silicon dioxide. The actuation was achieved by identical comb-drives on both axes. The comb drives produce a displacement of ~ 4 μm which was amplified to ~ 30 μm by the use of a distance multiplier. A pin and track arrangement in the X and Y arms, extending from the actuator assembly, allows bi-axis motion. The stage is connected to the central pin. For testing the performance of the fabricated design a custom made optical characterization setup was assembled. To provide the actuation signals to the stage, a Keithley 2400 source meter was programmed using LabView to provide actuation voltages from 0-100 V with a 2 volt step. An optical microscope, interfaced with a Canon S5 IS digital camera, was used to record the actuation events for the measurement of in-plane displacement. Displacement at the various actuation voltages was obtained using a National Instruments' Vision image analysis software routine. The device has been tested and demonstrates a useful design for realizing a bi-directional 2-D positioning system. The positioning system is capable of 0 - 30 μm of motion in both the X and Y axes, with displacement showing a quadratic relationship with the applied voltage.

  15. Global positioning system recorder: Software user guide

    SciTech Connect

    Toole, B.

    1996-02-12

    This manual provides information needed to use the Global Positioning System Recorder Data processing software. The software runs on an IBM compatible computer. The DeLorme XMp program requires Microsoft Windows and a CDROM reader. Section 5.1 `Copy GPSR data from PCMCIA card` and Section 5.4 `PCMCIA card setup for field use` require a PCMCIA drive installed in the computer. The user interfaces with the software using a computer keyboard and when in Windows, a mouse. New users can be trained by anyone with experience using the system.

  16. Reset stabilisation of positive linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xudong; Yin, Yunfei; Shen, Jun

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the problems of reset stabilisation for positive linear systems (PLSs) are investigated. Some properties relating to reset control of PLSs are first revealed. It is shown that these properties are different from the corresponding ones of general linear systems. Second, a class of periodic reset scheme is designed to exponentially stabilise an unstable PLS with a prescribed decay rate. Then, for a given PLS with reset control, some discussions on the upper bound of its decay rate are presented. Meanwhile, the reset stabilisation for PLSs in a special case is probed as well. Finally, two numerical examples are used to demonstrate the correctness and effectiveness of the obtained theoretical results.

  17. Long range position and orientation tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Jansen, J.F.; Burks, B.L.; Bernacki, B.E.; Nypaver, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    The long range position and orientation tracking system (LRPOTS) will consist of two measurement pods, a VME-based computer system, and a detector array. The system is used to measure the position and orientation of a target that may be attached to a robotic arm, teleoperated manipulator, or autonomous vehicle. The pods have been designed to be mounted in the man-ways of the domes of the Fernald K-65 waste silos. Each pod has two laser scanner subsystems as well as lights and camera systems. One of the laser scanners will be oriented to scan in the pan direction, the other in the tilt direction. As the lasers scan across the detector array, the angles of incidence with each detector are recorded. Combining measurements from each of the four lasers yields sufficient data for a closed-form solution of the transform describing the location and orientation of the Content Mobilization System (CMS). Redundant detectors will be placed on the CMS to accommodate occlusions, to provide improved measurement accuracy, and to determine the CMS orientation.

  18. MEMS accelerometers in accurate mount positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, László; Pál, András.; Jaskó, Attila

    2014-07-01

    In order to attain precise, accurate and stateless positioning of telescope mounts we apply microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (also known as MEMS accelerometers). In common practice, feedback from the mount position is provided by electronic, optical or magneto-mechanical systems or via real-time astrometric solution based on the acquired images. Hence, MEMS-based systems are completely independent from these mechanisms. Our goal is to investigate the advantages and challenges of applying such devices and to reach the sub-arcminute range { that is well smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. We present how this sub-arcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors. Basically, these sensors yield raw output within an accuracy of a few degrees. We show what kind of calibration procedures could exploit spherical and cylindrical constraints between accelerometer output channels in order to achieve the previously mentioned accuracy level. We also demonstrate how can our implementation be inserted in a telescope control system. Although this attainable precision is less than both the resolution of telescope mount drive mechanics and the accuracy of astrometric solutions, the independent nature of attitude determination could significantly increase the reliability of autonomous or remotely operated astronomical observations.

  19. Deconvolution methods and systems for the mapping of acoustic sources from phased microphone arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system for mapping acoustic sources determined from a phased microphone array. A plurality of microphones are arranged in an optimized grid pattern including a plurality of grid locations thereof. A linear configuration of N equations and N unknowns can be formed by accounting for a reciprocal influence of one or more beamforming characteristics thereof at varying grid locations among the plurality of grid locations. A full-rank equation derived from the linear configuration of N equations and N unknowns can then be iteratively determined. A full-rank can be attained by the solution requirement of the positivity constraint equivalent to the physical assumption of statically independent noise sources at each N location. An optimized noise source distribution is then generated over an identified aeroacoustic source region associated with the phased microphone array in order to compile an output presentation thereof, thereby removing the beamforming characteristics from the resulting output presentation.

  20. Development and Evaluation of New Coupling System for Lower Limb Prostheses with Acoustic Alarm System

    PubMed Central

    Eshraghi, Arezoo; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu; Gholizadeh, Hossein; Ahmadian, Jalil; Rahmati, Bizhan; Abas, Wan Abu Bakar Wan

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with lower limb amputation need a secure suspension system for their prosthetic devices. A new coupling system was developed that is capable of suspending the prosthesis. The system's safety is ensured through an acoustic alarm system. This article explains how the system works and provides an in vivo evaluation of the device with regard to pistoning during walking. The system was designed to be used with silicone liners and is based on the requirements of prosthetic suspension systems. Mechanical testing was performed using a universal testing machine. The pistoning during walking was measured using a motion analysis system. The new coupling device produced significantly less pistoning compared to a common suspension system (pin/lock). The safety alarm system would buzz if the suspension was going to fail. The new coupling system could securely suspend the prostheses in transtibial amputees and produced less vertical movement than the pin/lock system. PMID:23881340

  1. Ion Thruster Support and Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system for supporting and selectively positioning an ion thruster relative to a surface of a spacecraft includes three angularly spaced thruster support assemblies. Each thruster support assembly includes a frame which has a rotary actuator mounted thereon. The rotary actuator is connected to an actuator member which is rotatably connected to a thruster attachment member connected to a body of the thruster. A stabilizer member is rotatably mounted to the frame and to the thruster attachment member. The thruster is selectively movable in the pitch and yaw directions responsive to movement of the actuator members by the actuators on the thruster support assemblies. A failure of any one actuator on a thruster support assembly will generally still enable limited thruster positioning capability in two directions. In a retracted position the thruster attachment members are held in nested relation in saddles supported on the frames of the thruster support assemblies. The thruster is securely held in the retracted position during periods of high loading such as during launch of the spacecraft.

  2. Long range position and Orientation Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Jansen, J.F.; Burks, B.L.

    1996-02-01

    The long range Position and Orientation Tracking System is an active triangulation-based system that is being developed to track a target to a resolution of 6.35 mm (0.25 in.) and 0.009{degrees}(32.4 arcseconds) over a range of 13.72 m (45 ft.). The system update rate is currently set at 20 Hz but can be increased to 100 Hz or more. The tracking is accomplished by sweeping two pairs of orthogonal line lasers over infrared (IR) sensors spaced with known geometry with respect to one another on the target (the target being a rigid body attached to either a remote vehicle or a remote manipulator arm). The synchronization and data acquisition electronics correlates the time that an IR sensor has been hit by one of the four lasers and the angle of the respective mirror at the time of the hit. This information is combined with the known geometry of the IR sensors on the target to determine position and orientation of the target. This method has the advantage of allowing the target to be momentarily lost due to occlusions and then reacquired without having to return the target to a known reference point. The system also contains a camera with operator controlled lighting in each pod that allows the target to be continuously viewed from either pod, assuming their are no occlusions.

  3. Relativistic Positioning System in perturbed spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostić, Uroš; Horvat, Martin; Gomboc, Andreja

    2015-11-01

    We present a variant of a Global Navigation Satellite System called a Relativistic Positioning System (RPS), which is based on emission coordinates. We modelled the RPS dynamics in a spacetime around Earth, described by a perturbed Schwarzschild metric, where we included the perturbations due to Earth multipoles (up to the 6th), the Moon, the Sun, Venus, Jupiter, solid tide, ocean tide, and Kerr rotation effect. The exchange of signals between the satellites and a user was calculated using a ray-tracing method in the Schwarzschild spacetime. We find that positioning in a perturbed spacetime is feasible and is highly accurate already with standard numerical procedures: the positioning algorithms used to transform between the emission and the Schwarzschild coordinates of the user are very accurate and time efficient—on a laptop it takes 0.04 s to determine the user’s spatial and time coordinates with a relative accuracy of {10}-28-{10}-26 and {10}-32-{10}-30, respectively.

  4. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation using compressional acoustic sources

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2016-09-27

    A system and method for investigating rock formations outside a borehole are provided. The method includes generating a first compressional acoustic wave at a first frequency by a first acoustic source; and generating a second compressional acoustic wave at a second frequency by a second acoustic source. The first and the second acoustic sources are arranged within a localized area of the borehole. The first and the second acoustic waves intersect in an intersection volume outside the borehole. The method further includes receiving a third shear acoustic wave at a third frequency, the third shear acoustic wave returning to the borehole due to a non-linear mixing process in a non-linear mixing zone within the intersection volume at a receiver arranged in the borehole. The third frequency is equal to a difference between the first frequency and the second frequency.

  5. Design and instrumentation of a measurement and calibration system for an acoustic telemetry system.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark; Carlson, Thomas; Eppard, M Brad

    2010-01-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) is an active sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used primarily for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more "fish-friendly" hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a Measurement and Calibration System (MCS) for evaluating the JSATS components, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The MCS consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated MCS has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. The MCS provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The MCS has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS.

  6. Acoustic Characterization and Impact Sensing for Ceramic Thermal Protection Systems (TPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhr, S. J.; Reibel, R.; Sathish, S.; Jata, K. V.

    2006-03-06

    A study was conducted to understand acoustic wave propagation characteristics in a ceramic matrix composite (CMC) wrapped tile thermal protection system (CMC+ Foam+ RTV+ SIP+ RTV+ Al) and ceramic foam. Sound velocities were measured in three orthogonal directions on the above material. The attenuation coefficients were also determined for a uncoated ceramic foam. Commercially available standard acoustic emission transducers, piezo-wafers and polymer based PVDF (polyvinylidiene fluoride) film were employed in the experiments to acquire the acoustic data. The performance characteristics of these sensors will be discussed in light of impact detection. Variation in the wave propagation characteristics along different directions and the role of processing in causing anisotropic acoustic properties in thermal protection systems will be discussed.

  7. Influence of viscoelastic property on laser-generated surface acoustic waves in coating-substrate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Hongxiang; Zhang Shuyi; Xu Baiqiang

    2011-04-01

    Taking account of the viscoelasticity of materials, the pulsed laser generation of surface acoustic waves in coating-substrate systems has been investigated quantitatively by using the finite element method. The displacement spectra of the surface acoustic waves have been calculated in frequency domain for different coating-substrate systems, in which the viscoelastic properties of the coatings and substrates are considered separately. Meanwhile, the temporal displacement waveforms have been obtained by applying inverse fast Fourier transforms. The numerical results of the normal surface displacements are presented for different configurations: a single plate, a slow coating on a fast substrate, and a fast coating on a slow substrate. The influences of the viscoelastic properties of the coating and the substrate on the attenuation of the surface acoustic waves have been studied. In addition, the influence of the coating thickness on the attenuation of the surface acoustic waves has been also investigated in detail.

  8. A survey on acoustic signature recognition and classification techniques for persistent surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirkhodaie, Amir; Alkilani, Amjad

    2012-06-01

    Application of acoustic sensors in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS) has received considerable attention over the last two decades because they can be rapidly deployed and have low cost. Conventional utilization of acoustic sensors in PSS spans a wide range of applications including: vehicle classification, target tracking, activity understanding, speech recognition, shooter detection, etc. This paper presents a current survey of physics-based acoustic signature classification techniques for outdoor sounds recognition and understanding. Particularly, this paper focuses on taxonomy and ontology of acoustic signatures resulted from group activities. The taxonomy and supportive ontology considered include: humanvehicle, human-objects, and human-human interactions. This paper, in particular, exploits applicability of several spectral analysis techniques as a means to maximize likelihood of correct acoustic source detection, recognition, and discrimination. Spectral analysis techniques based on Fast Fourier Transform, Discrete Wavelet Transform, and Short Time Fourier Transform are considered for extraction of features from acoustic sources. In addition, comprehensive overviews of most current research activities related to scope of this work are presented with their applications. Furthermore, future potential direction of research in this area is discussed for improvement of acoustic signature recognition and classification technology suitable for PSS applications.

  9. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  10. Eliminating Nonlinear Acoustical Effects From Thermoacoustic Refrigeration Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Steven L.; Smith, Robert W. M.; Poese, Matthew E.

    2006-05-01

    Nonlinear acoustical effects dissipate energy that degrades thermoacoustic refrigerator performance. The largest of these effects occur in acoustic resonators and include shock formation; turbulence and boundary layer disruption; and entry/exit (minor) losses induced by changes in resonator cross-sectional area. Effects such as these also make the creation of accurate performance models more complicated. Suppression of shock formation by intentional introduction of resonator anharmonicity has been common practice for the past two decades. Recent attempts to increase cooling power density by increasing pressure amplitudes has required reduction of turbulence and minor loss by using an new acousto-mechanical resonator topology. The hybrid resonator still stores potential energy in the compressibility of the gaseous working fluid, but stores kinetic energy in the moving (solid) mass of the motor and piston. This talk will first present nonlinear acoustical loss measurements obtained in a "conventional" double-Helmholtz resonator geometry (TRITON) that dissipated four kilowatts of acoustic power. We will then describe the performance of the new "bellows bounce" resonator configuration and "vibromechanical multiplier" used in the first successful implementation of this approach that created an ice cream freezer produced at Penn State for Ben & Jerry's.

  11. Prediction of Acoustic Loads Generated by Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Linamaria; Allgood, Daniel C.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Stennis Space Center is one of the nation's premier facilities for conducting large-scale rocket engine testing. As liquid rocket engines vary in size, so do the acoustic loads that they produce. When these acoustic loads reach very high levels they may cause damages both to humans and to actual structures surrounding the testing area. To prevent these damages, prediction tools are used to estimate the spectral content and levels of the acoustics being generated by the rocket engine plumes and model their propagation through the surrounding atmosphere. Prior to the current work, two different acoustic prediction tools were being implemented at Stennis Space Center, each having their own advantages and disadvantages depending on the application. Therefore, a new prediction tool was created, using NASA SP-8072 handbook as a guide, which would replicate the same prediction methods as the previous codes, but eliminate any of the drawbacks the individual codes had. Aside from replicating the previous modeling capability in a single framework, additional modeling functions were added thereby expanding the current modeling capability. To verify that the new code could reproduce the same predictions as the previous codes, two verification test cases were defined. These verification test cases also served as validation cases as the predicted results were compared to actual test data.

  12. Acoustic Evidence for Positional and Complexity Effects on Children's Production of Plural "-s"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodore, Rachel M.; Demuth, Katherine; Shattuck-Hufnagel, Stefanie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Some variability in children's early productions of grammatical morphemes reflects phonological factors. For example, production of 3rd person singular "-s" is increased in utterance-final versus utterance-medial position and in simple versus cluster codas (e.g., "sees" vs. "hits"). Understanding the factors that govern such variability…

  13. [High-speed target recognition positioning system based on multi-spectral radiation characteristics].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Min; Wang, Gao

    2014-11-01

    In order to achieve quick recognition and positioning of the high-speed target, using multi-spectral radiation combined with acoustic positioning technology, in the passive state, the blast wave spectral characteristics and acoustic characteristics of the measured target were rapidly obtained, thus analysis was performed to determine the type, location and other important parameters. Multi-spectral radiation detection target recognition formula was deduced. The accuracy of the optical path length and the logical integration time was calculated by shock acoustic positioning method. Experiments used 5.56 mm NATO bullets, 7.62 mm 56-rifle bullets, 12.7 mm 54 type machine-gun bullets as a target identified projectile. Interference fringes were collected by the static Fourier transform interferometer system and ICX387AL type CCD, and the peak of sound pressure was collected using 2209 pulse sound pressure meter made by B & K Company from Denmark Experimental results show that for the 5.56 mm NATO bullets, the three characteristic wavelengths position amplitudes are close to each other, with the maximum amplitude at 966 nm; For the 7.62 mm 56-rifle bullets, 935 nm is the maximum amplitude position, while for 966 and 997 nm position the magnitudes are sunukar; For 12.7 mm 54 type machine-gun bullets, the three wavelengths show a ladder-like distribution. With the increase in the detection distance spectral radiation energy decreased. Meanwhile, with the decrease in the total radiation spectrum, the spectrum of target was affected strongly by background noise, and the SNR of system was decreased. But the spectral characteristics of different target still exist, the target species can be identified by the system with the ratio algorithm of characteristic peaks. Through spectral calibration and characteristic wavelengths extraction, the target can successfully identify the type of projectile and target position, and it meets the design requirements. PMID:25752076

  14. Single-satellite global positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, Alexander V.; Leonov, Vladislav A.; Mitkin, Alexander S.; Nasyrov, Alexander F.; Ponomarenko, Andreu D.; Pichkhadze, Konstantin M.; Sysoev, Valentin K.

    2015-12-01

    A new concept of a global positioning support system, based on only one satellite, was offered. Unlike all other GPS and GLONASS satellite systems that are in use, within the offered modification, all metrological support is provided by on-board measurements, which means, that it does not need any ground support of coordinate measurements or orbital characteristics of the satellite system. The cosmic-based angle-measuring instrument measures the arcs lengths between the measured ground-points, that are marked with light beacons, and navigation stars. Each measurement takes approximately 0.04 s, with the precision of 1 mm in recalculation to ground-relations. Long series of arc measurements between different objects on the ground and in the sky enable the solution of both determination of geodesic coordinates of the measured points and position of the spacecraft during the measuring process by using geodesic equation methods. In addition, it enables the qualification of the geopotential guaranties. The offered scheme will be used for the determination of the frame of selenocentric coordinates during the "Luna-Globe" and "Luna-Resource" missions for precise navigation of landing modules and maybe will be used for precise gridding of the Martian surface.

  15. Spaceborne Global Positioning System for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Lamar F. (Inventor); Niles, Frederick A. (Inventor); Wennersten, Miriam D. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The spaceborne Global Positioning System receiver provides navigational solutions and is designed for use in low Earth orbit. The spaceborne GPS receiver can determine the orbital position of a spacecraft using any of the satellites wi thin the GPS constellation. It is a multiple processor system incorporating redundancy by using a microcontroller to handle the closure of tracking loops for acquired GPS satellites, while a separate microprocessor computes the spacecraft navigational solution and handles other tasks within the receiver. 'Me spaceborne GPS receiver can use either microcontroller or the microprocessor to close the satellite tracking loops. The use of microcontroller provides better tracking performance of acquired GPS satellites. The spaceborne GPS receiver utilizes up to seven separate GPS boards, with each board including its own set of correlators, down-converters and front-end components. The spaceborne GPS receiver also includes telemetry and time-marking circuitry. The spaceborne GPS receiver communicates with other spacecraft systems through a variety of interfaces and can be software-configured to support several different mission profiles.

  16. Development of an Automatic Identification System Autonomous Positioning System.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qing; Jiang, Yi; Zhang, Jingbo; Sun, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shufang

    2015-11-11

    In order to overcome the vulnerability of the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) and provide robust position, navigation and time (PNT) information in marine navigation, the autonomous positioning system based on ranging-mode Automatic Identification System (AIS) is presented in the paper. The principle of the AIS autonomous positioning system (AAPS) is investigated, including the position algorithm, the signal measurement technique, the geometric dilution of precision, the time synchronization technique and the additional secondary factor correction technique. In order to validate the proposed AAPS, a verification system has been established in the Xinghai sea region of Dalian (China). Static and dynamic positioning experiments are performed. The original function of the AIS in the AAPS is not influenced. The experimental results show that the positioning precision of the AAPS is better than 10 m in the area with good geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) by the additional secondary factor correction technology. This is the most economical solution for a land-based positioning system to complement the GNSS for the navigation safety of vessels sailing along coasts.

  17. Development of an Automatic Identification System Autonomous Positioning System.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qing; Jiang, Yi; Zhang, Jingbo; Sun, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shufang

    2015-01-01

    In order to overcome the vulnerability of the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) and provide robust position, navigation and time (PNT) information in marine navigation, the autonomous positioning system based on ranging-mode Automatic Identification System (AIS) is presented in the paper. The principle of the AIS autonomous positioning system (AAPS) is investigated, including the position algorithm, the signal measurement technique, the geometric dilution of precision, the time synchronization technique and the additional secondary factor correction technique. In order to validate the proposed AAPS, a verification system has been established in the Xinghai sea region of Dalian (China). Static and dynamic positioning experiments are performed. The original function of the AIS in the AAPS is not influenced. The experimental results show that the positioning precision of the AAPS is better than 10 m in the area with good geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) by the additional secondary factor correction technology. This is the most economical solution for a land-based positioning system to complement the GNSS for the navigation safety of vessels sailing along coasts. PMID:26569258

  18. Development of an Automatic Identification System Autonomous Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qing; Jiang, Yi; Zhang, Jingbo; Sun, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shufang

    2015-01-01

    In order to overcome the vulnerability of the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) and provide robust position, navigation and time (PNT) information in marine navigation, the autonomous positioning system based on ranging-mode Automatic Identification System (AIS) is presented in the paper. The principle of the AIS autonomous positioning system (AAPS) is investigated, including the position algorithm, the signal measurement technique, the geometric dilution of precision, the time synchronization technique and the additional secondary factor correction technique. In order to validate the proposed AAPS, a verification system has been established in the Xinghai sea region of Dalian (China). Static and dynamic positioning experiments are performed. The original function of the AIS in the AAPS is not influenced. The experimental results show that the positioning precision of the AAPS is better than 10 m in the area with good geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) by the additional secondary factor correction technology. This is the most economical solution for a land-based positioning system to complement the GNSS for the navigation safety of vessels sailing along coasts. PMID:26569258

  19. Precise Applications Of The Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, Stephen M.

    1992-01-01

    Report represents overview of Global Positioning System (GPS). Emphasizes those aspects of theory, history, and status of GPS pertaining to potential utility for highly precise scientific measurements. Current and anticipated applications include measurements of crustal motions in seismically active regions of Earth, measurements of rate of rotation of Earth and orientation of poles, tracking of non-GPS spacecraft in orbit around Earth, surveying, measurements of radio-signal-propagation delays, determinations of coordinates of ground stations, and transfer of precise time signals worldwide.

  20. The Mars Exploration Rover Instrument Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, Eric T.; Bonitz, Robert G.; Shiraishi, Lori R.; Melko, Joseph P.; Leger, P. Chris

    2005-01-01

    During Mars Exploration Rover (MER) surface operations, the scientific data gathered by the in situ instrument suite has been invaluable with respect to the discovery of a significant water history at Meridiani Planum and the hint of water processes at work in Gusev Crater. Specifically, the ability to perform precision manipulation from a mobile platform (i.e., mobile manipulation) has been a critical part of the successful operation of Spirit and Opportunity rovers. As such, this paper describes the MER Instrument Positioning System that allows the in situ instruments to operate and collect their important science data using a robust, dexterous robotic arm combined with visual target selection and autonomous software functions.

  1. Small arm fire acoustic detection and localization systems: gunfire detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzier, Alain; Cadavid, Sandra

    2005-05-01

    The Gunfire Detection System (GDS) is an acoustic passive sensor designed to rapidly detect, locate, and report on hostile fire from small arms upon detection of a blast wave from a bullet exiting the gun barrel and/or the supersonic wave of the bullet. Upon the detection of the muzzle blast and/or the acoustic shock wave caused by the moving bullet the GDS notifies the user and displays the azimuth, elevation and range to the gunfire origin (shooter). This information allows the GDS user to swiftly move, return fire or take other appropriate action. The paper presented examines the militarization process of a Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) item and provides lessons learned.

  2. Implantable acoustic-beacon automatic fish-tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhue, R. J.; Lovelady, R. W.; Ferguson, R. L.; Richards, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    A portable automatic fish tracking system was developed for monitoring the two dimensional movements of small fish within fixed areas of estuarine waters and lakes. By using the miniature pinger previously developed for this application, prototype tests of the system were conducted in the York River near the Virginia Institute of Marine Science with two underwater listening stations. Results from these tests showed that the tracking system could position the miniature pinger signals to within + or - 2.5 deg and + or - 135 m at ranges up to 2.5 km. The pingers were implanted in small fish and were successfully tracked at comparable ranges. No changes in either fish behavior or pinger performance were observed as a result of the implantation. Based on results from these prototype tests, it is concluded that the now commercially available system provides an effective approach to underwater tracking of small fish within a fixed area of interest.

  3. A machine protection beam position monitor system

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedko, E.; Smith, S.; Fisher, A.

    1998-12-10

    Loss of the stored beam in an uncontrolled manner can cause damage to the PEP-II B Factory. We describe here a device which detects large beam position excursions or unexpected beam loss and triggers the beam abort system to extract the stored beam safely. The bad-orbit abort trigger beam position monitor (BOAT BPM) generates a trigger when the beam orbit is far off the center (>20 mm), or rapid beam current loss (dI/dT) is detected. The BOAT BPM averages the input signal over one turn (136 kHz). AM demodulation is used to convert input signals at 476 MHz to baseband voltages. The detected signal goes to a filter section for suppression of the revolution frequency, then on to amplifiers, dividers, and comparators for position and current measurements and triggering. The derived current signal goes to a special filter, designed to perform dI/dT monitoring at fast, medium, and slow current loss rates. The BOAT BPM prototype test results confirm the design concepts.

  4. A machine protection beam position monitor system

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedko, E.; Smith, S.; Fisher, A.

    1998-12-01

    Loss of the stored beam in an uncontrolled manner can cause damage to the PEP-II {ital B} Factory. We describe here a device which detects large beam position excursions or unexpected beam loss and triggers the beam abort system to extract the stored beam safely. The bad-orbit abort trigger beam position monitor (BOAT BPM) generates a trigger when the beam orbit is far off the center ({gt}20 mm), or rapid beam current loss (dI/dT) is detected. The BOAT BPM averages the input signal over one turn (136 kHz). AM demodulation is used to convert input signals at 476 MHz to baseband voltages. The detected signal goes to a filter section for suppression of the revolution frequency, then on to amplifiers, dividers, and comparators for position and current measurements and triggering. The derived current signal goes to a special filter, designed to perform dI/dT monitoring at fast, medium, and slow current loss rates. The BOAT BPM prototype test results confirm the design concepts. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Control system of warehouse robots' position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruev, Ivan A.; Lebedko, Eugene G.; Nikulin, Anton V.

    2015-05-01

    Development of robotic vehicles allowed to carry out massively introduction of their different spheres of activity. But often a necessary condition for the functioning of such systems is the presence of the control of their movement. The opto-electronic system control the spatial position of vehicles, such as mobile robots, describes in this paper. The system consists of reference marks installed on the vehicle and cameras for watching it. The paper presents a mathematical description of the system, the method of determining the coordinates of objects based on their photographic projections using the camcorder. The layout system was developed for testing algorithms having two cameras observe the movement of the layout of the vehicle, realized on the platform Rover 5 Chaisis. The reference mark, which consists of four LEDs, was fixed on the vehicle. The configuration of the LEDs has been presented in the form of vertices of the cube. In the course of the study was found that error does not exceed a value of 1 mm at the distance of 2 meters.

  6. Comparison of PAM Systems for Acoustic Monitoring and Further Risk Mitigation Application.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Stefan; Kreimeyer, Roman; Knoll, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    We present results of the SIRENA 2011 research cruises conducted by the NATO Undersea Research Centre (NURC) and joined by the Research Department for Underwater Acoustics and Geophysics (FWG), Bundeswehr Technical Centre (WTD 71) and the Universities of Kiel and Pavia. The cruises were carried out in the Ligurian Sea. The main aim of the FWG was to test and evaluate the newly developed towed hydrophone array as a passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) tool for risk mitigation applications. The system was compared with the PAM equipment used by the other participating institutions. Recorded sounds were used to improve an automatic acoustic classifier for marine mammals, and validated acoustic detections by observers were compared with the results of the classifier.

  7. A system for acoustical and optical analysis of encapsulated microbubbles at ultrahigh hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed

    Zhushma, Aleksandr; Lebedeva, Natalia; Sen, Pabitra; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei S; Dayton, Paul A

    2013-05-01

    Acoustics are commonly used for borehole (i.e., oil well) imaging applications, under conditions where temperature and pressure reach extremes beyond that of conventional medical ultrasonics. Recently, there has been an interest in the application of encapsulated microbubbles as borehole contrast agents for acoustic assessment of fluid composition and flow. Although such microbubbles are widely studied under physiological conditions for medical imaging applications, to date there is a paucity of information on the behavior of encapsulated gas-filled microbubbles at high pressures. One major limitation is that there is a lack of experimental systems to assess both optical and acoustic data of micrometer-sized particles data at these extremes. In this paper, we present the design and application of a high-pressure cell designed for acoustical and optical studies of microbubbles at hydrostatic pressures up to 27.5 MPa (271 atm). PMID:23742587

  8. Comparison of PAM Systems for Acoustic Monitoring and Further Risk Mitigation Application.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Stefan; Kreimeyer, Roman; Knoll, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    We present results of the SIRENA 2011 research cruises conducted by the NATO Undersea Research Centre (NURC) and joined by the Research Department for Underwater Acoustics and Geophysics (FWG), Bundeswehr Technical Centre (WTD 71) and the Universities of Kiel and Pavia. The cruises were carried out in the Ligurian Sea. The main aim of the FWG was to test and evaluate the newly developed towed hydrophone array as a passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) tool for risk mitigation applications. The system was compared with the PAM equipment used by the other participating institutions. Recorded sounds were used to improve an automatic acoustic classifier for marine mammals, and validated acoustic detections by observers were compared with the results of the classifier. PMID:26611016

  9. A system for acoustical and optical analysis of encapsulated microbubbles at ultrahigh hydrostatic pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhushma, Aleksandr; Lebedeva, Natalia; Sen, Pabitra; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei S.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2013-05-01

    Acoustics are commonly used for borehole (i.e., oil well) imaging applications, under conditions where temperature and pressure reach extremes beyond that of conventional medical ultrasonics. Recently, there has been an interest in the application of encapsulated microbubbles as borehole contrast agents for acoustic assessment of fluid composition and flow. Although such microbubbles are widely studied under physiological conditions for medical imaging applications, to date there is a paucity of information on the behavior of encapsulated gas-filled microbubbles at high pressures. One major limitation is that there is a lack of experimental systems to assess both optical and acoustic data of micrometer-sized particles data at these extremes. In this paper, we present the design and application of a high-pressure cell designed for acoustical and optical studies of microbubbles at hydrostatic pressures up to 27.5 MPa (271 atm).

  10. Acoustically shielded exhaust system for high thrust jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, John P. (Inventor); Lee, Robert (Inventor); Majjigi, Rudramuni K. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A flade exhaust nozzle for a high thrust jet engine is configured to form an acoustic shield around the core engine exhaust flowstream while supplementing engine thrust during all flight conditions, particularly during takeoff. The flade airflow is converted from an annular 360.degree. flowstream to an arcuate flowstream extending around the lower half of the core engine exhaust flowstream so as to suppress exhaust noise directed at the surrounding community.

  11. Energy scavenging system by acoustic wave and integrated wireless communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Albert

    The purpose of the project was developing an energy-scavenging device for other bio implantable devices. Researchers and scientist have studied energy scavenging method because of the limitation of traditional power source, especially for bio-implantable devices. In this research, piezoelectric power generator that activates by acoustic wave, or music was developed. Follow by power generator, a wireless communication also integrated with the device for monitoring the power generation. The Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) bimorph cantilever with a proof mass at the free end tip was studied to convert acoustic wave to power. The music or acoustic wave played through a speaker to vibrate piezoelectric power generator. The LC circuit integrated with the piezoelectric material for purpose of wireless monitoring power generation. However, wireless monitoring can be used as wireless power transmission, which means the signal received via wireless communication also can be used for power for other devices. Size of 74 by 7 by 7cm device could generate and transmit 100mVp from 70 mm distance away with electrical resonant frequency at 420.2 kHz..

  12. 14 CFR 23.1385 - Position light system installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Position light system installation. 23.1385... Lights § 23.1385 Position light system installation. (a) General. Each part of each position light system... requirements of §§ 23.1387 through 23.1397. (b) Left and right position lights. Left and right position...

  13. 14 CFR 23.1385 - Position light system installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Position light system installation. 23.1385... Lights § 23.1385 Position light system installation. (a) General. Each part of each position light system... requirements of §§ 23.1387 through 23.1397. (b) Left and right position lights. Left and right position...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1385 - Position light system installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Position light system installation. 23.1385... Lights § 23.1385 Position light system installation. (a) General. Each part of each position light system... requirements of §§ 23.1387 through 23.1397. (b) Left and right position lights. Left and right position...

  15. Validation of an acoustic location system to monitor Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii) long calls.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Brigitte; van Noordwijk, Maria A; Willems, Erik P; Mitra Setia, Tatang; Wipfli, Urs; van Schaik, Carel P

    2015-07-01

    The long call is an important vocal communication signal in the widely dispersed, semi-solitary orangutan. Long calls affect individuals' ranging behavior and mediate social relationships and regulate encounters between dispersed individuals in a dense rainforest. The aim of this study was to test the utility of an Acoustic Location System (ALS) for recording and triangulating the loud calls of free-living primates. We developed and validated a data extraction protocol for an ALS used to record wild orangutan males' long calls at the Tuanan field site (Central Kalimantan). We installed an ALS in a grid of 300 ha, containing 20 SM2+ recorders placed in a regular lattice at 500 m intervals, to monitor the distribution of calling males in the area. The validated system had the following main features: (i) a user-trained software algorithm (Song Scope) that reliably recognized orangutan long calls from sound files at distances up to 700 m from the nearest recorder, resulting in a total area of approximately 900 ha that could be monitored continuously; (ii) acoustic location of calling males up to 200 m outside the microphone grid, which meant that within an area of approximately 450 ha, call locations could be calculated through triangulation. The mean accuracy was 58 m, an error that is modest relative to orangutan mobility and average inter-individual distances. We conclude that an ALS is a highly effective method for detecting long-distance calls of wild primates and triangulating their position. In combination with conventional individual focal follow data, an ALS can greatly improve our knowledge of orangutans' social organization, and is readily adaptable for studying other highly vocal animals.

  16. Global Positioning System Satellite Selection Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, Frederick A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The satellite selection method as utilized by the spaceborne Global Positioning System receiver provides navigational solutions and is designed for use in low Earth orbit. The satellite selection method is a robust algorithm that can be used a GPS receiver to select appropriate GPS satellites for use in calculating point solutions or attitude solutions. The method is takes into account the difficulty of finding a particular GPS satellite phase code, especially when the search range in greatly increased due to Doppler shifts introduced into the carrier frequency. The method starts with an update of the antenna pointing and spacecraft vectors to determine the antenna backplane direction. Next, the GPS satellites that will potentially be in view of the antenna are ranked on a list, whereby the list is generated based on the estimated attitude and position of each GPS satellite. Satellites blocked by the Earth are not entered on this list. A second list is created, whereby the GPS satellites are ranked according to their desirability for use in attitude determination. GPS satellites are ranked according to their orthogonality to the antenna backplane, and according to geometric dilution of precision considerations. After the lists are created, the channels of the spaceborne GPS receiver are assigned to various GPS satellites for acquisition and lock. Preliminary Doppler frequencies for searching are assigned to the various channels.

  17. An intelligent position-specific training system for mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, M. P.

    1992-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) payload ground controller training program provides very good generic training; however, ground controller position-specific training can be improved by including position-specific training systems in the training program. This report explains why MSFC needs to improve payload ground controller position-specific training. The report describes a generic syllabus for position-specific training systems, a range of system designs for position-specific training systems, and a generic development process for developing position-specific training systems. The report also describes a position-specific training system prototype that was developed for the crew interface coordinator payload operations control center ground controller position. The report concludes that MSFC can improve the payload ground controller training program by incorporating position-specific training systems for each ground controller position; however, MSFC should not develop position-specific training systems unless payload ground controller position experts will be available to participate in the development process.

  18. Positive solutions of advanced differential systems.

    PubMed

    Diblík, Josef; Kúdelčíková, Mária

    2013-01-01

    We study asymptotic behavior of solutions of general advanced differential systems y(t) = F(t, y(t)), where F : Ω → [Symbol: see text] (n) is a continuous quasi-bounded functional which satisfies a local Lipschitz condition with respect to the second argument and Ω is a subset in [Symbol: see text] × C(r)(n), C(r)(n) := C([0, r], [Symbol: see text] (n)), y t [Symbol: see text]C(r)(n), and y t (θ) = y(t + θ), θ [Symbol: see text] [0, r]. A monotone iterative method is proposed to prove the existence of a solution defined for t → ∞ with the graph coordinates lying between graph coordinates of two (lower and upper) auxiliary vector functions. This result is applied to scalar advanced linear differential equations. Criteria of existence of positive solutions are given and their asymptotic behavior is discussed.

  19. A Galerkin method for linear PDE systems in circular geometries with structural acoustic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ralph C.

    1994-01-01

    A Galerkin method for systems of PDE's in circular geometries is presented with motivating problems being drawn from structural, acoustic, and structural acoustic applications. Depending upon the application under consideration, piecewise splines or Legendre polynomials are used when approximating the system dynamics with modifications included to incorporate the analytic solution decay near the coordinate singularity. This provides an efficient method which retains its accuracy throughout the circular domain without degradation at singularity. Because the problems under consideration are linear or weakly nonlinear with constant or piecewise constant coefficients, transform methods for the problems are not investigated. While the specific method is developed for the two dimensional wave equations on a circular domain and the equation of transverse motion for a thin circular plate, examples demonstrating the extension of the techniques to a fully coupled structural acoustic system are used to illustrate the flexibility of the method when approximating the dynamics of more complex systems.

  20. 29 CFR 1915.160 - Positioning device systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Positioning device systems. 1915.160 Section 1915.160 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.160 Positioning device systems. Positioning device systems and their use shall conform to... (22.24 Kn). (3) Positioning device systems shall be secured to an anchorage capable of supporting...

  1. Concert hall acoustics: Repertoire, listening position, and individual taste of the listeners influence the qualitative attributes and preferences.

    PubMed

    Lokki, Tapio; Pätynen, Jukka; Kuusinen, Antti; Tervo, Sakari

    2016-07-01

    Some studies of concert hall acoustics consider the acoustics in a hall as a single entity. Here, it is shown that the acoustics vary between different seats, and the choice of music also influences the perceived acoustics. The presented study compared the acoustics of six unoccupied concert halls with extensive listening tests, applying two different music excerpts on three different seats. Twenty eight assessors rated the halls according to the subjective preference of the assesors and individual attributes with a paired comparison method. Results show that assessors can be classified into two preference groups, which prioritize different perceptual factors. In addition, the individual attributes elicited by assessors were clustered into three latent classes. PMID:27475177

  2. An acoustic dual filter in the audio frequencies with two local resonant systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhao-qun; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Shu-yi; Fan, Li

    2014-08-01

    We report an acoustic dual filter to realize the sound regulation in the audio frequency range, in which resonant vibrations of two membrane-air and metal-elastomer systems generate two sound transmission peaks and a sound blocking below 3000 Hz. The local vibrational profiles manifest that the transmission peak at lower frequency is mainly dependent on the resonant vibration of the membrane-air system, and the coupling vibrations of two systems generate the blocking frequency and transmission peak at higher frequency. Importantly, two transmission peaks can be controlled independently. It is feasible to realize the acoustic device in sound shield and dual filters.

  3. Performance analysis of a LDPC coded OFDM communication system in shallow water acoustic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shengxing; Xu, Xiaomei

    2012-11-01

    Time-varying significant multipath interference is the major obstacle to reliable data communication in shallow water acoustic channels. In this paper, the performance of a low density parity check (LDPC) coded orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) communication system is investigated for these channels. The initial message for LDPC, decoded by using the belief propagation (BP) algorithm, is deduced for OFDM underwater acoustic channels; based on this deduction, the noise thresholds of regular LDPC codes with different code rates are obtained by using the density evolution algorithm. Furthermore, a communication system model, developed with LDPC code, OFDM and channel interleaver for shallow water acoustic channels, is introduced. The effect of modulation and coding schemes on the LDPC codes performance is investigated by simulation. The results show that the system can achieve remarkable performance in shallow water acoustic channels, and the performance improves with increasing code length and decreasing code rate. The bit error rate (BER) of the system, under conditions with QPSK modulation, 1280-code length and 1/2-code rate, is less than 10-5 when the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is greater than 6.8dB. These values are obtained for a five-path shallow water acoustic channel of Xiamen harbor.

  4. Auto-positioning ultrasonic transducer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Randy K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer apparatus and process for determining the optimal transducer position for flow measurement along a conduit outer surface. The apparatus includes a transmitting transducer for transmitting an ultrasonic signal, said transducer affixed to a conduit outer surface; a guide rail attached to a receiving transducer for guiding movement of a receiving transducer along the conduit outer surface, wherein the receiving transducer receives an ultrasonic signal from the transmitting transducer and sends a signal to a data acquisition system; and a motor for moving the receiving transducer along the guide rail, wherein the motor is controlled by a controller. The method includes affixing a transmitting transducer to an outer surface of a conduit; moving a receiving transducer on the conduit outer surface, wherein the receiving transducer is moved along a guide rail by a motor; transmitting an ultrasonic signal from the transmitting transducer that is received by the receiving transducer; communicating the signal received by the receiving transducer to a data acquisition and control system; and repeating the moving, transmitting, and communicating along a length of the conduit.

  5. Statistical analysis of storm electrical discharges reconstituted from a lightning mapping system, a lightning location system, and an acoustic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallin, Louis-Jonardan; Farges, Thomas; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François; Defer, Eric; Rison, William; Schulz, Wolfgang; Nuret, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the European Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment project, a field campaign devoted to the study of electrical activity during storms took place in the south of France in 2012. An acoustic station composed of four microphones and four microbarometers was deployed within the coverage of a Lightning Mapping Array network. On the 26 October 2012, a thunderstorm passed just over the acoustic station. Fifty-six natural thunder events, due to cloud-to-ground and intracloud flashes, were recorded. This paper studies the acoustic reconstruction, in the low frequency range from 1 to 40 Hz, of the recorded flashes and their comparison with detections from electromagnetic networks. Concurrent detections from the European Cooperation for Lightning Detection lightning location system were also used. Some case studies show clearly that acoustic signal from thunder comes from the return stroke but also from the horizontal discharges which occur inside the clouds. The huge amount of observation data leads to a statistical analysis of lightning discharges acoustically recorded. Especially, the distributions of altitudes of reconstructed acoustic detections are explored in detail. The impact of the distance to the source on these distributions is established. The capacity of the acoustic method to describe precisely the lower part of nearby cloud-to-ground discharges, where the Lightning Mapping Array network is not effective, is also highlighted.

  6. Effects of superthermal electrons and negatively (positively) charged dust grains on dust-ion acoustic wave modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainejad, H.; Mahdavi, M.; Shahmansouri, M.

    2014-05-01

    The modulational instability of dust-ion acoustic (DIA) waves is studied in an unmagnetized dusty plasma comprising arbitrarily charged dust particles, adiabatic fluid ions, and electrons satisfying a kappa ( κ) distribution. By using the multiple space and time scales perturbation, a nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation is derived, and then the existence along with the stability of wave packets are discussed in the parameter space of two oppositely charged dust and ion temperature over a range of values of electron superthermality. It is found that the transition from stable dark solitons to unstable bright ones shifts to the smaller wavelength regions in a way that depends on the increase of superthermality index κ. In this case, a narrower range (in spatial extension) of the envelope solitons is observed. It is also found that the instability growth rate reduces, due to the electron superthemality. Furthermore, positive dust concentration enhances the instability region, whereas more populations of negative dust grains may control or suppress one.

  7. Acoustic Transmitters for Underwater Neutrino Telescopes

    PubMed Central

    Ardid, Miguel; Martínez-Mora, Juan A.; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Larosa, Giuseppina; Adrián-Martínez, Silvia; Llorens, Carlos D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper acoustic transmitters that were developed for use in underwater neutrino telescopes are presented. Firstly, an acoustic transceiver has been developed as part of the acoustic positioning system of neutrino telescopes. These infrastructures are not completely rigid and require a positioning system in order to monitor the position of the optical sensors which move due to sea currents. To guarantee a reliable and versatile system, the transceiver has the requirements of reduced cost, low power consumption, high pressure withstanding (up to 500 bars), high intensity for emission, low intrinsic noise, arbitrary signals for emission and the capacity of acquiring and processing received signals. Secondly, a compact acoustic transmitter array has been developed for the calibration of acoustic neutrino detection systems. The array is able to mimic the signature of ultra-high-energy neutrino interaction in emission directivity and signal shape. The technique of parametric acoustic sources has been used to achieve the proposed aim. The developed compact array has practical features such as easy manageability and operation. The prototype designs and the results of different tests are described. The techniques applied for these two acoustic systems are so powerful and versatile that may be of interest in other marine applications using acoustic transmitters. PMID:22666022

  8. Acoustic transmitters for underwater neutrino telescopes.

    PubMed

    Ardid, Miguel; Martínez-Mora, Juan A; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Larosa, Giuseppina; Adrián-Martínez, Silvia; Llorens, Carlos D

    2012-01-01

    In this paper acoustic transmitters that were developed for use in underwater neutrino telescopes are presented. Firstly, an acoustic transceiver has been developed as part of the acoustic positioning system of neutrino telescopes. These infrastructures are not completely rigid and require a positioning system in order to monitor the position of the optical sensors which move due to sea currents. To guarantee a reliable and versatile system, the transceiver has the requirements of reduced cost, low power consumption, high pressure withstanding (up to 500 bars), high intensity for emission, low intrinsic noise, arbitrary signals for emission and the capacity of acquiring and processing received signals. Secondly, a compact acoustic transmitter array has been developed for the calibration of acoustic neutrino detection systems. The array is able to mimic the signature of ultra-high-energy neutrino interaction in emission directivity and signal shape. The technique of parametric acoustic sources has been used to achieve the proposed aim. The developed compact array has practical features such as easy manageability and operation. The prototype designs and the results of different tests are described. The techniques applied for these two acoustic systems are so powerful and versatile that may be of interest in other marine applications using acoustic transmitters.

  9. Aircraft IR/acoustic detection evaluation. Volume 2: Development of a ground-based acoustic sensor system for the detection of subsonic jet-powered aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    The design and performance of a ground-based acoustic sensor system for the detection of subsonic jet-powered aircraft is described and specified. The acoustic detection system performance criteria will subsequently be used to determine target detection ranges for the subject contract. Although the defined system has never been built and demonstrated in the field, the design parameters were chosen on the basis of achievable technology and overall system practicality. Areas where additional information is needed to substantiate the design are identified.

  10. Roles of polarization force and nonthermal electron on dust-acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous dusty plasma with positively charged dust

    SciTech Connect

    Asaduzzaman, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2012-09-15

    The influence of polarization force (PF) (arises due to dust density inhomogeneity), nonthermal electrons, and dust density inhomogeneity associated with positively charged dust on linear dust-acoustic (DA) waves in an inhomogeneous unmagnetized dusty plasma are investigated. By taking the normal mode analysis, the dispersion relation in such a non-Maxwellian inhomogeneous plasma is obtained, and that the dispersion properties of the DA waves are significantly modified by the presence of PF and nonthermal electrons. The PF is increased with the increase of nonthermal electrons. It is found that the phase speed of the DA waves is significantly decreased with the presence of PF and nonthermal electrons. The potential associated with the DA waves is de-enhanced with the increase of equilibrium dust number density. The role of positive dust number density on dispersion properties is also shown. The present findings relevant to different scenarios in laboratory and space dusty plasma, such as Martian ionosphere, solar flares, TEXTOR-94 tokamak plasmas, rf excited argon magnetoplasma, etc., can be useful to understand the properties of localized electrostatic disturbances in those dusty plasma system, are also briefly addressed.

  11. Characterization Test Report for the Mnemonics-UCS Wireless Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Joshua J.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this testing includes the Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor System delivered to KSC: two interrogator (transceiver) systems, four temperature sensors, with wooden mounting blocks, two antennas, two power supplies, network cables, and analysis software. Also included are a number of additional temperature sensors and newly-developed hydrogen sensors

  12. Use of an Acoustic Orientation System for Indoor Travel with a Spatially Disabled Blind Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, G. E.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    An acoustic orientation system was developed that employed a portable remote control device keyed to trigger audio tones from modules placed at key locations throughout the user's home and work environments. Results found that the system helped a blind subject to move and work successfully in both settings, and the subject found it easy and…

  13. Perceptual and Acoustic Reliability Estimates for the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Fourakis, Marios; Hall, Sheryl D.; Karlsson, Heather B.; Lohmeier, Heather L.; McSweeny, Jane L.; Potter, Nancy L.; Scheer-Cohen, Alison R.; Strand, Edythe A.; Tilkens, Christie M.; Wilson, David L.

    2010-01-01

    A companion paper describes three extensions to a classification system for paediatric speech sound disorders termed the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS). The SDCS uses perceptual and acoustic data reduction methods to obtain information on a speaker's speech, prosody, and voice. The present paper provides reliability estimates for…

  14. Response of acoustic imaging systems using convergent leaky waves to cylindrical flaws.

    PubMed

    Gunalp, N; Atalar, A

    1989-01-01

    A theoretical study of imaging systems utilizing focused leaky surface acoustic waves (SAWs), and their response to certain kind of defects is presented. In particular, circular cylindrical inhomogeneities with axes perpendicular to the surface are considered. The scattering of the SAW from this cylinder is formulated with some approximations. The surface wave incident on the inhomogeneity is initially found as an angular spectrum of plane waves. However, to apply the boundary conditions at the cylindrical surface, the incident field has to be transformed into a superposition of cylindrical waves. Similarly, the scattered field, which is found in the form of outgoing cylindrical SAWs, is converted back to a plane wave spectrum. A formula is obtained for the transducer output voltage in terms of the position and the radius of the cylinder, and it is suitable for computer evaluation. By considering various locations for the cylinder, the sensitivity of the system around the focal point is studied. By comparing the output voltages for cylinders of different radii, the sensitivity of the system to the size of the inhomogeneity is examined. The numerical results are in agreement with the experimental observations.

  15. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Shuttle Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John; Hooker, Jeffery; Immer, Christopher; Walker, James

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) signals generated from projectile impacts on reinforced and advanced carbon/carbon (RCC and ACC) panels, fired from a compressed-gas gun, identify the type and severity of damage sustained by the target. This type of testing is vital in providing the required "return to flight" (RTF) data needed to ensure continued and safe operation of NASA's Space Shuttle fleet. The gas gun at Kennedy Space Center is capable of propelling 12-inch by 3-inch cylinders of external tank (ET) foam at exit velocities exceeding 1,000 feet per second. Conventional AE analysis techniques require time domain processing of impulse data, along with amplitude distribution analysis. It is well known that identical source excitations can produce a wide range of AE signals amplitudes. In order to satisfy RTF goals, it is necessary to identify impact energy levels above and below damage thresholds. Spectral analysis techniques involving joint time frequency analysis (JTFA) are used to reinforce time domain AE analysis. JTFA analysis of the AE signals consists of short-time Fourier transforms (STFT) and the Huang-Hilbert transform (HHT). The HHT provides a very good measure of the instantaneous frequency of impulse events dominated by a single component. Identifying failure modes and cracking of fibers from flexural and/or extensional mode acoustic signals will help support in-flight as well as postflight impact analysis.

  16. Acousto-plasmofluidics: Acoustic modulation of surface plasmon resonance in microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Daniel; Peng, Xiaolei; Ozcelik, Adem; Zheng, Yuebing; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-09-01

    We acoustically modulated the localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) of metal nanostructures integrated within microfluidic systems. An acoustically driven micromixing device based on bubble microstreaming quickly and homogeneously mixes multiple laminar flows of different refractive indices. The altered refractive index of the mixed fluids enables rapid modulation of the LSPRs of gold nanodisk arrays embedded within the microfluidic channel. The device features fast response for dynamic operation, and the refractive index within the channel is tailorable. With these unique features, our "acousto-plasmofluidic" device can be useful in applications such as optical switches, modulators, filters, biosensors, and lab-on-a-chip systems.

  17. FEASIBILITY OF ACOUSTIC METHODS FOR IMPURITY GAS MONITORING IN DRY STORAGE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Cuta, Judith M.; Jones, Anthony M.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Adkins, Harold E.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2015-05-01

    This paper explores the feasibility of monitoring impurities in dry storage containers (DSCs) for spent nuclear fuel using non-invasive acoustic sensing. The conceived implementation considers measurements based on changes in acoustic velocity at successive measurement intervals. Uncertainty contributions from the measurement system and temperature variability are estimated. Sources of temperature variability considered include changes in the decay heat source over time and ambient temperature variation. The results show that performance of a system which does not incorporate temperature compensation will be dependent upon geographic location and the decay heat source strength. The results also indicate that an annual measurement interval is optimal.

  18. Geophysical applications of the global positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ailin

    1998-12-01

    Observation of land surface motions plays a critical role in the study of a wide range of geophysical phenomena. The Global Positioning System (GPS), designed by the US Department of Defense for military and civilian navigation and positioning, has been used to measure crustal motion. The ever expanding global network of GPS sites improves both temporal and spatial resolution of geophysical phenomena. I assess the noise characteristics in time series of daily position estimates for 23 GPS stations with three years of data, using spectral analysis and Maximum Likelihood Estimation. A combination of white plus flicker noise can be used to model the noise characteristics of all three position components. Both white and flicker noise amplitudes are smallest in the north component and largest in the vertical component. The white noise part of the vertical component is higher for tropical stations (±23sp° latitude) compared to mid-latitude stations, which may be related to high wet tropospheric path delay and/or higher variability. Velocity error in the coordinate time series may be underestimated by factors of 5-11 if a pure white noise model is assumed. I analyze data from 20 permanent GPS stations broadly distributed through the interior of the North American plate, and use the resulting velocities to estimate an Euler vector describing motion of "stable" North America as a single rigid plate. The site velocities fit the single plate model with a mean residual of 1.3 mm/yr. The residuals do not appear to reflect post-glacial rebound, and tests for differential motion between eastern and western North America at the New Madrid seismic zone show no resolvable motion within uncertainties. The residuals more likely reflect observational error, and thus our estimate of the stability of the plate interior is likely an upper bound. In addition, I found that GPS velocity errors estimated with the white plus flicker noise model fit the observations significantly better than

  19. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock-walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, L.; Beutel, J.; Gruber, S.; Hunziker, J.; Lim, R.; Weber, S.

    2012-06-01

    We present a custom acoustic emission (AE) monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock-walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node) integrated into a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock-wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock-wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock-wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock-fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  20. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, L.; Beutel, J.; Gruber, S.; Hunziker, J.; Lim, R.; Weber, S.

    2012-11-01

    We present a custom acoustic emission (AE) monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node) integrated into a wireless sensor network (WSN) customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  1. Precise Wireless Triggering System for Anemometers with Long-Baseline Acoustic Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoto Wakatsuki,; Shin Kinjo,; Jun Takarada,; Koichi Mizutani,

    2010-07-01

    A wireless triggering system for acoustic anemometers using an acoustic probe with a long baseline is investigated. Acoustic probes for measuring micrometeorologic parameters, such as temperature and wind velocity, are used as noncontact and nondestructive methods. The acoustic probe with a long baseline was previously proposed by the authors and investigated to form a sensing grid system for micrometeorologic measurement. The authors have also partially investigated a wireless sensing grid using a wireless local-area network (LAN). However, because of the synchronization problem between sensor nodes, the trigger line has been left wired. In this paper, the problem of synchronization is solved by investigating a wireless triggering system using frequency modulated (FM) radio waves. The primitive triggering system of FM radio waves has some instability on time synchronization depending on such the communication environment as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). To overcome the influence of the instability, a cross-correlation method is adopted to the triggering system. As a result, the time synchronization errors of the trigger system were reduced by up to one tenth. In addition, not only the instability problem but also other larger errors are compensated by the proposed system in an experimental wind velocity measurement.

  2. Global Positioning System Simulator Field Operational Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Quinn, David A.; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) simulation is an important activity in the development or qualification of GPS signal receivers for space flight. Because a GPS simulator is a critical resource it is highly desirable to develop a set of field operational procedures to supplement the basic procedures provided by most simulator vendors. Validated field procedures allow better utilization of the GPS simulator in the development of new test scenarios and simulation operations. These procedures expedite simulation scenario development while resulting in scenarios that are more representative of the true design, as well as enabling construction of more complex simulations than previously possible, for example, spacecraft maneuvers. One difficulty in the development of a simulation scenario is specifying various modes of test vehicle motion and associated maneuvers requiring that a user specify some (but not all) of a few closely related simulation parameters. Currently this can only be done by trial and error. A stand-alone procedure that implements the simulator maneuver motion equations and solves for the motion profile transient times, jerk and acceleration would be of considerable value. Another procedure would permit the specification of some configuration parameters that would determine the simulated GPS signal composition. The resulting signal navigation message, for example, would force the receiver under test to use only the intended C-code component of the simulated GPS signal. A representative class of GPS simulation-related field operational procedures is described in this paper. These procedures were developed and used in support of GPS integration and testing for many successful spacecraft missions such as SAC-A, EO-1, AMSAT, VCL, SeaStar, sounding rockets, and by using the industry standard Spirent Global Simulation Systems Incorporated (GSSI) STR series simulators.

  3. Time dependent inflow-outflow boundary conditions for 2D acoustic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Myers, Michael K.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of the number and form of the required inflow-outflow boundary conditions for the full two-dimensional time-dependent nonlinear acoustic system in subsonic mean flow is performed. The explicit predictor-corrector method of MacCormack (1969) is used. The methodology is tested on both uniform and sheared mean flows with plane and nonplanar sources. Results show that the acoustic system requires three physical boundary conditions on the inflow and one on the outflow boundary. The most natural choice for the inflow boundary conditions is judged to be a specification of the vorticity, the normal acoustic impedance, and a pressure gradient-density gradient relationship normal to the boundary. Specification of the acoustic pressure at the outflow boundary along with these inflow boundary conditions is found to give consistent reliable results. A set of boundary conditions developed earlier, which were intended to be nonreflecting is tested using the current method and is shown to yield unstable results for nonplanar acoustic waves.

  4. Imaging the position-dependent 3D force on microbeads subjected to acoustic radiation forces and streaming.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Andreas; Lakämper, Stefan; Baasch, Thierry; Schaap, Iwan A T; Dual, Jurg

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic particle manipulation in microfluidic channels is becoming a powerful tool in microfluidics to control micrometer sized objects in medical, chemical and biological applications. By creating a standing acoustic wave in the channel, the resulting pressure field can be employed to trap or sort particles. To design efficient and reproducible devices, it is important to characterize the pressure field throughout the volume of the microfluidic device. Here, we used an optically trapped particle as probe to measure the forces in all three dimensions. By moving the probe through the volume of the channel, we imaged spatial variations in the pressure field. In the direction of the standing wave this revealed a periodic energy landscape for 2 μm beads, resulting in an effective stiffness of 2.6 nN m(-1) for the acoustic trap. We found that multiple fabricated devices showed consistent pressure fields. Surprisingly, forces perpendicular to the direction of the standing wave reached values of up to 20% of the main-axis-values. To separate the direct acoustic force from secondary effects, we performed experiments with different bead sizes, which attributed some of the perpendicular forces to acoustic streaming. This method to image acoustically generated forces in 3D can be used to either minimize perpendicular forces or to employ them for specific applications in novel acoustofluidic designs. PMID:27302661

  5. Imaging the position-dependent 3D force on microbeads subjected to acoustic radiation forces and streaming.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Andreas; Lakämper, Stefan; Baasch, Thierry; Schaap, Iwan A T; Dual, Jurg

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic particle manipulation in microfluidic channels is becoming a powerful tool in microfluidics to control micrometer sized objects in medical, chemical and biological applications. By creating a standing acoustic wave in the channel, the resulting pressure field can be employed to trap or sort particles. To design efficient and reproducible devices, it is important to characterize the pressure field throughout the volume of the microfluidic device. Here, we used an optically trapped particle as probe to measure the forces in all three dimensions. By moving the probe through the volume of the channel, we imaged spatial variations in the pressure field. In the direction of the standing wave this revealed a periodic energy landscape for 2 μm beads, resulting in an effective stiffness of 2.6 nN m(-1) for the acoustic trap. We found that multiple fabricated devices showed consistent pressure fields. Surprisingly, forces perpendicular to the direction of the standing wave reached values of up to 20% of the main-axis-values. To separate the direct acoustic force from secondary effects, we performed experiments with different bead sizes, which attributed some of the perpendicular forces to acoustic streaming. This method to image acoustically generated forces in 3D can be used to either minimize perpendicular forces or to employ them for specific applications in novel acoustofluidic designs.

  6. System and method for acquisition management of subject position information

    DOEpatents

    Carrender, Curt

    2007-01-23

    A system and method for acquisition management of subject position information that utilizes radio frequency identification (RF ID) to store position information in position tags. Tag programmers receive position information from external positioning systems, such as the Global Positioning System (GPS), from manual inputs, such as keypads, or other tag programmers. The tag programmers program each position tag with the received position information. Both the tag programmers and the position tags can be portable or fixed. Implementations include portable tag programmers and fixed position tags for subject position guidance, and portable tag programmers for collection sample labeling. Other implementations include fixed tag programmers and portable position tags for subject route recordation. Position tags can contain other associated information such as destination address of an affixed subject for subject routing.

  7. System and method for acquisition management of subject position information

    DOEpatents

    Carrender, Curt

    2005-12-13

    A system and method for acquisition management of subject position information that utilizes radio frequency identification (RF ID) to store position information in position tags. Tag programmers receive position information from external positioning systems, such as the Global Positioning System (GPS), from manual inputs, such as keypads, or other tag programmers. The tag programmers program each position tag with the received position information. Both the tag programmers and the position tags can be portable or fixed. Implementations include portable tag programmers and fixed position tags for subject position guidance, and portable tag programmers for collection sample labeling. Other implementations include fixed tag programmers and portable position tags for subject route recordation. Position tags can contain other associated information such as destination address of an affixed subject for subject routing.

  8. Connect Global Positioning System RF Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Garth W.; Young, Lawrence E.; Ciminera, Michael A.; Tien, Jeffrey Y.; Gorelik, Jacob; Okihiro, Brian Bachman; Koelewyn, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    The CoNNeCT Global Positioning System RF Module (GPSM) slice is part of the JPL CoNNeCT Software Defined Radio (SDR). CoNNeCT is the Communications, Navigation, and Net working reconfigurable Testbed project that is part of NASA's Space Communication and Nav igation (SCaN) Program. The CoNNeCT project is an experimental dem onstration that will lead to the advancement of SDRs and provide a path for new space communication and navigation systems for future NASA exploration missions. The JPL CoNNeCT SDR will be flying on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2012 in support of the SCaN CoNNeCT program. The GPSM is a radio-frequency sampler module (see Figure 1) that directly sub-harmonically samples the filtered GPS L-band signals at L1 (1575.42 MHz), L2 (1227.6 MHz), and L5 (1176.45 MHz). The JPL SDR receives GPS signals through a Dorne & Margolin antenna mounted onto a choke ring. The GPS signal is filtered against interference, amplified, split, and fed into three channels: L1, L2, and L5. In each of the L-band channels, there is a chain of bandpass filters and amplifiers, and the signal is fed through each of these channels to where the GPSM performs a one-bit analog-to-digital conversion (see Figure 2). The GPSM uses a sub-harmonic, single-bit L1, L2, and L5 sampler that samples at a clock rate of 38.656 MHz. The new capability is the down-conversion and sampling of the L5 signal when previous hardware did not provide this capability. The first GPS IIF Satellite was launched in 2010, providing the new L5 signal. With the JPL SDR flying on the ISS, it will be possible to demonstrate navigation solutions with 10-meter 3-D accuracy at 10-second intervals using a field-program mable gate array (FPGA)-based feedback loop running at 50 Hz. The GPS data bits will be decoded and used in the SDR. The GPSM will also allow other waveforms that are installed in the SDR to demonstrate various GNSS tracking techniques.

  9. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN).more » Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems.« less

  10. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems. PMID:24023536

  11. Crack propagation analysis using acoustic emission sensors for structural health monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems. PMID:24023536

  12. The Doppler Effect based acoustic source separation for a wayside train bearing monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Zhang, Shangbin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2016-01-01

    Wayside acoustic condition monitoring and fault diagnosis for train bearings depend on acquired acoustic signals, which consist of mixed signals from different train bearings with obvious Doppler distortion as well as background noises. This study proposes a novel scheme to overcome the difficulties, especially the multi-source problem in wayside acoustic diagnosis system. In the method, a time-frequency data fusion (TFDF) strategy is applied to weaken the Heisenberg's uncertainty limit for a signal's time-frequency distribution (TFD) of high resolution. Due to the Doppler Effect, the signals from different bearings have different time centers even with the same frequency. A Doppler feature matching search (DFMS) algorithm is then put forward to locate the time centers of different bearings in the TFD spectrogram. With the determined time centers, time-frequency filters (TFF) are designed with thresholds to separate the acoustic signals in the time-frequency domain. Then the inverse STFT (ISTFT) is taken and the signals are recovered and filtered aiming at each sound source. Subsequently, a dynamical resampling method is utilized to remove the Doppler Effect. Finally, accurate diagnosis for train bearing faults can be achieved by applying conventional spectrum analysis techniques to the resampled data. The performance of the proposed method is verified by both simulated and experimental cases. It shows that it is effective to detect and diagnose multiple defective bearings even though they produce multi-source acoustic signals.

  13. The acoustic streamflow-measuring system on the Columbia River at The Dalles, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Winchell; Hubbard, Larry L.; Laenen, Antonius

    1971-01-01

    Installation of this sytem, which is the first application of an AVM (acoustic velocity meter) in a large natural channel, was completed in April 1969. It has been in continuous operation since that date. Performance has been satisfactory, and similar installations at other key points in the Columbia River basin are now under consideration. This paper covers the general theory behind acoustic velocity meters, tracing development from earlier concepts to the present commercially available system. Conclusions are that the AVM can now be considered as an operational instrument which permits accurate gaging of river discharge at many sites where conventional stream-gaging procedures have proved to be unreliable.

  14. Micro-battery Development for Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Honghao; Cartmell, Samuel S.; Wang, Qiang; Lozano, Terence J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Li, Huidong; Chen, Xilin; Yuan, Yong; Gross, Mark E.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Xiao, Jie

    2014-01-21

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) project supported by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, has yielded the smallest acoustic fish tag transmitter commercially available to date. In order to study even smaller fish populations and make the transmitter injectable by needles, the JSATS acoustic micro transmitter needs to be further downsized. This study focuses on the optimization of microbattery design based on Li/CFx chemistry. Through appropriate modifications, a steady high-rate pulse current with desirable life time has been achieved while the weight and volume of the battery is largely reduced. The impedance variation in as-designed microbatteries is systematically compared with that of currently used watch batteries in JSATS with an attempt to understand the intrinsic factors that control the performances of microbatteries under the real testing environments.

  15. Opti-acoustic stereo imaging: on system calibration and 3-D target reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Negahdaripour, Shahriar; Sekkati, Hicham; Pirsiavash, Hamed

    2009-06-01

    Utilization of an acoustic camera for range measurements is a key advantage for 3-D shape recovery of underwater targets by opti-acoustic stereo imaging, where the associated epipolar geometry of optical and acoustic image correspondences can be described in terms of conic sections. In this paper, we propose methods for system calibration and 3-D scene reconstruction by maximum likelihood estimation from noisy image measurements. The recursive 3-D reconstruction method utilized as initial condition a closed-form solution that integrates the advantages of two other closed-form solutions, referred to as the range and azimuth solutions. Synthetic data tests are given to provide insight into the merits of the new target imaging and 3-D reconstruction paradigm, while experiments with real data confirm the findings based on computer simulations, and demonstrate the merits of this novel 3-D reconstruction paradigm.

  16. Dynamical energy analysis for built-up acoustic systems at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Chappell, D J; Giani, S; Tanner, G

    2011-09-01

    Standard methods for describing the intensity distribution of mechanical and acoustic wave fields in the high frequency asymptotic limit are often based on flow transport equations. Common techniques are statistical energy analysis, employed mostly in the context of vibro-acoustics, and ray tracing, a popular tool in architectural acoustics. Dynamical energy analysis makes it possible to interpolate between standard statistical energy analysis and full ray tracing, containing both of these methods as limiting cases. In this work a version of dynamical energy analysis based on a Chebyshev basis expansion of the Perron-Frobenius operator governing the ray dynamics is introduced. It is shown that the technique can efficiently deal with multi-component systems overcoming typical geometrical limitations present in statistical energy analysis. Results are compared with state-of-the-art hp-adaptive discontinuous Galerkin finite element simulations.

  17. Opti-acoustic stereo imaging: on system calibration and 3-D target reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Negahdaripour, Shahriar; Sekkati, Hicham; Pirsiavash, Hamed

    2009-06-01

    Utilization of an acoustic camera for range measurements is a key advantage for 3-D shape recovery of underwater targets by opti-acoustic stereo imaging, where the associated epipolar geometry of optical and acoustic image correspondences can be described in terms of conic sections. In this paper, we propose methods for system calibration and 3-D scene reconstruction by maximum likelihood estimation from noisy image measurements. The recursive 3-D reconstruction method utilized as initial condition a closed-form solution that integrates the advantages of two other closed-form solutions, referred to as the range and azimuth solutions. Synthetic data tests are given to provide insight into the merits of the new target imaging and 3-D reconstruction paradigm, while experiments with real data confirm the findings based on computer simulations, and demonstrate the merits of this novel 3-D reconstruction paradigm. PMID:19380272

  18. A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: part 2. Three-dimensional tracking and passage outcomes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Z Daniel; Weiland, Mark A; Fu, Tao; Seim, Tom A; LaMarche, Brian L; Choi, Eric Y; Carlson, Thomas J; Eppard, M Brad

    2011-01-01

    In Part 1 of this paper, we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Oregon, USA) to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m upstream from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.07 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the 2008 case study at John Day Dam, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more "fish-friendly" hydroelectric facilities. PMID:22163919

  19. A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: part 2. Three-dimensional tracking and passage outcomes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Z Daniel; Weiland, Mark A; Fu, Tao; Seim, Tom A; LaMarche, Brian L; Choi, Eric Y; Carlson, Thomas J; Eppard, M Brad

    2011-01-01

    In Part 1 of this paper, we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Oregon, USA) to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m upstream from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.07 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the 2008 case study at John Day Dam, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more "fish-friendly" hydroelectric facilities.

  20. A Cabled Acoustic Telemetry System for Detecting and Tracking Juvenile Salmon: Part 2. Three-Dimensional Tracking and Passage Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Fu, Tao; Seim, Thomas A.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2011-05-26

    In Part 1 of this paper [1], we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the 31 dams in the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.06 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.05 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the case study at John Day Dam during 2008, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities.

  1. A Cabled Acoustic Telemetry System for Detecting and Tracking Juvenile Salmon: Part 2. Three-Dimensional Tracking and Passage Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Z. Daniel; Weiland, Mark A.; Fu, Tao; Seim, Tom A.; LaMarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, M. Brad

    2011-01-01

    In Part 1 of this paper, we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Oregon, USA) to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m upstream from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.07 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the 2008 case study at John Day Dam, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. PMID:22163919

  2. A Mobile Acoustic Subsurface Sensing (MASS) System for Rapid Roadway Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yifeng; Zhang, Yi; Cao, Yinghong; McDaniel, J. Gregory; Wang, Ming L.

    2013-01-01

    Surface waves are commonly used for vibration-based nondestructive testing for infrastructure. Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) has been used to detect subsurface properties for geologic inspections. Recently, efforts were made to scale down these subsurface detection approaches to see how they perform on small-scale structures such as concrete slabs and pavements. Additional efforts have been made to replace the traditional surface-mounted transducers with non-contact acoustic transducers. Though some success has been achieved, most of these new approaches are inefficient because they require point-to-point measurements or off-line signal analysis. This article introduces a Mobile Acoustic Subsurface Sensing system as MASS, which is an improved surface wave based implementation for measuring the subsurface profile of roadways. The compact MASS system is a 3-wheeled cart outfitted with an electromagnetic impact source, distance register, non-contact acoustic sensors and data acquisition/processing equipment. The key advantage of the MASS system is the capability to collect measurements continuously at walking speed in an automatic way. The fast scan and real-time analysis advantages are based upon the non-contact acoustic sensing and fast air-coupled surface wave analysis program. This integration of hardware and software makes the MASS system an efficient mobile prototype for the field test. PMID:23698266

  3. Designing an Acoustic Suspension Speaker System in the General Physics Laboratory: A Divergent experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Philip B.

    1969-01-01

    Describes a student laboratory project involving the design of an "acoustic suspension speaker system. The characteristics of the loudspeaker used are measured as an extension of the inertia-balance experiment. The experiment may be extended to a study of Stelmholtz resonators, coupled oscillators, electromagnetic forces, thermodynamics and…

  4. Structural FE model updating of cavity systems incorporating vibro-acoustic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehete, D. V.; Modak, S. V.; Gupta, K.

    2015-01-01

    Finite element model updating techniques are used to update the finite element model of a structure in order to improve its correlation with the experimental dynamic test data. These techniques are well developed and extensively studied for the case of purely structural dynamic systems. However, the cavities encountered in automotive, aerospace and other transportation applications represent a class of structures in which an elastic structure encloses an acoustic medium. In such systems the dynamic characteristics of the structure are influenced by the acoustic loading due to the acoustic response in the cavity. The existing structural FE model updating approaches assume the structure to be under in-vacuo condition and hence if used for updating cavity structural FE models would not allow taking into account the effect of acoustic loading on the structural dynamic characteristics. This may adversely affect the effectiveness of updating in yielding an accurate updated FE model. This paper addresses the above issue and presents a structural FE model updating method, called 'coupled inverse eigen-sensitivity method', which takes into account the acoustic loading on the structure. The method uses the experimentally identified coupled modal data on the structure as the reference data. A numerical case study of a 3D rectangular cavity backed by a flexible plate is presented to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach to obtain an accurate structural FE model. Updating is also carried out using the existing (uncoupled) inverse eigen-sensitivity method to study the influence of acoustic loading on the updating process and to study the accuracy with which the updating parameters are identified. The results obtained are also compared with those obtained by the proposed coupled inverse eigen-sensitivity method.

  5. Back-end algorithms that enhance the functionality of a biomimetic acoustic gunfire direction finding system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yirong; Kelsall, Sarah; Ziph-Schatzberg, Leah; Hubbard, Allyn

    2009-05-01

    Increasing battlefield awareness can improve both the effectiveness and timeliness of response in hostile military situations. A system that processes acoustic data is proposed to handle a variety of possible applications. The front-end of the existing biomimetic acoustic direction finding system, a mammalian peripheral auditory system model, provides the back-end system with what amounts to spike trains. The back-end system consists of individual algorithms tailored to extract specific information. The back-end algorithms are transportable to FPGA platforms and other general-purpose computers. The algorithms can be modified for use with both fixed and mobile, existing sensor platforms. Currently, gunfire classification and localization algorithms based on both neural networks and pitch are being developed and tested. The neural network model is trained under supervised learning to differentiate and trace various gunfire acoustic signatures and reduce the effect of different frequency responses of microphones on different hardware platforms. The model is being tested against impact and launch acoustic signals of various mortars, supersonic and muzzle-blast of rifle shots, and other weapons. It outperforms the cross-correlation algorithm with regard to computational efficiency, memory requirements, and noise robustness. The spike-based pitch model uses the times between successive spike events to calculate the periodicity of the signal. Differences in the periodicity signatures and comparisons of the overall spike activity are used to classify mortar size and event type. The localization of the gunfire acoustic signals is further computed based on the classification result and the location of microphones and other parameters of the existing hardware platform implementation.

  6. Automatic tuning of Bragg condition in a Radio-Acoustic System for PBL temperature profile measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonino, G.; Trivero, P.

    A Radio-Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) with acoustic wavelength λa ~ 1 m was designed and successfully tested. The system proved to be capable of measuring the vertical temperature profile in the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) with an accuracy and vertical resolution comparable to that of traditional apparatus (radiothermosondes borne by tethered or disposable balloons, thermosondes borne by aircraft and so on), yet combined with the advantages typical of remote sensing techniques. Up to the summer of 1983 the system needed attendance by an operator who had to identify the acoustic sounding frequency affording the fundamental condition of Bragg resonance between acoustic and radio wavelengths. Features and performance of the new completely automatic RASS arrangement are presented. These include the possibility of obtaining average thermal vertical profiles at preset time intervals. Maximum range of measurements obtained in about 1000 1/2-h averages was: in 90% of cases ⩾ 600m; in 50% of cases ⩾ 1100m. Such results indicate the usefulness of automatic RASS as a tool for meteorological purposes and for the application of air pollution control strategies.

  7. 14 CFR 25.1385 - Position light system installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Position light system installation. 25.1385... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1385 Position light system installation. (a) General. Each part of each position light system must meet the...

  8. 14 CFR 27.1385 - Position light system installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Position light system installation. 27.1385... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Lights § 27.1385 Position light system installation. (a) General. Each part of each position light system must meet the...

  9. 14 CFR 25.1385 - Position light system installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Position light system installation. 25.1385... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1385 Position light system installation. (a) General. Each part of each position light system must meet the...

  10. 14 CFR 29.1385 - Position light system installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Position light system installation. 29.1385... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Lights § 29.1385 Position light system installation. (a) General. Each part of each position light system must meet the...

  11. A two-beam acoustic system for tissue analysis.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T D; Janney, C D

    1977-03-01

    In the 'thermo-acoustic sensing technique' (TAST), a burst of sound, called the 'thermometer' beam is passed through tissue and its transit time is measured. A focused sound field, called the heating field, then warms a small volume in the path of the therometer beam, in proportion to the absorption. Finally, the therometer beam burst is repeated and its transit time subtracted from that of the initial thermometer burst. This difference measures the velocity perturbation in the tissue produced by the heating field. The transit time difference is td = K integral of infinity-infinity IP dchi where K is the instrument constant, I the heating field intensity, and P a perturbation factor which characterizes the tissues. The integration is carried out along the path of the thermometer beam. The perturbation factor is P = (formula: see text) where C is the specific heat, rho the denisty, V the velocity of sound, (formula: see text) the temperature coefficient of velocity and alpha the heating field absorption coefficient which is apparently sensitive to tissue structure and condition. Experiments on a fixed human brain showed an ability to distinguish between various tissue types combined with a spatial resolution of better than 3 mm. Should predictions based on the data and theory prove correct, TAST may become a non-invasive alternative to biopsy. PMID:857267

  12. An investigation of thermally driven acoustical oscillations in helium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J.D.

    1990-08-01

    The phenomenon of thermal-acoustic oscillation is seen to arise spontaneously in gas columns subjected to steep temperature gradients, particularly in tubes connecting liquid helium reservoirs with the ambient environment. This if often the arrangement for installed cryogenic instrumentation and is accompanied by undesirably large heat transfer rates to the cold region. Experimental data are collected and matched to theoretical predictions of oscillatory behavior; these results are in good agreement with the analytical model and with previously collected data. The present experiment places the open ends of oscillating tubes of the various lengths and cross sections in communication with flowing helium in the subcooled, 2-phase, or superheated state while the other ends are maintained at some controlled, elevated temperature. Assorted cold end conditions are achieved through adjustments to the Fermilab Tevatron satellite test refrigerator to which the test cryostat is connected. The warm, closed ends of the tubes are maintained by isothermal baths of liquid nitrogen, ice water, and boiling water. The method is contrasted to previous arrangements whereby tubes are run from room temperature into or adjacent to a stagnant pool of liquid helium. Additionally, the effect of pulsations in the flowing helium stream is explored through operation of the refrigerator's wet and dry expanders during data collection. These data confirm the theory to which try were compared and support its use in the design of cryogenic sensing lines for avoidance of thermoacoustic oscillation.

  13. Coded acoustic wave sensors and system using time diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solie, Leland P. (Inventor); Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus and method for distinguishing between sensors that are to be wirelessly detected is provided. An interrogator device uses different, distinct time delays in the sensing signals when interrogating the sensors. The sensors are provided with different distinct pedestal delays. Sensors that have the same pedestal delay as the delay selected by the interrogator are detected by the interrogator whereas other sensors with different pedestal delays are not sensed. Multiple sensors with a given pedestal delay are provided with different codes so as to be distinguished from one another by the interrogator. The interrogator uses a signal that is transmitted to the sensor and returned by the sensor for combination and integration with the reference signal that has been processed by a function. The sensor may be a surface acoustic wave device having a differential impulse response with a power spectral density consisting of lobes. The power spectral density of the differential response is used to determine the value of the sensed parameter or parameters.

  14. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Kesai; Lu, Siliang; Zhang, Shangbin; Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-08-27

    The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS). Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE) is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy.

  15. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Kesai; Lu, Siliang; Zhang, Shangbin; Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-01-01

    The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS). Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE) is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy. PMID:26343657

  16. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Kesai; Lu, Siliang; Zhang, Shangbin; Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-01-01

    The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS). Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE) is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy. PMID:26343657

  17. Acoustic Biometric System Based on Preprocessing Techniques and Linear Support Vector Machines.

    PubMed

    del Val, Lara; Izquierdo-Fuente, Alberto; Villacorta, Juan J; Raboso, Mariano

    2015-06-17

    Drawing on the results of an acoustic biometric system based on a MSE classifier, a new biometric system has been implemented. This new system preprocesses acoustic images, extracts several parameters and finally classifies them, based on Support Vector Machine (SVM). The preprocessing techniques used are spatial filtering, segmentation-based on a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) to separate the person from the background, masking-to reduce the dimensions of images-and binarization-to reduce the size of each image. An analysis of classification error and a study of the sensitivity of the error versus the computational burden of each implemented algorithm are presented. This allows the selection of the most relevant algorithms, according to the benefits required by the system. A significant improvement of the biometric system has been achieved by reducing the classification error, the computational burden and the storage requirements.

  18. Acoustic Biometric System Based on Preprocessing Techniques and Linear Support Vector Machines

    PubMed Central

    del Val, Lara; Izquierdo-Fuente, Alberto; Villacorta, Juan J.; Raboso, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on the results of an acoustic biometric system based on a MSE classifier, a new biometric system has been implemented. This new system preprocesses acoustic images, extracts several parameters and finally classifies them, based on Support Vector Machine (SVM). The preprocessing techniques used are spatial filtering, segmentation—based on a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) to separate the person from the background, masking—to reduce the dimensions of images—and binarization—to reduce the size of each image. An analysis of classification error and a study of the sensitivity of the error versus the computational burden of each implemented algorithm are presented. This allows the selection of the most relevant algorithms, according to the benefits required by the system. A significant improvement of the biometric system has been achieved by reducing the classification error, the computational burden and the storage requirements. PMID:26091392

  19. Acoustic-Modal Testing of the Ares I Launch Abort System Attitude Control Motor Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. Benjamin; Fischbach, Sean R.

    2010-01-01

    The Attitude Control Motor (ACM) is being developed for use in the Launch Abort System (LAS) of NASA's Ares I launch vehicle. The ACM consists of a small solid rocket motor and eight actuated pintle valves that directionally allocate.thrust_- 1t.has-been- predicted-that significant unsteady. pressure.fluctuations.will.exist. inside the-valves during operation. The dominant frequencies of these oscillations correspond to the lowest several acoustic natural frequencies of the individual valves. An acoustic finite element model of the fluid volume inside the valve has been critical to the prediction of these frequencies and their associated mode shapes. This work describes an effort to experimentally validate the acoustic finite model of the valve with an acoustic modal test. The modal test involved instrumenting a flight-like valve with six microphones and then exciting the enclosed air with a loudspeaker. The loudspeaker was configured to deliver broadband noise at relatively high sound pressure levels. The aquired microphone signals were post-processed and compared to results generated from the acoustic finite element model. Initial comparisons between the test data and the model results revealed that additional model refinement was necessary. Specifically, the model was updated to implement a complex impedance boundary condition at the entrance to the valve supply tube. This boundary condition models the frequency-dependent impedance that an acoustic wave will encounter as it reaches the end of the supply tube. Upon invoking this boundary condition, significantly improved agreement between the test data and the model was realized.

  20. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor); Book, Michael L. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor); Bell, Joseph L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprising at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  1. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprises at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  2. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Richard

    1994-08-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprises at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  3. Measurement of transient acoustic fields using a single-shot pressure-sensitive paint system.

    PubMed

    Disotell, Kevin J; Gregory, James W

    2011-07-01

    A pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) system capable of measuring high-frequency acoustic fields with non-periodic, acoustic-level pressure changes is described. As an optical measurement technique, PSP provides the experimenter with a global distribution of pressure on a painted surface. To demonstrate frequency response and enhanced sensitivity to pressure changes, a PSP system consisting of a polymer∕ceramic matrix binder with platinum tetra(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin (PtTFPP) as the oxygen probe was applied to a wall inside an acoustic resonance cavity excited at 1.3 kHz. A data acquisition technique based on the luminescent decay lifetime of the oxygen sensors excited by a single pulse of light afforded the ability to capture instantaneous pressure fields with no phase-averaging. Superimposed wave-like structures were observed with a wavelength corresponding to a 4.7% difference from the theoretical value for a sound wave emanating from the speaker. High sound pressure cases upwards of 145 dB (re 20 μPa) exhibited skewed nodal lines attributed to a nonlinear acoustic field. The lowest sound pressure level of 125.4 dB--corresponding to an amplitude of 52.7 Pa, or approximately 0.05% of standard sea-level atmospheric pressure--showed that the paint could resolve the spatial details of the mode shape at the given resonance condition.

  4. Measurement of transient acoustic fields using a single-shot pressure-sensitive paint system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disotell, Kevin J.; Gregory, James W.

    2011-07-01

    A pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) system capable of measuring high-frequency acoustic fields with non-periodic, acoustic-level pressure changes is described. As an optical measurement technique, PSP provides the experimenter with a global distribution of pressure on a painted surface. To demonstrate frequency response and enhanced sensitivity to pressure changes, a PSP system consisting of a polymer/ceramic matrix binder with platinum tetra(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin (PtTFPP) as the oxygen probe was applied to a wall inside an acoustic resonance cavity excited at 1.3 kHz. A data acquisition technique based on the luminescent decay lifetime of the oxygen sensors excited by a single pulse of light afforded the ability to capture instantaneous pressure fields with no phase-averaging. Superimposed wave-like structures were observed with a wavelength corresponding to a 4.7% difference from the theoretical value for a sound wave emanating from the speaker. High sound pressure cases upwards of 145 dB (re 20 μPa) exhibited skewed nodal lines attributed to a nonlinear acoustic field. The lowest sound pressure level of 125.4 dB—corresponding to an amplitude of 52.7 Pa, or approximately 0.05% of standard sea-level atmospheric pressure—showed that the paint could resolve the spatial details of the mode shape at the given resonance condition.

  5. Measurement of transient acoustic fields using a single-shot pressure-sensitive paint system.

    PubMed

    Disotell, Kevin J; Gregory, James W

    2011-07-01

    A pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) system capable of measuring high-frequency acoustic fields with non-periodic, acoustic-level pressure changes is described. As an optical measurement technique, PSP provides the experimenter with a global distribution of pressure on a painted surface. To demonstrate frequency response and enhanced sensitivity to pressure changes, a PSP system consisting of a polymer∕ceramic matrix binder with platinum tetra(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin (PtTFPP) as the oxygen probe was applied to a wall inside an acoustic resonance cavity excited at 1.3 kHz. A data acquisition technique based on the luminescent decay lifetime of the oxygen sensors excited by a single pulse of light afforded the ability to capture instantaneous pressure fields with no phase-averaging. Superimposed wave-like structures were observed with a wavelength corresponding to a 4.7% difference from the theoretical value for a sound wave emanating from the speaker. High sound pressure cases upwards of 145 dB (re 20 μPa) exhibited skewed nodal lines attributed to a nonlinear acoustic field. The lowest sound pressure level of 125.4 dB--corresponding to an amplitude of 52.7 Pa, or approximately 0.05% of standard sea-level atmospheric pressure--showed that the paint could resolve the spatial details of the mode shape at the given resonance condition. PMID:21806232

  6. Positive appraisal style: The mental immune system?

    PubMed

    Luyten, Laura; Boddez, Yannick; Hermans, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Instead of converging to one, all-embracing resilience mechanism - that is, positive appraisal style - we encourage complementary research strategies, exploring both vulnerabilities and resilience factors, much like the biomedical sciences combine insights from pathophysiology and immunology. Furthermore, we argue that research with a strong focus on one central resilience mechanism may overlook or undervalue other processes that can aid in maintaining mental health. PMID:26787100

  7. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Data Processing System manual [ADCP

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cote, Jessica M.; Hotchkiss, Frances S.; Martini, Marinna; Denham, Charles R.; revisions by Ramsey, Andree L.; Ruane, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    This open-file report describes the data processing software currently in use by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center (WHCMSC), to process time series of acoustic Doppler current data obtained by Teledyne RD Instruments Workhorse model ADCPs. The Sediment Transport Instrumentation Group (STG) at the WHCMSC has a long-standing commitment to providing scientists high quality oceanographic data published in a timely manner. To meet this commitment, STG has created this software to aid personnel in processing and reviewing data as well as evaluating hardware for signs of instrument malfunction. The output data format for the data is network Common Data Form (netCDF), which meets USGS publication standards. Typically, ADCP data are recorded in beam coordinates. This conforms to the USGS philosophy to post-process rather than internally process data. By preserving the original data quality indicators as well as the initial data set, data can be evaluated and reprocessed for different types of analyses. Beam coordinate data are desirable for internal and surface wave experiments, for example. All the code in this software package is intended to run using the MATLAB program available from The Mathworks, Inc. As such, it is platform independent and can be adapted by the USGS and others for specialized experiments with non-standard requirements. The software is continuously being updated and revised as improvements are required. The most recent revision may be downloaded from: http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/operations/stg/Pubs/ADCPtools/adcp_index.htm The USGS makes this software available at the user?s discretion and responsibility.

  8. Developing a system for blind acoustic source localization and separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Raghavendra

    This dissertation presents innovate methodologies for locating, extracting, and separating multiple incoherent sound sources in three-dimensional (3D) space; and applications of the time reversal (TR) algorithm to pinpoint the hyper active neural activities inside the brain auditory structure that are correlated to the tinnitus pathology. Specifically, an acoustic modeling based method is developed for locating arbitrary and incoherent sound sources in 3D space in real time by using a minimal number of microphones, and the Point Source Separation (PSS) method is developed for extracting target signals from directly measured mixed signals. Combining these two approaches leads to a novel technology known as Blind Sources Localization and Separation (BSLS) that enables one to locate multiple incoherent sound signals in 3D space and separate original individual sources simultaneously, based on the directly measured mixed signals. These technologies have been validated through numerical simulations and experiments conducted in various non-ideal environments where there are non-negligible, unspecified sound reflections and reverberation as well as interferences from random background noise. Another innovation presented in this dissertation is concerned with applications of the TR algorithm to pinpoint the exact locations of hyper-active neurons in the brain auditory structure that are directly correlated to the tinnitus perception. Benchmark tests conducted on normal rats have confirmed the localization results provided by the TR algorithm. Results demonstrate that the spatial resolution of this source localization can be as high as the micrometer level. This high precision localization may lead to a paradigm shift in tinnitus diagnosis, which may in turn produce a more cost-effective treatment for tinnitus than any of the existing ones.

  9. LGBTQ relationally based positive psychology: An inclusive and systemic framework.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Daniela G; Bobele, Monte; Coppock, Jacqueline; Peña, Ezequiel

    2015-05-01

    Positive psychologists have contributed to our understandings of how positive emotions and flexible cognition enhance resiliency. However, positive psychologists' research has been slow to address the relational resources and interactions that help nonheterosexual families overcome adversity. Addressing overlooked lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ) and systemic factors in positive psychology, this article draws on family resilience literature and LGBTQ literature to theorize a systemic positive psychology framework for working with nonheterosexual families. We developed the LGBTQ relationally based positive psychology framework that integrates positive psychology's strengths-based perspective with the systemic orientation of Walsh's (1996) family resilience framework along with the cultural considerations proposed by LGBTQ family literature. We theorize that the LGBTQ relationally based positive psychology framework takes into consideration the sociopolitical adversities impacting nonheterosexual families and sensitizes positive psychologists, including those working in organized care settings, to the systemic interactions of same-sex loving relationships.

  10. Estimating suspended sediment using acoustics in a fine-grained riverine system, Kickapoo Creek at Bloomington, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manaster, Amanda D.; Domanski, Marian M.; Straub, Timothy D.; Boldt, Justin A.

    2016-08-18

    Acoustic technologies have the potential to be used as a surrogate for measuring suspended-sediment concentration (SSC). This potential was examined in a fine-grained (97-100 percent fines) riverine system in central Illinois by way of installation of an acoustic instrument. Acoustic data were collected continuously over the span of 5.5 years. Acoustic parameters were regressed against SSC data to determine the accuracy of using acoustic technology as a surrogate for measuring SSC in a fine-grained riverine system. The resulting regressions for SSC and sediment acoustic parameters had coefficients of determination ranging from 0.75 to 0.97 for various events and configurations. The overall Nash-Sutcliffe model-fit efficiency was 0.95 for the 132 observed and predicted SSC values determined using the sediment acoustic parameter regressions. The study of using acoustic technologies as a surrogate for measuring SSC in fine-grained riverine systems is ongoing. The results at this site are promising in the realm of surrogate technology.

  11. Correcting acoustic Doppler current profiler discharge measurement bias from moving-bed conditions without global positioning during the 2004 Glen Canyon Dam controlled flood on the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Ganju, N.K.

    2007-01-01

    Discharge measurements were made by acoustic Doppler current profiler at two locations on the Colorado River during the 2004 controlled flood from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona. Measurement hardware and software have constantly improved from the 1980s such that discharge measurements by acoustic profiling instruments are now routinely made over a wide range of hydrologic conditions. However, measurements made with instruments deployed from moving boats require reliable boat velocity data for accurate measurements of discharge. This is normally accomplished by using special acoustic bottom track pings that sense instrument motion over bottom. While this method is suitable for most conditions, high current flows that produce downstream bed sediment movement create a condition known as moving bed that will bias velocities and discharge to lower than actual values. When this situation exists, one solution is to determine boat velocity with satellite positioning information. Another solution is to use a lower frequency instrument. Discharge measurements made during the 2004 Glen Canyon controlled flood were subject to moving-bed conditions and frequent loss of bottom track. Due to site conditions and equipment availability, the measurements were conducted without benefit of external positioning information or lower frequency instruments. This paper documents and evaluates several techniques used to correct the resulting underestimated discharge measurements. One technique produces discharge values in good agreement with estimates from numerical model and measured hydrographs during the flood. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  12. Acoustic-Phonetic Differences between Infant- and Adult-Directed Speech: The Role of Stress and Utterance Position

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Seidl, Amanda; Cristia, Alejandrina

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that infant-directed speech (IDS) differs from adult-directed speech (ADS) on a variety of dimensions. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether acoustic differences between IDS and ADS in English are modulated by prosodic structure. We compared vowels across the two registers (IDS, ADS) in both stressed…

  13. 14 CFR 25.1385 - Position light system installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....1397. (b) Forward position lights. Forward position lights must consist of a red and a green light... airplane in the normal flying position, the red light is on the left side and the green light is on the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Position light system installation....

  14. 14 CFR 29.1385 - Position light system installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....1397. (b) Forward position lights. Forward position lights must consist of a red and a green light... rotorcraft in the normal flying position, the red light is on the left side, and the green light is on the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Position light system installation....

  15. 14 CFR 25.1385 - Position light system installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....1397. (b) Forward position lights. Forward position lights must consist of a red and a green light... airplane in the normal flying position, the red light is on the left side and the green light is on the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Position light system installation....

  16. 14 CFR 27.1385 - Position light system installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....1397. (b) Forward position lights. Forward position lights must consist of a red and a green light... rotorcraft in the normal flying position, the red light is on the left side and the green light is on the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Position light system installation....

  17. 14 CFR 27.1385 - Position light system installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....1397. (b) Forward position lights. Forward position lights must consist of a red and a green light... rotorcraft in the normal flying position, the red light is on the left side and the green light is on the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Position light system installation....

  18. 14 CFR 29.1385 - Position light system installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....1397. (b) Forward position lights. Forward position lights must consist of a red and a green light... rotorcraft in the normal flying position, the red light is on the left side, and the green light is on the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Position light system installation....

  19. Ionospheric Signature of Surface Mine Blasts from Global Positioning System Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calais, Eric; Minster, J. Bernard; Hofton, Michelle A.; Hedlin, Michael A. H.

    1998-01-01

    Sources such as atmospheric or buried explosions and shallow earthquakes are known to produce infrasonic pressure waves in the atmosphere. Because of the coupling between neutral particles and electrons at ionospheric altitudes, these acoustic and gravity waves induce variations of the ionospheric electron density. The Global Positioning System (GPS) provides a way of directly measuring the total electron content in the ionosphere and, therefore, of detecting such perturbations in the upper atmosphere. In July and August 1996, three large surface mine blasts (1.5 Kt each) were detonated at the Black Thunder coal mine in eastern Wyoming. As part of a seismic and acoustic monitoring- experiment, we deployed five dual-frequency GPS receivers at distances ranging from 50 to 200 km from the mine and were able to detect the ionospheric perturbation caused by the blasts. The perturbation starts 10 to 15 min after the blast, lasts for about 30 min, and propagates with an apparent horizontal velocity of 1200 meters per second. Its amplitude reaches 3 x 10 (exp 14) el per square meters in the 7-3 min period band, a value close to the ionospheric perturbation caused by the M = 6.7 Northridge earthquake. The small signal-to-noise ratio of the perturbation can be improved by slant-stacking the electron content time-series recorded by the different GPS receivers taking into account the horizontal propagation of the perturbation. The energy of the perturbation is concentrated in the 200 to 300 second period band, a result consistent with previous observations and numerical model predictions. The 300 second band probably corresponds to gravity modes and shorter periods to acoustic modes, respectively. Using a 1-D stratified velocity model of the atmosphere we show that linear acoustic ray tracing fits arrival times at all GPS receivers. We interpret the perturbation as a direct acoustic wave caused by the explosion itself. This study shows that even relatively small subsurface

  20. RESEARCH PAPERS : Ionospheric signature of surface mine blasts from Global Positioning System measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calais, Eric; Bernard Minster, J.; Hofton, Michelle; Hedlin, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Sources such as atmospheric or buried explosions and shallow earthquakes are known to produce infrasonic pressure waves in the atmosphere Because of the coupling between neutral particles and electrons at ionospheric altitudes, these acoustic and gravity waves induce variations of the ionospheric electron density. The Global Positioning System (GPS) provides a way of directly measuring the total electron content in the ionosphere and, therefore, of detecting such perturbations in the upper atmosphere. In July and August 1996, three large surface mine blasts (1.5 Kt each) were detonated at the Black Thunder coal mine in eastern Wyoming. As part of a seismic and acoustic monitoring experiment, we deployed five dual-frequency GPS receivers at distances ranging from 50 to 200 km from the mine and were able to detect the ionospheric perturbation caused by the blasts. The perturbation starts 10 to 15 min after the blast, lasts for about 30 min, and propagates with an apparent horizontal velocity of 1200 m s- 1. Its amplitude reaches 3 × 1014 el m- 2 in the 7-3 min period band, a value close to the ionospheric perturbation caused by the M=6.7 Northridge earthquake (Calais & Minster 1995). The small signal-to-noise ratio of the perturbation can be improved by slant-stacking the electron content time-series recorded by the different GPS receivers taking into account the horizontal propagation of the perturbation. The energy of the perturbation is concentrated in the 200 to 300 s period band, a result consistent with previous observations and numerical model predictions. The 300 s band probably corresponds to gravity modes and shorter periods to acoustic modes, respectively. Using a 1-D stratified velocity model of the atmosphere we show that linear acoustic ray tracing fits arrival times at all GPS receivers. We interpret the perturbation as a direct acoustic wave caused by the explosion itself. This study shows that even relatively small subsurface events can produce

  1. The LANDSAT/global positioning system project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Terri

    1988-01-01

    A GPSPAC/LANDSAT-D Interface (GLI) Ground Support System was built to validate the performance and to calibrate the accuracy of the experimental navigation package, GPSPAC, flown on the LANDSAT-4 and 5 spacecraft. Although the GLI system operated successfully to give the orbit information needed to validate the GPSPAC, it also detected two anomalies: one is characteristic of the GLI system and the other is characteristic of the pre-operational phase of GPS. Several methods were applied to resolve or reduce the anomalies. This paper presents a description of the problems, the methods applied to resolve or reduce them, and the results.

  2. Tracking Three-Dimensional Fish Behavior with a New Marine Acoustic Telemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosnan, Ian G.; McGarry, Louise P.; Greene, Charles H.; Steig, Tracey W.; Johnston, Samuel V.; Ehrenberg, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The persistent monitoring capability provided by acoustic telemetry systems allows us to study behavior, movement, and resource selection of mobile marine animals. Current marine acoustic telemetry systems are challenged by localization errors and limits in the number of animals that can be tracked simultaneously. We designed a new system to provide detection ranges of up to 1 km, to reduce localization errors to less than 1 m, and to increase to 500 the number of unique tags simultaneously tracked. The design builds on HTIs experience of more than a decade developing acoustic telemetry systems for freshwater environments. A field trial of the prototype system was conducted at the University of Washingtons Friday Harbor Marine Laboratory (Friday Harbor, WA). Copper rockfish (Sebastes caurinus) were selected for field trials of this new system because their high site-fidelity and small home ranges provide ample opportunity to track individual fish behavior while testing our ability to characterize the movements of a species of interest to management authorities.

  3. Two-dimensional approach to relativistic positioning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Coll, Bartolome; Ferrando, Joan Josep; Morales, Juan Antonio

    2006-04-15

    A relativistic positioning system is a physical realization of a coordinate system consisting in four clocks in arbitrary motion broadcasting their proper times. The basic elements of the relativistic positioning systems are presented in the two-dimensional case. This simplified approach allows to explain and to analyze the properties and interest of these new systems. The positioning system defined by geodesic emitters in flat metric is developed in detail. The information that the data generated by a relativistic positioning system give on the space-time metric interval is analyzed, and the interest of these results in gravimetry is pointed out.

  4. System for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T.; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Christopher

    2012-07-31

    In some aspects of the invention, a device, positioned within a well bore, configured to generate and direct an acoustic beam into a rock formation around a borehole is disclosed. The device comprises a source configured to generate a first signal at a first frequency and a second signal at a second frequency; a transducer configured to receive the generated first and the second signals and produce acoustic waves at the first frequency and the second frequency; and a non-linear material, coupled to the transducer, configured to generate a collimated beam with a frequency equal to the difference between the first frequency and the second frequency by a non-linear mixing process, wherein the non-linear material includes one or more of a mixture of liquids, a solid, a granular material, embedded microspheres, or an emulsion.

  5. System for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T.; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Christopher

    2012-09-04

    In some aspects of the invention, a device, positioned within a well bore, configured to generate and direct an acoustic beam into a rock formation around a borehole is disclosed. The device comprises a source configured to generate a first signal at a first frequency and a second signal at a second frequency; a transducer configured to receive the generated first and the second signals and produce acoustic waves at the first frequency and the second frequency; and a non-linear material, coupled to the transducer, configured to generate a collimated beam with a frequency equal to the difference between the first frequency and the second frequency by a non-linear mixing process, wherein the non-linear material includes one or more of a mixture of liquids, a solid, a granular material, embedded microspheres, or an emulsion.

  6. Accuracy of acoustic velocity metering systems for measurement of low velocity in open channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Curtis, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) accuracy depends on equipment limitations, the accuracy of acoustic-path length and angle determination, and the stability of the mean velocity to acoustic-path velocity relation. Equipment limitations depend on path length and angle, transducer frequency, timing oscillator frequency, and signal-detection scheme. Typically, the velocity error from this source is about +or-1 to +or-10 mms/sec. Error in acoustic-path angle or length will result in a proportional measurement bias. Typically, an angle error of one degree will result in a velocity error of 2%, and a path-length error of one meter in 100 meter will result in an error of 1%. Ray bending (signal refraction) depends on path length and density gradients present in the stream. Any deviation from a straight acoustic path between transducer will change the unique relation between path velocity and mean velocity. These deviations will then introduce error in the mean velocity computation. Typically, for a 200-meter path length, the resultant error is less than one percent, but for a 1,000 meter path length, the error can be greater than 10%. Recent laboratory and field tests have substantiated assumptions of equipment limitations. Tow-tank tests of an AVM system with a 4.69-meter path length yielded an average standard deviation error of 9.3 mms/sec, and the field tests of an AVM system with a 20.5-meter path length yielded an average standard deviation error of a 4 mms/sec. (USGS)

  7. Parametric study of an acoustic levitation system. [for thermophysical properties determination of nonmetal materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oran, W. A.; Berge, L. H.; Parker, H. W.

    1980-01-01

    The performance of an acoustic levitation system designed for the containerless processing of materials and consisting of a St. Clair generator and a reflector arranged in a six-axis configuration, is examined in order to define critical parameters of high-temperature systems and limitations of earth-based devices. The fields and forces along the axis of the system are measured and the forces are plotted versus body volume. It is found that for a range of shapes and sizes the levitation force is roughly proportional to body volume until the characteristic 'diameter' reaches a value of about lambda/2. A significant (i.e., factor of four) enhancement in the levitation force is obtained by curving the faces of the driver and reflector. In addition, the behavior of liquid materials in the acoustic fields is studied, and the radius at which the deformation of a levitated drop occurs is calculated.

  8. The development of a biomimetic acoustic direction finding system for use on multiple platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligeorges, Socrates; Anderson, David; Browning, Cassandra A.; Cohen, Howard; Freedman, David; Gore, Tyler; Karl, Christian; Kelsall, Sarah; Mountain, David; Nourzad, Marianne; Pu, Yirong; Sandifer, Matt; Xue, Shuwan; Ziph-Schatzberg, Leah; Hubbard, Allyn

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes the flow of scientific and technological achievements beginning with a stationary "small, smart, biomimetic acoustic processor" designed for DARPA that led to a program aimed at acoustic characterization and direction finding for multiple, mobile platforms. ARL support and collaboration has allowed us to adapt the core technology to multiple platforms including a Packbot robotic platform, a soldier worn platform, as well as a vehicle platform. Each of these has varying size and power requirements, but miniaturization is an important component of the program for creating practical systems which we address further in companion papers. We have configured the system to detect and localize gunfire and tested system performance with live fire from numerous weapons such as the AK47, the Dragunov, and the AR15. The ARL-sponsored work has led to connections with Natick Labs and the Future Force Warrior program, and in addition, the work has many and obvious applications to homeland defense, police, and civilian needs.

  9. DARPA counter-sniper program: Phase 1 Acoustic Systems Demonstration results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carapezza, Edward M.; Law, David B.; Csanadi, Christina J.

    1997-02-01

    During October 1995 through May 1996, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency sponsored the development of prototype systems that exploit acoustic muzzle blast and ballistic shock wave signatures to accurately predict the location of gunfire events and associated shooter locations using either single or multiple volumetric arrays. The output of these acoustic systems is an estimate of the shooter location and a classification estimate of the caliber of the shooter's weapon. A portable display and control unit provides both graphical and alphanumeric shooter location related information integrated on a two- dimensional digital map of the defended area. The final Phase I Acoustic Systems Demonstration field tests were completed in May. These these tests were held at USMC Base Camp Pendleton Military Operations Urban Training (MOUT) facility. These tests were structured to provide challenging gunfire related scenarios with significant reverberation and multi-path conditions. Special shot geometries and false alarms were included in these tests to probe potential system vulnerabilities and to determine the performance and robustness of the systems. Five prototypes developed by U.S. companies and one Israeli developed prototype were tested. This analysis quantifies the spatial resolution estimation capability (azimuth, elevation and range) of these prototypes and describes their ability to accurately classify the type of bullet fired in a challenging urban- like setting.

  10. An acoustic telemetry system for a sahllow-eater under-ice Arctic environment

    SciTech Connect

    DePinto, V.; Kosalos, J.G.; Lanter, S.

    1983-05-01

    A new underwater acoustic telemetry system has been developed for long-range medium-rate, full duplex digital data transmission in a shallow water, under-ice Arctic environment. Prior to design of the system, acoustic properties of three ice-covered transmission channels were evaluated in experiments in the Canadian Arctic, near Resolute Bay. The three channels, each ranging to 4500 m in length, were characterized by their water depth profiles: In the first, one end of the channel was 100 m deep, while the other end was 10 m deep; in the second, one end was 100 m deep, while the other end was 200 m deep; in the third, the water depth was constant at 100 m. Results of the Arctic experiment are presented here, along with a discussion of the design concepts used to optimize the telemetry system for low error rates in a severe multipath environment. Acoustic telemetry can be used to advantage whenever digital data must be transmitted under water. The present system was developed under contract with the Canadian Government, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, for a remotely piloted vehicle being developed by the Bedford Institute of Oceanography for evaluation and use by the Canadian Hydrographic Service. The telemetry system will be used to transmit control signals and data, both to and from the vehicle.

  11. A New Indoor Positioning System Architecture Using GPS Signals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Chen, Wu; Xu, Ying; Ji, Shengyue

    2015-04-29

    The pseudolite system is a good alternative for indoor positioning systems due to its large coverage area and accurate positioning solution. However, for common Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, the pseudolite system requires some modifications of the user terminals. To solve the problem, this paper proposes a new pseudolite-based indoor positioning system architecture. The main idea is to receive real-world GPS signals, repeat each satellite signal and transmit those using indoor transmitting antennas. The transmitted GPS-like signal can be processed (signal acquisition and tracking, navigation data decoding) by the general receiver and thus no hardware-level modification on the receiver is required. In addition, all Tx can be synchronized with each other since one single clock is used in Rx/Tx. The proposed system is simulated using a software GPS receiver. The simulation results show the indoor positioning system is able to provide high accurate horizontal positioning in both static and dynamic situations.

  12. A New Indoor Positioning System Architecture Using GPS Signals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Chen, Wu; Xu, Ying; Ji, Shengyue

    2015-01-01

    The pseudolite system is a good alternative for indoor positioning systems due to its large coverage area and accurate positioning solution. However, for common Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, the pseudolite system requires some modifications of the user terminals. To solve the problem, this paper proposes a new pseudolite-based indoor positioning system architecture. The main idea is to receive real-world GPS signals, repeat each satellite signal and transmit those using indoor transmitting antennas. The transmitted GPS-like signal can be processed (signal acquisition and tracking, navigation data decoding) by the general receiver and thus no hardware-level modification on the receiver is required. In addition, all Tx can be synchronized with each other since one single clock is used in Rx/Tx. The proposed system is simulated using a software GPS receiver. The simulation results show the indoor positioning system is able to provide high accurate horizontal positioning in both static and dynamic situations. PMID:25938199

  13. 76 FR 52918 - Positive Train Control Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... control systems. See 70 FR 11,052 (Mar. 7, 2005) (codified at 49 CFR part 236, subpart H). As a..., 2015. 75 FR 2598 (Jan. 15, 2010). Under RSIA, such PTC implementation must be completed by each Class I... be so equipped and the basis for those decisions. See 49 CFR 236.1011. This list of track...

  14. 75 FR 2597 - Positive Train Control Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... control systems without impairing technological development. 70 FR 11,052 (Mar. 7, 2005). FRA intended... ACSES. See 63 FR 39,343 (July 22, 1998). ACSES was installed between 2000 and 2002, and has functioned....49(oo); 74 FR 26,981 (June 5, 2009); see also 49 U.S.C. 103(g). In the RSIA08, Congress...

  15. Investigation of an acoustical holography system for real-time imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fecht, Barbara A.; Andre, Michael P.; Garlick, George F.; Shelby, Ronald L.; Shelby, Jerod O.; Lehman, Constance D.

    1998-07-01

    A new prototype imaging system based on ultrasound transmission through the object of interest -- acoustical holography -- was developed which incorporates significant improvements in acoustical and optical design. This system is being evaluated for potential clinical application in the musculoskeletal system, interventional radiology, pediatrics, monitoring of tumor ablation, vascular imaging and breast imaging. System limiting resolution was estimated using a line-pair target with decreasing line thickness and equal separation. For a swept frequency beam from 2.6 - 3.0 MHz, the minimum resolution was 0.5 lp/mm. Apatite crystals were suspended in castor oil to approximate breast microcalcifications. Crystals from 0.425 - 1.18 mm in diameter were well resolved in the acoustic zoom mode. Needle visibility was examined with both a 14-gauge biopsy needle and a 0.6 mm needle. The needle tip was clearly visible throughout the dynamic imaging sequence as it was slowly inserted into a RMI tissue-equivalent breast biopsy phantom. A selection of human images was acquired in several volunteers: a 25 year-old female volunteer with normal breast tissue, a lateral view of the elbow joint showing muscle fascia and tendon insertions, and the superficial vessels in the forearm. Real-time video images of these studies will be presented. In all of these studies, conventional sonography was used for comparison. These preliminary investigations with the new prototype acoustical holography system showed favorable results in comparison to state-of-the-art pulse-echo ultrasound and demonstrate it to be suitable for further clinical study. The new patient interfaces will facilitate orthopedic soft tissue evaluation, study of superficial vascular structures and potentially breast imaging.

  16. Multipoint dynamically reconfigure adaptive distributed fiber optic acoustic emission sensor (FAESense) system for condition based maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Prohaska, John; Kempen, Connie; Esterkin, Yan; Sun, Sunjian; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes preliminary results obtained under a Navy SBIR contract by Redondo Optics Inc. (ROI), in collaboration with Northwestern University towards the development and demonstration of a next generation, stand-alone and fully integrated, dynamically reconfigurable, adaptive fiber optic acoustic emission sensor (FAESense™) system for the in-situ unattended detection and localization of shock events, impact damage, cracks, voids, and delaminations in new and aging critical infrastructures found in ships, submarines, aircraft, and in next generation weapon systems. ROI's FAESense™ system is based on the integration of proven state-of-the-art technologies: 1) distributed array of in-line fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) sensors sensitive to strain, vibration, and acoustic emissions, 2) adaptive spectral demodulation of FBG sensor dynamic signals using two-wave mixing interferometry on photorefractive semiconductors, and 3) integration of all the sensor system passive and active optoelectronic components within a 0.5-cm x 1-cm photonic integrated circuit microchip. The adaptive TWM demodulation methodology allows the measurement of dynamic high frequnency acoustic emission events, while compensating for passive quasi-static strain and temperature drifts. It features a compact, low power, environmentally robust 1-inch x 1-inch x 4-inch small form factor (SFF) package with no moving parts. The FAESense™ interrogation system is microprocessor-controlled using high data rate signal processing electronics for the FBG sensors calibration, temperature compensation and the detection and analysis of acoustic emission signals. Its miniaturized package, low power operation, state-of-the-art data communications, and low cost makes it a very attractive solution for a large number of applications in naval and maritime industries, aerospace, civil structures, the oil and chemical industry, and for homeland security applications.

  17. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F; Burnett, Greg C; Ng, Lawrence C

    2013-05-21

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  18. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2007-10-16

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  19. System and method for characterizing synthesizing and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2003-01-01

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  20. Active vibration and noise control of vibro-acoustic system by using PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Wang, Xiaojun; Huang, Ren; Qiu, Zhiping

    2015-07-01

    Active control simulation of the acoustic and vibration response of a vibro-acoustic cavity of an airplane based on a PID controller is presented. A full numerical vibro-acoustic model is developed by using an Eulerian model, which is a coupled model based on the finite element formulation. The reduced order model, which is used to design the closed-loop control system, is obtained by the combination of modal expansion and variable substitution. Some physical experiments are made to validate and update the full-order and the reduced-order numerical models. Optimization of the actuator placement is employed in order to get an effective closed-loop control system. For the controller design, an iterative method is used to determine the optimal parameters of the PID controller. The process is illustrated by the design of an active noise and vibration control system for a cavity structure. The numerical and experimental results show that a PID-based active control system can effectively suppress the noise inside the cavity using a sound pressure signal as the controller input. It is also possible to control the noise by suppressing the vibration of the structure using the structural displacement signal as the controller input. For an airplane cavity structure, considering the issue of space-saving, the latter is more suitable.

  1. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation with acoustic sources generating coded signals

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S

    2014-12-30

    A system and a method for investigating rock formations includes generating, by a first acoustic source, a first acoustic signal comprising a first plurality of pulses, each pulse including a first modulated signal at a central frequency; and generating, by a second acoustic source, a second acoustic signal comprising a second plurality of pulses. A receiver arranged within the borehole receives a detected signal including a signal being generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first-and-second acoustic signal in a non-linear mixing zone within the intersection volume. The method also includes-processing the received signal to extract the signal generated by the non-linear mixing process over noise or over signals generated by a linear interaction process, or both.

  2. Finite Difference Time Domain Analysis of Underwater Acoustic Lens System for Ambient Noise Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Miyazaki, Ayano; Ogasawara, Hanako; Yokoyama, Tomoki; Nakamura, Toshiaki

    2006-05-01

    Much attention has been paid to the new idea of detecting objects using ocean ambient noise. This concept is called ambient noise imaging (ANI). In this study, sound fields focused by an acoustic lens system constructed with a single biconcave lens were analyzed using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method for realizing an ANI system. The size of the lens aperture that would have sufficient resolution—for example, the beam width is 1° at 60 kHz—was roughly determined by comparing the image points and -3 dB areas of sound pressure fields generated by lenses with various apertures. Then, in another FDTD analysis, we successfully used a lens with a determined aperture to detect rigid target objects in an acoustic noise field generated by a large number of point sources.

  3. Experimental study of an acoustic communication system in shallow-water conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrovskii, I. V.; Yagotinets, V. P.

    2013-11-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental studies of an acoustic communication system containing parallel transmission digital information channels, which came about from applying the principles of orthogonal frequency division of individual information channels, resulting in an increased information rate. Received signals were processed by two separate receivers differing in the method by which the pulse response parameters of the medium were estimated during signal propagation. It is shown that to increase the reliability of received digital information for coherent separated reception of a multipath signal, it is necessary to estimate the parameters of this signal's components in frequency bands corresponding to individual information channels. When such estimates were taken into account, the acoustic communication system provided error-less reception of digital information in all experiments conducted under conditions of the shallow Volgograd Reservoir and Lake Ladoga.

  4. Method for predicting pump-induced acoustic pressures in fluid-handling systems. [ACSTIC code

    SciTech Connect

    Schwirian, R.E.; Shockling, L.A.; Singleton, N.R.; Riddell, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described for predicting the amplitudes of pump-induced acoustic pressures in fluid-handling systems using a node-flow path discretization methodology and a harmonic analysis algorithm. A computer model of a Westinghouse test loop using the volumetric forcing function model of the pump is presented. Comparisons of measured pressure amplitude profiles in the loop with model prediction are shown to be in good agreement for both the first and second pump blade-passing frequencies. 10 refs.

  5. Tightly Coupled Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System (TCMIG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Jackson, Kurt (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Many NASA applications planned for execution later this decade are seeking high performance, miniaturized, low power Inertial Management Units (IMU). Much research has gone into Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) over the past decade as a solution to these needs. While MEMS devices have proven to provide high accuracy acceleration measurements, they have not yet proven to have the accuracy required by many NASA missions in rotational measurements. Therefore, a new solution has been formulated integrating the best of all IMU technologies to address these mid-term needs in the form of a Tightly Coupled Micro Inertial Navigation System (INS)/Global Positioning System (GPS) (TCMIG). The TCMIG consists of an INS and a GPS tightly coupled by a Kalman filter executing on an embedded Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) processor. The INS consists of a highly integrated Interferometric Fiber Optic Gyroscope (IFOG) and a MEMS accelerometer. The IFOG utilizes a tightly wound fiber coil to reduce volume and the high level of integration and advanced optical components to reduce power. The MEMS accelerometer utilizes a newly developed deep etch process to increase the proof mass and yield a highly accurate accelerometer. The GPS receiver consists of a low power miniaturized version of the Blackjack receiver. Such an IMU configuration is ideal to meet the mid-term needs of the NASA Science Enterprises and the new launch vehicles being developed for the Space Launch Initiative (SLI).

  6. Acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer array technology.

    PubMed

    Shin, Minchul; Krause, Joshua S; DeBitetto, Paul; White, Robert D

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, modeling, and characterization of a small (1 cm(2) transducer chip) acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using microelectromechanical systems capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (cMUT) array technology. The cMUT sensor has a 185 kHz resonant frequency to achieve a 13° beam width for a 1 cm aperture. A model for the cMUT and the acoustic system which includes electrical, mechanical, and acoustic components is provided. Furthermore, this paper shows characterization of the cMUT sensor with a variety of testing procedures including Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV), beampattern measurement, reflection testing, and velocity testing. LDV measurements demonstrate that the membrane displacement at the center point is 0.4 nm/V(2) at 185 kHz. The maximum range of the sensor is 60 cm (30 cm out and 30 cm back). A velocity sled was constructed and used to demonstrate measureable Doppler shifts at velocities from 0.2 to 1.0 m/s. The Doppler shifts agree well with the expected frequency shifts over this range.

  7. Acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer array technology.

    PubMed

    Shin, Minchul; Krause, Joshua S; DeBitetto, Paul; White, Robert D

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, modeling, and characterization of a small (1 cm(2) transducer chip) acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using microelectromechanical systems capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (cMUT) array technology. The cMUT sensor has a 185 kHz resonant frequency to achieve a 13° beam width for a 1 cm aperture. A model for the cMUT and the acoustic system which includes electrical, mechanical, and acoustic components is provided. Furthermore, this paper shows characterization of the cMUT sensor with a variety of testing procedures including Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV), beampattern measurement, reflection testing, and velocity testing. LDV measurements demonstrate that the membrane displacement at the center point is 0.4 nm/V(2) at 185 kHz. The maximum range of the sensor is 60 cm (30 cm out and 30 cm back). A velocity sled was constructed and used to demonstrate measureable Doppler shifts at velocities from 0.2 to 1.0 m/s. The Doppler shifts agree well with the expected frequency shifts over this range. PMID:23927100

  8. Method and system to synchronize acoustic therapy with ultrasound imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Neil (Inventor); Bailey, Michael R. (Inventor); Hossack, James (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Interference in ultrasound imaging when used in connection with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is avoided by employing a synchronization signal to control the HIFU signal. Unless the timing of the HIFU transducer is controlled, its output will substantially overwhelm the signal produced by ultrasound imaging system and obscure the image it produces. The synchronization signal employed to control the HIFU transducer is obtained without requiring modification of the ultrasound imaging system. Signals corresponding to scattered ultrasound imaging waves are collected using either the HIFU transducer or a dedicated receiver. A synchronization processor manipulates the scattered ultrasound imaging signals to achieve the synchronization signal, which is then used to control the HIFU bursts so as to substantially reduce or eliminate HIFU interference in the ultrasound image. The synchronization processor can alternatively be implemented using a computing device or an application-specific circuit.

  9. Surface acoustic wave regulated single photon emission from a coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, M.; Kapfinger, S.; Reichert, T.; Finley, J. J.; Wixforth, A.; Kaniber, M.; Krenner, H. J.

    2016-07-01

    A coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system in the weak coupling regime of cavity-quantumelectrodynamics is dynamically tuned in and out of resonance by the coherent elastic field of a fSAW ≃ 800 MHz surface acoustic wave. When the system is brought to resonance by the sound wave, light-matter interaction is strongly increased by the Purcell effect. This leads to a precisely timed single photon emission as confirmed by the second order photon correlation function, g(2). All relevant frequencies of our experiment are faithfully identified in the Fourier transform of g(2), demonstrating high fidelity regulation of the stream of single photons emitted by the system.

  10. Dynamics of an acoustic black hole as an open quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Fernando C.; Turiaci, Gustavo Joaquin

    2013-04-01

    We study the process of decoherence induced by the presence of an environment in acoustic black holes, using the open quantum system approach, thus extending previous work. We focus on the ion trap model but the formalism is general to any experimental implementation. We compute the decoherence time for that setup. We find that a quantum-to-classical transition occurs during the measurement and we propose improved parameters to avoid such a feature. We provide analytic estimations for both zero and finite temperature. We also study the entanglement between the Hawking-pair phonons for an acoustic black hole while in contact with a reservoir, through the quantum correlations, showing that they remain strongly correlated for small enough times and temperatures. We use the stochastic formalism and the method of characteristic to solve the field wave equation.

  11. A Non-Intrusive GMA Welding Process Quality Monitoring System Using Acoustic Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cayo, Eber Huanca; Alfaro, Sadek Crisostomo Absi

    2009-01-01

    Most of the inspection methods used for detection and localization of welding disturbances are based on the evaluation of some direct measurements of welding parameters. This direct measurement requires an insertion of sensors during the welding process which could somehow alter the behavior of the metallic transference. An inspection method that evaluates the GMA welding process evolution using a non-intrusive process sensing would allow not only the identification of disturbances during welding runs and thus reduce inspection time, but would also reduce the interference on the process caused by the direct sensing. In this paper a nonintrusive method for weld disturbance detection and localization for weld quality evaluation is demonstrated. The system is based on the acoustic sensing of the welding electrical arc. During repetitive tests in welds without disturbances, the stability acoustic parameters were calculated and used as comparison references for the detection and location of disturbances during the weld runs. PMID:22399990

  12. CSI feedback-based CS for underwater acoustic adaptive modulation OFDM system with channel prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuai, Xiao-yan; Sun, Hai-xin; Qi, Jie; Cheng, En; Xu, Xiao-ka; Guo, Yu-hui; Chen, You-gan

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of adaptive modulation (AM) orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) system in underwater acoustic (UWA) communications. The aim is to solve the problem of large feedback overhead for channel state information (CSI) in every subcarrier. A novel CSI feedback scheme is proposed based on the theory of compressed sensing (CS). We propose a feedback from the receiver that only feedback the sparse channel parameters. Additionally, prediction of the channel state is proposed every several symbols to realize the AM in practice. We describe a linear channel prediction algorithm which is used in adaptive transmission. This system has been tested in the real underwater acoustic channel. The linear channel prediction makes the AM transmission techniques more feasible for acoustic channel communications. The simulation and experiment show that significant improvements can be obtained both in bit error rate (BER) and throughput in the AM scheme compared with the fixed Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK) modulation scheme. Moreover, the performance with standard CS outperforms the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) method.

  13. Detection of Volatile Organics Using a Surface Acoustic Wave Array System

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON, LAWRENCE F.; BARTHOLOMEW, JOHN W.; CERNOSEK, RICHARD W.; COLBURN, CHRISTOPHER W.; CROOKS, R.M.; MARTINEZ, R.F.; OSBOURN, GORDON C.; RICCO, A.J.; STATON, ALAN W.; YELTON, WILLIAM G.

    1999-10-14

    A chemical sensing system based on arrays of surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay lines has been developed for identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The individual SAW chemical sensors consist of interdigital transducers patterned on the surface of an ST-cut quartz substrate to launch and detect the acoustic waves and a thin film coating in the SAW propagation path to perturb the acoustic wave velocity and attenuation during analyte sorption. A diverse set of material coatings gives the sensor arrays a degree of chemical sensitivity and selectivity. Materials examined for sensor application include the alkanethiol-based self-assembled monolayer, plasma-processed films, custom-synthesized conventional polymers, dendrimeric polymers, molecular recognition materials, electroplated metal thin films, and porous metal oxides. All of these materials target a specific chemical fi.mctionality and the enhancement of accessible film surface area. Since no one coating provides absolute analyte specificity, the array responses are further analyzed using a visual-empirical region-of-influence (VERI) pattern recognition algorithm. The chemical sensing system consists of a seven-element SAW array with accompanying drive and control electronics, sensor signal acquisition electronics, environmental vapor sampling hardware, and a notebook computer. Based on data gathered for individual sensor responses, greater than 93%-accurate identification can be achieved for any single analyte from a group of 17 VOCs and water.

  14. Control of inertial acoustic cavitation in pulsed sonication using a real-time feedback loop system.

    PubMed

    Desjouy, Cyril; Poizat, Adrien; Gilles, Bruno; Inserra, Claude; Bera, Jean-Christophe

    2013-08-01

    Owing to the complex behavior of ultrasound-induced bubble clouds (nucleation, linear and nonlinear oscillations, collapse), acoustic cavitation remains a hardly controllable phenomenon, leading to poorly reproducible ultrasound-based therapies. A better control of the various aspects of cavitation phenomena for in vivo applications is a key requirement to improve emerging ultrasound therapies. Previous publications have reported on systems performing regulation of acoustic cavitation in continuous sonication when applied in vitro, but the main challenge today is to achieve real-time control of cavitation activity in pulsed sonication when used in vivo. The present work aims at developing a system to control acoustic cavitation in a pulsed wave condition using a real-time feedback loop. The experimental setup consists of a water bath in which is submerged a focused transducer (pulsed waves, frequency 550 kHz) used for sonication and a hydrophone used to listen to inertial cavitation. The designed regulation process allows the cavitation activity to be controlled through a 300 μs feedback loop. Without regulation, cavitation exhibits numerous bursts of intense activity and large variations of inertial cavitation level over time. In a regulated regime, the control of inertial cavitation activity within a pulse leads to consistent cavitation levels over time with an enhancement of the reproducibility.

  15. Acoustic characteristics of the vowel systems of six regional varieties of American English

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clopper, Cynthia G.; Pisoni, David B.; de Jong, Kenneth

    2005-09-01

    Previous research by speech scientists on the acoustic characteristics of American English vowel systems has typically focused on a single regional variety, despite decades of sociolinguistic research demonstrating the extent of regional phonological variation in the United States. In the present study, acoustic measures of duration and first and second formant frequencies were obtained from five repetitions of 11 different vowels produced by 48 talkers representing both genders and six regional varieties of American English. Results revealed consistent variation due to region of origin, particularly with respect to the production of low vowels and high back vowels. The Northern talkers produced shifted low vowels consistent with the Northern Cities Chain Shift, the Southern talkers produced fronted back vowels consistent with the Southern Vowel Shift, and the New England, Midland, and Western talkers produced the low back vowel merger. These findings indicate that the vowel systems of American English are better characterized in terms of the region of origin of the talkers than in terms of a single set of idealized acoustic-phonetic baselines of ``General'' American English and provide benchmark data for six regional varieties.

  16. Parameter estimation in a structural acoustic system with fully nonlinear coupling conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, Ralph C.

    1994-01-01

    A methodology for estimating physical parameters in a class of structural acoustic systems is presented. The general model under consideration consists of an interior cavity which is separated from an exterior noise source by an enclosing elastic structure. Piezoceramic patches are bonded to or embedded in the structure; these can be used both as actuators and sensors in applications ranging from the control of interior noise levels to the determination of structural flaws through nondestructive evaluation techniques. The presence and excitation of patches, however, changes the geometry and material properties of the structure as well as involves unknown patch parameters, thus necessitating the development of parameter estimation techniques which are applicable in this coupled setting. In developing a framework for approximation, parameter estimation and implementation, strong consideration is given to the fact that the input operator is unbonded due to the discrete nature of the patches. Moreover, the model is weakly nonlinear. As a result of the coupling mechanism between the structural vibrations and the interior acoustic dynamics. Within this context, an illustrating model is given, well-posedness and approximations results are discussed and an applicable parameter estimation methodology is presented. The scheme is then illustrated through several numerical examples with simulations modeling a variety of commonly used structural acoustic techniques for systems excitations and data collection.

  17. Acoustic characteristics of the vowel systems of six regional varieties of American English

    PubMed Central

    Clopper, Cynthia G.; Pisoni, David B.; de Jong, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Previous research by speech scientists on the acoustic characteristics of American English vowel systems has typically focused on a single regional variety, despite decades of sociolinguistic research demonstrating the extent of regional phonological variation in the United States. In the present study, acoustic measures of duration and first and second formant frequencies were obtained from five repetitions of 11 different vowels produced by 48 talkers representing both genders and six regional varieties of American English. Results revealed consistent variation due to region of origin, particularly with respect to the production of low vowels and high back vowels. The Northern talkers produced shifted low vowels consistent with the Northern Cities Chain Shift, the Southern talkers produced fronted back vowels consistent with the Southern Vowel Shift, and the New England, Midland, and Western talkers produced the low back vowel merger. These findings indicate that the vowel systems of American English are better characterized in terms of the region of origin of the talkers than in terms of a single set of idealized acoustic-phonetic baselines of “General” American English and provide benchmark data for six regional varieties. PMID:16240825

  18. 29 CFR 1915.160 - Positioning device systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... parts of this system. (2) Connecting assemblies shall have a minimum tensile strength of 5,000 pounds... positioning device systems. (1) Restraint (tether) lines shall have a minimum breaking strength of...

  19. 29 CFR 1915.160 - Positioning device systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... parts of this system. (2) Connecting assemblies shall have a minimum tensile strength of 5,000 pounds... positioning device systems. (1) Restraint (tether) lines shall have a minimum breaking strength of...

  20. Optical position measurement for a Large Gap Magnetic Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Sharon S.; Shelton, Kevin J.; Clemmons, James I.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the design of an optical position measurement system which is being built as part of the NASA Langley Large Gap Magnetic Suspension System (LGMSS). The LGMSS is a five degree-of-freedom, large-gap magnetic suspension system which is being built for Langley Research Center as part of the Advanced Controls Test Facility (ACTF). The LGMSS consists of a planar array of electromagnets which levitate and position a cylindrically shaped model containing a permanent magnet core. The optical position measurement system provides information on the location and orientation of the model to the LGMSS control system to stabilize levitation of the model.

  1. Development of a Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) for continuous temperature profiling upto lower stratospheric altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekhar Sarma, T. V.; Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2012-07-01

    The Gadanki (13.46°N, 79.17°E) MST radar is a high power VHF pulsed coherent Doppler radar established for remote probing of atmospheric phenomena in the Mesosphere Stratosphere Troposphere regions. Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) was developed using this radar to obtain height profiles of atmospheric temperature up to lower stratospheric altitudes. RASS uses the effect of temperature on the speed of sound in air as a means to sense the atmospheric temperature. It is the combination of a Doppler radar and acoustic exciters. The radar was augmented with acoustic exciters that were designed and constructed for this purpose. The Doppler radar profiles the speed of refractive index perturbations induced by the acoustic source. RASS has been demonstrated to be a reliable ground-based remote profiling technique to obtain altitude profiles of atmospheric virtual temperature, Tv over the past two decades. This work describes the design of the system and its application to the observation of height profiles of atmospheric virtual temperature up to and beyond tropical tropopause altitudes. Observations were made during 2007, 2008 and 2009 over periods extending up to 72 hours. These observations demonstrate temperature profiling capability up to about 18 km in altitude, though on an occasion height coverage upto 22.8km was obtained briefly; lowest height covered is from about 1.5km onwards. During the period of the RASS observations simultaneous data from radiosonde was used to validate the temperature measurements. Simultaneous satellite-based measurement of outgoing long wave radiation (OLR) and precipitation from ground-based instruments was used to study the atmospheric phenomena of gravity waves and atmospheric stability during a convection event.

  2. 14 CFR 27.1385 - Position light system installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Position light system installation. 27.1385 Section 27.1385 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Lights § 27.1385 Position light system installation. (a) General. Each part...

  3. 14 CFR 29.1385 - Position light system installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Position light system installation. 29.1385 Section 29.1385 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Lights § 29.1385 Position light system installation. (a) General. Each...

  4. Optimization of computation efficiency in underwater acoustic navigation system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hua

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the estimation of the relative bearing angle between the unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) and the base station for the homing and docking operations. The key requirement of this project includes computation efficiency and estimation accuracy for direct implementation onto the UUV electronic hardware, subject to the extreme constraints of physical limitation of the hardware due to the size and dimension of the UUV housing, electric power consumption for the requirement of UUV survey duration and range coverage, and heat dissipation of the hardware. Subsequent to the design and development of the algorithm, two phases of experiments were conducted to illustrate the feasibility and capability of this technique. The presentation of this paper includes system modeling, mathematical analysis, and results from laboratory experiments and full-scale sea tests. PMID:27106337

  5. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  6. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  7. Acoustic signature recognition technique for Human-Object Interactions (HOI) in persistent surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkilani, Amjad; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2013-05-01

    Handling, manipulation, and placement of objects, hereon called Human-Object Interaction (HOI), in the environment generate sounds. Such sounds are readily identifiable by the human hearing. However, in the presence of background environment noises, recognition of minute HOI sounds is challenging, though vital for improvement of multi-modality sensor data fusion in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS). Identification of HOI sound signatures can be used as precursors to detection of pertinent threats that otherwise other sensor modalities may miss to detect. In this paper, we present a robust method for detection and classification of HOI events via clustering of extracted features from training of HOI acoustic sound waves. In this approach, salient sound events are preliminary identified and segmented from background via a sound energy tracking method. Upon this segmentation, frequency spectral pattern of each sound event is modeled and its features are extracted to form a feature vector for training. To reduce dimensionality of training feature space, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique is employed to expedite fast classification of test feature vectors, a kd-tree and Random Forest classifiers are trained for rapid classification of training sound waves. Each classifiers employs different similarity distance matching technique for classification. Performance evaluations of classifiers are compared for classification of a batch of training HOI acoustic signatures. Furthermore, to facilitate semantic annotation of acoustic sound events, a scheme based on Transducer Mockup Language (TML) is proposed. The results demonstrate the proposed approach is both reliable and effective, and can be extended to future PSS applications.

  8. Acoustic Characteristics of Stridor in Multiple System Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Young; Joo, Eun Yeon; Nam, Hyunwoo

    2016-01-01

    Nocturnal stridor is a breathing disorder prevalent in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA). An improved understanding of this breathing disorder is essential since nocturnal stridor carries a poor prognosis (an increased risk of sudden death). In this study, we aimed to classify types of stridor by sound analysis and to reveal their clinical significance. Patients who met the criteria for probable MSA and had undergone polysomnography (PSG) were recruited. Patients were then assessed clinically with sleep questionnaires, including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Hoehn and Yahr scale. Nocturnal stridor and snoring were analyzed with the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program. Nocturnal stridor was recorded in 22 patients and snoring in 18 patients using the PSG. Waveforms of stridors were classified into rhythmic or semirhythmic after analysis of the oscillogram. Formants and harmonics were observed in both types of stridor, but not in snoring. Of the 22 patients diagnosed with stridor during the present study, fifteen have subsequently died, with the time to death after the PSG study being 1.9 ± 1.4 years (range 0.8 to 5.0 years). The rhythmic waveform group presented higher scores on the Hoehn and Yahr scale and the survival outcome of this group was lower compared to the semirhythmic waveform group (p = 0.030, p = 0.014). In the Kaplan Meier’s survival curve, the outcome of patients with rhythmic waveform was significantly less favorable than the outcome of patients with semirhythmic waveform (log-rank test, p < 0.001). Stridor in MSA can be classified into rhythmic and semirhythmic types and the rhythmic component signifies a poorer outcome. PMID:27093692

  9. Global positioning system applications at the Bonneville Power Administration

    SciTech Connect

    Street, M.A.; Thurein, I.P.; Martin, K.E.

    1995-12-31

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has used the precise timing feature of the Global Positioning System (GPS) to enhance power system performance and reliability. The BPA Traveling Wave Fault Locator System and the BPA Phasor Measurement System both employ GPS timing.

  10. Passive pavement-mounted acoustical linguistic drive alert system and method

    DOEpatents

    Kisner, Roger A.; Anderson, Richard L.; Carnal, Charles L.; Hylton, James O.; Stevens, Samuel S.

    2001-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for passive pavement-mounted acoustical alert of the occupants of a vehicle. A method of notifying a vehicle occupant includes providing a driving medium upon which a vehicle is to be driven; and texturing a portion of the driving medium such that the textured portion interacts with the vehicle to produce audible signals, the textured portion pattern such that a linguistic message is encoded into the audible signals. The systems and methods provide advantages because information can be conveyed to the occupants of the vehicle based on the location of the vehicle relative to the textured surface.

  11. A smart pattern recognition system for the automatic identification of aerospace acoustic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, R. H.; Fuller, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    An intelligent air-noise recognition system is described that uses pattern recognition techniques to distinguish noise signatures of five different types of acoustic sources, including jet planes, propeller planes, a helicopter, train, and wind turbine. Information for classification is calculated using the power spectral density and autocorrelation taken from the output of a single microphone. Using this system, as many as 90 percent of test recordings were correctly identified, indicating that the linear discriminant functions developed can be used for aerospace source identification.

  12. Effects of acoustic hood on noise, CFC-11, and particulate matter in a recycling system for waste refrigerator cabinet.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jie; Fang, Wenxiong; Yang, Yichen; Xu, Zhenming

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical-physical process was proven to be technologically feasible for waste refrigerator recycling and has been widely used in the typical e-waste recycling factories in China. In this study, effects of the acoustic hood on the reduction of noise level, CFC-11, and heavy metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Cd, and Pb) in particulate matter (PM) were evaluated. For noise pollution, the noise level inside and outside the acoustic hood was 96.4 and 78.9 dB, respectively. Meanwhile, it had a significant effect on A-weighted sound level with a reduction from 98.3 to 63.6 dB. For CFC-11 exposure, abundant CFC-11 (255 mg/m(3)) was detected in the acoustic hood. However, the mean concentration of CFC-11 at the outline of polyurethane foam collection was obviously diminished to 14 mg/m(3), and no CFC-11 was monitored around the acoustic hood. The concentrations of PM and heavy metals in PM outside the acoustic hood were lower than those inside the acoustic hood due to the physical barriers of the acoustic hood. Based on the risk assessment, only adverse health effect caused by Pb might likely appear. All the results can provide the basic data for pollution control and risk assessment in waste refrigerator recycling system.

  13. Effects of acoustic hood on noise, CFC-11, and particulate matter in a recycling system for waste refrigerator cabinet.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jie; Fang, Wenxiong; Yang, Yichen; Xu, Zhenming

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical-physical process was proven to be technologically feasible for waste refrigerator recycling and has been widely used in the typical e-waste recycling factories in China. In this study, effects of the acoustic hood on the reduction of noise level, CFC-11, and heavy metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Cd, and Pb) in particulate matter (PM) were evaluated. For noise pollution, the noise level inside and outside the acoustic hood was 96.4 and 78.9 dB, respectively. Meanwhile, it had a significant effect on A-weighted sound level with a reduction from 98.3 to 63.6 dB. For CFC-11 exposure, abundant CFC-11 (255 mg/m(3)) was detected in the acoustic hood. However, the mean concentration of CFC-11 at the outline of polyurethane foam collection was obviously diminished to 14 mg/m(3), and no CFC-11 was monitored around the acoustic hood. The concentrations of PM and heavy metals in PM outside the acoustic hood were lower than those inside the acoustic hood due to the physical barriers of the acoustic hood. Based on the risk assessment, only adverse health effect caused by Pb might likely appear. All the results can provide the basic data for pollution control and risk assessment in waste refrigerator recycling system. PMID:24965005

  14. Sub-milliarcsecond determination of pole position using Global Positioning System data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Thomas A.; Dong, Danan; King, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The determination of pole-position variations from the analysis of 23 days of Global Positioning System (GPS) data continuously collected with a globally distributed, 21-station network is discussed. The comparison of the estimated pole positions from these data with results from 11 very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiments conducted during this same interval yields weighted root-mean-square differences about the mean differences of 0.5 mas for both X- and Y-pole position estimates from an analysis using single-day arcs, and 1.0 and 0.8 mas from an analysis using three weekly multiday arcs. These results are of sufficient quality that GPS could provide an alternative technique to VLBI and satellite laser ranging for regular monitoring of high-time-resolution variations in the position of the earth's rotation axis.

  15. Acoustic Performance of a Real-Time Three-Dimensional Sound-Reproduction System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faller, Kenneth J., II; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Aumann, Aric R.

    2013-01-01

    The Exterior Effects Room (EER) is a 39-seat auditorium at the NASA Langley Research Center and was built to support psychoacoustic studies of aircraft community noise. The EER has a real-time simulation environment which includes a three-dimensional sound-reproduction system. This system requires real-time application of equalization filters to compensate for spectral coloration of the sound reproduction due to installation and room effects. This paper describes the efforts taken to develop the equalization filters for use in the real-time sound-reproduction system and the subsequent analysis of the system s acoustic performance. The acoustic performance of the compensated and uncompensated sound-reproduction system is assessed for its crossover performance, its performance under stationary and dynamic conditions, the maximum spatialized sound pressure level it can produce from a single virtual source, and for the spatial uniformity of a generated sound field. Additionally, application examples are given to illustrate the compensated sound-reproduction system performance using recorded aircraft flyovers

  16. Real-time analysis system for gas turbine ground test acoustic measurements.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Robert T

    2003-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of a data system upgrade to the Pratt and Whitney facility designed for making acoustic measurements on aircraft gas turbine engines. A data system upgrade was undertaken because the return-on-investment was determined to be extremely high. That is, the savings on the first test series recovered the cost of the hardware. The commercial system selected for this application utilizes 48 input channels, which allows either 1/3 octave and/or narrow-band analyses to be preformed real-time. A high-speed disk drive allows raw data from all 48 channels to be stored simultaneously while the analyses are being preformed. Results of tests to ensure compliance of the new system with regulations and with existing systems are presented. Test times were reduced from 5 h to 1 h of engine run time per engine configuration by the introduction of this new system. Conservative cost reduction estimates for future acoustic testing are 75% on items related to engine run time and 50% on items related to the overall length of the test.

  17. Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Huskey, A.

    2011-11-01

    This report details the acoustic noise test conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. The test turbine is a two- bladed, downwind wind turbine with a rated power of 11 kW. The test turbine was tested in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission standard, IEC 61400-11 Ed 2.1 2006-11 Wind Turbine Generator Systems -- Part 11 Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques.

  18. Structural Dynamic Assessment of the GN2 Piping System for NASA's New and Powerful Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Staab, Lucas D.; Akers, James C.; Hughes, William O.; Chang, Li C.; Hozman, Aron D.; Henry, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) has led the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA from 2007 to 2011. SAIC-Benham has completed construction of a new reverberant acoustic test facility to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program and commercial customers. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) is approximately 101,000 cubic feet in volume and was designed to operate at a maximum empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. Initial checkout acoustic testing was performed on March 2011 by SAIC-Benham at test levels up to 161 dB OASPL. During testing, several branches of the gaseous nitrogen (GN2) piping system, which supply the fluid to the noise generating acoustic modulators, failed at their T-junctions connecting the 12 in. supply line to their respective 4 in. branch lines. The problem was initially detected when the oxygen sensors in the horn room indicated a lower than expected oxygen level from which was inferred GN2 leaks in the piping system. In subsequent follow up inspections, cracks were identified in the failed T-junction connections through non-destructive evaluation testing. Through structural dynamic modeling of the piping system, the root cause of the T-junction connection failures was determined. The structural dynamic assessment identified several possible corrective design improvements to the horn room piping system. The effectiveness of the chosen design repairs were subsequently evaluated in September 2011 during acoustic verification testing to 161 dB OASPL.

  19. Structural Dynamic Assessment of the GN2 Piping System for NASA's New and Powerful Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Staab, Lucas D.; Akers, James C.; Hughes, WIlliam O.; Chang, Li, C.; Hozman, Aron D.; Henry, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) has led the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA from 2007-2011. SAIC-Benham has completed construction of a new reverberant acoustic test facility to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program and commercial customers. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) is approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and was designed to operate at a maximum empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. Initial checkout acoustic testing was performed on March 2011 by SAIC-Benham at test levels up to 161 dB OASPL. During testing, several branches of the gaseous nitrogen (GN2) piping system, which supply the fluid to the noise generating acoustic modulators, failed at their "t-junctions" connecting the 12 inch supply line to their respective 4 inch branch lines. The problem was initially detected when the oxygen sensors in the horn room indicated a lower than expected oxygen level from which was inferred GN2 leaks in the piping system. In subsequent follow up inspections, cracks were identified in the failed "t-junction" connections through non-destructive evaluation testing . Through structural dynamic modeling of the piping system, the root cause of the "t-junction" connection failures was determined. The structural dynamic assessment identified several possible corrective design improvements to the horn room piping system. The effectiveness of the chosen design repairs were subsequently evaluated in September 2011 during acoustic verification testing to 161 dB OASPL.

  20. Global Positioning System test of the local position invariance of Planck's constant.

    PubMed

    Kentosh, J; Mohageg, M

    2012-03-16

    Publicly available clock correction data from the Global Positioning System was analyzed and used in combination with the results of terrestrial clock comparison experiments to confirm the local position invariance (LPI) of Planck's constant within the context of general relativity. The results indicate that h is invariant within a limit of |β(h)|<0.007, where β(h) is a dimensionless parameter that represents the extent of LPI violation.

  1. A pseudolite-based positioning system for legacy GNSS receivers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chongwon; So, Hyoungmin; Lee, Taikjin; Kee, Changdon

    2014-03-27

    The ephemeris data format of legacy GPS receivers is improper for positioning stationary pseudolites on the ground. Therefore, to utilize pseudolites for navigation, GPS receivers must be modified so that they can handle the modified data formats of the pseudolites. Because of this problem, the practical use of pseudolites has so far been limited. This paper proposes a pseudolite-based positioning system that can be used with unmodified legacy GPS receivers. In the proposed system, pseudolites transmit simulated GPS signals. The signals use standard GPS ephemeris data format and contain ephemeris data of simulated GPS satellites, not those of pseudolites. The use of the standard format enables the GPS receiver to process pseudolite signals without any modification. However, the position output of the GPS receiver is not the correct position in this system, because there are additional signal delays from each pseudolite to the receiver. A post-calculation process was added to obtain the correct receiver position using GPS receiver output. This re-estimation is possible because it is based on known information about the simulated signals, pseudolites, and positioning process of the GPS receiver. Simulations using generated data and live GPS data are conducted for various geometries to verify the proposed system. The test results show that the proposed system provides the desired user position using pseudolite signals without requiring any modifications to the legacy GPS receiver. In this initial study, a pseudolite-only indoor system was assumed. However, it can be expanded to a GPS-pseudolite system outdoors.

  2. Modelling and control of neutron and synchrotron beamline positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nneji, S. O.; Zhang, S. Y.; Kabra, S.; Moat, R. J.; James, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of residual stress using neutron or synchrotron diffraction relies on the accurate alignment of the sample in relation to the gauge volume of the instrument. Automatic sample alignment can be achieved using kinematic models of the positioning system provided the relevant kinematic parameters are known, or can be determined, to a suitable accuracy. In this paper, the use of techniques from robotic calibration theory to generate kinematic models of both off-the-shelf and custom-built positioning systems is demonstrated. The approach is illustrated using a positioning system in use on the ENGIN-X instrument at the UK's ISIS pulsed neutron source comprising a traditional XYZΩ table augmented with a triple axis manipulator. Accuracies better than 100 microns were achieved for this compound system. Discussed here in terms of sample positioning systems these methods are entirely applicable to other moving instrument components such as beam shaping jaws and detectors.

  3. Stabilization of linear undamped systems via position and delayed position feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Hu, Haiyan

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents a systematic approach to stabilizing a kind of linear undamped systems of multiple degrees of freedom by using both position and delayed position feedbacks, namely, PDP feedbacks for short. For the fully actuated system, the approach enables one to complete the design of controller directly through the use of modal decoupling and a stability chart. For the under-actuated system, the approach includes two steps. The first step is to move all the eigenvalues of the system on the imaginary axis of the complex plane by using a position feedback, and the second step is to drag all the eigenvalues of the system to the left half open complex plane through the use of a delayed position feedback, which can be determined on the basis of sensitivity analysis of eigenvalues. Two examples, i.e., a fully actuated robotic manipulator and an under-actuated double inverted pendulum, are discussed in the paper to demonstrate the design of controllers for the two different types of systems and to support the efficacy of the proposed approach.

  4. On the acoustic analysis and optimization of ducted ventilation systems using a sub-structuring approach.

    PubMed

    Yu, X; Cui, F S; Cheng, L

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a general sub-structuring approach to predict the acoustic performance of ducted ventilation systems. The modeling principle is to determine the subsystem characteristics by calculating the transfer functions at their coupling interfaces, and the assembly is enabled by using a patch-based interface matching technique. For a particular example of a bended ventilation duct connecting an inlet and an outlet acoustic domain, a numerical model is developed to predict its sound attenuation performance. The prediction accuracy is thoroughly validated against finite element models. Through numerical examples, the rigid-walled duct is shown to provide relatively weak transmission loss (TL) across the frequency range of interest, and exhibit only the reactive behavior for sound reflection. By integrating sound absorbing treatment such as micro-perforated absorbers into the system, the TL can be significantly improved, and the system is seen to exhibit hybrid mechanisms for sound attenuation. The dissipative effect dominates at frequencies where the absorber is designed to be effective, and the reactive effect provides compensations at the absorption valleys attributed to the resonant behavior of the absorber. This ultimately maintains the system TL at a relatively high level across the entire frequency of interest. The TL of the system can be tuned or optimized in a very efficient way using the proposed approach due to its modular nature. It is shown that a balance of the hybrid mechanism is important to achieve an overall broadband attenuation performance in the design frequency range. PMID:26827024

  5. Design of a robust underwater acoustic communication system over multipath fading channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jangeun; Shim, Taebo

    2012-11-01

    Due to the surface and bottom constraints of the underwater acoustic channel (UAC) in shallow waters, multipath fading occurs and causes degradation of the signal for the UAC system. To overcome these problems, a robust underwater acoustic communication system was designed over multipath fading channels by employing both decision feedback equalization with the RLS algorithm and convolutional coding with interleaving+shuffling block data sequence. The dual use of these two methods simultaneously can reduce the intersymbol interference (ISI) and the adjacent bit and burst errors. The system will retransmit the same signal if the system fails to estimate the channel due to severe multipath fading. To verify the performance of the system, the transmission of an image was tested using a 524,288bit gray-scaled image through the multipath fading channel. The test results showed that the number of bit errors was reduced from 86,824 to 5,106 when the reference SNR was 12 dB.

  6. Asynchronous indoor positioning system based on visible light communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weizhi; Chowdhury, M. I. Sakib; Kavehrad, Mohsen

    2014-04-01

    Indoor positioning has become an attractive research topic within the past two decades. However, no satisfying solution has been found with consideration of both accuracy and system complexity. Recently, research on visible light communications (VLC) offer new opportunities in realizing accurate indoor positioning with relatively simple system configuration. An indoor positioning system based on VLC technology is introduced, with no synchronization requirement on the transmitters. Simulation results show that, with over 95% confidence, the target receiver can be located with an accuracy of 5.9 cm, assuming indirect sunlight exposure and proper installation of light-emitting diode bulbs.

  7. Contact position sensor using constant contact force control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturdevant, Jay (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A force control system (50) and method are provided for controlling a position contact sensor (10) so as to produce a constant controlled contact force therewith. The system (50) includes a contact position sensor (10) which has a contact probe (12) for contacting the surface of a target to be measured and an output signal (V.sub.o) for providing a position indication thereof. An actuator (30) is provided for controllably driving the contact position sensor (10) in response to an actuation control signal (I). A controller (52) receives the position indication signal (V.sub.o) and generates in response thereto the actuation control signal (I) so as to provide a substantially constant selective force (F) exerted by the contact probe (12). The actuation drive signal (I) is generated further in response to substantially linear approximation curves based on predetermined force and position data attained from the sensor (10) and the actuator (30).

  8. Beam Position and Phase Monitor - Wire Mapping System

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Heath A; Shurter, Robert B.; Gilpatrick, John D.; Kutac, Vincent G.; Martinez, Derwin

    2012-04-10

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) deploys many cylindrical beam position and phase monitors (BPPM) throughout the linac to measure the beam central position, phase and bunched-beam current. Each monitor is calibrated and qualified prior to installation to insure it meets LANSCE requirements. The BPPM wire mapping system is used to map the BPPM electrode offset, sensitivity and higher order coefficients. This system uses a three-axis motion table to position the wire antenna structure within the cavity, simulating the beam excitation of a BPPM at a fundamental frequency of 201.25 MHz. RF signal strength is measured and recorded for the four electrodes as the antenna position is updated. An effort is underway to extend the systems service to the LANSCE facility by replacing obsolete electronic hardware and taking advantage of software enhancements. This paper describes the upgraded wire positioning system's new hardware and software capabilities including its revised antenna structure, motion control interface, RF measurement equipment and Labview software upgrades. The main purpose of the wire mapping system at LANSCE is to characterize the amplitude response versus beam central position of BPPMs before they are installed in the beam line. The wire mapping system is able to simulate a beam using a thin wire and measure the signal response as the wire position is varied within the BPPM aperture.

  9. Characterization of Pump-Induced Acoustics in Space Launch System Main Propulsion System Liquid Hydrogen Feedline Using Airflow Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhart, C. J.; Snellgrove, L. M.; Zoladz, T. F.

    2015-01-01

    High intensity acoustic edgetones located upstream of the RS-25 Low Pressure Fuel Turbo Pump (LPFTP) were previously observed during Space Launch System (STS) airflow testing of a model Main Propulsion System (MPS) liquid hydrogen (LH2) feedline mated to a modified LPFTP. MPS hardware has been adapted to mitigate the problematic edgetones as part of the Space Launch System (SLS) program. A follow-on airflow test campaign has subjected the adapted hardware to tests mimicking STS-era airflow conditions, and this manuscript describes acoustic environment identification and characterization born from the latest test results. Fluid dynamics responsible for driving discrete excitations were well reproduced using legacy hardware. The modified design was found insensitive to high intensity edgetone-like discretes over the bandwidth of interest to SLS MPS unsteady environments. Rather, the natural acoustics of the test article were observed to respond in a narrowband-random/mixed discrete manner to broadband noise thought generated by the flow field. The intensity of these responses were several orders of magnitude reduced from those driven by edgetones.

  10. Airy acoustical-sheet spinner tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-09-01

    The Airy acoustical beam exhibits parabolic propagation and spatial acceleration, meaning that the propagation bending angle continuously increases before the beam trajectory reaches a critical angle where it decays after a propagation distance, without applying any external bending force. As such, it is of particular importance to investigate its properties from the standpoint of acoustical radiation force, spin torque, and particle dynamics theories, in the development of novel particle sorting techniques and acoustically mediated clearing systems. This work investigates these effects on a two-dimensional (2D) circular absorptive structure placed in the field of a nonparaxial Airy "acoustical-sheet" (i.e., finite beam in 2D), for potential applications in surface acoustic waves and acousto-fluidics. Based on the characteristics of the acoustic field, the beam is capable of manipulating the circular cylindrical fluid cross-section and guides it along a transverse or parabolic trajectory. This feature of Airy acoustical beams could lead to a unique characteristic in single-beam acoustical tweezers related to acoustical sieving, filtering, and removal of particles and cells from a section of a small channel. The analysis developed here is based on the description of the nonparaxial Airy beam using the angular spectrum decomposition of plane waves in close association with the partial-wave series expansion method in cylindrical coordinates. The numerical results demonstrate the ability of the nonparaxial Airy acoustical-sheet beam to pull, propel, or accelerate a particle along a parabolic trajectory, in addition to particle confinement in the transverse direction of wave propagation. Negative or positive radiation force and spin torque causing rotation in the clockwise or the anticlockwise direction can occur depending on the nondimensional parameter ka (where k is the wavenumber and a is the radius) and the location of the cylinder in the beam. Applications in

  11. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  12. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  13. Acoustic pressure-vector sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dehua; Elswick, Roy C.; McEachern, James F.

    2001-05-01

    Pressure-vector sensors measure both scalar and vector components of the acoustic field. December 2003 measurements at the NUWC Seneca Lake test facility verify previous observations that acoustic ambient noise spectrum levels measured by acoustic intensity sensors are reduced relative to either acoustic pressure or acoustic vector sensor spectrum levels. The Seneca measurements indicate a reduction by as much as 15 dB at the upper measurement frequency of 2500 Hz. A nonlinear array synthesis theory for pressure-vector sensors will be introduced that allows smaller apertures to achieve narrow beams. The significantly reduced ambient noise of individual pressure-vector elements observed in the ocean by others, and now at Seneca Lake, should allow a nonlinearly combined array to detect significantly lower levels than has been observed in previous multiplicative processing of pressure sensors alone. Nonlinear array synthesis of pressure-vector sensors differs from conventional super-directive algorithms that linearly combine pressure elements with positive and negative weights, thereby reducing the sensitivity of conventional super-directive arrays. The much smaller aperture of acoustic pressure-vector sensor arrays will be attractive for acoustic systems on underwater vehicles, as well as for other applications that require narrow beam acoustic receivers. [The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of ONR and NUWC.

  14. The Ether Wind and the Global Positioning System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Rainer

    2000-01-01

    Explains how students can perform a refutation of the ether theory using information from the Global Positioning System (GPS). Discusses the functioning of the GPS, qualitatively describes how position determination would be affected by an ether wind, and illustrates the pertinent ideas with a simple quantitative model. (WRM)

  15. 14 CFR 23.1385 - Position light system installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... must consist of a red and a green light spaced laterally as far apart as practicable and installed on the airplane such that, with the airplane in the normal flying position, the red light is on the left... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Position light system installation....

  16. 14 CFR 23.1385 - Position light system installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... must consist of a red and a green light spaced laterally as far apart as practicable and installed on the airplane such that, with the airplane in the normal flying position, the red light is on the left... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Position light system installation....

  17. Four positive periodic solutions for the first order differential system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengqiu; Tang, Hengsheng

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, we establish the existence of four positive periodic solutions for the first order differential system by using the continuation theorem of coincidence degree theory. When our result is applied to a competition Lotka-Volterra population model, we obtain the existence of four positive periodic solutions for this model.

  18. Virtual global positioning system for distributed interactive simulation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gary; Stytz, Martin R.; Banks, Sheila B.

    1997-07-01

    A major shortfall in the fidelity of current military distributed virtual environments (DVEs) is the lack of virtual global positioning system (GPS) timing and position signals for entities within the environment. The DVE's usefulness is reduced because positional errors and positional accuracy that would be available in the real world are not present in the DVE. This, in turn, affects the validity of the results of training, analysis, and evaluations involving systems that rely on GPS. The magnitude of the affect depends on the degree that the systems involved in the DVE rely on GPS in the real world. The project reported in this paper addresses this deficit in current military DVEs. The capability we developed to provide a virtual GPS-based navigation capability within a DVE is based upon three components. These components are a complete virtual GPS satellite constellation, a means for broadcasting GPS signals using the Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) simulation protocols, and a software system, the Virtual GPS Receiver (VGPSR), to calculate simulation entity position using the virtual GPS time and position signals. The virtual GPS satellites are propagated in their orbits using the solar system modeler (SM). The SM also performs the simulated GPS signal broadcast by transmitting a DIS protocol data unit (PDU) with the data that would appear within a real world GPS satellite broadcast. The VGPSR is a plug-in module available for simulation applications that require virtual GPS navigation. To demonstrate the capability of this system, we used the VGPSR in conjunction with the virtual cockpit to simulate virtual weapons deployment. We present the design of the VGPSR and the design of the modules added to the SM for GPS broadcast. We describe the calculations the system performs to calculate position in the virtual environment and we describe the accuracy and performance the system achieves when calculating virtual environment position using our system. We

  19. Global Positioning Systems: Keeping Us on Track. Resources in Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valesey, Brigitte G.

    1998-01-01

    The Global Positioning System is a satellite-based system used to determine location, speed, and precise time in any weather, anywhere on earth. Developed by the U.S. Air Force as a defense system, it is now available for civilian and commercial uses. (JOW)

  20. Demodulation of acoustic telemetry binary phase shift keying signal based on high-order Duffing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bing-Nan; Liu, Chong-Xin; Ni, Jun-Kang; Zhao, Liang

    2016-10-01

    In order to grasp the downhole situation immediately, logging while drilling (LWD) technology is adopted. One of the LWD technologies, called acoustic telemetry, can be successfully applied to modern drilling. It is critical for acoustic telemetry technology that the signal is successfully transmitted to the ground. In this paper, binary phase shift keying (BPSK) is used to modulate carrier waves for the transmission and a new BPSK demodulation scheme based on Duffing chaos is investigated. Firstly, a high-order system is given in order to enhance the signal detection capability and it is realized through building a virtual circuit using an electronic workbench (EWB). Secondly, a new BPSK demodulation scheme is proposed based on the intermittent chaos phenomena of the new Duffing system. Finally, a system variable crossing zero-point equidistance method is proposed to obtain the phase difference between the system and the BPSK signal. Then it is determined that the digital signal transmitted from the bottom of the well is ‘0’ or ‘1’. The simulation results show that the demodulation method is feasible. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51177117) and the National Key Science & Technology Special Projects, China (Grant No. 2011ZX05021-005).

  1. Communication-based positioning systems: past, present and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guan-Yi; Wan, Qing-Tao; Gan, Tong

    2012-06-01

    This paper reviews positioning systems in the context of communication systems. First, the basic positioning technique is described for location based service (LBS) in mobile communication systems. Then the high integrity global positioning system (iGPS) is introduced in terms of aspects of what it is and how the low Earth orbit (LEO) Iridium telecommunication satellites enhance the global positioning system (GPS). Emphasis is on the Chinese Area Positioning System (CAPS) which is mainly based on commercial geostationary (GEO) communication satellites, including decommissioned GEO and inclined geosynchronous communication satellites. Characterized by its low cost, high flexibility, wide-area coverage and ample frequency resources, a distinctive feature of CAPS is that its navigation messages are generated on the ground, then uploaded to and forwarded by the communication satellites. Fundamental principles and key technologies applied in the construction of CAPS are presented in detail from the CAPS validation phase to its experimental system setup. A prospective view of CAPS has concluded it to be a seamless, high accuracy, large capacity navigation and communication system which can be achieved by expanding it world wide and enhancing it with LEO satellites and mobile base stations. Hence, this system is a potential candidate for the next generation of radio navigation after GPS.

  2. Unstructured grid finite volume analysis for acoustic and pulsed wave propagation characteristics in exhaust silencer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.T.; Kim, Y.M.; Maeng, J.S.; Lyu, M.S.; Ku, Y.G.

    1996-10-01

    The unstructured grid finite volume method has been applied to predict the linear and nonlinear attenuation characteristics of the expansion chamber type silencer system. In order to achieve grid flexibility and a solution adaptation for geometrically complex flow regions associated with the actual silencers, the unstructured mesh algorithm in context with the node-centered finite volume method has been employed. The validation cases for the linear and nonlinear wave propagation characteristics include the acoustic field of the concentric expansion chamber and the axisymmetric blast flow field with the open end. Effects of the chamber geometry on the nonlinear wave propagation characteristics are discussed in detail.

  3. System gain function calculation for acoustic arrays using ray optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, O.; Vonwinterfeld, C.

    1980-11-01

    The gain function of an acoustic antenna array is calculated with respect to waves, propagating from a point source into an homogeneous medium (water) with a sinusoidally varying surface of known phase statistics, treating antenna and environment as one system. An asymptotic solution (high frequency approximation) is developed. For distances of several wavelengths between the array and the surface of the medium, the propagation mechanism is described by a geometrical theory of diffraction applied to scalar waves. The gain function of the antenna together with the reflecting surface is obtained from the cross correlations of the resulting sound fields of each antenna element.

  4. Ice/berm interaction study using rotary sidescan sonar and acoustic profiling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Good, R.R.; Anderson, K.G.; Lanzier, H.H.

    1984-05-01

    Tarsiut Island, in the Canadian Beaufort Sea, was the first dredged caisson retained island built for exploration drilling operations in the Arctic offshore. Due to the island's configuration location, a large first-year ice rubble pile would result from the ice/structure interaction. This paper outlines how a rotary side-scan sonar and a mechanically scanning, narrow-beam acoustic profiling system were used to determine the geometry and the contact area of the underside of heavily rubbled first-year ice. The results of this study are to be used to further the understanding of the nature and mechanism of the ice/structure interaction in Arctic offshore structures.

  5. Coordinated joint motion control system with position error correction

    DOEpatents

    Danko, George

    2011-11-22

    Disclosed are an articulated hydraulic machine supporting, control system and control method for same. The articulated hydraulic machine has an end effector for performing useful work. The control system is capable of controlling the end effector for automated movement along a preselected trajectory. The control system has a position error correction system to correct discrepancies between an actual end effector trajectory and a desired end effector trajectory. The correction system can employ one or more absolute position signals provided by one or more acceleration sensors supported by one or more movable machine elements. Good trajectory positioning and repeatability can be obtained. A two-joystick controller system is enabled, which can in some cases facilitate the operator's task and enhance their work quality and productivity.

  6. Coordinated joint motion control system with position error correction

    DOEpatents

    Danko, George L.

    2016-04-05

    Disclosed are an articulated hydraulic machine supporting, control system and control method for same. The articulated hydraulic machine has an end effector for performing useful work. The control system is capable of controlling the end effector for automated movement along a preselected trajectory. The control system has a position error correction system to correct discrepancies between an actual end effector trajectory and a desired end effector trajectory. The correction system can employ one or more absolute position signals provided by one or more acceleration sensors supported by one or more movable machine elements. Good trajectory positioning and repeatability can be obtained. A two joystick controller system is enabled, which can in some cases facilitate the operator's task and enhance their work quality and productivity.

  7. Electronic Non-Contacting Linear Position Measuring System

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2005-06-14

    A non-contacting linear position location system employs a special transmission line to encode and transmit magnetic signals to a receiver on the object whose position is to be measured. The invention is useful as a non-contact linear locator of moving objects, e.g., to determine the location of a magnetic-levitation train for the operation of the linear-synchronous motor drive system.

  8. Professional rugby league positional match-play analysis through the use of global positioning system.

    PubMed

    Austin, Damien J; Kelly, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the movement demands of all 9 individual playing positions in professional rugby league. The movement demands of 135 professional rugby league players were recorded during 28 National Rugby League games in 2011, using a nondifferential 5 Hz global positioning system. The mean total distances covered in a game for fullback, wing, center, five-eight, halfback, hooker, lock, back row, and prop players were 7,760, 7,457, 7,301, 8,402, 8,500, 6,988, 5,481, 6,936, and 4,597 m, respectively. The average occurrence of high-intensity runs per match was 42, 35, 34, 86, 120, 74, 52, 26, and 18 for fullback, wing, center, five-eight, halfback, hooker, lock, back row, and prop players, respectively. The average distance traveled greater than 18 km·h-1 for fullback were 17 ± 2 m, wing 18 ± 2 m, center 18 ± 3 m, five-eight 16 ± 3 m, and halfback 17 ± 4 m. The average distance and range traveled greater than 18 km·h for hooker were 14 ± 3 m, lock 16 ± 2 m, back row 18 ± 3 m, and prop 16 ± 2 m. The use of global positioning systems has demonstrated plausibility to eliminate the use of grouping of positions in rugby league and for coaches to make specific training protocols for each position. Given the differences in movement demands of all 9 positions in rugby league, some positions would lack specificity to their positional requirements if using collective grouping for planning of training regimens.

  9. Matrix method for acoustic levitation simulation.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Marco A B; Perez, Nicolas; Buiochi, Flavio; Adamowski, Julio C

    2011-08-01

    A matrix method is presented for simulating acoustic levitators. A typical acoustic levitator consists of an ultrasonic transducer and a reflector. The matrix method is used to determine the potential for acoustic radiation force that acts on a small sphere in the standing wave field produced by the levitator. The method is based on the Rayleigh integral and it takes into account the multiple reflections that occur between the transducer and the reflector. The potential for acoustic radiation force obtained by the matrix method is validated by comparing the matrix method results with those obtained by the finite element method when using an axisymmetric model of a single-axis acoustic levitator. After validation, the method is applied in the simulation of a noncontact manipulation system consisting of two 37.9-kHz Langevin-type transducers and a plane reflector. The manipulation system allows control of the horizontal position of a small levitated sphere from -6 mm to 6 mm, which is done by changing the phase difference between the two transducers. The horizontal position of the sphere predicted by the matrix method agrees with the horizontal positions measured experimentally with a charge-coupled device camera. The main advantage of the matrix method is that it allows simulation of non-symmetric acoustic levitators without requiring much computational effort. PMID:21859587

  10. Operating a real time high accuracy positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, G.; Hanley, J.; Russell, D.; Vooght, A.

    2003-04-01

    The paper shall review the history and development of real time DGPS services prior to then describing the design of a high accuracy GPS commercial augmentation system and service currently delivering over a wide area to users of precise positioning products. The infrastructure and system shall be explained in relation to the need for high accuracy and high integrity of positioning for users. A comparison of the different techniques for the delivery of data shall be provided to outline the technical approach taken. Examples of the performance of the real time system shall be shown in various regions and modes to outline the current achievable accuracies. Having described and established the current GPS based situation, a review of the potential of the Galileo system shall be presented. Following brief contextual information relating to the Galileo project, core system and services, the paper will identify possible key applications and the main user communities for sub decimetre level precise positioning. The paper will address the Galileo and modernised GPS signals in space that are relevant to commercial precise positioning for the future and will discuss the implications for precise positioning performance. An outline of the proposed architecture shall be described and associated with pointers towards a successful implementation. Central to this discussion will be an assessment of the likely evolution of system infrastructure and user equipment implementation, prospects for new applications and their effect upon the business case for precise positioning services.

  11. Bilayer resist system utilizing alkali-developable organosilicon positive photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nate, Kazuo; Mizushima, Akiko; Sugiyama, Hisashi

    1991-06-01

    A bi-layer resist system utilizing an alkali-developable organosilicon positive photoresist (OSPR) has been developed. The composite prepared from an alkali-soluble organosilicon polymer, poly(p- hydroxybenzylsilsesquioxane) and naphthoquinone diazide becomes a alkali-developable positive photoresist which is sensitive to UV (i line - g line) region, and exhibited high oxygen reactive ion etching (O2 RIE) resistance. The sensitivity and the resolution of OSPR are almost the same as those of conventional novolac-based positive photoresists. The bi-layer resist system utilizing OSPR as the top imaging layer gave fine patterns of underlayers with high aspect ratio easily.

  12. System and method for calibrating a rotary absolute position sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system includes a rotary device, a rotary absolute position (RAP) sensor generating encoded pairs of voltage signals describing positional data of the rotary device, a host machine, and an algorithm. The algorithm calculates calibration parameters usable to determine an absolute position of the rotary device using the encoded pairs, and is adapted for linearly-mapping an ellipse defined by the encoded pairs to thereby calculate the calibration parameters. A method of calibrating the RAP sensor includes measuring the rotary position as encoded pairs of voltage signals, linearly-mapping an ellipse defined by the encoded pairs to thereby calculate the calibration parameters, and calculating an absolute position of the rotary device using the calibration parameters. The calibration parameters include a positive definite matrix (A) and a center point (q) of the ellipse. The voltage signals may include an encoded sine and cosine of a rotary angle of the rotary device.

  13. Multiplex transmission system for gate drive signals of inverter circuit using surface acoustic wave filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akifumi; Ueda, Kensuke; Goka, Shigeyoshi; Wada, Keiji; Kakio, Shoji

    2016-07-01

    We propose and fabricate a multiplexed transmission system based on frequency-division multiple access (FDMA) with surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters. SAW filters are suitable for use in wide-gap switching devices and multilevel inverters because of their capability to operate at high temperatures, good electrical isolation, low cost, and high reliability. Our proposed system reduces the number of electrical signal wires needed to control each switching device and eliminates the need for isolation circuits, simplifying the transmission system and gate drive circuits. We successfully controlled two switching devices with a single coaxial line and confirmed the operation of a single-phase half-bridge inverter at a supply voltage of 100 V, and the total delay time to control the switching devices was less than 2.5 µs. Our experimental results validated our proposed system.

  14. A prototype system of microwave induced thermo-acoustic tomography for breast tumor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaozhang; Zhao, Zhiqin; Yang, Kai; Nie, Zaiping; Liu, Qinghuo

    2012-01-01

    Microwave-induced thermo-acoustic tomography (MITAT) is an innovative technique for tumor's detection. Due to there has high contrast in terms with permittivity and electrical conductivity of tumor versus normal tissue, even if the tumor still in the early phase it can be imaged clearly. For the proposed MITAT system, low energy microwave pulses are used as the irradiating signals, while the received signals are ultrasound, high contrast and high resolution images can be obtained. After some theoretical research and basic fundamental experiments, the first prototype of experimental system is designed and built. It includes the microwave radiator, the arrayed sensor bowl, the circular scanning platform, the system controller and the signal processor. Based on the experimental results using this integral MITAT clinic system, the images contrast can be reached higher than 383:1; while the sub-millimeter special resolution is obtained for a 1cm(3) scale tumor mimic. PMID:23365929

  15. Prediction of thermal acoustic oscillations (TAOs) in the CLAES solid CO2/neon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spradley, I. E.; Yuan, S. W. K.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of a study initiated to investigate the possibility that the existence of thermal acoustic oscillations (TAOs) in the Cryogenic Limb Atmospheric Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) neon plumbing system ground configuration could be the cause of higher-than-predicted heat rates measured during thermal ground testing. Tests were conducted between warm boundary temperatures ranging from 40 to 100 K, which simulated the actual test conditions of the CLAES CO2/neon system. TAOs were observed between 6 and 106 Torr, which agreed with the analytical predictions, and verified the possible existence of TAOs in the CLAES system during ground testing. The presence of TAOs was eventually confirmed in the CLAES system during a subsequent thermal test and were determined to have caused the higher heat rates measured during the prior thermal test.

  16. Investigation of GPS/IMU Positioning System for Mining Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Ken L. Stratton

    2006-09-13

    The objective of this project is to investigate the applicability of a combined Global Positioning System and Inertial Measurement Unit (GPS/IMU) for information based displays on earthmoving machines and for automated earthmoving machines in the future. This technology has the potential of allowing an information-based product like Caterpillar's Computer Aided Earthmoving System (CAES) to operate in areas with satellite shading. Satellite shading is an issue in open pit mining because machines are routinely required to operate close to high walls, which reduces significantly the amount of the visible sky to the GPS antenna mounted on the machine. An inertial measurement unit is a product, which provides data for the calculation of position based on sensing accelerations and rotation rates of the machine's rigid body. When this information is coupled with GPS it results in a positioning system that can maintain positioning capability during time periods of shading.

  17. Distributed magnetic field positioning system using code division multiple access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prigge, Eric A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus and methods for a magnetic field positioning system use a fundamentally different, and advantageous, signal structure and multiple access method, known as Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA). This signal architecture, when combined with processing methods, leads to advantages over the existing technologies, especially when applied to a system with a large number of magnetic field generators (beacons). Beacons at known positions generate coded magnetic fields, and a magnetic sensor measures a sum field and decomposes it into component fields to determine the sensor position and orientation. The apparatus and methods can have a large `building-sized` coverage area. The system allows for numerous beacons to be distributed throughout an area at a number of different locations. A method to estimate position and attitude, with no prior knowledge, uses dipole fields produced by these beacons in different locations.

  18. Can global positioning systems quantify participation in cerebral palsy?

    PubMed

    Ben-Pazi, Hilla; Barzilay, Yair; Shoval, Noam

    2014-06-01

    This study examined whether motor-related participation could be assessed by global positioning systems in individuals with cerebral palsy. Global positioning systems monitoring devices were given to 2 adolescent girls (14-year-old with diplegic cerebral palsy and her 15-year-old healthy sister). Outcome measures were traveling distances, time spent outdoors, and Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment questionnaires. Global positioning systems documented that the girl with cerebral palsy did not visit nearby friends, spent less time outdoors and traveled shorter distances than her sister (P = .02). Participation questionnaire corroborated that the girl with cerebral palsy performed most activities at home alone. Lower outdoor activity of the girl with cerebral palsy measured by a global positioning system was 29% to 53% of that of her sibling similar to participation questionnaires (44%). Global positioning devices objectively documented low outdoor activity in an adolescent with cerebral palsy compared to her sibling reflecting participation reported by validated questionnaires. Global positioning systems can potentially quantify certain aspects of participation.

  19. Maximum likelihood estimation of vehicle position for outdoor image sensor-based visible light positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiang; Lin, Jiming

    2016-04-01

    Image sensor-based visible light positioning can be applied not only to indoor environments but also to outdoor environments. To determine the performance bounds of the positioning accuracy from the view of statistical optimization for an outdoor image sensor-based visible light positioning system, we analyze and derive the maximum likelihood estimation and corresponding Cramér-Rao lower bounds of vehicle position, under the condition that the observation values of the light-emitting diode (LED) imaging points are affected by white Gaussian noise. For typical parameters of an LED traffic light and in-vehicle camera image sensor, simulation results show that accurate estimates are available, with positioning error generally less than 0.1 m at a communication distance of 30 m between the LED array transmitter and the camera receiver. With the communication distance being constant, the positioning accuracy depends on the number of LEDs used, the focal length of the lens, the pixel size, and the frame rate of the camera receiver.

  20. The emergence of perceived position in the visual system.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jason; Spotswood, Nicole; Whitney, David

    2011-01-01

    Representing object position is one of the most critical functions of the visual system, but this task is not as simple as reading off an object's retinal coordinates. A rich body of literature has demonstrated that the position in which we perceive an object depends not only on retinotopy but also on factors such as attention, eye movements, object and scene motion, and frames of reference, to name a few. Despite the distinction between perceived and retinal position, strikingly little is known about how or where perceived position is represented in the brain. In the present study, we dissociated retinal and perceived object position to test the relative precision of retina-centered versus percept-centered position coding in a number of independently defined visual areas. In an fMRI experiment, subjects performed a five-alternative forced-choice position discrimination task; our analysis focused on the trials in which subjects misperceived the positions of the stimuli. Using a multivariate pattern analysis to track the coupling of the BOLD response with incremental changes in physical and perceived position, we found that activity in higher level areas--middle temporal complex, fusiform face area, parahippocampal place area, lateral occipital cortex, and posterior fusiform gyrus--more precisely reflected the reported positions than the physical positions of the stimuli. In early visual areas, this preferential coding of perceived position was absent or reversed. Our results demonstrate a new kind of spatial topography present in higher level visual areas in which an object's position is encoded according to its perceived rather than retinal location. We term such percept-centered encoding “perceptotopy".

  1. A hybrid finite element-transfer matrix model for vibroacoustic systems with flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments.

    PubMed

    Alimonti, Luca; Atalla, Noureddine; Berry, Alain; Sgard, Franck

    2015-02-01

    Practical vibroacoustic systems involve passive acoustic treatments consisting of highly dissipative media such as poroelastic materials. The numerical modeling of such systems at low to mid frequencies typically relies on substructuring methodologies based on finite element models. Namely, the master subsystems (i.e., structural and acoustic domains) are described by a finite set of uncoupled modes, whereas condensation procedures are typically preferred for the acoustic treatments. However, although accurate, such methodology is computationally expensive when real life applications are considered. A potential reduction of the computational burden could be obtained by approximating the effect of the acoustic treatment on the master subsystems without introducing physical degrees of freedom. To do that, the treatment has to be assumed homogeneous, flat, and of infinite lateral extent. Under these hypotheses, simple analytical tools like the transfer matrix method can be employed. In this paper, a hybrid finite element-transfer matrix methodology is proposed. The impact of the limiting assumptions inherent within the analytical framework are assessed for the case of plate-cavity systems involving flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments. The results prove that the hybrid model can capture the qualitative behavior of the vibroacoustic system while reducing the computational effort.

  2. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research

    PubMed Central

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Kie, John G.; Bates, Kirk K.

    2010-01-01

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS ‘rapid fixing’ technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives. PMID:20566494

  3. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Kie, John G.; Bates, Kirk K.

    2010-01-01

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS 'rapid fixing' technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives.

  4. Existence domains of large amplitude dust-acoustic solitons in non-thermal plasmas with positive and negative dust

    SciTech Connect

    Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.; Pillay, S. R.

    2011-11-29

    Using the traditional Sagdeev pseudopotential approach, the existence of large amplitude solitons is investigated for a plasma composed of cold negative dust, adiabatic positive dust, non-thermal ions and Boltzmann electrons. The lower and upper soliton Mach number limitations are determined as a function of various parameters and physical reasons are provided as to why these Mach number limits occur. Some regions in parameter space have been identified where only negative or positive solitons occur, whereas, other regions support the coexistence of both positive and negative potential solitons.

  5. Large amplitude dust-acoustic double layers in non-thermal plasmas with positive and negative dust

    SciTech Connect

    Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.; Pillay, S. R.

    2011-11-29

    The existence of large amplitude double layers in a plasma composed of cold negative dust, adiabatic positive dust, non-thermal ions and Boltzmann electrons is investigated using the Sagdeev pseudopotential technique. Both positive potential and negative potential double layers are found to be supported by the model. The variation of the maximum amplitudes of the double layers and corresponding Mach numbers are examined as a function of various plasma parameters. In particular, we investigate to what extent ion non-thermal effects are required for positive potential double layers to occur.

  6. A pseudolite-based positioning system for legacy GNSS receivers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chongwon; So, Hyoungmin; Lee, Taikjin; Kee, Changdon

    2014-01-01

    The ephemeris data format of legacy GPS receivers is improper for positioning stationary pseudolites on the ground. Therefore, to utilize pseudolites for navigation, GPS receivers must be modified so that they can handle the modified data formats of the pseudolites. Because of this problem, the practical use of pseudolites has so far been limited. This paper proposes a pseudolite-based positioning system that can be used with unmodified legacy GPS receivers. In the proposed system, pseudolites transmit simulated GPS signals. The signals use standard GPS ephemeris data format and contain ephemeris data of simulated GPS satellites, not those of pseudolites. The use of the standard format enables the GPS receiver to process pseudolite signals without any modification. However, the position output of the GPS receiver is not the correct position in this system, because there are additional signal delays from each pseudolite to the receiver. A post-calculation process was added to obtain the correct receiver position using GPS receiver output. This re-estimation is possible because it is based on known information about the simulated signals, pseudolites, and positioning process of the GPS receiver. Simulations using generated data and live GPS data are conducted for various geometries to verify the proposed system. The test results show that the proposed system provides the desired user position using pseudolite signals without requiring any modifications to the legacy GPS receiver. In this initial study, a pseudolite-only indoor system was assumed. However, it can be expanded to a GPS-pseudolite system outdoors. PMID:24681674

  7. A Pseudolite-Based Positioning System for Legacy GNSS Receivers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chongwon; So, Hyoungmin; Lee, Taikjin; Kee, Changdon

    2014-01-01

    The ephemeris data format of legacy GPS receivers is improper for positioning stationary pseudolites on the ground. Therefore, to utilize pseudolites for navigation, GPS receivers must be modified so that they can handle the modified data formats of the pseudolites. Because of this problem, the practical use of pseudolites has so far been limited. This paper proposes a pseudolite-based positioning system that can be used with unmodified legacy GPS receivers. In the proposed system, pseudolites transmit simulated GPS signals. The signals use standard GPS ephemeris data format and contain ephemeris data of simulated GPS satellites, not those of pseudolites. The use of the standard format enables the GPS receiver to process pseudolite signals without any modification. However, the position output of the GPS receiver is not the correct position in this system, because there are additional signal delays from each pseudolite to the receiver. A post-calculation process was added to obtain the correct receiver position using GPS receiver output. This re-estimation is possible because it is based on known information about the simulated signals, pseudolites, and positioning process of the GPS receiver. Simulations using generated data and live GPS data are conducted for various geometries to verify the proposed system. The test results show that the proposed system provides the desired user position using pseudolite signals without requiring any modifications to the legacy GPS receiver. In this initial study, a pseudolite-only indoor system was assumed. However, it can be expanded to a GPS-pseudolite system outdoors. PMID:24681674

  8. Passive aquatic listener (PAL): An adoptive underwater acoustic recording system for the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostou, Marios N.; Nystuen, Jeffrey A.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Papadopoulos, Anastasios; Lykousis, Vassilios

    2011-01-01

    The ambient sound field in the ocean is a combination of natural and manmade sounds. Consequently, the interpretation of the ambient sound field can be used to quantify these processes. In the frequency range from 1 to 50 kHz, the general character of ocean ambient sound is a slowly changing background that is closely associated with local wind speed, interspersed with shorter time scale events such as rain storms, ships and animal calls. At lower frequencies the underwater ambient sound budget includes geologically generated sound activities including underwater volcanic eruptions, seismic and seepage faults that generate bubbles, etc. that can also potentially be classified and quantified. Acoustic data are collected on hydrophones. Hydrophones are simple, robust sensors that can be deployed on most ocean instrumentation systems including surface or sub-surface moorings, bottom mounted systems, drifters, ARGO floats or autonomous underwater platforms. A dedicated oceanic underwater recorder called a passive acoustic listener (PAL) has been developed. A principal issue is to accurately distinguish different sound sources so that they can be quantified as part of a sound budget, and then quantified if appropriate. Based on ongoing data collected from the Poseidon II network the retrieval potential of multi-parameters from underwater sound, including meteorological (i.e., precipitation and winds) and in general geophysical, anthropogenetic (i.e., ships, submarines, etc.) and biological (whales, etc.) sources is presented.

  9. Ultrasonic database development for the acoustic inspection device: the velocity-attenuation measurement system (VAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Burghard, Brion J.; Valencia, Juan D.; Samuel, Todd J.

    2004-07-01

    The inspection of sealed containers is a critical task for personnel charged with enforcing government policies, maintaining public safety, and ensuring national security. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a portable, handheld acoustic inspection device (AID) that provides non-invasive container interrogation and material identification capabilities. The AID technology has been deployed worldwide and user"s are providing feedback and requesting additional capabilities and functionality. Recently, PNNL has developed a laboratory-based system for automated, ultrasonic characterization of fluids to support database development for the AID. Using pulse-echo ultrasound, ultrasonic pulses are launched into a container or bulk-solid commodity. The return echoes from these pulses are analyzed in terms of time-of-flight and frequency content (as a function of temperature) to extract physical property measurements (acoustic velocity and attenuation) of the material under test. These measured values are then compared to a tailored database of materials and fluids property data acquired using the Velocity-Attenuation Measurement System (VAMS). This bench-top platform acquires key ultrasonic property measurements as a function of temperature and frequency. This paper describes the technical basis for operation of the VAMS, recent enhancements to the measurement algorithms for both the VAMS and AID technologies, and new measurement data from laboratory testing and performance demonstration activities. Applications for homeland security and counterterrorism, law enforcement, drug-interdiction and fuel transportation compliance activities will be discussed.

  10. Vibro-acoustic characterization of flexible hose in CO2 car air conditioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, F.; Bergami, A.; Martarelli, M.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2008-06-01

    Following the EU directive 2006/40/EC proscribing from 2011 that refrigerant fluids must have a global warming potential not higher than 150, it will not be allowed anymore to employ the current R134a on car air conditioning systems. Maflow s.p.a (automotive hose maker) is developing products for each possible new refrigerant. This paper is focused on hoses for CO2 refrigerants operating in the worst conditions because of the high pressures and temperatures at which they are working (with R134a the high pressure is 18 bar and low pressure is 3 bar; with CO2 the high pressure is 100 bar and low pressure is 35 bar). Therefore the noise emission control of the CO2 air conditioning systems is very important. The aim of this study is to develop a standard measurement method for the vibro - acoustic characterization of High Pressure (HP - Shark F4) and Low Pressure (LP - ULEV) hoses to reduce noise emission and raise car passenger comfort; in particular deep research on high pressure hose. The method is based on the measurement of the vibration level of the hoses in a standard test bench by means of a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) and its acoustic emission by a sound intensity probe.

  11. Design guidelines for avoiding thermo-acoustic oscillations in helium piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Rabehl, Roger

    2015-04-02

    Thermo-acoustic oscillations are a commonly observed phenomenon in helium cryogenic systems, especially in tubes connecting hot and cold areas. The open ends of these tubes are connected to the lower temperature (typically at 4.5 K), and the closed ends of these tubes are connected to the high temperature (300 K). Cryogenic instrumentation installations provide ideal conditions for these oscillations to occur due to the steep temperature gradient along the tubing. These oscillations create errors in measurements as well as an undesirable heat load to the system. The work presented here develops engineering guidelines to design oscillation-free helium piping. This work also studies the effect of different piping inserts and shows how the proper geometrical combinations have to be chosen to avoid thermo-acoustic oscillations. The effect of an 80 K intercept is also studied and shows that thermo-oscillations can be dampened by placing the intercept at an appropriate location. As a result, the design of helium piping based on the present work is also verified with the experimental results available in open literature.

  12. Design guidelines for avoiding thermo-acoustic oscillations in helium piping systems

    DOE PAGES

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Rabehl, Roger

    2015-04-02

    Thermo-acoustic oscillations are a commonly observed phenomenon in helium cryogenic systems, especially in tubes connecting hot and cold areas. The open ends of these tubes are connected to the lower temperature (typically at 4.5 K), and the closed ends of these tubes are connected to the high temperature (300 K). Cryogenic instrumentation installations provide ideal conditions for these oscillations to occur due to the steep temperature gradient along the tubing. These oscillations create errors in measurements as well as an undesirable heat load to the system. The work presented here develops engineering guidelines to design oscillation-free helium piping. This workmore » also studies the effect of different piping inserts and shows how the proper geometrical combinations have to be chosen to avoid thermo-acoustic oscillations. The effect of an 80 K intercept is also studied and shows that thermo-oscillations can be dampened by placing the intercept at an appropriate location. As a result, the design of helium piping based on the present work is also verified with the experimental results available in open literature.« less

  13. Accuracy of the LPM tracking system considering dynamic position changes.

    PubMed

    Ogris, Georg; Leser, Roland; Horsak, Brian; Kornfeind, Philipp; Heller, Mario; Baca, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the accuracy of the tracking system LPM (local position measurement). The goal was to determine detailed error values of the system in the context of sports performance analyses. Six moderately trained male soccer players (amateur level) performed 276 runs on three different courses at six different speeds. Additionally, ten small-sided game plays were carried out. All runs and game plays were recorded with the LPM tracking system and the motion capture system VICON simultaneously. VICON served as the reference system. The absolute error of all LPM position estimations was on average 23.4±20.7 cm. The estimation for average velocities varied between 0.01 km h(-1) and 0.23 km h(-1), the maximum speed estimations differed by up to 2.71 km h(-1). In addition, the results showed that the accuracy of the LPM system is highly dependent on the instantaneous dynamics of the player and decreases in the margins of the observation field. These dependencies were quantified. Considering commonly used applications of position tracking systems in sports (Leser, Ogris, & Baca, 2011), the accuracy of LPM is acceptable for position and velocity estimations. The system provides valuable results for average velocities but seems to be far less reliable when dealing with high dynamic movements and measuring instantaneous velocities.

  14. Integrating Wraparound into a Schoolwide System of Positive Behavior Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eber, Lucille; Hyde, Kelly; Suter, Jesse C.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the structure for implementation of the wraparound process within a multi-tiered system of school wide positive behavior support (SWPBS) to address the needs of the 1-5% of students with complex emotional/behavioral challenges. The installation of prerequisite system features that, based on a 3 year demonstration process, we consider…

  15. 78 FR 22554 - Nationwide Differential Global Positioning System (NDGPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... records notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008 issue of the Federal Register (73 FR... needs and systems requirements of the inland (terrestrial) component of the NDGPS (72 FR 42219). On... Nationwide Differential Global Positioning System (NDGPS) AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS and Research...

  16. Precision positioning system based on intelligent Fuzzy-PID control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Liqiong; Li, Yan

    2010-08-01

    To break through the limitations of static and dynamic characteristics of conventional step motor driven open-loop positioning devices, a two-dimensional precision positioning system with a travel range of 100mm×100mm has been developed. This paper presents its structure, control principle and performance experiments. This system, equipped with cross roller guides working as linear guiding elements, is driven by step motors through ball screw transmission. A threeaxis dual-frequency laser interferometric measurement system is established for real-time measurement and feedback of system's movements in three degrees of freedom (DOF) and an intelligent Fuzzy-PID controller is implemented for this system's motion control. In the controller, the PID module calculates the output from motor drivers and its initial parameters are tuned through expansion of critical proportioning method; the Fuzzy module optimizes PID parameters to fulfill specific requirements of different movement stages. A dead zone control mechanism is developed in this controller to minimize the oscillations around target position. Experimental results indicate that system with Fuzzy-PID controller shows faster response than that with ordinary PID controller. Moreover, with this controller implemented, the developed precision positioning system achieves better repeatability (+/-2μm) and accuracy (+/-2.5μm) within the full range than open-loop system using step motor.

  17. SU-E-T-318: The Effect of Patient Positioning Errors On Target Coverage and Cochlear Dose in Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment of Acoustic Neuromas

    SciTech Connect

    Dellamonica, D.; Luo, G.; Ding, G.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Setup errors on the order of millimeters may cause under-dosing of targets and significant changes in dose to critical structures especially when planning with tight margins in stereotactic radiosurgery. This study evaluates the effects of these types of patient positioning uncertainties on planning target volume (PTV) coverage and cochlear dose for stereotactic treatments of acoustic neuromas. Methods: Twelve acoustic neuroma patient treatment plans were retrospectively evaluated in Brainlab iPlan RT Dose 4.1.3. All treatment beams were shaped by HDMLC from a Varian TX machine. Seven patients had planning margins of 2mm, five had 1–1.5mm. Six treatment plans were created for each patient simulating a 1mm setup error in six possible directions: anterior-posterior, lateral, and superiorinferior. The arcs and HDMLC shapes were kept the same for each plan. Change in PTV coverage and mean dose to the cochlea was evaluated for each plan. Results: The average change in PTV coverage for the 72 simulated plans was −1.7% (range: −5 to +1.1%). The largest average change in coverage was observed for shifts in the patient's superior direction (−2.9%). The change in mean cochlear dose was highly dependent upon the direction of the shift. Shifts in the anterior and superior direction resulted in an average increase in dose of 13.5 and 3.8%, respectively, while shifts in the posterior and inferior direction resulted in an average decrease in dose of 17.9 and 10.2%. The average change in dose to the cochlea was 13.9% (range: 1.4 to 48.6%). No difference was observed based on the size of the planning margin. Conclusion: This study indicates that if the positioning uncertainty is kept within 1mm the setup errors may not result in significant under-dosing of the acoustic neuroma target volumes. However, the change in mean cochlear dose is highly dependent upon the direction of the shift.

  18. An Acoustic OFDM System with Symbol-by-Symbol Doppler Compensation for Underwater Communication

    PubMed Central

    MinhHai, Tran; Rie, Saotome; Suzuki, Taisaku; Wada, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    We propose an acoustic OFDM system for underwater communication, specifically for vertical link communications such as between a robot in the sea bottom and a mother ship in the surface. The main contributions are (1) estimation of time varying Doppler shift using continual pilots in conjunction with monitoring the drift of Power Delay Profile and (2) symbol-by-symbol Doppler compensation in frequency domain by an ICI matrix representing nonuniform Doppler. In addition, we compare our proposal against a resampling method. Simulation and experimental results confirm that our system outperforms the resampling method when the velocity changes roughly over OFDM symbols. Overall, experimental results taken in Shizuoka, Japan, show our system using 16QAM, and 64QAM achieved a data throughput of 7.5 Kbit/sec with a transmitter moving at maximum 2 m/s, in a complicated trajectory, over 30 m vertically. PMID:27057558

  19. Chemical Tracking Systems: Not Your Usual Global Positioning System!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2007-01-01

    The haphazard storing and tracking of chemicals in the laboratory is a serious safety issue facing science teachers. To get control of your chemicals, try implementing a "chemical tracking system". A chemical tracking system (CTS) is a database of chemicals used in the laboratory. If implemented correctly, a CTS will reduce purchasing costs,…

  20. IMU/GPS System Provides Position and Attitude Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ching Fang

    2006-01-01

    A special navigation system is being developed to provide high-quality information on the position and attitude of a moving platform (an aircraft or spacecraft), for use in pointing and stabilization of a hyperspectral remote-sensing system carried aboard the platform. The system also serves to enable synchronization and interpretation of readouts of all onboard sensors. The heart of the system is a commercially available unit, small enough to be held in one hand, that contains an integral combination of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) type, Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, a differential GPS subsystem, and ancillary data-processing subsystems. The system utilizes GPS carrier-phase measurements to generate time data plus highly accurate and continuous data on the position, attitude, rotation, and acceleration of the platform. Relative to prior navigation systems based on IMU and GPS subsystems, this system is smaller, is less expensive, and performs better. Optionally, the system can easily be connected to a laptop computer for demonstration and evaluation. In addition to airborne and spaceborne remote-sensing applications, there are numerous potential terrestrial sensing, measurement, and navigation applications in diverse endeavors that include forestry, environmental monitoring, agriculture, mining, and robotics.