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Sample records for acoustic power radiated

  1. Relationship between acoustic power and acoustic radiation force on absorbing and reflecting targets for spherically focusing radiators.

    PubMed

    Gélat, Pierre; Shaw, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Total acoustic output power is an important parameter required by standards for most ultrasonic medical equipment including high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) systems. Radiation force balances are routinely used; however, radiation force is not strictly dependent on the ultrasound power but, rather, on the wave momentum resolved in one direction. Consequently, measurements based on radiation force become progressively less accurate as the ultrasound wave deviates further from a true plane wave. HIFU transducers can be very strongly focused with F-numbers less than one: under these conditions, the uncertainty associated with use of the radiation force method becomes very significant. International Standards IEC 61161 and IEC 62555 suggest plane-wave correction factors for unfocused transducers radiating onto an ideal absorbing target and focusing corrections for focused transducers radiating onto ideal absorbing targets and onto conical reflecting targets (IEC 61161). Previous models have relied on calculations based on the Rayleigh integral, which is not strictly correct for curved sources. In the work described here, an approach combining finite element methods with a discretization of the Helmholtz equation was developed, making it possible to model the boundary condition at the structure/fluid interface more correctly. This has been used to calculate the relationship between radiation force and total power for both absorbing and conical reflecting targets for transducers ranging from planar to an F-number of 0.5 (hemispherical) and to compare with the recommendations of IEC 61161 and IEC 62555. PMID:25683223

  2. Features of Propagation of the Acoustic-Gravity Waves Generated by High-Power Periodic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogor, L. F.; Frolov, V. L.

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of the bandpass filtering of temporal variations of the Doppler frequency shift of radio signals from a vertical-sounding Doppler radar located near the city of Kharkov when the ionosphere was heated by high-power periodic (with 10 and 15-min periods) radiation from the Sura facility. The filtering was done in the ranges of periods that are close to the acoustic cutoff period and the Brunt—Väisälä period (4-6, 8-12, and 13-17 min). Oscillations with periods of 4-6 min and amplitudes of 50-100 mHz were not recorded in fact. Oscillations with periods of 8-12 and 13-17 min and amplitudes of 60-100 mHz were detected in almost all the sessions. In the former and the latter oscillations, the time of delay with respect to the heater switch-on was close to 100 min and about 40-50 min, respectively. These values correspond to group propagation velocities of about 160 and 320-400 m/s. The Doppler shift oscillations were caused by the acoustic-gravity waves which led to periodic variations in the electron number density with a relative amplitude of about 0.1-1.0%. It was demonstrated that the acoustic-gravity waves were not recorded when the effective power of the Sura facility was equal to 50 MW and they were confidently observed when the effective power was increased up to 130 MW. It is shown that the period of the wave processes was determined by the period of the heating-pause cycles, and the duration of the wave trains did not depend on the duration of the series of heating-pause cycles. The data suggest that the generation mechanism of recorded wave disturbances is different from the mechanism proposed in 1970-1990.

  3. Turbofan Acoustic Propagation and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    2000-01-01

    This document describes progress in the development of finite element codes for the prediction of near and far field acoustic radiation from the inlet and aft fan ducts of turbofan engines. The report consists of nine papers which have appeared in archival journals and conference proceedings, or are presently in review for publication. Topics included are: 1. Aft Fan Duct Acoustic Radiation; 2. Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements for Acoustic Radiation in a Uniformly Moving Medium; 3. A Reflection Free Boundary Condition for Propagation in Uniform Flow Using Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements; 4. A Numerical Comparison Between Multiple-Scales and FEM Solution for Sound Propagation in Lined Flow Ducts; 5. Acoustic Propagation at High Frequencies in Ducts; 6. The Boundary Condition at an Impedance Wall in a Nonuniform Duct with Potential Flow; 7. A Reverse Flow Theorem and Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows; 8. Reciprocity and Acoustics Power in One Dimensional Compressible Potential Flows; and 9. Numerical Experiments on Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows.

  4. The effect of the size of the opening on the acoustic power radiated by a reed woodwind instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilloteau, Alexis; Guillemain, Philippe; Kergomard, Jean; Jousserand, Michael

    2015-05-01

    For a given note, the maker of woodwind instruments can choose between different sizes for the toneholes under the condition that the location is appropriate. The present paper aims at analyzing the consequences of this choice on the power radiated by a hole, which depends on the coupling between the acoustic resonator and the excitation mechanism of the self-sustained oscillation, thus on the blowing pressure. For that purpose a simplified reed instrument is investigated, with a cylindrical pipe and a unique orifice at the pipe termination. The orifice diameter was varied between the pipe diameter and a size such that the instrument did not play. The pipe length was in each case adjusted to keep the resonance frequency constant. A simple analytical model predicts that, for a given mouth pressure of the instrumentalist, the radiated power does not depend on the size of the hole if it is wide enough and if resonator losses are ignored. Numerical solution of a model including losses confirms this result: the difference in radiated power between two diaphragm sizes remains smaller than the difference obtained if the radiated power would be proportional to the orifice cross section area. This is confirmed by experiments using an artificial mouth, but the results show that the linear losses are underestimated, and that significant nonlinear losses occur. The measurements are limited to the acoustic pressure at a given distance of the orifice. Experiments also show that rounding edges of the orifice reduces nonlinear losses resulting in an increase of the power radiated and of the extinction threshold, and resulting in a larger dynamical range.

  5. The effect of the coupling between the top plate and the fingerboard on the acoustic power radiated by a classical guitar (L).

    PubMed

    García-Mayén, Héctor; Santillán, Arturo

    2011-03-01

    An experimental investigation on the coupling between the fingerboard and the top plate of a classical guitar at low frequencies is presented. The study was carried out using a finished top plate under fixed boundary conditions and a commercial guitar. Radiated sound power was determined in one-third octave bands up to the band of 1 kHz based on measurements of sound intensity. The results provide evidence that the way in which the fingerboard and top plate are coupled is not a relevant factor in the radiated acoustic power of the classical guitar in the studied frequency range. PMID:21428477

  6. Acoustic radiation stress in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the radiation-induced static strains associated with acoustic waves propagating in solids are obtained directly from the virial theorem for an elastic continuum and that the radiation stresses result from combining the virial theorem with the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle of adiabatic invariance. The experimental confirmation of critical theoretical predictions in solids is reported. The implications of the results for the fundamental thermal properties of crystals are addressed.

  7. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging

    PubMed Central

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E.

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are “stiffness weighted” and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery. PMID:18777934

  8. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  9. Multimodal far-field acoustic radiation pattern: An approximate equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    The far-field sound radiation theory for a circular duct was studied for both single mode and multimodal inputs. The investigation was intended to develop a method to determine the acoustic power produced by turbofans as a function of mode cut-off ratio. With reasonable simplifying assumptions the single mode radiation pattern was shown to be reducible to a function of mode cut-off ratio only. With modal cut-off ratio as the dominant variable, multimodal radiation patterns can be reduced to a simple explicit expression. This approximate expression provides excellent agreement with an exact calculation of the sound radiation pattern using equal acoustic power per mode.

  10. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far-field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far-field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  11. Acoustic radiation from lined, unflanged ducts: Acoustic source distribution program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckemeyer, R. J.; Sawdy, D. T.

    1971-01-01

    An acoustic radiation analysis was developed to predict the far-field characteristics of fan noise radiated from an acoustically lined unflanged duct. This analysis is comprised of three modular digital computer programs which together provide a capability of accounting for the impedance mismatch at the duct exit plane. Admissible duct configurations include circular or annular, with or without an extended centerbody. This variation in duct configurations provides a capability of modeling inlet and fan duct noise radiation. The computer programs are described in detail.

  12. Measurement of the total acoustic output power of HITU transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenderka, Klaus-V.; Beissner, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    The majority of High Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound (HITU) applications use strongly focused ultrasound fields generating very high local intensities in the focal region. The metrology of these high-power ultrasound fields is a challenge for the established measurement procedures and devices. This paper describes the results of measurements by means of the radiation force for a total acoustic output power up to 400 W at 1.5 MHz and up to 200 W at 2.45 MHz. For this purpose, a radiation force balance set-up was adapted for the determination of large acoustic output powers. For two types of HITU transducers, the relationship between the total acoustic output power and the applied net electrical power was determined at close transducer-target distance. Further, dependence of the measured electro-acoustic radiation conductance on the transducer-target distance was investigated at reduced power levels, considering the appearance of focal anomalies. Concluding, a list of the main uncertainty contributions, and an estimate of the uncertainty for the used radiation force balance set-up is given for measurements at high power levels.

  13. Acoustic emission sensor radiation damage threshold experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, K.M.; Pepper, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Determination of the threshold for damage to acoustic emission sensors exposed to radiation is important in their application to leak detection in radioactive waste transport and storage. Proper response to system leaks is necessary to ensure the safe operation of these systems. A radiation impaired sensor could provide ``false negative or false positive`` indication of acoustic signals from leaks within the system. Research was carried out in the Radiochemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the beta/gamma radiation damage threshold for acoustic emission sensor systems. The individual system consisted of an acoustic sensor mounted with a two part epoxy onto a stainless steel waveguide. The systems were placed in an irradiation fixture and exposed to a Cobalt-60 source. After each irradiation, the sensors were recalibrated by Physical Acoustics Corporation. The results were compared to the initial calibrations performed prior to irradiation and a control group, not exposed to radiation, was used to validate the results. This experiment determines the radiation damage threshold of each acoustic sensor system and verifies its life expectancy, usefulness and reliability for many applications in radioactive environments.

  14. Experimental Robust Control of Structural Acoustic Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.; Clark, Robert L.; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    1998-01-01

    This work addresses the design and application of robust controllers for structural acoustic control. Both simulation and experimental results are presented. H(infinity) and mu-synthesis design methods were used to design feedback controllers which minimize power radiated from a panel while avoiding instability due to unmodeled dynamics. Specifically, high order structural modes which couple strongly to the actuator-sensor path were poorly modeled. This model error was analytically bounded with an uncertainty model, which allowed controllers to be designed without artificial limits on control effort. It is found that robust control methods provide the control designer with physically meaningful parameters with which to tune control designs and can be very useful in determining limits of performance. Experimental results also showed, however, poor robustness properties for control designs with ad-hoc uncertainty models. The importance of quantifying and bounding model errors is discussed.

  15. Chromospheric Heating by Acoustic Waves Compared to Radiative Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotka, M.; Heinzel, P.; Švanda, M.; Jurčák, J.; del Moro, D.; Berrilli, F.

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic and magnetoacoustic waves are among the possible candidate mechanisms that heat the upper layers of the solar atmosphere. A weak chromospheric plage near the large solar pore NOAA 11005 was observed on 2008 October 15, in the Fe i 617.3 nm and Ca ii 853.2 nm lines of the Interferometric Bidimemsional Spectrometer attached to the Dunn Solar Telescope. In analyzing the Ca ii observations (with spatial and temporal resolutions of 0.″4 and 52 s) the energy deposited by acoustic waves is compared to that released by radiative losses. The deposited acoustic flux is estimated from the power spectra of Doppler oscillations measured in the Ca ii line core. The radiative losses are calculated using a grid of seven one-dimensional hydrostatic semi-empirical model atmospheres. The comparison shows that the spatial correlation of the maps of radiative losses and acoustic flux is 72%. In a quiet chromosphere, the contribution of acoustic energy flux to radiative losses is small, only about 15%. In active areas with a photospheric magnetic-field strength between 300 and 1300 G and an inclination of 20°–60°, the contribution increases from 23% (chromospheric network) to 54% (a plage). However, these values have to be considered as lower limits and it might be possible that the acoustic energy flux is the main contributor to the heating of bright chromospheric network and plages.

  16. Manipulating Liquids With Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    1999-01-01

    High-intensity ultrasound waves can produce the effects of "Acoustic Radiation Pressure" (ARP) and "acoustic streaming." These effects can be used to propel liquid flows and to apply forces that can be used to move or manipulate floating objects or liquid surfaces. NASA's interest in ARP includes the remote-control agitation of liquids and the manipulation of bubbles and drops in liquid experiments and propellant systems. A high level of flexibility is attained by using a high-power acoustic phased array to generate, steer, and focus a beam of acoustic waves. This is called an Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Array, or ARPPA. In this approach, many acoustic transducer elements emit wavelets that converge into a single beam of sound waves. Electronically coordinating the timing, or "phase shift," of the acoustic waves makes it possible to form a beam with a predefined direction and focus. Therefore, a user can direct the ARP force at almost any desired point within a liquid volume. ARPPA lets experimenters manipulate objects anywhere in a test volume. This flexibility allow it to be used for multiple purposes, such as to agitate liquids, deploy and manipulate drops or bubbles, and even suppress sloshing in spacecraft propellant tanks.

  17. Material fabrication using acoustic radiation forces

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Naveen N.; Sinha, Dipen N.; Goddard, Gregory Russ

    2015-12-01

    Apparatus and methods for using acoustic radiation forces to order particles suspended in a host liquid are described. The particles may range in size from nanometers to millimeters, and may have any shape. The suspension is placed in an acoustic resonator cavity, and acoustical energy is supplied thereto using acoustic transducers. The resulting pattern may be fixed by using a solidifiable host liquid, forming thereby a solid material. Patterns may be quickly generated; typical times ranging from a few seconds to a few minutes. In a one-dimensional arrangement, parallel layers of particles are formed. With two and three dimensional transducer arrangements, more complex particle configurations are possible since different standing-wave patterns may be generated in the resonator. Fabrication of periodic structures, such as metamaterials, having periods tunable by varying the frequency of the acoustic waves, on surfaces or in bulk volume using acoustic radiation forces, provides great flexibility in the creation of new materials. Periodicities may range from millimeters to sub-micron distances, covering a large portion of the range for optical and acoustical metamaterials.

  18. Measuring Acoustic-Radiation Stresses in Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    System measures nonlinearity parameters of materials. Uses static strain generated by acoustic wave propagating in material. Since static strain is effectively "dc" component of waveform distortion, problems associated with phase-cancellation artifacts disappear. Further, sign of nonlinearity parameter obtained by simple inspection of measured signal polarity. These features make this system very amenable to use in field. System expected to become standard for acoustic-radiation-stress measurements for solids and liquids and for characterization of material properties related to strength and residual or applied stresses. Also expected to become standard for transducer calibration.

  19. Radiation directivity rotation by acoustic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xue; Liang, Bin E-mail: jccheng@nju.edu.cn; Zou, Xin-ye; Cheng, Jian-chun E-mail: jccheng@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Likun

    2015-08-31

    We use a metamaterial-based scheme to rotate the radiation directivity of sound radiated by a source surrounded by the structure. The rotation is demonstrated through both numerical simulations and experiments. The performance persists within a broadband and is entirely independent of the location and pattern of source inside, suggesting great potential in various practical scenarios where both the signal frequency and source position may vary significantly. We have also investigated the possibility to realize versatile controls of radiation direction by tailoring the structural parameters. Our design with special directivity-steering capability may open route to loudspeaker and auditorium acoustics designs and medical ultrasound applications.

  20. Radiation directivity rotation by acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue; Zhang, Likun; Liang, Bin; Zou, Xin-ye; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2015-08-01

    We use a metamaterial-based scheme to rotate the radiation directivity of sound radiated by a source surrounded by the structure. The rotation is demonstrated through both numerical simulations and experiments. The performance persists within a broadband and is entirely independent of the location and pattern of source inside, suggesting great potential in various practical scenarios where both the signal frequency and source position may vary significantly. We have also investigated the possibility to realize versatile controls of radiation direction by tailoring the structural parameters. Our design with special directivity-steering capability may open route to loudspeaker and auditorium acoustics designs and medical ultrasound applications.

  1. Surface contributions to radiated sound power.

    PubMed

    Marburg, Steffen; Lösche, Eric; Peters, Herwig; Kessissoglou, Nicole

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a method to identify the surface areas of a vibrating structure that contribute to the radiated sound power. The surface contributions of the structure are based on the acoustic radiation modes and are computed for all boundaries of the acoustic domain. The surface contributions are compared to the acoustic intensity, which is a common measure for near-field acoustic energy. Sound intensity usually has positive and negative values that correspond to energy sources and sinks on the surface of the radiating structure. Sound from source and sink areas partially cancel each other and only a fraction of the near-field acoustic energy reaches the far-field. In contrast to the sound intensity, the surface contributions are always positive and no cancelation effects exist. The technique presented here provides a method to localize the relevant radiating surface areas on a vibrating structure. To illustrate the method, the radiated sound power from a baffled square plate is presented. PMID:23742325

  2. Power absorption in acoustically driven ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labanowski, D.; Jung, A.; Salahuddin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have recently been used to drive ferromagnetic resonance by exploiting the coupling between strain and magnetization in magnetostrictive materials in a technique called acoustically driven ferromagnetic resonance (ADFMR). In this work, we quantitatively examine the power absorbed by the magnetic elements in such systems. We find that power absorption scales exponentially with the length of the magnetic element in the direction of SAW propagation, with the rate of scaling set by the thickness of magnetic material. In addition, we find that ADFMR behaves consistently across a wide range of input power values (>65 dB). Our results indicate that devices such as filters, oscillators, and sensors can be designed that operate with very low power, yet provide high tunability.

  3. Experimental study of acoustic radiation force of an ultrasound beam on absorbing and scattering objects

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V. Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2015-10-28

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter.

  4. Experimental Study of Acoustic Radiation Force of an Ultrasound Beam on Absorbing and Scattering Objects

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V.; Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter. PMID:27147775

  5. Experimental study of acoustic radiation force of an ultrasound beam on absorbing and scattering objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V.; Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter.

  6. A general low frequency acoustic radiation capability for NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, G. C.; Henderson, F. M.; Schroeder, E. A.; Lipman, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    A new capability called NASHUA is described for calculating the radiated acoustic sound pressure field exterior to a harmonically-excited arbitrary submerged 3-D elastic structure. The surface fluid pressures and velocities are first calculated by coupling a NASTRAN finite element model of the structure with a discretized form of the Helmholtz surface integral equation for the exterior fluid. After the fluid impedance is calculated, most of the required matrix operations are performed using the general matrix manipulation package (DMAP) available in NASTRAN. Far field radiated pressures are then calculated from the surface solution using the Helmholtz exterior integral equation. Other output quantities include the maximum sound pressure levels in each of the three coordinate planes, the rms and average surface pressures and normal velocities, the total radiated power and the radiation efficiency. The overall approach is illustrated and validated using known analytic solutions for submerged spherical shells subjected to both uniform and nonuniform applied loads.

  7. Transthoracic Cardiac Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradway, David Pierson

    This dissertation investigates the feasibility of a real-time transthoracic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging system to measure myocardial function non-invasively in clinical setting. Heart failure is an important cardiovascular disease and contributes to the leading cause of death for developed countries. Patients exhibiting heart failure with a low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) can often be identified by clinicians, but patients with preserved LVEF might be undetected if they do not exhibit other signs and symptoms of heart failure. These cases motivate development of transthoracic ARFI imaging to aid the early diagnosis of the structural and functional heart abnormalities leading to heart failure. M-Mode ARFI imaging utilizes ultrasonic radiation force to displace tissue several micrometers in the direction of wave propagation. Conventional ultrasound tracks the response of the tissue to the force. This measurement is repeated rapidly at a location through the cardiac cycle, measuring timing and relative changes in myocardial stiffness. ARFI imaging was previously shown capable of measuring myocardial properties and function via invasive open-chest and intracardiac approaches. The prototype imaging system described in this dissertation is capable of rapid acquisition, processing, and display of ARFI images and shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) movies. Also presented is a rigorous safety analysis, including finite element method (FEM) simulations of tissue heating, hydrophone intensity and mechanical index (MI) measurements, and thermocouple transducer face heating measurements. For the pulse sequences used in later animal and clinical studies, results from the safety analysis indicates that transthoracic ARFI imaging can be safely applied at rates and levels realizable on the prototype ARFI imaging system. Preliminary data are presented from in vivo trials studying changes in myocardial stiffness occurring under normal and abnormal

  8. Modal analysis and intensity of acoustic radiation of the kettledrum.

    PubMed

    Tronchin, Lamberto

    2005-02-01

    The acoustical features of kettledrums have been analyzed by means of modal analysis and acoustic radiation (p/v ratio) measurements. Modal analysis of two different kettledrums was undertaken, exciting the system both by a hammer and a shaker. Up to 15 vibrational modes were clearly identified. Acoustic radiation was studied using two ways. Based on previous experiments of other researchers, a new parameter, called intensity of acoustic radiation (IAR), has been defined and measured. Results show a strict relationship between IAR and the frequency response function (FRF, which is the v/F ratio), and IAR also strongly relates the modal pattern to acoustic radiation. Finally, IAR is proposed for vibro-acoustical characterization of kettledrums and other musical instruments such as strings, pianos, and harpsichords. PMID:15759711

  9. Generation of thermo-acoustic waves from pulsed solar/IR radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Aowabin

    Acoustic waves could potentially be used in a wide range of engineering applications; however, the high energy consumption in generating acoustic waves from electrical energy and the cost associated with the process limit the use of acoustic waves in industrial processes. Acoustic waves converted from solar radiation provide a feasible way of obtaining acoustic energy, without relying on conventional nonrenewable energy sources. One of the goals of this thesis project was to experimentally study the conversion of thermal to acoustic energy using pulsed radiation. The experiments were categorized into "indoor" and "outdoor" experiments, each with a separate experimental setup. The indoor experiments used an IR heater to power the thermo-acoustic lasers and were primarily aimed at studying the effect of various experimental parameters on the amplitude of sound waves in the low frequency range (below 130 Hz). The IR radiation was modulated externally using a chopper wheel and then impinged on a porous solid, which was housed inside a thermo-acoustic (TA) converter. A microphone located at a certain distance from the porous solid inside the TA converter detected the acoustic signals. The "outdoor" experiments, which were targeted at TA conversion at comparatively higher frequencies (in 200 Hz-3 kHz range) used solar energy to power the thermo-acoustic laser. The amplitudes (in RMS) of thermo-acoustic signals obtained in experiments using IR heater as radiation source were in the 80-100 dB range. The frequency of acoustic waves corresponded to the frequency of interceptions of the radiation beam by the chopper. The amplitudes of acoustic waves were influenced by several factors, including the chopping frequency, magnitude of radiation flux, type of porous material, length of porous material, external heating of the TA converter housing, location of microphone within the air column, and design of the TA converter. The time-dependent profile of the thermo-acoustic signals

  10. Nonlinear aspects of acoustic radiation force in biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovsky, Lev; Tsyuryupa, Sergey; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2015-10-28

    In the past decade acoustic radiation force (ARF) became a powerful tool in numerous biomedical applications. ARF from a focused ultrasound beam acts as a virtual “finger” for remote probing of internal anatomical structures and obtaining diagnostic information. This presentation deals with generation of shear waves by nonlinear focused beams. Albeit the ARF has intrinsically nonlinear origin, in most cases the primary ultrasonic wave was considered in the linear approximation. In this presentation, we consider the effects of nonlinearly distorted beams on generation of shear waves by such beams.

  11. RADIATIVE HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF ACOUSTIC WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, S.; Carlsson, M.

    2010-10-10

    We investigate the formation and evolution of the Ca II H line in a sunspot. The aim of our study is to establish the mechanisms underlying the formation of the frequently observed brightenings of small regions of sunspot umbrae known as 'umbral flashes'. We perform fully consistent NLTE radiation hydrodynamic simulations of the propagation of acoustic waves in sunspot umbrae and conclude that umbral flashes result from increased emission of the local solar material during the passage of acoustic waves originating in the photosphere and steepening to shock in the chromosphere. To quantify the significance of possible physical mechanisms that contribute to the formation of umbral flashes, we perform a set of simulations on a grid formed by different wave power spectra, different inbound coronal radiation, and different parameterized chromospheric heating. Our simulations show that the waves with frequencies in the range 4.5-7.0 mHz are critical to the formation of the observed blueshifts of umbral flashes while waves with frequencies below 4.5 mHz do not play a role despite their dominance in the photosphere. The observed emission in the Ca II H core between flashes only occurs in the simulations that include significant inbound coronal radiation and/or extra non-radiative chromospheric heating in addition to shock dissipation.

  12. Acoustic radiation force impulse of the liver

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Mirko; Crosara, Stefano; De Robertis, Riccardo; Canestrini, Stefano; Demozzi, Emanuele; Gallotti, Anna; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is a new and promising ultrasound-based diagnostic technique that, evaluating the wave propagation speed, allows the assessment of the tissue stiffness. ARFI is implemented in the ultrasound scanner. By short-duration acoustic radiation forces (less than 1 ms), localized displacements are generated in a selected region of interest not requiring any external compression so reducing the operator dependency. The generated wave scan provides qualitative or quantitative (wave velocity values) responses. Several non-invasive methods for assessing the staging of fibrosis are used, in order to avoid liver biopsy. Liver function tests and transient elastography are non-invasive, sensitive and accurate tools for the assessment of liver fibrosis and for the discrimination between cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic liver. Many published studies analyse ARFI performance and feasibility in studying diffuse liver diseases and compare them to other diagnostic imaging modalities such as conventional ultrasonography and transient elastography. Solid focal liver lesions, both benign and malignant, are common findings during abdominal examinations. The accurate characterization and differential diagnosis are important aims of all the imaging modalities available today. Only few papers describe the application of ARFI technology in the study of solid focal liver lesions, with different results. In the present study, the existing literature, to the best of our knowledge, about ARFI application on diffuse and focal liver pathology has been evaluated and results and statistical analyses have been compared, bringing to the conclusion that ARFI can be used in the study of the liver with similar accuracy as transient elastography in diagnosing significant fibrosis or cirrhosis and has got some advantages in respect to transient elastography since it does not require separate equipment, better displays anatomical structures and measurements can be

  13. System for Manipulating Drops and Bubbles Using Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The manipulation and control of drops of liquid and gas bubbles is achieved using high intensity acoustics in the form of and/or acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. generated by a controlled wave emission from a transducer. Acoustic radiation pressure is used to deploy or dispense drops into a liquid or a gas or bubbles into a liquid at zero or near zero velocity from the discharge end of a needle such as a syringe needle. Acoustic streaming is useful in manipulating the drop or bubble during or after deployment. Deployment and discharge is achieved by focusing the acoustic radiation pressure on the discharge end of the needle, and passing the acoustic waves through the fluid in the needle. through the needle will itself, or coaxially through the fluid medium surrounding the needle. Alternatively, the acoustic waves can be counter-deployed by focusing on the discharge end of the needle from a transducer axially aligned with the needle, but at a position opposite the needle, to prevent premature deployment of the drop or bubble. The acoustic radiation pressure can also be used for detecting the presence or absence of a drop or a bubble at the tip of a needle or for sensing various physical characteristics of the drop or bubble such as size or density.

  14. Selectively manipulable acoustic-powered microswimmers

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Daniel; Lu, Mengqian; Nourhani, Amir; Lammert, Paul E.; Stratton, Zak; Muddana, Hari S.; Crespi, Vincent H.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-01

    Selective actuation of a single microswimmer from within a diverse group would be a first step toward collaborative guided action by a group of swimmers. Here we describe a new class of microswimmer that accomplishes this goal. Our swimmer design overcomes the commonly-held design paradigm that microswimmers must use non-reciprocal motion to achieve propulsion; instead, the swimmer is propelled by oscillatory motion of an air bubble trapped within the swimmer's polymer body. This oscillatory motion is driven by the application of a low-power acoustic field, which is biocompatible with biological samples and with the ambient liquid. This acoustically-powered microswimmer accomplishes controllable and rapid translational and rotational motion, even in highly viscous liquids (with viscosity 6,000 times higher than that of water). And by using a group of swimmers each with a unique bubble size (and resulting unique resonance frequencies), selective actuation of a single swimmer from among the group can be readily achieved. PMID:25993314

  15. Low power acoustic harvesting of aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Kaduchak, G.; Sinha, D. N.

    2001-01-01

    A new acoustic device for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and sniall liquid/solid samples (up to several millimeters in diameter) in air has been developed. The device is inexpensive, low-power, and, in its simplest embodiment, does not require accurate alignmen1 of a resonant cavity. It is constructed from a cylindrical PZT tube of outside diameter D = 19.0 mm and thickness-to-radius ratio h/a - 0.03. The lowest-order breathing mode of the tube is tuned to match a resonant mode of the interior air-filled cylindrical cavity. A high Q cavity results that can be driven efficiently. An acoustic standing wave is created in the inteirior cavity of the cylindrical shell where particle concrmtration takes place at the nodal planes of the field. It is shown that drops of water in excess of 1 mm in diameter may be levitated against the force of gravity for approxirnately 100 mW of input electrical power. The main objective of the research is to implement this lowpower device to concentrate and harvest aerosols in a flowing system. Several different cavity geonietries iwe presented for efficient collection of 1 he conaartratetl aerosols. Concentraiion factors greater than 40 iue demonstrated for particles of size 0.7 1.1 in a flow volume of 50 L/minute.

  16. Optimizing thermoacoustic regenerators for maximum amplification of acoustic power.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Tobias; Emmert, Thomas; Polifke, Wolfgang

    2014-11-01

    Identifying optimum design parameters and operating conditions of thermoacoustic engines or refrigerators is crucial for the further development of such devices. This publication proposes an optimization criterion for the stack of a thermoacoustic device with the objective of maximizing the amplification of acoustic energy by the stack. For this purpose, the stack is described as an acoustic multi-port, represented mathematically by its scattering matrix. It is shown how the scattering matrix may be deduced from the standard thermo-acoustic governing equations. Then an acoustic power balance is deduced from the scattering matrix. The spectral norm and the eigenvectors of the scattering matrix identify optimal acoustic states. Stack design operating parameters and frequencies with maximum amplification of acoustic power are identified for various stack configurations. The corresponding acoustic states are interpreted physically. PMID:25373945

  17. A study of the acoustical radiation force considering attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, RongRong; Liu, XiaoZhou; Gong, XiuFen

    2013-07-01

    Acoustical tweezer is a primary application of the radiation force of a sound field. When an ultrasound focused beam passes through a micro-particle, like a cell or living biological specimens, the particle will be manipulated accurately without physical contact and invasion, due to the three-dimensional acoustical trapping force. Based on the Ray acoustics approach in the Mie regime, this work discusses the effects on the particle caused by Gaussian focused ultrasound, studies the acoustical trapping force of spherical Mie particles by ultrasound in any position, and analyzes the numerical calculation on the two-dimensional acoustical radiation force. This article also analyzes the conditions for the acoustical trapping phenomenon, and discusses the impact of the initial position and size of the particle on the magnitude of the acoustical radiation force. Furthermore, this paper considers the ultrasonic attenuation in a particle in the case of two-dimension, studies the attenuation's effects on the acoustical trapping force, and amends the calculation to the ordinary case with attenuation.

  18. 76 FR 52734 - Underwater Locating Devices (Acoustic) (Self-Powered)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ...This notice announces the planned revocation of all Technical Standard Order authorizations (TSOA) issued for the production of Underwater Locating Devices (Acoustic) (Self-Powered) manufactured to the TSO-C121 and TSO-C121a specifications. These actions are necessary because the planned issuance of TSO-C121b, Underwater Locating Devices (Acoustic) (Self-Powered), with a minimum performance......

  19. 77 FR 13174 - Underwater Locating Devices (Acoustic) (Self-Powered)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ...This is a confirmation notice for the planned revocation of all Technical Standard Order authorizations issued for the production of Underwater Locating Devices (Acoustic) (Self-Powered) manufactured to the TSO-C121 and TSO-C121a specifications. These actions are necessary because the planned issuance of TSO-C121b, Underwater Locating Devices (Acoustic) (Self-Powered), minimum performance......

  20. Mobility power flow analysis of coupled plate structure subjected to mechanical and acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The mobility power flow approach that was previously applied in the derivation of expressions for the vibrational power flow between coupled plate substructures forming an L configuration and subjected to mechanical loading is generalized. Using the generalized expressions, both point and distributed mechanical loads on one or both of the plates can be considered. The generalized approach is extended to deal with acoustic excitation of one of the plate substructures. In this case, the forces (acoustic pressures) acting on the structure are dependent on the response of the structure because of the scattered pressure component. The interaction between the plate structure and the acoustic fluid leads to the derivation of a corrected mode shape for the plates' normal surface velocity and also for the structure mobility functions. The determination of the scattered pressure components in the expressions for the power flow represents an additional component in the power flow balance for the source plate and the receiver plate. This component represents the radiated acoustical power from the plate structure. For a number of coupled plate substrates, the acoustic pressure generated by one substructure will interact with the motion of another substructure. That is, in the case of the L-shaped plate, acoustic interaction exists between the two plate substructures due to the generation of the acoustic waves by each of the substructures. An approach to deal with this phenomena is described.

  1. Acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging methods

    PubMed Central

    Palmeri, Mark L.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional diagnostic ultrasound images portray differences in the acoustic properties of soft tissues, whereas ultrasound-based elasticity images portray differences in the elastic properties of soft tissues (i.e. stiffness, viscosity). The benefit of elasticity imaging lies in the fact that many soft tissues can share similar ultrasonic echogenicities, but may have different mechanical properties that can be used to clearly visualize normal anatomy and delineate pathological lesions. Acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging methods use acoustic radiation force to transiently deform soft tissues, and the dynamic displacement response of those tissues is measured ultrasonically and is used to estimate the tissue's mechanical properties. Both qualitative images and quantitative elasticity metrics can be reconstructed from these measured data, providing complimentary information to both diagnose and longitudinally monitor disease progression. Recently, acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging techniques have moved from the laboratory to the clinical setting, where clinicians are beginning to characterize tissue stiffness as a diagnostic metric, and commercial implementations of radiation force-based ultrasonic elasticity imaging are beginning to appear on the commercial market. This article provides an overview of acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging, including a review of the relevant soft tissue material properties, a review of radiation force-based methods that have been proposed for elasticity imaging, and a discussion of current research and commercial realizations of radiation force based-elasticity imaging technologies. PMID:22419986

  2. Acoustic radiation from lifting airfoils in compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, Hafiz M.; Subramaniam, Shankar; Scott, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The far field acoustic radiation from a lifting airfoil in a three-dimensional gust is studied. The acoustic pressure is calculated using the Kirchhoff method, instead of using the classical acoustic analogy approach due to Lighthill. The pressure on the Kirchhoff surface is calculated using an existing numerical solution of the unsteady flow field. The far field acoustic pressure is calculated in terms of these values using Kirchhoff's formula. The method is validated against existing semi-analytical results for a flat plate. The method is then used to study the problem of an airfoil in a harmonic three-dimensional gust, for a wide range of Mach numbers. The effect of variation of the airfoil thickness and angle of attack on the acoustic far field is studied. The changes in the mechanism of sound generation and propagation due to the presence of steady loading and nonuniform mean flow are also studied.

  3. Acoustic radiation from lifting airfoils in compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, Hafiz M.; Subramaniam, Shankar; Scott, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The far field acoustic radiation from a lifting airfoil in a three-dimensional gust is studied. The acoustic pressure is calculated using the Kirchhoff method, instead of using the classical acoustic analogy approach due to Lighthill. The pressure on the Kirchhoff surface is calculated using an existing numerical solution of the unsteady flow field. The far field acoustic pressure is calculated in terms of these values using Kirchhoff's formula. The method is validated against existing semi-analytical results for a flat plate. The method is then used to study the problem of an airfoil in a harmonic three-dimensional gust, for a wide range of Mach numbers. The effect of variation of the airfoil thickness and angle of attack on the acoustic far field is studied. The changes in the mechanism of sound generation and propagation due to the presence of steady loading and non-uniform mean flow are also studied.

  4. Acoustical radiation torque and force for spheres and Bessel beam extinction efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Zhang, Likun

    2014-11-01

    The scattering of optical and acoustical beams is relevant to the levitation and manipulation of drops. Here we examine theoretical developments in the acoustical case. We previously showed how the optical theorem for extinction can be extended to invariant beams. The example of a sphere in a Bessel beam facilitates the direct comparison with a circular disc computed using Babinet's principle and the Kirchhoff approximation. In related work, by considering traveling or standing wave first-order vortex beams we previously showed that the radiation torque is the ratio of the absorbed power and the radian acoustic frequency. By modifying the scattering to account for the viscosity of the surrounding fluid in the analysis of the absorbed power, approximations for radiation torque and force are obtained at long wavelengths in special cases and these can be compared with results published elsewhere.

  5. A Spectral Analysis Approach for Acoustic Radiation from Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Singh, Mahendra P.; Mei, Chuh

    2004-01-01

    A method is developed to predict the vibration response of a composite panel and the resulting far-field acoustic radiation due to acoustic excitation. The acoustic excitation is assumed to consist of obliquely incident plane waves. The panel is modeled by a finite element analysis and the radiated field is predicted using Rayleigh's integral. The approach can easily include other effects such as shape memory alloy (SMA) ber reinforcement, large detection thermal postbuckling, and non-symmetric SMA distribution or lamination. Transmission loss predictions for the case of an aluminum panel excited by a harmonic acoustic pressure are shown to compare very well with a classical analysis. Results for a composite panel with and without shape memory alloy reinforcement are also presented. The preliminary results demonstrate that the transmission loss can be significantly increased with shape memory alloy reinforcement. The mechanisms for further transmission loss improvement are identified and discussed.

  6. Acoustic radiation torque and the conservation of angular momentum (L).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Likun; Marston, Philip L

    2011-04-01

    This note concerns the evaluation of the static acoustic radiation torque exerted by an acoustic field on a scatterer immersed in a nonviscous fluid based on far-field scattering. The radiation torque is expressed as the integral of the time-averaged flux of angular momentum over a spherical surface far removed from the scattering object with its center at the centroid of the object. That result was given previously [G. Maidanik, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 30, 620-623 (1956)]. Another expression given recently [Z. W. Fan et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 124, 2727-2732 (2008)] is simplified to this formula. Comments are made on obtaining it directly from the general theorem of angular momentum conservation in the integral form. PMID:21476624

  7. An improved method for the calculation of Near-Field Acoustic Radiation Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zu-Bin; Maury, Cédric

    2016-02-01

    Sensing and controlling Acoustic Radiation Modes (ARMs) in the near-field of vibrating structures is of great interest for broadband noise reduction or enhancement, as ARMs are velocity distributions defined over a vibrating surface, that independently and optimally contribute to the acoustic power in the acoustic field. But present methods only provide far-field ARMs (FFARMs) that are inadequate for the acoustic near-field problem. The Near-Field Acoustic Radiation Modes (NFARMs) are firstly studied with an improved numerical method, the Pressure-Velocity method, which rely on the eigen decomposition of the acoustic transfers between the vibrating source and a conformal observation surface, including sound pressure and velocity transfer matrices. The active and reactive parts of the sound power are separated and lead to the active and reactive ARMs. NFARMs are studied for a 2D baffled beam and for a 3D baffled plate, and so as differences between the NFARMS and the classical FFARMs. Comparisons of the NFARMs are analyzed when varying frequency and observation distance to the source. It is found that the efficiencies and shapes of the optimal active ARMs are independent on the distance while that of the reactive ones are distinctly related on.

  8. Axial acoustic radiation force on a sphere in Gaussian field

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Rongrong; Liu, Xiaozhou Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    Based on the finite series method, the acoustical radiation force resulting from a Gaussian beam incident on a spherical object is investigated analytically. When the position of the particles deviating from the center of the beam, the Gaussian beam is expanded as a spherical function at the center of the particles and the expanded coefficients of the Gaussian beam is calculated. The analytical expression of the acoustic radiation force on spherical particles deviating from the Gaussian beam center is deduced. The acoustic radiation force affected by the acoustic frequency and the offset distance from the Gaussian beam center is investigated. Results have been presented for Gaussian beams with different wavelengths and it has been shown that the interaction of a Gaussian beam with a sphere can result in attractive axial force under specific operational conditions. Results indicate the capability of manipulating and separating spherical spheres based on their mechanical and acoustical properties, the results provided here may provide a theoretical basis for development of single-beam acoustical tweezers.

  9. Acoustic intensity near a high-powered military jet aircraft.

    PubMed

    Stout, Trevor A; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Wall, Alan T; James, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    The spatial variation in vector acoustic intensity has been calculated between 100 and 3000 Hz near a high-performance military aircraft. With one engine of a tethered F-22A Raptor operating at military power, a tetrahedral intensity probe was moved to 27 locations in the geometric near and mid-fields to obtain the frequency-dependent intensity vector field. The angles of the maximum intensity region rotate from aft to sideline with increasing frequency, becoming less directional above 800 Hz. Between 100 and 400 Hz, which are principal radiation frequencies, the ray-traced dominant source region rapidly contracts and moves upstream, approaching nearly constant behavior by 1000 Hz. PMID:26233049

  10. Acoustic Radiation Force Elasticity Imaging in Diagnostic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Joshua R.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Palmeri, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    The development of ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods has been the focus of intense research activity since the mid-1990s. In characterizing the mechanical properties of soft tissues, these techniques image an entirely new subset of tissue properties that cannot be derived with conventional ultrasound techniques. Clinically, tissue elasticity is known to be associated with pathological condition and with the ability to image these features in vivo, elasticity imaging methods may prove to be invaluable tools for the diagnosis and/or monitoring of disease. This review focuses on ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods that generate an acoustic radiation force to induce tissue displacements. These methods can be performed non-invasively during routine exams to provide either qualitative or quantitative metrics of tissue elasticity. A brief overview of soft tissue mechanics relevant to elasticity imaging is provided, including a derivation of acoustic radiation force, and an overview of the various acoustic radiation force elasticity imaging methods. PMID:23549529

  11. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging: a Review

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force based elasticity imaging methods are under investigation by many groups. These methods differ from traditional ultrasonic elasticity imaging methods in that they do not require compression of the transducer, and are thus expected to be less operator dependent. Methods have been developed that utilize impulsive (i.e. < 1 ms), harmonic (pulsed), and steady state radiation force excitations. The work discussed herein utilizes impulsive methods, for which two imaging approaches have been pursued: 1) monitoring the tissue response within the radiation force region of excitation (ROE) and generating images of relative differences in tissue stiffness (Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging); and 2) monitoring the speed of shear wave propagation away from the ROE to quantify tissue stiffness (Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging (SWEI)). For these methods, a single ultrasound transducer on a commercial ultrasound system can be used to both generate acoustic radiation force in tissue, and to monitor the tissue displacement response. The response of tissue to this transient excitation is complicated and depends upon tissue geometry, radiation force field geometry, and tissue mechanical and acoustic properties. Higher shear wave speeds and smaller displacements are associated with stiffer tissues, and slower shear wave speeds and larger displacements occur with more compliant tissues. ARFI images have spatial resolution comparable to that of B-mode, often with greater contrast, providing matched, adjunctive information. SWEI images provide quantitative information about the tissue stiffness, typically with lower spatial resolution. A review these methods and examples of clinical applications are presented herein. PMID:22545033

  12. Ducted fan acoustic radiation including the effects of nonuniform mean flow and acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter; Roy, Indranil Danda

    1993-01-01

    Forward and aft acoustic propagation and radiation from a ducted fan is modeled using a finite element discretization of the acoustic field equations. The fan noise source is introduced as equivalent body forces representing distributed blade loading. The flow in and around the nacelle is assumed to be nonuniform, reflecting the effects of forward flight and flow into the inlet. Refraction due to the fan exit jet shear layer is not represented. Acoustic treatment on the inlet and exhaust duct surfaces provides a mechanism for attenuation. In a region enclosing the fan a pressure formulation is used with the assumption of locally uniform flow. Away from the fan a velocity potential formulation is used and the flow is assumed nonuniform but irrotational. A procedure is developed for matching the two regions by making use of local duct modal amplitudes as transition state variables and determining the amplitudes by enforcing natural boundary conditions at the interface between adjacent regions in which pressure and velocity potential are used. Simple models of rotor alone and rotor/exit guide vane generated noise are used to demonstrate the calculation of the radiated acoustic field and to show the effect of acoustic treatment. The model has been used to assess the success of four techniques for acoustic lining optimization in reducing far field noise.

  13. Distribution of Acoustic Power Spectra for an Isolated Helicopter Fuselage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusyumov, A. N.; Mikhailov, S. A.; Garipova, L. I.; Batrakov, A. S.; Barakos, G.

    2016-03-01

    The broadband aerodynamic noise can be studied, assuming isotropic flow, turbulence and decay. Proudman's approach allows practical calculations of noise based on CFD solutions of RANS or URANS equations at the stage of post processing and analysis of the solution. Another aspect is the broadband acoustic spectrum and the distribution of acoustic power over a range of frequencies. The acoustic energy spectrum distribution in isotropic turbulence is non monotonic and has a maximum at a certain value of Strouhal number. In the present work the value of acoustic power peak frequency is determined using a prescribed form of acoustic energy spectrum distribution presented in papers by S. Sarkar and M. Y. Hussaini and by G. M. Lilley. CFD modelling of the flow around isolated helicopter fuselage model was considered using the HMB CFD code and the RANS equations.

  14. Acoustic radiation of a submerged cylindrical shell in low frequency.

    PubMed

    Van de Loock, Julien; Décultot, Dominique; Léon, Fernand; Chati, Farid; Maze, Gérard; Rajaona, Dominique Raphael; Klauson, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of sound pressure levels produced by submerged structures is a part of regulations on underwater noise pollution. The purpose of this work is the study of the underwater acoustic radiation of a stainless steel tube subjected to vibrations generated by a shock obtained by using a hammer. The vibrations of the tube, placed successively in air and in water, are measured by using accelerometers. In water, the acoustic radiation measurements are performed by using a hydrophone. Results are presented as frequency spectra and are confronted with results of the elastic theory. PMID:23298014

  15. Reconstruction of transient acoustic radiation from a sphere.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F; Lu, Huancai; Bajwa, Manjit S

    2005-04-01

    Transient near-field acoustical holography (NAH) formulation is derived from the Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS) method to reconstruct acoustic radiation from a spherical surface subject to transient excitations in a free field. To facilitate derivations of temporal solutions, we make use of the Laplace transform and expansion in terms of the spherical Hankel functions and spherical harmonics, with their coefficients settled by solving a system of equations obtained by matching an assumed-form solution to the measured acoustic pressure. To derive a general form of solution for a temporal kernel, we replace the spherical Hankel functions and their derivatives by polynomials, recast infinite integrals in the inverse Laplace transform as contour integrals in a complex s-plane, and evaluate it via the residue theorem. The transient acoustic quantities anywhere including the source surface are then obtained by convoluting the temporal kernels with respect to the measured acoustic pressure. Numerical examples of reconstructing transient acoustic fields from explosively expanding, impulsively accelerating, and partially accelerating spheres, and that from a sphere subject to an arbitrarily time-dependent excitation are depicted. To illustrate the effectiveness of HELS-based transient NAH formulations, all input data are collected along an arbitrarily selected line segment and used to reconstruct transient acoustic quantities everywhere. PMID:15898648

  16. Acoustic-radiation stress in solids. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, J. H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The general case of acoustic-radiation stress associated with quasi-compressional and quasi-shear waves propagating in infinite and semiinfinite lossless solids of arbitrary crystalline symmetry is studied. The Boussinesq radiation stress is defined and found to depend directly on an acoustic nonlinearity parameter which characterizes the radiation-induced static strain, a stress-generalized nonlinearity parameter which characterizes the stress nonlinearity, and the energy density of the propagating wave. Application of the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle of adiabatic invariance to a self-constrained system described by the nonlinear equations of motion allows the acoustic-radiation-induced static strain to be identified with a self-constrained variation in the time-averaged product of the internal energy density and displacement gradient. The time-averaged product is scaled by the acoustic nonlinearity parameter and represents the first-order nonlinearity in the virial theorem. Finally, the relationship between the Boussinesq and the Cauchy radiation stress is obtained in a closed three-dimensional form.

  17. Tunable acoustic radiation pattern assisted by effective impedance boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Feng; Quan, Li; Wang, Li-Wei; Liu, Xiao-Zhou; Gong, Xiu-Fen

    2016-02-01

    The acoustic wave propagation from a two-dimensional subwavelength slit surrounded by metal plates decorated with Helmholtz resonators (HRs) is investigated both numerically and experimentally in this work. Owing to the presence of HRs, the effective impedance of metal surface boundary can be manipulated. By optimizing the distribution of HRs, the asymmetric effective impedance boundary will be obtained, which contributes to generating tunable acoustic radiation pattern such as directional acoustic beaming. These dipole-like radiation patterns have high radiation efficiency, no fingerprint of sidelobes, and a wide tunable range of the radiation pattern directivity angle which can be steered by the spatial displacements of HRs. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB921504 and 2011CB707902), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.11474160), the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities, China (Grant No. 020414380001), the State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. SKLOA201401), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, and the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry.

  18. Numerics of surface acoustic wave (SAW) driven acoustic streaming and radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nama, Nitesh; Barnkob, Rune; Kahler, Christian; Costanzo, Francesco; Jun Huang, Tony

    2015-11-01

    Recently, surface acoustic wave (SAW) based systems have shown great potential for various lab-on-a-chip applications. However, the physical understanding of the precise acoustic fields and associated acoustophoresis is rather limited. In this work, we present a numerical study of the acoustophoretic particle motion inside a SAW-actuated, liquid-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel. We utilize a perturbation approach to divide the flow variables into first- and second-order components. The first-order fields result in a time-averaged acoustic radiation force on suspended particles, as well as the time-averaged body force terms that drive the second-order fields. We model the SAW actuation by a displacement function while we utilize impedance boundary conditions to model the PDMS walls. We identify the precise acoustic fields generated inside the microchannel and investigate a range of particle sizes to characterize the transition from streaming-dominated acoustophoresis to radiation-force-dominated acoustophoresis. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of SAW devices to tune the position of vertical pressure node inside the microchannel by tuning the phase difference between the two incoming surface acoustic waves.

  19. Mobility power flow analysis of an L-shaped plate structure subjected to acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical investigation based on the Mobility Power Flow method is presented for the determination of the vibrational response and power flow for two coupled flat plate structures in an L-shaped configuration, subjected to acoustical excitation. The principle of the mobility power flow method consists of dividing the global structure into a series of subsystems coupled together using mobility functions. Each separate subsystem is analyzed independently to determine the structural mobility functions for the junction and excitation locations. The mobility functions, together with the characteristics of the junction between the subsystems, are then used to determine the response of the global structure and the power flow. In the coupled plate structure considered here, mobility power flow expressions are derived for excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. In this case, the forces (acoustic pressures) acting on the structure are dependent on the response of the structure because of the scattered pressure component. The interaction between the structure and the fluid leads to the derivation of a corrected mode shape for the plates' normal surface velocity and also for the structure mobility functions. The determination of the scattered pressure components in the expressions for the power flow represents an additional component in the power flow balance for the source plate and the receiver plate. This component represents the radiated acoustical power from the plate structure.

  20. Acoustical power amplification and damping by temperature gradients.

    PubMed

    Biwa, Tetsushi; Komatsu, Ryo; Yazaki, Taichi

    2011-01-01

    Ceperley proposed a concept of a traveling wave heat engine ["A pistonless Stirling engine-The traveling wave heat engine," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66, 1508-1513 (1979).] that provided a starting point of thermoacoustics today. This paper verifies experimentally his idea through observation of amplification and strong damping of a plane acoustic traveling wave as it passes through axial temperature gradients. The acoustic power gain is shown to obey a universal curve specified by a dimensionless parameter ωτα; ω is the angular frequency and τα is the relaxation time for the gas to thermally equilibrate with channel walls. As an application of his idea, a three-stage acoustic power amplifier is developed, which attains the gain up to 10 with a moderate temperature ratio of 2.3. PMID:21302995

  1. Physics of Acoustic Radiation from Jet Engine Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Parrish, Sarah A.; Envia, Edmane; Chien, Eugene W.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of acoustic radiation from a jet engine inlet are performed using advanced computational aeroacoustics (CAA) algorithms and high-quality numerical boundary treatments. As a model of modern commercial jet engine inlets, the inlet geometry of the NASA Source Diagnostic Test (SDT) is used. Fan noise consists of tones and broadband sound. This investigation considers the radiation of tones associated with upstream propagating duct modes. The primary objective is to identify the dominant physical processes that determine the directivity of the radiated sound. Two such processes have been identified. They are acoustic diffraction and refraction. Diffraction is the natural tendency for an acoustic wave to follow a curved solid surface as it propagates. Refraction is the turning of the direction of propagation of sound waves by mean flow gradients. Parametric studies on the changes in the directivity of radiated sound due to variations in forward flight Mach number and duct mode frequency, azimuthal mode number, and radial mode number are carried out. It is found there is a significant difference in directivity for the radiation of the same duct mode from an engine inlet when operating in static condition and in forward flight. It will be shown that the large change in directivity is the result of the combined effects of diffraction and refraction.

  2. High-frequency multi-wavelength acoustic power maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Frank; Ladenkov, Oleg; Ehgamberdiev, Shuhrat; Chou, Dean-Yi

    2001-01-01

    Acoustic power maps have been constructed using SOHO/MDI velocity and intensity data in Ni I 6768; NSO High-L Helioseismometer (HLH) Ca K intensity; and Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON) intensity in Ca K. The HLH data provides maps up to a frequency of 11.9 mHz, substantially higher than the usual 8.33 mHz. The Ca K observations show a surprising strong enhancement of power within a sunspot at all temporal frequencies, while the Ni I data show the well-known suppression of power. Tests suggest that this apparent acoustic enhancement is the result of strong intensity gradients observed through terrestrial seeing.

  3. Unphysical consequences of negative absorbed power in linear passive scattering: Implications for radiation force and torque.

    PubMed

    Marston, Philip L; Zhang, Likun

    2016-06-01

    Contrary to some claims, the absorbed power associated with linear scattering of sound by passive objects in ideal fluids must be non-negative. Such unphysical claims suggest analytical or computational error, or use of an unphysical constitutive relation for material properties. The close connection with the evaluation of acoustic radiation force on targets according to Westervelt's formulation [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 29, 26-29 (1957)], recently generalized to certain acoustic beams, is briefly reviewed along with the theory of acoustic radiation torque on axisymmetric targets with power absorption. Applications to viscous dissipation and to issues pertaining to active targets are also examined. PMID:27369138

  4. Spinning mode acoustic radiation from the flight inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, W. F.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for spinning mode acoustic radiation from a thick wall duct without flow. This model is based on a series of experiments (with and without flow). A nearly pure azimuthal spinning mode was isolated and then reflection coefficients and far field pressure (amplitude and phase) were measured. In our model the governing boundary value problem for the Helmholtz equation is first converted into an integral equation for the unknown acoustic pressure over a disk, S1, near the mouth of the duct and over the exterior surface, S2, of the duct. Assuming a pure azimuthal mode excitation, the azimuthal dependence is integrated out which yields an integral equation over the generator C1 of S1 and the generator C2 of S2. The sound pressure on C1 was approximated by a truncated modal expansion of the interior acoustic pressure. Piecewise linear spline approximation on C2 was used.

  5. Radiation dominated acoustophoresis driven by surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinhong; Kang, Yuejun; Ai, Ye

    2015-10-01

    Acoustophoresis-based particle manipulation in microfluidics has gained increasing attention in recent years. Despite the fact that experimental studies have been extensively performed to demonstrate this technique for various microfluidic applications, numerical simulation of acoustophoresis driven by surface acoustic waves (SAWs) has still been largely unexplored. In this work, a numerical model taking into account the acoustic-piezoelectric interaction was developed to simulate the generation of a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW) field and predict the acoustic pressure field in the liquid. Acoustic radiation dominated particle tracing was performed to simulate acoustophoresis of particles with different sizes undergoing a SSAW field. A microfluidic device composed of two interdigital transducers (IDTs) for SAW generation and a microfluidic channel was fabricated for experimental validation. Numerical simulations could well capture the focusing phenomenon of particles to the pressure nodes in the experimental observation. Further comparison of particle trajectories demonstrated considerably quantitative agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results with fitting in the applied voltage. Particle switching was also demonstrated using the fabricated device that could be further developed as an active particle sorting device. PMID:26070191

  6. Deformation of red blood cells using acoustic radiation forces

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Puja; Hill, Martyn; Glynne-Jones, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic radiation forces have been used to manipulate cells and bacteria in a number of recent microfluidic applications. The net force on a cell has been subject to careful investigation over a number of decades. We demonstrate that the radiation forces also act to deform cells. An ultrasonic standing wave field is created in a 0.1 mm glass capillary at a frequency of 7.9 MHz. Using osmotically swollen red-blood cells, we show observable deformations up to an aspect ratio of 1.35, comparable to deformations created by optical tweezing. In contrast to optical technologies, ultrasonic devices are potentially capable of deforming thousands of cells simultaneously. We create a finite element model that includes both the acoustic environment of the cell, and a model of the cell membrane subject to forces resulting from the non-linear aspects of the acoustic field. The model is found to give reasonable agreement with the experimental results, and shows that the deformation is the result of variation in an acoustic force that is directed outwards at all points on the cell membrane. We foresee applications in diagnostic devices, and in the possibility of mechanically stimulating cells to promote differentiation and physiological effects. PMID:25379070

  7. Optical acoustic experimental investigation of propagation femtosecond laser radiation in air and biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, N. N.; Kabanov, A. M.; Protasevich, E. S.; Stepanov, A. N.

    2008-01-01

    Using two optical acoustic approaches we experimentally investigated spatial location of filament zone of propagation channel of focused laser radiation. For femtosecond pulses passing in air it was shown that nonlinear focus length had spatial scale of 1/P at initial power P moderate for self-focusing and at optical system focus distance significantly lower than Rayleigh beam length. The results of experimental optical acoustic investigation of femto- and nanosecond pulses attenuation by some biological tissues (muscular tissue, adipose tissue, cutaneous covering, and milk) and optical breakdown thresholds on these one are presented. It was shown that penetration depth of short laser pulse radiation into biological tissues is the same as for longer one. However, amplitude of acoustic response to a process of interaction of femtosecond laser pulse with biological tissue is larger in several times than that to interaction with nanosecond pulses of the same power and spectral distribution. The obtained threshold values can be interesting for tabulation of limit allowable levels of irradiation at work with laser radiation. Such values are unknown for femtosecond laser pulses today.

  8. Characterizing the stiffness of Human Prostates using Acoustic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Liang; Madden, John; Foo, Wen-Chi; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Polascik, Thomas J.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging has been previously reported to portray normal anatomic structures and pathologies in ex vivo human prostates with good contrast and resolution. These findings were based on comparison with histological slides and McNeal’s zonal anatomy. In ARFI images, the central zone (CZ) appears darker (smaller displacement) than other anatomic zones, and prostate cancer (PCa) is darker than normal tissue in the peripheral zone (PZ). Since displacement amplitudes in ARFI images are determined by both the underlying tissue stiffness and the amplitude of acoustic radiation force which varies with acoustic attenuation, one question that arises is: how are the relative displacements in prostate ARFI images related to the underlying prostatic tissue stiffness? In linear, isotropic elastic materials and in tissues that are relatively uniform in acoustic attenuation (e.g. liver), relative displacement in ARFI images has been shown to be correlated with underlying tissue stiffness. However, the prostate is known to be heterogeneous. Variations in acoustic attenuation of prostatic structures could confound the interpretation of ARFI images due to the associated variations in the applied acoustic radiation force. Therefore, in this study, co-registered three-dimensional (3D) ARFI datasets and quantitative shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) datasets were acquired in freshly excised human prostates to investigate the relationship between displacement amplitudes in ARFI prostate images and the matched reconstructed shear moduli. The lateral time-to-peak (LTTP) algorithm was applied to the SWEI data to compute the shear wave speed and reconstruct the shear moduli. Five types of prostatic tissue (PZ, CZ, transition zone (TZ) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), PCa, and atrophy) were identified, whose shear moduli were quantified to be 4.1±0.8 kPa, 9.9±0.9 kPa, 4.8±0.6 kPa, 10.0±1.0 kPa and 8.0 kPa, respectively. Linear regression was

  9. Power method for calculating the far acoustic field of the helicopter lift rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samokhin, V. F.

    2011-05-01

    A semiempirical method for calculating the far acoustic field of the lift rotor of a helicopter operating in the regime of oblique flow over it is described. The basic parametric relations for the acoustic radiation power of rotor noise components have been obtained on the basis of the Lamb idea that vortex-free motion arises under the action of a periodic force on an infinitely small volume of the medium. All sources of lift rotor noise are subdivided into two groups pertaining, respectively, to the inductive and profile parts of the total power supplied to the rotor. A comparison has been made between the results of calculation of the harmonic components of lift rotor noise made on the basis of the power method and the experimental data for the Mi-28 helicopter.

  10. Acoustic Radiation Force on a Finite-Sized Particle due to an Acoustic Field in a Viscous Compressible Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annamalai, Subramanian; Parmar, Manoj; Balachandar, S.

    2013-11-01

    Particles when subjected to acoustic waves experience a time-averaged second-order force known as the acoustic radiation force, which is of prime importance in the fields of microfluidics and acoustic levitation. Here, the acoustic radiation force on a rigid spherical particle in a viscous compressible medium due to progressive and standing waves is considered. The relevant length scales include: particle radius (a), acoustic wavelength (λ) and viscous penetration depth (δ). While a / λ and a / δ are arbitrary, δ << λ . A farfield derivation approach has been used in determining the radiated force. Expressing the flow-field as a sum of the incident and scattered fields, an analytical expression for the force is obtained as a summation over infinite series (monopole, dipole and higher sources). These results indicate that the contributions from monopole, dipole and their cross-interaction are sufficient to describe the acoustic radiation force. Subsequently, the monopole and dipole strengths are represented in terms of the particle surface and volume averages of the incoming velocity. This generalization allows one to evaluate the radiation force for an incoming wave of any functional form. However acoustic streaming effects are neglected.

  11. Acoustic centering of sources with high-order radiation patterns.

    PubMed

    Shabtai, Noam R; Vorländer, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Surrounding spherical microphone arrays have recently been used in order to model the radiation pattern of acoustic sources that are assumed to be at the center of the array. Source centering algorithms are applied to the measurements in order to reduce the negative effect of acoustic source misalignment with regard to the physical center of the microphone array. Recent works aim to minimize the energy that is contained in the high-order coefficients of the radiation pattern in the spherical harmonics domain, in order to directly address the problem of increased order and spatial aliasing resulted by this misalignment. However, objective functions which directly minimize the norm of these coefficients were shown to be convex only when employed on sources with low-order radiation patterns. This work presents a source centering algorithm that operates on plane sections and aims to achieve a convex objective function on every plane section. The results of the proposed algorithm are shown to be more convex than the previous algorithms for sources with higher-order radiation pattern, usually at higher frequencies. PMID:25920846

  12. Surface Power Radiative Cooling Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2006-01-20

    Terrestrial nuclear power plants typically maintain their temperature through convective cooling, such as water and forced air. However, the space environment is a vacuum environment, typically 10-8 Torr pressure, therefore in proposed missions to the lunar surface, power plants would have to rely on radiative cooling to remove waste heat. Also, the Martian surface has a very tenuous atmosphere (e.g. {approx}5 Torr CO2), therefore, the main heat transfer method on the Martian surface is also radiative. Because of the lack of atmosphere on the Moon and the tenuous atmosphere on Mars, surface power systems on both the Lunar and Martian surface must rely heavily on radiative heat transfer. Because of the large temperature swings on both the lunar and the Martian surfaces, trying to radiate heat is inefficient. In order to increase power system efficiency, an effort is underway to test various combinations of materials with high emissivities to demonstrate their ability to survive these degrading atmospheres to maintain a constant radiator temperature improving surface power plant efficiency. An important part of this effort is the development of a unique capability that would allow the determination of a materials emissivity at high temperatures. A description of the test capability as well as initial data is presented.

  13. Surface Power Radiative Cooling Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Terrestrial nuclear power plants typically maintain their temperature through convective cooling, such as water and forced air. However, the space environment is a vacuum environment, typically 10-8 Torr pressure, therefore in proposed missions to the lunar surface, power plants would have to rely on radiative cooling to remove waste heat. Also, the Martian surface has a very tenuous atmosphere (e.g. ~5 Torr CO2), therefore, the main heat transfer method on the Martian surface is also radiative. Because of the lack of atmosphere on the Moon and the tenuous atmosphere on Mars, surface power systems on both the Lunar and Martian surface must rely heavily on radiative heat transfer. Because of the large temperature swings on both the lunar and the Martian surfaces, trying to radiate heat is inefficient. In order to increase power system efficiency, an effort is underway to test various combinations of materials with high emissivities to demonstrate their ability to survive these degrading atmospheres to maintain a constant radiator temperature improving surface power plant efficiency. An important part of this effort is the development of a unique capability that would allow the determination of a materials emissivity at high temperatures. A description of the test capability as well as initial data is presented.

  14. Application of the Spectral Element Method to Acoustic Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, James F.; Rizzi, Stephen A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes research to develop a capability for analysis of interior noise in enclosed structures when acoustically excited by an external random source. Of particular interest was the application to the study of noise and vibration transmission in thin-walled structures as typified by aircraft fuselages. Three related topics are focused upon. The first concerns the development of a curved frame spectral element, the second shows how the spectral element method for wave propagation in folded plate structures is extended to problems involving curved segmented plates. These are of significance because by combining these curved spectral elements with previously presented flat spectral elements, the dynamic response of geometrically complex structures can be determined. The third topic shows how spectral elements, which incorporate the effect of fluid loading on the structure, are developed for analyzing acoustic radiation from dynamically loaded extended plates.

  15. Acoustic Radiation from a Mach 14 Turbulent Boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan

    2015-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to examine the pressure fluctuations generated by a high-speed turbulent boundary layer with a nominal freestream Mach number of 14 and wall temperature of 0.18 times the recovery temperature. The emphasis is on characterizing the acoustic radiation from the turbulent boundary layer and comparing it with previous simulations at Mach 2.5 and Mach 6 to assess the Mach-number dependence of the freestream pressure fluctuations. In particular, the numerical database is used to provide insights into the pressure disturbance spectrum and amplitude scaling with respect to the freestream Mach number as well as to understand the acoustic source mechanisms at very high Mach numbers. Such information is important for characterizing the freestream disturbance environment in conventional (i.e., noisy) hypersonic wind tunnels. Spectral characteristics of pressure fluctuations at the surface are also investigated. Sponsored by Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  16. Ultrasonic waveguide sensor for acoustic monitoring of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mel'nikov, V.I.; Khokhlov, V.N.; Duntsev, A.V.

    1988-02-01

    Waveguide sensors are being increasingly used for acoustic emission monitoring of equipment in nuclear power plants and in systems for acoustic diagnostics of the coolant. In this paper we examine the construction of a waveguide sensor for acoustic monitoring for the example of an impedance sensor for the steam content of water coolant, intended for use in the active emission-reception mode. The dynamic properties of the sensor are determined by the construction and the dimensions of the transducer, and are usually represented by its amplitude-frequency characteristic, which, as a rule, is of the resonance type. The longitudinal-wave waveguide, made from steel wire 0.8-1.2 mm in diameter, can transmit signals in the band 50-1000 kHz. To increase the reliability and the ease of maintenance of the monitoring system the transducer and the waveguide are connected in a detachable manner.

  17. High frequency formulation for the acoustic power spectrum due to cascade-turbulence interaction.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Cheolung; Joseph, Phillip; Lee, Soogab

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the noise radiated by a cascade of flat-plate airfoils interacting with homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. An analytic formulation for the spectrum of acoustic power of a two-dimensional flat-plate is derived. The main finding of this paper is that the acoustic power spectrum from the cascade of flat airfoils may be split into two distinct frequency regions of low frequency and high frequency, separated by a critical frequency. Below this frequency, cascade effects due to the interaction between neighboring airfoils are shown to be important. At frequencies above the critical frequency, cascade effects are shown to be relatively weak. In this frequency range, acoustic power is shown to be approximately proportional to the number of blades. Based on this finding at high frequencies, an approximate expression is derived for the power spectrum that is valid above the critical frequency and which is in excellent agreement with the exact expression for the broadband power spectrum. The formulation is used to perform a parametric study on the effects on the power spectrum of the blade number, stagger angle, gap-chord ratio, and Mach number. The theory is also shown to provide a close fit to the measured spectrum of rotor-stator interaction. PMID:16454269

  18. Radiation and propagation of short acoustical pulses from underground explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Banister, J.R.

    1982-06-01

    Radiation and propagation of short acoustical pulses from underground nuclear explosions were analyzed. The cone of more intense radiation is defined by the ratio of sound speeds in the ground and air. The pressure history of the radiated pulse is a function of the vertical ground-motion history, the range, the burial depth, and the velocity of longitudinal seismic waves. The analysis of short-pulse propagation employed an N-wave model with and without enegy conservation. Short pulses with initial wave lengths less than 100 m are severely attenuated by the energy loss in shocks and viscous losses in the wave interior. The methods developed in this study should be useful for system analysis.

  19. Material selection for acoustic radiators that are light and stiff.

    PubMed

    Porter, S P; Markley, D C; Van Tol, D J; Meyer, R J

    2011-01-01

    The headmass is a key element in tonpilz transducer design. As an acoustic radiator, a successful headmass must be built from a material that is both light and stiff. To assess the suitability of ceramics for this application, the authors used the mechanical properties of candidate materials to perform a theoretical comparison based on the flexural behavior of square plates. Although not a comprehensive metric for identifying the best headmass materials, the headmass flexure may be usefully employed as a first-level selection criteria. A software routine based on thin plate and thick plate theory was created to evaluate the flexural behavior in candidate materials. PMID:21302996

  20. Enhanced output power by eigenfrequency shift in acoustic energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; You, Jeong Ho

    2014-04-01

    In our previous studies, multiple piezoelectric cantilever plates were placed inside a quarter-wavelength straight tube resonator to harvest low frequency acoustic energy. To investigate the modification of eigenmodes in the tube resonator due to the presence of piezoelectric plates, the eigenfrequency shift properties by introducing single and multiple rectangular blockages in open-closed ducts are studied by using 1D segmented Helmholtz equations, Webster horn equation, and finite element simulations. The first-mode eigenfrequency of the duct is reduced when the blockage is placed near the open inlet. The decrease of eigenfrequency leads to the enhancement of absorbed acoustic power in the duct. Furthermore, the first half of the tube resonator possesses high pressure gradient resulting in larger driving forces for the vibration motion of piezoelectric plates. Therefore, in our harvesters, it is better to place the piezoelectric plates in the first half of the tube resonator to obtain high output voltage and power.

  1. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  2. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1985-09-03

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas. 5 figs.

  3. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOEpatents

    Mims, James; Buden, David; Williams, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometeorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length.

  4. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOEpatents

    Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

    1988-03-11

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

  5. Broadband control of plate radiation using a piezoelectric, double-amplifier active-skin and structural acoustic sensing

    PubMed

    Johnson; Fuller

    2000-02-01

    The potential of a piezoelectric, double-amplifier active-skin with structural acoustic sensing (SAS) is demonstrated for the reduction of broadband acoustic radiation from a clamped, aluminum plate. The active-skin is a continuous covering of the vibrating portions of the plate with active, independently controllable piezoelectric, double-amplifier elements and is designed to affect control by altering the continuous structural radiation impedance rather than structural vibration. In simulation, acoustic models are sought for the primary and secondary sources that incorporate finite element methods. Simulation indicates that a total radiated power attenuation in excess of 10 dB may be achieved between 250 and 750 Hz with microphone error sensing, while under SAS the radiated power is reduced by nearly 8 dB in the same frequency range. In experiment, the adaptive feed forward filtered-x LMS (least mean square) algorithm, implemented on a Texas Instruments C40 DSP, was used in conjunction with the 6I6O control system. With microphone error sensing, 11.8-dB attenuation was achieved in the overall radiated power between 175 and 600 Hz, while inclusion of SAS resulted in a 7.3-dB overall power reduction in this frequency band. PMID:10687697

  6. Thermometric- and Acoustic-Based Beam Power Monitor for Ultra-Bright X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bentsen, Gregory; /Rochester U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A design for an average beam power monitor for ultra-bright X-ray sources is proposed that makes simultaneous use of calorimetry and radiation acoustics. Radiation incident on a solid target will induce heating and ultrasonic vibrations, both of which may be measured to give a fairly precise value of the beam power. The monitor is intended for measuring ultra-bright Free-Electron Laser (FEL) X-ray beams, for which traditional monitoring technologies such as photo-diodes or scintillators are unsuitable. The monitor consists of a Boron Carbide (B{sub 4}C) target designed to absorb most of the incident beam's energy. Resistance temperature detectors (RTD) and piezoelectric actuators are mounted on the outward faces of the target to measure the temperature changes and ultrasonic vibrations induced by the incident beam. The design was tested using an optical pulsed beam (780 nm, 120 and 360 Hz) from a Ti:sapphire oscillator at several energies between 0.8 and 2.6 mJ. The RTDs measured an increase in temperature of about 10 K over a period of several minutes. The piezoelectric sensors recorded ringing acoustic oscillations at 580 {+-} 40 kHz. Most importantly, the amplitude of the acoustic signals was observed to scale linearly with beam power up to 2 mJ of pulse energy. Above this pulse energy, the vibrational signals became nonlinear. Several causes for this nonlinearity are discussed, including amplifier saturation and piezoelectric saturation. Despite this nonlinearity, these measurements demonstrate the feasibility of such a beam power measurement device. The advantage of two distinct measurements (acoustic and thermometric) provides a useful method of calibration that is unavailable to current LCLS diagnostics tools.

  7. Considerations on the acoustic energy radiated by toothed gears. [model for calculating noise intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popinceanu, N. G.; Kremmer, I.

    1974-01-01

    A mechano-acoustic model is reported for calculating acoustic energy radiated by a working gear. According to this model, a gear is an acoustic coublet formed of the two wheels. The wheel teeth generate cylindrical acoustic waves while the front surfaces of the teeth behave like vibrating pistons. Theoretical results are checked experimentally and good agreement is obtained with open gears. The experiments show that the air noise effect is negligible as compared with the structural noise transmitted to the gear box.

  8. Acoustic Radiation Optimization Using the Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jin-Young; Okuma, Masaaki

    The present paper describes a fundamental study on structural bending design to reduce noise using a new evolutionary population-based heuristic algorithm called the particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSOA). The particle swarm optimization algorithm is a parallel evolutionary computation technique proposed by Kennedy and Eberhart in 1995. This algorithm is based on the social behavior models for bird flocking, fish schooling and other models investigated by zoologists. Optimal structural design problems to reduce noise are highly nonlinear, so that most conventional methods are difficult to apply. The present paper investigates the applicability of PSOA to such problems. Optimal bending design of a vibrating plate using PSOA is performed in order to minimize noise radiation. PSOA can be effectively applied to such nonlinear acoustic radiation optimization.

  9. ISS Radiation Shielding and Acoustic Simulation Using an Immersive Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhage, Joshua E.; Sandridge, Chris A.; Qualls, Garry D.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station Environment Simulator (ISSES) is a virtual reality application that uses high-performance computing, graphics, and audio rendering to simulate the radiation and acoustic environments of the International Space Station (ISS). This CAVE application allows the user to maneuver to different locations inside or outside of the ISS and interactively compute and display the radiation dose at a point. The directional dose data is displayed as a color-mapped sphere that indicates the relative levels of radiation from all directions about the center of the sphere. The noise environment is rendered in real time over headphones or speakers and includes non-spatial background noise, such as air-handling equipment, and spatial sounds associated with specific equipment racks, such as compressors or fans. Changes can be made to equipment rack locations that produce changes in both the radiation shielding and system noise. The ISSES application allows for interactive investigation and collaborative trade studies between radiation shielding and noise for crew safety and comfort.

  10. Theoretical models for duct acoustic propagation and radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    1991-01-01

    The development of computational methods in acoustics has led to the introduction of analysis and design procedures which model the turbofan inlet as a coupled system, simultaneously modeling propagation and radiation in the presence of realistic internal and external flows. Such models are generally large, require substantial computer speed and capacity, and can be expected to be used in the final design stages, with the simpler models being used in the early design iterations. Emphasis is given to practical modeling methods that have been applied to the acoustical design problem in turbofan engines. The mathematical model is established and the simplest case of propagation in a duct with hard walls is solved to introduce concepts and terminologies. An extensive overview is given of methods for the calculation of attenuation in uniform ducts with uniform flow and with shear flow. Subsequent sections deal with numerical techniques which provide an integrated representation of duct propagation and near- and far-field radiation for realistic geometries and flight conditions.

  11. Prediction of acoustic radiation from functionally graded shells of revolution in light and heavy fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yegao; Meng, Guang

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical method for the vibro-acoustic analysis of a functionally graded shell of revolution immersed in an infinite light or heavy fluid. The structural model of the shell is formulated on the basis of a modified variational method combined with a multi-segment technique, whereas a spectral Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral formulation is employed to model the exterior fluid field. The material properties of the shell are estimated by using the Voigt's rule of mixture and the Mori-Tanaka's homogenization scheme. Displacement and sound pressure variables of each segment are expanded in the form of a mixed series using Fourier series and Chebyshev orthogonal polynomials. A set of collocation nodes distributed over the roots of Chebyshev polynomials are employed to establish the algebraic system of the acoustic integral equations, and the non-uniqueness solution is eliminated using a combined Helmholtz integral equation formulation. Loosely and strongly coupled schemes are implemented for the structure-acoustic interaction problem of a functionally graded shell immersed in a light and heavy fluid, respectively. The present method provides a flexible way to account for the individual contributions of circumferential wave modes to the vibration and acoustic responses of functionally graded shells of revolution in an analytical manner. Numerical tests are presented for sound radiation problems of spherical, cylindrical, conical and coupled shells. The individual contributions of the circumferential modes to the radiated sound pressure and sound power of functionally graded shells are observed. Effects of the material profile on the sound radiation of the shells are also investigated.

  12. Acoustic black holes: massless scalar field analytic solutions and analogue Hawking radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, H. S.; Bezerra, V. B.

    2016-07-01

    We obtain the analytic solutions of the radial part of the massless Klein-Gordon equation in the spacetime of both three dimensional rotating and four dimensional canonical acoustic black holes, which are given in terms of the confluent Heun functions. From these solutions, we obtain the scalar waves near the acoustic horizon. We discuss the analogue Hawking radiation of massless scalar particles and the features of the spectrum associated with the radiation emitted by these acoustic black holes.

  13. Experimental verification of theoretical equations for acoustic radiation force on compressible spherical particles in traveling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kennita A.; Vormohr, Hannah R.; Doinikov, Alexander A.; Bouakaz, Ayache; Shields, C. Wyatt; López, Gabriel P.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    Acoustophoresis uses acoustic radiation force to remotely manipulate particles suspended in a host fluid for many scientific, technological, and medical applications, such as acoustic levitation, acoustic coagulation, contrast ultrasound imaging, ultrasound-assisted drug delivery, etc. To estimate the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, equations derived for an inviscid host fluid are commonly used. However, there are theoretical predictions that, in the case of a traveling wave, viscous effects can dramatically change the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, which make the equations obtained for an inviscid host fluid invalid for proper estimation of acoustic radiation forces. To date, experimental verification of these predictions has not been published. Experimental measurements of viscous effects on acoustic radiation forces in a traveling wave were conducted using a confocal optical and acoustic system and values were compared with available theories. Our results show that, even in a low-viscosity fluid such as water, the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces is increased manyfold by viscous effects in comparison with what follows from the equations derived for an inviscid fluid.

  14. Experimental verification of theoretical equations for acoustic radiation force on compressible spherical particles in traveling waves.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kennita A; Vormohr, Hannah R; Doinikov, Alexander A; Bouakaz, Ayache; Shields, C Wyatt; López, Gabriel P; Dayton, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    Acoustophoresis uses acoustic radiation force to remotely manipulate particles suspended in a host fluid for many scientific, technological, and medical applications, such as acoustic levitation, acoustic coagulation, contrast ultrasound imaging, ultrasound-assisted drug delivery, etc. To estimate the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, equations derived for an inviscid host fluid are commonly used. However, there are theoretical predictions that, in the case of a traveling wave, viscous effects can dramatically change the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, which make the equations obtained for an inviscid host fluid invalid for proper estimation of acoustic radiation forces. To date, experimental verification of these predictions has not been published. Experimental measurements of viscous effects on acoustic radiation forces in a traveling wave were conducted using a confocal optical and acoustic system and values were compared with available theories. Our results show that, even in a low-viscosity fluid such as water, the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces is increased manyfold by viscous effects in comparison with what follows from the equations derived for an inviscid fluid. PMID:27300980

  15. Power cepstrum technique with application to model helicopter acoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. M.; Burley, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    The application of the power cepstrum to measured helicopter-rotor acoustic data is investigated. A previously applied correction to the reconstructed spectrum is shown to be incorrect. For an exact echoed signal, the amplitude of the cepstrum echo spike at the delay time is linearly related to the echo relative amplitude in the time domain. If the measured spectrum is not entirely from the source signal, the cepstrum will not yield the desired echo characteristics and a cepstral aliasing may occur because of the effective sample rate in the frequency domain. The spectral analysis bandwidth must be less than one-half the echo ripple frequency or cepstral aliasing can occur. The power cepstrum editing technique is a useful tool for removing some of the contamination because of acoustic reflections from measured rotor acoustic spectra. The cepstrum editing yields an improved estimate of the free field spectrum, but the correction process is limited by the lack of accurate knowledge of the echo transfer function. An alternate procedure, which does not require cepstral editing, is proposed which allows the complete correction of a contaminated spectrum through use of both the transfer function and delay time of the echo process.

  16. Identifying Vulnerable Plaques with Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Joshua Ryan

    The rupture of arterial plaques is the most common cause of ischemic complications including stroke, the fourth leading cause of death and number one cause of long term disability in the United States. Unfortunately, because conventional diagnostic tools fail to identify plaques that confer the highest risk, often a disabling stroke and/or sudden death is the first sign of disease. A diagnostic method capable of characterizing plaque vulnerability would likely enhance the predictive ability and ultimately the treatment of stroke before the onset of clinical events. This dissertation evaluates the hypothesis that Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging can noninvasively identify lipid regions, that have been shown to increase a plaque's propensity to rupture, within carotid artery plaques in vivo. The work detailed herein describes development efforts and results from simulations and experiments that were performed to evaluate this hypothesis. To first demonstrate feasibility and evaluate potential safety concerns, finite- element method simulations are used to model the response of carotid artery plaques to an acoustic radiation force excitation. Lipid pool visualization is shown to vary as a function of lipid pool geometry and stiffness. A comparison of the resulting Von Mises stresses indicates that stresses induced by an ARFI excitation are three orders of magnitude lower than those induced by blood pressure. This thesis also presents the development of a novel pulse inversion harmonic tracking method to reduce clutter-imposed errors in ultrasound-based tissue displacement estimates. This method is validated in phantoms and was found to reduce bias and jitter displacement errors for a marked improvement in image quality in vivo. Lastly, this dissertation presents results from a preliminary in vivo study that compares ARFI imaging derived plaque stiffness with spatially registered composition determined by a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) gold standard

  17. Klamath Falls: High-Power Acoustic Well Stimulation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Brian

    2006-07-24

    Acoustic well stimulation (AWS) technology uses high-power sonic waves from specific frequency spectra in an attempt to stimulate production in a damaged or low-production wellbore. AWS technology is one of the most promising technologies in the oil and gas industry, but it has proven difficult for the industry to develop an effective downhole prototype. This collaboration between Klamath Falls Inc. and the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) included a series of tests using high-power ultrasonic tools to stimulate oil and gas production. Phase I testing was designed and implemented to verify tool functionality, power requirements, and capacity of high-power AWS tools. The purpose of Phase II testing was to validate the production response of wells with marginal production rates to AWS stimulation and to capture and identify any changes in the downhole environment after tool deployment. This final report presents methodology and results.

  18. Evaluation of human middle ear function via an acoustic power assessment.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jont B; Jeng, Patricia S; Levitt, Harry

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of middle ear (ME) acoustic power flow (power reflectance, power absorption, and transmittance) and normalized impedance (acoustic resistance, acoustic reactance, and impedance magnitude) were compared for their utility in clinical applications. Transmittance, a measure of the acoustic power absorbed by the ME, was found to have several important advantages over other measures of acoustic power flow. In addition to its simple and audiologically relevant physical interpretation (absorbed power), the normal transmittance curve has a simple shape that is visually similar to the ME transfer function. The acoustic impedance measures (resistance and reactance) provided important additional information about ME status and supplemented transmittance measurements. Together these measurements can help identify unusual conditions such as eardrum perforations. While this article is largely a review of the development of a commercial power reflectance measurement system, previously unpublished experimental results are presented. PMID:16470465

  19. Material properties from acoustic radiation force step response

    PubMed Central

    Orescanin, Marko; Toohey, Kathleen S.; Insana, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    An ultrasonic technique for estimating viscoelastic properties of hydrogels, including engineered biological tissues, is being developed. An acoustic radiation force is applied to deform the gel locally while Doppler pulses track the induced movement. The system efficiently couples radiation force to the medium through an embedded scattering sphere. A single-element, spherically-focused, circular piston element transmits a continuous-wave burst to suddenly apply and remove a radiation force to the sphere. Simultaneously, a linear array and spectral Doppler technique are applied to track the position of the sphere over time. The complex shear modulus of the gel was estimated by applying a harmonic oscillator model to measurements of time-varying sphere displacement. Assuming that the stress-strain response of the surrounding gel is linear, this model yields an impulse response function for the gel system that may be used to estimate material properties for other load functions. The method is designed to explore the force-frequency landscape of cell-matrix viscoelasticity. Reported measurements of the shear modulus of gelatin gels at two concentrations are in close agreement with independent rheometer measurements of the same gels. Accurate modulus measurements require that the rate of Doppler-pulse transmission be matched to a priori estimates of gel properties. PMID:19425636

  20. Structural acoustics model of the violin radiativity profile.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George

    2008-12-01

    Violin radiativity profiles are dominated by the Helmholtz-like A0 cavity mode ( approximately 280 Hz), first corpus bending modes B1(-) and B1(+) ( approximately 500 Hz), and BH and bridge-filter peaks ( approximately 2.4 kHz and approximately 3.5 kHz, respectively), with falloff above approximately 4 kHz. The B1 modes-dependent on two low-lying free-plate modes--are proposed to excite A0 via coupling to B1-driven in-phase f-hole volume flows. VIOCADEAS data show that A0 radiativity increases primarily as A0-B1(-) frequency difference decreases, consistent with Meinel's 1937 experiment for too-thick/too-thin plate thicknesses, plus sound post removal and violin octet baritone results. The vibration-->acoustic energy filter, F(RAD), computed from shape-material-independent radiation and total damping, peaks at the critical frequency f(crit), estimated from a free-plate mode by analogy to flat-plate bending. Experimentally, f(crit) decreased as this plate mode (and B1(+)) frequency increased. Simulations show that increasing plate thicknesses lowers f(crit), reduces F(RAD), and moves the spectral balance toward lower frequencies. Incorporating string-->corpus filters (including bridge versus bridge-island impedances) provides a model for overall violin radiativity. This model-with B1 and A0-B1 couplings, and f(crit) (computed from a free-plate mode important to B1) strongly affecting the lowest and highest parts of the radiativity profile-substantiates prior empirical B1--sound quality linkages. PMID:19206824

  1. Acoustic power of a moving point source in a moving medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, J. E., III; Sarris, I. I.

    1976-01-01

    The acoustic power output of a moving point-mass source in an acoustic medium which is in uniform motion and infinite in extent is examined. The acoustic medium is considered to be a homogeneous fluid having both zero viscosity and zero thermal conductivity. Two expressions for the acoustic power output are obtained based on a different definition cited in the literature for the average energy-flux vector in an acoustic medium in uniform motion. The acoustic power output of the source is found by integrating the component of acoustic intensity vector in the radial direction over the surface of an infinitely long cylinder which is within the medium and encloses the line of motion of the source. One of the power expressions is found to give unreasonable results even though the flow is uniform.

  2. A radioisotope-powered surface acoustic wave transponder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tin, S.; Lal, A.

    2009-09-01

    We demonstrate a 63Ni radioisotope-powered pulse transponder that has a SAW (surface acoustic wave) device as the frequency transmission frequency selector. Because the frequency is determined by a SAW device, narrowband detection with an identical SAW device enables the possibility for a long-distance RF-link. The SAW transponders can be buried deep into structural constructs such as steel and concrete, where changing batteries or harvesting vibration or EM energy is not a reliable option. RF-released power to radioisotope- released power amplification is 108, even when regulatory safe amounts of 63Ni are used. Here we have achieved an 800 µW pulse (315 MHz, 10 µs pause) across a 50 Ω load every 3 min, using a 1.5 milli-Ci 63Ni source.

  3. Reversing pathologically increased EEG power by acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation

    PubMed Central

    Adamchic, Ilya; Toth, Timea; Hauptmann, Christian; Tass, Peter Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic Coordinated Reset (CR) neuromodulation is a patterned stimulation with tones adjusted to the patient's dominant tinnitus frequency, which aims at desynchronizing pathological neuronal synchronization. In a recent proof-of-concept study, CR therapy, delivered 4–6 h/day more than 12 weeks, induced a significant clinical improvement along with a significant long-lasting decrease of pathological oscillatory power in the low frequency as well as γ band and an increase of the α power in a network of tinnitus-related brain areas. As yet, it remains unclear whether CR shifts the brain activity toward physiological levels or whether it induces clinically beneficial, but nonetheless abnormal electroencephalographic (EEG) patterns, for example excessively decreased δ and/or γ. Here, we compared the patients' spontaneous EEG data at baseline as well as after 12 weeks of CR therapy with the spontaneous EEG of healthy controls by means of Brain Electrical Source Analysis source montage and standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography techniques. The relationship between changes in EEG power and clinical scores was investigated using a partial least squares approach. In this way, we show that acoustic CR neuromodulation leads to a normalization of the oscillatory power in the tinnitus-related network of brain areas, most prominently in temporal regions. A positive association was found between the changes in tinnitus severity and the normalization of δ and γ power in the temporal, parietal, and cingulate cortical regions. Our findings demonstrate a widespread CR-induced normalization of EEG power, significantly associated with a reduction of tinnitus severity. PMID:23907785

  4. a Computational Method for the Analysis of Acoustic Radiation from Turbofan Inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raviprakash, G. K.

    1992-01-01

    A computational method is presented for the analysis of the noise radiation from turbofan inlets. The method developed considers the effect of mean flow and can be used at high frequencies. The techniques for generating the grid, solving the acoustic equations, applying radiating conditions on the far-field boundary, imposing inlet-fan interface conditions as well as solving the steady compressible flow equations are embodied in the Inlet Acoustic Analysis Method. The theoretical basis, formulated for 3-D acoustics within an axisymmetric domain, considers the effect of non-uniform mean flow. The discretization of the field equations is done using a finite volume type differencing. This leads to a block tri-diagonal system of equations which is then efficiently solved. A new and powerful method is developed for the application of radiating conditions. A layer potential representation is used in obtaining numerically local radiating conditions. The locally radiating conditions, developed using the single layer source representation, can be used even at the interior eigenvalues. Using this technique, the radiating conditions can be applied very close to the inlet, and hence the computational efficiency can be significantly increased. The irrotationality conditions for the axisymmetric compressible flow are discretized for solving the mean flow field. An iterative scheme is developed to solve for the stream function, the density, and the speed of sound. The inlet-fan interface conditions are incorporated to properly specify the source of noise. The noise source is either directly specified or the interface potential distribution is split into a combination of an imposed right traveling disturbance and an unknown combination of left traveling disturbances, that come out as part of the solution process. The grid generation procedure utilizes algebraic transformations as well as the grid blending technique. This process is automated to accommodate variations in the grid

  5. A computational method for the analysis of acoustic radiation from turbofan inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raviprakash, G. K.

    A computational method is presented for the analysis of the noise radiation from turbofan inlets. The method developed considers the effect of mean flow and can be used at high frequencies. The techniques for generating the grid, solving the acoustic equations, applying radiating conditions on the far-field boundary, imposing inlet-fan interface conditions as well as solving the steady compressible flow equations are embodied in the Inlet Acoustic Analysis Method. The theoretical basis, formulated for 3-D acoustics within an axisymmetric domain, considers the effect of non-uniform mean flow. The discretization of the field equations is done using a finite volume type differencing. This leads to a block tri-diagonal system of equations which is then efficiently solved. A new and powerful method is developed for the application of radiating conditions. A layer potential representation is used in obtaining numerically local radiating conditions. The locally radiating conditions, developed using the single layer source representation, can be used even at the interior eigenvalues. Using this technique, the radiating conditions can be applied very close to the inlet, and hence the computational efficiency can be significantly increased. The irrotationality conditions for the axisymmetric compressible flow are discretized for solving the mean flow field. An iterative scheme is developed to solve for the stream function, the density, and the speed of sound. The inlet-fan interface conditions are incorporated to properly specify the source of noise. The noise source is either directly specified or the interface potential distribution is split into a combination of an imposed right traveling disturbance and an unknown combination of left traveling disturbances, that come out as part of the solution process. The grid generation procedure utilizes algebraic transformations as well as the grid blending techniques. This process is automated to accommodate variations in the grid

  6. The patterning mechanism of carbon nanotubes using surface acoustic waves: the acoustic radiation effect or the dielectrophoretic effect.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhichao; Guo, Jinhong; Liu, Yan Jun; Ai, Ye

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we present a simple technique capable of assembling and patterning suspended CNTs using a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW) field. Individual CNTs could be assembled into larger CNT bundles and patterned in periodic positions on a substrate surface. The mechanism of the SSAW-based patterning technique has been investigated using both numerical simulation and experimental study. It has been found that the acoustic radiation effect due to the acoustic pressure field and the dielectrophoretic (DEP) effect induced by the electric field co-existing in the patterning process however play different roles depending on the properties of the suspended particles and the suspension medium. In the SSAW-based patterning of highly conductive CNTs with high aspect ratio geometry, the positive DEP effect dominates over the acoustic radiation effect. In contrast, the acoustic radiation effect dominates over the DEP effect when manipulating less conductive, spherical or low aspect ratio particles or biological cells. These results provide a meaningful insight into the mechanism of SSAW-based patterning, which is of great help to guide the effective use of this patterning technique for various applications. PMID:26239679

  7. Acoustic and elastic multiple scattering and radiation from cylindrical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirkulova, Feruza Abdukadirovna

    Multiple scattering (MS) and radiation of waves by a system of scatterers is of great theoretical and practical importance and is required in a wide variety of physical contexts such as the implementation of "invisibility" cloaks, the effective parameter characterization, and the fabrication of dynamically tunable structures, etc. The dissertation develops fast, rapidly convergent iterative techniques to expedite the solution of MS problems. The formulation of MS problems reduces to a system of linear algebraic equations using Graf's theorem and separation of variables. The iterative techniques are developed using Neumann expansion and Block Toeplitz structure of the linear system; they are very general, and suitable for parallel computations and a large number of MS problems, i.e. acoustic, elastic, electromagnetic, etc., and used for the first time to solve MS problems. The theory is implemented in Matlab and FORTRAN, and the theoretical predictions are compared to computations obtained by COMSOL. To formulate the MS problem, the transition matrix is obtained by analyzing an acoustic and an elastic single scattering of incident waves by elastic isotropic and anisotropic solids. The mathematical model of wave scattering from multilayered cylindrical and spherical structures is developed by means of an exact solution of dynamic 3D elasticity theory. The recursive impedance matrix algorithm is derived for radially heterogeneous anisotropic solids. An explicit method for finding the impedance in piecewise uniform, transverse-isotropic material is proposed; the solution is compared to elasticity theory solutions involving Buchwald potentials. Furthermore, active exterior cloaking devices are modeled for acoustic and elastic media using multipole sources. A cloaking device can render an object invisible to some incident waves as seen by some external observer. The active cloak is generated by a discrete set of multipole sources that destructively interfere with an

  8. High-power radiating plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozanov, V. B.; Rukhadze, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    The physical principles underlying the use of radiating plasmas for the optical pumping of lasers are described. Particular consideration is given to the properties of radiating plasmas; radiation selectivity; the dynamics, equilibrium, and stability of radiating plasmas; the radiative Reynolds number; and experimental results on radiating discharges.

  9. Weakly Dissipative Dust Ion-Acoustic Solitons in the Presence of Electromagnetic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Golub', A. P.; Izvekova, Y. N.; Losseva, T. V.; Popel, S. I.; Shukla, P. K.

    2011-11-29

    We present the model, which describes nonlinear dust ion-acoustic (DIA) perturbations in complex plasmas with electromagnetic radiation. We study time-evolution of the individual DIA soliton and interaction of two DIA solitons.

  10. Ultrafast strain gauge: Observation of THz radiation coherently generated by acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M; Reed, E; Kim, K; Glownia, J; Howard, W M; Piner, E; Roberts, J

    2008-08-14

    The study of nanoscale, terahertz frequency (THz) acoustic waves has great potential for elucidating material and chemical interactions as well as nanostructure characterization. Here we report the first observation of terahertz radiation coherently generated by an acoustic wave. Such emission is directly related to the time-dependence of the stress as the acoustic wave crosses an interface between materials of differing piezoelectric response. This phenomenon enables a new class of strain wave metrology that is fundamentally distinct from optical approaches, providing passive remote sensing of the dynamics of acoustic waves with ultrafast time resolution. The new mechanism presented here enables nanostructure measurements not possible using existing optical or x-ray approaches.

  11. Ultrasonic Measurement of Microdisplacement Induced by Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Ryo; Izumi, Takuya; Komatsu, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2013-07-01

    Quantitative evaluation of human skin aging is achieved by measuring the viscoelasticity of the skin. In the present study, microdisplacement induced by acoustic radiation force (ARF) is quantitatively measured by high-frequency ultrasonography (HFUS) and the result is confirmed by laser-Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with 1% cellulose particles was used as the biological phantom. A concave piezoelectric zirconate titanate (PZT) transducer with a diameter and focal length of 3 cm was used as an applicator to generate ARF. Microdisplacement at each depth of PVA was measured by the phased tracking method at 100 MHz of ultrasound with a repetition rate of 2000 Hz. When 80 tone-burst pulses were applied, the displacement measured by HFUS was 9 µm and the same result was obtained by LDV. As the displacement at each depth of PVA is measurable using ARF and the HFUS system, the system could be applied to measuring the viscoelasticity of the layered structure of the human skin.

  12. Analysis of clot formation with acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Francesco; Longo, Diane M.; Lawrence, Michael B.; Walker, William F.

    2002-04-01

    Inappropriate blood coagulation plays an important role in diseases including stroke, heart attack, and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). DVT arises when a blood clot forms in a large vein of the leg. DVT is detrimental because the blood flow may be partially or completely obstructed. More importantly, a potentially fatal situation may arise if part of the clot travels to the arteries in the lungs, forming a pulmonary embolism (PE). Characterization of the mechanical properties of DVT could improve diagnosis and suggest appropriate treatment. We are developing a technique to assess mechanical properties of forming thrombi. The technique uses acoustic radiation force as a means to produce small, localized displacements within the sample. Returned ultrasound echoes are processed to estimate the time dependent displacement of the sample. Appropriate mechanical modeling and signal processing produce plots depicting relative mechanical properties (relative elasticity and relative viscosity) and force-free parameters (time constant, damping ratio, and natural frequency). We present time displacement curves of blood samples obtained during coagulation, and show associated relative and force-free parameter plots. These results show that the Voigt model with added mass accurately characterizes blood behavior during clot formation.

  13. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging-Based Needle Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Rotemberg, Veronica; Palmeri, Mark; Rosenzweig, Stephen; Grant, Stuart; Macleod, David; Nightingale, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle placement is widely used in the clinical setting, particularly for central venous catheter placement, tissue biopsy and regional anesthesia. Difficulties with ultrasound guidance in these areas often result from steep needle insertion angles and spatial offsets between the imaging plane and the needle. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging leads to improved needle visualization because it uses a standard diagnostic scanner to perform radiation force based elasticity imaging, creating a displacement map that displays tissue stiffness variations. The needle visualization in ARFI images is independent of needle-insertion angle and also extends needle visibility out of plane. Although ARFI images portray needles well, they often do not contain the usual B-mode landmarks. Therefore, a three-step segmentation algorithm has been developed to identify a needle in an ARFI image and overlay the needle prediction on a coregistered B-mode image. The steps are: (1) contrast enhancement by median filtration and Laplacian operator filtration, (2) noise suppression through displacement estimate correlation coefficient thresholding and (3) smoothing by removal of outliers and best-fit line prediction. The algorithm was applied to data sets from horizontal 18, 21 and 25 gauge needles between 0–4 mm offset in elevation from the transducer imaging plane and to 18G needles on the transducer axis (in plane) between 10° and 35° from the horizontal. Needle tips were visualized within 2 mm of their actual position for both horizontal needle orientations up to 1.5 mm off set in elevation from the transducer imaging plane and on-axis angled needles between 10°–35° above the horizontal orientation. We conclude that segmented ARFI images overlaid on matched B-mode images hold promise for improved needle visibility in many clinical applications. PMID:21608445

  14. Radiation power measurement on the ADITYA tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahiliani, Kumudni; Jha, Ratneshwar; Gopalkrishana, M. V.; Doshi, Kalpesh; Rathod, Vipal; Hansalia, Chandresh; ADITYA Team

    2009-08-01

    The radiation power loss and its variation with plasma density and current are studied in the ADITYA tokamak. The radiation power loss varies from 20% to 40% of the input power for different discharges. The radiation fraction decreases with increasing plasma current but it increases with increasing line-averaged central density. The radiated power behavior has also been studied in discharges with short pulses of molecular beam injection (MBI) and gas puff (GP). The increase in radiation loss is limited to the edge chords in the case of GP, but it extends to the core region for MBI fueling. The MBI seems to indicate reduction in the edge recycling. It is observed that during the density limit disruption, the radiated power loss is more in the current quench phase as compared with the thermal quench phase and comes mainly from the plasma edge.

  15. Reconstructing transient acoustic radiation from an arbitrary object with a uniform surface velocity distribution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the general formulations for reconstructing the transient acoustic field generated by an arbitrary object with a uniformly distributed surface velocity in free space. These formulations are derived from the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral theory that correlates the transient acoustic pressure at any field point to those on the source surface. For a class of acoustic radiation problems involving an arbitrarily oscillating object with a uniformly distributed surface velocity, for example, a loudspeaker membrane, the normal surface velocity is frequency dependent but is spatially invariant. Accordingly, the surface acoustic pressure is expressible as the product of the surface velocity and the quantity that can be solved explicitly by using the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral equation. This surface acoustic pressure can be correlated to the field acoustic pressure using the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral formulation. Consequently, it is possible to use nearfield acoustic holography to reconstruct acoustic quantities in entire three-dimensional space based on a single set of acoustic pressure measurements taken in the near field of the target object. Examples of applying these formulations to reconstructing the transient acoustic pressure fields produced by various arbitrary objects are demonstrated. PMID:25096086

  16. Progress in Acoustic Transmission of Power through Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit,Stewart; Coty, Benjamin; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea; Chang, Zensheu

    2008-01-01

    A document presents updated information on implementation of the wireless acoustic-electric feed-through (WAEF) concept, which was reported in Using Piezoelectric Devices To Transmit Power Through Walls (NPO-41157), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 6 (June 2008), page 70. To recapitulate: In a basic WAEF setup, a transmitting piezoelectric transducer on one side of a wall is driven at resonance to excite ultrasonic vibrations in the wall. A receiving piezoelectric transducer on the opposite side of the wall converts the vibrations back to an ultrasonic AC electric signal, which is then detected and otherwise processed in a manner that depends on the modulation (if any) applied to the signal and whether the signal is used to transmit power, data, or both. The present document expands upon the previous information concerning underlying physical principles, advantages, and potential applications of WAEF. It discusses the design and construction of breadboard prototype piezoelectric transducers for WAEF. It goes on to present results of computational simulations of performance and results of laboratory tests of the prototypes. In one notable test, a 100-W light bulb was lit by WAEF to demonstrate the feasibility of powering a realistic load.

  17. High-Power Piezoelectric Acoustic-Electric Power Feedthru for Metal Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Biederman, Will; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Jones, Christopher; Aldrich, Jack; Chang, Zensheu

    2008-01-01

    Piezoelectric acoustic-electric power feed-through devices transfer electric power wirelessly through a solid wall by using acoustic waves. This approach allows for the removal of holes through structures. The technology is applicable to power supply for electric equipment inside sealed containers, vacuum or pressure vessels, etc where the holes on the wall are prohibitive or result in significant performance degrade or complex designs. In the author's previous work, 100-W electric power was transferred through a metal wall by a small, simple-structure piezoelectric device. To meet requirements of higher power applications, the feasibility to transfer kilowatts level power was investigated. Pre-stressed longitudinal piezoelectric feedthru devices were analyzed by finite element model. An equivalent circuit model was developed to predict the power transfer characteristics to different electric loads. Based on the analysis results, a prototype device was designed, fabricated and a demonstration of the transmission of electric power up to 1-kW was successfully conducted. The methods to minimize the plate wave excitation on the wall were also analyzed. Both model analysis and experimental results are presented in detail in this presentation.

  18. Acoustic radiation force on a double-layer microsphere by a Gaussian focused beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Rongrong; Cheng, Kaixuan; Liu, Jiehui; Mao, Yiwei; Gong, Xiufen; Liu, Xiaozhou

    2014-10-14

    A new model for calculating the radiation force on double-layer microsphere is proposed based on the ray acoustics approach. The axial acoustic radiation force resulting from a focused Gaussian beam incident on spherical shells immersed in water is examined theoretically in relation to its thickness and the contents of its double-layer. The attenuation both in the water and inside the sphere is considered in this method, which cannot be ignored while the high frequency ultrasonic is used. Results of numerical calculations are presented for fat and low density polyethylene materials, with the hollow region filled with animal oil, water, or air. These results show how the acoustic impedance and the sound velocity of both layers, together with the thickness of the shell, affect the acoustic radiation force.

  19. Acoustic radiation force on a double-layer microsphere by a Gaussian focused beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Rongrong; Cheng, Kaixuan; Liu, Xiaozhou; Liu, Jiehui; Mao, Yiwei; Gong, Xiufen

    2014-10-01

    A new model for calculating the radiation force on double-layer microsphere is proposed based on the ray acoustics approach. The axial acoustic radiation force resulting from a focused Gaussian beam incident on spherical shells immersed in water is examined theoretically in relation to its thickness and the contents of its double-layer. The attenuation both in the water and inside the sphere is considered in this method, which cannot be ignored while the high frequency ultrasonic is used. Results of numerical calculations are presented for fat and low density polyethylene materials, with the hollow region filled with animal oil, water, or air. These results show how the acoustic impedance and the sound velocity of both layers, together with the thickness of the shell, affect the acoustic radiation force.

  20. The directional sensitivity of the acoustic radiation force to particle diameter.

    PubMed

    Ran, W; Saylor, J R

    2015-06-01

    When viscous corrections to the inviscid acoustic radiation force theory are implemented and applied to a standing wave field, the direction of the acoustic radiation force on particles varies from theory to theory. Specifically, some theories predict that the direction of the force depends on the particle diameter, while others reveal that the direction of the force is independent of particle diameter. The present study is an experimental investigation of the direction of the acoustic radiation force which suggests that particle diameter does affect the direction. Experiments were conducted in air using an ultrasonic standing wave field with a nominal frequency of 30 kHz. Smoke particles and fine water droplets having a range of diameters were flowed into the region of a standing wave field. The direction of the acoustic radiation force was determined by observing whether the particles accumulated in the nodes or the anti-nodes of the standing wave. Results show a change in the direction of the acoustic radiation force at a particle diameter of 0.3±0.1 μm, which corresponds to a particle diameter to acoustic-boundary-layer thickness ratio of 0.023±0.008. PMID:26093419

  1. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Measurement in Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juhan; Oh, Young Taik; Joo, Dong Jin; Ma, Bo Gyoung; Lee, A-lan; Lee, Jae Geun; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Seung Up; Jung, Dae Chul; Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Yu Seun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA) is a common cause of kidney allograft loss. Several noninvasive techniques developed to assess tissue fibrosis are widely used to examine the liver. However, relatively few studies have investigated the use of elastographic methods to assess transplanted kidneys. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical implications of the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) technique in renal transplant patients. A total of 91 patients who underwent living donor renal transplantation between September 2010 and January 2013 were included in this prospective study. Shear wave velocity (SWV) was measured by ARFI at baseline and predetermined time points (1 week and 6 and 12 months after transplantation). Protocol biopsies were performed at 12 months. Instead of reflecting IF/TA, SWVs were found to be related to time elapsed after transplantation. Mean SWV increased continuously during the first postoperative year (P < 0.001). In addition, mixed model analysis showed no correlation existed between SWV and serum creatinine (r = −0.2426, P = 0.0771). There was also no evidence of a relationship between IF/TA and serum creatinine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.220, P = 0.7648). Furthermore, SWV temporal patterns were dependent on the kidney weight to body weight ratio (KW/BW). In patients with a KW/BW <3.5 g/kg, mean SWV continuously increased for 12 months, whereas it decreased after 6 months in those with a KW/BW ≥3.5 g/kg. No significant correlation was observed between SWV and IF/TA or renal dysfunction. However, SWV was found to be related to the time after transplantation. Renal hemodynamics influenced by KW/BW might impact SWV values. PMID:26426636

  2. Acoustic Radiation From a Mach 14 Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Chao; Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to examine the turbulence statistics and the radiation field generated by a high-speed turbulent boundary layer with a nominal freestream Mach number of 14 and wall temperature of 0:18 times the recovery temperature. The flow conditions fall within the range of nozzle exit conditions of the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) Hypervelocity Tunnel No. 9 facility. The streamwise domain size is approximately 200 times the boundary-layer thickness at the inlet, with a useful range of Reynolds number corresponding to Re 450 ?? 650. Consistent with previous studies of turbulent boundary layer at high Mach numbers, the weak compressibility hypothesis for turbulent boundary layers remains applicable under this flow condition and the computational results confirm the validity of both the van Driest transformation and Morkovin's scaling. The Reynolds analogy is valid at the surface; the RMS of fluctuations in the surface pressure, wall shear stress, and heat flux is 24%, 53%, and 67% of the surface mean, respectively. The magnitude and dominant frequency of pressure fluctuations are found to vary dramatically within the inner layer (z/delta 0.< or approx. 0.08 or z+ < or approx. 50). The peak of the pre-multiplied frequency spectrum of the pressure fluctuation is f(delta)/U(sub infinity) approx. 2.1 at the surface and shifts to a lower frequency of f(delta)/U(sub infinity) approx. 0.7 in the free stream where the pressure signal is predominantly acoustic. The dominant frequency of the pressure spectrum shows a significant dependence on the freestream Mach number both at the wall and in the free stream.

  3. Effect of static pressure on acoustic energy radiated by cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Towata, Atsuya; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2011-11-01

    The effect of static pressure on acoustic emissions including shock-wave emissions from cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound has been studied by numerical simulations in order to investigate the effect of static pressure on dispersion of nano-particles in liquids by ultrasound. The results of the numerical simulations for bubbles of 5 μm in equilibrium radius at 20 kHz have indicated that the optimal static pressure which maximizes the energy of acoustic waves radiated by a bubble per acoustic cycle increases as the acoustic pressure amplitude increases or the viscosity of the solution decreases. It qualitatively agrees with the experimental results by Sauter et al. [Ultrason. Sonochem. 15, 517 (2008)]. In liquids with relatively high viscosity (∼200 mPa s), a bubble collapses more violently than in pure water when the acoustic pressure amplitude is relatively large (∼20 bar). In a mixture of bubbles of different equilibrium radius (3 and 5 μm), the acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is much larger than that by a 3 μm bubble due to the interaction with bubbles of different equilibrium radius. The acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is substantially increased by the interaction with 3 μm bubbles. PMID:22087995

  4. Acoustic agglomeration of power plant fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reethof, G.; McDaniel, O.H.

    1982-01-01

    The work has shown that acoustic agglomeration at practical acoustic intensities and frequencies is technically and most likely economically viable. The following studies were performed with the listed results: The physics of acoustic agglomeration is complex particularly at the needed high acoustic intensities in the range of 150 to 160 dB and frequencies in the 2500 Hz range. The analytical model which we developed, although not including nonlinear acoustic efforts, agreed with the trends observed. We concentrated our efforts on clarifying the impact of high acoustic intensities on the generation of turbulence. Results from a special set of tests show that although some acoustically generated turbulence of sorts exists in the 150 to 170 dB range with acoustic streaming present, such turbulence will not be a significant factor in acoustic agglomeration compared to the dominant effect of the acoustic velocities at the fundamental frequency and its harmonics. Studies of the robustness of the agglomerated particles using the Anderson Mark III impactor as the source of the shear stresses on the particles show that the agglomerates should be able to withstand the rigors of flow through commercial cyclones without significant break-up. We designed and developed a 700/sup 0/F tubular agglomerator of 8'' internal diameter. The electrically heated system functioned well and provided very encouraging agglomeration results at acoustic levels in the 150 to 160 dB and 2000 to 3000 Hz ranges. We confirmed earlier results that an optimum frequency exists at about 2500 Hz and that larger dust loadings will give better results. Studies of the absorption of acoustic energy by various common gases as a function of temperature and humidity showed the need to pursue such an investigation for flue gas constituents in order to provide necessary data for the design of agglomerators. 65 references, 56 figures, 4 tables.

  5. A numerical method for the calculation of dynamic response and acoustic radiation from an underwater structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Q.; Joseph, P. F.

    2005-05-01

    An approach combining finite element with boundary element methods is proposed to calculate the elastic vibration and acoustic field radiated from an underwater structure. The FEM software NASTRAN is employed for computation of the structural vibration. An uncoupled boundary element method, based on the potential decomposition technique, is described to determine the acoustic added mass and damping coefficients that result due to fluid loading effects. The acoustic matrices of added mass and damping coefficients are then added to the structural mass and damping matrices, respectively, by the DMAP modules of NASTRAN. Numerical results are shown to be in good agreement with experimental data. The complex eigenvalue analyses of underwater structure are obtained by NASTRAN solution sequence SOL107. Results obtained from this study suggest that the natural frequencies of underwater structures are only weakly dependent on the acoustic frequency if the acoustic wavelength is roughly twice as large as the maximum structural dimension.

  6. Acoustic Radiation from High-Speed Turbulent Boundary Layers in a Tunnel-Like Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of acoustic radiation from a turbulent boundary layer in a cylindrical domain will be conducted under the flow conditions corresponding to those at the nozzle exit of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel (BAM6QT) operated under noisy-flow conditions with a total pressure p(sub t) of 225 kPa and a total temperature of T(sub t) equal to 430 K. Simulations of acoustic radiation from a turbulent boundary layer over a flat surface are used as a reference configuration to illustrate the effects of the cylindrical enclosure. A detailed analysis of acoustic freestream disturbances in the cylindrical domain will be reported in the final paper along with a discussion pertaining to the significance of the flat-plate acoustic simulations and guidelines concerning the modeling of the effects of an axisymmetric tunnel wall on the noise field.

  7. Acoustic intensity-based method for sound radiations in a uniform flow.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Zhou, Zhengfang; Zhuang, Mei

    2009-11-01

    An acoustic intensity-based method (AIBM) is extended and verified for predicting sound radiation in a subsonic uniform flow. The method assumes that the acoustic propagation is governed by the modified Helmholtz equation on and outside of a control surface, which encloses all the noise sources and nonlinear effects. With acoustic pressure derivative and its co-located acoustic pressure as input from an open control surface, the unique solution of the modified Helmholtz equation is obtained by solving the least squares problem. The AIBM is coupled with near-field Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)/Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) methods to predict sound radiation of model aeroacoustic problems. The effectiveness of this hybrid approach has been demonstrated by examples of both tonal and broadband noise. Since the AIBM method is stable and accurate based on the input acoustic data from an open surface in a radiated field, it is therefore advantageous for the far-field prediction of aerodynamics noise propagation when an acoustic input from a closed control surface, like the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings surface, is not available [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 264, 321-342 (1969)]. PMID:19894800

  8. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  9. Production of Local Acoustic Radiation Force to Constrain Direction of Microcapsules in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohji Masuda,; Nobuyuki Watarai,; Ryusuke Nakamoto,; Yusuke Muramatsu,

    2010-07-01

    We have ever reported our attempt to control the direction of microcapsules in flow by acoustic radiation force. However, the diameter of capsules was too large to be applied in vivo. Furthermore, the acoustic radiation force affected only the focal area because focused ultrasound was used. Thus, we have improved our experiment by using microcapsules as small as blood cells and introducing a plane wave of ultrasound. We prepared an artificial blood vessel including a Y-form bifurcation established in two observation areas. Then, we newly defined the induction index to evaluate the difference in capsule density in two downstream paths. As a result, the optimum angle of ultrasound emission to induct to the desired path was derived. The induction index increased in proportion to the central frequency of ultrasound, which is affected by the aggregation of capsules to receive more acoustic radiation force.

  10. Eccentricity effects on acoustic radiation from a spherical source suspended within a thermoviscous fluid sphere.

    PubMed

    Hasheminejad, Seyyed M; Azarpeyvand, Mahdi

    2003-11-01

    Acoustic radiation from a spherical source undergoing angularly periodic axisymmetric harmonic surface vibrations while eccentrically suspended within a thermoviscous fluid sphere, which is immersed in a viscous thermally conducting unbounded fluid medium, is analyzed in an exact fashion. The formulation uses the appropriate wave-harmonic field expansions along with the translational addition theorem for spherical wave functions and the relevant boundary conditions to develop a closed-form solution in form of infinite series. The analytical results are illustrated with a numerical example in which the vibrating source is eccentrically positioned within a chemical fluid sphere submerged in water. The modal acoustic radiation impedance load on the source and the radiated far-field pressure are evaluated and discussed for representative values of the parameters characterizing the system. The proposed model can lead to a better understanding of dynamic response of an underwater acoustic lens. It is equally applicable in miniature transducer analysis and design with applications in medical ultrasonics. PMID:14682628

  11. Effects of Radiation on Commercial Power Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selva, Luis; Becker, Heidi; Chavez, Rosa; Scheick, Leif

    2006-01-01

    The effects of radiation on various commercial power devices are presented. The devices have proved to be very fragile to single event effects, with some of the devices actually succumbing to catastrophic SEE with protons.

  12. Acoustic-loads research for powered-lift configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenster, J. A.; Willis, C. M.; Schroeder, J. C.; Mixson, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    Data presented from large-scale model tests with jet engines having thrusts of 9 kN (2000 lb) and 36 kN (8000 lb) include acoustic loads for an externally blown wing and flap induced by a TF34 jet engine, an upper surface blown (USB) aircraft model in a wind tunnel, and two USB models in static tests. Comparisons of these results with results from acoustic loads studies on configurations of other sizes are made and the implications of these results on interior noise and acoustic fatigue are discussed.

  13. Sources and Radiation Patterns of Volcano-Acoustic Signals Investigated with Field-Scale Chemical Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. C.; Lees, J. M.; Taddeucci, J.; Graettinger, A. H.; Sonder, I.; Valentine, G.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the processes that give rise to complex acoustic signals during volcanic blasts by monitoring buried chemical explosions with infrasound and audio range microphones, strong motion sensors, and high speed imagery. Acoustic waveforms vary with scaled depth of burial (SDOB, units in meters per cube root of joules), ranging from high amplitude, impulsive, gas expansion dominated signals at low SDOB to low amplitude, longer duration, ground motion dominated signals at high SDOB. Typically, the sudden upward acceleration of the substrate above the blast produces the first acoustic arrival, followed by a second pulse due to the eruption of pressurized gas at the surface. Occasionally, a third overpressure occurs when displaced material decelerates upon impact with the ground. The transition between ground motion dominated and gas release dominated acoustics ranges between 0.0038-0.0018 SDOB, respectively. For example, one explosion registering an SDOB=0.0031 produced two overpressure pulses of approximately equal amplitude, one due to ground motion, the other to gas release. Recorded volcano infrasound has also identified distinct ground motion and gas release components during explosions at Sakurajima, Santiaguito, and Karymsky volcanoes. Our results indicate that infrasound records may provide a proxy for the depth and energy of these explosions. Furthermore, while magma fragmentation models indicate the possibility of several explosions during a single vulcanian eruption (Alidibirov, Bull Volc., 1994), our results suggest that a single explosion can also produce complex acoustic signals. Thus acoustic records alone cannot be used to distinguish between single explosions and multiple closely-spaced blasts at volcanoes. Results from a series of lateral blasts during the 2014 field experiment further indicates whether vent geometry can produce directional acoustic radiation patterns like those observed at Tungarahua volcano (Kim et al., GJI, 2012). Beside

  14. Generation of acoustic waves by focused infrared neodymium-laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Barry

    1991-02-01

    When the radiation from a sufficiently powerful pulsed laser is focused into the transparent gaseous, liquid or solid media, dielectric breakdown may occur around the beam waist giving rise to a short-lived high-temperature plasma which quickly heats the surrounding material. As a consequence of various energy-coupling mechanisms, this phenomenon causes the emission of one or more high-frequency ultrasonic acoustic waves whose speeds of propagation are dependent upon the physical properties of the host medium. In the high-speed photographic studies described, the 1.06 micron near-infrared radiation from an 8-ns, 10-mJ Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is focused in or onto a variety of fluid and solid materials. The rapid variations in density around the resulting plasma events are visualized using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a sub-nanosecond dye-laser light source and a video-imaging system. Calculations of the corresponding transient pressure distributions are then enacted from the digitally-recorded interferograms using a semi-automatic procedure under the control of a personal computer. Measurements of position, displacement, and velocity are also carried out using the same optical apparatus in schlieren and focused shadowgraph high-speed photographic measurements. The experimental work outlined in the following chapters is divided into three broad fields of interest. In the first of these, a study of the laser-generation of spherical shock waves in atmospheric air is carried out. In the second, the neodymium-laser beam is focused onto different solid-fluid interfaces resulting in the formation of bulk longitudinal and shear waves and surface acoustic waves. The interactions of these waves with various obstacles and defects are investigated with reference to their application to non-destructive testing. In the third and most important field, a detailed study of the dynamics of laser-induced cavitation bubbles in water is carried out. With regard to the associated

  15. Generation of a reference radiation pattern of string instruments using automatic excitation and acoustic centering.

    PubMed

    Shabtai, Noam R; Behler, Gottfried; Vorländer, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Radiation patterns of musical instruments are important for the understanding of music perception in concert halls, and may be used to improve the plausibility of virtual acoustic systems. Many attempts have been performed to measure the spatial response of musical instruments using surrounding spherical microphone arrays with a limited number of microphones. This work presents a high-resolution spatial sampling of the radiation pattern of an electrically excited violin, and addresses technical problems that arise due to mechanical reasons of the excitation apparatus using acoustic centering. PMID:26627818

  16. Confocal acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography using a ring ultrasonic transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Wenjuan; Li, Rui; Ma, Teng; Kirk Shung, K.; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-03-24

    We designed and developed a confocal acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography system. A ring ultrasound transducer was used to achieve reflection mode excitation and generate an oscillating acoustic radiation force in order to generate displacements within the tissue, which were detected using the phase-resolved optical coherence elastography method. Both phantom and human tissue tests indicate that this system is able to sense the stiffness difference of samples and quantitatively map the elastic property of materials. Our confocal setup promises a great potential for point by point elastic imaging in vivo and differentiation of diseased tissues from normal tissue.

  17. Tunable optical lens array using viscoelastic material and acoustic radiation force

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, Daisuke Kashihara, Yuta; Matsukawa, Mami; Hatanaka, Megumi; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2015-10-28

    A movable optical lens array that uses acoustic radiation force was investigated. The lens array consists of a glass plate, two piezoelectric bimorph transducers, and a transparent viscoelastic gel film. A cylindrical lens array with a lens pitch of 4.6 mm was fabricated using the acoustic radiation force generated by the flexural vibration of the glass plate. The focal point and the positioning of the lenses can be changed using the input voltage and the driving phase difference between the two transducers, respectively.

  18. Liver reserve function assessment by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Lan; Liang, Li-Wei; Cao, Hui; Men, Qiong; Hou, Ke-Zhu; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Ya-E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the utility of liver reserve function by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging in patients with liver tumors. METHODS: Seventy-six patients with liver tumors were enrolled in this study. Serum biochemical indexes, such as aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), serum albumin (ALB), total bilirubin (T-Bil), and other indicators were observed. Liver stiffness (LS) was measured by ARFI imaging, measurements were repeated 10 times, and the average value of the results was taken as the final LS value. Indocyanine green (ICG) retention was performed, and ICG-K and ICG-R15 were recorded. Child-Pugh (CP) scores were carried out based on patient’s preoperative biochemical tests and physical condition. Correlations among CP scores, ICG-R15, ICG-K and LS values were observed and analyzed using either the Pearson correlation coefficient or the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare LS values of CP scores, and the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve was used to analyze liver reserve function assessment accuracy. RESULTS: LS in the ICG-R15 10%-20% group was significantly higher than in the ICG-R15 < 10% group; and the difference was statistically significant (2.19 ± 0.27 vs 1.59 ± 0.32, P < 0.01). LS in the ICG-R15 > 20% group was significantly higher than in the ICG-R15 < 10% group; and the difference was statistically significant (2.92 ± 0.29 vs 1.59 ± 0.32, P < 0.01). The LS value in patients with CP class A was lower than in patients with CP class B (1.57 ± 0.34 vs 1.86 ± 0.27, P < 0.05), while the LS value in patients with CP class B was lower than in patients with CP class C (1.86 ± 0.27 vs 2.47 ± 0.33, P < 0.01). LS was positively correlated with ICG-R15 (r = 0.617, P < 0.01) and CP score (r = 0.772, P < 0.01). Meanwhile, LS was negatively correlated with ICG-K (r = -0.673, P < 0.01). AST, ALT and T-Bil were positively correlated with LS, while ALB was negatively

  19. Influence of the outer scales of temperature and dynamic turbulence on the characteristics of transmitted acoustic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanaeva, L. G.; Belov, V. V.; Burkatovskaya, Yu. B.; Krasnenko, N. P.

    2015-11-01

    In the present work, the problem of propagation of monochromatic acoustic radiation in the lower 500-meter layer of the plain stratified moving turbulent atmosphere is solved by the Monte Carlo method. The influence of the parameters of models of the outer scales of temperature and dynamic turbulence on the intensity of transmitted acoustic radiation intensity is investigated.

  20. An Evaluation of the Additional Acoustic Power Needed to Overcome the Effects of a Test-Article's Absorption During Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Testing of Spaceflight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of a customer's aerospace test-article to a simulated acoustic launch environment is typically performed in a reverberant acoustic test chamber. The acoustic pre-test runs that will ensure that the sound pressure levels of this environment can indeed be met by a test facility are normally performed without a test-article dynamic simulator of representative acoustic absorption and size. If an acoustic test facility's available acoustic power capability becomes maximized with the test-article installed during the actual test then the customer's environment requirement may become compromised. In order to understand the risk of not achieving the customer's in-tolerance spectrum requirement with the test-article installed, an acoustic power margin evaluation as a function of frequency may be performed by the test facility. The method for this evaluation of acoustic power will be discussed in this paper. This method was recently applied at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station's Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility for the SpaceX Falcon 9 Payload Fairing acoustic test program.

  1. An Evaluation of the Additional Acoustic Power Needed to Overcome the Effects of a Test-Article's Absorption during Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Testing of Spaceflight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of a customers aerospace test-article to a simulated acoustic launch environment is typically performed in a reverberant acoustic test chamber. The acoustic pre-test runs that will ensure that the sound pressure levels of this environment can indeed be met by a test facility are normally performed without a test-article dynamic simulator of representative acoustic absorption and size. If an acoustic test facilitys available acoustic power capability becomes maximized with the test-article installed during the actual test then the customers environment requirement may become compromised. In order to understand the risk of not achieving the customers in-tolerance spectrum requirement with the test-article installed, an acoustic power margin evaluation as a function of frequency may be performed by the test facility. The method for this evaluation of acoustic power will be discussed in this paper. This method was recently applied at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Stations Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility for the SpaceX Falcon 9 Payload Fairing acoustic test program.

  2. Acoustic radiation from the submerged circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Li-Yun; Xiang, Yu; Lu, Jing; Jiang, Hong-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Based on the transfer matrix method of exploring the circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping (i.e., ACLD), combined with the analytical solution of the Helmholtz equation for a point source, a multi-point multipole virtual source simulation method is for the first time proposed for solving the acoustic radiation problem of a submerged ACLD shell. This approach, wherein some virtual point sources are assumed to be evenly distributed on the axial line of the cylindrical shell, and the sound pressure could be written in the form of the sum of the wave functions series with the undetermined coefficients, is demonstrated to be accurate to achieve the radiation acoustic pressure of the pulsating and oscillating spheres respectively. Meanwhile, this approach is proved to be accurate to obtain the radiation acoustic pressure for a stiffened cylindrical shell. Then, the chosen number of the virtual distributed point sources and truncated number of the wave functions series are discussed to achieve the approximate radiation acoustic pressure of an ACLD cylindrical shell. Applying this method, different radiation acoustic pressures of a submerged ACLD cylindrical shell with different boundary conditions, different thickness values of viscoelastic and piezoelectric layer, different feedback gains for the piezoelectric layer and coverage of ACLD are discussed in detail. Results show that a thicker thickness and larger velocity gain for the piezoelectric layer and larger coverage of the ACLD layer can obtain a better damping effect for the whole structure in general. Whereas, laying a thicker viscoelastic layer is not always a better treatment to achieve a better acoustic characteristic. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11162001, 11502056, and 51105083), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (Grant No. 2012GXNSFAA053207), the Doctor Foundation of Guangxi

  3. 3D Finite-Difference Modeling of Acoustic Radiation from Seismic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chael, E. P.; Aldridge, D. F.; Jensen, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Shallow seismic events, earthquakes as well as explosions, often generate acoustic waves in the atmosphere observable at local or even regional distances. Recording both the seismic and acoustic signals can provide additional constraints on source parameters such as epicenter coordinates, depth, origin time, moment, and mechanism. Recent advances in finite-difference (FD) modeling methods enable accurate numerical treatment of wave propagation across the ground surface between the (solid) elastic and (fluid) acoustic domains. Using a fourth-order, staggered-grid, velocity-stress FD algorithm, we are investigating the effects of various source parameters on the acoustic (or infrasound) signals transmitted from the solid earth into the atmosphere. Compressional (P), shear (S), and Rayleigh waves all radiate some acoustic energy into the air at the ground surface. These acoustic wavefronts are typically conical in shape, since their phase velocities along the surface exceed the sound speed in air. Another acoustic arrival with a spherical wavefront can be generated from the vicinity of the epicenter of a shallow event, due to the strong vertical ground motions directly above the buried source. Images of acoustic wavefields just above the surface reveal the radiation patterns and relative amplitudes of the various arrivals. In addition, we compare the relative effectiveness of different seismic source mechanisms for generating acoustic energy. For point sources at a fixed depth, double-couples with almost any orientation produce stronger acoustic signals than isotropic explosions, due to higher-amplitude S and Rayleigh waves. Of course, explosions tend to be shallower than most earthquakes, which can offset the differences due to mechanism. Low-velocity material in the shallow subsurface acts to increase vertical seismic motions there, enhancing the coupling to acoustic waves in air. If either type of source breaks the surface (e.g., an earthquake with surface rupture

  4. Acoustic noise from volcanoes - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woulff, G.; Mcgetchin, T. R.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses some theoretical aspects of acoustic investigation of volcanoes and describes a field experiment involving the recording, analysis, and interpretation of acoustic radiation from energetic fumaroles at Volcan Acatenango, Guatemala, during mid-January 1973. Particular attention is given to deriving information about the flow velocity of the erupting medium from acoustics as a means to study eruption dynamics. Theoretical considerations suggest that acoustic power radiated during gaseous volcanic eruptions may be related to gas exit velocity according to appropriate power laws. Eruption acoustics proves useful as a means of quantitative monitoring of volcanic activity.

  5. A multimegawatt space power source radiator design

    SciTech Connect

    Jedruch, J.

    1988-01-28

    The multimegawatt space power sources (MMSPS) proposed for deployment in the late 1990s to meet mission burst power requirements, require an increase by four orders of magnitude in the power rating of equipment currently used in space. Prenger and Sullivan (1982) describe various radiator concepts proposed for such applications. They range from the innovative liquid droplet radiator (Mattick and Hertzberg 1981) to the more conventional heat pipe concept (Girrens 1982). The present paper deals with the design of the radiator for one such system, characterized by both high temperature and high pressure. It provides an estimate of the size, mass, and problems of orbiting such a radiator, based on the assumption that the next generation of heavy launch vehicle with 120-tonne carrying capacity, and 4000-m/sup 3/ cargo volume, will be available for putting hardware into orbit.

  6. Radiation hardening design of nuclear powered spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    The design and operation of space systems utilizing nuclear fueled power systems must consider the radiation environment from the earliest stages of their design. A range of nuclear systems are being considered for present and future satellite systems capable of supplying tens of kilowatts to multimegawatt and generating a corresponding range of radiation environments. The effects of these radiations on electronics and materials can be minimized by implementing early design considerations which maximize the design efficiency and minimize the impact on system mass. Space systems design considerations for the radiation environment must include all sources in addition to the self induced gamma ray and neutron radiation. These include the orbital dependent environment from the high energy electron and protons encountered in natural space. The system trades which the designer must consider in the development of space platforms which utilize nuclear reactor power supplies are discussed.

  7. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  8. An efficient model for coupling structural vibrations with acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Ting, LU

    1993-01-01

    The scattering of an incident wave by a flexible panel is studied. The panel vibration is governed by the nonlinear plate equations while the loading on the panel, which is the pressure difference across the panel, depends on the reflected and transmitted waves. Two models are used to calculate this structural-acoustic interaction problem. One solves the three dimensional nonlinear Euler equations for the flow-field coupled with the plate equations (the fully coupled model). The second uses the linear wave equation for the acoustic field and expresses the load as a double integral involving the panel oscillation (the decoupled model). The panel oscillation governed by a system of integro-differential equations is solved numerically and the acoustic field is then defined by an explicit formula. Numerical results are obtained using the two models for linear and nonlinear panel vibrations. The predictions given by these two models are in good agreement but the computational time needed for the 'fully coupled model' is 60 times longer than that for 'the decoupled model'.

  9. Small scale aspects of warm dark matter: Power spectra and acoustic oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanovsky, Daniel; Wu Jun

    2011-02-15

    We provide a semianalytic derivation of approximate evolution equations for density perturbations of warm dark matter candidates that decoupled while relativistic with arbitrary distribution functions, their solutions at small scales, and a simple numerical implementation that yields their transfer functions and power spectra. Density perturbations evolve through three stages: radiation domination when the particle is relativistic and nonrelativistic and matter domination. An early integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect during the first stage leads to an enhancement of density perturbations and a plateau in the transfer function for k < or approx. k{sub fs}, the free-streaming wave vector. An effective fluid description emerges at small scales which includes the effects of free streaming in initial conditions and inhomogeneities. The transfer function features warm dark matter acoustic oscillations at scales k > or approx. 2k{sub fs}. A simple analytic interpolation of the power spectra between large and small scales and a numerical implementation valid for arbitrary distribution functions is provided. As an application we study the power spectra for two models of sterile neutrinos with m{approx}keV produced nonresonantly and compare our results to those obtained from Boltzmann codes.

  10. High-power acoustic insult to living cultured cells as studied by high-frequency scanning acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, Chiaki; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2002-06-01

    A plurality of articles discussing combined effects of acoustic high-pressure (mechanical factor) and heat (thermal factor) caused by acoustic vibration on biological tissues and cells has been published. Herein, we contribute the preliminary results describing the behavior of living human skin cells when separately applying shock waves and thermal insult to them. First, we gradually increased temperature of a culturing medium from 37.5 to 52 degree(s)C using the heat plate with temperature controller, and carried out in-situ observation of the cells grown on a substrate via the medium using a scanning acoustic microscope. Second, we provided the pressure using high power ultrasonic pulses generated by a laser induced ultrasonic shock wave system to the cells, wherein the pressure caused by the pulses was measured by a hydrophone, and wherein temperature was monitored by thermocouples. The cells were observed just after giving the impact. The difference between phenomena indicating cellular insult and injury (e.g., shrinkage or lift-off) were clearly visualized by the scanning acoustic microscope with frequency at 1.0 GHz.

  11. Application of an ultrasonic focusing radiator for acoustic levitation of submillimeter samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    An acoustic apparatus has been specifically developed to handle samples of submillimeter size in a gaseous medium. This apparatus consists of an acoustic levitation device, deployment devices for small liquid and solid samples, heat sources for sample heat treatment, acoustic alignment devices, a cooling system and data-acquisition instrumentation. The levitation device includes a spherical aluminum dish of 12 in. diameter and 0.6 in. thickness, 130 pieces of PZT transducers attached to the back side of the dish and a spherical concave reflector situated in the vicinity of the center of curvature of the dish. The three lowest operating frequencies for the focusing-radiator levitation device are 75, 105 and 163 kHz, respectively. In comparison with other levitation apparatus, it possesses a large radiation pressure and a high lateral positional stability. This apparatus can be used most advantageously in the study of droplets and spherical shell systems, for instance, for fusion target applications.

  12. Manipulation of Liquids Using Phased Array Generation of Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A phased array of piezoelectric transducers is used to control and manipulate contained as well as uncontained fluids in space and earth applications. The transducers in the phased array are individually activated while being commonly controlled to produce acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. The phased array is activated to produce a single pulse, a pulse burst or a continuous pulse to agitate, segregate or manipulate liquids and gases. The phased array generated acoustic radiation pressure is also useful in manipulating a drop, a bubble or other object immersed in a liquid. The transducers can be arranged in any number of layouts including linear single or multi- dimensional, space curved and annular arrays. The individual transducers in the array are activated by a controller, preferably driven by a computer.

  13. Surprises and anomalies in acoustical and optical scattering and radiation forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Philip L.

    2015-09-01

    Experiments on radiation torques and negative radiation forces by various researchers display how the underlying wave-field geometry influences radiation forces. Other situations strongly influenced by wave-field geometry include high-order caustics present in light-scattering patterns of objects as simple as oblate drops of water or oblate bubbles of air in water. Related theoretical and experimental investigations are considered. Acoustic scattering enhancements associated with various guided waves are also examined. These include guided waves having negative group velocities and guided wave radiating wavefronts having a vanishing Gaussian curvature.

  14. Acoustic spectroscopy: A powerful analytical method for the pharmaceutical field?

    PubMed

    Bonacucina, Giulia; Perinelli, Diego R; Cespi, Marco; Casettari, Luca; Cossi, Riccardo; Blasi, Paolo; Palmieri, Giovanni F

    2016-04-30

    Acoustics is one of the emerging technologies developed to minimize processing, maximize quality and ensure the safety of pharmaceutical, food and chemical products. The operating principle of acoustic spectroscopy is the measurement of the ultrasound pulse intensity and phase after its propagation through a sample. The main goal of this technique is to characterise concentrated colloidal dispersions without dilution, in such a way as to be able to analyse non-transparent and even highly structured systems. This review presents the state of the art of ultrasound-based techniques in pharmaceutical pre-formulation and formulation steps, showing their potential, applicability and limits. It reports in a simplified version the theory behind acoustic spectroscopy, describes the most common equipment on the market, and finally overviews different studies performed on systems and materials used in the pharmaceutical or related fields. PMID:26976503

  15. Acoustic radiation damping of flat rectangular plates subjected to subsonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen Heitman

    1993-01-01

    The acoustic radiation damping for various isotropic and laminated composite plates and semi-infinite strips subjected to a uniform, subsonic and steady flow has been predicted. The predictions are based on the linear vibration of a flat plate. The fluid loading is characterized as the perturbation pressure derived from the linearized Bernoulli and continuity equations. Parameters varied in the analysis include Mach number, mode number and plate size, aspect ratio and mass. The predictions are compared with existing theoretical results and experimental data. The analytical results show that the fluid loading can significantly affect realistic plate responses. Generally, graphite/epoxy and carbon/carbon plates have higher acoustic radiation damping values than similar aluminum plates, except near plate divergence conditions resulting from aeroelastic instability. Universal curves are presented where the acoustic radiation damping normalized by the mass ratio is a linear function of the reduced frequency. A separate curve is required for each Mach number and plate aspect ratio. In addition, acoustic radiation damping values can be greater than or equal to the structural component of the modal critical damping ratio (assumed as 0.01) for the higher subsonic Mach numbers. New experimental data were acquired for comparison with the analytical results.

  16. Active Path Selection of Fluid Microcapsules in Artificial Blood Vessel by Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kohji; Muramatsu, Yusuke; Ueda, Sawami; Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Nakayashiki, Yusuke; Ishihara, Ken

    2009-07-01

    Micrometer-sized microcapsules collapse upon exposure to ultrasound. Use of this phenomenon for a drug delivery system (DDS), not only for local delivery of medication but also for gene therapy, should be possible. However, enhancing the efficiency of medication is limited because capsules in suspension diffuse in the human body after injection, since the motion of capsules in blood flow cannot be controlled. To control the behavior of microcapsules, acoustic radiation force was introduced. We detected local changes in microcapsule density by producing acoustic radiation force in an artificial blood vessel. Furthermore, we theoretically estimated the conditions required for active path selection of capsules at a bifurcation point in the artificial blood vessel. We observed the difference in capsule density at both in the bifurcation point and in alternative paths downstream of the bifurcation point for different acoustic radiation forces. Comparing the experimental results with those obtained theoretically, the conditions for active path selection were calculated from the acoustic radiation force and fluid resistance of the capsules. The possibility of controlling capsule flow towards a specific point in a blood vessel was demonstrated.

  17. Intravascular Ultrasound Catheter to Enhance Microbubble-Based Drug Delivery via Acoustic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Kilroy, Joseph P.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Wamhoff, Brian R.; Hossack, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that acoustic radiation force enhances intravascular microbubble adhesion to blood vessels in the presence of flow for molecular-targeted ultrasound imaging and drug delivery. A prototype acoustic radiation force intravascular ultrasound (ARFIVUS) catheter was designed and fabricated to displace a microbubble contrast agent in flow representative of conditions encountered in the human carotid artery. The prototype ARFIVUS transducer was designed to match the resonance frequency of 1.4- to 2.6-μm-diameter microbubbles modeled by an experimentally verified 1-D microbubble acoustic radiation force translation model. The transducer element was an elongated Navy Type I (hard) lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic designed to operate at 3 MHz. Fabricated devices operated with center frequencies of 3.3 and 3.6 MHz with −6-dB fractional bandwidths of 55% and 50%, respectively. Microbubble translation velocities as high as 0.86 m/s were measured using a high-speed streak camera when insonating with the ARFIVUS transducer. Finally, the prototype was used to displace microbubbles in a flow phantom while imaging with a commercial 45-MHz imaging IVUS transducer. A sustained increase of 31 dB in average video intensity was measured following insonation with the ARFIVUS, indicating microbubble accumulation resulting from the application of acoustic radiation force. PMID:23143566

  18. Integration of acoustic radiation force and optical imaging for blood plasma clot stiffness measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caroline W; Perez, Matthew J; Helmke, Brian P; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood's transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties. PMID:26042775

  19. Integration of Acoustic Radiation Force and Optical Imaging for Blood Plasma Clot Stiffness Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caroline W.; Perez, Matthew J.; Helmke, Brian P.; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood’s transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties. PMID:26042775

  20. A contactless methodology of picking up micro-particles from rigid surfaces by acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Kun; Yang, Keji; Fan, Zongwei; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Controlled movement and pick up of small object from a rigid surface is a primary challenge in many applications. In this paper, a contactless methodology of picking up micro-particles within deionized water from rigid surfaces by acoustic radiation force is presented. In order to achieve this, an acoustic radiation force was generated by 1.75 MHz transducers. A custom built setup facilitates the optimization of the sound field by varying the parameters such as sound source size and source position. The three-dimensional pressure distributions are measured and its relative sound field is also characterized accordingly. The standing wave field has been formed and it is mainly composed of two obliquely incident plane waves and their reflectors. We demonstrated the gripping and positioning of silica beads, SiO2, and aluminum micro-particles of 100 μm to 500 μm in size with this method using acoustic radiation force. The acoustic radiation force generated is well controlled, contactless, and in the tens of nano-Newton range which allowed us to manipulate relative big micro objects such as MEMS components as well as moving objects such as living cells. The proposed method provided an alternative form of contactless operating environment with scalable dimensions suitable for the manipulating of small objects. This permits high-throughput processing and reduction in time required for MEMS assembling, cell biomechanics, and biotechnology applications.

  1. Comparison with Analytical Solution: Generation and Radiation of Acoustic Waves from a 2-D Shear Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2000-01-01

    An acoustic source inside of a 2-D jet excites an instability wave in the shear layer resulting in sound radiating away from the shear layer. Solve the linearized Euler equations to predict the sound radiation outside of the jet. The jet static pressure is assumed to be constant. The jet flow is parallel and symmetric about the x-axis. Use a symmetry boundary condition along the x-axis.

  2. Tritium-powered radiation sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litz, Marc S.; Russo, Johnny A.; Katsis, Dimos

    2016-05-01

    Isotope power supplies offer long-lived (100 years using 63Ni), low-power energy sources, enabling sensors or communications nodes for the lifetime of infrastructure. A tritium beta-source (12.5-year half-life) encapsulated in a phosphor-lined vial couples directly to a photovoltaic (PV) to generate a trickle current into an electrical load. An inexpensive design is described using commercial-of-the-shelf (COTS) components that generate 100 μWe for nextgeneration compact electronics/sensors. A matched radiation sensor has been built for long-duration missions utilizing microprocessor-controlled sleep modes, low-power electronic components, and a passive interrupt driven environmental wake-up. The low-power early-warning radiation detector network and isotope power source enables no-maintenance mission lifetimes.

  3. Separation of Yeast Cells from MS2 Viruses Using Acoustic Radiation Force

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, B; Fisher, K; Ness, K; Rose, K A; Mariella, Jr., R P

    2008-03-27

    We report a rapid and robust separation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and MS2 bacteriophage using acoustic focusing in a microfluidic device. A piezoelectric transducer (PZT) generates acoustic standing waves in the microchannel. These standing waves induce acoustic radiation force fields that direct microparticles towards the nodes (i.e., pressure minima) or the anti-nodes (i.e., pressure maxima) of the standing waves depending on the relative compressidensity between the particle and the suspending liquid.[1] For particles larger than 2 {micro}m, the transverse velocities generated by these force fields enable continuous, high throughput separation. Extensive work in the last decade [2-4] has demonstrated acoustic focusing for manipulating microparticles or biological samples in microfluidic devices. This prior work has primarily focused on experimental realization of acoustic focusing without modeling or with limited one-dimensional modeling estimates. We recently developed a finite element modeling tool to predict the two-dimensional acoustic radiation force field perpendicular to the flow direction in microfluidic devices.[1] Here we compare results from this model with experimental parametric studies including variations of the PZT driving frequencies and voltages as well as various particle sizes and compressidensities. These experimental parametric studies also provide insight into the development of an adjustable 'virtual' pore-size filter as well as optimal operating conditions for various microparticle sizes. Figure 1 shows a typical experimental acoustic focusing result for microparticles (diameter = 2.0 {micro}m) in a 500 {micro}m wide by 200 {micro}m deep microchannel. In this case, the PZT driving frequency and voltage are, respectively, 1.459 MHz and 6.6 V. The microparticles tightly focus (full width half maximum (FWHM) {approx}30 {micro}m) less than 30 s after the initiation of the acoustic field. We simulated the same geometry and operating

  4. Stabilized Acoustic Levitation of Dense Materials Using a High-Powered Siren

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.; Croonquist, A.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    Stabilized acoustic levitation and manipulation of dense (e.g., steel) objects of 1 cm diameter, using a high powered siren, was demonstrated in trials that investigated the harmonic content and spatial distribution of the acoustic field, as well as the effect of sample position and reflector geometries on the acoustic field. Although further optimization is possible, the most stable operation achieved is expected to be adequate for most containerless processing applications. Best stability was obtained with an open reflector system, using a flat lower reflector and a slightly concave upper one. Operation slightly below resonance enhances stability as this minimizes the second harmonic, which is suspected of being a particularly destabilizing influence.

  5. Acoustic radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane (quasi)standing waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-12-07

    The acoustic radiation force on a 2D elliptical (non-circular) cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of plane quasi-standing and standing waves is derived, based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates. A non-dimensional acoustic radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, is defined in terms of the scattering coefficients that are determined by applying the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface. A system of linear equations involving a single numerical integration procedure is solved by matrix inversion. Numerical simulations showing the transition from the quasi-standing to the (equi-amplitude) standing wave behaviour are performed with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the ellipse semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb (where k is the wavenumber), without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. It is found that at high kb values > 1, the radiation force per length with broadside incidence is larger, whereas the opposite situation occurs in the long-wavelength limit (i.e., kb < 1). The results are particularly relevant in acoustic levitation of elliptical cylinders, the acoustic stabilization of liquid columns in a host medium, acousto-fluidics devices, and other particle dynamics applications to name a few. Moreover, the formalism presented here may be effectively applied to compute the acoustic radiation force on other 2D surfaces of arbitrary shape such as super-ellipses, Chebyshev cylindrical particles, or other non-circular geometries.

  6. Acoustic radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane (quasi)standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic radiation force on a 2D elliptical (non-circular) cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of plane quasi-standing and standing waves is derived, based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates. A non-dimensional acoustic radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, is defined in terms of the scattering coefficients that are determined by applying the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface. A system of linear equations involving a single numerical integration procedure is solved by matrix inversion. Numerical simulations showing the transition from the quasi-standing to the (equi-amplitude) standing wave behaviour are performed with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the ellipse semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb (where k is the wavenumber), without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. It is found that at high kb values > 1, the radiation force per length with broadside incidence is larger, whereas the opposite situation occurs in the long-wavelength limit (i.e., kb < 1). The results are particularly relevant in acoustic levitation of elliptical cylinders, the acoustic stabilization of liquid columns in a host medium, acousto-fluidics devices, and other particle dynamics applications to name a few. Moreover, the formalism presented here may be effectively applied to compute the acoustic radiation force on other 2D surfaces of arbitrary shape such as super-ellipses, Chebyshev cylindrical particles, or other non-circular geometries.

  7. Effect of holed reflector on acoustic radiation force in noncontact ultrasonic dispensing of small droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Wada, Yuji; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the fundamental aspects of droplet dispensing, which is an important procedure in the noncontact ultrasonic manipulation of droplets in air. A holed reflector was used to dispense a droplet from a 27.4 kHz standing-wave acoustic field to a well. First, the relationship between the hole diameter of the reflector and the acoustic radiation force acting on a levitated droplet was clarified by calculating the acoustic impedance of the point just above the hole. When the hole diameter was half of (or equal to) the acoustic wavelength λ, the acoustic radiation force was ∼80% (or 50%) of that without a hole. The maximal diameters of droplets levitated above the holes through flat and half-cylindrical reflectors were then experimentally investigated. For instance, with the half-cylindrical reflector, the maximal diameter was 5.0 mm for a hole diameter of 6.0 mm, and droplets were levitatable up to a hole diameter of 12 mm (∼λ).

  8. High-power ultrawideband electromagnetic pulse radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshelev, Vladimir I.; Buyanov, Yuri I.; Koval'chuk, Boris M.; Andreev, Yuri A.; Belichenko, Victor P.; Efremov, Anatoly M.; Plisko, Vyacheslav V.; Sukhushin, Konstantin N.; Vizir, Vadim A.; Zorin, Valery B.

    1997-10-01

    Basing on energetic processes studying in the near-field radiator zone, a new concept of antenna synthesizing for ultrawideband electromagnetic pulse radiation has been suggested. The results of experimental investigations of the antennae developed with using of this concept for high-power applications are presented. The antennae have small dimensions, high electrical strength, cardioid pattern with linear polarization of the pulse radiated and they are ideally adapted to be used as a steering antenna array element. A high-voltage nanosecond bipolar pulse generator design to excite antennae is described.

  9. Modeling the effects of wind tunnel wall absorption on the acoustic radiation characteristics of propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.

    1986-01-01

    Finite element theory is used to calculate the acoustic field of a propeller in a soft walled circular wind tunnel and to compare the radiation patterns to the same propeller in free space. Parametric solutions are present for a "Gutin" propeller for a variety of flow Mach numbers, admittance values at the wall, microphone position locations, and propeller to duct radius ratios. Wind tunnel boundary layer is not included in this analysis. For wall admittance nearly equal to the characteristic value of free space, the free field and ducted propeller models agree in pressure level and directionality. In addition, the need for experimentally mapping the acoustic field is discussed.

  10. Optical theorem for acoustic non-diffracting beams and application to radiation force and torque

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Likun; Marston, Philip L.

    2013-01-01

    Acoustical and optical non-diffracting beams are potentially useful for manipulating particles and larger objects. An extended optical theorem for a non-diffracting beam was given recently in the context of acoustics. The theorem relates the extinction by an object to the scattering at the forward direction of the beam’s plane wave components. Here we use this theorem to examine the extinction cross section of a sphere centered on the axis of the beam, with a non-diffracting Bessel beam as an example. The results are applied to recover the axial radiation force and torque on the sphere by the Bessel beam. PMID:24049681

  11. Modeling the effects of wind tunnel wall absorption on the acoustic radiation characteristics of propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.

    1986-01-01

    Finite element theory is used to calculate the acoustic field of a propeller in a soft walled circular wind tunnel and to compare the radiation patterns to the same propeller in free space. Parametric solutions are present for a 'Gutin' propeller for a variety of flow Mach numbers, admittance values at the wall, microphone position locations, and propeller to duct radius ratios. Wind tunnel boundary layer is not included in this analysis. For wall admittance nearly equal to the characteristic value of free space, the free field and ducted propeller models agree in pressure level and directionality. In addition, the need for experimentally mapping the acoustic field is discussed.

  12. Acoustic radiation force expressed using complex phase shifts and momentum-transfer cross sections.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Likun; Marston, Philip L

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic radiation force is expressed using complex phase shifts of partial wave scattering functions and the momentum-transfer cross section, herein incorporated into acoustics from quantum mechanisms. Imaginary parts of the phase shifts represent dissipation in the object and/or in the boundary layer adjacent to the object. The formula simplifies the force as summation of functions of complex phase shifts of adjacent partial waves involving differences of real parts and sums of imaginary parts, providing an efficient way of exploring the force parameter-space. The formula for the force is proportional to a generalized momentum-transfer cross section for plane waves and no dissipation. PMID:27586777

  13. Aeroacoustics of volcanic jets: Acoustic power estimation and jet velocity dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoza, Robin S.; Fee, David; Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Gee, Kent L.; Ogden, Darcy E.

    2013-12-01

    A fundamental goal of volcano acoustics is to relate observed infrasonic signals to the eruptive processes generating them. A link between acoustic power Πacoustic analogy theory). We reexamine this approach in the context of the current understanding of jet noise, using data from a laboratory jet, a full-scale military jet aircraft, and a full-scale rocket motor. Accurate estimates of Πacoustic field experiments. Typical volcano acoustic data better represent point measurements of acoustic intensity Iacoustic intensity differ from those for acoustic power and are of the form Iacoustic data and thus requires modification. Quantitative integration of field, numerical, and laboratory studies within a modern aeroacoustics framework will lead to a more accurate relationship between volcanic infrasound and eruption parameters.

  14. Adjustable virtual pore-size filter for automated sample preparation using acoustic radiation force

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, B; Fisher, K; Ness, K; Rose, K; Mariella, R

    2008-05-22

    We present a rapid and robust size-based separation method for high throughput microfluidic devices using acoustic radiation force. We developed a finite element modeling tool to predict the two-dimensional acoustic radiation force field perpendicular to the flow direction in microfluidic devices. Here we compare the results from this model with experimental parametric studies including variations of the PZT driving frequencies and voltages as well as various particle sizes and compressidensities. These experimental parametric studies also provide insight into the development of an adjustable 'virtual' pore-size filter as well as optimal operating conditions for various microparticle sizes. We demonstrated the separation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and MS2 bacteriophage using acoustic focusing. The acoustic radiation force did not affect the MS2 viruses, and their concentration profile remained unchanged. With optimized design of our microfluidic flow system we were able to achieve yields of > 90% for the MS2 with > 80% of the S. cerevisiae being removed in this continuous-flow sample preparation device.

  15. Acoustic radiation torque on an irregularly shaped scatterer in an arbitrary sound field.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zongwei; Mei, Deqing; Yang, Keji; Chen, Zichen

    2008-11-01

    To eliminate the limitation of the conventional acoustic radiation torque theory, which is only applicable to a disklike scatterer in a plane sound field, a new theory is established to calculate the radiation torque on any irregularly shaped scatterer in any arbitrary sound field. First, with the aid of the conservation law of angular momentum, the acoustic radiation torque is expressed as the angular momentum flux through a spherical surface with the center at the scatterer's centroid. Second, the velocity potential of the scattered field is derived, taking into account the influences of the translational and rotational movements of the scatterer induced by the first order stress of the incident sound field. Finally, a general calculating formula of the acoustic radiation torque is achieved. For a disklike scatterer in a plane sound filed, results from the above formula are well identical with those conventional formulas. By studying the case of a semicircular cylinder scatterer in a standing-wave sound field, it is found that for an irregularly shaped scatterer its rotation velocity is normally nonzero and the radiation torque changes with the spatial attitude. PMID:19045760

  16. Neutron responsive self-powered radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald P.; Cannon, Collins P.

    1978-01-01

    An improved neutron responsive self-powered radiation detector is disclosed in which the neutron absorptive central emitter has a substantially neutron transmissive conductor collector sheath spaced about the emitter and the space between the emitter and collector sheath is evacuated.

  17. Finite Element Prediction of Acoustic Scattering and Radiation from Submerged Elastic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, G. C.; Henderson, F. M.; Lipman, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    A finite element formulation is derived for the scattering and radiation of acoustic waves from submerged elastic structures. The formulation uses as fundamental unknowns the displacement in the structure and a velocity potential in the field. Symmetric coefficient matrices result. The outer boundary of the fluid region is terminated with an approximate local wave-absorbing boundary condition which assumes that outgoing waves are locally planar. The finite element model is capable of predicting only the near-field acoustic pressures. Far-field sound pressure levels may be determined by integrating the surface pressures and velocities over the wet boundary of the structure using the Helmholtz integral. Comparison of finite element results with analytic results show excellent agreement. The coupled fluid-structure problem may be solved with general purpose finite element codes by using an analogy between the equations of elasticity and the wave equation of linear acoustics.

  18. Ultrasonic acoustic health monitoring of ball bearings using neural network pattern classification of power spectral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, William; Southward, Steve; Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a generic passive non-contact based approach using ultrasonic acoustic emissions (UAE) to facilitate the neural network classification of bearing health, and more specifically the bearing operating condition. The acoustic emission signals used in this study are in the ultrasonic range (20-120 kHz). A direct benefit of microphones capable of measurements in this frequency range is their inherent directionality. Using selected bands from the UAE power spectrum signature, it is possible to pose the health monitoring problem as a multi-class classification problem, and make use of a single neural network to classify the ultrasonic acoustic emission signatures. Artificial training data, based on statistical properties of a significantly smaller experimental data set is used to train the neural network. This specific approach is generic enough to suggest that it is applicable to a variety of systems and components where periodic acoustic emissions exist.

  19. Off-axial acoustic radiation force of repulsor and tractor bessel beams on a sphere.

    PubMed

    Silva, Glauber T; Lopes, J Henrique; Mitri, Farid G

    2013-06-01

    Acoustic Bessel beams are known to produce an axial radiation force on a sphere centered on the beam axis (on-axial configuration) that exhibits both repulsor and tractor behaviors. The repulsor and the tractor forces are oriented along the beam's direction of propagation and opposite to it, respectively. The behavior of the acoustic radiation force generated by Bessel beams when the sphere lies outside the beam's axis (off-axial configuration) is unknown. Using the 3-D radiation force formulas given in terms of the partial wave expansion coefficients for the incident and scattered waves, both axial and transverse components of the force exerted on a silicone- oil sphere are obtained for a zero- and a first-order Bessel vortex beam. As the sphere departs from the beam's axis, the tractor force becomes weaker. Moreover, the behavior of the transverse radiation force field may vary with the sphere's size factor ka (where k is the wavenumber and a is the sphere radius). Both stable and unstable equilibrium regions around the beam's axis are found, depending on ka values. These results are particularly important for the design of acoustical tractor beam devices operating with Bessel beams. PMID:25004483

  20. An Evaluation of the Additional Acoustic Power Needed to Overcome the Effects of a Test-Articles Absorption During Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Testing of Spaceflight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.

    2014-01-01

    It is important to realize that some test-articles may have significant sound absorption that may challenge the acoustic power capabilities of a test facility. Therefore, to mitigate this risk of not being able to meet the customers target spectrum, it is prudent to demonstrate early-on an increased acoustic power capability which compensates for this test-article absorption. This paper describes a concise method to reduce this risk when testing aerospace test-articles which have significant absorption. This method was successfully applied during the SpaceX Falcon 9 Payload Fairing acoustic test program at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Stations RATF.

  1. Particle Transport across Bi-Fluid Interface Using Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Lim, Kian-Meng

    A bi-fluid micro-flow system is proposed for separating particles from its original solvent and re-diluting them into another solvent simultaneously. In this micro-flow system, two different miscible solvents flow parallel to each other through a 2-inlet-2-outlet micro-channel, where an acoustic standing wave is set up. Due to the differences in acoustic properties of these solvents, the pressure node of the acoustic wave is shifted from the middle line of the channel. Under the action of the acoustic radiation force, particles with positive ϕ-factors are extracted from their original solvent and re-suspended into the other solvent, wherein the pressure node resides. Particles suspended in the new solvent are collected at one of the two outlets downstream. Experiments were conducted on a prototype using two aqueous solutions: deionized water and 40% glycerin aqueous solution with polystyrene micro-particles. The results show that under the action of the acoustic standing wave, most of the particles were successfully transported from its original solvent to the other solvent and collected at the outlet.

  2. Numerical simulation of acoustofluidic manipulation by radiation forces and acoustic streaming for complex particles.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Philipp; Leibacher, Ivo; Baasch, Thierry; Dual, Jurg

    2015-11-21

    The numerical prediction of acoustofluidic particle motion is of great help for the design, the analysis, and the physical understanding of acoustofluidic devices as it allows for a simple and direct comparison with experimental observations. However, such a numerical setup requires detailed modeling of the acoustofluidic device with all its components and thorough understanding of the acoustofluidic forces inducing the particle motion. In this work, we present a 3D trajectory simulation setup that covers the full spectrum, comprising a time-harmonic device model, an acoustic streaming model of the fluid cavity, a radiation force simulation, and the calculation of the hydrodynamic drag. In order to make quantitatively accurate predictions of the device vibration and the acoustic field, we include the viscous boundary layer damping. Using a semi-analytical method based on Nyborg's calculations, the boundary-driven acoustic streaming is derived directly from the device simulation and takes into account cavity wall vibrations which have often been neglected in the literature. The acoustic radiation forces and the hydrodynamic drag are calculated numerically to handle particles of arbitrary shape, structure, and size. In this way, complex 3D particle translation and rotation inside experimental microdevices can be predicted. We simulate the rotation of a microfiber in an amplitude-modulated 2D field and analyze the results with respect to experimental observations. For a quantitative verification, the motion of an alumina microdisk is compared to a simple experiment. Demonstrating the potential of the simulation setup, we compute the trajectory of a red blood cell inside a realistic microdevice under the simultaneous effects of acoustic streaming and radiation forces. PMID:26448531

  3. Computing the acoustic radiation force exerted on a sphere using the translational addition theorem.

    PubMed

    Silva, Glauber T; Baggio, André L; Lopes, J Henrique; Mitri, Farid G

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the translational addition theorem for spherical functions is employed to calculate the acoustic radiation force produced by an arbitrary shaped beam on a sphere arbitrarily suspended in an inviscid fluid. The procedure is also based on the partial-wave expansion method, which depends on the beam-shape and scattering coefficients. Given a set of beam-shape coefficients (BSCs) for an acoustic beam relative to a reference frame, the translational addition theorem can be used to obtain the BSCs relative to the sphere positioned anywhere in the medium. The scattering coefficients are obtained from the acoustic boundary conditions across the sphere's surface. The method based on the addition theorem is particularly useful to avoid quadrature schemes to obtain the BSCs. We use it to compute the acoustic radiation force exerted by a spherically focused beam (in the paraxial approximation) on a silicone-oil droplet (compressible fluid sphere). The analysis is carried out in the Rayleigh (i.e., the particle diameter is much smaller than the wavelength) and Mie (i.e., the particle diameter is of the order of the wavelength or larger) scattering regimes. The obtained results show that the paraxial focused beam can only trap particles in the Rayleigh scattering regime. PMID:25768823

  4. Modelling of acoustic radiation problems associated with turbomachinery and rotating blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eversman, W.

    Finite element methods developed for computational predictions of turbofan and propeller acoustic radiation are presented. Account is taken of the disparate acoustic and geometric scales, the complex geometry, sound propagation in a nonuniformly flowing medium, the presence of a lining, and definition of bounds for calculations which are carried out in an unbounded domain. Density and pressure perturbations in the turbofan inlet are modeled with a linearized momentum equation. The sound radiation is represented by the Fourier components, i.e., angular modes. The same nacelle geometry is used for propeller noise, which requires inclusion of acoustic volume sources and forces. A forced convected wave equation for harmonic driving is obtained by combining continuity, momentum and state equations linearized for acoustic perturbations. The weak formulations for the two types of noise generation are solved by the Galerkin method modified with a frontal solver to reduce the required computer time. Model predictions show good agreement with experimental data for the directivity and amplitude of sound from the bellmouth inlet of the NASA-Langley Spinning Mode Synthesizer.

  5. 47 CFR 22.593 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effective radiated power limits. 22.593 Section... power limits. The effective radiated power of fixed stations operating on the channels listed in § 22.591 must not exceed 150 Watts. The equivalent isotropically radiated power of existing fixed...

  6. Effect of particle-particle interactions on the acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipkens, Bart; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic standing waves are widely used for separation applications. In MEMS applications, a half wavelength standing wave field is generated perpendicular to a laminar flow. The acoustic radiation force exerted on the particle drives the particle to the center of the MEMS channel, where concentrated particles are harvested. In macro-scale applications, the ultrasonic standing wave spans multiple wavelengths. Examples of such applications are oil/water emulsion splitting [1], and blood/lipid separation [2]. In macro-scale applications, particles are typically trapped in the standing wave, resulting in clumping or coalescence of particles/droplets. Subsequent gravitational settling results in separation of the secondary phase. An often used expression for the radiation force on a particle is that derived by Gorkov [3]. The assumptions are that the particle size is small relative to the wavelength, and therefore, only monopole and dipole scattering contributions are used to calculate the radiation force. This framework seems satisfactory for MEMS scale applications where each particle is treated separately by the standing wave, and concentrations are typically low. In macro-scale applications, particle concentration is high, and particle clumping or droplet coalescence results in particle sizes not necessarily small relative to the wavelength. Ilinskii et al. developed a framework for calculation of the acoustic radiation force valid for any size particle [4]. However, this model does not take into account particle to particle effects, which can become important as particle concentration increases. It is known that an acoustic radiation force on a particle or a droplet is determined by the local field. An acoustic radiation force expression is developed that includes the effect of particle to particle interaction. The case of two neighboring particles is considered. The approach is based on sound scattering by the particles. The acoustic field at the location of

  7. Effect of particle-particle interactions on the acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkens, Bart; Ilinskii, Yurii A. Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.

    2015-10-28

    Ultrasonic standing waves are widely used for separation applications. In MEMS applications, a half wavelength standing wave field is generated perpendicular to a laminar flow. The acoustic radiation force exerted on the particle drives the particle to the center of the MEMS channel, where concentrated particles are harvested. In macro-scale applications, the ultrasonic standing wave spans multiple wavelengths. Examples of such applications are oil/water emulsion splitting [1], and blood/lipid separation [2]. In macro-scale applications, particles are typically trapped in the standing wave, resulting in clumping or coalescence of particles/droplets. Subsequent gravitational settling results in separation of the secondary phase. An often used expression for the radiation force on a particle is that derived by Gorkov [3]. The assumptions are that the particle size is small relative to the wavelength, and therefore, only monopole and dipole scattering contributions are used to calculate the radiation force. This framework seems satisfactory for MEMS scale applications where each particle is treated separately by the standing wave, and concentrations are typically low. In macro-scale applications, particle concentration is high, and particle clumping or droplet coalescence results in particle sizes not necessarily small relative to the wavelength. Ilinskii et al. developed a framework for calculation of the acoustic radiation force valid for any size particle [4]. However, this model does not take into account particle to particle effects, which can become important as particle concentration increases. It is known that an acoustic radiation force on a particle or a droplet is determined by the local field. An acoustic radiation force expression is developed that includes the effect of particle to particle interaction. The case of two neighboring particles is considered. The approach is based on sound scattering by the particles. The acoustic field at the location of

  8. Phase decorrelation, streamwise vortices and acoustic radiation in mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. M.; Zohar, Y.; Moser, R. D.; Rogers, M. M.; Lele, S. K.; Buell, J. C.

    1988-01-01

    Several direct numerical simulations were performed and analyzed to study various aspects of the early development of mixing layers. Included are the phase jitter of the large-scale eddies, which was studied using a 2-D spatially-evolving mixing layer simulation; the response of a time developing mixing layer to various spanwise disturbances; and the sound radiation from a 2-D compressible time developing mixing layer.

  9. Acoustic radiation force due to arbitrary incident fields on spherical particles in soft tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Treweek, Benjamin C. Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2015-10-28

    Acoustic radiation force is of interest in a wide variety of biomedical applications ranging from tissue characterization (e.g. elastography) to tissue treatment (e.g. high intensity focused ultrasound, kidney stone fragment removal). As tissue mechanical properties are reliable indicators of tissue health, the former is the focus of the present contribution. This is accomplished through an investigation of the acoustic radiation force on a spherical scatterer embedded in tissue. Properties of both the scatterer and the surrounding tissue are important in determining the magnitude and the direction of the force. As these properties vary, the force computation shows changes in magnitude and direction, which may enable more accurate noninvasive determination of tissue properties.

  10. Three-dimensional visualization of shear wave propagation generated by dual acoustic radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Yuta; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    An elastic property of biological soft tissue is an important indicator of the tissue status. Therefore, quantitative and noninvasive methods for elasticity evaluation have been proposed. Our group previously proposed a method using acoustic radiation pressure irradiated from two directions for elastic property evaluation, in which by measuring the propagation velocity of the shear wave generated by the acoustic radiation pressure inside the object, the elastic properties of the object were successfully evaluated. In the present study, we visualized the propagation of the shear wave in a three-dimensional space by the synchronization of signals received at various probe positions. The proposed method succeeded in visualizing the shear wave propagation clearly in the three-dimensional space of 35 × 41 × 4 mm3. These results show the high potential of the proposed method to estimate the elastic properties of the object in the three-dimensional space.

  11. Acoustic radiation force due to arbitrary incident fields on spherical particles in soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treweek, Benjamin C.; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic radiation force is of interest in a wide variety of biomedical applications ranging from tissue characterization (e.g. elastography) to tissue treatment (e.g. high intensity focused ultrasound, kidney stone fragment removal). As tissue mechanical properties are reliable indicators of tissue health, the former is the focus of the present contribution. This is accomplished through an investigation of the acoustic radiation force on a spherical scatterer embedded in tissue. Properties of both the scatterer and the surrounding tissue are important in determining the magnitude and the direction of the force. As these properties vary, the force computation shows changes in magnitude and direction, which may enable more accurate noninvasive determination of tissue properties.

  12. Production of high power femtosecond terahertz radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Neil, George R.; Carr, G.L.; Gubeli III, Joseph F.; Jordan, K.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Shinn, Michelle; Tani, Masahiko; Williams, G.P.; Zhang, X.-C.

    2003-07-11

    The terahertz (THz) region of the electromagnetic spectrum is attracting interest for a broad range of applications ranging from diagnosing electron beams to biological imaging. Most sources of short pulse THz radiation utilize excitation of biased semiconductors or electro-optic crystals by high peak power lasers. For example, this was done by using an un-doped InAs wafer irradiated by a femtosecond free-electron laser (FEL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Microwatt levels of THz radiation were detected when excited with FEL pulses at 1.06 mm wavelength and 10W average power. Recently substantially higher powers of femtosecond THz pulses produced by synchrotron emission were extracted from the electron beamline. Calculations and measurements confirm the production of coherent broadband THz radiation from relativistic electrons with an average power of nearly 20W, a world record in this wavelength range by a factor of 10,000. We describe the source, presenting theoretical calculations and their experimental verification. Potential applications of this exciting new source include driving new non-linear phenomena, performing pump-probe studies of dynamical properties of novel materials, and studying molecular vibrations and rotations, low frequency protein motions, phonons, superconductor band gaps, electronic scattering, collective electronic excitations (e.g., charge density waves), and spintronics.

  13. Production of high power femtosecond terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, George R.; Carr, G. L.; Gubeli, Joseph F.; Jordan, K.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Shinn, Michelle; Tani, Masahiko; Williams, G. P.; Zhang, X.-C.

    2003-07-01

    The terahertz (THz) region of the electromagnetic spectrum is attracting interest for a broad range of applications ranging from diagnosing electron beams to biological imaging. Most sources of short pulse THz radiation utilize excitation of biased semiconductors or electro-optic crystals by high peak power lasers. For example, this was done by using an un-doped InAs wafer irradiated by a femtosecond free-electron laser (FEL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Microwatt levels of THz radiation were detected when excited with FEL pulses at 1.06 μm wavelength and 10 W average power. Recently substantially higher powers of femtosecond THz pulses produced by synchrotron emission were extracted from the electron beamline. Calculations and measurements confirm the production of coherent broadband THz radiation from relativistic electrons with an average power of nearly 20 W, a world record in this wavelength range by a factor of 10,000. We describe the source, presenting theoretical calculations and their experimental verification. Potential applications of this exciting new source include driving new non-linear phenomena, performing pump-probe studies of dynamical properties of novel materials, and studying molecular vibrations and rotations, low frequency protein motions, phonons, superconductor bandgaps, electronic scattering, collective electronic excitations (e.g., charge density waves), and spintronics.

  14. Hawking radiation from an acoustic black hole on an ion ring.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, B; Reznik, B; Fagnocchi, S; Cirac, J I

    2010-06-25

    In this Letter we propose to simulate acoustic black holes with ions in rings. If the ions are rotating with a stationary and inhomogeneous velocity profile, regions can appear where the ion velocity exceeds the group velocity of the phonons. In these regions phonons are trapped like light in black holes, even though we have a discrete field theory and a nonlinear dispersion relation. We study the appearance of Hawking radiation in this setup and propose a scheme to detect it. PMID:20867352

  15. Active Control of Fan Noise-Feasibility Study. Volume 2: Canceling Noise Source-Design of an Acoustic Plate Radiator Using Piezoceramic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, F. G.; Rajiyah, H.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of using acoustic plate radiators powered by piezoceramic thin sheets as canceling sources for active control of aircraft engine fan noise is demonstrated. Analytical and numerical models of actuated beams and plates are developed and validated. An optimization study is performed to identify the optimum combination of design parameters that maximizes the plate volume velocity for a given resonance frequency. Fifteen plates with various plate and actuator sizes, thicknesses, and bonding layers were fabricated and tested using results from the optimization study. A maximum equivalent piston displacement of 0.39 mm was achieved with the optimized plate samples tested with only one actuator powered, corresponding to a plate deflection at the center of over 1 millimeter. This is very close to the deflection required for a full size engine application and represents a 160-fold improvement over previous work. Experimental results further show that performance is limited by the critical stress of the piezoceramic actuator and bonding layer rather than by the maximum moment available from the actuator. Design enhancements are described in detail that will lead to a flight-worthy acoustic plate radiator by minimizing actuator tensile stresses and reducing nonlinear effects. Finally, several adaptive tuning methods designed to increase the bandwidth of acoustic plate radiators are analyzed including passive, active, and semi-active approaches. The back chamber pressurization and volume variation methods are investigated experimentally and shown to be simple and effective ways to obtain substantial control over the resonance frequency of a plate radiator. This study shows that piezoceramic-based plate radiators can be a viable acoustic source for active control of aircraft engine fan noise.

  16. New generation low power radiation survey instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Waechter, D.A.; Bjarke, G.O.; Trujillo, F.; Umbarger, C.J.; Wolf, M.A.

    1984-02-01

    A number of new, ultra-low-powered radiation instruments have recently been developed at Los Alamos. Among these are two instruments which use a novel power source to eliminate costly batteries. The newly developed gamma detecting radiac, nicknamed the Firefly, and the alpha particle detecting instrument, called the Simple Cordless Alpha Monitor, both use recent advances in miniaturization and powersaving electronics to yield devices which are small, rugged, and very power-frugal. The two instruments consume so little power that the need for batteries to run them is eliminated. They are, instead, powered by a charged capacitor which will operate the instruments for an hour or more. Use of a capacitor as a power source eliminates many problems commonly associated with battery-operated instruments, such as having to open the case to change batteries, battery storage life, availability of batteries in the field, and some savings in weight. Both line power and mechanical sources are used to charge the storage capacitors which power the instruments.

  17. Noise control using a plate radiator and an acoustic resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active noise control subassembly for reducing noise caused by a source (such as an aircraft engine) independent of the subassembly. A noise radiating panel is bendably vibratable to generate a panel noise canceling at least a portion of the source noise. A piezoceramic actuator plate is connected to the panel. A front plate is spaced apart from the panel and the first plate, is positioned generally between the source noise and the panel, and has a sound exit port. A first pair of spaced-apart side walls each generally abut the panel and the front plate so as to generally enclose a front cavity to define a resonator.

  18. On the contribution of circumferential resonance modes in acoustic radiation force experienced by cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Majid; Behzad, Mehdi

    2014-10-01

    A body insonified by a constant (time-varying) intensity sound field is known to experience a steady (oscillatory) force that is called the steady-state (dynamic) acoustic radiation force. Using the classical resonance scattering theorem (RST) which suggests the scattered field as a superposition of a resonance field and a background (non-resonance) component, we show that the radiation force acting on a cylindrical shell may be synthesized as a composition of three components: background part, resonance part and their interaction. The background component reveals the pure geometrical reflection effects and illustrates a regular behavior with respect to frequency, while the others demonstrate a singular behavior near the resonance frequencies. The results illustrate that the resonance effects associated to partial waves can be isolated by the subtraction of the background component from the total (steady-state or dynamic) radiation force function (i.e., residue component). In the case of steady-state radiation force, the components are exerted on the body as static forces. For the case of oscillatory amplitude excitation, the components are exerted at the modulation frequency with frequency-dependant phase shifts. The results demonstrate the dominant contribution of the non-resonance component of dynamic radiation force at high frequencies with respect to the residue component, which offers the potential application of ultrasound stimulated vibro-acoustic spectroscopy technique in low frequency resonance spectroscopy purposes. Furthermore, the proposed formulation may be useful essentially due to its intrinsic value in physical acoustics. In addition, it may unveil the contribution of resonance modes in the dynamic radiation force experienced by the cylindrical objects and its underlying physics.

  19. Acoustic radiation force and torque exerted on a small viscoelastic particle in an ideal fluid.

    PubMed

    Leão-Neto, J P; Silva, G T

    2016-09-01

    We provide a detailed analysis on the acoustic radiation force and torque exerted on a homogeneous viscoelastic particle in the long-wave limit (i.e. the particle radius is much smaller than the incident wavelength) by an arbitrary wave. We assume that the particle behaves as a linear viscoelastic solid, which obeys the fractional Kelvin-Voigt model. Simple analytical expressions for the radiation force and torque are obtained. The developed theory is used to describe the interaction of acoustic waves (traveling and standing plane waves, and zero- and first-order Bessel beams) in the MHz-range with polymeric particles, namely lexan, low-density (LDPE) and high-density (HDPE) polyethylene. We found that particle absorption is chiefly the cause of the radiation force due to a traveling plane wave and zero-order Bessel beam when the frequency is smaller than 5MHz (HDPE), 3.9MHz (LDPE), and 0.9MHz (lexan). Whereas in a standing wave field, the radiation force is mildly changed due to dispersion inside the particle. We also show that the radiation torque caused by a first-order Bessel beam varies nearly quadratic with frequency. These findings may enable new possibilities of particle handling in acoustophoretic techniques. PMID:27254398

  20. Fan Noise Prediction System Development: Source/Radiation Field Coupling and Workstation Conversion for the Acoustic Radiation Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, H. D.

    1993-01-01

    The Acoustic Radiation Code (ARC) is a finite element program used on the IBM mainframe to predict far-field acoustic radiation from a turbofan engine inlet. In this report, requirements for developers of internal aerodynamic codes regarding use of their program output an input for the ARC are discussed. More specifically, the particular input needed from the Bolt, Beranek and Newman/Pratt and Whitney (turbofan source noise generation) Code (BBN/PWC) is described. In a separate analysis, a method of coupling the source and radiation models, that recognizes waves crossing the interface in both directions, has been derived. A preliminary version of the coupled code has been developed and used for initial evaluation of coupling issues. Results thus far have shown that reflection from the inlet is sufficient to indicate that full coupling of the source and radiation fields is needed for accurate noise predictions ' Also, for this contract, the ARC has been modified for use on the Sun and Silicon Graphics Iris UNIX workstations. Changes and additions involved in this effort are described in an appendix.

  1. 47 CFR 95.855 - Transmitter effective radiated power limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Transmitter effective radiated power limitation. The effective radiated power (ERP) of each CTS and RTU shall... with an ERP exceeding 20 watts. No mobile RTU may transmit with an ERP exceeding 4 watts....

  2. 47 CFR 22.867 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Effective radiated power limits. The effective radiated power (ERP) of ground and airborne stations... peak ERP of airborne mobile station transmitters must not exceed 12 Watts. (b) The peak ERP of...

  3. Research on power-law acoustic transient signal detection based on wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jian-hui; Yang, Ri-jie; Wang, Wei

    2007-11-01

    Aiming at the characteristics of acoustic transient signal emitted from antisubmarine weapon which is being dropped into water (torpedo, aerial sonobuoy and rocket assisted depth charge etc.), such as short duration, low SNR, abruptness and instability, based on traditional power-law detector, a new method to detect acoustic transient signal is proposed. Firstly wavelet transform is used to de-noise signal, removes random spectrum components and improves SNR. Then Power- Law detector is adopted to detect transient signal. The simulation results show the method can effectively extract envelop characteristic of transient signal on the condition of low SNR. The performance of WT-Power-Law markedly outgoes that of traditional Power-Law detection method.

  4. Acoustic backscattering and radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane progressive waves.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2016-03-01

    This work proposes a formal analytical theory using the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates, to calculate the acoustic backscattering form function as well as the radiation force-per-length on an infinitely long elliptical (non-circular) cylinder in plane progressive waves. The major (or minor) semi-axis of the ellipse coincides with the direction of the incident waves. The scattering coefficients for the rigid elliptical cylinder are determined by imposing the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface and solving a resulting system of linear equations by matrix inversion. The present method, which utilizes standard cylindrical (Bessel and Hankel) wave functions, presents an advantage over the solution for the scattering that is ordinarily expressed in a basis of elliptical Mathieu functions (which are generally non-orthogonal). Furthermore, an integral equation showing the direct connection of the radiation force function with the square of the scattering form function in the far-field from the scatterer (applicable for plane waves only), is noted and discussed. An important application of this integral equation is the adequate evaluation of the radiation force function from a bistatic measurement (i.e., in the polar plane) of the far-field scattering from any 2D object of arbitrary shape. Numerical predictions are evaluated for the acoustic backscattering form function and the radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density, and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb, without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. The results are particularly relevant in acoustic levitation, acousto-fluidics and particle dynamics applications. PMID:26726146

  5. Three-dimensional acoustic radiation force on an arbitrarily located elastic sphere.

    PubMed

    Baresch, Diego; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Marchiano, Régis

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to model the acoustic radiation forces acting on an elastic sphere placed in an inviscid fluid. An expression of the axial and transverse forces exerted on the sphere is derived. The analysis is based on the scattering of an arbitrary acoustic field expanded in the spherical coordinate system centered on the spherical scatterer. The sphere is allowed to be arbitrarily located. The special case of high order Bessel beams, acoustical vortices, are considered. These types of beams have a helicoidal wave front, i.e., a screw-type phase singularity and hence, the beam has a central dark core of zero amplitude surrounded by an intense ring. Depending on the sphere's radius, different radial equilibrium positions may exist and the sphere can be set in rotation around the beam axis by an azimuthal force. This confirms the pseudo-angular moment transfer from the beam to the sphere. Cases where the axial force is directed opposite to the direction of the beam propagation are investigated and the potential use of Bessel beams as tractor beams is demonstrated. Numerical results provide an impetus for further designing acoustical tweezers for potential applications in particle entrapment and remote controlled manipulation. PMID:23297880

  6. 47 CFR 22.659 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effective radiated power limits. 22.659 Section 22.659 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC... radiated power limits. The purpose of the rules in this section, which limit effective radiated power...

  7. 47 CFR 22.627 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effective radiated power limits. 22.627 Section 22.627 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC... radiated power limits. The effective radiated power (ERP) of transmitters operating on the channels...

  8. 47 CFR 22.535 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effective radiated power limits. 22.535 Section... MOBILE SERVICES Paging and Radiotelephone Service Paging Operation § 22.535 Effective radiated power limits. The effective radiated power (ERP) of transmitters operating on the channels listed in §...

  9. Numerical investigation of acoustic radiation from vortex-airfoil interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legault, Anne; Ji, Minsuk; Wang, Meng

    2012-11-01

    Numerical simulations of vortices interacting with a NACA 0012 airfoil and a flat-plate airfoil at zero angle of attack are carried out to assess the applicability and accuracy of classical theories. Unsteady lift and sound are computed and compared with the predictions by theories of Sears and Amiet, which assume a thin-plate airfoil in an inviscid flow. A Navier-Stokes solver is used in the simulations, and therefore viscous effects are taken into consideration. For the thin-plate airfoil, the effect of viscosity is negligible. For a NACA 0012 airfoil, the viscous contribution to the unsteady lift and sound mainly comes from coherent vortex shedding in the wake of the airfoil and the interaction of the incoming vortices with the airfoil wake, which become stronger at higher Reynolds numbers for a 2-D laminar flow. When the flow is turbulent at chord Reynolds number of 4 . 8 ×105 , however, the viscous contribution becomes negligible as coherent vortex shedding is not present. Sound radiation from vortex-airfoil interaction at turbulent Reynolds numbers is computed numerically via Lighthill's theory and the result is compared with the predictions of Amiet and Curle. The effect of the airfoil thickness is also examined. Supported by ONR Grant N00014-09-1-1088.

  10. Lunar surface fission power supplies: Radiation issues

    SciTech Connect

    Houts, M.G.; Lee, S.K.

    1994-07-01

    A lunar space fission power supply shield that uses a combination of lunar regolith and materials brought from earth may be optimal for early lunar outposts and bases. This type of shield can be designed such that the fission power supply does not have to be moved from its landing configuration, minimizing handling and required equipment on the lunar surface. Mechanisms for removing heat from the lunar regolith are built into the shield, and can be tested on earth. Regolith activation is greatly reduced compared with a shield that uses only regolith, and it is possible to keep the thermal conditions of the fission power supply close to these seen in free space. For a well designed shield, the additional mass required to be brought fro earth should be less than 1000 kg. Detailed radiation transport calculations confirm the feasibility of such a shield.

  11. Radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Baker, John; Collins, Leland F.; Kuklo, Thomas C.; Micali, James V.

    1992-01-01

    A radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system for measuring the average power of a beam such as a laser beam, including a calorimeter configured to operate over a wide range of coolant flow rates and being cooled by continuously flowing coolant for absorbing light from a laser beam to convert the laser beam energy into heat. The system further includes a flow meter for measuring the coolant flow in the calorimeter and a pair of thermistors for measuring the temperature difference between the coolant inputs and outputs to the calorimeter. The system also includes a microprocessor for processing the measured coolant flow rate and the measured temperature difference to determine the average power of the laser beam.

  12. Comparison of Comet Enflow and VA One Acoustic-to-Structure Power Flow Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2010-01-01

    Comet Enflow is a commercially available, high frequency vibroacoustic analysis software based on the Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA). In this method the same finite element mesh used for structural and acoustic analysis can be employed for the high frequency solutions. Comet Enflow is being validated for a floor-equipped composite cylinder by comparing the EFEA vibroacoustic response predictions with Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) results from the commercial software program VA One from ESI Group. Early in this program a number of discrepancies became apparent in the Enflow predicted response for the power flow from an acoustic space to a structural subsystem. The power flow anomalies were studied for a simple cubic, a rectangular and a cylindrical structural model connected to an acoustic cavity. The current investigation focuses on three specific discrepancies between the Comet Enflow and the VA One predictions: the Enflow power transmission coefficient relative to the VA One coupling loss factor; the importance of the accuracy of the acoustic modal density formulation used within Enflow; and the recommended use of fast solvers in Comet Enflow. The frequency region of interest for this study covers the one-third octave bands with center frequencies from 16 Hz to 4000 Hz.

  13. NONLINEAR EVOLUTION OF THE RADIATION-DRIVEN MAGNETO-ACOUSTIC INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Rodrigo; Socrates, Aristotle

    2013-04-20

    We examine the nonlinear development of unstable magnetosonic waves driven by a background radiative flux-the radiation-driven magneto-acoustic instability (RMI, a.k.a. the ''photon bubble'' instability). The RMI may serve as a persistent source of density, radiative flux, and magnetic field fluctuations in stably stratified, optically thick media. The conditions for instability are present in a variety of astrophysical environments and do not require the radiation pressure to dominate or the magnetic field to be strong. Here, we numerically study the saturation properties of the RMI, covering three orders of magnitude in the relative strength of radiation, magnetic field, and gas energies. Two-dimensional, time-dependent radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of local, stably stratified domains are conducted with Zeus-MP in the optically thick, highly conducting limit. Our results confirm the theoretical expectations of Blaes and Socrates in that the RMI operates even in gas-pressure-dominated environments that are weakly magnetized. The saturation amplitude is a monotonically increasing function of the ratio of radiation to gas pressure. Keeping this ratio constant, we find that the saturation amplitude peaks when the magnetic pressure is comparable to the radiation pressure. We discuss the implications of our results for the dynamics of magnetized stellar envelopes, where the RMI should act as a source of sub-photospheric perturbations.

  14. Nonlinear Evolution of the Radiation-driven Magneto-acoustic Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Rodrigo; Socrates, Aristotle

    2013-04-01

    We examine the nonlinear development of unstable magnetosonic waves driven by a background radiative flux—the radiation-driven magneto-acoustic instability (RMI, a.k.a. the "photon bubble" instability). The RMI may serve as a persistent source of density, radiative flux, and magnetic field fluctuations in stably stratified, optically thick media. The conditions for instability are present in a variety of astrophysical environments and do not require the radiation pressure to dominate or the magnetic field to be strong. Here, we numerically study the saturation properties of the RMI, covering three orders of magnitude in the relative strength of radiation, magnetic field, and gas energies. Two-dimensional, time-dependent radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of local, stably stratified domains are conducted with Zeus-MP in the optically thick, highly conducting limit. Our results confirm the theoretical expectations of Blaes & Socrates in that the RMI operates even in gas-pressure-dominated environments that are weakly magnetized. The saturation amplitude is a monotonically increasing function of the ratio of radiation to gas pressure. Keeping this ratio constant, we find that the saturation amplitude peaks when the magnetic pressure is comparable to the radiation pressure. We discuss the implications of our results for the dynamics of magnetized stellar envelopes, where the RMI should act as a source of sub-photospheric perturbations.

  15. Acoustic radiation force and torque on an absorbing compressible particle in an inviscid fluid.

    PubMed

    Silva, Glauber T

    2014-11-01

    Exact formulas of the acoustic radiation force and torque exerted by an arbitrary time-harmonic wave on an absorbing compressible particle that is suspended in an inviscid fluid are presented. It is considered that the particle diameter is much smaller than the incident wavelength, i.e., the so-called Rayleigh scattering limit. Moreover, the particle absorption assumed here is due to the attenuation of compressional waves only. Shear waves inside and outside the particle are neglected, since the inner and outer viscous boundary layer of the particle are supposed to be much smaller than the particle radius. The obtained radiation force formulas are used to establish the trapping conditions of a particle by a single-beam acoustical tweezer based on a spherically focused ultrasound transducer. In this case, it is shown that the particle absorption has a pivotal role in single-beam trapping at the transducer focal region. Furthermore, it is found that only the first-order Bessel vortex beam can generate the radiation torque on a small particle. In addition, numerical evaluation of the radiation force and torque exerted on a benzene and an olive oil droplet suspended in water are presented and discussed. PMID:25373943

  16. Ultrasonic Measurement of Strain Distribution Inside Object Cyclically Compressed by Dual Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odagiri, Yoshitaka; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2008-05-01

    One possible way to evaluate acupuncture therapy quantitatively is to measure the change in the elastic property of muscle after application of the therapy. Many studies have been conducted to measure mechanical properties of tissues using ultrasound-induced acoustic radiation force. To assess mechanical properties, strain must be generated in an object. However, a single radiation force is not effective because it mainly generates translational motion when the object is much harder than the surrounding medium. In this study, two cyclic radiation forces are simultaneously applied to a muscle phantom from two opposite horizontal directions so that the object is cyclically compressed in the horizontal direction. By the horizontal compression, the object is expanded vertically based on its incompressibility. The resultant vertical displacement is measured using another ultrasound pulse. Two ultrasonic transducers for actuation were both driven by the sum of two continuous sinusoidal signals at two slightly different frequencies [1 MHz and (1 M + 5) Hz]. The displacement of several micrometers in amplitude, which fluctuated at 5 Hz, was measured by the ultrasonic phased tracking method. Increase in thickness inside the object was observed just when acoustic radiation forces increased. Such changes in thickness correspond to vertical expansion due to horizontal compression.

  17. Frequency-Preserved Acoustic Diode Model with High Forward-Power-Transmission Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Du, Zongliang; Sun, Zhi; Gao, Huajian; Guo, Xu

    2015-06-01

    The acoustic diode (AD) can provide brighter and clearer ultrasound images by eliminating acoustic disturbances caused by sound waves traveling in two directions at the same time and interfering with each other. Such an AD could give designers new flexibility in making ultrasonic sources like those used in medical imaging or nondestructive testing. However, current AD designs, based on nonlinear effects, only partially fill this role by converting sound to a new frequency and blocking any backward flow of the original frequency. In this work, an AD model that preserves the frequencies of acoustic waves and has a relatively high forward-power-transmission rate is proposed. Theoretical analysis indicates that the proposed AD has forward, reverse, and breakdown characteristics very similar to electrical diodes. The significant rectifying effect of the proposed AD is verified numerically through a one-dimensional example. Possible schemes for experimental realization of this model as well as more complex and efficient AD designs are also discussed.

  18. Effect of Existence of Red Blood Cells in Trapping Performance of Microbubbles by Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kohji; Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Watarai, Nobuyuki; Koda, Ren; Taguchi, Yuto; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Kakimoto, Takashi; Enosawa, Shin; Chiba, Toshio

    2011-07-01

    We have proposed a method to control microbubbles by making use of acoustic radiation force, which is generated with acoustic propagation, to correspond to therapeutic applications of ultrasound. By preventing bubbles from passing through the desired target area, the local concentration of bubbles can be enhanced. However, we have never experimentally confirmed this phenomenon under in vivo conditions or close to those. Thus, we carried out an experiment to evaluate the trapping performance of bubbles using a suspension of red blood cells (RBCs) and an artificial blood vessel. By defining the trapping index to evaluate the amount of trapped microbubbles, we have confirmed that the trapping performance was enhanced according to the concentration of RBCs and the sound pressure, but not according to the central frequency of ultrasound. The results indicate that the existence of RBCs near microbubbles contributed to the increase in the size of aggregations propelled against the vessel wall.

  19. Modelling of wind tunnel wall effects on the radiation characteristics of acoustic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, W.; Baumeister, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that the relatively high fuel economy available from propeller-driven aircraft has renewed interest in high speed, highly loaded multiple blade turboprop propulsion systems. Undesirable features related to community noise and the high intensity cabin noise have stimulated new research on the acoustic characteristics of turboprops. The present investigation has the objective to develop a mathematical model of the essential features of the radiation of acoustic disturbances from propellers in a duct and in free space in order to quantify the success with which duct testing can be expected to approximate free field conditions. In connection with the importance of source directionality, a detailed model is considered which consists of a finite element representation of the Gutin propeller theory valid in both the near and far field.

  20. Self-heating study of bulk acoustic wave resonators under high RF power.

    PubMed

    Ivira, Brice; Fillit, René-Yves; Ndagijimana, Fabien; Benech, Philippe; Parat, Guy; Ancey, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    The present work first provides an experimental technique to study self-heating of bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators under high RF power in the gigahertz range. This study is specially focused on film bulk acoustic wave resonators and solidly mounted resonators processed onto silicon wafers and designed for wireless systems. Precisely, the reflection coefficient of a one-port device is measured while up to several watts are applied and power leads to electrical drifts of impedances. In the following, we describe how absorbed power can be determined from the incident one in real time. Therefore, an infrared camera held over the radio frequency micro electromechanical system (RF-MEMS) surface with an exceptional spatial resolution reaching up to 2 microm/pixels gives accurate temperature mapping of resonators after emissivity correction. From theoretical point of view, accurate three-dimensional (3-D) structures for finite-element modeling analyses are carried out to know the best materials and architectures to use for enhancing power handling. In both experimental and theoretical investigations, comparison is made between film bulk acoustic wave resonators and solidly mounted resonators. Thus, the trend in term of material, architecture, and size of device for power application such as in transmission path of a transceiver is clearly identified. PMID:18334320

  1. Determining radiated sound power of building structures by means of laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roozen, N. B.; Labelle, L.; Rychtáriková, M.; Glorieux, C.

    2015-06-01

    This paper introduces a methodology that makes use of laser Doppler vibrometry to assess the acoustic insulation performance of a building element. The sound power radiated by the surface of the element is numerically determined from the vibrational pattern, offering an alternative for classical microphone measurements. Compared to the latter the proposed analysis is not sensitive to room acoustical effects. This allows the proposed methodology to be used at low frequencies, where the standardized microphone based approach suffers from a high uncertainty due to a low acoustic modal density. Standardized measurements as well as laser Doppler vibrometry measurements and computations have been performed on two test panels, a light-weight wall and a gypsum block wall and are compared and discussed in this paper. The proposed methodology offers an adequate solution for the assessment of the acoustic insulation of building elements at low frequencies. This is crucial in the framework of recent proposals of acoustic standards for measurement approaches and single number sound insulation performance ratings to take into account frequencies down to 50 Hz.

  2. Radiation effects on power integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Darwish, M.N.; Dolly, M.C.; Goodwin, C.A.; Titus, J.L

    1988-12-01

    A study was initiated to investigate the effects of gamma (total ionizing dose), prompt gamma (gamma dot), and neutron radiation on commercially available power integrated circuits (PIC's). A Dielectric Isolated (DI) Bipolar-CMOS-DMOS (BCDMOS) technology developed at AT and T Bell Laboratories was selected for this characterization. Total ionizing dose testing resulted in device failure at 30 krads (Si). Gamma dot testing (30 ns pulsewidth) resulted in device failure due to transient upset of the CMOS logic at 1.0 E+09 rads(Si)/s. Neutron testing resulted in severe degradation in performance, but devices remained functional after receiving a fluence of 2.0 E+14 n/cm/sup 2/. Also, an attempt was made to harden the BCDMOS technology to gamma radiation. Devices from eight processing splits were characterized to determine if specific process changes would improve their performance.

  3. A 3-D elasticity theory based model for acoustic radiation from multilayered anisotropic plates.

    PubMed

    Shen, C; Xin, F X; Lu, T J

    2014-05-01

    A theoretical model built upon three-dimensional elasticity theory is developed to investigate the acoustic radiation from multilayered anisotropic plates subjected to a harmonic point force excitation. Fourier transform technique and stationary phase method are combined to predict the far-field radiated sound pressure of one-side water immersed plate. Compared to equivalent single-layer plate models, the present model based on elasticity theory can differentiate radiated sound pressure between dry-side and wet-side excited cases, as well as discrepancies induced by different layer sequences for multilayered anisotropic plates. These results highlight the superiority of the present theoretical model especially for handling multilayered anisotropic structures. PMID:24815294

  4. Radiated microwave power transmission system efficiency measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.; Brown, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    The measured and calculated results from determining the operating efficiencies of a laboratory version of a system for transporting electric power from one point to another via a wireless free space radiated microwave beam are reported. The system's overall end-to-end efficiency as well as intermediated conversion efficiencies were measured. The maximum achieved end-to-end dc-to-ac system efficiency was 54.18% with a probable error of + or - 0.94%. The dc-to-RF conversion efficiency was measured to be 68.87% + or - 1.0% and the RF-to-dc conversion efficiency was 78.67 + or - 1.1%. Under these conditions a dc power of 495.62 + or - 3.57 W was received with a free space transmitter antenna receiver antenna separation of 170.2 cm (67 in).

  5. Design of Low-power Wake-up Circuits in Underwater Acoustic Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuixia, Zhang; Jiaxin, Wu; Yuanxuan, Li

    In underwater acoustic communication, the power consumption of the underwater communication equipments at harsh conditions of marine environment is an important problem. Under that scenario, we propose a design of low-power wake-up circuits based on SCM C8051F020 system. Compare to traditional wake-up circuits which directly judge the energy of received signals, our approach can greatly reduce the misjudgment caused by the environmental disturbance, and the performance of energy conservation is effective. The low-power wake-up circuits possess a promising application prospect in the long-distance wireless underwater communication.

  6. Influence of an oscillating circuit on the radiation of transient acoustic waves by an electroelastic cylinder.

    PubMed

    Babaev, A E; Babaev, A A; Yanchevskiy, I V

    2010-04-01

    The problem of nonstationary wave radiation in an infinitely long thick-wall piezoelectric cylinder in fluid medium is considered. The influence of an oscillating circuit with lumped parameters on characteristics of transient process is taken into consideration. Problem formulation is executed within the forced electrostatic theory, acoustic approximations, and quasistatic theory for electric circuit. The solution method is based on the integral Laplace transform in time. This allows analytically reducing the problem to solving a system of Volterra integral equations with retarded arguments. The numerical results of calculations are presented and analyzed. PMID:20370009

  7. Estimation of mechanical properties of gelatin using a microbubble under acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Eriko; Ando, Keita

    2015-12-01

    This paper is concerned with observations of the translation of a microbubble (80 μm or 137 μm in radius) in a viscoelastic medium (3 w% gelatin), which is induced by acoustic radiation force originating from 1 MHz focused ultrasound. An optical system using a high-speed camera was designed to visualize the bubble translation and deformation. If the bubble remains its spherical shape under the sonication, the bubble translation we observed can be described by theory based on the Voigt model for linear viscoelastic solids; mechanical properties of the gelatin are calculated from measurements of the terminal displacement under the sonication.

  8. Experimental Study of the Acoustic Navigation of a Helicopter by Its Noise Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, V. P.; Kuz'menko, A. K.; Svet, V. D.; Spitsyn, E. I.

    2000-11-01

    Results of experimental measurements of the coordinates and trajectories of an MI-8 helicopter flight are presented for various types of maneuvers and the landing approach. The current coordinates are measured in real time by acoustic differential navigation methods using the noise radiation of a helicopter. It is shown that, when a measuring base with a microphone spacing of 2 m or less is used, the spatial correlation coefficient for the signals in the frequency band from 200 to 5000 Hz approaches unity. This makes it possible to estimate the position of the helicopter with rms errors less than 0.4 m at all stages of flight and at the landing approach.

  9. Detection scheme for acoustic quantum radiation in Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Schützhold, Ralf

    2006-11-10

    Based on doubly detuned Raman transitions between (meta)stable atomic or molecular states and recently developed atom counting techniques, a detection scheme for sound waves in dilute Bose-Einstein condensates is proposed whose accuracy might reach down to the level of a few or even single phonons. This scheme could open up a new range of applications including the experimental observation of quantum radiation phenomena such as the Hawking effect in sonic black-hole analogues or the acoustic analogue of cosmological particle creation. PMID:17155600

  10. 2-D steering and propelling of acoustic bubble-powered microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jian; Yuan, Junqi; Cho, Sung Kwon

    2016-06-21

    This paper describes bi-directional (linear and rotational) propelling and 2-D steering of acoustic bubble-powered microswimmers that are achieved in a centimeter-scale pool (beyond chip level scale). The core structure of a microswimmer is a microtube with one end open in which a gaseous bubble is trapped. The swimmer is propelled by microstreaming flows that are generated when the trapped bubble is oscillated by an external acoustic wave. The bubble oscillation and thus propelling force are highly dependent on the frequency of the acoustic wave and the bubble length. This dependence is experimentally studied by measuring the resonance behaviors of the testing pool and bubble using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) and by evaluating the generated streaming flows. The key idea in the present 2-D steering is to utilize this dependence. Multiple bubbles with different lengths are mounted on a single microswimmer with a variety of arrangements. By controlling the frequency of the acoustic wave, only frequency-matched bubbles can strongly oscillate and generate strong propulsion. By arranging multiple bubbles of different lengths in parallel but with their openings opposite and switching the frequency of the acoustic wave, bi-directionally linear propelling motions are successfully achieved. The propelling forces are calculated by a CFD analysis using the Ansys Fluent® package. For bi-directional rotations, a similar method but with diagonal arrangement of bubbles on a rectangular swimmer is also applied. The rotation can be easily reversed when the frequency of the acoustic wave is switched. For 2-D steering, short bubbles are aligned perpendicular to long bubbles. It is successfully demonstrated that the microswimmer navigates through a T-junction channel under full control with and without carrying a payload. During the navigation, the frequency is the main control input to select and resonate targeted bubbles. All of these operations are achieved by a single

  11. Estimation of the detection range of a hydroacoustic system based on the acoustic power flux receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, V. A.; Krasnopistsev, N. V.; Nasedkin, A. V.; Nekrasov, V. N.

    2007-11-01

    Approaches to estimating the detection range of systems based on vector receivers are considered. The approaches rely on a detailed analysis of the process of signal’s acoustic power flux formation in the presence of ambient sea noise and uncover the signal information parameters at the receiver output that provide the required statistically confident range of weak signal detection under these conditions. Based on the sonar equations and the known fundamental relationships between the outputs of a pressure receiver and a vector receiver for signal and noise, estimates of the maximum possible gain in the detection range of an acoustic power flux receiver are considered as a function of anisotropy of the ambient noise field in the area.

  12. Sound propagation in and radiation from acoustically lined flow ducts: A comparison of experiment and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumblee, H. E., Jr.; Dean, P. D.; Wynne, G. A.; Burrin, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an experimental and theoretical study of many of the fundamental details of sound propagation in hard wall and soft wall annular flow ducts are reported. The theory of sound propagation along such ducts and the theory for determining the complex radiation impedance of higher order modes of an annulus are outlined, and methods for generating acoustic duct modes are developed. The results of a detailed measurement program on propagation in rigid wall annular ducts with and without airflow through the duct are presented. Techniques are described for measuring cut-on frequencies, modal phase speed, and radial and annular mode shapes. The effects of flow velocity on cut-on frequencies and phase speed are measured. Comparisons are made with theoretical predictions for all of the effects studies. The two microphone method of impedance is used to measure the effects of flow on acoustic liners. A numerical study of sound propagation in annular ducts with one or both walls acoustically lined is presented.

  13. Risk of a second cancer from scattered radiation in acoustic neuroma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Hyunho; Sung, Jiwon; Shin, Dongoh; Park, Sungho; Chung, Weon Kuu; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Kim, Dong Wook

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to compare the risk of a secondary cancer from scattered and leakage doses in patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of a secondary cancer were estimated using the corresponding secondary doses measured at various organs by using radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, liver, bowel, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were 14.6, 1.7, 0.9, 0.8, 0.6, 0.6, and 0.6 cGy, respectively, for IMRT whereas they were 19.1, 1.8, 2.0, 0.6, 0.4, 0.4, and 0.4 cGy, respectively, for VMAT, and 22.8, 4.6, 1.4, 0.7, 0.5, 0.5, and 0.5 cGy, respectively, for SRS. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A lifetime attributable risk evaluation estimated that more than 0.03% of acoustic neuroma (AN) patients would get radiation-induced cancer within 20 years of receiving radiation therapy. The organ with the highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN was the thyroid. We found that the LAR could be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  14. Power law statistics of force and acoustic emission from a slowly penetrated granular bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, K.; Katsuragi, H.

    2014-01-01

    Penetration-resistant force and acoustic emission (AE) from a plunged granular bed are experimentally investigated through their power law distribution forms. An AE sensor is buried in a glass bead bed. Then, the bed is slowly penetrated by a solid sphere. During the penetration, the resistant force exerted on the sphere and the AE signal are measured. The resistant force shows power law relation to the penetration depth. The power law exponent is independent of the penetration speed, while it seems to depend on the container's size. For the AE signal, we find that the size distribution of AE events obeys power laws. The power law exponent depends on grain size. Using the energy scaling, the experimentally observed power law exponents are discussed and compared to the Gutenberg-Richter (GR) law.

  15. The effects of acoustic radiation force on contrast agents: Experimental and theoretial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayton, Paul Alexander

    The goal of this research is to understand the response of ultrasound contrast agents to acoustic radiation force. Ultrasound contrast agents are encapsulated microbubbles similar in size and rheologic behavior to human erythrocytes. A core of either air or a high- molecular weight gas makes these microbubbles extremely compressible and highly echogenic. Clinically, the detection of blood is difficult without contrast agents because the echoes from blood cells are typically 30-40 dB less than tissue echoes. Ultrasound contrast agents have been shown to be extremely useful in assisting delineation of perfused tissue in echocardiography, and are being increasingly used for tumor detection in radiology. The high compressibility of gas-filled contrast agents makes these microbubbles susceptible to translation due to radiation force. Thus, it is important to understand the effects of this force in order to avoid erroneous measurements based on the location and flow velocity of microbubbles. In addition, the ability to displace and concentrate microbubbles may be an advantage in targeted imaging, targeted therapy, or industrial applications where it is desired to localize microbubbles in a region. In this study, experimental and theoretical tools are combined to investigate the interaction between microbubbles and an acoustic pulse. Several unique experimental systems allow visualization and analysis of the radius-time curves of individual microbubbles, the displacement of individual microbubbles in-vitro, and the displacement of microbubbles in-vivo. Theoretical analysis illustrates that the effect of radiation force on microbubbles is directly proportional to the product of the bubble volume and the acoustic pressure gradient. A model designed to simulate the radius-time behavior of individual microbubbles is verified from experimental data, and used to estimate the magnitude of radiation force. The resulting bubble translation is determined using a second model

  16. 47 CFR 80.765 - Effective radiated power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Effective radiated power. 80.765 Section 80.765 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Standards for Computing Public Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.765 Effective radiated power. Effective radiated...

  17. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius. PMID:26558995

  18. Radiation of long and high power arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressault, Y.; Bauchire, J. M.; Hong, D.; Rabat, H.; Riquel, G.; Sanchez, F.; Gleizes, A.

    2015-10-01

    The operators working on electrical installations of low, medium and high voltages can be accidentally exposed to short-circuit arcs ranging from a few kA to several tens of kA. To protect them from radiation, according to the exposure limits, we need to characterize the radiation emitted by the powerful arc. Therefore, we have developed a general experimental and numerical study in order to estimate the spectral irradiance received at a given distance from the arc. The experimental part was based on a very long arc (up to 2 m) with high ac current (between 4 and 40 kA rms, duration 100 ms) using 3 kinds of metallic contacts (copper, steel and aluminium). We measured the irradiance received 10m from the axis of the arc, and integrated on 4 spectral intervals corresponding to the UV, visible, IRA  +  B and IRC. The theoretical part consisted of calculating the radiance of isothermal plasmas in mixtures of air and metal vapour, integrated over the same spectral intervals as defined in the experiments. The comparison between the theoretical and experimental results has allowed the defining of three isothermal radiation sources whose combination leads to a spectral irradiation equivalent to the experimental one. Then the calculation allowed the deduction of the spectral description of the irradiance over all the wavelength range, between 200 nm and 20 μm. The final results indicate that the influence of metal is important in the visible and UVA ranges whereas the IR radiation is due to the air plasma and surrounding hot gas and fumes.

  19. Determining the nominal power transfer coefficient for passive surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoshenko, A. N.; Palamarchuk, A. A.; Semenko, A. I.

    1982-05-01

    A method for calculating the nominal power transfer coefficient of passive SAW devices operating in a linear mode is described. Relations of practical importance are obtained, making it possible, on the basis of known characteristics of acousto-electric transducers and acoustic lines, to determine the losses incurred by devices when they are connected to radioelectronic equipment. The relations also permit an assessment of the uniformity of the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the devices.

  20. Correlation of combustor acoustic power levels inferred from internal fluctuating pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.

    1978-01-01

    Combustion chamber acoustic power levels inferred from internal fluctuating pressure measurements are correlated with operating conditions and chamber geometries over a wide range. The variables include considerations of chamber design (can, annular, and reverse-flow annular) and size, number of fuel nozzles, burner staging and fuel split, airflow and heat release rates, and chamber inlet pressure and temperature levels. The correlated data include those obtained with combustion component development rigs as well as engines.

  1. Stabilization and Low-Frequency Oscillation of Capillary Bridges with Modulated Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Marr-Lyon, Mark J.; Morse, S. F.; Thiessen, David B.

    1996-01-01

    In the work reported here it is demonstrated that acoustic radiation pressure may be used in simulated low gravity to produce stable bridges significantly beyond the Rayleigh limit with S as large as 3.6. The bridge (PDMS mixed with a dense liquid) has the same density as the surrounding water bath containing an ultrasonic standing wave. Modulation was first used to excite specific bridge modes. In the most recent work reported here the shape of the bridge is optically sensed and the ultrasonic drive is electronically adjusted such that the radiation stress distribution dynamically quenches the most unstable mode. This active control simulates passive stabilization suggested for low gravity. Feedback increases the mode frequency in the naturally stable region since the effective stiffness of the mode is increased.

  2. Inhomogeneous Radiation Boundary Conditions Simulating Incoming Acoustic Waves for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Fang, Jun; Kurbatskii, Konstantin A.

    1996-01-01

    A set of nonhomogeneous radiation and outflow conditions which automatically generate prescribed incoming acoustic or vorticity waves and, at the same time, are transparent to outgoing sound waves produced internally in a finite computation domain is proposed. This type of boundary condition is needed for the numerical solution of many exterior aeroacoustics problems. In computational aeroacoustics, the computation scheme must be as nondispersive ans nondissipative as possible. It must also support waves with wave speeds which are nearly the same as those of the original linearized Euler equations. To meet these requirements, a high-order/large-stencil scheme is necessary The proposed nonhomogeneous radiation and outflow boundary conditions are designed primarily for use in conjunction with such high-order/large-stencil finite difference schemes.

  3. Acoustic radiation pressure: A 'phase contrast' agent for x-ray phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bailat, Claude J.; Hamilton, Theron J.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J.

    2004-11-08

    We show that the radiation pressure exerted by a beam of ultrasound can be used for contrast enhancement in high-resolution x-ray imaging of tissue and soft materials. Interfacial features of objects are highlighted as a result of both the displacement introduced by the ultrasound and the inherent sensitivity of x-ray phase contrast imaging to density variations. The potential of the method is demonstrated by imaging microscopic tumor phantoms embedded into tissue with a thickness typically presented in mammography. The detection limit of micrometer size masses exceeds the resolution of currently available mammography imaging systems. The directionality of the acoustic radiation force and its localization in space permits the imaging of ultrasound-selected tissue volumes. The results presented here suggest that the method may permit the detection of tumors in soft tissue in their early stage of development.

  4. The development and potential of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging for carotid artery plaque characterization.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jason D; Ham, Katherine L; Dumont, Douglas M; Sileshi, Bantayehu; Trahey, Gregg E; Dahl, Jeremy J

    2011-08-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death and long-term disability in the USA. Currently, surgical intervention decisions in asymptomatic patients are based upon the degree of carotid artery stenosis. While there is a clear benefit of endarterectomy for patients with severe (> 70%) stenosis, in those with high/moderate (50-69%) stenosis the evidence is less clear. Evidence suggests ischemic stroke is associated less with calcified and fibrous plaques than with those containing softer tissue, especially when accompanied by a thin fibrous cap. A reliable mechanism for the identification of individuals with atherosclerotic plaques which confer the highest risk for stroke is fundamental to the selection of patients for vascular interventions. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is a new ultrasonic-based imaging method that characterizes the mechanical properties of tissue by measuring displacement resulting from the application of acoustic radiation force. These displacements provide information about the local stiffness of tissue and can differentiate between soft and hard areas. Because arterial walls, soft tissue, atheromas, and calcifications have a wide range in their stiffness properties, they represent excellent candidates for ARFI imaging. We present information from early phantom experiments and excised human limb studies to in vivo carotid artery scans and provide evidence for the ability of ARFI to provide high-quality images which highlight mechanical differences in tissue stiffness not readily apparent in matched B-mode images. This allows ARFI to identify soft from hard plaques and differentiate characteristics associated with plaque vulnerability or stability. PMID:21447606

  5. Shear-layer acoustic radiation in an excited subsonic jet: experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Vincent; Bailly, Christophe; Juvé, Daniel

    2005-10-01

    The subharmonic acoustic radiation of a tone excited subsonic jet shear-layer has been investigated experimentally. Two jet velocities U=20 mṡs and U=40 mṡs were studied. For U=20 mṡs, the natural boundary-layer at the nozzle exit is laminar. When the perturbation is applied, the fluctuations of the first and the second subharmonics of the excitation frequency are detected in the shear-layer. In addition, the first subharmonic near pressure field along the spreading jet is constituted of two strong maxima of sinusoidal shape. The far-field directivity pattern displays two lobes separated by an extinction angle θ at around 85° from the jet axis. These observations follow the results of Bridges about the vortex pairing noise. On the other hand, for U=40 mṡs, the initial boundary-layer is transitional and only the first subharmonic is observed in the presence of the excitation. The near pressure field is of Gaussian shape in the jet periphery and the acoustic far-field is superdirective as observed by Laufer and Yen. The state of the initial shear-layer seems to be the key feature to distinguish these two different radiation patterns. To cite this article: V. Fleury et al., C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  6. An integrated modular power-aware microsensor architecture and application to unattended acoustic vehicle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajura, Michael; Schott, Brian; Flidr, Jaroslav; Czarnaski, Joe; Worth, Carl; Tho, Tam; Wang, Li

    2005-05-01

    We introduce a truly modular, power-aware, distributed microsensor architecture, capable of seamlessly spanning performance metrics from point-optimized low-power to point-optimized high-power applications. This type of performance is often needed in unattended ground sensor applications such as acoustic sensing and tracking, where long periods of minimal sensing activity are intermixed with short periods of intense sensor processing. The system design and implementation of a microsensor platform based on this architecture are described with experimental results. We show that although building a modular power-aware system requires additional hardware components, it results in system capable of rapid physical hardware and software reconfiguration with module reuse for new applications, while achieving a significant decrease in overall system power.

  7. Power lines harmonic radiation in circumterrestrial space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronenko, Vira; Korepanov, Valery; Dudkin, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Currently, one of the main areas in the near-Earth space research is the space weather exploration and forecasting. This study mainly relates to solar activity influence on the ionosphere and the Earth's atmosphere (i.e., the energy transfer in the direction of the Sun-magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere-surface of the Earth) and does not reflect a significant impact of the powerful natural and anthropogenic processes, which occur on the Earth's surface and influence on the atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere chain. The powerful sources and consumers of electrical energy (radio transmitters, power plants, power lines and industrial objects) cause different ionospheric phenomena, for example, changes of the electromagnetic (EM) field and plasma in the ionosphere, and affect on the state of the Earth atmosphere. Anthropogenic EM effects in the ionosphere are already observed by the scientific satellites. Consequences of anthropogenic impacts on the ionosphere are not currently known. Therefore, it is very important and urgent task to conduct the statistically significant research of the ionospheric parameters variations due to the influence of the powerful man-made factors, primarily owing to substantial increase of the EM energy production. Naturally, the satellite monitoring of the ionosphere and magnetosphere in the frequency range from tens of hertz to tens of MHz with wide ground support offers the best opportunity to observe the EM energy release, both in the global and local scales. The available experimental data, as well as theoretical estimations, allow with a high degree of certainty to say that the permanent satellite monitoring of the ionospheric and magnetospheric anthropogenic EM perturbations can be used for: a) objective assessment and prediction of the space weather conditions; b) evaluation of the daily or seasonal changes in the level of energy consumption; c) construction of a map for estimation of near space EM pollution. The examples of power

  8. Moisture estimation in power transformer oil using acoustic signals and spectral kurtosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, Valéria C. M. N.; Veloso, Giscard F. C.; Borges da Silva, Luiz Eduardo; Lambert-Torres, Germano; Borges da Silva, Jonas G.; Onofre Pereira Pinto, João

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a new technique for estimating the contamination by moisture in power transformer insulating oil based on the spectral kurtosis analysis of the acoustic signals of partial discharges (PDs). Basically, in this approach, the spectral kurtosis of the PD acoustic signal is calculated and the correlation between its maximum value and the moisture percentage is explored to find a function that calculates the moisture percentage. The function can be easily implemented in DSP, FPGA, or any other type of embedded system for online moisture monitoring. To evaluate the proposed approach, an experiment is assembled with a piezoelectric sensor attached to a tank, which is filled with insulating oil samples contaminated by different levels of moisture. A device generating electrical discharges is submerged into the oil to simulate the occurrence of PDs. Detected acoustic signals are processed using fast kurtogram algorithm to extract spectral kurtosis values. The obtained data are used to find the fitting function that relates the water contamination to the maximum value of the spectral kurtosis. Experimental results show that the proposed method is suitable for online monitoring system of power transformers.

  9. Incident signal power comparison for localization of concurrent multiple acoustic sources.

    PubMed

    Salvati, Daniele; Canazza, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a method to solve the localization of concurrent multiple acoustic sources in large open spaces is presented. The problem of the multisource localization in far-field conditions is to correctly associate the direction of arrival (DOA) estimated by a network array system to the same source. The use of systems implementing a Bayesian filter is a traditional approach to address the problem of localization in multisource acoustic scenario. However, in a real noisy open space the acoustic sources are often discontinuous with numerous short-duration events and thus the filtering methods may have difficulty to track the multiple sources. Incident signal power comparison (ISPC) is proposed to compute DOAs association. ISPC is based on identifying the incident signal power (ISP) of the sources on a microphone array using beamforming methods and comparing the ISP between different arrays using spectral distance (SD) measurement techniques. This method solves the ambiguities, due to the presence of simultaneous sources, by identifying sounds through a minimization of an error criterion on SD measures of DOA combinations. The experimental results were conducted in an outdoor real noisy environment and the ISPC performance is reported using different beamforming techniques and SD functions. PMID:24701179

  10. Incident Signal Power Comparison for Localization of Concurrent Multiple Acoustic Sources

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a method to solve the localization of concurrent multiple acoustic sources in large open spaces is presented. The problem of the multisource localization in far-field conditions is to correctly associate the direction of arrival (DOA) estimated by a network array system to the same source. The use of systems implementing a Bayesian filter is a traditional approach to address the problem of localization in multisource acoustic scenario. However, in a real noisy open space the acoustic sources are often discontinuous with numerous short-duration events and thus the filtering methods may have difficulty to track the multiple sources. Incident signal power comparison (ISPC) is proposed to compute DOAs association. ISPC is based on identifying the incident signal power (ISP) of the sources on a microphone array using beamforming methods and comparing the ISP between different arrays using spectral distance (SD) measurement techniques. This method solves the ambiguities, due to the presence of simultaneous sources, by identifying sounds through a minimization of an error criterion on SD measures of DOA combinations. The experimental results were conducted in an outdoor real noisy environment and the ISPC performance is reported using different beamforming techniques and SD functions. PMID:24701179

  11. 1KW Power Transmission Using Wireless Acoustic-Electric Feed-Through (WAEF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, S.; Bao, X.; Badescu, M.; Aldrich, J.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Biederman, W.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of space applications require the delivery of power into sealed structures. Since the structural integrity can be degraded by holes for cabling we present an alternative method of delivering power and information using stress waves to the internal space of a sealed structure. One particular application of this technology is in sample return missions where it is critical to preserve the sample integrity and to prevent earth contamination. Therefore, the container has to be hermetically sealed and the integrity of the seal must be monitored in order to insure to a high degree of reliability the integrity of the sample return vessel. In this study we investigated the use of piezoelectric acoustic-electric power feed-through devices to transfer electric power wirelessly through a solid wall by using elastic or acoustic waves. The technology is applicable to a range of space and terrestrial applications where power is required by electronic equipment inside sealed containers, vacuum or pressure vessels, etc., where holes in the wall are prohibitive or may result in significant structural performance degradation or unnecessarily complex designs. To meet requirements of higher power applications, the feasibility to transfer kilowatts level power was investigated. Pre-stressed longitudinal piezoelectric feed-through devices were analyzed by finite element models and an equivalent circuit model was developed to predict the power transfer characteristics to different electric loads. Based on the results of the analysis a prototype device was designed, fabricated and a demonstration of the transmission of electric power up to 1.068-kW was successfully conducted. Efficiencies in the 80-90% range were also demonstrated and methods to increase the efficiency further are currently being considered.

  12. Varying the agglomeration position of particles in a micro-channel using Acoustic Radiation Force beyond the resonance condition.

    PubMed

    Dron, Olivier; Aider, Jean-Luc

    2013-09-01

    It is well-known that particles can be focused at mid-height of a micro-channel using Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) tuned at the resonance frequency (h=λ/2). The resonance condition is a strong limitation to the use of acoustophoresis (particles manipulation using acoustic force) in many applications. In this study we show that it is possible to focus the particles anywhere along the height of a micro-channel just by varying the acoustic frequency, in contradiction with the resonance condition. This result has been thoroughly checked experimentally. The different physical properties as well as wall materials have been changed. The wall materials is finally the only critical parameters. One of the specificity of the micro-channel is the thickness of the carrier and reflector layer. A preliminary analysis of the experimental results suggests that the acoustic focusing beyond the classic resonance condition can be explained in the framework of the multilayered resonator proposed by Hill [1]. Nevertheless, further numerical studies are needed in order to confirm and fully understand how the acoustic pressure node can be moved over the entire height of the micro channel by varying the acoustic frequency. Despite some uncertainties about the origin of the phenomenon, it is robust and can be used for improved acoustic sorting or manipulation of particles or biological cells in confined set-ups. PMID:23628114

  13. SU-E-T-208: Incidence Cancer Risk From the Radiation Treatment for Acoustic Neuroma Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D; Chung, W; Shin, D; Yoon, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to compare the incidence risk of a secondary cancer from therapeutic doses in patients receiving intensitymodulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their incidnece excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) were estimated using the corresponding therapeutic doses measured at various organs by radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. Results: When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, normal liver, colon, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were measured. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A LAR were estimated that more than 0.03% of AN patients would get radiation-induced cancer. Conclusion: The tyroid was highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN. We found that LAR can be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  14. Radiation force of an arbitrary acoustic beam on an elastic sphere in a fluid

    PubMed Central

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical approach is developed to calculate the radiation force of an arbitrary acoustic beam on an elastic sphere in a liquid or gas medium. First, the incident beam is described as a sum of plane waves by employing conventional angular spectrum decomposition. Then, the classical solution for the scattering of a plane wave from an elastic sphere is applied for each plane-wave component of the incident field. The net scattered field is expressed as a superposition of the scattered fields from all angular spectrum components of the incident beam. With this formulation, the incident and scattered waves are superposed in the far field to derive expressions for components of the radiation stress tensor. These expressions are then integrated over a spherical surface to analytically describe the radiation force on an elastic sphere. Limiting cases for particular types of incident beams are presented and are shown to agree with known results. Finally, the analytical expressions are used to calculate radiation forces associated with two specific focusing transducers. PMID:23363086

  15. Aircraft IR/acoustic detection evaluation. Volume 2: Development of a ground-based acoustic sensor system for the detection of subsonic jet-powered aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    The design and performance of a ground-based acoustic sensor system for the detection of subsonic jet-powered aircraft is described and specified. The acoustic detection system performance criteria will subsequently be used to determine target detection ranges for the subject contract. Although the defined system has never been built and demonstrated in the field, the design parameters were chosen on the basis of achievable technology and overall system practicality. Areas where additional information is needed to substantiate the design are identified.

  16. A Advanced Boundary Element Formulation for Acoustic Radiation and Scattering in Three Dimensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soenarko, Benjamin

    A computational method is presented for determining acoustic fields produced by arbitrary shaped three-dimensional bodies. The formulation includes both radiation and scattering problems. In particular an isoparametric element formulation is introduced in which both the surface geometry and the acoustic variables on the surface of the body are represented by second order shape functions within the local coordinate system. A general result for the surface velocity potential and the exterior field is derived. This result is applicable to non-smooth bodies, i.e. it includes the case where the surface may have a non-unique normal (e.g. at the edge of a cube). Test cases are shown involving spherical, cylindrical and cubical geometry for both radiation and scattering problems. The present formulation is also extended to include half-space problems in which the effect of the reflected wave from an infinite plane is taken into account. By selecting an appropriate Green's function, the surface integral over the plane is nullified; thus all the computational efforts can be performed only on the radiating or scattering body at issue and thereby greatly simplify the solution. A special formulation involving axisymmetric bodies and boundary conditions is also presented. For this special case, the surface integrals are reduced to line integrals and an integral over the angle of revolution. The integration over the angle is performed partly analytically in terms of elliptic integrals and partly numerically using simple Gaussian quadrature formula. Since the rest of the integrals involve only line integrals along the generator of the body, any discretization scheme can be easily obtained to achieve a desired degree of accuracy in evaluating these integrals.

  17. ACOUSTIC RADIATION FORCE-DRIVEN ASSESSMENT OF MYOCARDIAL ELASTICITY USING THE DISPLACEMENT RATIO RATE (DRR) METHOD

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Richard R.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Rouze, Ned C.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2011-01-01

    A noninvasive method of characterizing myocardial stiffness could have significant implications in diagnosing cardiac disease. Acoustic radiation force (ARF)–driven techniques have demonstrated their ability to discern elastic properties of soft tissue. For the purpose of myocardial elasticity imaging, a novel ARF-based imaging technique, the displacement ratio rate (DRR) method, was developed to rank the relative stiffnesses of dynamically varying tissue. The basis and performance of this technique was demonstrated through numerical and phantom imaging results. This new method requires a relatively small temporal (<1 ms) and spatial (tenths of mm2) sampling window and appears to be independent of applied ARF magnitude. The DRR method was implemented in two in vivo canine studies, during which data were acquired through the full cardiac cycle by imaging directly on the exposed epicardium. These data were then compared with results obtained by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and shear wave velocimetry, with the latter being used as the gold standard. Through the cardiac cycle, velocimetry results portray a range of shear wave velocities from 0.76–1.97 m/s, with the highest velocities observed during systole and the lowest observed during diastole. If a basic shear wave elasticity model is assumed, such a velocity result would suggest a period of increased stiffness during systole (when compared with diastole). Despite drawbacks of the DRR method (i.e., sensitivity to noise and limited stiffness range), its results predicted a similar cyclic stiffness variation to that offered by velocimetry while being insensitive to variations in applied radiation force. PMID:21645966

  18. The acoustic radiation force on a small thermoviscous or thermoelastic particle suspended in a viscous and heat-conducting fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsen, Jonas; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-11-01

    We present a theoretical analysis (arxiv.org/abs/1507.01043) of the acoustic radiation force on a single small particle, either a thermoviscous fluid droplet or a thermoelastic solid particle, suspended in a viscous and heat-conducting fluid. Our analysis places no restrictions on the viscous and thermal boundary layer thicknesses relative to the particle radius, but it assumes the particle to be small in comparison to the acoustic wavelength. This is the limit relevant to scattering of ultrasound waves from sub-micrometer particles. For particle sizes smaller than the boundary layer widths, our theory leads to profound consequences for the acoustic radiation force. For example, for liquid droplets and solid particles suspended in gasses we predict forces orders of magnitude larger than expected from ideal-fluid theory. Moreover, for certain relevant choices of materials, we find a sign change in the acoustic radiation force on different-sized but otherwise identical particles. These findings lead to the concept of a particle-size-dependent acoustophoretic contrast factor, highly relevant to applications in acoustic levitation or separation of micro-particles in gases, as well as to handling of μm- and nm-sized particles such as bacteria and vira in lab-on-a-chip systems.

  19. Prophylaxis and treatment of acute radiation ulcers in rats with low-power infrared laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursova, Larisa V.; Kaplan, Michael A.; Nikitina, Rosa G.; Maligina, Antonina I.

    1999-12-01

    Exposure of radiation ulcers in rats to low-power infrared laser radiation (LPLR) (wavelength--890 nm, pulse power--6 W, frequency--150 and 300 Hz, irradiation time--10 min) noticeably accelerates their healing, reduces exudative processes, increases number of specialized cells in wound. Application of LPLR prior to radiation damage decreases ulcer dimensions.

  20. Biosonar resolving power: echo-acoustic perception of surface structures in the submillimeter range

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Ralph; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Tschapka, Marco; Schneider, Annkathrin; Passauer, Nadine; Kalko, Elisabeth K. V.; von Helversen, Otto

    2014-01-01

    The minimum distance for which two points still can be separated from each other defines the resolving power of a visual system. In an echo-acoustic context, the resolving power is usually measured as the smallest perceivable distance of two reflecting surfaces on the range axis and is found to be around half a millimeter for bats employing frequency modulated (FM) echolocation calls. Only few studies measured such thresholds with physical objects, most often bats were trained on virtual echoes i.e., echoes generated and played back by a computer; moreover, bats were sitting while they received the stimuli. In these studies differences in structure depth between 200 and 340 μm were found. However, these low thresholds were never verified for free-flying bats and real physical objects. Here, we show behavioral evidence that the echo-acoustic resolving power for surface structures in fact can be as low as measured for computer generated echoes and even lower, sometimes below 100 μm. We found this exceptional fine discrimination ability only when one of the targets showed spectral interferences in the frequency range of the bats′ echolocation call while the other target did not. This result indicates that surface structure is likely to be perceived as a spectral quality rather than being perceived strictly in the time domain. Further, it points out that sonar resolving power directly depends on the highest frequency/shortest wavelength of the signal employed. PMID:24616703

  1. Generation and Radiation of Acoustic Waves from a 2-D Shear Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, Anurag; Morris, Philip J.

    2000-01-01

    A parallel numerical simulation of the radiation of sound from an acoustic source inside a 2-D jet is presented in this paper. This basic benchmark problem is used as a test case for scattering problems that are presently being solved by using the Impedance Mismatch Method (IMM). In this technique, a solid body in the domain is represented by setting the acoustic impedance of each medium, encountered by a wave, to a different value. This impedance discrepancy results in reflected and scattered waves with appropriate amplitudes. The great advantage of the use of this method is that no modifications to a simple Cartesian grid need to be made for complicated geometry bodies. Thus, high order finite difference schemes may be applied simply to all parts of the domain. In the IMM, the total perturbation field is split into incident and scattered fields. The incident pressure is assumed to be known and the equivalent sources for the scattered field are associated with the presence of the scattering body (through the impedance mismatch) and the propagation of the incident field through a non-uniform flow. An earlier version of the technique could only handle uniform flow in the vicinity of the source and at the outflow boundary. Scattering problems in non-uniform mean flow are of great practical importance (for example, scattering from a high lift device in a non-uniform mean flow or the effects of a fuselage boundary layer). The solution to this benchmark problem, which has an acoustic wave propagating through a non-uniform mean flow, serves as a test case for the extensions of the IMM technique.

  2. Generation and Radiation of Acoustic Waves from a 2-D Shear Layer using the CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Wang, Xiao Y.; Chang, Sin-Chung; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2000-01-01

    In the present work, the generation and radiation of acoustic waves from a 2-D shear layer problem is considered. An acoustic source inside of a 2-D jet excites an instability wave in the shear layer, resulting in sound Mach radiation. The numerical solution is obtained by solving the Euler equations using the space time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. Linearization is achieved through choosing a small acoustic source amplitude. The Euler equations are nondimensionalized as instructed in the problem statement. All other conditions are the same except that the Crocco's relation has a slightly different form. In the following, after a brief sketch of the CE/SE method, the numerical results for this problem are presented.

  3. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  4. Lamb Wave-Based Acoustic Radiation Force-Driven Particle Ring Formation Inside a Sessile Droplet.

    PubMed

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Ha, Byunghang; Park, Jinsoo; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate an acoustofluidic device using Lamb waves (LWs) to manipulate polystyrene (PS) microparticles suspended in a sessile droplet of water. The LW-based acoustofluidic platform used in this study is advantageous in that the device is actuated over a range of frequencies without changing the device structure or electrode pattern. In addition, the device is simple to operate and cheap to fabricate. The LWs, produced on a piezoelectric substrate, attenuate inside the fluid and create acoustic streaming flow (ASF) in the form of a poloidal flow with toroidal vortices. The PS particles experience direct acoustic radiation force (ARF) in addition to being influenced by the ASF, which drive the concentration of particles to form a ring. This phenomenon was previously attributed to the ASF alone, but the present experimental results confirm that the ARF plays an important role in forming the particle ring, which would not be possible in the presence of only the ASF. We used a range of actuation frequencies (45-280 MHz), PS particle diameters (1-10 μm), and droplet volumes (5, 7.5, and 10 μL) to experimentally demonstrate this phenomenon. PMID:26937678

  5. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Allison; de Bever, Josh; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  6. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Allison; Bever, Josh de; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  7. Acoustic-radiation-force-induced shear wave propagation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard R.; Wolf, Patrick D.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2009-02-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) was employed to track acoustic radiation force (ARF)-induced shear waves in the myocardium of a beating heart. Shear waves were generated in and tracked through the myocardium of the left ventricular free wall (LVFW) in an in vivo heart that was exposed through a thoracotomy; matched studies were also preformed on an ex vivo myocardial specimen. Average shear wave velocities ranged from 2.22 to 2.53 m/s for the ex vivo specimen and 1.5 to 2.9 m/s (1.5-2.09 m/s during diastole; 2.9 m/s during systole) for in vivo specimens. Despite the known rotation of myocardial fiber orientation with tissue depth, there was no statistically significant shear wave velocity depth dependence observed in any of the experimental trials.

  8. Loss tangent and complex modulus estimated by acoustic radiation force creep and shear wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2012-03-01

    Elasticity imaging methods have been used to study tissue mechanical properties and have demonstrated that tissue elasticity changes with disease state. In current shear wave elasticity imaging methods typically only shear wave speed is measured and rheological models, e.g. Kelvin-Voigt, Maxwell and Standard Linear Solid, are used to solve for tissue mechanical properties such as the shear viscoelastic complex modulus. This paper presents a method to quantify viscoelastic material properties in a model-independent way by estimating the complex shear elastic modulus over a wide frequency range using time-dependent creep response induced by acoustic radiation force. This radiation force induced creep method uses a conversion formula that is the analytic solution of a constitutive equation. The proposed method in combination with shearwave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry is used to measure the complex modulus so that knowledge of the applied radiation force magnitude is not necessary. The conversion formula is shown to be sensitive to sampling frequency and the first reliable measure in time according to numerical simulations using the Kelvin-Voigt model creep strain and compliance. Representative model-free shear complex moduli from homogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms and one excised swine kidney were obtained. This work proposes a novel model-free ultrasound-based elasticity method that does not require a rheological model with associated fitting requirements.

  9. Loss tangent and complex modulus estimated by acoustic radiation force creep and shear wave dispersion.

    PubMed

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F

    2012-03-01

    Elasticity imaging methods have been used to study tissue mechanical properties and have demonstrated that tissue elasticity changes with disease state. In current shear wave elasticity imaging methods typically only shear wave speed is measured and rheological models, e.g. Kelvin-Voigt, Maxwell and Standard Linear Solid, are used to solve for tissue mechanical properties such as the shear viscoelastic complex modulus. This paper presents a method to quantify viscoelastic material properties in a model-independent way by estimating the complex shear elastic modulus over a wide frequency range using time-dependent creep response induced by acoustic radiation force. This radiation force induced creep method uses a conversion formula that is the analytic solution of a constitutive equation. The proposed method in combination with shearwave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry is used to measure the complex modulus so that knowledge of the applied radiation force magnitude is not necessary. The conversion formula is shown to be sensitive to sampling frequency and the first reliable measure in time according to numerical simulations using the Kelvin-Voigt model creep strain and compliance. Representative model-free shear complex moduli from homogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms and one excised swine kidney were obtained. This work proposes a novel model-free ultrasound-based elasticity method that does not require a rheological model with associated fitting requirements. PMID:22345425

  10. Loss tangent and complex modulus estimated by acoustic radiation force creep and shear wave dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F

    2012-01-01

    Elasticity imaging methods have been used to study tissue mechanical properties and have demonstrated that tissue elasticity changes with disease state. In current shear wave elasticity imaging methods typically only shear wave speed is measured and rheological models, e.g., Kelvin-Voigt, Maxwell and Standard Linear Solid, are used to solve for tissue mechanical properties such as the shear viscoelastic complex modulus. This paper presents a method to quantify viscoelastic material properties in a model-independent way by estimating the complex shear elastic modulus over a wide frequency range using time-dependent creep response induced by acoustic radiation force. This radiation force induced creep (RFIC) method uses a conversion formula that is the analytic solution of a constitutive equation. The proposed method in combination with Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) is used to measure the complex modulus so that knowledge of the applied radiation force magnitude is not necessary. The conversion formula is shown to be sensitive to sampling frequency and the first reliable measure in time according to numerical simulations using the Kelvin-Voigt model creep strain and compliance. Representative model-free shear complex moduli from homogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms and one excised swine kidney were obtained. This work proposes a novel model-free ultrasound-based elasticity method that does not require a rheological model with associated fitting requirements. PMID:22345425

  11. Image quality, tissue heating, and frame rate trade-offs in acoustic radiation force impulse imaging.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Richard R; Dahl, Jeremy J; Hsu, Stephen J; Palmeri, Mark L; Trahey, Gregg E

    2009-01-01

    The real-time application of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging requires both short acquisition times for a single ARFI image and repeated acquisition of these frames. Due to the high energy of pulses required to generate appreciable radiation force, however, repeated acquisitions could result in substantial transducer face and tissue heating. We describe and evaluate several novel beam sequencing schemes which, along with parallel-receive acquisition, are designed to reduce acquisition time and heating. These techniques reduce the total number of radiation force impulses needed to generate an image and minimize the time between successive impulses. We present qualitative and quantitative analyses of the trade-offs in image quality resulting from the acquisition schemes. Results indicate that these techniques yield a significant improvement in frame rate with only moderate decreases in image quality. Tissue and transducer face heating resulting from these schemes is assessed through finite element method modeling and thermocouple measurements. Results indicate that heating issues can be mitigated by employing ARFI acquisition sequences that utilize the highest track-to-excitation ratio possible. PMID:19213633

  12. Dust-acoustic waves and stability in the permeating dusty plasma. II. Power-law distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Jingyu; Du Jiulin; Liu Zhipeng

    2012-08-15

    The dust-acoustic waves and the stability theory for the permeating dusty plasma with power-law distributions are studied by using nonextensive q-statistics. In two limiting physical cases, when the thermal velocity of the flowing dusty plasma is much larger than, and much smaller than the phase velocity of the waves, we derived the dust-acoustic wave frequency, the instability growth rate, and the instability critical flowing velocity. As compared with the formulae obtained in part I [Gong et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 043704 (2012)], all formulae of the present cases and the resulting plasma characteristics are q-dependent, and the power-law distribution of each plasma component of the permeating dusty plasma has a different q-parameter and thus has a different nonextensive effect. Further, we make numerical analyses of an example that a cometary plasma tail is passing through the interplanetary space dusty plasma and we show that these power-law distributions have significant effects on the plasma characteristics of this kind of plasma environment.

  13. Concurrent Visualization of Acoustic Radiation Force Displacement and Shear Wave Propagation with 7T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Fite, Brett Z.; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Johnson, Sarah M.; Larrat, Benoit; Dumont, Erik; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2015-01-01

    Manual palpation is a common and very informative diagnostic tool based on estimation of changes in the stiffness of tissues that result from pathology. In the case of a small lesion or a lesion that is located deep within the body, it is difficult for changes in mechanical properties of tissue to be detected or evaluated via palpation. Furthermore, palpation is non-quantitative and cannot be used to localize the lesion. Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) can also be used to evaluate the properties of biological tissues non-invasively. In this study, an MRgFUS system combines high field (7T) MR and 3 MHz focused ultrasound to provide high resolution MR imaging and a small ultrasonic interrogation region (~0.5 x 0.5 x 2 mm), as compared with current clinical systems. MR-Acoustic Radiation Force Imaging (MR-ARFI) provides a reliable and efficient method for beam localization by detecting micron-scale displacements induced by ultrasound mechanical forces. The first aim of this study is to develop a sequence that can concurrently quantify acoustic radiation force displacements and image the resulting transient shear wave. Our motivation in combining these two measurements is to develop a technique that can rapidly provide both ARFI and shear wave velocity estimation data, making it suitable for use in interventional radiology. Secondly, we validate this sequence in vivo by estimating the displacement before and after high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation, and we validate the shear wave velocity in vitro using tissue-mimicking gelatin and tofu phantoms. Such rapid acquisitions are especially useful in interventional radiology applications where minimizing scan time is highly desirable. PMID:26439259

  14. Acoustic radiation force on a sphere in standing and quasi-standing zero-order Bessel beam tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2008-07-01

    Starting from the exact acoustic scattering from a sphere immersed in an ideal fluid and centered along the propagation axis of a standing or quasi-standing zero-order Bessel beam, explicit partial-wave representations for the radiation force are derived. A standing or a quasi-standing acoustic field is the result of propagating two equal or unequal amplitude zero-order Bessel beams, respectively, along the same axis but in opposite sense. The Bessel beam is characterized by the half-cone angle β of its plane wave components, such that β = 0 represents a plane wave. It is assumed here that the half-cone angle β for each of the counter-propagating acoustic Bessel beams is equal. Fluid, elastic and viscoelastic spheres immersed in water are treated as examples. Results indicate the capability of manipulating spherical targets based on their mechanical and acoustical properties. This condition provides an impetus for further designing acoustic tweezers operating with standing or quasi-standing Bessel acoustic waves. Potential applications include particle manipulation in micro-fluidic lab-on-chips as well as in reduced gravity environments.

  15. Nonlinear effects of flow unsteadiness on the acoustic radiation of a heaving airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manela, Avshalom

    2013-12-01

    The study considers the combined effects of boundary animation (small-amplitude heaving) and incoming flow unsteadiness (incident vorticity) on the vibroacoustic signature of a thin rigid airfoil in low-Mach number flow. The potential-flow problem is analysed using the Brown and Michael equation, yielding the incident vortex trajectory and time evolution of trailing edge wake. The dynamical description serves as an effective source term to evaluate the far-field sound using Powell-Howe analogy. The results identify the fluid-airfoil system as a dipole-type source, and demonstrate the significance of nonlinear eddy-airfoil interactions on the acoustic radiation. Based on the value of scaled heaving frequency ωa/U (with ω the dimensional heaving frequency, a the airfoil half-chord, and U the mean flow speed), the system behaviour can be divided into two characteristic regimes: (i) for ωa/U≪1, the effect of heaving is minor, and the acoustic response is well approximated by considering the interaction of a line vortex with a stationary airfoil; (ii) for ωa/U≫1, the impact of heaving is dominant, radiating sound through an “airfoil motion” dipole oriented along the direction of heaving. In between (for ωa/U~O(1)), an intermediate regime takes place. The results indicate that trailing edge vorticity has a two-fold impact on the acoustic far field: while reducing pressure fluctuations generated by incident vortex interaction with the airfoil, trailing edge vortices transmit sound along the mean-flow direction, characterized by airfoil heaving frequency. The “silencing” effect of trailing edge vorticity is particularly efficient when the incident vortex passes close to the airfoil trailing edge: at that time, application of the Kutta condition implies the release of a trailing edge vortex in the opposite direction to the incident vortex; the released vortex then detaches from the airfoil and follows the incident vortex, forming a “silent” vortex pair

  16. Vibroacoustics of the piano soundboard: Reduced models, mobility synthesis, and acoustical radiation regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutillon, Xavier; Ege, Kerem

    2013-09-01

    In string musical instruments, the sound is radiated by the soundboard, subject to the strings excitation. This vibration of this rather complex structure is described here with models which need only a small number of parameters. Predictions of the models are compared with the results of experiments that have been presented in Ege et al. [Vibroacoustics of the piano soundboard: (non)linearity and modal properties in the low- and mid-frequency ranges, Journal of Sound and Vibration 332 (5) (2013) 1288-1305]. The apparent modal density of the soundboard of an upright piano in playing condition, as seen from various points of the structure, exhibits two well-separated regimes, below and above a frequency flim that is determined by the wood characteristics and by the distance between ribs. Above flim, most modes appear to be localised, presumably due to the irregularity of the spacing and height of the ribs. The low-frequency regime is predicted by a model which consists of coupled sub-structures: the two ribbed areas split by the main bridge and, in most cases, one or two so-called cut-off corners. In order to assess the dynamical properties of each of the subplates (considered here as homogeneous plates), we propose a derivation of the (low-frequency) modal density of an orthotropic homogeneous plate which accounts for the boundary conditions on an arbitrary geometry. Above flim, the soundboard, as seen from a given excitation point, is modelled as a set of three structural wave-guides, namely the three inter-rib spacings surrounding the excitation point. Based on these low- and high-frequency models, computations of the point-mobility and of the apparent modal densities seen at several excitation points match published measurements. The dispersion curve of the wave-guide model displays an acoustical radiation scheme which differs significantly from that of a thin homogeneous plate. It appears that piano dimensioning is such that the subsonic regime of acoustical

  17. Ultrasonic power transfer from a spherical acoustic wave source to a free-free piezoelectric receiver: Modeling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-03-01

    Contactless powering of small electronic components has lately received growing attention for wireless applications in which battery replacement or tethered charging is undesired or simply impossible, and ambient energy harvesting is not a viable solution. As an alternative to well-studied methods of contactless energy transfer, such as the inductive coupling method, the use of ultrasonic waves transmitted and received by piezoelectric devices enables larger power transmission distances, which is critical especially for deep-implanted electronic devices. Moreover, energy transfer by means of acoustic waves is well suited in situations where no electromagnetic fields are allowed. The limited literature of ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer is mainly centered on proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this method, lacking experimentally validated modeling efforts for the resulting multiphysics problem that couples the source and receiver dynamics with domain acoustics. In this work, we present fully coupled analytical, numerical, and experimental multiphysics investigations for ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer from a spherical wave source to a piezoelectric receiver bar that operates in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity. The fluid-loaded piezoelectric receiver under free-free mechanical boundary conditions is shunted to an electrical load for quantifying the electrical power output for a given acoustic source strength of the transmitter. The analytical acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling framework is validated experimentally, and the effects of system parameters are reported along with optimal electrical loading and frequency conditions of the receiver.

  18. Ultrasonic power transfer from a spherical acoustic wave source to a free-free piezoelectric receiver: Modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-03-14

    Contactless powering of small electronic components has lately received growing attention for wireless applications in which battery replacement or tethered charging is undesired or simply impossible, and ambient energy harvesting is not a viable solution. As an alternative to well-studied methods of contactless energy transfer, such as the inductive coupling method, the use of ultrasonic waves transmitted and received by piezoelectric devices enables larger power transmission distances, which is critical especially for deep-implanted electronic devices. Moreover, energy transfer by means of acoustic waves is well suited in situations where no electromagnetic fields are allowed. The limited literature of ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer is mainly centered on proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this method, lacking experimentally validated modeling efforts for the resulting multiphysics problem that couples the source and receiver dynamics with domain acoustics. In this work, we present fully coupled analytical, numerical, and experimental multiphysics investigations for ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer from a spherical wave source to a piezoelectric receiver bar that operates in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity. The fluid-loaded piezoelectric receiver under free-free mechanical boundary conditions is shunted to an electrical load for quantifying the electrical power output for a given acoustic source strength of the transmitter. The analytical acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling framework is validated experimentally, and the effects of system parameters are reported along with optimal electrical loading and frequency conditions of the receiver.

  19. Development of Lightweight Radiators for Lunar Based Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Bloomfield, Harvey S.

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses application of a new lightweight carbon-carbon (C-C) space radiator technology developed under the NASA Civil-Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) High Capacity Power Program to a 20 kWe lunar based power system. This system comprises a nuclear (SP-100 derivative) heat source, a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) power conversion unit with heat rejection by means of a plane radiator. The new radiator concept is based on a C-C composite heat pipe with integrally woven fins and a thin walled metallic liner for containment of the working fluid. Using measured areal specific mass values (1.5 kg/m2) for flat plate radiators, comparative CBC power system mass and performance calculations show significant advantages if conventional heat pipes for space radiators are replaced by the new C-C heat pipe technology.

  20. A Correlated Study of the Response of a Satellite to Acoustic Radiation Using Statistical Energy Analysis and Acoustic Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    CAP,JEROME S.; TRACEY,BRIAN

    1999-11-15

    Aerospace payloads, such as satellites, are subjected to vibroacoustic excitation during launch. Sandia's MTI satellite has recently been certified to this environment using a combination of base input random vibration and reverberant acoustic noise. The initial choices for the acoustic and random vibration test specifications were obtained from the launch vehicle Interface Control Document (ICD). In order to tailor the random vibration levels for the laboratory certification testing, it was necessary to determine whether vibration energy was flowing across the launch vehicle interface from the satellite to the launch vehicle or the other direction. For frequencies below 120 Hz this issue was addressed using response limiting techniques based on results from the Coupled Loads Analysis (CLA). However, since the CLA Finite Element Analysis FEA model was only correlated for frequencies below 120 Hz, Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) was considered to be a better choice for predicting the direction of the energy flow for frequencies above 120 Hz. The existing SEA model of the launch vehicle had been developed using the VibroAcoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) computer code [1]. Therefore, the satellite would have to be modeled using VAPEPS as well. As is the case for any computational model, the confidence in its predictive capability increases if one can correlate a sample prediction against experimental data. Fortunately, Sandia had the ideal data set for correlating an SEA model of the MTI satellite--the measured response of a realistic assembly to a reverberant acoustic test that was performed during MTI's qualification test series. The first part of this paper will briefly describe the VAPEPS modeling effort and present the results of the correlation study for the VAPEPS model. The second part of this paper will present the results from a study that used a commercial SEA software package [2] to study the effects of in-plane modes and to

  1. Monitoring Thermal Fatigue Damage In Nuclear Power Plant Materials Using Acoustic Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Pitman, Stan G.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-04-26

    Proactive aging management of nuclear power plant passive components requires technologies to enable monitoring and accurate quantification of material condition at early stages of degradation (i.e., pre-macrocrack). Acoustic emission (AE) is well-suited to continuous monitoring of component degradation and is proposed as a method to monitor degradation during accelerated thermal fatigue tests. A key consideration is the ability to separate degradation responses from external sources such as water spray induced during thermal fatigue testing. Water spray provides a significant background of acoustic signals, which can overwhelm AE signals caused by degradation. Analysis of AE signal frequency and energy is proposed in this work as a means for separating degradation signals from background sources. Encouraging results were obtained by applying both frequency and energy filters to preliminary data. The analysis of signals filtered using frequency and energy provides signatures exhibiting several characteristics that are consistent with degradation accumulation in materials. Future work is planned to enable verification of the efficacy of AE for thermal fatigue crack initiation detection. While the emphasis has been placed on the use of AE for crack initiation detection during accelerated aging tests, this work also has implications with respect to the use of AE as a primary tool for early degradation monitoring in nuclear power plant materials. The development of NDE tools for characterization of aging in materials can also benefit from the use of a technology such as AE which can continuously monitor and detect crack initiation during accelerated aging tests.

  2. Convergence of intense aerial acoustic waves radiated by a rectangular transverse vibrating plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Tomoki; Asami, Takuya; Miura, Hikaru

    2016-07-01

    A stripe-mode rectangular transverse vibrating plate can be used as a sound source that emits intense ultrasonic waves in air by placing a jut driving point outside the vibrating plate. The aim of this research was to use this vibrating plate to focus sound waves in the direction perpendicular to the nodal lines of the vibrating plate, which differs from the conventional direction. In this study, we investigated new methods for focusing the emitted sound waves by arranging reflective plates around the vibrating plate, using a design equation for each node between nodes in the vibrating plate, and placing additional reflective plates at an outer position beyond the convergence point, and found that a powerful acoustic field can be formed at an arbitrary position.

  3. Acoustic radiation force due to a diverging wave: Demonstration and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardo, Bruce C.; Freemyers, Stanley G.; Schock, Michael P.; Sundem, Scott T.

    2014-02-01

    A radiation force is the time-averaged force exerted by any kind of wave on a body. In the case of a divergent traveling acoustic wave, it is known that a relatively small rigid body can experience a radiation force that is directed toward the source. We show that this effect can be readily demonstrated with a styrofoam sphere pendulum near a horizontally directed loudspeaker that is emitting sound of sufficiently high amplitude and low frequency. The attraction is surprising because repulsive forces are exerted by a traveling plane wave and by an outward jetting or "wind" from the loudspeaker. We argue that the attractive force near a source that is small compared to the wavelength can be roughly understood and calculated as a time-averaged Bernoulli effect, if scattering is ignored. The result is within a factor of two of rigorous published results based on scattering calculations, when these results are specialized to the case of a rigid body whose average density is much greater than the density of the fluid. However, repulsion occurs when the average density of the body is less than the density of the fluid, in which case our Bernoulli result completely fails.

  4. Imaging the position-dependent 3D force on microbeads subjected to acoustic radiation forces and streaming.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Andreas; Lakämper, Stefan; Baasch, Thierry; Schaap, Iwan A T; Dual, Jurg

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic particle manipulation in microfluidic channels is becoming a powerful tool in microfluidics to control micrometer sized objects in medical, chemical and biological applications. By creating a standing acoustic wave in the channel, the resulting pressure field can be employed to trap or sort particles. To design efficient and reproducible devices, it is important to characterize the pressure field throughout the volume of the microfluidic device. Here, we used an optically trapped particle as probe to measure the forces in all three dimensions. By moving the probe through the volume of the channel, we imaged spatial variations in the pressure field. In the direction of the standing wave this revealed a periodic energy landscape for 2 μm beads, resulting in an effective stiffness of 2.6 nN m(-1) for the acoustic trap. We found that multiple fabricated devices showed consistent pressure fields. Surprisingly, forces perpendicular to the direction of the standing wave reached values of up to 20% of the main-axis-values. To separate the direct acoustic force from secondary effects, we performed experiments with different bead sizes, which attributed some of the perpendicular forces to acoustic streaming. This method to image acoustically generated forces in 3D can be used to either minimize perpendicular forces or to employ them for specific applications in novel acoustofluidic designs. PMID:27302661

  5. Shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave phononic device with high density filling material for ultra-low power sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M.; Bhethanabotla, V. R.; Sankaranarayanan, S. K. R. S.

    2014-06-23

    Finite element simulations of a phononic shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor based on ST 90°-X Quartz reveal a dramatic reduction in power consumption. The phononic sensor is realized by artificially structuring the delay path to form an acoustic meta-material comprised of a periodic microcavity array incorporating high-density materials such as tantalum or tungsten. Constructive interference of the scattered and secondary reflected waves at every microcavity interface leads to acoustic energy confinement in the high-density regions translating into reduced power loss. Tantalum filled cavities show the best performance while tungsten inclusions create a phononic bandgap. Based on our simulation results, SAW devices with tantalum filled microcavities were fabricated and shown to significantly decrease insertion loss. Our findings offer encouraging prospects for designing low power, highly sensitive portable biosensors.

  6. Direct opto-acoustic in vitro measurement of the spatial distribution of laser radiation in biological media

    SciTech Connect

    Pelivanov, Ivan M; Belov, Sergej A; Solomatin, Vladimir S; Khokhlova, Tanya D; Karabutov, Aleksander A

    2006-12-31

    The problem of opto-acoustic (AO) diagnostics of light scattering and absorption in biological media is considered. The objects under study were milk, bovine and porcine liver, and bovine muscle tissue. The forward and backward schemes for recording acoustic signals were used in experiments. The spatial distribution of the light intensity was measured for each biological medium from the temporal profile of the excited OA pulse and the absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient were determined. Opto-acoustic signals were excited by a 1064-nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser and a tunable Ti:sapphire laser at 779 nm. It is shown that the proposed method can be used for obtaining a priori information on a biological medium in problems of optical and AO tomography. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  7. Toward Standardized Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF)-Based Ultrasound Elasticity Measurements With Robotic Force Control

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shalki; Lily, Kuo; Sen, H. Tutkun; Iordachita, Iulian; Kazanzides, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acoustic radiation force (ARF)-based approaches to measure tissue elasticity require transmission of a focused high-energy acoustic pulse from a stationary ultrasound probe and ultrasound-based tracking of the resulting tissue displacements to obtain stiffness images or shear wave speed estimates. The method has established benefits in biomedical applications such as tumor detection and tissue fibrosis staging. One limitation, however, is the dependence on applied probe pressure, which is difficult to control manually and prohibits standardization of quantitative measurements. To overcome this limitation, we built a robot prototype that controls probe contact forces for shear wave speed quantification. Methods The robot was evaluated with controlled force increments applied to a tissue-mimicking phantom and in vivo abdominal tissue from three human volunteers. Results The root-mean-square error between the desired and measured forces was 0.07 N in the phantom and higher for the fatty layer of in vivo abdominal tissue. The mean shear wave speeds increased from 3.7 to 4.5 m/s in the phantom and 1.0 to 3.0 m/s in the in vivo fat for compressive forces ranging from 2.5 to 30 N. The standard deviation of shear wave speeds obtained with the robotic approach were low in most cases (< 0.2 m/s) and comparable to that obtained with a semiquantitative landmark-based method. Conclusion Results are promising for the introduction of robotic systems to control the applied probe pressure for ARF-based measurements of tissue elasticity. Significance This approach has potential benefits in longitudinal studies of disease progression, comparative studies between patients, and large-scale multidimensional elasticity imaging. PMID:26552071

  8. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-02: Exploring Radiation Acoustics CT Dosimeter Design Aspects for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Alsanea, F; Moskvin, V; Stantz, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Investigate the design aspects and imaging dose capabilities of the Radiation Acoustics Computed Tomography (RA CT) dosimeter for Proton induced acoustics, with the objective to characterize a pulsed pencil proton beam. The focus includes scanner geometry, transducer array, and transducer bandwidth on image quality. Methods: The geometry of the dosimeter is a cylindrical water phantom (length 40cm, radius 15cm) with 71 ultrasound transducers placed along the length and end of the cylinder to achieve a weighted set of projections with spherical sampling. A 3D filtered backprojection algorithm was used to reconstruct the dosimetric images and compared to MC dose distribution. First, 3D Monte Carlo (MC) Dose distributions for proton beam energies (range of 12cm, 16cm, 20cm, and 27cm) were used to simulate the acoustic pressure signal within this scanner for a pulsed proton beam of 1.8x107 protons, with a pulse width of 1 microsecond and a rise time of 0.1 microseconds. Dose comparison within the Bragg peak and distal edge were compared to MC analysis, where the integrated Gaussian was used to locate the 50% dose of the distal edge. To evaluate spatial fidelity, a set of point sources within the scanner field of view (15×15×15cm3) were simulated implementing a low-pass bandwidth response function (0 to 1MHz) equivalent to a multiple frequency transducer array, and the FWHM of the point-spread-function determined. Results: From the reconstructed images, RACT and MC range values are within 0.5mm, and the average variation of the dose within the Bragg peak are within 2%. The spatial resolution tracked with transducer bandwidth and projection angle sampling, and can be kept at 1.5mm. Conclusion: This design is ready for fabrication to start acquiring measurements. The 15 cm FOV is an optimum size for imaging dosimetry. Currently, simulations comparing transducer sensitivity, bandwidth, and proton beam parameters are being evaluated to assess signal-to-noise.

  9. Radiation Specifications for Fission Power Conversion Component Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Shin, E. Eugene; Mireles, Omar R.; Radel, Ross F.; Qualls, A. Louis

    2011-01-01

    NASA has been supporting design studies and technology development that could provide power to an outpost on the moon, Mars, or an asteroid. One power-generation system that is independent of sunlight or power-storage limitations is a fission-based power plant. There is a wealth of terrestrial system heritage that can be transferred to the design and fabrication of a fission power system for space missions, but there are certain design aspects that require qualification. The radiation tolerance of the power conversion system requires scrutiny because the compact nature of a space power plant restricts the dose reduction methodologies compared to those used in terrestrial systems. An integrated research program has been conducted to establish the radiation tolerance of power conversion system-component materials. The radiation limit specifications proposed for a Fission Power System power convertor is 10 Mrad ionizing dose and 5 x 10(exp 14) neutron per square centimeter fluence for a convertor operating at 150 C. Specific component materials and their radiation tolerances are discussed. This assessment is for the power convertor hardware; electronic components are not covered here.

  10. Evaluating the intensity of the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) in intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging: Preliminary in vitro results.

    PubMed

    Shih, Cho-Chiang; Lai, Ting-Yu; Huang, Chih-Chung

    2016-08-01

    The ability to measure the elastic properties of plaques and vessels is significant in clinical diagnosis, particularly for detecting a vulnerable plaque. A novel concept of combining intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging has recently been proposed. This method has potential in elastography for distinguishing between the stiffness of plaques and arterial vessel walls. However, the intensity of the acoustic radiation force requires calibration as a standard for the further development of an ARFI-IVUS imaging device that could be used in clinical applications. In this study, a dual-frequency transducer with 11MHz and 48MHz was used to measure the association between the biological tissue displacement and the applied acoustic radiation force. The output intensity of the acoustic radiation force generated by the pushing element ranged from 1.8 to 57.9mW/cm(2), as measured using a calibrated hydrophone. The results reveal that all of the acoustic intensities produced by the transducer in the experiments were within the limits specified by FDA regulations and could still displace the biological tissues. Furthermore, blood clots with different hematocrits, which have elastic properties similar to the lipid pool of plaques, with stiffness ranging from 0.5 to 1.9kPa could be displaced from 1 to 4μm, whereas the porcine arteries with stiffness ranging from 120 to 291kPa were displaced from 0.4 to 1.3μm when an acoustic intensity of 57.9mW/cm(2) was used. The in vitro ARFI images of the artery with a blood clot and artificial arteriosclerosis showed a clear distinction of the stiffness distributions of the vessel wall. All the results reveal that ARFI-IVUS imaging has the potential to distinguish the elastic properties of plaques and vessels. Moreover, the acoustic intensity used in ARFI imaging has been experimentally quantified. Although the size of this two-element transducer is unsuitable for IVUS imaging, the

  11. Iterative solution of multiple radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics using the BL-QMR algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, M.

    1996-12-31

    Finite-element discretizations of time-harmonic acoustic wave problems in exterior domains result in large sparse systems of linear equations with complex symmetric coefficient matrices. In many situations, these matrix problems need to be solved repeatedly for different right-hand sides, but with the same coefficient matrix. For instance, multiple right-hand sides arise in radiation problems due to multiple load cases, and also in scattering problems when multiple angles of incidence of an incoming plane wave need to be considered. In this talk, we discuss the iterative solution of multiple linear systems arising in radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics by means of a complex symmetric variant of the BL-QMR method. First, we summarize the governing partial differential equations for time-harmonic structural acoustics, the finite-element discretization of these equations, and the resulting complex symmetric matrix problem. Next, we sketch the special version of BL-QMR method that exploits complex symmetry, and we describe the preconditioners we have used in conjunction with BL-QMR. Finally, we report some typical results of our extensive numerical tests to illustrate the typical convergence behavior of BL-QMR method for multiple radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics, to identify appropriate preconditioners for these problems, and to demonstrate the importance of deflation in block Krylov-subspace methods. Our numerical results show that the multiple systems arising in structural acoustics can be solved very efficiently with the preconditioned BL-QMR method. In fact, for multiple systems with up to 40 and more different right-hand sides we get consistent and significant speed-ups over solving the systems individually.

  12. The peak electromagnetic power radiated by lightning return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.; Guo, C.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates of the peak electromagnetic (EM) power radiated by return strokes have been made by integrating the Poynting vector of measured fields over an imaginary hemispherical surface that is centered on the lightning source, assuming that ground losses are negligible. Values of the peak EM power from first and subsequent strokes have means and standard deviations of 2 + or - 2 x 10 to the 10th and 3 + or - 4 x 10 to the 9th W, respectively. The average EM power that is radiated by subsequent strokes, at the time of the field peak, is about 2 orders of magnitude larger than the optical power that is radiated by these strokes in the wavelength interval from 0.4 to 1.1 micron; hence an upper limit to the radiative efficiency of a subsequent stroke is of the order of 1 percent or less at this time.

  13. Radiator selection for Space Station Solar Dynamic Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Mike; Hoehn, Frank

    A study was conducted to define the best radiator for heat rejection of the Space Station Solar Dynamic Power System. Included in the study were radiators for both the Organic Rankine Cycle and Closed Brayton Cycle heat engines. A number of potential approaches were considered for the Organic Rankine Cycle and a constructable radiator was chosen. Detailed optimizations of this concept were conducted resulting in a baseline for inclusion into the ORC Preliminary Design. A number of approaches were also considered for the CBC radiator. For this application a deployed pumped liquid radiator was selected which was also refined resulting in a baseline for the CBC preliminary design. This paper reports the results and methodology of these studies and describes the preliminary designs of the Space Station Solar Dynamic Power System radiators for both of the candidate heat engine cycles.

  14. Acoustic waveguide technique for sensing incipient faults in underground power-transmission cables: including acousto-optic techniques. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harrold, R.T.

    1981-09-01

    The feasibility of using acoustic waveguide techniques for sensing incipient faults in underground power transmission cables was determined. Theoretical and practical studies were made of both the acoustic emission spectrum signatures associated with cable incipient faults, and the attenuation of acoustic waves in waterfilled metal tubes used as waveguides. Based on critical data, it can be estimated that in favorable circumstances, the acoustic waveguide system would only be useful for sensing incipient faults in underground cables of approx. 800 meters (approx. 0.5 miles) or less in length. As underground power transmission cables are often several kilometers in length, it was clear at this stage of the study, that simple acoustic waveguide sensing techniques would not be adequate, and some modification would be needed. With DOE approval it was decided to investigate acousto-optic sensing techniques in order to extend the detection range. In particular, a system in which acoustic emissions from cable incipient faults impinge on a fiber-optic lightguide and locally change its refractive indes, and as a consequence, modulate laser light transmitted along the light guide. Experiments based on this concept were successful, and it has been demonstrated that it is possible to sense acoustic emissions with energy levels below one micro-joule. A practical test of this system in the laboratory using a section of compressed gas-insulated cable with an internal flashover was successfully carried out. Long distance fault sensing with this technique should be feasible as laser light can be transmitted several kilometers in fiber optic lightguides. It is believed that laser-acousto-optic fault sensing is a viable technique which, with development, could be applied for fault sensing in power cables and other apparatus.

  15. Violin f-hole contribution to far-field radiation via patch near-field acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George; Williams, Earl G; Valdivia, Nicolas

    2007-06-01

    The violin radiates either from dual ports (f-holes) or via surface motion of the corpus (top+ribs+back), with no clear delineation between these sources. Combining "patch" near-field acoustical holography over just the f-hole region of a violin with far-field radiativity measurements over a sphere, it was possible to separate f-hole from surface motion contributions to the total radiation of the corpus below 2.6 kHz. A0, the Helmholtz-like lowest cavity resonance, radiated essentially entirely through the f-holes as expected while A1, the first longitudinal cavity mode with a node at the f-holes, had no significant f-hole radiation. The observed A1 radiation comes from an indirect radiation mechanism, induced corpus motion approximately mirroring the cavity pressure profile seen for violinlike bowed string instruments across a wide range of sizes. The first estimates of the fraction of radiation from the f-holes F(f) indicate that some low frequency corpus modes thought to radiate only via surface motion (notably the first corpus bending modes) had significant radiation through the f-holes, in agreement with net volume changes estimated from experimental modal analysis. F(f) generally trended lower with increasing frequency, following corpus mobility decreases. The f-hole directivity (top/back radiativity ratio) was generally higher than whole-violin directivity. PMID:17552736

  16. Code for Analyzing and Designing Spacecraft Power System Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert

    2005-01-01

    GPHRAD is a computer code for analysis and design of disk or circular-sector heat-rejecting radiators for spacecraft power systems. A specific application is for Stirling-cycle/linear-alternator electric-power systems coupled to radioisotope general-purpose heat sources. GPHRAD affords capabilities and options to account for thermophysical properties (thermal conductivity, density) of either metal-alloy or composite radiator materials.

  17. Is natural background or radiation from nuclear power plants leukemogenic

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1989-01-01

    The objective in this review is to provide some facts about normal hemopoietic cell proliferation relevant to leukemogenesis, physical, chemical, and biological facts about radiation effects with the hope that each person will be able to decide for themselves whether background radiation or emissions from nuclear power plants and facilities significantly add to the spontaneous leukemia incidence. 23 refs., 1 tab.

  18. CMOS Ultra Low Power Radiation Tolerant (CULPRiT) Microelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Penshu; Maki, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Space Electronics needs Radiation Tolerance or hardness to withstand the harsh space environment: high-energy particles can change the state of the electronics or puncture transistors making them disfunctional. This viewgraph document reviews the use of CMOS Ultra Low Power Radiation Tolerant circuits for NASA's electronic requirements.

  19. Baryon acoustic oscillations in 2D: Modeling redshift-space power spectrum from perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Taruya, Atsushi; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Saito, Shun

    2010-09-15

    We present an improved prescription for the matter power spectrum in redshift space taking proper account of both nonlinear gravitational clustering and redshift distortion, which are of particular importance for accurately modeling baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs). Contrary to the models of redshift distortion phenomenologically introduced but frequently used in the literature, the new model includes the corrections arising from the nonlinear coupling between the density and velocity fields associated with two competitive effects of redshift distortion, i.e., Kaiser and Finger-of-God effects. Based on the improved treatment of perturbation theory for gravitational clustering, we compare our model predictions with the monopole and quadrupole power spectra of N-body simulations, and an excellent agreement is achieved over the scales of BAOs. Potential impacts on constraining dark energy and modified gravity from the redshift-space power spectrum are also investigated based on the Fisher-matrix formalism, particularly focusing on the measurements of the Hubble parameter, angular diameter distance, and growth rate for structure formation. We find that the existing phenomenological models of redshift distortion produce a systematic error on measurements of the angular diameter distance and Hubble parameter by 1%-2%, and the growth-rate parameter by {approx}5%, which would become non-negligible for future galaxy surveys. Correctly modeling redshift distortion is thus essential, and the new prescription for the redshift-space power spectrum including the nonlinear corrections can be used as an accurate theoretical template for anisotropic BAOs.

  20. Computer and laboratory modeling of radiation-acoustic detector for charged particles pulse beams and plasma parameters measuring

    SciTech Connect

    Kresnin, Yu.A.; Stervoedov, N.G.

    1996-12-31

    Model investigations and laboratory tests of detectors for charged particles pulse beams and plasma parameters measuring are presented. Detector represents combination of classic Faraday cup with electrical way of signal getting and radiation-acoustic meter of pulse beams parameters. Radiation-acoustic meter consists of two parts--thin detector, transparent for beams of high energy particles, and thick detector with full absorption. Ultrasonic oscillations, which arise during interaction of charged particles pulse beams or plasma with detector material, are transformed by piezoelectric detector into electric signals, whose amplitude-frequency and time characteristics functionally depended on beams parameters. All the signals come into microcontroller device Intel MSC51. This device produces calculations of following beam parameters: average energy, pulse charge, pulse currents, density, beam size and pulse time. Calculated characteristics of meter well coincide with experimental measurements, carried out at accelerators in particles energy range from 1 to 100 Mev.

  1. Inverse problem of nonlinear acoustics: Synthesizing intense signals to intensify the thermal and radiation action of ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Gurbatov, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    Inverse problems of nonlinear acoustics have important applied significance. On the one hand, they are necessary for nonlinear diagnostics of media, materials, manufactured articles, building units, and biological and geological structures. On the other hand, they are needed for creating devices that ensure optimal action of acoustic radiation on a target. However, despite the many promising applications, this direction remains underdeveloped, especially for strongly distorted high-intensity waves containing shock fronts. An example of such an inverse problem is synthesis of the spatiotemporal structure of a field in a radiating system that ensures the highest possible energy density in the focal region. This problem is also related to the urgent problems of localizing wave energy and the theory of strongly nonlinear waves. Below we analyze some quite general and simple inverse nonlinear problems.

  2. Benthic microbial fuel cell as direct power source for an acoustic modem and seawater oxygen/temperature sensor system.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yanming; Radachowsky, Sage E; Wolf, Michael; Nielsen, Mark E; Girguis, Peter R; Reimers, Clare E

    2011-06-01

    Supported by the natural potential difference between anoxic sediment and oxic seawater, benthic microbial fuel cells (BMFCs) promise to be ideal power sources for certain low-power marine sensors and communication devices. In this study a chambered BMFC with a 0.25 m(2) footprint was used to power an acoustic modem interfaced with an oceanographic sensor that measures dissolved oxygen and temperature. The experiment was conducted in Yaquina Bay, Oregon over 50 days. Several improvements were made in the BMFC design and power management system based on lessons learned from earlier prototypes. The energy was harvested by a dynamic gain charge pump circuit that maintains a desired point on the BMFC's power curve and stores the energy in a 200 F supercapacitor. The system also used an ultralow power microcontroller and quartz clock to read the oxygen/temperature sensor hourly, store data with a time stamp, and perform daily polarizations. Data records were transmitted to the surface by the acoustic modem every 1-5 days after receiving an acoustic prompt from a surface hydrophone. After jump-starting energy production with supplemental macroalgae placed in the BMFC's anode chamber, the average power density of the BMFC adjusted to 44 mW/m(2) of seafloor area which is better than past demonstrations at this site. The highest power density was 158 mW/m(2), and the useful energy produced and stored was ≥ 1.7 times the energy required to operate the system. PMID:21545151

  3. Acoustic field modeling for physiotherapy ultrasound applicators by using approximated functions of measured non-uniform radiation distributions.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Mario Ibrahín; Calás, Héctor; Ramos, Antonio; Vera, Arturo; Leija, Lorenzo

    2012-08-01

    The strongest therapeutic effects in ultrasonic physiotherapy are mainly produced at the first centimeters, i.e. close to the applicator surface and, in general, only in the near-field zone. The acoustic field produced in practice by this type of transducers differs from the classical models because the vibration distribution on the real transducer surfaces is non-uniform. However, neither models using uniform distribution, nor those using typical non-uniform distribution patterns for the source accurately represent the radiation of this kind of transducers. Although this therapy is widely used and many efforts have been made in experimentally studying the patterns of ultrasound radiation produced during physiotherapy applications (IEC-61689, 1998), additional modeling researches still would be needed in order to achieve improved models giving field patterns closer to the measured ultrasonic results. In this paper, acoustic patterns produced from two source radiation functions are proposed and evaluated for field modeling of physiotherapy applicators. Both the functions are approximations to the pressure distribution measured close to the emitting surface and they are based on the modulation of the classical simply-supported function using either sinusoidal or Bessel-type distributions. The simply-supported function is accounted for the radiator-fixing condition and the modulation function simulates the complex vibration distribution of this kind of transducer. The modulator Bessel function is based on reports about Bessel-type vibration distributions found in piezoelectric disk resonators. The use of a selected sinusoidal segment represents another analytical option for obtaining an approximated behavior of the measured data in a real applicator. Both the field models are implemented using the finite element method (FEM) to obtain the numerical solution of wave equation at each point in the radiated space. The solution is reached by considering axisymmetric

  4. Evidence of Longitudinal Acoustic Phonon Generation in Si Doping Superlattices by Ge Prism-Coupled THz Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, T.; Kasper, E.; Oehme, M.; Schulze, J.; Korolev, K.

    2014-11-01

    We report on the direct excitation of 246 GHz longitudinal acoustic phonons in silicon doping superlattices by the resonant absorption of nanosecond-pulsed far-infrared laser radiation of the same frequency. A longitudinally polarized evanescent laser light field is coupled to the superlattice through a germanium prism providing total internal reflection at the superlattice interface. The ballistic phonon signal is detected by a superconducting aluminum bolometer. The sample is immersed in low-temperature liquid helium.

  5. Simulation of Acoustic Noise Generated by an Airbreathing, Beam-Powered Launch Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, W. C.; Van Laak, P.; Scarton, H. A.; Myrabo, L. N.

    2005-04-01

    A simple acoustic model is developed for predicting the noise signature vs. power level for advanced laser-propelled lightcraft — capable of single-stage flights into low Earth orbit. This model predicts the noise levels generated by a pulsed detonation engine (PDE) during the initial lift-off and acceleration phase, for two representative `tractor-beam' lightcraft designs: a 1-place `Mercury' vehicle (2.5-m diameter, 900-kg); and a larger 5-place `Apollo' vehicle (5-m diameter, 5555-kg) — both the subject of an earlier study. The use of digital techniques to simulate the expected PDE noise signature is discussed, and three examples of fly-by noise signatures are presented. The reduction, or complete elimination of perceptible noise from such engines, can be accomplished by shifting the pulse frequency into the supra-audible or sub-audible range.

  6. Acoustic radiation force impulse elastography for hepatocellular carcinoma-associated radiofrequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hee-Jin; Kang, Myong-Jin; Cho, Jin-Han; Oh, Jong-Young; Nam, Kyung-Jin; Han, Sang-Yeong; Lee, Sung Wook

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the potential usefulness of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) images for evaluation of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC)-associated radiofrequency ablation. METHODS: From January 2010 to June 2010, a total of 38 patients with HCC including recurred HCCs after RFA underwent ARFI elastography. The brightness of tumor was checked and the shear wave velocity was measured for the quantification of stiffness. According to the brightness, the tumors were classified as brighter, same color and darker compared with adjacent parenchyma. Using the same methods, 8 patients with recurred HCCs after RFA state were evaluated about the brightness compared with adjacent RFA ablation area. RESULTS: In the 38 patients with HCCs, 20 (52.6%) were brighter than surrounding cirrhotic parenchyma. Another 13 (34.2%) were darker. The others (5 cases, 13.2%) were seen as the same color as the adjacent liver parenchyma. Post-RFA lesions were darker than previous tumor and surrounding parenchyma in all 38 cases. However, recurred HCCs were brighter than the treated site in all 8 cases. CONCLUSION: Using ARFI technique is helpful for differential diagnosis in order to detect recurred HCCs more easily in patients with confusing status. PMID:21528062

  7. Testicular microlithiasis and preliminary experience of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Osther, Palle Jørn Sloth; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Elastography of the testis can be used as a part of multiparametric examination of the scrotum. Purpose To determine the testicular stiffness using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) technique in men with testicular microlithiasis (TML). Material and Methods In 2013, 12 patients with diagnosed testicular microlithiasis in 2008 (mean age, 51 years; age range, 25–76 years) underwent a 5-year follow-up B-mode ultrasonography with three ARFI elastography measurements of each testis. We used a Siemens Acuson S3000 machine. Results No malignancy was found at the 5-year follow-up B-mode and elastography in 2013. However, we found an increase in TML; in the previous ultrasonography in 2008, eight men had bilateral TML, whereas in 2013, 10 men were diagnosed with bilateral TML. The mean elasticity of testicles with TML was 0.82 m/s (interquartile range [IQR], 0.72–0.88 m/s; range, 65–1.08 m/s). Conclusion Elastography velocity of testis with TML seems to be in the same velocity range as in men with normal testis tissue. PMID:27504193

  8. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging of zebrafish embryo by high-frequency coded excitation sequence.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinhyoung; Lee, Jungwoo; Lau, Sien Ting; Lee, Changyang; Huang, Ying; Lien, Ching-Ling; Kirk Shung, K

    2012-04-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging has been developed as a non-invasive method for quantitative illustration of tissue stiffness or displacement. Conventional ARFI imaging (2-10 MHz) has been implemented in commercial scanners for illustrating elastic properties of several organs. The image resolution, however, is too coarse to study mechanical properties of micro-sized objects such as cells. This article thus presents a high-frequency coded excitation ARFI technique, with the ultimate goal of displaying elastic characteristics of cellular structures. Tissue mimicking phantoms and zebrafish embryos are imaged with a 100-MHz lithium niobate (LiNbO₃) transducer, by cross-correlating tracked RF echoes with the reference. The phantom results show that the contrast of ARFI image (14 dB) with coded excitation is better than that of the conventional ARFI image (9 dB). The depths of penetration are 2.6 and 2.2 mm, respectively. The stiffness data of the zebrafish demonstrate that the envelope is harder than the embryo region. The temporal displacement change at the embryo and the chorion is as large as 36 and 3.6 μm. Consequently, this high-frequency ARFI approach may serve as a remote palpation imaging tool that reveals viscoelastic properties of small biological samples. PMID:22101757

  9. Study on the radial vibration and acoustic field of an isotropic circular ring radiator.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuyu; Xu, Long

    2012-01-01

    Based on the exact analytical theory, the radial vibration of an isotropic circular ring is studied and its electro-mechanical equivalent circuit is obtained. By means of the equivalent circuit model, the resonance frequency equation is derived; the relationship between the radial resonance frequency, the radial displacement amplitude magnification and the geometrical dimensions, the material property is analyzed. For comparison, numerical method is used to simulate the radial vibration of isotropic circular rings. The resonance frequency and the radial vibrational displacement distribution are obtained, and the radial radiation acoustic field of the circular ring in radial vibration is simulated. It is illustrated that the radial resonance frequencies from the analytical method and the numerical method are in good agreement when the height is much less than the radius. When the height becomes large relative to the radius, the frequency deviation from the two methods becomes large. The reason is that the exact analytical theory is limited to thin circular ring whose height must be much less than its radius. PMID:21802702

  10. Optical tracking of acoustic radiation force impulse-induced dynamics in a tissue-mimicking phantom

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Richard R.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Streeter, Jason E.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Optical tracking was utilized to investigate the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI)-induced response, generated by a 5-MHz piston transducer, in a translucent tissue-mimicking phantom. Suspended 10-μm microspheres were tracked axially and laterally at multiple locations throughout the field of view of an optical microscope with 0.5-μm displacement resolution, in both dimensions, and at frame rates of up to 36 kHz. Induced dynamics were successfully captured before, during, and after the ARFI excitation at depths of up to 4.8 mm from the phantom’s proximal boundary. Results are presented for tracked axial and lateral displacements resulting from on-axis and off-axis (i.e., shear wave) acquisitions; these results are compared to matched finite element method modeling and independent ultrasonically based empirical results and yielded reasonable agreement in most cases. A shear wave reflection, generated by the proximal boundary, consistently produced an artifact in tracked displacement data later in time (i.e., after the initial ARFI-induced displacement peak). This tracking method provides high-frame-rate, two-dimensional tracking data and thus could prove useful in the investigation of complex ARFI-induced dynamics in controlled experimental settings. PMID:19894849

  11. Burton-Miller-type singular boundary method for acoustic radiation and scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhuo-Jia; Chen, Wen; Gu, Yan

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes the singular boundary method (SBM) in conjunction with Burton and Miller's formulation for acoustic radiation and scattering. The SBM is a strong-form collocation boundary discretization technique using the singular fundamental solutions, which is mathematically simple, easy-to-program, meshless and introduces the concept of source intensity factors (SIFs) to eliminate the singularities of the fundamental solutions. Therefore, it avoids singular numerical integrals in the boundary element method (BEM) and circumvents the troublesome placement of the fictitious boundary in the method of fundamental solutions (MFS). In the present method, we derive the SIFs of exterior Helmholtz equation by means of the SIFs of exterior Laplace equation owing to the same order of singularities between the Laplace and Helmholtz fundamental solutions. In conjunction with the Burton-Miller formulation, the SBM enhances the quality of the solution, particularly in the vicinity of the corresponding interior eigenfrequencies. Numerical illustrations demonstrate efficiency and accuracy of the present scheme on some benchmark examples under 2D and 3D unbounded domains in comparison with the analytical solutions, the boundary element solutions and Dirichlet-to-Neumann finite element solutions.

  12. Viscoelastic characterization of thin tissues using acoustic radiation force and model-based inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzina, Bojan B.; Tuleubekov, Kairat; Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2009-07-01

    By means of the viscoelastodynamic model for a two-layer solid-fluid system and a detailed account of the locally induced acoustic radiation force, a rational analytical and computational framework is established for the viscoelastic characterization of thin tissues from high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) measurements. For practical applications, the back-analysis is set up to interpret the frequency response function, signifying the tissue's axial displacement (captured by the imaging transducer) per squared voltage driving the 'pushing' transducer, as experimental input. On parametrizing the tissue's viscoelastic behavior in terms of the standard linear model, the proposed methodology is applied to a set of measurements performed on tissue-mimicking phantom constructs with thicknesses ranging from 0.5 to 4 mm. The results demonstrate that the model-based inversion, which carefully mimics the local boundary conditions and applied ultrasound excitation, yields viscoelastic properties for the phantom that are virtually invariant over the range of specimen thicknesses tested. Beyond its immediate application to in vitro viscoelastic characterization of thin excised tissues and tissue constructs, the proposed methodology may also find use in the characterization of skin or skin lesions over bone in vivo.

  13. In Vivo Cardiac, Acoustic-Radiation-Force-Driven, Shear Wave Velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Stephen J.; Wolf, Patrick D.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2009-01-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) was employed to track acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) -induced shear waves in the mid-myocardium of the left ventricular free wall (LVFW) of a beating canine heart. Shear waves were generated and tracked with a linear ultrasound transducer that was placed directly on the exposed epicardium. Acquinsition was ECG-gated arid coincided with the mid-diastolic portion of the cardiac cycle. Axial displacement profiles consistent with shear wave propagation were clearly evident in all SWEI acquisitions (i.e., those including an ARFI excitation); displacement data from control cases (i.e., sequences lacking an ARFI excitation) offered no evidence of shear wave propagation and yielded a peak absolute mean displacement below 0.31 μm after motion filtering. Shear wave velocity estimates ranged from 0.82 to 2.65 m/s and were stable across multiple heartbeats for the same interrogation region, with coefficients of variation less than 19% for all matched acquisitions. Variations in velocity estimates suggest a spatial dependence of shear wave velocity through the mid-myocardium of the LVFW, with velocity estimates changing, in limited cases, through depth and lateral position. PMID:19771962

  14. Generation and Radiation of Acoustic Waves from a 2D Shear Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2000-01-01

    A thin free shear layer containing an inflection point in the mean velocity profile is inherently unstable. Disturbances in the flow field can excite the unstable behavior of a shear layer, if the appropriate combination of frequencies and shear layer thicknesses exists, causing instability waves to grow. For other combinations of frequencies and thicknesses, these instability waves remain neutral in amplitude or decay in the downstream direction. A growing instability wave radiates noise when its phase velocity becomes supersonic relative to the ambient speed of sound. This occurs primarily when the mean jet flow velocity is supersonic. Thus, the small disturbances in the flow, which themselves may generate noise, have generated an additional noise source. It is the purpose of this problem to test the ability of CAA to compute this additional source of noise. The problem is idealized such that the exciting disturbance is a fixed known acoustic source pulsating at a single frequency. The source is placed inside of a 2D jet with parallel flow; hence, the shear layer thickness is constant. With the source amplitude small enough, the problem is governed by the following set of linear equations given in dimensional form.

  15. The ‘sixth sense’ of ultrasound: probing nonlinear elasticity with acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzina, Bojan B.; Dontsov, Egor V.; Urban, Matthew W.; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2015-05-01

    Prompted by a recent finding that the magnitude of the acoustic radiation force (ARF) in isotropic tissue-like solids depends linearly on a particular third-order modulus of elasticity—hereon denoted by C, this study investigates the possibility of estimating C from the amplitude of the ARF-generated shear waves. The featured coefficient of nonlinear elasticity, which captures the incipient nonlinear interaction between the volumetric and deviatoric modes of deformation, has so far received only a limited attention in the context of soft tissues due to the fact that the latter are often approximated as (i) fluid-like when considering ultrasound waves, and (ii) incompressible under static deformations. On establishing the analytical and computational platform for the proposed sensing methodology, the study proceeds with applying the prototype technique toward estimating via ARF the third-order modulus C in a series of tissue-mimicking phantoms. To help validate the concept and its implementation, the germane third-order modulus is independently estimated in each phantom via an established technique known as acoustoelasticity. The C-estimates obtained respectively via acoustoelasticity and the new theory of ARF show a significant degree of consistency. The key features of the new sensing methodology are that: (a) it requires no external deformation of a material other than that produced by the ARF, and (b) it estimates the nonlinear C-modulus locally, over the focal region of an ultrasound beam—where the shear waves are being generated.

  16. The 'sixth sense' of ultrasound: probing nonlinear elasticity with acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Guzina, Bojan B; Dontsov, Egor V; Urban, Matthew W; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2015-05-01

    Prompted by a recent finding that the magnitude of the acoustic radiation force (ARF) in isotropic tissue-like solids depends linearly on a particular third-order modulus of elasticity-hereon denoted by C, this study investigates the possibility of estimating C from the amplitude of the ARF-generated shear waves. The featured coefficient of nonlinear elasticity, which captures the incipient nonlinear interaction between the volumetric and deviatoric modes of deformation, has so far received only a limited attention in the context of soft tissues due to the fact that the latter are often approximated as (i) fluid-like when considering ultrasound waves, and (ii) incompressible under static deformations. On establishing the analytical and computational platform for the proposed sensing methodology, the study proceeds with applying the prototype technique toward estimating via ARF the third-order modulus C in a series of tissue-mimicking phantoms. To help validate the concept and its implementation, the germane third-order modulus is independently estimated in each phantom via an established technique known as acoustoelasticity. The C-estimates obtained respectively via acoustoelasticity and the new theory of ARF show a significant degree of consistency. The key features of the new sensing methodology are that: (a) it requires no external deformation of a material other than that produced by the ARF, and (b) it estimates the nonlinear C-modulus locally, over the focal region of an ultrasound beam-where the shear waves are being generated. PMID:25905553

  17. A Bayesian approach for characterization of soft tissue viscoelasticity in acoustic radiation force imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaodong; Pelegri, Assimina A

    2016-04-01

    Biomechanical imaging techniques based on acoustic radiation force (ARF) have been developed to characterize the viscoelasticity of soft tissue by measuring the motion excited by ARF non-invasively. The unknown stress distribution in the region of excitation limits an accurate inverse characterization of soft tissue viscoelasticity, and single degree-of-freedom simplified models have been applied to solve the inverse problem approximately. In this study, the ARF-induced creep imaging is employed to estimate the time constant of a Voigt viscoelastic tissue model, and an inverse finite element (FE) characterization procedure based on a Bayesian formulation is presented. The Bayesian approach aims to estimate a reasonable quantification of the probability distributions of soft tissue mechanical properties in the presence of measurement noise and model parameter uncertainty. Gaussian process metamodeling is applied to provide a fast statistical approximation based on a small number of computationally expensive FE model runs. Numerical simulation results demonstrate that the Bayesian approach provides an efficient and practical estimation of the probability distributions of time constant in the ARF-induced creep imaging. In a comparison study with the single degree of freedom models, the Bayesian approach with FE models improves the estimation results even in the presence of large uncertainty levels of the model parameters. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26255624

  18. Assessment of Placental Stiffness Using Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography in Pregnant Women with Fetal Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Göya, Cemil; Tunç, Senem; Teke, Memik; Hattapoğlu, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate placental stiffness measured by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in pregnant women in the second trimester with a normal fetus versus those with structural anomalies and non-structural findings. Materials and Methods Forty pregnant women carrying a fetus with structural anomalies diagnosed sonographically at 18–28 weeks of gestation comprised the study group. The control group consisted of 34 healthy pregnant women with a sonographically normal fetus at a similar gestational age. Placental shear wave velocity (SWV) was measured by ARFI elastography and compared between the two groups. Structural anomalies and non-structural findings were scored based on sonographic markers. Placental stiffness measurements were compared among fetus anomaly categories. Doppler parameters of umbilical and uterine arteries were compared with placental SWV measurements. Results All placental SWV measurements, including minimum SWV, maximum SWV, and mean SWV were significantly higher in the study group than the control group ([0.86 ± 0.2, 0.74 ± 0.1; p < 0.001], [1.89 ± 0.7, 1.59 ± 0.5; p = 0.04], and [1.26 ± 0.4, 1.09 ± 0.2; p = 0.01]), respectively. Conclusion Placental stiffness evaluated by ARFI elastography during the second trimester in pregnant women with fetuses with congenital structural anomalies is higher than that of pregnant women with normal fetuses. PMID:26957906

  19. Radiation power losses and opacity of mid-Z impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benredjem, D.; Calisti, A.; Pain, J. C.; Gilleron, F.

    2010-08-01

    We present results on opacity and radiation losses of mid-Z impurities in ICF conditions. Two approaches were investigated. The first one is based on a detailed calculation where the atomic database is provided by the MCDF code. Then a lineshape code (PPP) based on a fast algorithm was adapted to the calculation of emissivity and opacity profiles. The second approach is a statistical one. It involves high-order moments of the radiative power losses. Atomic calculations were performed with the Cowan code. The Normal Inverse Gaussian and the Generalized Gaussian distributions were then used to calculate the radiation power loss profile.

  20. Structural Dynamic Assessment of the GN2 Piping System for NASA's New and Powerful Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Staab, Lucas D.; Akers, James C.; Hughes, WIlliam O.; Chang, Li, C.; Hozman, Aron D.; Henry, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) has led the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA from 2007-2011. SAIC-Benham has completed construction of a new reverberant acoustic test facility to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program and commercial customers. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) is approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and was designed to operate at a maximum empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. Initial checkout acoustic testing was performed on March 2011 by SAIC-Benham at test levels up to 161 dB OASPL. During testing, several branches of the gaseous nitrogen (GN2) piping system, which supply the fluid to the noise generating acoustic modulators, failed at their "t-junctions" connecting the 12 inch supply line to their respective 4 inch branch lines. The problem was initially detected when the oxygen sensors in the horn room indicated a lower than expected oxygen level from which was inferred GN2 leaks in the piping system. In subsequent follow up inspections, cracks were identified in the failed "t-junction" connections through non-destructive evaluation testing . Through structural dynamic modeling of the piping system, the root cause of the "t-junction" connection failures was determined. The structural dynamic assessment identified several possible corrective design improvements to the horn room piping system. The effectiveness of the chosen design repairs were subsequently evaluated in September 2011 during acoustic verification testing to 161 dB OASPL.

  1. Structural Dynamic Assessment of the GN2 Piping System for NASA's New and Powerful Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Staab, Lucas D.; Akers, James C.; Hughes, William O.; Chang, Li C.; Hozman, Aron D.; Henry, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) has led the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA from 2007 to 2011. SAIC-Benham has completed construction of a new reverberant acoustic test facility to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program and commercial customers. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) is approximately 101,000 cubic feet in volume and was designed to operate at a maximum empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. Initial checkout acoustic testing was performed on March 2011 by SAIC-Benham at test levels up to 161 dB OASPL. During testing, several branches of the gaseous nitrogen (GN2) piping system, which supply the fluid to the noise generating acoustic modulators, failed at their T-junctions connecting the 12 in. supply line to their respective 4 in. branch lines. The problem was initially detected when the oxygen sensors in the horn room indicated a lower than expected oxygen level from which was inferred GN2 leaks in the piping system. In subsequent follow up inspections, cracks were identified in the failed T-junction connections through non-destructive evaluation testing. Through structural dynamic modeling of the piping system, the root cause of the T-junction connection failures was determined. The structural dynamic assessment identified several possible corrective design improvements to the horn room piping system. The effectiveness of the chosen design repairs were subsequently evaluated in September 2011 during acoustic verification testing to 161 dB OASPL.

  2. A Novel Device for Total Acoustic Output Measurement of High Power Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, S.; Twomey, R.; Morris, H.; Zanelli, C. I.

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a device for ultrasound power measurement applicable over a broad range of medical transducer types, orientations and powers, and which supports automatic measurements to simplify use and minimize errors. Considering all the recommendations from standards such as IEC 61161, an accurate electromagnetic null-balance has been designed for ultrasound power measurements. The sensing element is placed in the water to eliminate errors due to surface tension and water evaporation, and the motion and detection of force is constrained to one axis, to increase immunity to vibration from the floor, water sloshing and water surface waves. A transparent tank was designed so it could easily be submerged in a larger tank to accommodate large transducers or side-firing geometries, and can also be turned upside-down for upward-firing transducers. A vacuum lid allows degassing the water and target in situ. An external control module was designed to operate the sensing/driving loop and to communicate to a local computer for data logging. The sensing algorithm, which incorporates temperature compensation, compares the feedback force needed to cancel the motion for sources in the "on" and "off" states. These two states can be controlled by the control unit or manually by the user, under guidance by a graphical user interface (the system presents measured power live during collection). Software allows calibration to standard weights, or to independently calibrated acoustic sources. The design accommodates a variety of targets, including cone, rubber, brush targets and an oil-filled target for power measurement via buoyancy changes. Measurement examples are presented, including HIFU sources operating at powers from 1 to 100.

  3. Recent Radiation Test Results for Power MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Topper, Alyson D.; Casey, Megan C.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Phan, Anthony M.; Kim, Hak S.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Single-event effect (SEE) and total ionizing dose (TID) test results are presented for various hardened and commercial power metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), including vertical planar, trench, superjunction, and lateral process designs.

  4. Very high power THz radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, G.L.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Jordan, K.; Neil, George R.; Williams, G.P.

    2002-10-31

    We report the production of high power (20 watts average, {approx} 1 Megawatt peak) broadband THz light based on coherent emission from relativistic electrons. Such sources are ideal for imaging, for high power damage studies and for studies of non-linear phenomena in this spectral range. We describe the source, presenting theoretical calculations and their experimental verification. For clarity we compare this source to one based on ultrafast laser techniques.

  5. Variable ultrasound trigger delay for improved magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougenot, Charles; Waspe, Adam; Looi, Thomas; Drake, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) allows the quantification of microscopic displacements induced by ultrasound pulses, which are proportional to the local acoustic intensity. This study describes a new method to acquire MR-ARFI maps, which reduces the measurement noise in the quantification of displacement as well as improving its robustness in the presence of motion. Two MR-ARFI sequences were compared in this study. The first sequence ‘variable MSG’ involves switching the polarity of the motion sensitive gradient (MSG) between odd and even image frames. The second sequence named ‘static MSG’ involves a variable ultrasound trigger delay to sonicate during the first or second MSG for odd and even image frames, respectively. As previously published, the data acquired with a variable MSG required the use of reference data acquired prior to any sonication to process displacement maps. In contrary, data acquired with a static MSG were converted to displacement maps without using reference data acquired prior to the sonication. Displacement maps acquired with both sequences were compared by performing sonications for three different conditions: in a polyacrylamide phantom, in the leg muscle of a freely breathing pig and in the leg muscle of pig under apnea. The comparison of images acquired at even image frames and odd image frames indicates that the sequence with a static MSG provides a significantly better steady state (p  <  0.001 based on a Student’s t-test) than the images acquired with a variable MSG. In addition no reference data prior to sonication were required to process displacement maps for data acquired with a static MSG. The absence of reference data prior to sonication provided a 41% reduction of the spatial distribution of noise (p  <  0.001 based on a Student’s t-test) and reduced the sensitivity to motion for displacements acquired with a static MSG. No significant differences were expected and

  6. Generation of Acoustic Gravity Waves by Periodic Radio Transmissions from a High-Power Ionospheric Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Vladimir; Chernogor, Leonid; Rozumenko, Victor

    The Radiophysical Research Institute (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) and Kharkiv V. N. Karazin National University (Kharkiv, Ukraine) have studied opportunities for the effective generation of acoustic gravity waves (AGWs) in 3 - 180-min period range. The excitation of such waves was conducted for the last several years using the SURA heating facility (Nizhny Novgorod). The detection of the HF-induced AGWs was carried out in the Radiophysical Observatory located near Kharkiv City at a distance of about 960 km from the SURA. A coherent radar for vertical sounding, an ionosonde, and magnetometer chains were used in our measurements. The main results are the following (see [1-5]): 1. Infrasound oscillation trains with a period of 6 min are detected during periodic SURA heater turn-on and -off. Similar oscillation trains are detected after long time pumping, during periodic transmissions with a period of 20 s, as well as after pumping turn-off. The train recordings begin 28 - 54 min after the heater turn-on or -off, and the train propagation speeds are about 300 - 570 m/s, the value of which is close to the sound speed at upper atmospheric altitudes. The amplitude of the Doppler shift frequency is of 10 - 40 mHz, which fits to the 0.1 - 0.3% electron density disturbances at ionospheric altitudes. The amplitude of the infrasound oscillations depends on the SURA mode of operation and the state of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. 2. High-power radio transmissions stimulate the generation (or enhancement) of waves at ionospheric altitudes in the range of internal gravity wave periods. The HF-induced waves propagate with speeds of 360 - 460 m/s and produce changes in electron density with amplitudes of 2 - 3%. The generation of such periodic perturbations is more preferable with periods of 10 - 60 minutes. Their features depend significantly on the heater mode of operation. It should be stressed that perturbation intensity increases when a pumping wave frequency approaches

  7. Solar cycle variations in the powers and damping rates of low-degree solar acoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broomhall, A.-M.; Pugh, C. E.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    Helioseismology uses the Sun's natural resonant oscillations to study the solar interior. The properties of the solar oscillations are sensitive to the Sun'2019;s magnetic activity cycle. Here we examine variations in the powers, damping rates, and energy supply rates of the most prominent acoustic oscillations in unresolved, Sun-as-a-star data, obtained by the Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network (BiSON) during solar cycles 22, 23, and the first half of 24. The variations in the helioseismic parameters are compared to the 10.7 cm flux, a well-known global proxy of solar activity. As expected the oscillations are most heavily damped and the mode powers are at a minimum at solar activity maximum. The 10.7 cm flux was linearly regressed using the fractional variations of damping rates and powers observed during cycle 23. In general, good agreement is found between the damping rates and the 10.7 cm flux. However, the linearly regressed 10.7 cm flux and fractional variation in powers diverge in cycles 22 and 24, indicating that the relationship between the mode powers and the 10.7 cm flux is not consistent from one cycle to the next. The energy supply rate of the oscillations, which is usually approximately constant, also decreases at this time. We have determined that this discrepancy is not because of the first-order bias introduced by an increase in the level of background noise or gaps in the data. Although we cannot categorically rule out an instrumental origin, the divergence observed in cycle 24, when the data were of high quality and the data coverage was over 80%, raises the possibility that the effect may be solar in origin.

  8. A high-temperature acoustic-electric system for power delivery and data communication through thick metallic barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawry, T. J.; Wilt, K. R.; Roa-Prada, S.; Ashdown, J. D.; Saulnier, G. J.; Scarton, H. A.; Das, P. K.; Gavens, A. J.

    2011-06-01

    In many sensing applications that monitor extreme environmental conditions within sealed metallic vessels, penetrating vessel walls in order to feed through power and data cables is impractical, as this may compromise a vessels structural integrity and its environmental isolation. Frequent servicing of sensing equipment within these environments is costly, so the use of batteries is strongly undesired and power harvesting techniques are preferred. Traditional electromagnetic power delivery and communication techniques, however, are highly ineffective in these applications, due to Faraday shielding effects from the metallic vessel walls. A viable, non-destructive alternative is to use piezoelectric materials to transmit power through thick metallic barriers acoustically. We present critical elements of a high-temperature battery-less sensor system prototype, including power harvesting, voltage regulation, and data communication circuitry able to operate up to 260°C. Power transmission is achieved by coaxially aligning a pair of high-temperature piezoelectric transducers on opposite sides of a thick steel barrier. Continuous-wave excitation of the outside transducer creates an acoustic beam that is captured by the opposite transducer, forming an acoustic-electric link for power harvesting circuitry. Simultaneously, sensor data can be transmitted out of the high-temperature environment by switching the electrical impedance placed across the leads of the inside transducer, creating a reflection-based amplitude modulated signal on the outside transducer. Transducer housing, loading, and alternatives for acoustic couplants are discussed. Measurement results are presented, and it was found that the system can harvest up to 1 watt of power and communicate sensor data up to 50 kbps, while operating at 260°C.

  9. Problems of applications of high power IR radiation in aquatic medium under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Yurii V.; Kuzyakov, Boris A.

    2004-06-01

    In this work the effects that appear in the optical breakdown are analyzed in water and the time dependences received also for the velocities and pressures at the wave fronts. The application of acoustic waves, generated by high power laser pulses in the aqueous medium, has quite serious perspectives for sounding. It is shown in the work that under comparatively low power density of radiation, as a result of a surface layer heating, the thermoelastic sresses arise, leading to the excitation of the acoustic waves. The analysis showed that the prognostic evaluations of the values of a light deflagration area are possible for a clear aqueous medium with the pressures up to 400 kg/cm2. With the presence of microinhomogeneities, it is necessary to know their total physical and chemical properties and detailed trustworthy data by their spatial distribution. A principally new approach was developed to the problem of videoinformation transmission from the object surfaces by the fiber-optic channel. The application of a precision measuring TV-camera with a color format in the range 0.3 - 0.98 μm allows to raise the information capacity of the transmitted information. The optimization of vision module choice are considered also.

  10. Studies of acoustic-electric feed-throughs for power transmission through structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Doty, Benjamin; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Aldrich, Jack; Chang, Zensheu

    2006-01-01

    There are numerous engineering design problems where the use of wires to transfer power and communicate data thru the walls of a structure is prohibitive or significantly difficult that it may require a complex design. Using physical feedthroughs in such systems may make them susceptible to leakage of chemicals or gasses, loss of pressure or vacuum, as well as difficulties in providing adequate thermal or electrical insulation. Moreover, feeding wires thru a wall of a structure reduces the strength of the structure and makes the structure prone to cracking due to fatigue that can result from cyclic loading and stress concentrations. One area that has already been identified to require a wireless alternative to electrical feedthroughs is the container of the Mars Sample Return Mission, which will need wireless sensors to sense a pressure leak and to avoid potential contamination. The idea of using elastic or acoustic waves to transfer power was suggested recently by [Y. Hu, et al., July 2003]. This system allows for the avoidance of cabling or wiring. The technology is applicable to the transfer of power for actuation, sensing and other tasks inside any sealed container or vacuum/pressure vessel. An alternative approach to the modeling presented previously [Sherrit et a., 2005] used network analysis to solve the same problem in a clear and expandable manner. Experimental tests on three different designs of these devices were performed. The three designs used different methods of coupling the piezoelectric element to the wall. In the first test the piezoelectric material was bolted using a backing structure. In the second test the piezoelectric was clamped after the application of grease and finally the piezoelectric element was attached using a conductive epoxy. The mechanical clamp with grease produced the highest measured efficiency of 53% however this design was the least practical from a fabrication viewpoint. The power transfer efficiency of conductive epoxy

  11. The utility of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in diagnosing acute appendicitis and staging its severity

    PubMed Central

    Göya, Cemil; Hamidi, Cihad; Okur, Mehmet Hanifi; İçer, Mustafa; Oğuz, Abdullah; Hattapoğlu, Salih; Çetinçakmak, Mehmet Güli; Teke, Memik

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging to diagnose acute appendicitis. METHODS Abdominal ultrasonography (US) and ARFI imaging were performed in 53 patients that presented with right lower quadrant pain, and the results were compared with those obtained in 52 healthy subjects. Qualitative evaluation of the patients was conducted by Virtual Touch™ tissue imaging (VTI), while quantitative evaluation was performed by Virtual Touch™ tissue quantification (VTQ) measuring the shear wave velocity (SWV). The severity of appendix inflammation was observed and rated using ARFI imaging in patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis. Alvarado scores were determined for all patients presenting with right lower quadrant pain. All patients diagnosed with appendicitis received appendectomies. The sensitivity and specificity of ARFI imaging relative to US was determined upon confirming the diagnosis of acute appendicitis via histopathological analysis. RESULTS The Alvarado score had a sensitivity and specificity of 70.8% and 20%, respectively, in detecting acute appendicitis. Abdominal US had 83.3% sensitivity and 80% specificity, while ARFI imaging had 100% sensitivity and 98% specificity, in diagnosing acute appendicitis. The median SWV value was 1.11 m/s (range, 0.6–1.56 m/s) for healthy appendix and 3.07 m/s (range, 1.37–4.78 m/s) for acute appendicitis. CONCLUSION ARFI imaging may be useful in guiding the clinical management of acute appendicitis, by helping its diagnosis and determining the severity of appendix inflammation. PMID:25323836

  12. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging for assessing liver fibrosis in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Anita; Brun, Vanessa; Lainé, Fabrice; Turlin, Bruno; Morcet, Jeff; Michalak, Sophie; Le Gruyer, Antonia; Legros, Ludivine; Bardou-Jacquet, Edouard; Gandon, Yves; Moirand, Romain

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the performance of elastography by ultrasound with acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) in determining fibrosis stage in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) undergoing alcoholic detoxification in relation to biopsy. METHODS: Eighty-three patients with ALD undergoing detoxification were prospectively enrolled. Each patient underwent ARFI imaging and a liver biopsy on the same day. Fibrosis was staged according to the METAVIR scoring system. The median of 10 valid ARFI measurements was calculated for each patient. RESULTS: Sixty-nine males and thirteen females (one patient excluded due to insufficient biopsy size) were assessed with a mean alcohol consumption of 132.4 ± 128.8 standard drinks per week and mean cumulative year duration of 17.6 ± 9.5 years. Sensitivity and specificity were respectively 82.4% (0.70-0.95) and 83.3% (0.73-0.94) (AUROC = 0.87) for F ≥ 2 with a cut-off value of 1.63m/s; 82.4% (0.64-1.00) and 78.5% (0.69-0.89) (AUROC = 0.86) for F ≥ 3 with a cut-off value of 1.84m/s; and 92.3% (0.78-1.00] and 81.6% (0.72-0.90) (AUROC = 0.89) for F = 4 with a cut-off value of 1.94 m/s. CONCLUSION: ARFI is an accurate, non-invasive and easy method for assessing liver fibrosis in patients with ALD undergoing alcoholic detoxification. PMID:27239119

  13. In vivo study of transverse carpal ligament stiffness using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhilei Liu; Vince, D Geoffrey; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The transverse carpal ligament (TCL) forms the volar boundary of the carpal tunnel and may provide mechanical constraint to the median nerve, leading to carpal tunnel syndrome. Therefore, the mechanical properties of the TCL are essential to better understand the etiology of carpal tunnel syndrome. The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo TCL stiffness using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging. The shear wave velocity (SWV) of the TCL was measured using Virtual Touch IQ(TM) software in 15 healthy, male subjects. The skin and the thenar muscles were also examined as reference tissues. In addition, the effects of measurement location and ultrasound transducer compression on the SWV were studied. The SWV of the TCL was dependent on the tissue location, with greater SWV values within the muscle-attached region than those outside of the muscle-attached region. The SWV of the TCL was significantly smaller without compression (5.21 ± 1.08 m/s) than with compression (6.62 ± 1.18 m/s). The SWV measurements of the skin and the thenar muscles were also affected by transducer compression, but to different extents than the SWV of the TCL. Therefore to standardize the ARFI imaging procedure, it is recommended that a layer of ultrasound gel be maintained to minimize the effects of tissue compression. This study demonstrated the feasibility of ARFI imaging for assessing the stiffness characteristics of the TCL in vivo, which has the potential to identify pathomechanical changes of the tissue. PMID:23861919

  14. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography for Focal Hepatic Tumors: Usefulness for Differentiating Hemangiomas from Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Eun; Bae, Kyung Soo; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate whether acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography with ARFI quantification and ARFI 2-dimensional (2D) imaging is useful for differentiating hepatic hemangiomas from malignant hepatic tumors. Materials and Methods One-hundred-and-one tumors in 74 patients were included in this study: 28 hemangiomas, 26 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs), three cholangiocarcinomas (CCCs), 20 colon cancer metastases and 24 other metastases. B-mode ultrasound, ARFI 2D imaging, and ARFI quantification were performed in all tumors. Shear wave velocities (SWVs) of the tumors and the adjacent liver and their SWV differences were compared among the tumor groups. The ARFI 2D images were compared with B-mode images regarding the stiffness, conspicuity and size of the tumors. Results The mean SWV of the hemangiomas was significantly lower than the malignant hepatic tumor groups: hemangiomas, 1.80 ± 0.57 m/sec; HCCs, 2.66 ± 0.94 m/sec; CCCs, 3.27 ± 0.64 m/sec; colon cancer metastases, 3.70 ± 0.61 m/sec; and other metastases, 2.82 ± 0.96 m/sec (p < 0.05). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of SWV for differentiating hemangiomas from malignant tumors was 0.86, with a sensitivity of 96.4% and a specificity of 65.8% at a cut-off value of 2.73 m/sec (p < 0.05). In the ARFI 2D images, the malignant tumors except HCCs were stiffer and more conspicuous as compared with the hemangiomas (p < 0.05). Conclusion ARFI elastography with ARFI quantification and ARFI 2D imaging may be useful for differentiating hepatic hemangiomas from malignant hepatic tumors. PMID:24043967

  15. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Measurement in Renal Transplantation: A Prospective, Longitudinal Study With Protocol Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhan; Oh, Young Taik; Joo, Dong Jin; Ma, Bo Gyoung; Lee, A-lan; Lee, Jae Geun; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Seung Up; Jung, Dae Chul; Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Yu Seun

    2015-09-01

    Interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA) is a common cause of kidney allograft loss. Several noninvasive techniques developed to assess tissue fibrosis are widely used to examine the liver. However, relatively few studies have investigated the use of elastographic methods to assess transplanted kidneys. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical implications of the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) technique in renal transplant patients. A total of 91 patients who underwent living donor renal transplantation between September 2010 and January 2013 were included in this prospective study. Shear wave velocity (SWV) was measured by ARFI at baseline and predetermined time points (1 week and 6 and 12 months after transplantation). Protocol biopsies were performed at 12 months. Instead of reflecting IF/TA, SWVs were found to be related to time elapsed after transplantation. Mean SWV increased continuously during the first postoperative year (P < 0.001). In addition, mixed model analysis showed no correlation existed between SWV and serum creatinine (r = -0.2426, P = 0.0771). There was also no evidence of a relationship between IF/TA and serum creatinine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.220, P = 0.7648). Furthermore, SWV temporal patterns were dependent on the kidney weight to body weight ratio (KW/BW). In patients with a KW/BW < 3.5 g/kg, mean SWV continuously increased for 12 months, whereas it decreased after 6 months in those with a KW/BW ≥ 3.5 g/kg.No significant correlation was observed between SWV and IF/TA or renal dysfunction. However, SWV was found to be related to the time after transplantation. Renal hemodynamics influenced by KW/BW might impact SWV values. PMID:26426636

  16. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography in the Diagnosis of Thyroid Nodules: Useful or Not Useful?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Feng; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Xu, Jun-Mei; Liu, Chang; Guo, Le-Hang; Liu, Lin-Na; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Qu, Shen; Xing, Mingzhao

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic performance of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography for differentiating benign from malignant thyroid nodules. One hundred and seventy-four pathologically proven thyroid nodules (139 benign, 35 malignant) in 154 patients (mean age: 49.2 ± 12.1 y; range: 16-72 y) were included in this study. Conventional ultrasound (US) and ARFI elastography using virtual touch tissue imaging (VTI) and virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ) were performed to examine the thyroid nodules. Two blinded readers with different amounts of experience independently scored the likelihood of malignancy on the basis of a five-point scale in three different image-reading sets. The diagnostic performances among different image-reading sets and between the two readers were compared. The diagnostic specificity of both readers improved significantly after reading the VTI images or both VTI and VTQ images (all p < 0.05). After review of the results of both VTI and VTQ, the numbers of correctly diagnosed nodules increased in nodules <1.0 cm for both readers and in both nodular goiter and papillary thyroid carcinoma for the junior reader (p < 0.05). The nodules with definite diagnoses (i.e., confidence levels including definite benign and definite malignant cases) increased after review of VTI and VTQ images versus conventional US for the senior reader (p < 0.05). In conclusion, adding ARFI elastography improves the specificity in diagnosing malignant thyroid nodules compared with conventional US on its own. ARFI elastography particularly facilitates the specific diagnosis for thyroid nodules smaller than 1.0 cm. ARFI elastography is also able to increase the diagnostic confidence of the readers. PMID:26119458

  17. Breast Lesions Evaluated by Color-Coded Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, JianQiao; Yang, ZhiFang; Zhan, WeiWei; Zhang, JingWen; Hu, Na; Dong, YiJie; Wang, YingYing

    2016-07-01

    The goal of our study was to investigate the value of color-coded Virtual Touch tissue imaging (VTI) using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) technology in the characterization of breast lesions and to compare it with conventional ultrasound (US). Conventional US and color-coded VTI were performed in 196 solid breast lesions in 196 consecutive women (age range 17-91 y; mean 48.17 ± 14.46 y). A four-point scale VTI score was assigned for each lesion according to the color pattern both in the lesion and in the surrounding breast tissue. The mean VTI score was significantly higher for malignant lesions (3.80 ± 0.66, range 1-4) than for benign ones (2.02 ± 1.20, range 1-4) (p < 0.001), and the optimal cut-off value was between score 3 and score 4. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for combined conventional US and VTI (0.945) was significantly higher than that for conventional US (0.902) and for VTI (0.871) (p = 0.0021 and p < 0.001, respectively). It was concluded that color-coded VTI with the proposed four-point scale score system combined with conventional US might have the potential to aid in the characterization of benign and malignant breast lesions. PMID:27131841

  18. Mapping viscoelastic properties by multi-line (ML) acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomyo, Mikako; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2015-03-01

    In these days ultrasound studies of non-invasive diagnostic methods using the elastic property of tissue have showed very promising results. Biological soft tissues are viscoelastic in nature; therefore several recent studies have shown the feasibility of shear wave dispersion in order to express viscosity which is considered to be valid for early diagnoses. Shear wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) has been conducted under ex vivo and in vivo conditions, which could estimate the value of shear elasticity and viscosity from a 40 x 40 mm2 area. In this study, our proposed Multi-line (ML) acoustic radiation force method could map shear elasticity and viscosity at 0.2 x 0.2 mm2 pixel in 25.6 mm width and 29.6 mm depth area. ML uses seven focus points in depth to create much planar shear wave than ever, and twenty pushing line to obtain data such a broader area than ever. These sequences contribute to express precise values of shear elasticity and viscosity at each pixel. A 10% gelatin phantom with a 10% gelatin and 1% xanthan gum mixture inclusion was prepared for ML experiment, and one homogenous phantom made of the same concentrations as the background of ML experiments was for ML and SDUV experiments three times to validate. The ML measurement resulted μ1 = 1.129±0.118 kPa, μ2 = 0.893±0.090 Pa・s in the 10% gelatin background; their corresponding SDUV measurement were μ1 = 1.250±0.129 kPa, μ2 = 0.833±0.098 Pa・s in 10% gelatin phantom. Though further evaluations such as frequency and rheological model are required, the results could show the effectiveness of this proposed method in mapping viscoelasticity and the feasibility of in vivo and ex vivo experiments.

  19. The performance of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in predicting liver fibrosis in chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hung; Yeh, Ming-Lun; Huang, Ching-I; Yang, Jeng-Fu; Liang, Po-Cheng; Huang, Chung-Feng; Dai, Chia-Yen; Lin, Zu-Yau; Chen, Shinn-Cherng; Huang, Jee-Fu; Yu, Ming-Lung; Chuang, Wan-Long

    2016-07-01

    Sonography-based noninvasive liver fibrosis assessment is promising in the prediction of treatment efficacy and prognosis in chronic liver disease (CLD) patients. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) is a newly-developed transient elastography (TE) method integrated into a conventional ultrasound machine. The study aimed to assess the performance of ARFI imaging in the diagnosis of liver fibrosis in Taiwanese CLD patients. We also aimed to search for the optimal cut-off values in different fibrosis stages. A total of 60 CLD patients (40 males; mean age, 51.8±11 years) were consecutively included. They received standard ARFI measurement within 2 weeks at the time of liver biopsy. There were eight patients with Metavir fibrosis stage 0 (F0), 16 patients with F1, 20 patients with F2, eight patients with F3, and eight patients with F4, respectively. The mean values among patient with F0, F1, F2, F3, and F4 were 1.17±0.13, 1.30±0.17, 1.31±0.24, 2.01±0.45, and 2.69±0.91, respectively (p<0.001). The optimal cut-off ARFI value for significant fibrosis (F≥2) was 1.53 with the accuracy of 0.733, while it was 1.66 for advanced fibrosis (F≥3) with the accuracy of 0.957. Our study demonstrated that ARFI imaging is competent for fibrosis diagnosis, particularly in CLD patients with advanced fibrosis. PMID:27450025

  20. Two dimensional radiated power diagnostics on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinke, M. L.; Hutchinson, I. H.

    2008-10-01

    The radiated power diagnostics for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak have been upgraded to measure two dimensional structure of the photon emissivity profile in order to investigate poloidal asymmetries in the core radiation. Commonly utilized unbiased absolute extreme ultraviolet (AXUV) diode arrays view the plasma along five different horizontal planes. The layout of the diagnostic set is shown and the results from calibrations and recent experiments are discussed. Data showing a significant, 30%-40%, inboard/outboard emissivity asymmetry during ELM-free H-mode are presented. The ability to use AXUV diode arrays to measure absolute radiated power is explored by comparing diode and resistive bolometer-based emissivity profiles for highly radiative L-mode plasmas seeded with argon. Emissivity profiles match in the core but disagree radially outward resulting in an underprediction of Prad of nearly 50% by the diodes compared to Prad determined using resistive bolometers.

  1. Two dimensional radiated power diagnostics on Alcator C-Mod.

    PubMed

    Reinke, M L; Hutchinson, I H

    2008-10-01

    The radiated power diagnostics for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak have been upgraded to measure two dimensional structure of the photon emissivity profile in order to investigate poloidal asymmetries in the core radiation. Commonly utilized unbiased absolute extreme ultraviolet (AXUV) diode arrays view the plasma along five different horizontal planes. The layout of the diagnostic set is shown and the results from calibrations and recent experiments are discussed. Data showing a significant, 30%-40%, inboard/outboard emissivity asymmetry during ELM-free H-mode are presented. The ability to use AXUV diode arrays to measure absolute radiated power is explored by comparing diode and resistive bolometer-based emissivity profiles for highly radiative L-mode plasmas seeded with argon. Emissivity profiles match in the core but disagree radially outward resulting in an underprediction of P(rad) of nearly 50% by the diodes compared to P(rad) determined using resistive bolometers. PMID:19044619

  2. Digital stroboscopic holographic interferometry for power flow measurements in acoustically driven membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keustermans, William; Pires, Felipe; De Greef, Daniël; Vanlanduit, Steve J. A.; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Despite the importance of the eardrum and the ossicles in the hearing chain, it remains an open question how acoustical energy is transmitted between them. Identifying the transmission path at different frequencies could lead to valuable information for the domain of middle ear surgery. In this work a setup for stroboscopic holography is combined with an algorithm for power flow calculations. With our method we were able to accurately locate the power sources and sinks in a membrane. The setup enabled us to make amplitude maps of the out-of-plane displacement of a vibrating rubber membrane at subsequent instances of time within the vibration period. From these, the amplitude maps of the moments of force and velocities are calculated. The magnitude and phase maps are extracted from this amplitude data, and form the input for the power flow calculations. We present the algorithm used for the measurements and for the power flow calculations. Finite element models of a circular plate with a local energy source and sink allowed us to test and optimize this algorithm in a controlled way and without the present of noise, but will not be discussed below. At the setup an earphone was connected with a thin tube which was placed very close to the membrane so that sound impinges locally on the membrane, hereby acting as a local energy source. The energy sink was a little piece of foam carefully placed against the membrane. The laser pulses are fired at selected instants within the vibration period using a 30 mW HeNe continuous wave laser (red light, 632.8 nm) in combination with an acousto-optic modulator. A function generator controls the phase of these illumination pulses and the holograms are recorded using a CCD camera. We present the magnitude and phase maps as well as the power flow measurements on the rubber membrane. Calculation of the divergence of this power flow map provides a simple and fast way of identifying and locating an energy source or sink. In conclusion

  3. An Ultra-Low Power and Flexible Acoustic Modem Design to Develop Energy-Efficient Underwater Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Antonio; Blanc, Sara; Yuste, Pedro; Perles, Angel; Serrano, Juan José

    2012-01-01

    This paper is focused on the description of the physical layer of a new acoustic modem called ITACA. The modem architecture includes as a major novelty an ultra-low power asynchronous wake-up system implementation for underwater acoustic transmission that is based on a low-cost off-the-shelf RFID peripheral integrated circuit. This feature enables a reduced power dissipation of 10 μW in stand-by mode and registers very low power values during reception and transmission. The modem also incorporates clear channel assessment (CCA) to support CSMA-based medium access control (MAC) layer protocols. The design is part of a compact platform for a long-life short/medium range underwater wireless sensor network. PMID:22969324

  4. Calibration of radiation monitors at nuclear power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreau, L.; Miller, A.D.; Naughton, M.D.

    1994-03-01

    This work was performed to provide guidance to the utilities in the primary and secondary calibration of the radiation monitoring systems (RMS) installed in nuclear power plants. These systems are installed in nuclear power plants to monitor ongoing processes, identify changing radiation fields, predict and limit personnel radiation exposures and measure and control discharge of radioactive materials to the environment. RMS are checked and calibrated on a continuing basis to ensure their precision and accuracy. This report discusses various approaches towards primary and secondary calibrations of the RMS equipment in light of accepted practices at typical power plants and recent interpretations of regulatory guidance. Detailed calibration techniques and overall system responses, trends, and practices are discussed. Industry, utility, and regulatory sources were contacted to create an overall consensus of the most reasonable approaches to optimizing the performance of this equipment.

  5. New high power coherent radiation sources. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, P.; Coffey, T.

    1984-01-09

    In recent years, there has been considerable renewed interest in the development of novel devices for the production of high power coherent electromagnetic radiation. This interest has been motivated largely by the realization that, with existing technology, certain processes utilizing relativistic electron beams can produce coherent electromagnetic radiation at power levels far in excess of those achieved by conventional electron devices. This paper will review the current status of this rapidly developing field, with emphasis on two generic devices. The major thrust in the recent development of electron beam driven radiation sources has been directed towards achieving shorter wavelengths, greater power and higher efficiencies. Shortly after the development of such successful sources as the magnetron, kylstron and various traveling wave devices, it became clear that, in their original form, they were limited in their ability to produce high levels of radiation efficiently at short wavelengths. To circumvent the inherent limitations of these conventional coherent radiation sources, many new concepts and mechanisms, as well as variations on conventional concepts, were proposed. This paper is concerned primarily with two devices which are, relatively speaking, newcomers to the list of coherent classical radiation sources. They are the free electron laser and the cyclotron resonance maser (CRM); one well known type of CRM is the gyrotron.

  6. Strategies for Radiation Hardness Testing of Power Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltis, James V. (Technical Monitor); Patton, Martin O.; Harris, Richard D.; Rohal, Robert G.; Blue, Thomas E.; Kauffman, Andrew C.; Frasca, Albert J.

    2005-01-01

    Plans on the drawing board for future space missions call for much larger power systems than have been flown in the past. These systems would employ much higher voltages and currents to enable more powerful electric propulsion engines and other improvements on what will also be much larger spacecraft. Long term human outposts on the moon and planets would also require high voltage, high current and long life power sources. Only hundreds of watts are produced and controlled on a typical robotic exploration spacecraft today. Megawatt systems are required for tomorrow. Semiconductor devices used to control and convert electrical energy in large space power systems will be exposed to electromagnetic and particle radiation of many types, depending on the trajectory and duration of the mission and on the power source. It is necessary to understand the often very different effects of the radiations on the control and conversion systems. Power semiconductor test strategies that we have developed and employed will be presented, along with selected results. The early results that we have obtained in testing large power semiconductor devices give a good indication of the degradation in electrical performance that can be expected in response to a given dose. We are also able to highlight differences in radiation hardness that may be device or material specific.

  7. Properties of acoustic sources in the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Pawan

    1994-01-01

    The power spectrum of solar acoustic oscillations shows peaks extending out to frequencies much greater than the acoustic cutoff frequency of approximately 5.3 mHz, where waves are no longer trapped. Kumar & Lu (1991) proposed that these peaks arise from the interference of traveling waves which are generated by turbulent convection. According to this model, the frequencies of the peaks in the power spectrum depend on the static structure of the Sun as well as the radial location of the sources. Kumar & Lu used this idea to determine the depth of the acoustic sources. However, they ignored dissipative effects and found that the theoretically computed power spectrum was falling off much more rapidly than the observed spectrum. In this paper, we include the interaction of radiation with acoustic waves in the computation of the power spectrum. We find that the theoretically calculated power spectra, when radiative damping is included are in excellent agreement with the observed power spectra over the entire observed frequency range of 5.3 to 7.5 mHz above the acoustic cutoff frequency. Moreover, by matching the peak frequencies in the observed and theoretical spectra we find the mean depth of acoustic sources to be 140 +/- 60 km below the photosphere. We show that the spectrum of solar turbulence near the top of the solar convection zone is consistent with the Kolmogorov spectrum, and that the observed high frequency power spectrum provides strong evidence that the acoustic sources in the Sun are quadrupolar. The data, in fact, rules out dipole sources as significant contributors to acoustic wave generation in the Sun. The radial extent of the sources is poorly determined and is estimated to be less than about 550 km.

  8. Effects of head geometry simplifications on acoustic radiation of vowel sounds based on time-domain finite-element simulations.

    PubMed

    Arnela, Marc; Guasch, Oriol; Alías, Francesc

    2013-10-01

    One of the key effects to model in voice production is that of acoustic radiation of sound waves emanating from the mouth. The use of three-dimensional numerical simulations allows to naturally account for it, as well as to consider all geometrical head details, by extending the computational domain out of the vocal tract. Despite this advantage, many approximations to the head geometry are often performed for simplicity and impedance load models are still used as well to reduce the computational cost. In this work, the impact of some of these simplifications on radiation effects is examined for vowel production in the frequency range 0-10 kHz, by means of comparison with radiation from a realistic head. As a result, recommendations are given on their validity depending on whether high frequency energy (above 5 kHz) should be taken into account or not. PMID:24116430

  9. Radiation effects on power transistor performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frasca, Albert J.

    1987-01-01

    The D60T, D62T, and D75T transistors in the nuclear reactor were irradiated with bias voltage and high current I sub c vs. V sub ec curves were obtained to evaluate gain degradation at high power levels. Pre- and post-irradiation high current switching tests were performed to evaluate the response. The gamma ray damage work done at Sandia was correlated with the neutron work done at the O.S.U. reactor with the above specified transistors. Theoretical analyses of damage and electrical performance were conducted in terms of semiconductor physics. The experimental high current pulser was improved in order to measure switching time changes which are less than one microsecond at currents of 100 to 200 amperes for in-situ testing.

  10. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED THERMAL-ACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeffrey J. Swetelitsch

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project is to explore microwave-excited thermal-acoustic (META) phenomena for quantitative analysis of granular and powdered materials, with the culmination of the research to be an on-line carbon-in-ash monitor for coal-fired power plants. This technique of analyzing unburned carbon in fly ash could be a less tedious and time consuming method as compared to the traditional LOI manual procedure. Phase 1 of the research focused on off-line single-frequency thermal-acoustic measurements where an off-line fly ash monitor was constructed that could operate as analytical tool to explore instrument and methodology parameters for quantifying the microwave-excited thermal-acoustic effect of carbon in fly ash, and it was determined that the off-line thermal-acoustic technique could predict the carbon content of a random collection of fly ashes with a linear correlation constant of R{sup 2} = 0.778. Much higher correlations are expected for fly ashes generated from a single boiler. Phase 2 of the research developing a methodology to generate microwave spectra of various powders, including fly ash, coal, and inorganic minerals, and to determine if these microwave spectra could be used for chemical analyses. Although different minerals produced different responses, higher resolution microwave spectra would be required to be able to distinguish among minerals. Phase 3 of the research focused on the development of an on-line fly ash monitor that could be adapted to measure either a thermal-acoustic or thermal-elastic response to due microwave excitation of fly ash. The thermal-acoustic response was successfully employed for this purpose but the thermal-elastic response was too weak to yield a useful on-line device.

  11. Problems in Assessment of Wind Energy Potential and Acoustic Noise Distribution when Designing Wind Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukovs, Valerijs; Bezrukovs, Vladislavs; Levins, Nikolajs

    2011-01-01

    Interest in the use of renewable energy in Latvia is increasing every year. Government support and availability of large unpopulated areas on the coast makes the use of these lands for the placement of large wind power plants (WPP) attractive. The key factors that determine the choice of the location of WPP are reliable information about distribution of the resource of wind energy in this area and the influence of wind turbines on the environment. The paper presents the results of years-long observations on the density fluctuations of wind energy at heights of 10 to 60 m in the area in the Baltic Sea coast in Ventspils and Ainaži. The velocity observations since 2007 have been gathered by measurements complex of the LOGGER 9200 Symphonie type. The results are presented in the form of tables, bar charts and graphs. Extrapolation results of wind velocity and density mean values on heights up to 150 m for the two areas with different terrain types were shown. The distribution of acoustic noise in the vicinity of the WPP was studied and an assessment of its impact on the environment in accordance with the Latvian government requirements was conducted.

  12. Temperature Measurements on Hot Spots of Power Substations Utilizing Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaco, M. A. M.; Benedet, M. E.; Neto, L. R.

    2011-12-01

    In several applications in the field of metrology, the direct connection of the sensor element with the respective signal-processing unit of the measurement system is not trivial. It can be mentioned, as an example, the measurement of hot points in electric power substations because of the high electrical potential. To solve that problem, two alternatives were studied, one using active surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and other using passive SAW tags. For the passive sensor, a SAW radio-frequency identification (RFID) temperature detector was used. That technology is widely applied for typical transport identification (grain transportation, road traffic control), but its application in the field of metrology is innovative. The variation in temperature makes an alteration in the characteristics of the piezoelectric material of the SAW matrix, changing mostly the resonance frequency. Using SAW-RFID, the problem of measuring temperature basically is directed to the identification of the frequency of resonance of the SAW. The use of active SAW sensors has been demonstrated to be much more satisfactory for the solution of such a problem because of the limitation in the range of the passive sensors.

  13. 47 CFR 80.765 - Effective radiated power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effective radiated power. 80.765 Section 80.765 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE..., cavities, circulators, switches and filters, and the gain relative to a half-wave dipole of the...

  14. 47 CFR 80.765 - Effective radiated power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Effective radiated power. 80.765 Section 80.765 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE..., cavities, circulators, switches and filters, and the gain relative to a half-wave dipole of the...

  15. 47 CFR 80.765 - Effective radiated power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Effective radiated power. 80.765 Section 80.765 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE..., cavities, circulators, switches and filters, and the gain relative to a half-wave dipole of the...

  16. 47 CFR 80.765 - Effective radiated power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Effective radiated power. 80.765 Section 80.765 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE..., cavities, circulators, switches and filters, and the gain relative to a half-wave dipole of the...

  17. SEGR response of a radiation-hardened power MOSFET technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wheatley, C.F.; Titus, J.L.; Burton, D.I.; Carley, D.R.

    1996-12-01

    SEGR response curves are presented for eighteen different device types of radiation-hardened power MOSFETs. Comparisons are made to demonstrate the technology`s insensitivity to die size, rated blocking voltage, channel conductivity, and temperature. From this data, SEGR cross-sectional area curves are inferred.

  18. High-power terahertz radiation from relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, G. L.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Jordan, K.; Neil, George R.; Williams, G. P.

    2002-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation, which lies in the far-infrared region, is at the interface of electronics and photonics. Narrow-band THz radiation can be produced by free-electron lasers and fast diodes. Broadband THz radiation can be produced by thermal sources and, more recently, by table-top laser-driven sources and by short electron bunches in accelerators, but so far only with low power. Here we report calculations and measurements that confirm the production of high-power broadband THz radiation from subpicosecond electron bunches in an accelerator. The average power is nearly 20watts, several orders of magnitude higher than any existing source, which could enable various new applications. In particular, many materials have distinct absorptive and dispersive properties in this spectral range, so that THz imaging could reveal interesting features. For example, it would be possible to image the distribution of specific proteins or water in tissue, or buried metal layers in semiconductors; the present source would allow full-field, real-time capture of such images. High peak and average power THz sources are also critical in driving new nonlinear phenomena and for pump-probe studies of dynamical properties of materials.

  19. A rapid magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging sequence for ultrasonic refocusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougenot, Charles; Pichardo, Samuel; Engler, Steven; Waspe, Adam; Constanciel Colas, Elodie; Drake, James M.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance guided acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is being used to correct for aberrations induced by tissue heterogeneities when using high intensity focusing ultrasound (HIFU). A compromise between published MR-ARFI adaptive solutions is proposed to achieve efficient refocusing of the ultrasound beam in under 10 min. In addition, an ARFI sequence based on an EPI gradient echo sequence was used to simultaneously monitor displacement and temperature with a large SNR and low distortion. This study was conducted inside an Achieva 3T clinical MRI using a Philips Sonalleve MR-HIFU system to emit a 1 ms pulsed sonication with duty cycle of 2.3% at 300 Wac inside a polymer phantom. Virtual elements defined by a Hadamard array with sonication patterns composed of 6 phase steps were used to characterize 64 groups of 4 elements to find the optimal phase of the 256 elements of the transducer. The 384 sonication patterns were acquired in 580 s to identify the set of phases that maximize the displacement at the focal point. Three aberrators (neonatal skull, 8 year old skull and a checkered pattern) were added to each sonication pattern to evaluate the performance of this refocusing algorithm (n  =  4). These aberrators reduced the relative intensities to 95.3%, 69.6% and 25.5% for the neonatal skull, 8 year old skull, and checkered pattern virtual aberrators respectively. Using a 10 min refocusing algorithm, relative intensities of 101.6%, 91.3% and 93.3% were obtained. Better relative intensities of 103.9%, 94.3% and 101% were achieved using a 25 min refocusing algorithm. An average temperature increase of 4.2 °C per refocusing test was induced for the 10 min refocusing algorithm, resulting in a negligible thermal dose of 2 EM. A rapid refocusing of the beam can be achieved while keeping thermal effects to a minimum.

  20. Primary biliary cirrhosis degree assessment by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and hepatic fibrosis indicators

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-Chun; Hu, Rong-Fei; Zhu, Ting; Tong, Ling; Zhang, Qiu-Qin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the assessment of primary biliary cirrhosis degree by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) and hepatic fibrosis indicators. METHODS: One hundred and twenty patients who developed liver cirrhosis secondary to primary biliary cirrhosis were selected as the observation group, with the degree of patient liver cirrhosis graded by Child-Pugh (CP) score. Sixty healthy individuals were selected as the control group. The four indicators of hepatic fibrosis were detected in all research objects, including hyaluronic acid (HA), laminin (LN), type III collagen (PC III), and type IV collagen (IV-C). The liver parenchyma hardness value (LS) was then measured by ARFI technique. LS and the four indicators of liver fibrosis (HA, LN, PC III, and IV-C) were observed in different grade CP scores. The diagnostic value of LS and the four indicators of liver fibrosis in determining liver cirrhosis degree with PBC, whether used alone or in combination, were analyzed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. RESULTS: LS and the four indicators of liver fibrosis within the three classes (A, B, and C) of CP scores in the observation group were higher than in the control group, with C class > B class > A class; the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.01). Although AUC values of LS within the three classes of CP scores were higher than in the four indicators of liver fibrosis, sensitivity and specificity were unstable. The ROC curves of LS combined with the four indicators of liver fibrosis revealed that: AUC and sensitivity in all indicators combined in the A class of CP score were higher than in LS alone, albeit with slightly decreased specificity; AUC and specificity in all indicators combined in the B class of CP score were higher than in LS alone, with unchanged sensitivity; AUC values (0.967), sensitivity (97.4%), and specificity (90%) of all indicators combined in the C class of CP score were higher than in LS alone (0.936, 92.1%, 83

  1. A rapid magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging sequence for ultrasonic refocusing.

    PubMed

    Mougenot, Charles; Pichardo, Samuel; Engler, Steven; Waspe, Adam; Colas, Elodie Constanciel; Drake, James M

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance guided acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is being used to correct for aberrations induced by tissue heterogeneities when using high intensity focusing ultrasound (HIFU). A compromise between published MR-ARFI adaptive solutions is proposed to achieve efficient refocusing of the ultrasound beam in under 10 min. In addition, an ARFI sequence based on an EPI gradient echo sequence was used to simultaneously monitor displacement and temperature with a large SNR and low distortion. This study was conducted inside an Achieva 3T clinical MRI using a Philips Sonalleve MR-HIFU system to emit a 1 ms pulsed sonication with duty cycle of 2.3% at 300 Wac inside a polymer phantom. Virtual elements defined by a Hadamard array with sonication patterns composed of 6 phase steps were used to characterize 64 groups of 4 elements to find the optimal phase of the 256 elements of the transducer. The 384 sonication patterns were acquired in 580 s to identify the set of phases that maximize the displacement at the focal point. Three aberrators (neonatal skull, 8 year old skull and a checkered pattern) were added to each sonication pattern to evaluate the performance of this refocusing algorithm (n  =  4). These aberrators reduced the relative intensities to 95.3%, 69.6% and 25.5% for the neonatal skull, 8 year old skull, and checkered pattern virtual aberrators respectively. Using a 10 min refocusing algorithm, relative intensities of 101.6%, 91.3% and 93.3% were obtained. Better relative intensities of 103.9%, 94.3% and 101% were achieved using a 25 min refocusing algorithm. An average temperature increase of 4.2 °C per refocusing test was induced for the 10 min refocusing algorithm, resulting in a negligible thermal dose of 2 EM. A rapid refocusing of the beam can be achieved while keeping thermal effects to a minimum. PMID:27401452

  2. Shape oscillations of acoustically levitated drops in water: Early research with Bob Apfel on modulated radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Philip L.

    2001-05-01

    In 1976, research in collaboration with Bob Apfel demonstrated that low-frequency shape oscillations of hydrocarbon drops levitated in water could be driven using modulated radiation pressure. While that response to modulated ultrasound was subsequently extended to a range of systems, the emphasis here is to recall the initial stages of development in Bob Apfel's laboratory leading to some publications [P. L. Marston and R. E. Apfel, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 68, 280-286 (1979); J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 67, 27-37 (1980)]. The levitation technology used at that time was such that it was helpful to develop a sensitive method for detecting weak oscillations using the interference pattern in laser light scattered by levitated drops. The initial experiments to verify this scattering method used shape oscillations induced by modulated electric fields within the acoustic levitator. Light scattering was subsequently used to detect shape oscillations induced by amplitude modulating a carrier having a high frequency (around 680 kHz) at a resonance of the transducer. Methods were also developed for quantitative measurements of the drop's response and with improved acoustic coupling drop fission was observed. The connection with research currently supported by NASA will also be noted.

  3. The direct and inverse problems of an air-saturated porous cylinder submitted to acoustic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogam, Erick; Depollier, Claude; Fellah, Z. E. A.

    2010-09-01

    Gas-saturated porous skeleton materials such as geomaterials, polymeric and metallic foams, or biomaterials are fundamental in a diverse range of applications, from structural materials to energy technologies. Most polymeric foams are used for noise control applications and knowledge of the manner in which the energy of sound waves is dissipated with respect to the intrinsic acoustic properties is important for the design of sound packages. Foams are often employed in the audible, low frequency range where modeling and measurement techniques for the recovery of physical parameters responsible for energy loss are still few. Accurate acoustic methods of characterization of porous media are based on the measurement of the transmitted and/or reflected acoustic waves by platelike specimens at ultrasonic frequencies. In this study we develop an acoustic method for the recovery of the material parameters of a rigid-frame, air-saturated polymeric foam cylinder. A dispersion relation for sound wave propagation in the porous medium is derived from the propagation equations and a model solution is sought based on plane-wave decomposition using orthogonal cylindrical functions. The explicit analytical solution equation of the scattered field shows that it is also dependent on the intrinsic acoustic parameters of the porous cylinder, namely, porosity, tortuosity, and flow resistivity (permeability). The inverse problem of the recovery of the flow resistivity and porosity is solved by seeking the minima of the objective functions consisting of the sum of squared residuals of the differences between the experimental and theoretical scattered field data.

  4. Evolution Characteristics of Electromagnetic Power Radiated in Lightning Discharge Processes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jin-cui; Yuan, Ping; Cen, Jian-yong; Li, Ya-jun; Wang, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Combining the spectra of could-to-ground lightning discharge processes obtained by a slit-less spectrograph with synchronous electric field information, the temperature, the conductivity, the current peak, electromagnetic power peak and the luminance of the discharge channel are calculated. The values are in a normal range reported by references. The correlation among cut-off time before a subsequent return stroke, the luminance and electromagnetic power peak of the channel is discussed. The change trends of the conductivity, the current peak and electromagnetic power peak are also investigated. The results show when cut-off time is long, neutralized charges will grow, the current will rise and electromagnetic power radiated from the channel will increase. When the conductivity and the peak of the electric field change increase simultaneously, the current in the channel will rise and electromagnetic power radiated from the channel will be greater. This work will provide some references for calculating optical and electromagnetic energy radiated by lightning discharge processes. PMID:26601350

  5. Comparison reference etalon of unit laser radiation power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govor, I. N.; Kubarev, A. V.; Ozolin, V. V.

    1985-01-01

    An etalon was developed for comparing national secondary and governmental primary standards of laser radiation power. It contains, in addition to two reference instrument transducers operating by different principles and having different spectral characteristics, a laser source emitting at the 0.63 micron wavelength with high power stability, a recording instrument, a calibrating instrument, and signal shaping-checking circuits. The first reference transducer is a nonselective calorimetric one, a model of a black body consisting of two parallel conical copper shells with a 15 deg taper inserted one inside the other with two thin-film equivalent resistors between them. The second reference transducer is a precise photothermoelectric one for comparison of standard with similar spectral and space distributions of the radiation power, also for checking the performance of the calorimetric reference transducer. It consists of a photoelectric cell and a thermoelectric cell in thermal contact with one another through an integrating sphere on which they are placed not far apart. An auxiliary photodiode is provided for checking the radiation power level after it has stabilized. The instability of this etalon does not exceed 0.5 x 10 to the -4th power during 1 hour.

  6. Simultaneous backward data transmission and power harvesting in an ultrasonic transcutaneous energy transfer link employing acoustically dependent electric impedance modulation.

    PubMed

    Ozeri, Shaul; Shmilovitz, Doron

    2014-09-01

    The advancement and miniaturization of body implanted medical devices pose several challenges to Ultrasonic Transcutaneous Energy Transfer (UTET), such as the need to reduce the size of the piezoelectric resonator, and the need to maximize the UTET link power-transfer efficiency. Accordingly, the same piezoelectric resonator that is used for energy harvesting at the body implant, may also be used for ultrasonic backward data transfer, for instance, through impedance modulation. This paper presents physical considerations and design guidelines of the body implanted transducer of a UTET link with impedance modulation for a backward data transfer. The acoustic matching design procedure was based on the 2×2 transfer matrix chain analysis, in addition to the Krimholtz Leedom and Matthaei KLM transmission line model. The UTET power transfer was carried out at a frequency of 765 kHz, continuous wave (CW) mode. The backward data transfer was attained by inserting a 9% load resistance variation around its matched value (550 Ohm), resulting in a 12% increase in the acoustic reflection coefficient. A backward data transmission rate of 1200 bits/s was experimentally demonstrated using amplitude shift keying, simultaneously with an acoustic power transfer of 20 mW to the implant. PMID:24861424

  7. Structure- and fluid-borne acoustic power sources induced by turbulent flow in 90° piping elbows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambric, S. A.; Boger, D. A.; Fahnline, J. B.; Campbell, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    The structure- and fluid-borne vibro-acoustic power spectra induced by turbulent fluid flow over the walls of a continuous 90° piping elbow are computed. Although the actual power input to the piping by the wall pressure fluctuations is distributed throughout the elbow, equivalent total power inputs to various structural wavetypes (bending, torsion, axial) and fluid (plane-waves) at the inlet and discharge of the elbow are computed. The powers at the elbow “ports” are suitable inputs to wave- and statistically-based models of larger piping systems that include the elbow. Calculations for several flow and structural parameters, including pipe wall thickness, flow speed, and flow Reynolds number are shown. The power spectra are scaled on flow and structural-acoustic parameters so that levels for conditions other than those considered in the paper may be estimated, subject to geometric similarity constraints (elbow radius/pipe diameter). The approach for computing the powers (called CHAMP - combined hydroacoustic modeling programs), which links computational fluid dynamics, finite element and boundary element modeling, and efficient random analysis techniques, is general, and may be applied to other piping system components excited by turbulent fluid flow, such as U-bends and T-sections.

  8. Calculation of ionospheric effects due to acoustic radiation from an underground nuclear explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, G. V.; Uralov, A. M.

    1995-03-01

    Within the framework of the ionospheric detection of underground nuclear tests, we have developed analytic computing technique for the acoustic effect of a confined nuclear explosion on upper layers of the Earth's atmosphere. The relationship is obtained, which relates the nuclear test parameters (depth, explosion yield, and mechanical properties of the rock) to the vertical displacement of the ionosphere produced by the shock wave over the explosion's epicenter. It is also shown that most of the acoustic energy produced by a confined underground nuclear explosion escapes upward, with only a small fraction being captured by the atmospheric waveguide.

  9. The effects of nuclear radiation on Schottky power diodes and power MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulisek, Jonathan Andrew

    NASA is exploring the potential use of nuclear reactors as power sources for future space missions. These missions will require electrical components, consisting of power circuits and semiconductor devices, to be placed in close vicinity to the reactor, in the midst of a high neutron and gamma-ray radiation field. Therefore, the primary goal of this research is to examine the effects of a mixed neutron and gamma-ray radiation field on the static and dynamic electrical performance of power Schottky diodes and power MOSFETs in order to support future design efforts of radiation-hard power semiconductors and circuits. In order to accomplish this, non-radiation hardened commercial power Si and SiC Schottky power diodes, manufactured by International Rectifier and Cree, respectively, were irradiated in the Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR), and their degradation in electrical performance was observed using I-V characterization. Key electrical performance parameters were extracted using least squares curve-fits of the corresponding semiconductor physics model equations to the experimental data, and these electrical performance parameters were used to model the diodes in PSpice. A half-wave rectifier circuit containing Cree SiC Schottky diodes, rated for 5 A DC forward current and 1200 V DC blocking voltage, was also tested and modeled in order to determine and analyze changes in overall circuit performance and diode power dissipation as a function of radiation dose. Also, electrical components will be exposed to charged particle radiation from space, such as high energy protons in the Van Allen Radiation Belts surrounding earth. Therefore, the results from this study, with respect to the Si and SiC Schottky power diodes, were compared to results published by NASA, which had tested the same diode models at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) with a 203 MeV proton beam. The comparison was made on the basis of displacement damage dose, calculated

  10. New-generation low-power radiation survey instruments. [Powered by capacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Waechter, D.A.; Bjarke, G.O.; Wolf, M.A.; Trujillo, F.; Umbarger, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    A number of new, ultra-low-powered radiation instruments have recently been developed at Los Alamos. Among these are two instruments which use a novel power source to eliminate costly batteries. The newly developed gamma detecting radiac, nicknamed the Firefly, and the alpha particle detecting instrument, called the Simple Cordless Alpha Monitor, both use recent advances in miniaturization and power-saving electronics to yield devices which are small, rugged, and very power-frugal. The two instruments consume so little power that the need for batteries to run them is eliminated. They are, instead, powered by a charged capacitor which will operate the instruments for an hour or more. Both line power and mechanical sources are used to charge the storage capacitors which power the instruments.

  11. Record High Power Terahertz Radiation from Relativistic Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    G.L. Carr; Michael C. Martin; Wayne R. McKinney; Kevin Jordan; George R. Neil; Gwyn P. Williams

    2002-03-01

    Calculations and measurements confirm the production of coherent broadband THz radiation from relativistic electrons with an average power of nearly 20 watts. The radiation has qualities closely analogous to the THz radiation produced by ultrafast laser techniques (spatially coherent, short duration pulses with transform-limited spectral content). But in contrast to conventional THz radiation, the intensity is many orders of magnitude greater due to a relativistic enhancement. The absorption and dispersive properties of materials in this spectral range provide contrast for a unique type of imaging [1,2]. The striking improvement in power reported here could revolutionize this application by allowing full-field, real-time image capture. High peak and average power THz sources are also critical in driving new non-linear phenomena with excellent signal to noise, and for pump-probe studies of dynamical properties of novel materials, both of which are central to future high-speed electronic devices [3,4]. It should also be useful for studies of molecular vibrations and rotations, low frequency protein motions, phonons, superconductor bandgaps, electronic scattering and collective electronic excitations (e.g., charge density waves).

  12. Reversible swarming and separation of self-propelled chemically powered nanomotors under acoustic fields.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tailin; Soto, Fernando; Gao, Wei; Dong, Renfeng; Garcia-Gradilla, Victor; Magaña, Ernesto; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Joseph

    2015-02-18

    The collective behavior of biological systems has inspired efforts toward the controlled assembly of synthetic nanomotors. Here we demonstrate the use of acoustic fields to induce reversible assembly of catalytic nanomotors, controlled swarm movement, and separation of different nanomotors. The swarming mechanism relies on the interaction between individual nanomotors and the acoustic field, which triggers rapid migration and assembly around the nearest pressure node. Such on-demand assembly of catalytic nanomotors is extremely fast and reversible. Controlled movement of the resulting swarm is illustrated by changing the frequency of the acoustic field. Efficient separation of different types of nanomotors, which assemble in distinct swarming regions, is illustrated. The ability of acoustic fields to regulate the collective behavior of catalytic nanomotors holds considerable promise for a wide range of practical applications. PMID:25634724

  13. Estimation of mechanical properties of a viscoelastic medium using a laser-induced microbubble interrogated by an acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangpil; Aglyamov, Salavat R; Karpiouk, Andrei B; Kim, Seungsoo; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2011-10-01

    An approach to assess the mechanical properties of a viscoelastic medium using laser-induced microbubbles is presented. To measure mechanical properties of the medium, dynamics of a laser-induced cavitation microbubble in viscoelastic medium under acoustic radiation force was investigated. An objective lens with a 1.13 numerical aperture and an 8.0 mm working distance was designed to focus a 532 nm wavelength nanosecond pulsed laser beam and to create a microbubble at the desired location. A 3.5 MHz ultrasound transducer was used to generate acoustic radiation force to excite a laser-induced microbubble. Motion of the microbubble was tracked using a 25 MHz imaging transducer. Agreement between a theoretical model of bubble motion in a viscoelastic medium and experimental measurements was demonstrated. Young's modulii reconstructed using the laser-induced microbubble approach were compared with those measured using a direct uniaxial method over the range from 0.8 to 13 kPa. The results indicate good agreement between methods. Thus, the proposed approach can be used to assess the mechanical properties of a viscoelastic medium. PMID:21973379

  14. Imaging and characterizing shear wave and shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force excitation using OCT Doppler variance method.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiang; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    We report on a novel acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) technique for imaging shear wave and quantifying shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) Doppler variance method. The ARF perpendicular to the OCT beam is produced by a remote ultrasonic transducer. A shear wave induced by ARF excitation propagates parallel to the OCT beam. The OCT Doppler variance method, which is sensitive to the transverse vibration, is used to measure the ARF-induced vibration. For analysis of the shear modulus, the Doppler variance method is utilized to visualize shear wave propagation instead of Doppler OCT method, and the propagation velocity of the shear wave is measured at different depths of one location with the M scan. In order to quantify shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth, we move ARF to a deeper layer at a known step and measure the time delay of the shear wave propagating to the same OCT imaging depth. We also quantitatively map the shear modulus of a cross-section in a tissue-equivalent phantom after employing the B scan. PMID:25927794

  15. Imaging and characterizing shear wave and shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force excitation using OCT Doppler variance method

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiang; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    We report on a novel acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) technique for imaging shear wave and quantifying shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) Doppler variance method. The ARF perpendicular to the OCT beam is produced by a remote ultrasonic transducer. A shear wave induced by ARF excitation propagates parallel to the OCT beam. The OCT Doppler variance method, which is sensitive to the transverse vibration, is used to measure the ARF-induced vibration. For analysis of the shear modulus, the Doppler variance method is utilized to visualize shear wave propagation instead of Doppler OCT method, and the propagation velocity of the shear wave is measured at different depths of one location with the M scan. In order to quantify shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth, we move ARF to a deeper layer at a known step and measure the time delay of the shear wave propagating to the same OCT imaging depth. We also quantitatively map the shear modulus of a cross-section in a tissue-equivalent phantom after employing the B scan. PMID:25927794

  16. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging: Characterizing the mechanical properties of tissues using their transient response to localized force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Congdon, Amy N.; Frinkely, Kristin D.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2001-05-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging utilizes brief, high energy, focused acoustic pulses to generate radiation force in tissue, and conventional diagnostic ultrasound methods to detect the resulting tissue displacements in order to image the relative mechanical properties of tissue. The magnitude and spatial extent of the applied force is dependent upon the transmit beam parameters and the tissue attenuation. Forcing volumes are on the order of 5 mm3, pulse durations are less than 1 ms, and tissue displacements are typically several microns. Images of tissue displacement reflect local tissue stiffness, with softer tissues (e.g., fat) displacing farther than stiffer tissues (e.g., muscle). Parametric images of maximum displacement, time to peak displacement, and recovery time provide information about tissue material properties and structure. In both in vivo and ex vivo data, structures shown in matched B-mode images are in good agreement with those shown in ARFI images, with comparable resolution. Potential clinical applications under investigation include soft tissue lesion characterization, assessment of focal atherosclerosis, and imaging of thermal lesion formation during tissue ablation procedures. Results from ongoing studies will be presented. [Work supported by NIH Grant R01 EB002132-03, and the Whitaker Foundation. System support from Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc.

  17. Very high power THz radiation at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, G. L.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Jordan, K.; Neil, George R.; Williams, G. P.

    2002-11-01

    We report the production of high power (20 W average, ~1 MW peak) broadband THz light based on coherent emission from relativistic electrons. We describe the source, presenting theoretical calculations and their experimental verification. For clarity we compare this source with that based on ultrafast laser techniques, and in fact the radiation has qualities closely analogous to those produced by such sources, namely that it is spatially coherent, and comprises short duration pulses with transform-limited spectral content. In contrast to conventional THz radiation, however, the intensity is many orders of magnitude greater due to the relativistic enhancement.

  18. Radiation protection performance indicators at the Nuclear Power Plant Krsko.

    PubMed

    Janzekovic, Helena

    2006-06-01

    Nuclear power plant safety performance indicators are developed "by nuclear operating organisations to monitor their own performance and progress, to set their own challenging goals for improvement, and to gain additional perspective on performance relative to that of other plants". In addition, performance indicators are widely used by regulatory authorities although the use is not harmonised. Two basic performance indicators related to good radiation protection practice are collective radiation exposure and volume of low-level radioactive waste. In 2000, Nuclear Power Plant Krsko, a Westinghouse pressurised water reactor with electrical output 700 MW, finished an extensive modernisation including the replacement of both steam generators. While the annual volume of low-level radioactive waste does not show a specific trend related to modernisation, the annual collective dose reached maximum, i.e. 2.60 man Sv, and dropped to 1.13 man Sv in 2001. During the replacement of the steam generators in 2000, the dose associated with this activity was 1.48 man Sv. The annual doses in 2002 and 2003 were 0.53 and 0.80 man Sv, respectively, nearing thus the goal set by the US Institute of Nuclear Power Operators, which is 0.65 man Sv. Therefore, inasmuch as collective dose as the radiation protection performance indicator are concerned, the modernisation of the Krsko nuclear power plant was a success. PMID:16832974

  19. Wireless acoustic-electric feed-through for power and signal transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Bao, Xiaoqi (Inventor); Doty, Benjamin (Inventor); Badescu, Mircea (Inventor); Chang, Zensheu (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An embodiment provides electrical energy from a source on one side of a medium to a load on the other side of the medium, the embodiment including a first piezoelectric to generate acoustic energy in response to electrical energy from the source, and a second piezoelectric to convert the received acoustic energy to electrical energy used by the load. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  20. Lunar and Martian environmental interactions with nuclear power system radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Gaier, James R.; Katzan, Cynthia M.

    1992-01-01

    Future NASA space missions include a permanent manned presence on the moon and an expedition to the planet Mars. Such steps will require careful consideration of environmental interactions in the selection and design of required power systems. Several environmental constituents may be hazardous to performance integrity. Potential threats common to both the moon and Mars are low ambient temperatures, wide daily temperature swings, solar flux, and large quantities of dust. The surface of Mars provides the additional challenges of dust storms, winds, and a carbon dioxide atmosphere. In this review, the anticipated environmental interactions with surface power system radiators are described, as well as the impacts of these interactions on radiator durability, which were identified at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  1. Lunar and Martian environmental interactions with nuclear power system radiators

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Davis, M.E.; Gaier, J.R.; Katzan, C.M.

    1994-09-01

    In the foreseeable future, NASA space milestones include a permanent manned presence on the Moon and an expedition to the planet Mars. Such steps will require careful consideration of environmental interactions in the selection and design of required power systems. Several environmental constituents may be hazardous to performance integrity. Potential threats common to both the Moon and Mars are low ambient temperatures, wide daily temperature swings, solar flux, and large quantities of dust. The surface of Mars provides the additional challenges of dust storms, winds, and a carbon dioxide atmosphere. In this review, the anticipated environmental interactions with surface power system radiators are described, as well as the impacts of these interactions on radiator durability, which have been identified at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  2. Power Beaming Leakage Radiation as a SETI Observable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, James N.; Benford, Dominic J.

    2016-07-01

    The most observable leakage radiation from an advanced civilization may well be from the use of power beaming to transfer energy and accelerate spacecraft. Applications suggested for power beaming involve launching spacecraft to orbit, raising satellites to a higher orbit, and interplanetary concepts involving space-to-space transfers of cargo or passengers. We also quantify beam-driven launch to the outer solar system, interstellar precursors, and ultimately starships. We estimate the principal observable parameters of power beaming leakage. Extraterrestrial civilizations would know their power beams could be observed, and so could put a message on the power beam and broadcast it for our receipt at little additional energy or cost. By observing leakage from power beams we may find a message embedded on the beam. Recent observations of the anomalous star KIC 8462852 by the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) set some limits on extraterrestrial power beaming in that system. We show that most power beaming applications commensurate with those suggested for our solar system would be detectable if using the frequency range monitored by the ATA, and so the lack of detection is a meaningful, if modest, constraint on extraterrestrial power beaming in that system. Until more extensive observations are made, the limited observation time and frequency coverage are not sufficiently broad in frequency and duration to produce firm conclusions. Such beams would be visible over large interstellar distances. This implies a new approach to the SETI search: instead of focusing on narrowband beacon transmissions generated by another civilization, look for more powerful beams with much wider bandwidth. This requires a new approach for their discovery by telescopes on Earth. Further studies of power beaming applications should be performed, potentially broadening the parameter space of the observable features that we have discussed here.

  3. The resistive bolometer for radiated power measurement on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Y. M.; Hu, L. Q.; Mao, S. T.; Chen, K. Y.; Lin, S. Y.; Collaboration: EAST Diagnostics Team

    2012-09-15

    The resistive bolometer system has been successfully employed on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak for the first time to measure the radiated power of plasma. The bolometer detectors are based on 4 {mu}m thick Pt absorbers deposited on 1.5 {mu}m thick SiN membranes. The system consists of 3 cameras with a total of 48 channels. The detector and the system setup are described in detail. The detector calibration and typical measurement results are presented as well.

  4. Radiation Testing of PICA at the Solar Power Tower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratory's Solar Power Tower was used to irradiate specimens of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), in order to evaluate whether this thermal protection system material responded differently to potential shock layer radiative heating than to convective heating. Tests were run at 50, 100 and 150 Watts per square centimeter levels of concentrated solar radiation. Experimental results are presented both from spectral measurements on 1- 10 mm thick specimens of PICA, as well as from in-depth temperature measurements on instrumented thicker test specimens. Both spectral measurements and measured in-depth temperature profiles showed that, although it is a porous, low-density material, PICA does not exhibit problematic transparency to the tested high levels of NIR radiation, for all pragmatic cm-to-inch scale thicknesses. PICA acted as a surface absorber to efficiently absorb the incident visible and near infrared incident radiation in the top 2 millimeter layer in the Solar Power Tower tests up to 150 Watts per square centimeter.

  5. High power beam profile monitor with optical transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Denard, J.C.; Piot, P.; Capek, K.; Feldl, E.

    1997-06-01

    A simple monitor has been built to measure the profile of the high power beam (800 kW) delivered by the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab. The monitor uses the optical part of the forward transition radiation emitted from a thin carbon foil. The small beam size to be measured, about 100 {mu}m, is challenging not only for the power density involved but also for the resolution the instrument must achieve. An important part of the beam instrumentation community believes the radiation being emitted into a cone of characteristic angle 1/{gamma} is originated from a region of transverse dimension roughly {lambda}{gamma}; thus the apparent size of the source of transition radiation would become very large for highly relativistic particles. This monitor measures 100 {mu}m beam sizes that are much smaller than the 3.2 mm {lambda}{gamma} limit; it confirms the statement of Rule and Fiorito that optical transition radiation can be used to image small beams at high energy. The present paper describes the instrument and its performance. The authors tested the foil in, up to 180 {mu}A of CW beam without causing noticeable beam loss, even at 800 MeV, the lowest CEBAF energy.

  6. Elasticity imaging of speckle-free tissue regions with moving acoustic radiation force and phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Song, Shaozhen; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Yoon, Soon Joon; Shen, Tueng; Wang, Ruikang; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) can be utilized for quantitative shear-wave elastography using speckle tracking. However, current approaches cannot directly reconstruct elastic properties in speckle-less or speckle-free regions, for example within the crystalline lens in ophthalmology. Investigating the elasticity of the crystalline lens could improve understanding and help manage presbyopia-related pathologies that change biomechanical properties. We propose to reconstruct the elastic properties in speckle-less regions by sequentially launching shear waves with moving acoustic radiation force (mARF), and then detecting the displacement at a specific speckle-generating position, or limited set of positions, with PhS-OCT. A linear ultrasound array (with a center frequency of 5 MHz) interfaced with a programmable imaging system was designed to launch shear waves by mARF. Acoustic sources were electronically translated to launch shear waves at laterally shifted positions, where displacements were detected by speckle tracking images produced by PhS-OCT operating in M-B mode with a 125-kHz A-line rate. Local displacements were calculated and stitched together sequentially based on the distance between the acoustic source and the detection beam. Shear wave speed, and the associated elasticity map, were then reconstructed based on a time-of-flight algorithm. In this study, moving-source shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) can highlight a stiff inclusion within an otherwise homogeneous phantom but with a CNR increased by 3.15 dB compared to a similar image reconstructed with moving-detector SWEI. Partial speckle-free phantoms were also investigated to demonstrate that the moving-source sequence could reconstruct the elastic properties of speckle-free regions. Results show that harder inclusions within the speckle-free region can be detected, suggesting that this imaging method may be able to detect the elastic properties of the crystalline lens.

  7. 21 CFR 892.5770 - Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly... therapy patient support assembly. (a) Identification. A powered radiation therapy patient support assembly is an electrically powered adjustable couch intended to support a patient during radiation...

  8. Perception of power modulation of light in conjunction with acoustic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius F.; Weyer, Cornelia; Gercke-Hahn, Harald; Gutzmann, Holger L.; Brahmann, Andre; Rothe, Hendrik

    2013-09-01

    The present paper is derived from an ongoing study on the human perception of combined optical and acoustical periodical stimuli. Originating from problems of occupational medicine concerning artificial illumination and certain machinery with coherent optical and acoustical emissions there are effects which are interesting in the context of Optics and Music. Because of the difficulties in evaluation of physical and psychological effects of such coherent stimuli in a first step we questioned if such coherence is perceivable at all. Concept, experimental set-up and first results are discussed in short.

  9. A high-powered siren for stable acoustic levitation of dense materials in the earth's gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammel, Paul M.; Croonquist, Arvid P.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1988-01-01

    Levitation of large dense samples (e.g., 1-cm diameter steel balls) has been performed in a 1-g environment. A siren was used to study the effects of reflector geometry and variable-frequency operation in order to attain stable acoustic positioning. The harmonic content and spatial distribution of the acoustic field have been investigated. The best stability was obtained with an open reflector system, using a flat lower reflector and a slightly concave upper reflector while operating at a frequency slightly below resonance.

  10. Design and Modeling of High Power Density Acoustic Transducer Materials for Autonomous Undersea Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitmann, Adam Arthur

    Advances in piezocrystal transducer materials technology has opened new avenues to impact the size, weight, and power consumption of sonar systems for deployment in autonomous undersea vehicles (AUVs). Although piezocrystals exhibit exceptional electromechanical properties, they have low ferroelectric Curie temperatures, small electrical coercivities, and exhibit temperature, electrical field, and/or stress induced phase transitions between ferroelectric phases with differing electromechanical properties. New piezocrystal materials are required that can provide the compositional tailoring capability needed to increase the Curie temperature and coercive field, ameliorate the deleterious effects of ferroelectric-ferroelectric phase transitions, and enable property optimization for specific transducer applications. Currently, new piezocrystal systems and compositions are selected almost exclusively by empirical 'make and measure' approaches guided by past experiences. These empirical processes can be time and labor intensive and as a result there exists only limited predictive capability for finding new piezocrystal compositions even in known piezocrystal systems. In this study we seek to develop a comprehensive phenomenological theory and a unified parameterization scheme applicable to binary and ternary ferroelectric solid solution systems in order to enable the accelerated development and characterization of new piezocrystal systems for optimized transducer performance. A modified form of the classical Ginzburg-Landau-Devonshire theory of weak first-order transitions is applied to perovskite-structured ferroelectric systems based on the ternary oxide compounds, barium titanate and lead titanate, which places special emphasis on the role played by the crystallographic anisotropy of polarization. It is shown that the theory produces excellent qualitative agreement with the experimentally measured phase diagram topologies, crystal lattice parameters, and

  11. Acoustic radiation force on an air bubble and soft fluid spheres in ideal liquids: Example of a high-order Bessel beam of quasi-standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2009-04-01

    The partial wave series for the scattering of a high-order Bessel beam (HOBB) of acoustic quasi-standing waves by an air bubble and fluid spheres immersed in water and centered on the axis of the beam is applied to the calculation of the acoustic radiation force. A HOBB refers to a type of beam having an axial amplitude null and an azimuthal phase gradient. Radiation force examples obtained through numerical evaluation of the radiation force function are computed for an air bubble, a hexane, a red blood and mercury fluid spheres in water. The examples were selected to illustrate conditions having progressive, standing and quasi-standing waves with appropriate selection of the waves’ amplitude ratio. An especially noteworthy result is the lack of a specific vibrational mode contribution to the radiation force determined by appropriate selection of the HOBB parameters.

  12. Axial and transverse acoustic radiation forces on a fluid sphere placed arbitrarily in Bessel beam standing wave tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2014-03-01

    The axial and transverse radiation forces on a fluid sphere placed arbitrarily in the acoustical field of Bessel beams of standing waves are evaluated. The three-dimensional components of the time-averaged force are expressed in terms of the beam-shape coefficients of the incident field and the scattering coefficients of the fluid sphere using a partial-wave expansion (PWE) method. Examples are chosen for which the standing wave field is composed of either a zero-order (non-vortex) Bessel beam, or a first-order Bessel vortex beam. It is shown here, that both transverse and axial forces can push or pull the fluid sphere to an equilibrium position depending on the chosen size parameter ka (where k is the wave-number and a the sphere's radius). The corresponding results are of particular importance in biophysical applications for the design of lab-on-chip devices operating with Bessel beams standing wave tweezers. Moreover, potential investigations in acoustic levitation and related applications in particle rotation in a vortex beam may benefit from the results of this study.

  13. Suppression of sound radiation to far field of near-field acoustic communication system using evanescent sound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Ayaka; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Mizutani, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A method of suppressing sound radiation to the far field of a near-field acoustic communication system using an evanescent sound field is proposed. The amplitude of the evanescent sound field generated from an infinite vibrating plate attenuates exponentially with increasing a distance from the surface of the vibrating plate. However, a discontinuity of the sound field exists at the edge of the finite vibrating plate in practice, which broadens the wavenumber spectrum. A sound wave radiates over the evanescent sound field because of broadening of the wavenumber spectrum. Therefore, we calculated the optimum distribution of the particle velocity on the vibrating plate to reduce the broadening of the wavenumber spectrum. We focused on a window function that is utilized in the field of signal analysis for reducing the broadening of the frequency spectrum. The optimization calculation is necessary for the design of window function suitable for suppressing sound radiation and securing a spatial area for data communication. In addition, a wide frequency bandwidth is required to increase the data transmission speed. Therefore, we investigated a suitable method for calculating the sound pressure level at the far field to confirm the variation of the distribution of sound pressure level determined on the basis of the window shape and frequency. The distribution of the sound pressure level at a finite distance was in good agreement with that obtained at an infinite far field under the condition generating the evanescent sound field. Consequently, the window function was optimized by the method used to calculate the distribution of the sound pressure level at an infinite far field using the wavenumber spectrum on the vibrating plate. According to the result of comparing the distributions of the sound pressure level in the cases with and without the window function, it was confirmed that the area whose sound pressure level was reduced from the maximum level to -50 dB was

  14. Single- and Multiple- Track Location Shear Wave and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging: Matched Comparison of Contrast, CNR, and Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hollender, Peter J.; Rosenzweig, Stephen J.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) use the dynamic response of tissue to impulsive mechanical stimulus to characterize local elasticity. A variant of conventional, multiple track location SWEI (MTL-SWEI), denoted single track location SWEI (STL-SWEI) offers the promise of creating speckle-free shear wave images. This work compares the three imaging modalities using a high push and track beam density combined acquisition sequence to image inclusions of different sizes and contrasts. STL-SWEI is shown to have significantly higher CNR than MTL-SWEI, allowing for operation at higher resolution. ARFI and STL-SWEI perform similarly in the larger inclusions, with STL-SWEI providing better visualization of small targets ≤2.5 mm in diameter. The processing of each modality introduces different trade-offs between smoothness and resolution of edges and structures; these are discussed in detail. PMID:25701531

  15. Thermal and dynamic analysis of the RING (Radiatively-cooled, Inertially-driven Nuclear Generator) power system radiator

    SciTech Connect

    Apley, W.J.; Babb, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear option for a space-based power system appears most suitable for missions that require long-term, sustained operation at power levels above 100 kWe. Systems currently available operate at relatively low thermal efficiencies (6--10%). Thus, a 100 kWe system must discharge nearly 2 MWth of waste heat through the comparatively inefficient process of radiative cooling. The impact of the resultant radiator assembly size on overall power system weight is significant, and has led to proposals for radiators with potentially higher efficiencies. Examples include the: liquid droplet radiator; fabric radiator; bubble membrane radiator; rotating film radiator; and dust radiator. 14 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Enhanced acoustic startle responding in rats with radiation-induced hippocampal granule cell hypoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Ferguson, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Irradiation of the neonatal rat hippocampus reduces the proliferation of granule cells in the dentate gyrus and results in locomotor hyperactivity, behavioral preservation, and deficits on some learned tasks. In order to address the role of changes in stimulus salience and behavioral inhibition in animals with this type of brain damage, irradiated and normal rats were compared in their startle reactions to an acoustic stimulus. Irradiated rats startled with a consistently higher amplitude than control and were more likely to exhibit startle responses. These animals with hippocampal damage also failed to habituate to the startle stimulus and, under certain circumstances, showed potentiated startle responses after many tone presentations.

  17. Design and implementation of an omni-directional underwater acoustic micro-modem based on a low-power micro-controller unit.

    PubMed

    Won, Tae-Hee; Park, Sung-Joon

    2012-01-01

    For decades, underwater acoustic communication has been restricted to the point-to-point long distance applications such as deep sea probes and offshore oil fields. For this reason, previous acoustic modems were typically characterized by high data rates and long working ranges at the expense of large size and high power consumption. Recently, as the need for underwater wireless sensor networks (UWSNs) has increased, the research and development of compact and low-power consuming communication devices has become the focus. From the consideration that the requisites of acoustic modems for UWSNs are low power consumption, omni-directional beam pattern, low cost and so on, in this paper, we design and implement an omni-directional underwater acoustic micro-modem satisfying these requirements. In order to execute fast digital domain signal processing and support flexible interfaces with other peripherals, an ARM Cortex-M3 is embedded in the micro-modem. Also, for the realization of small and omni-directional properties, a spherical transducer having a resonant frequency of 70 kHz and a diameter of 34 mm is utilized for the implementation. Physical layer frame format and symbol structure for efficient packet-based underwater communication systems are also investigated. The developed acoustic micro-modem is verified analytically and experimentally in indoor and outdoor environments in terms of functionality and performance. Since the modem satisfies the requirements for use in UWSNs, it could be deployed in a wide range of applications requiring underwater acoustic communication. PMID:22438765

  18. Low-Cost Radiator for Fission Power Thermal Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, Taylor; Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William; Hartenstine, John; Stern, Theodore; Walmsley, Nicholas; Briggs, Maxwell

    2014-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing fission power system technology for future Lunar surface power applications. The systems are envisioned in the 10 to 100kW(sub e) range and have an anticipated design life of 8 to 15 years with no maintenance. NASA GRC is currently setting up a 55 kW(sub e) non-nuclear system ground test in thermal-vacuum to validate technologies required to transfer reactor heat, convert the heat into electricity, reject waste heat, process the electrical output, and demonstrate overall system performance. Reducing the radiator mass, size, and cost is essential to the success of the program. To meet these goals, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) and Vanguard Space Technologies, Inc. (VST) are developing a single facesheet radiator with heat pipes directly bonded to the facesheet. The facesheet material is a graphite fiber reinforced composite (GFRC) and the heat pipes are titanium/water. By directly bonding a single facesheet to the heat pipes, several heavy and expensive components can be eliminated from the traditional radiator design such as, POC(TradeMark) foam saddles, aluminum honeycomb, and a second facesheet. A two-heat pipe radiator prototype, based on the single facesheet direct-bond concept, was fabricated and tested to verify the ability of the direct-bond joint to withstand coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) induced stresses during thermal cycling. The thermal gradients along the bonds were measured before and after thermal cycle tests to determine if the performance degraded. Overall, the results indicated that the initial uniformity of the adhesive was poor along one of the heat pipes. However, both direct bond joints showed no measureable amount of degradation after being thermally cycled at both moderate and aggressive conditions.

  19. Behavioral consequences of radiation exposure to simulated space radiation in the C57BL/6 mouse: open field, rotorod, and acoustic startle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecaut, Michael J.; Haerich, Paul; Zuccarelli, Cara N.; Smith, Anna L.; Zendejas, Eric D.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to investigate the consequences of exposure to proton radiation, such as might occur for astronauts during space flight. C57BL/6 mice were exposed, either with or without 15-g/cm2 aluminum shielding, to 0-, 3-, or 4-Gy proton irradiation mimicking features of a solar particle event. Irradiation produced transient direct deficits in open-field exploratory behavior and acoustic startle habituation. Rotorod performance at 18 rpm was impaired by exposure to proton radiation and was impaired at 26 rpm, but only for mice irradiated with shielding and at the 4-Gy dose. Long-term (>2 weeks) indirect deficits in open-field activity appeared as a result of impaired experiential encoding immediately following exposure. A 2-week recovery prior to testing decreased most of the direct effects of exposure, with only rotorod performance at 26 rpm being impaired. These results suggest that the performance deficits may have been mediated by radiation damage to hippocampal, cerebellar, and possibly, forebrain dopaminergic function.

  20. Behavioral consequences of radiation exposure to simulated space radiation in the C57BL/6 mouse: open field, rotorod, and acoustic startle.

    PubMed

    Pecaut, Michael J; Haerich, Paul; Zuccarelli, Cara N; Smith, Anna L; Zendejas, Eric D; Nelson, Gregory A

    2002-12-01

    Two experiments were carried out to investigate the consequences of exposure to proton radiation, such as might occur for astronauts during space flight. C57BL/6 mice were exposed, either with or without 15-g/cm2 aluminum shielding, to 0-, 3-, or 4-Gy proton irradiation mimicking features of a solar particle event. Irradiation produced transient direct deficits in open-field exploratory behavior and acoustic startle habituation. Rotorod performance at 18 rpm was impaired by exposure to proton radiation and was impaired at 26 rpm, but only for mice irradiated with shielding and at the 4-Gy dose. Long-term (>2 weeks) indirect deficits in open-field activity appeared as a result of impaired experiential encoding immediately following exposure. A 2-week recovery prior to testing decreased most of the direct effects of exposure, with only rotorod performance at 26 rpm being impaired. These results suggest that the performance deficits may have been mediated by radiation damage to hippocampal, cerebellar, and possibly, forebrain dopaminergic function. PMID:12641177

  1. Explosive pulsed power system for new radiation sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Oona, H.; Goforth, J. H.; Idzorek, G. C.; Herrera, D. H.; King, J. C.; Lopez, E. A.; Tasker, D. G.; Torres, D. T.

    2004-01-01

    High explosive pulsed power (HEPP) systems are capable of accessing very high energy densities and can reach conditions that are not possible with capacitor bank systems. The Procyon system was developed and used for experiments over a period of six years, and is exemplary of the capabilities of HEPP systems for state-of-the-art research. In this paper we will summarize some of the more interesting aspects of the work done in the past but will suggest ideas toward applications for future research. One of the main, unique features of HEPP systems is that they integrate easily to a particular physics experiment and the power flow can be optimized for a specific test. Magnetic flux compression generators have been an ideal power source for both high current plasma physics and hydrodynamic experimental loads. These experiments have contributed greatly to the understanding of high temperature and density plasmas and more recently to the understanding of instability growth in thick ({approx}1 mm) imploding metal cylinders. Common to all these experiments is the application of a large current pulse to a cylindrically symmetric load. The resulting Lorenz force compresses the load to produce hydrodynamic motion and/or high temperature, high density plasma. In the plasma physics experiments, plasma thermalizes on axis and a black body distribution of x-rays is produced. To get better access to the radiation pulse, the load electrode geometry was modified. For example, by shaping the plasma implosion glide planes, a mass depletion region was formed along one electrode at pinch time which generated a very large voltage drop across a 1-2 mm segment of the pinch, and also produced a high energy ion beam on axis. These results were predicted by magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) codes and verified with framing camera and x-ray, pinhole, camera pictures. We have not previously published these features but will take another look and propose possible scenarios for studying and generating

  2. Nonlinear vibration and radiation from a panel with transition to chaos induced by acoustic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio; Frendi, Abdelkader; Brown, Donald E.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamic response of an aircraft panel forced at resonance and off-resonance by plane acoustic waves at normal incidence is investigated experimentally and numerically. Linear, nonlinear (period doubling) and chaotic responses are obtained by increasing the sound pressure level of the excitation. The response time history is sensitive to the input level and to the frequency of excitation. The change in response behavior is due to a change in input conditions, triggered either naturally or by modulation of the bandwidth of the incident waves. Off-resonance, bifurcation is diffused and difficult to maintain, thus the panel response drifts into a linear behavior. The acoustic pressure emanated by the panel is either linear or nonlinear as is the vibration response. The nonlinear effects accumulate during the propagation with distance. Results are also obtained on the control of the panel response using damping tape on aluminum panel and using a graphite epoxy panel having the same size and weight. Good agreement is obtained between the experimental and numerical results.

  3. Unveiling acoustic physics of the CMB using nonparametric estimation of the temperature angular power spectrum for Planck

    SciTech Connect

    Aghamousa, Amir; Shafieloo, Arman; Arjunwadkar, Mihir; Souradeep, Tarun E-mail: shafieloo@kasi.re.kr E-mail: tarun@iucaa.ernet.in

    2015-02-01

    Estimation of the angular power spectrum is one of the important steps in Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data analysis. Here, we present a nonparametric estimate of the temperature angular power spectrum for the Planck 2013 CMB data. The method implemented in this work is model-independent, and allows the data, rather than the model, to dictate the fit. Since one of the main targets of our analysis is to test the consistency of the ΛCDM model with Planck 2013 data, we use the nuisance parameters associated with the best-fit ΛCDM angular power spectrum to remove foreground contributions from the data at multipoles ℓ ≥50. We thus obtain a combined angular power spectrum data set together with the full covariance matrix, appropriately weighted over frequency channels. Our subsequent nonparametric analysis resolves six peaks (and five dips) up to ℓ ∼1850 in the temperature angular power spectrum. We present uncertainties in the peak/dip locations and heights at the 95% confidence level. We further show how these reflect the harmonicity of acoustic peaks, and can be used for acoustic scale estimation. Based on this nonparametric formalism, we found the best-fit ΛCDM model to be at 36% confidence distance from the center of the nonparametric confidence set—this is considerably larger than the confidence distance (9%) derived earlier from a similar analysis of the WMAP 7-year data. Another interesting result of our analysis is that at low multipoles, the Planck data do not suggest any upturn, contrary to the expectation based on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe contribution in the best-fit ΛCDM cosmology.

  4. The resistive bolometer for radiated power measurement on EAST.

    PubMed

    Duan, Y M; Hu, L Q; Mao, S T; Chen, K Y; Lin, S Y

    2012-09-01

    The resistive bolometer system has been successfully employed on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak for the first time to measure the radiated power of plasma. The bolometer detectors are based on 4 μm thick Pt absorbers deposited on 1.5 μm thick SiN membranes. The system consists of 3 cameras with a total of 48 channels. The detector and the system setup are described in detail. The detector calibration and typical measurement results are presented as well. PMID:23025621

  5. Ionizing radiation risks to satellite power systems (SPS) workers

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, J.T.; Ainsworth, E.J.; Alpen, E.L.; Bond, V.; Curtis, S.B.; Fry, R.J.M.; Jackson, K.L.; Nachtwey, S.; Sondhaus, C.; Tobias, C.A.; Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-11-01

    The radiation risks to the health of workers who will construct and maintain solar power satellites in the space environment were examined. For ionizing radiation, the major concern will be late or delayed health effects, particularly the increased risk of radiation-induced cancer. The estimated lifetime risk for cancer is 0.8 to 5.0 excess deaths per 10,000 workers per rad of exposure. Thus, for example, in 10,000 workers who completed ten missions with an exposure of 40 rem per mission, 320 to 2000 additional deaths in excess of the 1640 deaths from normally occurring cancer, would be expected. These estimates would indicate a 20 to 120% increase in cancer deaths in the worker-population. The wide range in these estimates stems from the choice of the risk-projection model and the dose-response relationsip. The choice between a linear and a linear-quadratic dose-response model may alter the risk estimate by a factor of about two. The method of analysis (e.g., relative vs absolute risk model) can alter the risk estimate by an additional factor of three. Choosing different age and sex distributions can further change the estimate by another factor of up to three. The potential genetic consequences could be of significance, but at the present time, sufficient information on the age and sex distribution of the worker population is lacking for precise estimation of risk. The potential teratogenic consequences resulting from radiation are considered significant. Radiation exposure of a pregnant worker could result in developmental abnormalities.

  6. Beamed microwave power transmitting and receiving subsystems radiation characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Measured characteristics of the spectrum of typical converters and the distribution of radiated Radio Frequency (RF) energy from the terminals (transmitting antenna and rectenna) of a beamed microwave power subsystem are presented for small transmitting and receiving S-band (2.45 GHz) subarrays. Noise and harmonic levels of tube and solid-state RF power amplifiers are shown. The RF patterns and envelope of a 64 element slotted waveguide antenna are given for the fundamental frequency and harmonics through the fifth. Reflected fundamental and harmonic patterns through the fourth for a 42 element rectenna subarray are presented for various dc load and illumination conditions. Bandwidth measurements for the waveguide antenna and rectenna are shown.

  7. Evaluation of a novel solid-state method for determining the acoustic power generated by physiotherapy ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Zeqiri, Bajram; Barrie, Jill

    2008-09-01

    A new secondary method of determining ultrasound power is presented based on the pyroelectricity of a thin membrane of the piezoelectric polymer, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). In operation, the membrane is backed by a polyurethane-based rubber material that is extremely attenuating to ultrasound, resulting in the majority of the acoustic power applied to the PVDF being absorbed within a short distance of the membrane-backing interface. The resulting rapid heating leads to a pyroelectric voltage being generated across the electrodes of the sensor that, under appropriate conditions, is related to the rate of change of temperature with respect to time. For times immediately after changes in transducer excitation (switching either ON or OFF), the change in the pyroelectric voltage is proportional to the delivered ultrasound power level. This paper describes a systematic evaluation of the measurement concept applied at physiotherapy frequencies and power levels, investigating key aspects such as repeatability, linearity and sensitivity. The research demonstrates the way that heating of the backing material affects the sensor performance, but outlines the potential of the method as a reproducible, rapid, solid-state method of determining power, requiring calibration using a known ultrasound power source. PMID:18440695

  8. Predicting Where a Radiation Will Occur: Acoustic and Molecular Surveys Reveal Overlooked Diversity in Indian Ocean Island Crickets (Mogoplistinae: Ornebius)

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Ben H.; Baudin, Rémy; Franck, Antoine; Hugel, Sylvain; Strasberg, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Recent theory suggests that the geographic location of island radiations (local accumulation of species diversity due to cladogenesis) can be predicted based on island area and isolation. Crickets are a suitable group for testing these predictions, as they show both the ability to reach some of the most isolated islands in the world, and to speciate at small spatial scales. Despite substantial song variation between closely related species in many island cricket lineages worldwide, to date this characteristic has not received attention in the western Indian Ocean islands; existing species descriptions are based on morphology alone. Here we use a combination of acoustics and DNA sequencing to survey these islands for Ornebius crickets. We uncover a small but previously unknown radiation in the Mascarenes, constituting a three-fold increase in the Ornebius species diversity of this archipelago (from two to six species). A further new species is detected in the Comoros. Although double archipelago colonisation is the best explanation for species diversity in the Seychelles, in situ cladogenesis is the best explanation for the six species in the Mascarenes and two species of the Comoros. Whether the radiation of Mascarene Ornebius results from intra- or purely inter- island speciation cannot be determined on the basis of the phylogenetic data alone. However, the existence of genetic, song and ecological divergence at the intra-island scale is suggestive of an intra-island speciation scenario in which ecological and mating traits diverge hand-in-hand. Our results suggest that the geographic location of Ornebius radiations is partially but not fully explained by island area and isolation. A notable anomaly is Madagascar, where our surveys are consistent with existing accounts in finding no Ornebius species present. Possible explanations are discussed, invoking ecological differences between species and differences in environmental history between islands. PMID:26871932

  9. Predicting Where a Radiation Will Occur: Acoustic and Molecular Surveys Reveal Overlooked Diversity in Indian Ocean Island Crickets (Mogoplistinae: Ornebius).

    PubMed

    Warren, Ben H; Baudin, Rémy; Franck, Antoine; Hugel, Sylvain; Strasberg, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Recent theory suggests that the geographic location of island radiations (local accumulation of species diversity due to cladogenesis) can be predicted based on island area and isolation. Crickets are a suitable group for testing these predictions, as they show both the ability to reach some of the most isolated islands in the world, and to speciate at small spatial scales. Despite substantial song variation between closely related species in many island cricket lineages worldwide, to date this characteristic has not received attention in the western Indian Ocean islands; existing species descriptions are based on morphology alone. Here we use a combination of acoustics and DNA sequencing to survey these islands for Ornebius crickets. We uncover a small but previously unknown radiation in the Mascarenes, constituting a three-fold increase in the Ornebius species diversity of this archipelago (from two to six species). A further new species is detected in the Comoros. Although double archipelago colonisation is the best explanation for species diversity in the Seychelles, in situ cladogenesis is the best explanation for the six species in the Mascarenes and two species of the Comoros. Whether the radiation of Mascarene Ornebius results from intra- or purely inter- island speciation cannot be determined on the basis of the phylogenetic data alone. However, the existence of genetic, song and ecological divergence at the intra-island scale is suggestive of an intra-island speciation scenario in which ecological and mating traits diverge hand-in-hand. Our results suggest that the geographic location of Ornebius radiations is partially but not fully explained by island area and isolation. A notable anomaly is Madagascar, where our surveys are consistent with existing accounts in finding no Ornebius species present. Possible explanations are discussed, invoking ecological differences between species and differences in environmental history between islands. PMID:26871932

  10. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS. GENERATION OF ULTRASHORT PULSES: Analysis of mode locking in a laser with a traveling-acoustic-wave modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovskaya, T. V.; Klochan, E. L.; Lariontsev, E. G.

    1990-12-01

    A theoretical analysis is made of active mode locking in a solid-state laser with an acoustooptic modulator based on traveling acoustic waves. It is postulated that the acoustooptic modulator is placed in a V-shaped resonator so that diffraction feedback is established in the modulator. It is found that the transmission coefficient of the acoustooptic modulator is a function of time. The mode locking achieved in a V-shaped resonator is equivalent to that observed in lasers with intracavity frequency modulation of the radiation. An investigation is made of the stability of mode locking in a resonator with a traveling-acoustic-wave acoustooptic modulator.

  11. Heart sounds as a result of acoustic dipole radiation of heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasoev, S. G.

    2005-11-01

    Heart sounds are associated with impulses of force acting on heart valves at the moment they close under the action of blood-pressure difference. A unified model for all the valves represents this impulse as an acoustic dipole. The near pressure field of this dipole creates a distribution of the normal velocity on the breast surface with features typical of auscultation practice: a pronounced localization of heart sound audibility areas, an individual area for each of the valves, and a noncoincidence of these areas with the projections of the valves onto the breast surface. In the framework of the dipole theory, the optimum size of the stethoscope’s bell is found and the spectrum of the heart sounds is estimated. The estimates are compared with the measured spectrum.

  12. Comparison of Different Measurement Technologies for the In-Flight Assessment of Radiated Acoustic Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Williams, Earl G.; Valdivia, Nicolas; Herdic, Peter C.; Sklanka, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    A series of tests was planned and conducted in the Interior Noise Test Facility at Boeing Field, on the NASA Aries 757 flight research aircraft, and in the Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. These tests were designed to answer several questions concerning the use of array methods in flight. One focus of the tests was determining whether and to what extent array methods could be used to identify the effects of an acoustical treatment applied to a limited portion of an aircraft fuselage. Another focus of the tests was to verify that the arrays could be used to localize and quantify a known source purposely placed in front of the arrays. Thus the issues related to backside sources and flanking paths present in the complicated sound field were addressed during these tests. These issues were addressed through the use of reference transducers, both accelerometers mounted to the fuselage and microphones in the cabin, that were used to correlate the pressure holograms. measured by the microphone arrays using either SVD methods or partial coherence methods. This correlation analysis accepts only energy that is coherent with the sources sensed by the reference transducers, allowing a noise control engineer to only identify and study those vibratory sources of interest. The remainder of this paper will present a detailed description of the test setups that were used in this test sequence and typical results of the NAH/IBEM analysis used to reconstruct the sound fields. Also, a comparison of data obtained in the laboratory environments and during flights of the 757 aircraft will be made.

  13. Spin radiative corrections to the radiation probability and power in classical and quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Spin radiative effects in a one-particle sector of QED have a dual nature and can be understood with the Frenkel classical rotating-electron model. In the region of parameters under study γ⊥ 2 ≫ 1 (γ⊥ 2 = 1 + p ⊥ 2/ m 2) and χ ≪ 1 (χ = {{√ {{{( {e{F_{μ v}}{p_v}} )}^2}} } {/ {{√ ( {e{F_{μ v}}{p_v}} )}^2}} {m^3}, the imaginary part of the mass shift and radiation power contain two types of spin contributions. The contributions of the first type are related to the intrinsic magnetic moment of a fermion representing an additional source of electromagnetic radiation. The contributions of the second type have the opposite sign and are caused by a small change in the electron acceleration appearing due to the Frenkel addition to the particle mass. Contributions of the second type dominate, which explains the "wrong" sign of total spin corrections. We show that not only the sign but also the values of coefficients can be explained with specified accuracy using classical electrodynamics if corrections to the mass shift (action) and radiation power are calculated in canonical variables, i.e., for fixed velocity and momentum values, respectively. The results can be treated as a demonstration of the correspondence principle in the field of radiative spin effects, in addition to correspondence between classical and quantum theories at the tree (in the external filed) level. For a e ≡ ( g-2)/2 ≲ χ ≪ 1, equations of the Frenkel model lead to generalization of the system of Lorentz-BMT (Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi) equations taking into account the Frenkel addition to mass. Some features of experimental observations of the spin light are discussed.

  14. Seismic attenuation parameters in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region from elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Peter; Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    We estimate frequency-dependent seismic scattering and intrinsic attenuation parameters for the crustal structure beneath the W-Bohemia/Vogtland swarm earthquake region close to the border of Czech Republic and Germany. The parameter estimations are based on fitting synthetic envelopes modeled using elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory to observed seismogram envelopes from 14 shallow local events from the October 2008 W-Bohemia/Vogtland earthquake swarm. The two different methods yield similar results for the estimated crustal parameters and show a comparable frequency dependence of both transport mean free path and intrinsic absorption path length. Results suggest, that intrinsic seismic attenuation is larger than attenuation due to scattering of seismic energy in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region for the investigated epicentral distance range and frequency bands from 3 to 24 Hz. From the elastic simulations we conclude, that forward scattering is required to explain the data, however, the strength of forward scattering is not resolvable. The elastic approach shows smaller errors in the parameter estimation compared to the results of the acoustic simulations. The frequency dependence of the transport mean free path suggests a random medium described by a nearly exponential autocorrelation function. However the parameters describing this random medium, fluctuation strength and correlation length, cannot be estimated independently, but only a combination of the parameters related to the transport mean free path of the medium can be computed. We furthermore conclude from the results of the elastic simulations, that it is not possible to resolve the value of the mean free path of the random medium.

  15. Seismic scattering and absorption parameters in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region from elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Peter J.; Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    In this study, frequency-dependent seismic scattering and intrinsic attenuation parameters for the crustal structure beneath the W-Bohemia/Vogtland swarm earthquake region close to the border of Czech Republic and Germany are estimated. Synthetic seismogram envelopes are modelled using elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory. Scattering and absorption parameters are determined by fitting these synthetic envelopes to observed seismogram envelopes from 14 shallow local events from the October 2008 W-Bohemia/Vogtland earthquake swarm. The two different simulation approaches yield similar results for the estimated crustal parameters and show a comparable frequency dependence of both transport mean free path and intrinsic absorption path length. Both methods suggest that intrinsic attenuation is dominant over scattering attenuation in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region for the investigated epicentral distance range and frequency bands from 3 to 24 Hz. Elastic simulations of seismogram envelopes suggest that forward scattering is required to explain the data, however, the degree of forward scattering is not resolvable. Errors in the parameter estimation are smaller in the elastic case compared to results from the acoustic simulations. The frequency decay of the transport mean free path suggests a random medium described by a nearly exponential autocorrelation function. The fluctuation strength and correlation length of the random medium cannot be estimated independently, but only a combination of the parameters related to the transport mean free path of the medium can be computed. Furthermore, our elastic simulations show, that using our numerical method, it is not possible to resolve the value of the mean free path of the random medium.

  16. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  17. The GIMLI: A Compact High-Power UWB Radiation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmote, P.; Martin, B.

    This chapter presents the design and performances of a compact, general-purpose, high-power ultra-wideband (UWB) source named GIMLI. The system was designed for dual use, homeland security and military applications. It is powered by a compact, coaxial 12-stage Marx generator with a rise time lower than 25 ns and an operating voltage up to 360 kV. A fast monocycle pulse is sharpened using a pulse former (MPF). The shaper stage comprises a switching module including a peaking and a grounding multi-channel spark gap under a N2 pressure of 6 MPa. The module is followed by a monopulse-to-monocycle converter based on a coaxial Blumlein pulse forming line. The bipolar signal measured at the output of the MPF has a duration shorter than 2 ns with a rise time of 250 ps. The peak-to-peak output voltage is 250 kV on a 50 Ω resistive load. Repetitive operation of the MPF has been experienced with a 200 Hz Tesla transformer developed by the CEA (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique). Electromagnetic energy is focused by a dedicated antenna. The designed antenna is a TEM half-horn with two ridges which improve the low-frequency focusing. High-power radiation tests show that the field measured at a distance of 9 m from the TEM Horn-antenna is higher than 120 kV/m.

  18. Electromagnetic Launch Vehicle Fairing and Acoustic Blanket Model of Received Power Using FEKO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trout, Dawn H.; Stanley, James E.; Wahid, Parveen F.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the impact of radio frequency transmission in vehicle fairings is important to sensitive spacecraft. This paper employees the Multilevel Fast Multipole Method (MLFMM) feature of a commercial electromagnetic tool to model the fairing electromagnetic environment in the presence of an internal transmitter. This work is an extension of the perfect electric conductor model that was used to represent the bare aluminum internal fairing cavity. This fairing model includes typical acoustic blanketing commonly used in vehicle fairings. Representative material models within FEKO were successfully used to simulate the test case.

  19. From nuclear power to coal power: Aerosol-induced health and radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielonen, Tero; Laakso, Anton; Karhunen, Anni; Kokkola, Harri; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Korhonen, Hannele; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated what would be the climate and PM-induced air quality consequences if all nuclear reactors worldwide were closed down and replaced by coal combustion. In a way, this presents a "worst-case scenario" since less polluting energy sources are available. We studied simultaneously the radiative and health effects of coal power emissions using a global 3-D aerosol-climate model (ECHAM-HAMMOZ). This approach allowed us to estimate the effects of a major global energy production change from low carbon source to a high carbon one using detailed spatially resolved population density information. We included the radiative effects of both CO2 and PM2.5 but limited the study of health effects to PM2.5 only. Our results show that the replacement of nuclear power with coal power would have globally caused an average of 150,000 premature deaths per year during the period 2005-2009 with two thirds of them in Europe. For 37 years the aerosol emissions from the additional coal power plants would cool the climate but after that the accumulating CO2 emissions would accelerate the warming of the climate.

  20. Mechanical-Acoustic Multi-Objective Optimization of Honeycomb Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wang-Ying; Yang, Xiong-Wei; Li, Yue-Ming

    At present, optimal design against noise caused by vibrating structures is often formulated with the objective of minimizing sound power or sound pressure. In this paper, a mechanical and acoustic multi-objective optimization method is proposed aimed at minimizing static, dynamic and acoustic response of a honeycomb sandwich panel under given mass constraint. The multi-objective is defined as a weighted sum of static deflection, vibration response and sound power from the norm method. The static and dynamic responses are calculated using FEM and sound power radiated by structures is calculated using discrete Rayleigh integral. The sensitivities of static, dynamic and acoustic response are formulated to improve efficiency by the adjoint method. Numerical examples on the honeycomb plate are considered, which indicate that the proposed method can improve acoustical property without weakening mechanical property.

  1. Measurement and Characterization of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Robert Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    NASA's current models to predict lift-off acoustics for launch vehicles are currently being updated using several numerical and empirical inputs. One empirical input comes from free-field acoustic data measured at three Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) static firings. The measurements were collected by a joint collaboration between NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center, Wyle Labs, and ATK Launch Systems. For the first time NASA measured large-thrust solid rocket motor plume acoustics for evaluation of both noise sources and acoustic radiation properties. Over sixty acoustic free-field measurements were taken over the three static firings to support evaluation of acoustic radiation near the rocket plume, far-field acoustic radiation patterns, plume acoustic power efficiencies, and apparent noise source locations within the plume. At approximately 67 m off nozzle centerline and 70 m downstream of the nozzle exit plan, the measured overall sound pressure level of the RSRM was 155 dB. Peak overall levels in the far field were over 140 dB at 300 m and 50-deg off of the RSRM thrust centerline. The successful collaboration has yielded valuable data that are being implemented into NASA's lift-off acoustic models, which will then be used to update predictions for Ares I and Ares V liftoff acoustic environments.

  2. Near-Field Acoustic Power Level Analysis of F31/A31 Open Rotor Model at Simulated Cruise Conditions, Technical Report II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Near-field acoustic power level analysis of F31A31 open rotor model has been performed to determine its noise characteristics at simulated cruise flight conditions. The non-proprietary parts of the test data obtained from experiments in the 8x6 supersonic wind tunnel were provided by NASA-Glenn Research Center. The tone and broadband components of total noise have been separated from raw test data by using a new data analysis tool. Results in terms of sound pressure levels, acoustic power levels, and their variations with rotor speed, freestream Mach number, and input shaft power, with different blade-pitch setting angles at simulated cruise flight conditions, are presented and discussed. Empirical equations relating models acoustic power level and input shaft power have been developed. The near-field acoustic efficiency of the model at simulated cruise conditions is also determined. It is hoped that the results presented in this work will serve as a database for comparison and improvement of other open rotor blade designs and also for validating open rotor noise prediction codes.

  3. The Acoustic Analogy: A Powerful Tool in Aeroacoustics with Emphasis on Jet Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Doty, Michael J.; Hunter, Craig A.

    2004-01-01

    The acoustic analogy introduced by Lighthill to study jet noise is now over 50 years old. In the present paper, Lighthill s Acoustic Analogy is revisited together with a brief evaluation of the state-of-the-art of the subject and an exploration of the possibility of further improvements in jet noise prediction from analytical methods, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions, and measurement techniques. Experimental Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) data is used both to evaluate turbulent statistics from Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) CFD and to propose correlation models for the Lighthill stress tensor. The NASA Langley Jet3D code is used to study the effect of these models on jet noise prediction. From the analytical investigation, a retarded time correction is shown that improves, by approximately 8 dB, the over-prediction of aft-arc jet noise by Jet3D. In experimental investigation, the PIV data agree well with the CFD mean flow predictions, with room for improvement in Reynolds stress predictions. Initial modifications, suggested by the PIV data, to the form of the Jet3D correlation model showed no noticeable improvements in jet noise prediction.

  4. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashenfelter, J.; Balantekin, B.; Baldenegro, C. X.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bryan, C. D.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, R.; Classen, T.; Davee, D.; Dean, D.; Deichert, G.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dolph, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Fan, S.; Gaison, J. K.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilje, K.; Glenn, A.; Green, M.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heffron, B.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S.; Langford, T. J.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Martinez, D.; McKeown, R. D.; Morrell, S.; Mueller, P. E.; Mumm, H. P.; Napolitano, J.; Norcini, D.; Pushin, D.; Romero, E.; Rosero, R.; Saldana, L.; Seilhan, B. S.; Sharma, R.; Stemen, N. T.; Surukuchi, P. T.; Thompson, S. J.; Varner, R. L.; Wang, W.; Watson, S. M.; White, B.; White, C.; Wilhelmi, J.; Williams, C.; Wise, T.; Yao, H.; Yeh, M.; Yen, Y.-R.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including γ-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. The general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  5. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ashenfelter, J.; Yeh, M.; Balantekin, B.; Baldenegro, C. X.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bryan, C. D.; et al

    2015-10-23

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including γ-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the backgroundmore » fields encountered. Furthermore, the general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.« less

  6. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ashenfelter, J.; Yeh, M.; Balantekin, B.; Baldenegro, C. X.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bryan, C. D.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, R.; Classen, T.; Davee, D.; Dean, D.; Deichert, G.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dolph, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Fan, S.; Gaison, J. K.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilje, K.; Glenn, A.; Green, M.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heffron, B.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S.; Langford, T. J.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Martinez, D.; McKeown, R. D.; Morrell, S.; Mueller, P. E.; Mumm, H. P.; Napolitano, J.; Norcini, D.; Pushin, D.; Romero, E.; Rosero, R.; Saldana, L.; Seilhan, B. S.; Sharma, R.; Stemen, N. T.; Surukuchi, P. T.; Thompson, S. J.; Varner, R. L.; Wang, W.; Watson, S. M.; White, B.; White, C.; Wilhelmi, J.; Williams, C.; Wise, T.; Yao, H.; Yen, Y. -R.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, X.

    2015-10-23

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including γ-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. Furthermore, the general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  7. Overcoming the specific power limitations of nuclear electric propulsion by laser radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1997-07-01

    It is shown that the specific power of nuclear electric propulsion can be greatly increased by replacing black body radiators with laser radiators. In black body radiators the atomic oscillators have a random phase with the emission rate for black body radiators proportional to the sum of the squared amplitudes. In laser radiators the oscillators are all in phase with the emission rate proportional to the squared sum of the amplitudes, which is the reason for the much larger emission rate of laser radiators. In a laser radiator the low entropy low temperature laser beam removes the waste heat by resonance absorption and isotropic reemission of the laser radiation into space.

  8. Kilometric radiation power flux dependence on area of discrete aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saflekos, N. A.; Burch, J. L.; Gurnett, D. A.; Anderson, R. R.; Sheehan, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    Kilometer wavelength radiation, measured from distant positions over the North Pole and over the Earth's equator, was compared to the area of discrete aurora imaged by several low-altitude spacecraft. Through correlative studies of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) with about two thousand auroral images, a stereoscopic view of the average auroral acceleration region was obtained. A major result is that the total AKR power increases as the area of the discrete auroral oval increases. The implications are that the regions of parallel potentials or the auroral plasma cavities, in which AKR is generated, must possess the following attributes: (1) they are shallow in altitude and their radial position depends on wavelength, (2) they thread flux tubes of small cross section, (3) the generation mechanism in them reaches a saturation limit rapidly, and (4) their distribution over the discrete auroral oval is nearly uniform. The above statistical results are true for large samples collected over a long period of time (about six months). In the short term, AKR frequently exhibits temporal variations with scales as short as three minutes (the resolution of the averaged data used). These fluctuations are explainable by rapid quenchings as well as fast starts of the electron cyclotron maser mechanism. There were times when AKR was present at substantial power levels while optical emissions were below instrument thresholds. A recent theoretical result may account for this set of observations by predicting that suprathermal electrons, of energies as low as several hundred eV, can generate second harmonic AKR. The indirect observations of second harmonic AKR require that these electrons have mirror points high above the atmosphere so as to minimize auroral light emissions. The results provide evidence supporting the electron cyclotron maser mechanism.

  9. Near- to far-field characteristics of acoustic radiation through plug flow jets.

    PubMed

    Gabard, G

    2008-11-01

    This paper reports a theoretical study of the radiation of sound through jet exhausts. It focuses on the transition from near field to far field by considering the features of the near-field solution and how these features translate to the far field. The main focus of this work is the importance in some cases of lateral waves radiating from the jet. While the presence of lateral waves has long been recognized, there has been no systematic investigation of the practical consequences of these waves in the prediction of sound propagation through round jets. The physical mechanisms involved in the generation of these waves are presented as well as the conditions under which they become significant. Another issue is the possibility of "channeled waves" inside the jet associated with strong sound radiation in the forward arc. This paper also discusses the validity of the far-field approximation when lateral waves are present. It is shown that the standard far-field approximation can be improved by adding correction terms that account for the presence of the lateral waves and channeled waves. The challenge posed to computational aeroacoustics by these near-field effects is also discussed. PMID:19045763

  10. Acoustic backscattering enhancements for circular elastic plates and acrylic targets, the application of acoustic holography to the study of scattering from planar elastic objects, and other research on the radiation of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hefner, Brian Todd

    2000-08-01

    Backscattering enhancements on both circular elastic plates and acrylic targets are investigated as well as several techniques for the study of the radiation of sound. For sound scattered from a circular plate, two backscattering enhancements associated with the extensional wave are observed. The first of these enhancements involves extensional wave excitation along the diameter of the plate. When the extensional wave strikes the plate edge, reflection occurs which produces radiation into the backscattering direction. For those portions of the leaky wave which strike the edge at oblique incidence, there is mode conversion into a trapped shear wave. For certain angles of incidence on the plate edge, this wave can undergo multiple reflections and convert back into a leaky wave directed in the backscattering direction. Each of these enhancements are modeled using quantitative ray methods. Acoustic holography is also used to image the surface motion of the plate to identify the causes of these enhancements and to assess the validity of the ray model. Backscattering enhancements associated with antisymmetric Lamb wave excitation are also investigated. Scattering at the first-order antisymmetric wave coupling angle is studied using acoustic holography. Significant mode- conversion between the zeroth and first-order antisymmetric waves is observed which plays a significant role in the scattering processes. Quantitative ray models were also used to examine the backscattering from acrylic targets. Polymer solids typically have shear and Rayleigh wave phase velocities which are less than the speed of sound in water. For solid acrylic spheres, low frequency resonances are observed both experimentally and in the exact backscattering form functions which are due to coupling between the incident field and the subsonic Rayleigh wave on the sphere. The effects of material absorption, which is generally high in polymers, is examined in both the exact solutions and the quantitative

  11. The effect of acoustic radiation force on osteoblasts in cell/hydrogel constructs for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Veronick, James; Assanah, Fayekah; Nair, Lakshmi S; Vyas, Varun; Huey, Bryan; Khan, Yusuf

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound, or the application of acoustic energy, is a minimally invasive technique that has been used in diagnostic, surgical, imaging, and therapeutic applications. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been used to accelerate bone fracture repair and to heal non-union defects. While shown to be effective the precise mechanism behind its utility is still poorly understood. In this study, we considered the possibility that LIPUS may be providing a physical stimulus to cells within bony defects. We have also evaluated ultrasound as a means of producing a transdermal physical force that could stimulate osteoblasts that had been encapsulated within collagen hydrogels and delivered to bony defects. Here we show that ultrasound does indeed produce a measurable physical force and when applied to hydrogels causes their deformation, more so as ultrasound intensity was increased or hydrogel stiffness decreased. MC3T3 mouse osteoblast cells were then encapsulated within hydrogels to measure the response to this force. Statistically significant elevated gene expression for alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin, both well-established markers of osteoblast differentiation, was noted in encapsulated osteoblasts (p < 0.05), suggesting that the physical force provided by ultrasound may induce bone formation in part through physically stimulating cells. We have also shown that this osteoblastic response is dependent in part on the stiffness of the encapsulating hydrogel, as stiffer hydrogels resulted in reducing or reversing this response. Taken together this approach, encapsulating cells for implantation into a bony defect that can potentially be transdermally loaded using ultrasound presents a novel regenerative engineering approach to enhanced fracture repair. PMID:27229906

  12. Review of advanced radiator technologies for spacecraft power systems and space thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Peterson, George P.

    1994-01-01

    A two-part overview of progress in space radiator technologies is presented. The first part reviews and compares the innovative heat-rejection system concepts proposed during the past decade, some of which have been developed to the breadboard demonstration stage. Included are space-constructable radiators with heat pipes, variable-surface-area radiators, rotating solid radiators, moving-belt radiators, rotating film radiators, liquid droplet radiators, Curie point radiators, and rotating bubble-membrane radiators. The second part summarizes a multielement project including focused hardware development under the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) High Capacity Power program carried out by the NASA Lewis Research Center and its contractors to develop lightweight space radiators in support of Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) power systems technology.

  13. Assessment of liver fibrosis with 2-D shear wave elastography in comparison to transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Ludmila; Kasper, Daniela; Fitting, Daniel; Knop, Viola; Vermehren, Annika; Sprinzl, Kathrin; Hansmann, Martin L; Herrmann, Eva; Bojunga, Joerg; Albert, Joerg; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zeuzem, Stefan; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen

    2015-09-01

    Two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2-D SWE) is an ultrasound-based elastography method integrated into a conventional ultrasound machine. It can evaluate larger regions of interest and, therefore, might be better at determining the overall fibrosis distribution. The aim of this prospective study was to compare 2-D SWE with the two best evaluated liver elastography methods, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse (point SWE using acoustic radiation force impulse) imaging, in the same population group. The study included 132 patients with chronic hepatopathies, in which liver stiffness was evaluated using transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and 2-D SWE. The reference methods were liver biopsy for the assessment of liver fibrosis (n = 101) and magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis (n = 31). No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy, assessed as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC), was found between the three elastography methods (2-D SWE, transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging) for the diagnosis of significant and advanced fibrosis and liver cirrhosis in the "per protocol" (AUROCs for fibrosis stages ≥2: 0.90, 0.95 and 0.91; for fibrosis stage [F] ≥3: 0.93, 0.95 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.92, 0.96 and 0.92) and "intention to diagnose" cohort (AUROCs for F ≥2: 0.87, 0.92 and 0.91; for F ≥3: 0.91, 0.93 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.88, 0.90 and 0.89). Therefore, 2-D SWE, ARFI imaging and transient elastography seem to be comparably good methods for non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis. PMID:26116161

  14. Acoustic field effects on a negative corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bálek, R.; Červenka, M.; Pekárek, S.

    2014-06-01

    For a negative corona discharge under atmospheric pressure in different regimes, we investigated the effects of an acoustic field both on its electrical parameters and on the change in its visual appearance. We found that the application of an acoustic field on the true corona discharge, for particular currents, decreases the discharge voltage. The application of an acoustic field on the discharge in the filamentary streamer regime substantially extends the range of currents for which the discharge voltage remains more or less constant, i.e. it allows a substantial increase in the power delivered to the discharge. The application of an acoustic field on the discharge causes the discharge to spread within the discharge chamber and consequently, a highly reactive non-equilibrium plasma is created throughout the inter-electrode space. Finally, our experimental apparatus radiates almost no acoustic energy from the discharge chamber.

  15. In vivo quantification of liver stiffness in a rat model of hepatic fibrosis with acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Wang, Michael H; Palmeri, Mark L; Guy, Cynthia D; Yang, Liu; Hedlund, Laurence W; Diehl, Anna Mae; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2009-10-01

    with those obtained by Salameh et al. (2007) and Yin et al. (2007b) using animal models of liver fibrosis and MR elastography. This suggests that stiffness measurement using acoustic radiation force can provide a quantitative assessment of the extent of fibrosis in the liver and can be potentially used for the diagnosis, management and study of liver fibrosis. PMID:19683381

  16. Acoustic agglomeration of power-plant fly ash. A comprehensive semi-annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Reethof, G.

    1980-02-01

    Results obtained during the reporting period are presented. The agglomeration of submicron fly ash particles has been studied as a function of sound pressure level, sound frequency, loading, and exposure time. A second generation model of the agglomeration process is being developed. A high-frequency, high-intensity variable speed siren delivering at least 600 W at frequencies up to 4000 Hz has been developed and tested. Details on the design and operation are presented. The agglomeration chamber has been completely cleaned and the aerosol generating system has been rebuilt. A mathematical model of the acoustics of agglomeration is being developed. Preliminary results of computerized electron microscopic scanning of fly ash particles during agglomeration are presented. (DMC)

  17. Acoustic emission monitoring for inspection of seam-welded hot reheat piping in fossil power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, John M.; Morgan, Bryan C.; Tilley, Richard M.

    1996-11-01

    Although failure of the seam weld on reheat steam piping has been an infrequent occurrence, such failure is still a major safety concern for fossil plant operations. EPRI has provided guidelines for a piping management program base don periodic inspection. More recently, EPRI has also sponsored research to develop inspection techniques to both improve the quality and reduce the cost of piping inspections. Foremost in this research has been the use of acoustic emission (AE) techniques to detect crack damage in seam welds. AE has the substantial cost advantages of both allowing inspection without full removal of the thermal insulation on the reheat piping and making short-re- inspection intervals practical. This paper reviews the EPRI guidelines for performing an AE inspection on seam-welded hot reheat piping.

  18. Electromagnetic Launch Vehicle Fairing and Acoustic Blanket Model of Received Power Using FEKO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trout, Dawn H.; Stanley, James E.; Wahid, Parveen F.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the impact of radio frequency transmission in vehicle fairings is important to electromagnetically sensitive spacecraft. This study employs the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM) from a commercial electromagnetic tool, FEKO, to model the fairing electromagnetic environment in the presence of an internal transmitter with improved accuracy over industry applied techniques. This fairing model includes material properties representative of acoustic blanketing commonly used in vehicles. Equivalent surface material models within FEKO were successfully applied to simulate the test case. Finally, a simplified model is presented using Nicholson Ross Weir derived blanket material properties. These properties are implemented with the coated metal option to reduce the model to one layer within the accuracy of the original three layer simulation.

  19. Visualization and characterization of the acoustic radiation force assisted displacement of particles using an OCT technique (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razani, Marjan; Zam, Azhar; Arezza, Nico J. J.; Wang, Yan J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we present a technique to image the enhanced particle displacement generated using an acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation source. A swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system with a center wavelength of 1310nm, a bandwidth of ~100nm, and an A-scan rate of 100 kHz (MEMS-VCSEL OCT Thorlabs) was used to detect gold nanoparticle (70nm in diameter) displacement .ARF was applied after the nanoparticles passed through a porous membrane and diffused into a collagen (6% collagen) matrix. B-mode, M-B mode, 3D and Speckle Variance (SV) images were acquired before and after the ARF beam was on. Differential OCT speckle variance images with and without the ARF were used to measure the particle displacement. The images were used to detect the microscopic enhancement of nanoparticle displacement generated by the ARF. Using this OCT imaging technique, the extravasation of particles though a porous membrane and characterization of the enhanced particle displacement in a collagen gel after using an ARF excitation was achieved.

  20. Active induction of in vivo microbubbles by acoustic radiation force at the bifurcation of blood vessel and its evaluation.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Kohji; Koido, Jun; Miyazawa, Shinya; Wada, Hikaru; Hosaka, Naoto; Mochizuki, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Alhough the development of drug delivery system using microbubbles and ultrasound is expected, because microbubbles diffuse in bloodstream, we have so far reported our attempts for active control of the microbubbles in flow by acoustic radiation force in order to increase local concentration of the microbubbles. However, there was no evidence that in vivo microbubbles act as similar as in vitro experiments, because there were limitations for reproduction of in vivo conditions. In this study, we have elucidated the relationship between brightness variation and microbubbles concentration in the suspension to estimate the absolute concentration in an invisible condition considering in vivo experiment. Then we conducted an experiment of active induction of microbubbles in a Y-form bifurcation of artificial blood vessel, where experimental conditions were with focused ultrasound, the central frequency of 5 MHz, flow velocity of 30 mm/s, and maximum sound pressure of 300 kPa-pp, respectively. Then we applied the conditions for active induction of in vivo microbubbles to compare with in vitro experiments. We used a bifurcation of blood vessel in an ear of a rabbit because the bifurcation shape in its blood vessel is visible. As the results of the experiment, the microbubbles concentration in the induced path was almost two times higher than that in the other path, which agrees with the results from in vitro experiments. PMID:26736523

  1. Factors Influencing the Diagnostic Accuracy of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mi Sung; Kim, Sun Wook; Yoon, Ki Tae; Kim, Seung Up; Park, Soo Young; Tak, Won Young; Kweon, Young Oh; Cho, Mong; Kim, Beom Kyung; Park, Jun Yong; Kim, Do Young; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To determine factors predictive of discordance in staging liver fibrosis using liver biopsy (LB) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Methods Consecutive patients with CHB who underwent LB and ARFI elastography on the same day from November 2010 to March 2013 were prospectively recruited from three tertiary hospitals. Results We analyzed 105 patients (median age of 47 years). The F0–1, F2, F3, and F4 fibrosis stages were identified in 27 (25.7%), 27 (25.7%), 21 (20.0%), and 30 (28.6%) patients, respectively. The areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves for ARFI elastography in assessing ≥F2, ≥F3, and F4 was 0.814, 0.848, and 0.752, respectively. The discordance of at least one stage between LB and ARFI was observed in 68 patients (64.8%) and of at least two stages in 16 patients (15.2%). In a multivariate analysis, advanced fibrosis stage (F3–4) was the only factor that was negatively correlated with one-stage discordance (p=0.042). Moreover, advanced fibrosis stage was negatively (p=0.016) correlated and body mass index (BMI) was positively (p=0.006) correlated with two-stage discordance. Conclusions Advanced fibrosis stage (F3–4) was a predictor of nondiscordance between LB and ARFI elastography; BMI also influenced the accuracy of ARFI elastography. PMID:26087790

  2. Prediction of Renal Allograft Acute Rejection Using a Novel Non-Invasive Model Based on Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Jin, Yunjie; Wu, Shengdi; Li, Long; Hu, Mushuang; Xu, Ming; Rong, Ruiming; Zhu, Tongyu; He, Wanyuan

    2016-09-01

    Point shear wave elastography based on acoustic radiation force impulse is a novel technology used to quantify tissue stiffness by measuring shear wave speed. A total of 115 kidney transplantation recipients were consecutively enrolled in this prospective study. The patients were subdivided into two groups using 1 mo post-transplantation as the cutoff time for determining the development of acute rejection (AR). Shear wave speed was significantly higher in the AR group than in the non-AR group. We created a model called SEV, comprising shear wave speed, estimated glomerular filtration rate and kidney volume change, that could successfully discriminate patients with or without AR. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of SEV was 0.89, which was higher than values for other variables; it was even better in patients within 1 mo post-transplantation (0.954), but was lower than the estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients after 1 mo post-transplantation. Therefore, the SEV model may predict AR after renal transplantation with a high degree of accuracy, and it may be more useful in the early post-operative stage after renal transplantation. PMID:27267289

  3. Evaluation of Stiffness of the Spastic Lower Extremity Muscles in Early Spinal Cord Injury by Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kang Hee

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate intrinsic viscoelastic changes using shear wave velocities (SWVs) of spastic lower extremity muscles in patients with early spinal cord injury (SCI) via acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and to evaluate correlation between the SWV values and spasticity. Methods Eighteen patients with SCI within 3 months and 10 healthy adults participated. We applied the ARFI technique to measure SWV of gastrocnemius muscle (GCM) and long head of biceps femoris muscle. Spasticity of ankle and knee joint was assessed by original Ashworth Scale. Results Ten patients with SCI had spasticity. Patients with spasticity had significantly faster SWV for GCM and biceps femoris muscle than those without spasticity (Mann-Whitney U test, p=0.007 and p=0.008) and normal control (p=0.011 and p=0.037, respectively). The SWV values of GCM correlated with the ankle spasticity (Spearman rank teat, p=0.026). There was significant correlation between the SWV values for long head of biceps femoris muscle and knee spasticity (Spearman rank teat, p=0.022). Conclusion ARFI demonstrated a difference in muscle stiffness in the GCM between patients with spastic SCI and those without spasticity. This finding suggested that stiffness of muscles increased in spastic lower extremity of early SCI patients. ARFI imaging is a valuable tool for noninvasive assessment of the stiffness of the spastic muscle and has the potential to identify pathomechanical changes of the tissue associated with SCI. PMID:26161345

  4. Renal elasticity quantification by acoustic radiation force impulse applied to the evaluation of kidney diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Zaffanello, Marco; Piacentini, Giorgio; Bruno, Costanza; Brugnara, Milena; Fanos, Vassilios

    2015-04-01

    For centuries, clinicians have used palpation to evaluate abdominal organs. After exploring almost all the different methods of interaction between x-rays, ultrasound, and magnetic fields on tissues, recent interest has focused on the evaluation of their mechanical properties.Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) is a recent, established ultrasound-based diagnostic technique that allows physicians to obtain a measure of the elastic properties of an organ. Shear wave velocity, obtained by the ARFI technique, depends on the elasticity of tissues.To date, there are studies on the ARFI technique applied to normal kidneys, chronic kidney diseases, and kidney transplants. Mechanical properties of the kidney, such as stiffness and deformity, depend on various conditions that alter its histology, in particular the amount of fibrosis in the renal parenchyma; urinary pressure and renal blood perfusion may be other important contributing factors. Unfortunately, the ARFI technique applied to native renal pathologies is still limited, and not all studies are comparable because they used different methods. Therefore, the results reported in recent literature encourage further improvement of this method and the drawing up of standardized guidelines of investigation. PMID:25738649

  5. Acoustic Radiation Force Beam Sequence Performance for Detection and Material Characterization of Atherosclerotic Plaques: Preclinical, Ex Vivo Results

    PubMed Central

    Behler, Russell H.; Czernuszewicz, Tomasz J.; Wu, Chih-Da; Nichols, Timothy C.; Zhu, Hongtu; Homeister, Jonathon W.; Merricks, Elizabeth P.; Caughey, Melissa C.; Gallippi, Caterina M.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents preclinical data demonstrating performance of acoustic radiation force (ARF) based elasticity imaging with five different beam sequences for atherosclerotic plaque detection and material characterization. Twelve trained, blinded readers evaluated parametric images taken ex vivo under simulated in vivo conditions of 22 porcine femoral arterial segments. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was carried out to quantify reader performance using spatially-matched immunohistochemistry for validation. The beam sequences employed had high sensitivity and specificity for detecting Type III+ plaques (Sens: 85%, Spec: 79%), lipid pools (Sens: 80%, Spec: 86%), fibrous caps (Sens: 86%, spec: 82%), calcium (Sens: 96%, Spec: 85%), collagen (Sens: 78%, Spec: 77%), and disrupted internal elastic lamina (Sens: 92%, Spec: 75%). 1:1 single-receive tracking yielded the highest median areas under the ROC curve (AUC), but was not statistically significantly higher than 4:1 parallel-receive tracking. Excitation focal configuration did not result in statistically different AUCs. Overall, these results suggest ARF-based imaging is relevant to detecting and characterizing plaques and support its use for diagnosing and monitoring atherosclerosis. PMID:24297014

  6. Hepatic and Splenic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Velocity Elastography in Children with Liver Disease Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Teresa; Maciá, Araceli; Muñoz-Codoceo, Rosa Ana; Fontanilla, Teresa; González-Rios, Patricia; Miralles, María; Gómez-Mardones, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background. Liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CFLD) is the second cause of mortality in these patients. The diagnosis is difficult because none of the available tests are specific enough. Noninvasive elastographic techniques have been proven to be useful to diagnose hepatic fibrosis. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an elastography imaging system. The purpose of the work was to study the utility of liver and spleen ARFI Imaging in the detection of CFLD. Method. 72 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) were studied and received ARFI imaging in the liver and in the spleen. SWV values were compared with the values of 60 healthy controls. Results. Comparing the SWV values of CFLD with the control healthy group, values in the right lobe were higher in patients with CFLD. We found a SWV RHL cut-off value to detect CFLD of 1.27 m/s with a sensitivity of 56.5% and a specificity of 90.5%. CF patients were found to have higher SWC spleen values than the control group. Conclusions. ARFI shear wave elastography in the right hepatic lobe is a noninvasive technique useful to detect CFLD in our sample of patients. Splenic SWV values are higher in CF patients, without any clinical consequence. PMID:26609528

  7. Noninvasive In Vivo Characterization of Human Carotid Plaques with Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Ultrasound: Comparison with Histology Following Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Czernuszewicz, Tomasz J.; Homeister, Jonathon W.; Caughey, Melissa C.; Farber, Mark A.; Fulton, Joseph J.; Ford, Peter F.; Marston, William A.; Vallabhaneni, Raghuveer; Nichols, Timothy C.; Gallippi, Caterina M.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke from thromboembolic sources is linked to carotid artery atherosclerotic disease with a trend toward medical management in asymptomatic patients. Extent of disease is currently diagnosed by noninvasive imaging techniques that measure luminal stenosis, but it has been suggested that a better biomarker for determining risk of future thromboembolic events is plaque morphology and composition. Specifically, plaques that are composed of mechanically-soft lipid/necrotic regions covered by thin fibrous caps are the most vulnerable to rupture. An ultrasound technique that noninvasively interrogates the mechanical properties of soft tissue, called acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, has been developed as a new modality for atherosclerotic plaque characterization using phantoms and atherosclerotic pigs, but the technique has yet to be validated in vivo in humans. In this preliminary study, in vivo ARFI imaging is presented in a case-study format from four patients undergoing clinically-indicated carotid endarterectomy and compared to histology. In two type Va plaques, characterized by lipid/necrotic cores covered by fibrous caps, mean ARFI displacements in focal regions were high relative to the surrounding plaque material, suggesting soft features covered by stiffer layers within the plaques. In two type Vb plaques, characterized by heavy calcification, mean ARFI peak displacements were low relative to the surrounding plaque and arterial wall, suggesting stiff tissue. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility and challenges of transcutaneous ARFI for characterizing the material and structural composition of carotid atherosclerotic plaques via mechanical properties, in humans, in vivo. PMID:25619778

  8. Quasi-plane shear wave propagation induced by acoustic radiation force with a focal line region: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Min; Abbott, Derek; Lu, Minhua; Liu, Huafeng

    2016-03-01

    Shear wave propagation speed has been regarded as an attractive indicator for quantitatively measuring the intrinsic mechanical properties of soft tissues. While most existing techniques use acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation with focal spot region based on linear array transducers, we try to employ a special ARF with a focal line region and apply it to viscoelastic materials to create shear waves. First, a two-dimensional capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer with 64 × 128 fully controllable elements is realised and simulated to generate this special ARF. Then three-dimensional finite element models are developed to simulate the resulting shear wave propagation through tissue phantom materials. Three different phantoms are explored in our simulation study using: (a) an isotropic viscoelastic medium, (b) within a cylindrical inclusion, and (c) a transverse isotropic viscoelastic medium. For each phantom, the ARF creates a quasi-plane shear wave which has a preferential propagation direction perpendicular to the focal line excitation. The propagation of the quasi-plane shear wave is investigated and then used to reconstruct shear moduli sequentially after the estimation of shear wave speed. In the phantom with a transverse isotropic viscoelastic medium, the anisotropy results in maximum speed parallel to the fiber direction and minimum speed perpendicular to the fiber direction. The simulation results show that the line excitation extends the displacement field to obtain a large imaging field in comparison with spot excitation, and demonstrate its potential usage in measuring the mechanical properties of anisotropic tissues. PMID:26768475

  9. Shear wave elastography using amplitude-modulated acoustic radiation force and phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Arnal, Bastien; Song, Shaozhen; Huang, Zhihong; Wang, Ruikang K.; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Investigating the elasticity of ocular tissue (cornea and intraocular lens) could help the understanding and management of pathologies related to biomechanical deficiency. In previous studies, we introduced a setup based on optical coherence tomography for shear wave elastography (SWE) with high resolution and high sensitivity. SWE determines tissue stiffness from the propagation speed of shear waves launched within tissue. We proposed acoustic radiation force to remotely induce shear waves by focusing an ultrasound (US) beam in tissue, similar to several elastography techniques. Minimizing the maximum US pressure is essential in ophthalmology for safety reasons. For this purpose, we propose a pulse compression approach. It utilizes coded US emissions to generate shear waves where the energy is spread over a long emission, and then numerically compressed into a short, localized, and high-energy pulse. We used a 7.5-MHz single-element focused transducer driven by coded excitations where the amplitude is modulated by a linear frequency-swept square wave (1 to 7 kHz). An inverse filter approach was used for compression. We demonstrate the feasibility of performing shear wave elastography measurements in tissue-mimicking phantoms at low US pressures (mechanical index <0.6). PMID:25554970

  10. Miniature probe for mechanical properties of vascular lesions using acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; He, Youmin; Yu, Mingyue; Li, Rui; Zhu, Jiang; Dai, Cuixia; Piao, Zhonglie; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-03-01

    Changes in tissue biomechanical properties often signify the onset and progression of diseases, such as in determining the vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques. Acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography (ARF-OCE) has been used in the detection of tissue elasticity to obtain high-resolution elasticity maps. We have developed a probe-based ARF-OCE technology that utilizes a miniature 10 MHz ring ultrasonic transducer for excitation and Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) for detection. The transducer has a small hole in the center for the OCT light to propagate through. This allows for a confocal stress field and light detection within a small region for high sensitivity and localized excitation. This device is a front-facing probe that is only 3.5 mm in diameter and it is the smallest ARF-OCE catheter to the best of our knowledge. We have tested the feasibility of the probe by measuring the point displacement of an agarose tissue-mimicking phantom using different ARF excitation voltages. Small displacement values ranging from 30 nm to 90 nm have been detected and are shown to be directly proportional to the excitation voltage as expected. We are currently working on obtaining 2D images using a scanning mechanism. We will be testing to capture 2D elastograms of phantoms to further verify feasibility, and eventually characterize the mechanical properties of cardiovascular tissue. With its high portability and sensitivity, this novel technology can be applied to the diagnosis and characterization of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques.

  11. Radiation forces and torque on a rigid elliptical cylinder in acoustical plane progressive and (quasi)standing waves with arbitrary incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents two key contributions; the first concerns the development of analytical expressions for the axial and transverse acoustic radiation forces exerted on a 2D rigid elliptical cylinder placed in the field of plane progressive, quasi-standing, or standing waves with arbitrary incidence. The second emphasis is on the acoustic radiation torque per length. The rigid elliptical cylinder case is important to be considered as a first-order approximation of the behavior of a cylindrical fluid column trapped in air because of the significant acoustic impedance mismatch at the particle boundary. Based on the rigorous partial-wave series expansion method in cylindrical coordinates, non-dimensional acoustic radiation force and torque functions are derived and defined in terms of the scattering coefficients of the elliptic cylinder. A coupled system of linear equations is obtained after applying the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface in a non-viscous fluid and solved numerically by matrix inversion after performing a single numerical integration procedure. Computational results for the non-dimensional force components and torque, showing the transition from the progressive to the (equi-amplitude) standing wave behavior, are performed with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the semi-axes of the ellipse, the dimensionless size parameter, as well as the angle of incidence ranging from end-on to broadside incidence. The results show that the elliptical geometry has a direct influence on the radiation force and torque, so that the standard theory for circular cylinders (at normal incidence) leads to significant miscalculations when the cylinder cross section becomes non-circular. Moreover, the elliptical cylinder experiences, in addition to the acoustic radiation force, a radiation torque that vanishes for the circular cylinder case. The application of the formalism presented here may be extended to other 2D surfaces of

  12. Evaluation of Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler to Measure Discharge at New York Power Authority's Niagara Power Project, Niagara Falls, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zajd, Henry J., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The need for accurate real-time discharge in the International Niagara River hydro power system requires reliable, accurate and reproducible data. The U.S. Geological Survey has been widely using Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) to accurately measure discharge in riverine channels since the mid-1990s. The use of the ADCP to measure discharge has remained largely untested at hydroelectric-generation facilities such as the New York Power Authority's (NYPA) Niagara Power Project in Niagara Falls, N.Y. This facility has a large, engineered diversion channel with the capacity of high volume discharges in excess of 100,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s). Facilities such as this could benefit from the use of an ADCP, if the ADCP discharge measurements prove to be more time effective and accurate than those obtained from the flow-calculation techniques that are currently used. Measurements of diversion flow by an ADCP in the 'Pant Leg' diversion channel at the Niagara Power Project were made on November 6, 7, and 8, 2006, and compared favorably (within 1 percent) with those obtained concurrently by a conventional Price-AA current-meter measurement during one of the ADCP measurement sessions. The mean discharge recorded during each 2-hour individual ADCP measurement session compared favorably with (3.5 to 6.8 percent greater than) the discharge values computed by the flow-calculation method presently in use by NYPA. The use of ADCP technology to measure discharge could ultimately permit increased power-generation efficiency at the NYPA Niagara Falls Power Project by providing improved predictions of the amount of water (and thus the power output) available.

  13. Post Treatment of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Identifying an AN Symptoms Acoustic Neuroma Keywords Educational Video Pre-Treatment Treatment Options Summary Treatment Options Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions ...

  14. Time-domain simulation of constitutive relations for nonlinear acoustics including relaxation for frequency power law attenuation media modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Noé; Camarena, Francisco; Redondo, Javier; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-10-01

    We report a numerical method for solving the constitutive relations of nonlinear acoustics, where multiple relaxation processes are included in a generalized formulation that allows the time-domain numerical solution by an explicit finite differences scheme. Thus, the proposed physical model overcomes the limitations of the one-way Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) type models and, due to the Lagrangian density is implicitly included in the calculation, the proposed method also overcomes the limitations of Westervelt equation in complex configurations for medical ultrasound. In order to model frequency power law attenuation and dispersion, such as observed in biological media, the relaxation parameters are fitted to both exact frequency power law attenuation/dispersion media and also empirically measured attenuation of a variety of tissues that does not fit an exact power law. Finally, a computational technique based on artificial relaxation is included to correct the non-negligible numerical dispersion of the finite difference scheme, and, on the other hand, improve stability trough artificial attenuation when shock waves are present. This technique avoids the use of high-order finite-differences schemes leading to fast calculations. The present algorithm is especially suited for practical configuration where spatial discontinuities are present in the domain (e.g. axisymmetric domains or zero normal velocity boundary conditions in general). The accuracy of the method is discussed by comparing the proposed simulation solutions to one dimensional analytical and k-space numerical solutions.

  15. Dynamic Acoustic Radiation Force Retains Bone Structural and Mechanical Integrity in a Functional Disuse Osteopenia Model

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Sardar M. Z.; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2015-01-01

    Disuse osteopenia and bone loss have been extensively reported in long duration space mission and long term bed rest. The pathology of the bone loss is similar to osteoporosis but highly confined to weight bearing bones. The current anabolic and/or anti-resorptive drugs have systemic effects and are costly over extended time, with concerns of long term fracture risk. This study use Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS) as a non-invasive acoustic force and anabolic stimulus to countermeasure disuse induced bone loss. Four-month old C57BL/6 mice were randomized to five groups, 1) age-matched (AM), 2) non-suspended sham (NS), 3) nonsuspended –LIPUS (NU), 4) suspended sham (SS), and 5) suspended-LIPUS (SU) groups. After four weeks of suspension, µCT analyses showed significant decreases in trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) (−36%, p<0.005), bone tissue mineral density (TMD) (−3%, p<0.05), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) (−12.5%, p<0.005), and increase in bone surface/bone volume (+BS/BV) (+16%, p<0.005), relative to age-matched (AM). Application of LIPUS for 20 min/day for 5 days/week, significantly increased TMD (+3%, p<0.05), Tb.Th (+6%, p<0.05), and decreased BS/BV (−10%, p<0.005), relative to suspension alone (SS) mice. Histomorphometry analyses showed a breakdown of bone microstructure under disuse conditions consist with µCT results. In comparison to SS mice, LIPUS treated bone showed increased structural integrity with increased bone formation rates at metaphysical endosteal and trabecular surfaces (+0.104±0.07 vs 0.031±0.30 µm3/µm2/d) relative to SS. Four-point bending mechanical tests of disused SS femurs showed reduced elastic modulus (−53%, p<0.05), yield (−33%, p<0.05) and ultimate strength (−45%, p<0.05) at the femoral diaphysis relative to AM bone. LIPUS stimulation mitigated the adverse effects of disuse on bone elastic modulus (+42%, p<0.05), yield strength (+29%, p<0.05), and ultimate strength (+39%, p<0.05) relative to SS

  16. Optical power and energy radiated by natural lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, Mason G.; Krider, E. Philip

    2013-02-01

    Calibrated measurements of the visible and near-infrared radiation produced by both negative and positive cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning strokes have been made at distances of 5 to 32 km in southern Arizona (AZ) and the central Great Plains using a photodiode sensor with a flat spectral response between 0.4 and 1.0 µm. Time-correlated video images (60 fps) of the channel development provided information about the types of strokes that were detected and reports from the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network indicated their locations, polarities, and estimates of their peak current. In our sample of negative strokes that were suitable for analysis, there were 23 first (or only) strokes (FS), 19 subsequent strokes that created new ground contacts (NGC), and 101 subsequent strokes that re-illuminated a preexisting channel (PEC). We also analyzed 10 positive strokes (in nine flashes), and 73 of the larger impulses that were radiated by intracloud discharges (CPs). Assuming that these events can be approximated as isotropic sources and that the effects of atmospheric extinction are negligible, the peak optical power (Po), total optical energy (Eo), and characteristic widths of the sources (tcw = Eo/Po) have been computed. Median values of Po for negative FS, NGC, and PEC strokes were 1.8 × 1010 W, 1.1 × 1010 W, and 4.4 × 109 W, respectively. Median values of Eo were 3.6 × 106 J, 3.5 × 106 J, and 1.2 × 106 J, respectively. The median characteristic widths of negative FS, NGC, and PEC strokes were 229 µs, 244 µs, and 283 µs, respectively. Positive CG strokes produced a median Po, Eo, and tcw of 1.9 × 1010 W, 9.3 × 106 J, and 497 µs, respectively. Estimates of the space-and-time-average power per unit length (ℓo) in the lower portion of negative FS, NGC, and PEC channels had medians of 2.8 × 106 W/m, 3.2 × 106 W/m, and 1.4 × 106 W/m, respectively, and the median ℓo for four positive strokes was 8.8 × 106 W/m. Median values for the estimated peak

  17. Pseudopotential approach for dust acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasmas with kappa-distributed ions and electrons and dust grains having power law size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Gadadhar; Maitra, Sarit

    2015-04-15

    Sagdeev's pseudopotential method is used to study small as well as arbitrary amplitude dust acoustic solitons in a dusty plasma with kappa distributed electrons and ions with dust grains having power law size distribution. The existence of potential well solitons has been shown for suitable parametric region. The criterion for existence of soliton is derived in terms of upper and lower limit for Mach numbers. The numerical results show that the size distribution can affect the existence as well as the propagation characteristics of the dust acoustic solitons. The effect of kappa distribution is also highlighted.

  18. Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, Mark A; Hanson, Gregory R; Bryan, William L

    2009-04-28

    Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes insitu polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

  19. Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers

    DOEpatents

    Britton, Jr., Charles L.; Buckner, Mark A.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Bryan, William L.

    2011-05-03

    Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes insitu polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

  20. Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers

    DOEpatents

    Britton, Jr.; Charles L.; Buckner, Mark A.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Bryan, William L.

    2011-04-26

    Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes in situ polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

  1. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  2. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  3. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  4. Low power underwater acoustic DPSK detection: Theoretical prediction and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Andrew

    This thesis presents two methods of analyzing the effectiveness of a prototype differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) detection circuit. The first method is to make modifications to the existing hardware to reliably output and record the cross-correlation values of the DPSK detection process. The second method is to write a MATLAB detection algorithm which accurately simulates the detection results of the hardware system without the need of any electronics. These two systems were tested and verified with a bench test using computer generated DPSK signals. The hardware system was tested using real acoustic data from shallow and deep water at-sea tests to determine the effectiveness of the DPSK detection circuit in different ocean environments. The hydrophone signals from the tests were recorded so that the cross-correlation values could be verified using the MATLAB detector. As a result of this study, these two systems provided more insight into how well the DPSK detection prototype works and helped to identify ways of improving the detection reliability and overall performance of the prototype DPSK detection circuit.

  5. Elaborate visual and acoustic signals evolve independently in a large, phenotypically diverse radiation of songbirds.

    PubMed

    Mason, Nicholas A; Shultz, Allison J; Burns, Kevin J

    2014-08-01

    The concept of a macroevolutionary trade-off among sexual signals has a storied history in evolutionary biology. Theory predicts that if multiple sexual signals are costly for males to produce or maintain and females prefer a single, sexually selected trait, then an inverse correlation between sexual signal elaborations is expected among species. However, empirical evidence for what has been termed the 'transfer hypothesis' is mixed, which may reflect different selective pressures among lineages, evolutionary covariates or methodological differences among studies. Here, we examine interspecific correlations between song and plumage elaboration in a phenotypically diverse, widespread radiation of songbirds, the tanagers. The tanagers (Thraupidae) are the largest family of songbirds, representing nearly 10% of all songbirds. We assess variation in song and plumage elaboration across 301 species, representing the largest scale comparative study of multimodal sexual signalling to date. We consider whether evolutionary covariates, including habitat, structural and carotenoid-based coloration, and subfamily groupings influence the relationship between song and plumage elaboration. We find that song and plumage elaboration are uncorrelated when considering all tanagers, although the relationship between song and plumage complexity varies among subfamilies. Taken together, we find that elaborate visual and vocal sexual signals evolve independently among tanagers. PMID:24943371

  6. Elaborate visual and acoustic signals evolve independently in a large, phenotypically diverse radiation of songbirds

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Nicholas A.; Shultz, Allison J.; Burns, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of a macroevolutionary trade-off among sexual signals has a storied history in evolutionary biology. Theory predicts that if multiple sexual signals are costly for males to produce or maintain and females prefer a single, sexually selected trait, then an inverse correlation between sexual signal elaborations is expected among species. However, empirical evidence for what has been termed the ‘transfer hypothesis’ is mixed, which may reflect different selective pressures among lineages, evolutionary covariates or methodological differences among studies. Here, we examine interspecific correlations between song and plumage elaboration in a phenotypically diverse, widespread radiation of songbirds, the tanagers. The tanagers (Thraupidae) are the largest family of songbirds, representing nearly 10% of all songbirds. We assess variation in song and plumage elaboration across 301 species, representing the largest scale comparative study of multimodal sexual signalling to date. We consider whether evolutionary covariates, including habitat, structural and carotenoid-based coloration, and subfamily groupings influence the relationship between song and plumage elaboration. We find that song and plumage elaboration are uncorrelated when considering all tanagers, although the relationship between song and plumage complexity varies among subfamilies. Taken together, we find that elaborate visual and vocal sexual signals evolve independently among tanagers. PMID:24943371

  7. Detailed Evaluation of MODIS Fire Radiative Power Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing is providing us tremendous opportunities to measure the fire radiative energy (FRE) release rate or power (FRP) from open biomass burning, which affects many vegetated regions of the world on a seasonal basis. Knowledge of the biomass burning characteristics and emission source strengths of different (particulate and gaseous) smoke constituents is one of the principal ingredients upon which the assessment, modeling, and forecasting of their distribution and impacts depend. This knowledge can be gained through accurate measurement of FRP, which has been shown to have a direct relationship with the rates of biomass consumption and emissions of major smoke constituents. Over the last decade or so, FRP has been routinely measured from space by both the MODIS sensors aboard the polar orbiting Terra and Aqua satellites, and the SEVIRI sensor aboard the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) geostationary satellite. During the last few years, FRP has been gaining recognition as an important parameter for facilitating the development of various scientific studies relating to the quantitative characterization of biomass burning and their emissions. Therefore, we are conducting a detailed analysis of the FRP products from MODIS to characterize the uncertainties associated with them, such as those due to the MODIS bow-tie effects and other factors, in order to establish their error budget for use in scientific research and applications. In this presentation, we will show preliminary results of the MODIS FRP data analysis, including comparisons with airborne measurements.

  8. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI) on an IVUS Circular Array

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vivek; Dahl, Jeremy; Bradway, David; Doherty, Joshua; Lee, Seung Yun; Smith, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Our long-term goal is the detection and characterization of vulnerable plaque in the coronary arteries of the heart using IVUS catheters. Vulnerable plaque, characterized by a thin fibrous cap and a soft, lipid-rich, necrotic core is a pre-cursor to heart attack and stroke. Early detection of such plaques may potentially alter the course of treatment of the patient in order to prevent ischemic events. We have previously described the characterization of carotid plaques using external linear arrays operating at 9 MHz. In addition, we previously modified circular array IVUS catheters by short-circuiting several neighboring elements to produce fixed beam-widths for intra-vascular hyperthermia applications. In this paper we modified Volcano Visions 8.2 French, 9 MHz catheters and Volcano Platinum 3.5 French, 20 MHz catheters by short circuiting portions of the array for ARFI applications. The catheters had an effective transmit aperture size of 2 mm and 1.5 mm respectively. The catheters were connected to a Verasonics scanner and driven with pushing pulses of 180 V p-p to acquire ARFI data from a soft gel phantom with a Young’s modulus of 2.9 kPa. The dynamic response of the tissue-mimicking material demonstrates a typical ARFI motion of 1–2 microns as the gel phantom displaces away and recovers back to its normal position. The hardware modifications applied to our IVUS catheters mimic potential beamforming modifications that could be implemented on IVUS scanners. Our results demonstrate that the generation of radiation force from IVUS catheters and the development of intra-vascular ARFI may be feasible. PMID:24554291

  9. Contactless and non-invasive delivery of micro-particles lying on a non-customized rigid surface by using acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianxin; Mei, Deqing; Jia, Kun; Fan, Zongwei; Yang, Keji

    2014-07-01

    In the existing acoustic micro-particle delivery methods, the micro-particles always lie and slide on the surface of platform in the whole delivery process. To avoid the damage and contamination of micro-particles caused by the sliding motion, this paper deals with a novel approach to trap micro-particles from non-customized rigid surfaces and freely manipulate them. The delivery process contains three procedures: detaching, transporting, and landing. Hence, the micro-particles no longer lie on the surface, but are levitated in the fluid, during the long range transporting procedure. It is very meaningful especially for the fragile and easily contaminated targets. To quantitatively analyze the delivery process, a theoretical model to calculate the acoustic radiation force exerting upon a micro-particle near the boundary in half space is built. An experimental device is also developed to validate the delivery method. A 100 μm diameter micro-silica bead adopted as the delivery target is detached from the upper surface of an aluminum platform and levitated in the fluid. Then, it is transported along the designated path with high precision in horizontal plane. The maximum deviation is only about 3.3 μm. During the horizontal transportation, the levitation of the micro-silica bead is stable, the maximum fluctuation is less than 1 μm. The proposed method may extend the application of acoustic radiation force and provide a promising tool for microstructure or cell manipulation. PMID:24568691

  10. Differentiation of benign and malignant focal liver lesions: value of virtual touch tissue quantification of acoustic radiation force impulse elastography.

    PubMed

    Guo, Le-Hang; Wang, Shu-Jun; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Sun, Li-Ping; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Xu, Jun-Mei; Wu, Jian; Fu, Hui-Jun; Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of virtual tissue quantification (VTQ) of acoustic radiation force impulse elastography for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant focal liver lesions (FLLs). Thus, a total of 134 FLLs in 134 patients were included. VTQ measurement was performed for each lesion in which the shear wave velocity (SWV) was measured. The difference in SWV and SWV ratio of FLL to surrounding liver between malignant and benign FLLs was evaluated, and the cutoff value was investigated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted to evaluate the diagnostic performance. A total of 134 lesions including 55 (41.0%) malignant FLLs and 79 (59.0%) benign ones were analyzed. The SWV of malignant and benign FLLs was 2.95 ± 1.00 m/s and 1.69 ± 0.89 m/s, respectively. Significant difference in SWV was presented between malignant and benign FLLs (p < 0.001). The SWV ratio of each FLL to the surrounding liver parenchyma was 1.83 ± 1.32 for malignant and 1.26 ± 0.78 for benign FLLs (p < 0.001). The area under the ROC curve in distinguishing malignant from benign lesions was 0.824 for SWV and 0.660 for SWV ratio. The cutoff value for differential diagnosis was 2.13 m/s for SWV and 1.37 for SWV ratio. The associated sensitivity and specificity were 83.3 and 77.9% for SWV and 59.6 and 77.3% for SWV ratio, respectively. In conclusion, VTQ provides quantitative stiffness information of FLLs and is helpful in the differential diagnosis between malignant and benign FLLs, particularly for the patients who are not candidates for contrast-enhanced imaging such as CT, MRI or contrast-enhanced ultrasound. PMID:25691297

  11. A Novel Model to Predict Esophageal Varices in Patients with Compensated Cirrhosis Using Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yehyun; Kim, Seung Up; Park, Soo Young; Kim, Beom Kyung; Park, Jun Yong; Kim, Do Young; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Tak, Won Young; Kweon, Young Oh; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Few noninvasive methods can accurately identify esophageal varices (EVs) in patients with compensated cirrhosis. We developed and validated a novel, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography-based prediction model for high-risk EVs (HEVs) in patients with compensated cirrhosis. Methods A total of 143 patients with compensated cirrhosis between February, 2010 and February, 2013 (training set) and 148 between June, 2010 and May, 2013 (validation set) who underwent ARFI elastography and endoscopy were prospectively recruited. Independent predictors of HEVs were used to construct a prediction model. Results Based on multivariate analysis, we developed two new statistical models, a varices risk score and ARFI-spleen diameter-to-platelet ratio score (ASPS), the latter of which was calculated as ARFI velocity × spleen diameter/platelet count. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of the varices risk score and ASPS to predict HEVs were 0.935 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.882–0.970) and 0.946 (95% CI 0.895–0.977), respectively. When ASPS, a simpler model with a higher AUROC, was applied in the validation set, acceptable diagnostic accuracy for HEVs was observed (AUROC = 0.814 [95% CI 0.743–0.885]). To detect HEVs, a negative predictive value of 98.3% was achieved at ASPS <2.83, whereas a positive predictive value of 100% was achieved at ASPS >5.28. Conclusions ASPS, a novel noninvasive ARFI-based prediction model, can accurately identify HEVs in patients with compensated cirrhosis. ASPS <2.83 may safely rule out the presence of HEVs, whereas patients with ASPS >5.28 should be considered for endoscopic examinations or appropriate prophylactic treatment. PMID:25826654

  12. Acoustic radiation force impulse induced strain elastography and point shear wave elastography for evaluation of thyroid nodules

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xian; Guo, Le-Hang; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Gong, Xue-Hao; Liu, Bo-Ji; Xu, Jun-Mei; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Li, Xiao-Long; Li, Dan-Dan; Qu, Shen; Fang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) induced strain elastography (SE), point shear wave elastography (p-SWE), and their combined use in differentiating thyroid nodules. This retrospective study included 155 thyroid nodules (94 benign and 61 malignant) in 136 patients. Ultrasound, ARFI-induced SE and p-SWE were performed on each nodule. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analyses were performed to assess the diagnostic efficacy of ARFI-induced SE, p-SWE and their combined use to distinguish benign from malignant thyroid nodules with histological results used as the reference standard. The areas under the ROC for ARFI-induced SE, p-SWE, and their combined use were 0.828, 0.829, and 0.840, respectively (both P > 0.05). The specificity of ARFI-induced SE was higher than that of p-SWE as well as their combined use (both P < 0.05). The combination of the two methods significantly improved the diagnostic sensitivity and NPV compared with either ARFI-induced SE or p-SWE alone (both P < 0.05). For nodules ≤ 10 mm, the combination of the two methods significantly improved the diagnostic sensitivity only. For nodules > 10 mm, there were no significant differences in sensitivity and NPV among the three methods in differentiating thyroid nodules (all P > 0.05). In conclusions, ARFI-induced SE and p-SWE are both valuable tools for detecting malignant thyroid nodules. The combined use of ARFI-induced SE and p-SWE improves the diagnostic sensitivity and NPV significantly whereas ARFI-induced SE alone achieves the highest specificity. PMID:26379890

  13. Quantitative shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) with acoustic radiation force impulses (ARFI) induced by phase array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Le, Nhan Minh; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Shear Wave Optical Coherence Elastography (SW-OCE) uses the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative measurement of localized shear modulus, making it a valuable technique for the elasticity characterization of tissues such as skin and ocular tissue. One of the main challenges in shear wave elastography is to induce a reliable source of shear wave; most of nowadays techniques use external vibrators which have several drawbacks such as limited wave propagation range and/or difficulties in non-invasive scans requiring precisions, accuracy. Thus, we propose linear phase array ultrasound transducer as a remote wave source, combined with the high-speed, 47,000-frame-per-second Shear-wave visualization provided by phase-sensitive OCT. In this study, we observed for the first time shear waves induced by a 128 element linear array ultrasound imaging transducer, while the ultrasound and OCT images (within the OCE detection range) were triggered simultaneously. Acoustic radiation force impulses are induced by emitting 10 MHz tone-bursts of sub-millisecond durations (between 50 μm - 100 μm). Ultrasound beam steering is achieved by programming appropriate phase delay, covering a lateral range of 10 mm and full OCT axial (depth) range in the imaging sample. Tissue-mimicking phantoms with agarose concentration of 0.5% and 1% was used in the SW-OCE measurements as the only imaging samples. The results show extensive improvements over the range of SW-OCE elasticity map; such improvements can also be seen over shear wave velocities in softer and stiffer phantoms, as well as determining the boundary of multiple inclusions with different stiffness. This approach opens up the feasibility to combine medical ultrasound imaging and SW-OCE for high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  14. Low-Power Multi-Aspect Space Radiation Detector System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave; Freeman, Jon C.; Burkebile, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of all of these detector technologies will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art (SOA) instruments for the detection and monitoring of the deep space radiation field.

  15. New high-power source of directional electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumakhov, M. A.

    2014-07-01

    A new source of electromagnetic radiation in a wide spectral range can be based on multiple contactless deflection of the beams of charged particles in a circular channel. The radiation with wavelengths ranging from submillimeter to radio ranges can be generated using nonrelativistic electrons. Directional radiation is obtained at relativistic energies. The IR, optical, and UV radiation can be generated. The X-ray and gamma-radiation can be obtained at relatively high energies. The new source is compared with the source of synchrotron radiation. The radiation intensity at energies of 1-2 GeV is relatively high, since strong currents are possible in the ring channel. The channeling and synchrotron emission are simultaneously obtained at relatively small (several tens of nanometers) internal diameters of the ring.

  16. Performance of a flight-type laminar radiator with a Brayton power system. [for space electric power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cintula, T. C.; Prok, G. M.; Smith, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    A space-type laminar flow radiator was designed and integrated with a 2- to 15-kilowatt Brayton electrical power generating system. The design, fabrication, and testing of this radiator are presented. Test results include performance under steady state and transient conditions. Included in the transient results is performance in a simulated low earth orbit. Results show that the computer design is conservative. Orbital transients show that a further reduction in radiator area over that determined from steady state conditions is possible. Radiator efficiency was always greater than 83 percent.

  17. Applications of velocity potential function to acoustic duct propagation and radiation from inlets using finite element theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Majjigi, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element velocity potential program was developed to study acoustic wave propagation in complex geometries. For irrotational flows, relatively low sound frequencies, and plane wave input, the finite element solutions showed significant effects of inlet curvature and flow gradients on the attenuation of a given acoustic liner in a realistic variable area turbofan inlet. The velocity potential approach can not be used to estimate the effects of rotational flow on acoustic propagation, since the potential acoustic disturbances propagate at the speed of the media in sheared flow. Approaches are discussed that are being considered for extending the finite element solution to include the far field, as well as the internal portion of the duct. A new matrix partitioning approach is presented that can be incorporated in previously developed programs to allow the finite element calculation to be marched into the far field. The partitioning approach provided a large reduction in computer storage and running times.

  18. Power Spectrum of Cerenkov Radiation from Laser Wakefield in Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hong; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Ito, Hiroaki; Nishida, Yasushi

    2000-10-01

    An angle and radiation frequecy distribution of the output power of the electromagnetic wave radiation from the laser wakefield in a magnetized plasma (Cerenkov wakes radiaiton) have been calculated. The magnetic field here is applied for the far field electromagnetic wave radiation = requirement. The radiation frequency is confined from ωp to = ω_h. The electromagnetic wave generation originates from the coupling between the DC perpendicular magnetic field and the plasma electron longitudinal = disturbance caused by the laser ponderomotive force. Under Coulomb gauge condition, the wave equation can be completely partitioned for the scale potential = and the vector field, so it can be easily obtained from the near zone static = field and far zone radiation field. The former has well been studied as the = static wakefield acceleration. Here we wish to present the detailed study on = the feature of the radiated electromagnetic field for the later case. The radiation = power spectrum which depends on the magnetic field, the laser pulse length, = the radiation frequency and the corresponding refraction index have been = given. The analysis shows that at the direction of \\cos θ= c=3D1/β n, where n is the refraction index of the magnetized plasma, the output = power has the maximum which satisfies the Cerenkov radiation angle condition, = so that the output power for the radiation frequency of ωp = is mainly located at the forward direction.

  19. Impact of Radiation Hardness and Operating Temperatures of Silicon Carbide Electronics on Space Power System Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Tew, Roy C.; Schwarze, Gene E.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of silicon carbide (SiC) electronics operating temperatures on Power Management and Distribution (PMAD), or Power Conditioning (PC), subsystem radiator size and mass requirements was evaluated for three power output levels (100 kW(e) , 1 MW(e), and 10 MW(e)) for near term technology ( i.e. 1500 K turbine inlet temperature) Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) power systems with a High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) heat source. The study was conducted for assumed PC radiator temperatures ranging from 370 to 845 K and for three scenarios of electrical energy to heat conversion levels which needed to be rejected to space by means of the PC radiator. In addition, during part of the study the radiation hardness of the PC electronics was varied at a fixed separation distance to estimate its effect on the mass of the instrument rated reactor shadow shield. With both the PC radiator and the conical shadow shield representing major components of the overall power system the influence of the above on total power system mass was also determined. As expected, results show that the greatest actual mass savings achieved by the use of SiC electronics occur with high capacity power systems. Moreover, raising the PC radiator temperature above 600 K yields only small additional system mass savings. The effect of increased radiation hardness on total system mass is to reduce system mass by virtue of lowering the shield mass.

  20. Impact of radiation hardness and operating temperatures of silicon carbide electronics on space power system mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Tew, Roy C.; Schwarze, Gene E.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of silicon carbide (SiC) electronics operating temperatures on Power Management and Distribution (PMAD), or Power Conditioning (PC), subsystem radiator size and mass requirements was evaluated for three power output levels (100 kWe, 1 MWe, and 10 MWe) for near term technology (i.e. 1500 K turbine inlet temperature) Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) power systems with a High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) heat source. The study was conducted for assumed PC radiator temperatures ranging from 370 to 845 K and for three scenarios of electrical energy to heat conversion levels which needed to be rejected to space by means of the PC radiator. In addition, during part of the study the radiation hardness of the PC electronics was varied at a fixed separation distance to estimate its effect on the mass of the instrument rated reactor shadow shield. With both the PC radiator and the conical shadow shield representing major components of the overall power system the influence of the above on total power system mass was also determined. As expected, results show that the greatest actual mass savings achieved by the use of SiC electronics occur with high capacity power systems. Moreover, raising the PC radiator temperature above 600 K yields only small additional system mass savings. The effect of increased radiation hardness on total system mass is to reduce system mass by virtue of lowering the shield mass.

  1. Acoustic waveguide technique for sensing incipient faults in underground power-transmission cables: Including acousto-optic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrold, R. T.

    1981-09-01

    Theoretical and practical studies were made of both the acoustic emission, spectrum signatures associated with underground cable incipient faults, and the attenuation of acoustic waves in waterfilled metal tubes used as waveguided. Based on critical data, it can be estimated that in favorable circumstances, the acoustic waveguide system would only be useful for sensing incipient faults in underground cables of approx. 800 meters of less in length. A system were investigated which acoustic emissions from cable incipient faults impinge on a fiber-optic lightguide and locally change its refractive index and modulate laser light transmitted along the light guide. Experiments based on this concept show that is is possible t sense acoustic emissions with energy levels below on micro-joule. A test of this system using a section of compressed gas-insulated cable with an internal flashover was successfully carried out.

  2. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques. PMID:16454274

  3. Radiation-hard power electronics for the ATLAS New Small Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameel, J.; Amidei, D.; Baccaro, S.; Citterio, M.; Cova, P.; Delmonte, N.; Sekhon Edgar, K.; Edgar, R.; Fiore, S.; Lanza, A.; Latorre, S.; Lazzaroni, M.; Yang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The New Small Wheel (NSW) is an upgrade for the ATLAS detector to provide enhanced triggering and reconstruction of muons in the forward region. The large LV power demands of the NSW necessitate a point-of-load architecture with on-detector power conversion. The radiation load and magnetic field of this environment, while significant, are nevertheless still in the range where commercial-off-the-shelf power devices may suffice. We present studies on the radiation-hardness and magnetic-field tolerance of several candidate buck converters and linear regulators. Device survival and performance are characterized when exposed to gamma radiation, neutrons, protons and magnetic fields.

  4. Multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control using adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators.

    PubMed

    Vipperman, J S; Clark, R L

    1999-01-01

    An experimental implementation of a multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control system is demonstrated on a piezostructure plate with pinned boundary conditions. Four adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators provide an array of truly colocated actuator/sensor pairs to be used as control transducers. Radiation filters are developed based on the self- and mutual-radiation efficiencies of the structure and are included into the performance cost of an H2 control law which minimizes total radiated sound power. In the cost function, control effort is balanced with reductions in radiated sound power. A similarity transform which produces generalized velocity states that are required as inputs to the radiation filters is presented. Up to 15 dB of attenuation in radiated sound power was observed at the resonant frequencies of the piezostructure. PMID:9921654

  5. NASA powered lift facility internally generated noise and its transmission to the acoustic far field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Ronald G.

    1988-01-01

    Noise tests of NASA Lewis Research Center's Powered Lift Facility (PLF) were performed to determine the frequency content of the internally generated noise that reaches the far field. The sources of the internally generated noise are the burner, elbows, valves, and flow turbulence. Tests over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 1.2 to 3.5 using coherence analysis revealed that low frequency noise below 1200 Hz is transmitted through the nozzle. Broad banded peaks at 240 and 640 Hz were found in the transmitted noise. Aeroacoustic excitation effects are possible in this frequency range. The internal noise creates a noise floor that limits the amount of jet noise suppression that can be measured on the PLF and similar facilities.

  6. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography: A Useful Tool for Differential Diagnosis of Thyroid Nodules and Recommending Fine-Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Feng; Xu, Jun-Mei; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Liu, Chang; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Li, Xiao-Long; Guo, Le-Hang; Liu, Bo-Ji; Liu, Lin-Na; Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the diagnostic performance of combined use of conventional ultrasound (US) and elastography, including conventional strain elastography such as elasticity imaging (EI) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography, and to evaluate their usefulness in recommending fine-needle aspiration (FNA). A total of 556 pathologically proven thyroid nodules were evaluated by US, EI, and ARFI examinations in this study. Three blinded readers scored the likelihood of malignancy for 4 datasets (ie, US alone, US and EI, US and virtual touch tissue imaging [VTI], and US and virtual touch tissue quantification [VTQ]). The diagnostic performances of 4 datasets in differentiating malignant from benign thyroid nodules were evaluated. The decision-making changes for FNA recommendation in the indeterminate nodules or the probably benign nodules on conventional US were evaluated after review of elastography. The diagnostic performance in terms of area under the ROC curve did not show any change after adding EI, VTI, or VTQ for analysis; and no differences were found among different readers; however, the specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) improved significantly after adding VTI or VTQ for analysis in the senior reader. For the indeterminate nodules on US that were pathologically benign, VTQ made correct decision-making changes from FNA biopsy to follow-up in a mean of 82.6% nodules, which was significantly higher than those achieved by EI (46.8%) and VTI (54.4%) (both P < 0.05). With regard to the probably benign nodules on US that were pathologically malignant, EI made the highest correct decision-making change from follow-up to FNA biopsy in a mean of 62.6% nodules (compared with 41.5% on VTQ, P < 0.05). The results indicated that ARFI increases the specificity and PPV in diagnosing thyroid nodules. US combined VTQ might be helpful in reducing unnecessary FNA for indeterminate nodules on US whereas US combined EI is useful to detect

  7. The diagnosis value of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography for thyroid malignancy without highly suspicious features on conventional ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo-Ji; Lu, Feng; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Guo, Le-Hang; Li, Dan-Dan; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Li, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Xu, Jun-Mei; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Qu, Shen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential diagnostic performance of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in identifying malignancy in nodules that do not appear highly suspicious on conventional ultrasound (US). Methods: 330 pathologically confirmed thyroid nodules (40 malignant and 290 benign; mean size, 22.0±11.6 mm) not suspicious of malignancy on conventional US in 330 patients (mean age 52.8±11.7 years) underwent ARFI elastography before surgery. ARFI elastography included qualitative ARFI-induced strain elastography (SE) and quantitative point shear wave elastography (p-SWE). ARFI-induced SE image was assessed by SE score, while p-SWE was denoted with shear wave velocity (SWV, m/s). The diagnostic performance of four criteria sets was evaluated: criteria set 1 (ARFI-induced SE), criteria set 2 (p-SWE), criteria set 3 (either set 1 or 2), criteria set 4 (both set 1 and 2). Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analyses were performed to assess the diagnostic performance. Results: SE score ≥4 was more frequently found in malignant nodules (32/40) than in benign nodules (30/290, P<0.001). The mean SWV of malignant nodules (3.64±2.23 m/s) was significantly higher than that of benign nodules (2.02±0.69 m/s) (P<0.001). ARFI-induced SE (set 1) had a sensitivity of 80.0% (32/40) and a specificity of 89.7% (260/290) with a cut-off point of SE score ≥4; p-SWE (set 2) had a sensitivity of 80.0% (32/40) and a specificity of 57.9% (168/290) with a cut-off point of SWV ≥2.15 m/s. When ARFI-induced SE and p-SWE were combined, set 3 had the highest sensitivity (92.5%, 37/40) while set 4 had the highest specificity (95.2%, 276/290). Conclusion: ARFI elastography can be used for differential diagnosis of malignant thyroid nodules without highly suspicious features on US. The combination of ARFI-induced SE and p-SWE leads to improved sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26629025

  8. Hybrid optical and acoustic force based sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahoney, Paul; Brodie, Graham W.; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E. M.; Cochran, Sandy; Spalding, Gabriel C.; MacDonald, Michael P.

    2014-09-01

    We report the combined use of optical sorting and acoustic levitation to give particle sorting. Differing sizes of microparticles are sorted optically both with and without the aid of acoustic levitation, and the results compared to show that the use of acoustic trapping can increase sorting efficiency. The use of a transparent ultrasonic transducer is also shown to streamline the integration of optics and acoustics. We also demonstrate the balance of optical radiation pressure and acoustic levitation to achieve vertical sorting.

  9. Prediction of acoustic radiation from axisymmetric surfaces with arbitrary boundary conditions using the boundary element method on a distributed computing system.

    PubMed

    Wright, Louise; Robinson, Stephen P; Humphrey, Victor F

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents a computational technique using the boundary element method for prediction of radiated acoustic waves from axisymmetric surfaces with nonaxisymmetric boundary conditions. The aim is to predict the far-field behavior of underwater acoustic transducers based on their measured behavior in the near-field. The technique is valid for all wavenumbers and uses a volume integral method to calculate the singular integrals required by the boundary element formulation. The technique has been implemented on a distributed computing system to take advantage of its parallel nature, which has led to significant reductions in the time required to generate results. Measurement data generated by a pair of free-flooding underwater acoustic transducers encapsulated in a polyurethane polymer have been used to validate the technique against experiment. The dimensions of the outer surface of the transducers (including the polymer coating) were an outer diameter of 98 mm with an 18 mm wall thickness and a length of 92 mm. The transducers were mounted coaxially, giving an overall length of 185 mm. The cylinders had resonance frequencies at 13.9 and 27.5 kHz, and the data were gathered at these frequencies. PMID:19275294

  10. [Radiation measures and trend after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryuji

    2014-02-01

    The radioactive materials spread by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident in March, 2011 caused NPP workers to be exposed to radiation above ordinance limits. The number of workers exposed to radiation within ordinance limits is increasing. Decontamination began at many places in Fukushima, although new laws were enforced in the decontamination work, in the current situation, medical examinations for radiation are limited due to a shortage of doctors. In this paper, I introduce the ordinances on the prevention of ionizing radiation hazards and the revised points about radiation exposure doses of the NPP workers, as well as the new ordinance for decontamination. PMID:24605520

  11. Power Radiated from ITER and CIT by Impurities

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cummings, J.; Cohen, S. A.; Hulse, R.; Post, D. E.; Redi, M. H.; Perkins, J.

    1990-07-01

    The MIST code has been used to model impurity radiation from the edge and core plasmas in ITER and CIT. A broad range of parameters have been varied, including Z{sub eff}, impurity species, impurity transport coefficients, and plasma temperature and density profiles, especially at the edge. For a set of these parameters representative of the baseline ITER ignition scenario, it is seen that impurity radiation, which is produced in roughly equal amounts by the edge and core regions, can make a major improvement in divertor operation without compromising core energy confinement. Scalings of impurity radiation with atomic number and machine size are also discussed.

  12. Prompt gamma radiation as a new tool to measure reactor power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    jalali, Majid; Abdi, Mohammad Reza; davati, Mojtaba Mostajabod

    2013-10-01

    A new method, based on reactor prompt gamma radiation detection, for reactor power measurement is introduced and validated. To verify, the ex-core gamma radiation spectrum from the Iranian Heavy Water Zero Power Reactor (HWZPR) were measured by HPGe and NaI detectors each suitably positioned. The collective prompt gamma count rates for all or for a portion of each of 2″×2″ NaI detector spectra were obtained for seven power level readings from calibrated reactor power monitors. A good linear behavior was found between gamma count rate and reactor power. The method of calibrated prompt gamma reactor power determination is a stable and reliable tool, on-line, sensitive to sudden variation of power, working in pulse mode, increasing redundancy and diversity and so improving the reactor safety. The prompt gamma counting system can be adopted and installed in other nuclear reactors to measure power.

  13. Particle analysis in an acoustic cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for acoustically manipulating one or more particles. Acoustically manipulated particles may be separated by size. The particles may be flowed in a flow stream and acoustic radiation pressure, which may be radial, may be applied to the flow stream. This application of acoustic radiation pressure may separate the particles. In one embodiment, the particles may be separated by size, and as a further example, the larger particles may be transported to a central axis.

  14. Generation of high-power electromagnetic radiation by a beam-driven plasma antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annenkov, V. V.; Volchok, E. P.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study how efficiently electromagnetic radiation can be generated by a relativistic electron beam with a gigawatt power level during its injection into a thin magnetized plasma. It is shown that, if the transverse beam and plasma size is compared with the radiation wavelength and the plasma density is modulated along the magnetic field, such a beam-plasma system can radiate electromagnetic waves via the antenna mechanism. We propose a theoretical model describing generation of electromagnetic waves by this plasma antenna and calculate its main radiation characteristics. In the two-dimensional case theoretical predictions on the radiation efficiency are shown to be confirmed by the results of particle-in-cell simulations, and the three-dimensional variant of this theory is used to estimate the peak power of sub-terahertz radiation that can be achieved in beam-plasma experiments in mirror traps.

  15. Radiation Power Affected by Current and Wall Radius in Water Cooled Vortex Wall-stabilized Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwao, Toru; Nakamura, Takaya; Yanagi, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Shinji

    2015-11-01

    The arc lighting to obtain the environment to evacuate, save the life, keep the safety and be comfortable are focus on. The lack of radiation intensity and color rendering is problem because of inappropriate energy balance. Some researchers have researched the arc lamp mixed with metal vapor for improvement of color rendering spectrum. The metal vapor can emit the high intense radiation. In addition, the radiation is derived from the high temperature medium. Because the arc temperature can be controlled by current and arc radius, the radiation can be controlled by the current and arc radius. This research elucidates the radiation power affected by the current and wall radius in wall-stabilized arc of water-cooled vortex type. As a result, the radiation power increases with increasing the square of current / square of wall radius because of the temperature distribution which is derived from the current density at the simulation.

  16. Partial discharge localization in power transformers based on the sequential quadratic programming-genetic algorithm adopting acoustic emission techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hua-Long; Liu, Hua-Dong

    2014-10-01

    Partial discharge (PD) in power transformers is one of the prime reasons resulting in insulation degradation and power faults. Hence, it is of great importance to study the techniques of the detection and localization of PD in theory and practice. The detection and localization of PD employing acoustic emission (AE) techniques, as a kind of non-destructive testing, plus due to the advantages of powerful capability of locating and high precision, have been paid more and more attention. The localization algorithm is the key factor to decide the localization accuracy in AE localization of PD. Many kinds of localization algorithms exist for the PD source localization adopting AE techniques including intelligent and non-intelligent algorithms. However, the existed algorithms possess some defects such as the premature convergence phenomenon, poor local optimization ability and unsuitability for the field applications. To overcome the poor local optimization ability and easily caused premature convergence phenomenon of the fundamental genetic algorithm (GA), a new kind of improved GA is proposed, namely the sequence quadratic programming-genetic algorithm (SQP-GA). For the hybrid optimization algorithm, SQP-GA, the sequence quadratic programming (SQP) algorithm which is used as a basic operator is integrated into the fundamental GA, so the local searching ability of the fundamental GA is improved effectively and the premature convergence phenomenon is overcome. Experimental results of the numerical simulations of benchmark functions show that the hybrid optimization algorithm, SQP-GA, is better than the fundamental GA in the convergence speed and optimization precision, and the proposed algorithm in this paper has outstanding optimization effect. At the same time, the presented SQP-GA in the paper is applied to solve the ultrasonic localization problem of PD in transformers, then the ultrasonic localization method of PD in transformers based on the SQP-GA is proposed. And

  17. High-power spontaneous UV radiation source and its excitation regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Baksht, E Kh; Lomaev, Mikhail I; Panchenko, Aleksei N; Rybka, D V; Tarasenko, Viktor F; Krishnan, M; Thompson, J

    2005-07-31

    Different excitation regimes of a discharge in a xenon flashlamp are studied. It is shown that in passing from the oscillating discharge current to the unidirectional current pulse, the UV power radiation increases, while the FWHM of the radiation pulses decreases. The maximum UV power density of the discharge restricted by the flashlamp tube walls was {approx}700 and {approx}380 kW cm{sup -2} on the internal and external surfaces of the flashlamp tube, respectively. (active media)

  18. Environmental radiation real-time monitoring system permanently installed near Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Ding, M; Sheng, P; Zhi, Z

    1996-03-01

    An environmental radiation real-time monitoring system with high pressure ionization chamber was developed. It has been installed permanently in the vicinity of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, the first built in mainland China. The system consists of four basic components: environmental radiation monitors; data communication network; a data processing center; and a remote terminal computer situated in Hangzhou. It has provided five million readings of environmental radiation levels as of January 1993. PMID:8609035

  19. Studies of the acoustic transmission characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted velocity profiles, volume 1. [jet engine noise radiation through coannular exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.; Plumblee, H. E.; Mungur, P.

    1979-01-01

    The efficiency of internal noise radiation through coannular exhaust nozzle with an inverted velocity profile was studied. A preliminary investigation was first undertaken to: (1) define the test parameters which influence the internal noise radiation; (2) develop a test methodology which could realistically be used to examine the effects of the test parameters; (3) and to validate this methodology. The result was the choice of an acoustic impulse as the internal noise source in the in the jet nozzles. Noise transmission characteristics of a nozzle system were then investigated. In particular, the effects of fan nozzle convergence angle, core extention length to annulus height ratio, and flow Mach number and temperatures were studied. The results are presented as normalized directivity plots.

  20. Comparison of sound power radiation from isolated airfoils and cascades in a turbulent flow.

    PubMed

    Blandeau, Vincent P; Joseph, Phillip F; Jenkins, Gareth; Powles, Christopher J

    2011-06-01

    An analytical model of the sound power radiated from a flat plate airfoil of infinite span in a 2D turbulent flow is presented. The effects of stagger angle on the radiated sound power are included so that the sound power radiated upstream and downstream relative to the fan axis can be predicted. Closed-form asymptotic expressions, valid at low and high frequencies, are provided for the upstream, downstream, and total sound power. A study of the effects of chord length on the total sound power at all reduced frequencies is presented. Excellent agreement for frequencies above a critical frequency is shown between the fast analytical isolated airfoil model presented in this paper and an existing, computationally demanding, cascade model, in which the unsteady loading of the cascade is computed numerically. Reasonable agreement is also observed at low frequencies for low solidity cascade configurations. PMID:21682379