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Sample records for acoustic pressure levels

  1. Sound pressure level gain in an acoustic metamaterial cavity.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Kiwon; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Park, Jihyun; Yoon, Jong Rak; Kim, Jedo

    2014-01-01

    The inherent attenuation of a homogeneous viscous medium limits radiation propagation, thereby restricting the use of many high-frequency acoustic devices to only short-range applications. Here, we design and experimentally demonstrate an acoustic metamaterial localization cavity which is used for sound pressure level (SPL) gain using double coiled up space like structures thereby increasing the range of detection. This unique behavior occurs within a subwavelength cavity that is 1/10(th) of the wavelength of the incident acoustic wave, which provides up to a 13 dB SPL gain. We show that the amplification results from the Fabry-Perot resonance of the cavity, which has a simultaneously high effective refractive index and effective impedance. We also experimentally verify the SPL amplification in an underwater environment at higher frequencies using a sample with an identical unit cell size. The versatile scalability of the design shows promising applications in many areas, especially in acoustic imaging and underwater communication. PMID:25502279

  2. Correlation of combustor acoustic power levels inferred from internal fluctuating pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.

    1978-01-01

    Combustion chamber acoustic power levels inferred from internal fluctuating pressure measurements are correlated with operating conditions and chamber geometries over a wide range. The variables include considerations of chamber design (can, annular, and reverse-flow annular) and size, number of fuel nozzles, burner staging and fuel split, airflow and heat release rates, and chamber inlet pressure and temperature levels. The correlated data include those obtained with combustion component development rigs as well as engines.

  3. Acoustic pressure-vector sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dehua; Elswick, Roy C.; McEachern, James F.

    2001-05-01

    Pressure-vector sensors measure both scalar and vector components of the acoustic field. December 2003 measurements at the NUWC Seneca Lake test facility verify previous observations that acoustic ambient noise spectrum levels measured by acoustic intensity sensors are reduced relative to either acoustic pressure or acoustic vector sensor spectrum levels. The Seneca measurements indicate a reduction by as much as 15 dB at the upper measurement frequency of 2500 Hz. A nonlinear array synthesis theory for pressure-vector sensors will be introduced that allows smaller apertures to achieve narrow beams. The significantly reduced ambient noise of individual pressure-vector elements observed in the ocean by others, and now at Seneca Lake, should allow a nonlinearly combined array to detect significantly lower levels than has been observed in previous multiplicative processing of pressure sensors alone. Nonlinear array synthesis of pressure-vector sensors differs from conventional super-directive algorithms that linearly combine pressure elements with positive and negative weights, thereby reducing the sensitivity of conventional super-directive arrays. The much smaller aperture of acoustic pressure-vector sensor arrays will be attractive for acoustic systems on underwater vehicles, as well as for other applications that require narrow beam acoustic receivers. [The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of ONR and NUWC.

  4. Acoustic cymbal performance under hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenne, Kirk E.; Huang, Dehua; Howarth, Thomas R.

    2001-05-01

    Continual awareness about the need to develop light-weight, low-volume, broadband, underwater acoustic projector and receive arrays that perform consistently in diverse environments is evident in recent Navy acoustic system initiatives. Acoustic cymbals, so named for resemblance to the percussive musical instruments, are miniature flextensional transducers that may perhaps meet the performance criteria for consistent performance under hydrostatic pressure after modifications in the design. These acoustic cymbals consist of a piezoceramic disk (or ring) bonded to two opposing cymbal-shaped metal shells. Operating as mechanical transformers, the two metal shells convert the large generative force inherently within the disk's radial mode into increased volume displacement at the metal shell surface to obtain volume displacement that translates into usable source levels and/or sensitivities at sonar frequencies in a relatively broad band. The air-backed design for standard acoustic cymbal transducers presents a barrier to deepwater applications. A new acoustic cymbal design for high-pressure applications will be presented for the first time. This practical pressure compensation is designed to diminish the effects of hydrostatic pressure to maintain consistent acoustic cymbal performance. Transmit and receive performance data, determined at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center's (NUWC) Acoustic Pressure Tank Facility (APTF), is presented.

  5. Acoustic pressures emanating from a turbomachine stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandra, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    A knowledge of the acoustic energy emission of each blade row of a turbomachine is useful for estimating the overall noise level of the machine and for determining its discrete frequency noise content. Because of the close spacing between the rotor and stator of a compressor stage, the strong aerodynamic interactions between them have to be included in obtaining the resultant flow field. A three dimensional theory for determining the discrete frequency noise content of an axial compressor consisting of a rotor and a stator each with a finite number of blades are outlined. The lifting surface theory and the linearized equation of an ideal, nonsteady compressible fluid motion are used for thin blades of arbitrary cross section. The combined pressure field at a point of the fluid is constructed by linear addition of the rotor and stator solutions together with an interference factor obtained by matching them for net zero vorticity behind the stage.

  6. Manipulating Liquids With Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    1999-01-01

    High-intensity ultrasound waves can produce the effects of "Acoustic Radiation Pressure" (ARP) and "acoustic streaming." These effects can be used to propel liquid flows and to apply forces that can be used to move or manipulate floating objects or liquid surfaces. NASA's interest in ARP includes the remote-control agitation of liquids and the manipulation of bubbles and drops in liquid experiments and propellant systems. A high level of flexibility is attained by using a high-power acoustic phased array to generate, steer, and focus a beam of acoustic waves. This is called an Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Array, or ARPPA. In this approach, many acoustic transducer elements emit wavelets that converge into a single beam of sound waves. Electronically coordinating the timing, or "phase shift," of the acoustic waves makes it possible to form a beam with a predefined direction and focus. Therefore, a user can direct the ARP force at almost any desired point within a liquid volume. ARPPA lets experimenters manipulate objects anywhere in a test volume. This flexibility allow it to be used for multiple purposes, such as to agitate liquids, deploy and manipulate drops or bubbles, and even suppress sloshing in spacecraft propellant tanks.

  7. Nucleation pressure threshold in acoustic droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Christopher J.; Doering, Charles R.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.

    2016-07-01

    We combine classical nucleation theory with superharmonic focusing to predict necessary pressures to induce nucleation in acoustic droplet vaporization. We show that linear acoustics is a valid approximation to leading order when particle displacements in the sound field are small relative to the radius of the droplet. This is done by perturbation analysis of an axisymmetric compressible inviscid flow about a droplet with small surface perturbations relative to the mean radius subjected to an incoming ultrasonic wave. The necessary nucleation pressure threshold inside the droplet is calculated to be -9.33 ± 0.30 MPa for typical experimental parameters by employing results from classical homogeneous nucleation theory. As a result, we are able to predict if a given incident pressure waveform will induce nucleation.

  8. Neural network/acoustic emission burst pressure prediction for impact damaged composite pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.L.; Workman, G.L.; Russell, S.S.; Hill, E.V.K.

    1997-08-01

    Acoustic emission signal analysis has been used to measure the effect impact damage has on the burst pressure of 146 mm (5.75 in.) diameter graphite/epoxy and the organic polymer, Kevlar/epoxy filament wound pressure vessels. Burst pressure prediction models were developed by correlating the differential acoustic emission amplitude distribution collected during low level hydroproof tests to known burst pressures using backpropagation artificial neural networks. Impact damage conditions ranging from barely visible to obvious fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination were included in this work. A simulated (inert) propellant was also cast into a series of the vessels from each material class, before impact loading, to provide boundary conditions during impact that would simulate those found on solid rocket motors. The results of this research effort demonstrate that a quantitative assessment of the effects that impact damage has on burst pressure can be made for both organic polymer/epoxy and graphite/epoxy pressure vessels. Here, an artificial neural network analysis of the acoustic emission parametric data recorded during low pressure hydroproof testing is used to relate burst pressure to the vessel`s acoustic signature. Burst pressure predictions within 6.0% of the actual failure pressure are demonstrated for a series of vessels.

  9. Acoustics and Surface Pressure Measurements from Tandem Cylinder Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic and unsteady surface pressure measurements from two cylinders in tandem configurations were acquired to study the effect of spacing, surface trip and freestream velocity on the radiated noise. The Reynolds number ranged from 1.15x10(exp 5) to 2.17x10(exp 5), and the cylinder spacing varied between 1.435 and 3.7 cylinder diameters. The acoustic and surface pressure spectral characteristics associated with the different flow regimes produced by the cylinders' wake interference were identified. The dependence of the Strouhal number, peak Sound Pressure Level and spanwise coherence on cylinder spacing and flow velocity was examined. Directivity measurements were performed to determine how well the dipole assumption for the radiation of vortex shedding noise holds for the largest and smallest cylinder spacing tested.

  10. Pressure distribution based optimization of phase-coded acoustical vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Haixiang; Gao, Lu; Dai, Yafei; Ma, Qingyu; Zhang, Dong

    2014-02-28

    Based on the acoustic radiation of point source, the physical mechanism of phase-coded acoustical vortices is investigated with formulae derivations of acoustic pressure and vibration velocity. Various factors that affect the optimization of acoustical vortices are analyzed. Numerical simulations of the axial, radial, and circular pressure distributions are performed with different source numbers, frequencies, and axial distances. The results prove that the acoustic pressure of acoustical vortices is linearly proportional to the source number, and lower fluctuations of circular pressure distributions can be produced for more sources. With the increase of source frequency, the acoustic pressure of acoustical vortices increases accordingly with decreased vortex radius. Meanwhile, increased vortex radius with reduced acoustic pressure is also achieved for longer axial distance. With the 6-source experimental system, circular and radial pressure distributions at various frequencies and axial distances have been measured, which have good agreements with the results of numerical simulations. The favorable results of acoustic pressure distributions provide theoretical basis for further studies of acoustical vortices.

  11. Acoustic calibration apparatus for calibrating plethysmographic acoustic pressure sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Davis, David C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for calibrating an acoustic sensor is described. The apparatus includes a transmission material having an acoustic impedance approximately matching the acoustic impedance of the actual acoustic medium existing when the acoustic sensor is applied in actual in-service conditions. An elastic container holds the transmission material. A first sensor is coupled to the container at a first location on the container and a second sensor coupled to the container at a second location on the container, the second location being different from the first location. A sound producing device is coupled to the container and transmits acoustic signals inside the container.

  12. Model helicopter rotor high-speed impulsive noise: Measured acoustics and blade pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    A 1/17-scale research model of the AH-1 series helicopter main rotor was tested. Model-rotor acoustic and simultaneous blade pressure data were recorded at high speeds where full-scale helicopter high-speed impulsive noise levels are known to be dominant. Model-rotor measurements of the peak acoustic pressure levels, waveform shapes, and directively patterns are directly compared with full-scale investigations, using an equivalent in-flight technique. Model acoustic data are shown to scale remarkably well in shape and in amplitude with full-scale results. Model rotor-blade pressures are presented for rotor operating conditions both with and without shock-like discontinuities in the radiated acoustic waveform. Acoustically, both model and full-scale measurements support current evidence that above certain high subsonic advancing-tip Mach numbers, local shock waves that exist on the rotor blades ""delocalize'' and radiate to the acoustic far-field.

  13. Nonlinear Bubble Interactions in Acoustic Pressure Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbat, Tiberiu; Ashgriz, Nasser; Liu, Ching-Shi

    1996-01-01

    The systems consisting of a two-phase mixture, as clouds of bubbles or drops, have shown many common features in their responses to different external force fields. One of particular interest is the effect of an unsteady pressure field applied to these systems, case in which the coupling of the vibrations induced in two neighboring components (two drops or two bubbles) may result in an interaction force between them. This behavior was explained by Bjerknes by postulating that every body that is moving in an accelerating fluid is subjected to a 'kinetic buoyancy' equal with the product of the acceleration of the fluid multiplied by the mass of the fluid displaced by the body. The external sound wave applied to a system of drops/bubbles triggers secondary sound waves from each component of the system. These secondary pressure fields integrated over the surface of the neighboring drop/bubble may result in a force additional to the effect of the primary sound wave on each component of the system. In certain conditions, the magnitude of these secondary forces may result in significant changes in the dynamics of each component, thus in the behavior of the entire system. In a system containing bubbles, the sound wave radiated by one bubble at the location of a neighboring one is dominated by the volume oscillation mode and its effects can be important for a large range of frequencies. The interaction forces in a system consisting of drops are much smaller than those consisting of bubbles. Therefore, as a first step towards the understanding of the drop-drop interaction subject to external pressure fluctuations, it is more convenient to study the bubble interactions. This paper presents experimental results and theoretical predictions concerning the interaction and the motion of two levitated air bubbles in water in the presence of an acoustic field at high frequencies (22-23 KHz).

  14. System for Manipulating Drops and Bubbles Using Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The manipulation and control of drops of liquid and gas bubbles is achieved using high intensity acoustics in the form of and/or acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. generated by a controlled wave emission from a transducer. Acoustic radiation pressure is used to deploy or dispense drops into a liquid or a gas or bubbles into a liquid at zero or near zero velocity from the discharge end of a needle such as a syringe needle. Acoustic streaming is useful in manipulating the drop or bubble during or after deployment. Deployment and discharge is achieved by focusing the acoustic radiation pressure on the discharge end of the needle, and passing the acoustic waves through the fluid in the needle. through the needle will itself, or coaxially through the fluid medium surrounding the needle. Alternatively, the acoustic waves can be counter-deployed by focusing on the discharge end of the needle from a transducer axially aligned with the needle, but at a position opposite the needle, to prevent premature deployment of the drop or bubble. The acoustic radiation pressure can also be used for detecting the presence or absence of a drop or a bubble at the tip of a needle or for sensing various physical characteristics of the drop or bubble such as size or density.

  15. Holographic and acoustic emission evaluation of pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, D.M.

    1980-03-05

    Optical holographic interfereometry and acoustic emission monitoring were simultaneously used to evaluate two small, high pressure vessels during pressurization. The techniques provide pressure vessel designers with both quantitative information such as displacement/strain measurements and qualitative information such as flaw detection. The data from the holographic interferograms were analyzed for strain profiles. The acoustic emission signals were monitored for crack growth and vessel quality.

  16. Inlet total pressure loss due to acoustic wall treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of diffuser wall acoustic treatment on inlet total pressure loss was experimentally determined. Data were obtained by testing an inlet model with 10 different acoustically treated diffusers differing only in the design of the Helmholtz resonator acoustic treatment. Tests were conducted in a wind tunnel at forward velocities to 41 meters per second for inlet throat Mach numbers of .5 to .8 and angles of attack as high as 50 degrees. Results indicate a pressure loss penalty due to acoustic treatment that increases linearly with the porosity of the acoustic facing sheet. For a surface porosity of 14 percent the total pressure loss was 21 percent greater than that for an untreated inlet.

  17. Acoustics of the piezo-electric pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutt, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    Acoustical properties of a piezoelectric device are reported for measuring the pressure in the plasma flow from an MPD arc. A description and analysis of the acoustical behavior in a piezoelectric probe is presented for impedance matching and damping. The experimental results are presented in a set of oscillographic records.

  18. Acoustic waves in gases with strong pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, William E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of strong pressure gradients on the acoustic modes (standing waves) of a rectangular cavity is investigated analytically. When the cavity response is represented by a sum of modes, each mode is found to have two resonant frequencies. The lower frequency is near the Viaesaela-Brundt frequency, which characterizes the buoyant effect, and the higher frequency is above the ordinary acoustic resonance frequency. This finding shows that the propagation velocity of the acoustic waves is increased due to the pressure gradient effect.

  19. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and tower mounted on the Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments located throughout the test article. There were four primary ASMAT instrument suites: ignition overpressure (IOP), lift-off acoustics (LOA), ground acoustics (GA), and spatial correlation (SC). Each instrumentation suite incorporated different sensor models which were selected based upon measurement requirements. These requirements included the type of measurement, exposure to the environment, instrumentation check-outs and data acquisition. The sensors were attached to the test article using different mounts and brackets dependent upon the location of the sensor. This presentation addresses the observed effect of the sensors and mounts on the acoustic and pressure measurements.

  20. The contamination of acoustic pressure measurements by sensor oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Surry, J.; Kezele, D.; Risley, C.

    1996-04-01

    The significance of micromotion (sensor) noise contamination of low frequency, low level, ambient ocean acoustic measurements has been pursued experimentally and analytically. Oceanographic hydrophones are subject to small motions resulting from various phenomena; the present study focussed on a pressure-sensitive hydrophone exposed to vertical oscillations. While under such imposed motion, the responses from a pressure-sensitive hydrophone and a collocated accelerometer were analyzed relative to a stationary reference hydrophone. The imposed motion was vertical, colored noise (1 to 50 Hz) of various acceleration amplitudes (10 {mu}g to 10 mg), transmitted through an elastic isolation suspension. Formation of Frequency Response Functions between the measured transducer signals, demonstrated that a three component model of the hydrophone signal predicts the response-to-motion contamination of the acoustic signal. In the lower frequency range, the vertical motion through the static head gradient generates a signal similar to the response-to-acoustic signal, while in the upper frequency range, the hydrophone responds inertially to the motion. For acceleration greater than 30 {mu}g, these components masked the laboratory ambient sound, except in a narrow frequency band where the two motion related components canceled each other. The in-water acceleration sensitivity of the hydrophone was found to be higher than the measured in-air value, apparently due to two hydrodynamic effects: water mass loading predicted by a classical added-mass term and a greatly magnifying effect from an adjacent moving body. Extrapolating the results to a deep ocean environment, the hydrophone signals would be contaminated below 5 Hz. A spectral technique is demonstrated to remove both forms of motion contamination from laboratory data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Acoustic emission testing of 12-nickel maraging steel pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunegan, H. L.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustic emission data were obtained from three point bend fracture toughness specimens of 12-nickel maraging steel, and two pressure vessels of the same material. One of the pressure vessels contained a prefabricated flaw which was extended and sharpened by fatigue cycling. It is shown that the flawed vessel had similar characteristics to the fracture specimens, thereby allowing estimates to be made of its nearness to failure during a proof test. Both the flawed and unflawed pressure vessel survived the proof pressure and 5 cycles to the working pressure, but it was apparent from the acoustic emission response during the proof cycle and the 5 cycles to the working pressure that the flawed vessel was very near failure. The flawed vessel did not survive a second cycle to the proof pressure before failure due to flaw extension through the wall (causing a leak).

  2. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  3. Active control of acoustic pressure fields using smart material technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    An overview describing the use of piezoceramic patches in reducing noise in a structural acoustics setting is presented. The passive and active contributions due to patches which are bonded to an Euler-Bernoulli beam or thin shell are briefly discussed and the results are incorporated into a 2-D structural acoustics model. In this model, an exterior noise source causes structural vibrations which in turn lead to interior noise as a result of nonlinear fluid/structure coupling mechanism. Interior sound pressure levels are reduced via patches bonded to the flexible boundary (a beam in this case) which generate pure bending moments when an out-of-phase voltage is applied. Well-posedness results for the infinite dimensional system are discussed and a Galerkin scheme for approximating the system dynamics is outlined. Control is implemented by using linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control theory to calculate gains for the linearized system and then feeding these gains back into the nonlinear system of interest. The effectiveness of this strategy for this problem is illustrated in an example.

  4. Numerical Investigations of High Pressure Acoustic Waves in Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athavale, Mahesh; Pindera, Maciej; Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation presents work on numerical investigations of nonlinear acoustic phenomena in resonators that can generate high-pressure waves using acoustic forcing of the flow. Time-accurate simulations of the flow in a closed cone resonator were performed at different oscillation frequencies and amplitudes, and the numerical results for the resonance frequency and fluid pressure increase match the GRC experimental data well. Work on cone resonator assembly simulations has started and will involve calculations of the flow through the resonator assembly with and without acoustic excitation. A new technique for direct calculation of resonance frequency of complex shaped resonators is also being investigated. Script-driven command procedures will also be developed for optimization of the resonator shape for maximum pressure increase.

  5. Wall pressure fluctuations and acoustics in turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, M. A.; Lauchle, G. C.

    1986-09-01

    Measurements of the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) wall pressure spectrum and the facility's propagating acoustic field were conducted in the Boundary Layer Research Facility. Subminiature, piezoresistive-type pressure transducers were used. Detailed calibration of the pressure transducers was performed using a standing wave tube. Measured sensitivities of the transducers were within 0.5 dB of factory specifications and measured phase differences between individual transducers were insignificant. The TBL wall pressure spectrum was obtained using a novel signal-processing technique that allowed a minimization of both acoustic and vibration-induced noise. This technique uses pairs of transducer difference signals from an exisymmetric array of three flush-mounted pressure sensors and permits cancellation of the propagating acoustic and vibrationally induced pressure fields. A measurement involving the coherence function between these transducer signals was shown to validate the measured TBL wall pressure spectra and all assumptions used in developing the measurement technique. Non-dimensionalized spectra of the TBL fluctuating wall pressure measured in this investigation are compared to those measured previously. These comparisons substantiated a maximum, normalized transducer diameter for the complete resolution of the high-frequency part of the TBL wall pressure spectrum.

  6. ACOUSTIC LOCATION OF LEAKS IN PRESSURIZED UNDERGROUND PETROLEUM PIPELINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were conducted at the UST Test Apparatus Pipeline in which three acoustic sensors separated by a maximum distance of 38 m (125-ft) were used to monitor signals produced by 3.0-, 1.5-, and 1.0-gal/h leaks in the wall of a 2-in.-diameter pressurized petroleum pipeline. ...

  7. Effects of voice style, noise level, and acoustic feedback on objective and subjective voice evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Bottalico, Pasquale; Graetzer, Simone; Hunter, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Speakers adjust their vocal effort when communicating in different room acoustic and noise conditions and when instructed to speak at different volumes. The present paper reports on the effects of voice style, noise level, and acoustic feedback on vocal effort, evaluated as sound pressure level, and self-reported vocal fatigue, comfort, and control. Speakers increased their level in the presence of babble and when instructed to talk in a loud style, and lowered it when acoustic feedback was increased and when talking in a soft style. Self-reported responses indicated a preference for the normal style without babble noise. PMID:26723357

  8. Effects of voice style, noise level, and acoustic feedback on objective and subjective voice evaluations.

    PubMed

    Bottalico, Pasquale; Graetzer, Simone; Hunter, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Speakers adjust their vocal effort when communicating in different room acoustic and noise conditions and when instructed to speak at different volumes. The present paper reports on the effects of voice style, noise level, and acoustic feedback on vocal effort, evaluated as sound pressure level, and self-reported vocal fatigue, comfort, and control. Speakers increased their level in the presence of babble and when instructed to talk in a loud style, and lowered it when acoustic feedback was increased and when talking in a soft style. Self-reported responses indicated a preference for the normal style without babble noise. PMID:26723357

  9. Acoustic Wave Propagation in Pressure Sense Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitarius, Patrick; Gregory, Don A.; Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin

    2003-01-01

    Sense lines are used in pressure measurements to passively transmit information from hostile environments to areas where transducers can be used. The transfer function of a sense line can be used to obtain information about the measured environment from the protected sensor. Several properties of this transfer function are examined, including frequency dependence, Helmholtz resonance, and time of flight delay.

  10. Program for the feasibility of developing a high pressure acoustic levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rey, Charles A.; Merkley, Dennis R.; Hammarlund, Gregory R.

    1988-01-01

    This is the final report for the program for the feasibility of developing a high-pressure acoustic levitator (HPAL). It includes work performed during the period from February 15, 1987 to October 26, 1987. The program was conducted for NASA under contract number NAS3-25115. The HPAL would be used for containerless processing of materials in the 1-g Earth environment. Results show that the use of increased gas pressure produces higher sound pressure levels. The harmonics produced by the acoustic source are also reduced. This provides an improvement in the capabilities of acoustic levitation in 1-g. The reported processing capabilities are directly limited by the design of the Medium Pressure Acoustic Levitator used for this study. Data show that sufficient acoustic intensities can be obtained to levitate and process a specimen of density 5 g/cu cm at 1500 C. However, it is recommended that a working engineering model of the HPAL be developed. The model would be used to establish the maximum operating parameters of furnace temperature and sample density.

  11. Quantitative measurement of acoustic pressure in the focal zone of acoustic lens-line focusing using the Schlieren method.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xueping; Cheng, Qian; Xu, Zheng; Qian, Menglu; Han, Qingbang

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a theory and method for quantitative measurement of the acoustic lens-line focusing ultrasonic (ALLFU) field in its focal spot size and acoustic pressure using the Schlieren imaging technique. Using Fourier transformation, the relationship between the brightness of the Schlieren image and the acoustic pressure was introduced. The ALLFU field was simulated using finite element method and compared with the Schlieren acoustic field image. The measurement of the focal spot size was performed using the Schlieren method. The acoustic pressure in the focal zone of the ALLFU field and the transducer-transmitting voltage response were quantitatively determined by measuring the diffraction light fringe intensity. The results show that the brightness of the Schlieren image is a linear function of the acoustic intensity when the acousto-optic interaction length remains constant and the acoustic field is weak. PMID:27139646

  12. Tongue-Palate Contact Pressure, Oral Air Pressure, and Acoustics of Clear Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searl, Jeff; Evitts, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared articulatory contact pressure (ACP), oral air pressure (Po), and speech acoustics for conversational versus clear speech. They also assessed the relationship of these measures to listener perception. Method: Twelve adults with normal speech produced monosyllables in a phrase using conversational and clear speech.…

  13. High pressure liquid level monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bean, Vern E.; Long, Frederick G.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  14. Level indicator for pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-04-28

    A liquid-level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic-field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal-processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  15. A Comparison of Measured and Predicted XV-15 Tiltrotor Surface Acoustic Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.; Burley, Casey L.; Prichard, Devon S.

    1997-01-01

    Predicted XV-15 exterior surface acoustic pressures are compared with previously published experimental data. Surface acoustic pressure transducers were concentrated near the tip-path-plane of the rotor in airplane mode. The comparison emphasized cruise conditions which are of interest for tiltrotor interior noise - level flight for speeds ranging from 72 m/s to 113 m/s. The predictions were produced by components of the NASA Langley Tiltrotor Aeroacoustic Code (TRAC) system of computer codes. Comparisons between measurements and predictions were made in both the time and frequency domains, as well as overall sound pressure levels. In general, the predictions replicated the measured data well. Discrepancies between measurements and predictions were noted. Some of the discrepancies were due to poor correlation of the measured data with the rotor tach signal. In other cases limitations of the predictive methodology have been indicated.

  16. An oxygen pressure sensor using surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighty, Bradley D.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) piezoelectric devices are finding widespread applications in many arenas, particularly in the area of chemical sensing. We have developed an oxygen pressure sensor based on coating a SAW device with an oxygen binding agent which can be tailored to provide variable sensitivity. The coating is prepared by dissolving an oxygen binding agent in a toluene solution of a copolymer which is then sprayed onto the surface of the SAW device. Experimental data shows the feasibility of tailoring sensors to measure the partial pressure of oxygen from 2.6 to 67 KPa (20 to 500 torr). Potential applications of this technology are discussed.

  17. Dual mode acoustic wave sensor for precise pressure reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Xiaojing; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Wang, Yong; Randles, Andrew Benson; Chuan Chai, Kevin Tshun; Cai, Hong; Gu, Yuan Dong

    2014-09-01

    In this letter, a Microelectromechanical system acoustic wave sensor, which has a dual mode (lateral field exited Lamb wave mode and surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode) behavior, is presented for precious pressure change read out. Comb-like interdigital structured electrodes on top of piezoelectric material aluminium nitride (AlN) are used to generate the wave modes. The sensor membrane consists of single crystalline silicon formed by backside-etching of the bulk material of a silicon on insulator wafer having variable device thickness layer (5 μm-50 μm). With this principle, a pressure sensor has been fabricated and mounted on a pressure test package with pressure applied to the backside of the membrane within a range of 0 psi to 300 psi. The temperature coefficient of frequency was experimentally measured in the temperature range of -50 °C to 300 °C. This idea demonstrates a piezoelectric based sensor having two modes SAW/Lamb wave for direct physical parameter—pressure readout and temperature cancellation which can operate in harsh environment such as oil and gas exploration, automobile and aeronautic applications using the dual mode behavior of the sensor and differential readout at the same time.

  18. Sensing the characteristic acoustic impedance of a fluid utilizing acoustic pressure waves

    PubMed Central

    Antlinger, Hannes; Clara, Stefan; Beigelbeck, Roman; Cerimovic, Samir; Keplinger, Franz; Jakoby, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic sensors can be used to determine physical fluid parameters like viscosity, density, and speed of sound. In this contribution, we present the concept for an integrated sensor utilizing pressure waves to sense the characteristic acoustic impedance of a fluid. We note that the basic setup generally allows to determine the longitudinal viscosity and the speed of sound if it is operated in a resonant mode as will be discussed elsewhere. In this contribution, we particularly focus on a modified setup where interferences are suppressed by introducing a wedge reflector. This enables sensing of the liquid's characteristic acoustic impedance, which can serve as parameter in condition monitoring applications. We present a device model, experimental results and their evaluation. PMID:23565036

  19. Measurements of acoustic pressure at high amplitudes and intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, L. A.; Bailey, M. R.; Kaczkowski, P.; McAteer, J. A.; Pishchalnikov, Y. A.; Sapozhnikov, O. A.

    2004-01-01

    In our research group, we desire measurements of the large pressure amplitudes generated by the shock waves used in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and the large acoustic intensities used in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Conventional piezoelectric or PVDF hydrophones can not be used for such measurements as they are damaged either by cavitation, in SWL applications, or heat, in HIFU applications. In order to circumvent these difficulties, we have utilized optical fiber hydrophones in SWL that do not cavitate, and small glass probes and a scattering technique for measurements of large HIFU intensities. Descriptions of these techniques will be given as well as some typical data.

  20. Vibro-acoustics of a pressurized optical membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarazaga, Pablo A.; Johnson, Marty E.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2012-07-01

    Optical membranes are currently pursued for their ability to replace the conventional rigid mirrors that are used in space-based telescopes. Among some of the many benefits of using optical membranes is their ability to considerably reduce the weight of the structure. Given the low density of these thin-film membranes, the lower end dynamics play a more significant role than in their rigid plate-like counterparts. Space-based mirrors are subjected to a series of disturbances. Among those encountered are thermal radiation, debris impact, and slewing maneuvers. Thus, being able to model the dynamics appropriately is essential for the adequate performance of thin-film membrane mirrors. With this in mind, the work presented herein uses an impedance based modeling approach to describe the coupled dynamics of a pressurized optical membrane mirror with the end goal of performing vibration suppression of a membrane through acoustic excitation. First the effects of mass loading due to air surrounding a membrane and energy loss due to sound radiation to the far field are modeled in the case of a single membrane. These results are compared to the case of a membrane in vacuum. Second, the membrane is then coupled to a cylindrical cavity where the modeling takes into account the structural acoustic coupling between a cylindrical membrane and a rigid cylindrical cavity, similar to a drum. The coupled model also takes into account the energy loss by sound radiation to the far field due to the membrane's vibration. Third, this paper also looks at using a positive position feedback controller for vibration suppression of the membrane. This is done using a centralized acoustic source at the base of the cavity as the method of actuation. The acoustic actuation is of great interest since it does not mass load the membrane in the conventional way, as most methods of actuation would.

  1. Wind, waves, and acoustic background levels at Station ALOHA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duennebier, Fred K.; Lukas, Roger; Nosal, Eva-Marie; Aucan, JéRome; Weller, Robert A.

    2012-03-01

    Frequency spectra from deep-ocean near-bottom acoustic measurements obtained contemporaneously with wind, wave, and seismic data are described and used to determine the correlations among these data and to discuss possible causal relationships. Microseism energy appears to originate in four distinct regions relative to the hydrophone: wind waves above the sensors contribute microseism energy observed on the ocean floor; a fraction of this local wave energy propagates as seismic waves laterally, and provides a spatially integrated contribution to microseisms observed both in the ocean and on land; waves in storms generate microseism energy in deep water that travels as seismic waves to the sensor; and waves reflected from shorelines provide opposing waves that add to the microseism energy. Correlations of local wind speed with acoustic and seismic spectral time series suggest that the local Longuet-Higgins mechanism is visible in the acoustic spectrum from about 0.4 Hz to 80 Hz. Wind speed and acoustic levels at the hydrophone are poorly correlated below 0.4 Hz, implying that the microseism energy below 0.4 Hz is not typically generated by local winds. Correlation of ocean floor acoustic energy with seismic spectra from Oahu and with wave spectra near Oahu imply that wave reflections from Hawaiian coasts, wave interactions in the deep ocean near Hawaii, and storms far from Hawaii contribute energy to the seismic and acoustic spectra below 0.4 Hz. Wavefield directionality strongly influences the acoustic spectrum at frequencies below about 2 Hz, above which the acoustic levels imply near-isotropic surface wave directionality.

  2. The trade-off characteristics of acoustic and pressure sensors for the NASP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, Martin; Bush, Chuck

    1992-01-01

    Results of a trade study for the development of pressure and acoustic sensors for use on the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) are summarized. Pressure sensors are needed to operate to 100 psia; acoustic sensors are needed that can give meaningful information about a 200 dB sound pressure level (SPL) environment. Both sensors will have to operate from a high temperature of 2000 F down to absolute zero. The main conclusions of the study are the following: (1) Diaphragm materials limit minimum size and maximum frequency response attainable. (2) No transduction is available to meet all the NASP requirements with existing technology. (3) Capacitive sensors are large relative to the requirement, have limited resolution and frequency response due to noise, and cable length is limited to approximately 20 feet. (4) Eddy current sensors are large relative to the requirement and have limited cable lengths. (5) Fiber optic sensors provide the possibility for a small sensor, even though present developments do not exhibit that characteristic. The need to use sapphire at high temperature complicates the design. Present high temperature research sensors suffer from poor resolution. A significant development effort will be required to realize the potential of fiber optics. (6) Short-term development seems to favor eddy current techniques with the penalty of larger size and reduced dynamic range for acoustic sensors. (7) Long-term development may favor fiber optics with the penalties of cost, schedule, and uncertainty.

  3. Systems and methods of monitoring acoustic pressure to detect a flame condition in a gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Krull, Anthony Wayne; Healy, Timothy Andrew , Yilmaz, Ertan

    2011-05-17

    A method may detect a flashback condition in a fuel nozzle of a combustor. The method may include obtaining a current acoustic pressure signal from the combustor, analyzing the current acoustic pressure signal to determine current operating frequency information for the combustor, and indicating that the flashback condition exists based at least in part on the current operating frequency information.

  4. Combining COMSOL modeling with acoustic pressure maps to design sono-reactors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zongsu; Weavers, Linda K

    2016-07-01

    Scaled-up and economically viable sonochemical systems are critical for increased use of ultrasound in environmental and chemical processing applications. In this study, computational simulations and acoustic pressure maps were used to design a larger-scale sono-reactor containing a multi-stepped ultrasonic horn. Simulations in COMSOL Multiphysics showed ultrasonic waves emitted from the horn neck and tip, generating multiple regions of high acoustic pressure. The volume of these regions surrounding the horn neck were larger compared with those below the horn tip. The simulated acoustic field was verified by acoustic pressure contour maps generated from hydrophone measurements in a plexiglass box filled with water. These acoustic pressure contour maps revealed an asymmetric and discrete distribution of acoustic pressure due to acoustic cavitation, wave interaction, and water movement by ultrasonic irradiation. The acoustic pressure contour maps were consistent with simulation results in terms of the effective scale of cavitation zones (∼ 10 cm and <5 cm above and below horn tip, respectively). With the mapped acoustic field and identified cavitation location, a cylindrically-shaped sono-reactor with a conical bottom was designed to evaluate the treatment capacity (∼ 5 L) for the multi-stepped horn using COMSOL simulations. In this study, verification of simulation results with experiments demonstrates that coupling of COMSOL simulations with hydrophone measurements is a simple, effective and reliable scientific method to evaluate reactor designs of ultrasonic systems. PMID:26964976

  5. Enhanced acoustic sensing through wave compression and pressure amplification in anisotropic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongyao; Liu, Haijun; Reilly, Michael; Bae, Hyungdae; Yu, Miao

    2014-10-01

    Acoustic sensors play an important role in many areas, such as homeland security, navigation, communication, health care and industry. However, the fundamental pressure detection limit hinders the performance of current acoustic sensing technologies. Here, through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, we show that anisotropic acoustic metamaterials can be designed to have strong wave compression effect that renders direct amplification of pressure fields in metamaterials. This enables a sensing mechanism that can help overcome the detection limit of conventional acoustic sensing systems. We further demonstrate a metamaterial-enhanced acoustic sensing system that achieves more than 20 dB signal-to-noise enhancement (over an order of magnitude enhancement in detection limit). With this system, weak acoustic pulse signals overwhelmed by the noise are successfully recovered. This work opens up new vistas for the development of metamaterial-based acoustic sensors with improved performance and functionalities that are highly desirable for many applications.

  6. Study on demodulated signal distribution and acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ying; Yang, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Chen; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2016-06-01

    We propose a demodulated signal distribution theory for a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system. The distribution region of Rayleigh backscattering including the acoustic sensing signal in the sensing fiber is investigated theoretically under different combinations of both the path difference and pulse width Additionally we determine the optimal solution between the path difference and pulse width to obtain the maximum phase change per unit length. We experimentally test this theory and realize a good acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of  ‑150 dB re rad/(μPa·m) of fiber in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 1 kHz.

  7. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  8. Near and Far Field Acoustic Pressure Skewness in a Heated Supersonic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Mora, Pablo; Kastner, Jeff; Heeb, Nick; Kailasanath, Kailas; Liu, Junhui; University of Cincinnati Collaboration; Naval Research Laboratory Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The dominant component of turbulent mixing noise in high speed jets is the Mach wave radiation generated by large turbulent structures in the shear layer The Over-All Sound Pressure Level (OASPL) in the far field peaks in a direction near the Mach wave angle. ``Crackle'' is another important component of high speed jet noise. Crackle cannot be recognized in the spectrum of the acoustic pressure signal, but it appears in the temporal waveform of the pressure as sharply rising peaks. Skewness levels of the pressure and dP/dt have been used as a measure of crackle in high specific thrust engines and rockets. In this paper, we focus on recognizing a technique that identifies the impact of different test conditions on the near-field and far-field statistics of the pressure and dP/dt signals of a supersonic jet with a design Mach number of Md=1.5 produced by a C-D conical nozzle. Cold and hot jets, T0=300K and 600K, are tested at over, design, and under-expanded conditions, with NPRs=2.5, 3.671, 4.5, respectively. Second, Third and Forth order statistics are examined in the near and far fields. Rms, skewness and kurtosis intensity levels and propagation are better identified in the dP/dt than in the pressure signal. Statistics of the dP/dt demonstrate to be a better measure for crackle. Project funded by ONR grant.

  9. Acoustic predictions using measured pressures from a model rotor in the DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visintainer, Joseph A.; Burley, Casey L.; Marcolini, Michael A.; Liu, Sandy R.

    1991-01-01

    A contemporary design, 4-bladed United Technologies model rotor with pressure-instrumented blades was tested in the Duits-Nederslandse Windtunnel. Simultaneous acoustic and pressure measurements were made for a wide range of operating conditions. Microphones were optimally positioned at a number of locations in the flow forward of the rotor to measure rotor thickness noise, high-speed impulsive noise (both in the rotor plane), and blade-vortex interaction noise (forward and 25 deg below the rotor plane). The blade surface pressure data are used as aerodynamic input to WOPWOP, which is a state-of-the-art rotor noise prediction program that predicts rotor thickness and loading noise. The predicted results using WOPWOP are compared to the measured noise levels for cases where either thickness noise, blade-vortex interaction noise, or high-speed impulsive noise is the dominant noise mechanism. The comparisons show regions of good agreement, as well as areas where further improvement is necessary.

  10. Predicting burst pressures in filament-wound composite pressure vessels by using acoustic emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Eric V. K.

    1992-12-01

    Multivariate statistical analysis was used to generate equations for predicting burst pressures in 14.6 cm dia. fiberglass-epoxy and 45.7 cm dia. graphite-epoxy pressure vessels from acoustic emission (AE) data taken during hydroproof. Using the AE energy and amplitude measurements as the primary independent variables, the less accurate of the two linear equations was able to predict burst pressures to within +/- 0.841 MPa of the value given by the 95 percent prediction interval. Moreover, this equation included the effects of two bottles that contained simulated manufacturing defects. Because the AE data used to generate the burst-pressure equations were both taken at or below 25 percent of the expected burst pressures, it is anticipated that by using this approach, it would be possible to lower proof pressures in larger filament-wound composite pressure vessels such as rocket motor cases. This would minimize hydroproof damage to the composite structure and the accompanying potential for premature failure in service.

  11. Experimental investigation on the characteristics of thermo-acoustic instability in hydrocarbon fuel at supercritical pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Zhou, Jin; Pan, Yu; Wang, Ning

    2016-04-01

    In the investigation of forced-convection heat transfer in a small-scale channel, the phenomenon of thermo-acoustic instability was observed in hydrocarbon fuel (RP-3) at supercritical pressures. The heat transfer was obviously enhanced when thermo-acoustic instability occurred. To understand the relationship between the enhancement on heat transfer and thermo-acoustic instability, the characteristics of thermo-acoustic instability were firstly investigated. The pressure drop fluctuations were used to represent the characteristics of thermo-acoustic instability. And two pivotal characteristics of thermo-acoustic instability are amplitude and duration. The characteristics could be affected by three operating parameters: fuel mass flow rate, channel inlet temperature and channel operating pressure. A series of experiments were designed to study the effect of these three parameters on the characteristics. It is found that the amplitude increases with increasing mass flow rate, while the duration reaches the maximum value when mass flow rate is a certain value; the effects of operating pressure on the characteristics of thermo-acoustic instability are strongly interactive with the threshold power. And an increase in operating pressure causes the amplitude and duration to decrease since the variation trends of thermal physical properties become smooth; an increase in inlet temperature causes the amplitude and duration to decrease and increase, respectively, when operating pressure is below 3.0 MPa. And the duration change indistinctively with increasing inlet temperature when operating pressure exceeds 3.5 MPa.

  12. Neural Network Burst Pressure Prediction in Graphite/Epoxy Pressure Vessels from Acoustic Emission Amplitude Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric v. K.; Walker, James L., II; Rowell, Ginger H.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data were taken during hydroproof for three sets of ASTM standard 5.75 inch diameter filament wound graphite/epoxy bottles. All three sets of bottles had the same design and were wound from the same graphite fiber; the only difference was in the epoxies used. Two of the epoxies had similar mechanical properties, and because the acoustic properties of materials are a function of their stiffnesses, it was thought that the AE data from the two sets might also be similar; however, this was not the case. Therefore, the three resin types were categorized using dummy variables, which allowed the prediction of burst pressures all three sets of bottles using a single neural network. Three bottles from each set were used to train the network. The resin category, the AE amplitude distribution data taken up to 25 % of the expected burst pressure, and the actual burst pressures were used as inputs. Architecturally, the network consisted of a forty-three neuron input layer (a single categorical variable defining the resin type plus forty-two continuous variables for the AE amplitude frequencies), a fifteen neuron hidden layer for mapping, and a single output neuron for burst pressure prediction. The network trained on all three bottle sets was able to predict burst pressures in the remaining bottles with a worst case error of + 6.59%, slightly greater than the desired goal of + 5%. This larger than desired error was due to poor resolution in the amplitude data for the third bottle set. When the third set of bottles was eliminated from consideration, only four hidden layer neurons were necessary to generate a worst case prediction error of - 3.43%, well within the desired goal.

  13. Considerations for acoustic emission monitoring of spherical Kevlar/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.; Patterson, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    We are continuing to research the applications of acoustic emission testing for predicting burst pressure of filament-wound Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels. This study has focused on three specific areas. The first area involves development of an experimental technique and the proper instrumentation to measure the energy given off by the acoustic emission transducer per acoustic emission burst. The second area concerns the design of a test fixture in which to mount the composite vessel so that the acoustic emission transducers are held against the outer surface of the composite. Included in this study area is the calibration of the entire test setup including couplant, transducer, electronics, and the instrument measuring the energy per burst. In the third and final area of this study, we consider the number, location, and sensitivity of the acoustic emission transducers used for proof testing composite pressure vessels.

  14. Wind turbine sound pressure level calculations at dwellings.

    PubMed

    Keith, Stephen E; Feder, Katya; Voicescu, Sonia A; Soukhovtsev, Victor; Denning, Allison; Tsang, Jason; Broner, Norm; Leroux, Tony; Richarz, Werner; van den Berg, Frits

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides calculations of outdoor sound pressure levels (SPLs) at dwellings for 10 wind turbine models, to support Health Canada's Community Noise and Health Study. Manufacturer supplied and measured wind turbine sound power levels were used to calculate outdoor SPL at 1238 dwellings using ISO [(1996). ISO 9613-2-Acoustics] and a Swedish noise propagation method. Both methods yielded statistically equivalent results. The A- and C-weighted results were highly correlated over the 1238 dwellings (Pearson's linear correlation coefficient r > 0.8). Calculated wind turbine SPLs were compared to ambient SPLs from other sources, estimated using guidance documents from the United States and Alberta, Canada. PMID:27036282

  15. Effect of static pressure on acoustic energy radiated by cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Towata, Atsuya; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2011-11-01

    The effect of static pressure on acoustic emissions including shock-wave emissions from cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound has been studied by numerical simulations in order to investigate the effect of static pressure on dispersion of nano-particles in liquids by ultrasound. The results of the numerical simulations for bubbles of 5 μm in equilibrium radius at 20 kHz have indicated that the optimal static pressure which maximizes the energy of acoustic waves radiated by a bubble per acoustic cycle increases as the acoustic pressure amplitude increases or the viscosity of the solution decreases. It qualitatively agrees with the experimental results by Sauter et al. [Ultrason. Sonochem. 15, 517 (2008)]. In liquids with relatively high viscosity (∼200 mPa s), a bubble collapses more violently than in pure water when the acoustic pressure amplitude is relatively large (∼20 bar). In a mixture of bubbles of different equilibrium radius (3 and 5 μm), the acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is much larger than that by a 3 μm bubble due to the interaction with bubbles of different equilibrium radius. The acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is substantially increased by the interaction with 3 μm bubbles. PMID:22087995

  16. Temperature and pressure dependences of acoustic anomalies of PET films studied by using Brillouin spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kwang Joo; Lee, Byoung Wan; Jeong, Min-Seok; Ko, Jae-Hyeon

    2015-04-01

    The acoustic properties of biaxially-oriented polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were investigated as a function of either temperature or pressure by using Brillouin spectroscopy. The Brillouin frequency shift of the longitudinal acoustic mode of both biaxially-oriented and amorphous PET materials showed a change in the slope near 80 °C, which was the approximate glass transition temperature. The acoustic damping of amorphous PET exhibited large values near the melting temperature compared to that of semicrystalline PET. This indicated stronger coupling between the acoustic waves and the structural relaxation process in the amorphous state. The pressure dependences of the sound velocities were investigated at pressures up to 8.5 GPa by using a diamond anvil cell. The pressure-density relationship could be obtained based on the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state.

  17. A system for acoustical and optical analysis of encapsulated microbubbles at ultrahigh hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed

    Zhushma, Aleksandr; Lebedeva, Natalia; Sen, Pabitra; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei S; Dayton, Paul A

    2013-05-01

    Acoustics are commonly used for borehole (i.e., oil well) imaging applications, under conditions where temperature and pressure reach extremes beyond that of conventional medical ultrasonics. Recently, there has been an interest in the application of encapsulated microbubbles as borehole contrast agents for acoustic assessment of fluid composition and flow. Although such microbubbles are widely studied under physiological conditions for medical imaging applications, to date there is a paucity of information on the behavior of encapsulated gas-filled microbubbles at high pressures. One major limitation is that there is a lack of experimental systems to assess both optical and acoustic data of micrometer-sized particles data at these extremes. In this paper, we present the design and application of a high-pressure cell designed for acoustical and optical studies of microbubbles at hydrostatic pressures up to 27.5 MPa (271 atm). PMID:23742587

  18. Analytic Formulation and Numerical Implementation of an Acoustic Pressure Gradient Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seongkyu; Brentner, Kenneth S.; Farassat, Fereidoun

    2007-01-01

    The scattering of rotor noise is an area that has received little attention over the years, yet the limited work that has been done has shown that both the directivity and intensity of the acoustic field may be significantly modified by the presence of scattering bodies. One of the inputs needed to compute the scattered acoustic field is the acoustic pressure gradient on a scattering surface. Two new analytical formulations of the acoustic pressure gradient have been developed and implemented in the PSU-WOPWOP rotor noise prediction code. These formulations are presented in this paper. The first formulation is derived by taking the gradient of Farassat's retarded-time Formulation 1A. Although this formulation is relatively simple, it requires numerical time differentiation of the acoustic integrals. In the second formulation, the time differentiation is taken inside the integrals analytically. The acoustic pressure gradient predicted by these new formulations is validated through comparison with the acoustic pressure gradient determined by a purely numerical approach for two model rotors. The agreement between analytic formulations and numerical method is excellent for both stationary and moving observers case.

  19. Conditionally Increased Acoustic Pressures in Nonfetal Diagnostic Ultrasound Examinations Without Contrast Agents: A Preliminary Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Church, Charles C.; Harris, Gerald; Wear, Keith A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Carson, Paul L.; Jiang, Hui; Sandstrom, Kurt L.; Szabo, Thomas L.; Ziskin, Marvin C.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical index (MI) has been used by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) since 1992 for regulatory decisions regarding the acoustic output of diagnostic ultrasound equipment. Its formula is based on predictions of acoustic cavitation under specific conditions. Since its implementation over 2 decades ago, new imaging modes have been developed that employ unique beam sequences exploiting higher-order acoustic phenomena, and, concurrently, studies of the bioeffects of ultrasound under a range of imaging scenarios have been conducted. In 2012, the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine Technical Standards Committee convened a working group of its Output Standards Subcommittee to examine and report on the potential risks and benefits of the use of conditionally increased acoustic pressures (CIP) under specific diagnostic imaging scenarios. The term “conditionally” is included to indicate that CIP would be considered on a per-patient basis for the duration required to obtain the necessary diagnostic information. This document is a result of that effort. In summary, a fundamental assumption in the MI calculation is the presence of a preexisting gas body. For tissues not known to contain preexisting gas bodies, based on theoretical predications and experimentally reported cavitation thresholds, we find this assumption to be invalid. We thus conclude that exceeding the recommended maximum MI level given in the FDA guidance could be warranted without concern for increased risk of cavitation in these tissues. However, there is limited literature assessing the potential clinical benefit of exceeding the MI guidelines in these tissues. The report proposes a 3-tiered approach for CIP that follows the model for employing elevated output in magnetic resonance imaging and concludes with summary recommendations to facilitate Institutional Review Board (IRB)-monitored clinical studies investigating CIP in specific tissues. PMID:26112617

  20. A theoretical prediction of the acoustic pressure generated by turbulence-flame front interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The equations of momentum and continuity are combined and linearized yielding the one dimensional nonhomogeneous acoustic wave equation. Three terms in the non-homogeneous equation act as acoustic sources and are taken to be forcing functions acting on the homogeneous wave equation. The three source terms are: fluctuating entropy, turbulence gradients, and turbulence-flame interactions. Each source term is discussed. The turbulence-flame interaction source is used as the basis for computing the source acoustic pressure from the Fourier transformed wave equation. Pressure fluctuations created in turbopump gas generators and turbines may act as a forcing function for turbine and propellant tube vibrations in earth to orbit space propulsion systems and could reduce their life expectancy. A preliminary assessment of the acoustic pressure fluctuations in such systems is presented.

  1. A theoretical prediction of the acoustic pressure generated by turbulence-flame front interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The equations of momentum annd continuity are combined and linearized yielding the one dimensional nonhomogeneous acoustic wave equation. Three terms in the non-homogeneous equation act as acoustic sources and are taken to be forcing functions acting on the homogeneous wave equation. The three source terms are: fluctuating entropy, turbulence gradients, and turbulence-flame interactions. Each source term is discussed. The turbulence-flame interaction source is used as the basis for computing the source acoustic pressure from the Fourier transformed wave equation. Pressure fluctuations created in turbopump gas generators and turbines may act as a forcing function for turbine and propellant tube vibrations in Earth to orbit space propulsion systems and could reduce their life expectancy. A preliminary assessment of the acoustic pressure fluctuations in such systems is presented.

  2. The role of acoustic cavitation in liquid pressurization in narrow tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, S.; Hatakeyama, M.

    2013-04-01

    The liquid pressurization mechanism in narrow tubes as a result of high intensity ultrasonic field along the irradiation direction is discussed, with a focus on the physical behavior of acoustic cavitation bubbles formed at the tube's open end. The acoustic energy dissipated at the surface of the bubbles results in radiation pressure with a second harmonic frequency (2f). We show here that during the phenomenon, which resembles the functioning an ultrasonic pump, cyclical pressure fluctuations with the second harmonic frequency 2f are observed using a high-response pressure transducer. The maximum value of accumulating pressure is equivalent to the positive peak of the sound pressure in the tube without acoustic cavitation. It can be thought that the cyclic collapse and expansion of acoustic cavitation bubbles at the tube's open end contribute to the control of the inrushing sound pressure. In particular, the transmission behavior of the received pressure in a viscous liquid containing gas bubbles with high number density near the tube's open end (a quantity that is related to the kinematic viscosity of the medium liquid) plays an important role in this pressure accumulation mechanism. A dynamic model of this pressurization phenomenon is also discussed.

  3. [Peak sound pressure levels of gunshots from starter's pistols].

    PubMed

    Rothschild, M A; Dieker, L; Prante, H; Maschke, C

    1998-12-01

    Starter's pistols are often bought for self-defense, but can also be used for criminal activities (e.g. assaults, etc.). When a starter's pistol is loaded with blank cartridges and is fired, a powerful shooting noise results. The level of the noise produced is high enough to cause acoustic trauma. For legal examinations and giving an expert opinion further information is needed about the power of such noise. We examined how high peak sound pressure levels were of the gunshots of blank cartridges and whether there existed any directional characteristics from the noise emissions. In all, 15 different models of starter's pistols of 8 different calibres were examined. In addition to blank cartridges, 8 mm tear gas cartridges were also examined. Four transducers were situated in the horizontal plane around the muzzle: 0 degree (shooting direction), 45 degrees, 90 degrees, and 180 degrees (towards the firer). The distances between the transducers and the muzzle were 25 cm, 50 cm, 100 cm, and 200 cm. At a distance of 1 m and in the 0 degree shooting direction the peak sound pressure levels of nearly all weapons tested exceeded 160 dB. At a shooting distance of 25 cm the peak sound pressure levels reached 181 dB. In addition, we observed a directional characteristic concerning the emission of noise: pistols produced higher peak sound pressure levels to the front than backwards towards the firer. PMID:10023593

  4. Towards a reference cavitating vessel Part III—design and acoustic pressure characterization of a multi-frequency sonoreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lian; Memoli, Gianluca; Hodnett, Mark; Butterworth, Ian; Sarno, Dan; Zeqiri, Bajram

    2015-08-01

    A multi-frequency cavitation vessel (RV-multi) has been commissioned at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL, UK), with the aim of establishing a standard source of acoustic cavitation in water, with reference to which details of the cavitation process can be studied and cavitation measurement techniques evaluated. The vessel is a cylindrical cavity with a maximum capacity up to 17 L, and is designed to work at six frequency ranges, from 21 kHz to 136 kHz, under controlled temperature conditions. This paper discusses the design of RV-multi and reports experiments carried out to establish the reproducibility of the acoustic pressure field established within the vessel and its operating envelope, including sensitivity to aspects such as water depth and temperature. The acoustic field distribution was determined along the radial and depth directions within the vessel using a miniature hydrophone, for two input voltage levels under low power transducer excitation conditions (e.g. below the cavitation threshold). Particular care was taken in determining peak acoustic pressure locations, as these are critical for accompanying cavitation studies. Perturbations of the vessel by the measuring hydrophone were also monitored with a bottom-mounted pressure sensor.

  5. Investigations of High Pressure Acoustic Waves in Resonators with Seal-Like Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Li, Xiao-Fan; Raman, Ganesh

    2004-01-01

    1) Standing waves with maximum pressures of 188 kPa have been produced in resonators containing ambient pressure air; 2) Addition of structures inside the resonator shifts the fundamental frequency and decreases the amplitude of the generated pressure waves; 3) Addition of holes to the resonator does reduce the magnitude of the acoustic waves produced, but their addition does not prohibit the generation of large magnitude non-linear standing waves; 4) The feasibility of reducing leakage using non-linear acoustics has been confirmed.

  6. Ultrafast high strain rate acoustic wave measurements at high static pressure in a diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M; Crowhurst, J; Reed, E; Zaug, J

    2008-02-04

    We have used sub-picosecond laser pulses to launch ultra-high strain rate ({approx} 10{sup 9} s{sup -1}) nonlinear acoustic waves into a 4:1 methanol-ethanol pressure medium which has been precompressed in a standard diamond anvil cell. Using ultrafast interferometry, we have characterized acoustic wave propagation into the pressure medium at static compression up to 24 GPa. We find that the velocity is dependent on the incident laser fluence, demonstrating a nonlinear acoustic response which may result in shock wave behavior. We compare our results with low strain, low strain-rate acoustic data. This technique provides controlled access to regions of thermodynamic phase space that are otherwise difficult to obtain.

  7. The acoustics and unsteady wall pressure of a circulation control airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Jonathan C.

    A Circulation Control (CC) airfoil uses a wall jet exiting onto a rounded trailing edge to generate lift via the Coanda effect. The aerodynamics of the CC airfoil have been studied extensively. The acoustics of the airfoil are, however, much less understood. The primary goal of the present work was to study the radiated sound and unsteady surface pressures of a CC airfoil. The focus of this work can be divided up into three main categories: characterizing the unsteady surface pressures, characterizing the radiated sound, and understanding the acoustics from surface pressures. The present work is the first to present the unsteady surface pressures from the trailing edge cylinder of a circulation control airfoil. The auto-spectral density of the unsteady surface pressures at various locations around the trailing edge are presented over a wide range of the jets momentum coefficient. Coherence of pressure and length scales were computed and presented. Single microphone measurements were made at a range of angles for a fixed observer distance in the far field. Spectra are presented for select angles to show the directivity of the airfoil's radiated sound. Predictions of the acoustics were made from unsteady surface pressures via Howe's curvature noise model and a modified Curle's analogy. A summary of the current understanding of the acoustics from a CC airfoil is given along with suggestions for future work.

  8. ACOUSTIC LOCATION OF LEAKS IN PRESSURIZED UNDER- GROUND PETROLEUM PIPELINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were conducted at the Underground Storage Tank (UST) Test Apparatus Pipeline in which three acoustic sensors separated by a maximum distance of 38.1 m (125 ft) were used to monitor signals produced by 11.4-, 5.7-, and 3.8-L/h (3.0-, 1.5-, and 1.0-gal/h) leaks in th...

  9. Higher-level linguistic categories dominate lower-level acoustics in lexical tone processing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T Christina; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2015-08-01

    Native tonal-language speakers exhibit reduced sensitivity to lexical tone differences within, compared to across, categories (higher-level linguistic category influence). Yet, sensitivity is enhanced among musically trained, non-tonal-language-speaking individuals (lower-level acoustics processing influence). The current study investigated the relative contribution of higher- and lower-level influences when both are present. Seventeen Mandarin musicians completed music pitch and lexical tone discrimination tasks. Similar to English musicians [Zhao and Kuhl (2015). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 137(3), 1452-1463], Mandarin musicians' overall sensitivity to lexical tone differences was associated with music pitch score, suggesting lower-level contributions. However, the musician's sensitivities to lexical tone pairs along a continuum were similar to Mandarin non-musicians, reflecting dominant higher-level influences. PMID:26328738

  10. Prediction of light aircraft interior sound pressure level using the room equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M.; Bernhard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The room equation is investigated for predicting interior sound level. The method makes use of an acoustic power balance, by equating net power flow into the cabin volume to power dissipated within the cabin using the room equation. The sound power level transmitted through the panels was calculated by multiplying the measured space averaged transmitted intensity for each panel by its surface area. The sound pressure level was obtained by summing the mean square sound pressures radiated from each panel. The data obtained supported the room equation model in predicting the cabin interior sound pressure level.

  11. Experimental and numerical characterization of the sound pressure in standing wave acoustic levitators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stindt, A.; Andrade, M. A. B.; Albrecht, M.; Adamowski, J. C.; Panne, U.; Riedel, J.

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for predictions of the sound pressure distribution in acoustic levitators is based on a matrix representation of the Rayleigh integral. This method allows for a fast calculation of the acoustic field within the resonator. To make sure that the underlying assumptions and simplifications are justified, this approach was tested by a direct comparison to experimental data. The experimental sound pressure distributions were recorded by high spatially resolved frequency selective microphone scanning. To emphasize the general applicability of the two approaches, the comparative studies were conducted for four different resonator geometries. In all cases, the results show an excellent agreement, demonstrating the accuracy of the matrix method.

  12. Analyzing excitation forces acting on a plate based on measured acoustic pressure.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F; Zhou, Pan

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on "seeing" through an elastic structure to uncover the root cause of sound and vibration by using nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) and normal modes expansion. This approach is of generality because vibro-acoustic responses on the surface of a vibrating structure can always be reconstructed, exactly or approximately. With these vibro-acoustic responses, excitation forces acting on the structure can always be determined, analytically or numerically, given any set of boundary conditions. As an example, the explicit formulations for reconstructing time-harmonic excitation forces, including point, line and surface forces, and their arbitrary combinations acting on a rectangular thin plate in vacuum mounted on an infinite baffle are presented. The reason for choosing this example is that the analytic solutions to vibro-acoustic responses are available, and in-depth analyses of results are possible. Results demonstrate that this approach allows one to identify excitation forces based on measured acoustic pressures and reveal their characteristics such as locations, types and amplitudes, as if one could "see" excitation forces acting behind the plate based on acoustic pressure measured on the opposite side. This approach is extendable to general elastic structures, except that in such circumstance numerical results must be sought. PMID:27475174

  13. Variabilities detected by acoustic emission from filament-wound Aramid fiber/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty Aramid fiber/epoxy pressure vessels were filament-wound over spherical aluminum mandrels under controlled conditions typical for advanced filament-winding. A random set of 30 vessels was proof-tested to 74% of the expected burst pressure; acoustic emission data were obtained during the proof test. A specially designed fixture was used to permit in situ calibration of the acoustic emission system for each vessel by the fracture of a 4-mm length of pencil lead (0.3 mm in diameter) which was in contact with the vessel. Acoustic emission signatures obtained during testing showed larger than expected variabilities in the mechanical damage done during the proof tests. To date, identification of the cause of these variabilities has not been determined.

  14. Manipulation of Liquids Using Phased Array Generation of Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A phased array of piezoelectric transducers is used to control and manipulate contained as well as uncontained fluids in space and earth applications. The transducers in the phased array are individually activated while being commonly controlled to produce acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. The phased array is activated to produce a single pulse, a pulse burst or a continuous pulse to agitate, segregate or manipulate liquids and gases. The phased array generated acoustic radiation pressure is also useful in manipulating a drop, a bubble or other object immersed in a liquid. The transducers can be arranged in any number of layouts including linear single or multi- dimensional, space curved and annular arrays. The individual transducers in the array are activated by a controller, preferably driven by a computer.

  15. Acoustic thermometric data on blood flow and thermal output in forearm under physical pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Vilkov, V. A.; Kazanskii, A. S.; Kuryatnikova, N. A.; Mansfel'd, A. D.

    2013-07-01

    The influence of blood flow and thermal output on temperature changes in the human forearm under physical pressure is studied by acoustic thermometry. Compression of the shoulder with a tourniquet decreases blood flow, which make it possible to evaluate the thermal output characteristics only. In calculating the depth temperature of the forearm, the thermal conductivity equation was used and blood flow and additional thermal output sources were taken into account. According to the calculations in which the experimental data were used, the peak depth temperature of the forearm at rest is 36°C. Due to thermal output alone (without blood flow), physical pressure increases this temperature to 37°C, and when both factors are considered, the temperature rises to 38°C. The experiments in question have allowed us to test acoustic thermographic method on subjects, which is an important step in adopting acoustic thermography in clinical practice.

  16. Liquid-Level Monitor for Pressurized Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Mall, G. H.

    1986-01-01

    Technique for monitoring water levels in pressurized stainless-steel cylinders, based on differences in gamma-ray attenuation coefficients in water and air, developed. Full-scale laboratory prototype system constructed to test technique. Technique usable with liquids other than water, since linear attenuation coefficients for intermediate-energy gamma rays in air considerably lower than in liquids. Also adaptable for continuous monitoring of liquid levels in resevoir systems and in underground storage tanks.

  17. Experimental Study on Effects of Frequency and Mean Pressure on Heat Pumping by Acoustic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Akira; Ozawa, Mamoru; Kataoka, Masaki; Takifuji, Tomonari

    Experimental studies were conducted for the fundamental understanding of the thermoacoustic behavior in the simulated resonance-tube refrigerator with special reference to the effect of imposed frequency and mean pressure. The resonance frequency in the case of helium was lower by about 20% than the theoretical prediction, while the experimental value in the case of air was almost the same as the theoretical one. The temperature difference observed along the stack increased with the increase in the amplitude of acoustic pressure, and decreased with the increase in the mean pressure, Based on the simplified model of heat pumping process, the relationship between the temperature variation and the acoustic pressure field was formulated, and thus the characteristic parameter which represents overall heat transfer between gas and stack plates or heat exchangers was obtained.

  18. A Neural Network/Acoustic Emission Analysis of Impact Damaged Graphite/Epoxy Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Hill, Erik v. K.; Workman, Gary L.; Russell, Samuel S.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) signal analysis has been used to measure the effects of impact damage on burst pressure in 5.75 inch diameter, inert propellant filled, filament wound pressure vessels. The AE data were collected from fifteen graphite/epoxy pressure vessels featuring five damage states and three resin systems. A burst pressure prediction model was developed by correlating the AE amplitude (frequency) distribution, generated during the first pressure ramp to 800 psig (approximately 25% of the average expected burst pressure for an undamaged vessel) to known burst pressures using a four layered back propagation neural network. The neural network, trained on three vessels from each resin system, was able to predict burst pressures with a worst case error of 5.7% for the entire fifteen bottle set.

  19. How male sound pressure level influences phonotaxis in virgin female Jamaican field crickets (Gryllus assimilis)

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Understanding female mate preference is important for determining the strength and direction of sexual trait evolution. The sound pressure level (SPL) acoustic signalers use is often an important predictor of mating success because higher sound pressure levels are detectable at greater distances. If females are more attracted to signals produced at higher sound pressure levels, then the potential fitness impacts of signalling at higher sound pressure levels should be elevated beyond what would be expected from detection distance alone. Here we manipulated the sound pressure level of cricket mate attraction signals to determine how female phonotaxis was influenced. We examined female phonotaxis using two common experimental methods: spherical treadmills and open arenas. Both methods showed similar results, with females exhibiting greatest phonotaxis towards loud sound pressure levels relative to the standard signal (69 vs. 60 dB SPL) but showing reduced phonotaxis towards very loud sound pressure level signals relative to the standard (77 vs. 60 dB SPL). Reduced female phonotaxis towards supernormal stimuli may signify an acoustic startle response, an absence of other required sensory cues, or perceived increases in predation risk. PMID:24949249

  20. Acoustic receptivity due to weak surface inhomogeneities in adverse pressure gradient boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Ng, Lian; Streett, Craig

    1995-01-01

    The boundary layer receptivity to free-stream acoustic waves in the presence of localized surface disturbances is studied for the case of incompressible Falkner-Skan flows with adverse pressure gradients. These boundary layers are unstable to both viscous and inviscid (i.e., inflectional) modes, and the finite Reynolds number extension of the Goldstein-Ruban theory provides a convenient method to compare the efficiency of the localized receptivity processes in these two cases. The value of the efficiency function related to the receptivity caused by localized distortions in surface geometry is relatively insensitive to the type of instability mechanism, provided that the same reference length scale is used to normalize the efficiency function for each type of instability. In contrast, when the receptivity is induced by variations in wall suction velocity or in wall admittance distribution, the magnitudes of the related efficiency functions, as well as the resulting coupling coefficients, are smaller for inflectional (i.e., Rayleigh) modes than for the viscous Tollmien-Schlichting waves. The reduced levels of receptivity can be attributed mainly to the shorter wavelengths and higher frequencies of the inflectional modes. Because the most critical band of frequencies shifts toward higher values, the overall efficiency of the wall suction- and the wall admittance-induced receptivity decreases with an increase in the adverse pressure gradient.

  1. Optimization of Acoustic Pressure Measurements for Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; Nark, D. M.

    2007-01-01

    As noise constraints become increasingly stringent, there is continued emphasis on the development of improved acoustic liner concepts to reduce the amount of fan noise radiated to communities surrounding airports. As a result, multiple analytical prediction tools and experimental rigs have been developed by industry and academia to support liner evaluation. NASA Langley has also placed considerable effort in this area over the last three decades. More recently, a finite element code (Q3D) based on a quasi-3D implementation of the convected Helmholtz equation has been combined with measured data acquired in the Langley Grazing Incidence Tube (GIT) to reduce liner impedance in the presence of grazing flow. A new Curved Duct Test Rig (CDTR) has also been developed to allow evaluation of liners in the presence of grazing flow and controlled, higher-order modes, with straight and curved waveguides. Upgraded versions of each of these two test rigs are expected to begin operation by early 2008. The Grazing Flow Impedance Tube (GFIT) will replace the GIT, and additional capabilities will be incorporated into the CDTR. The current investigation uses the Q3D finite element code to evaluate some of the key capabilities of these two test rigs. First, the Q3D code is used to evaluate the microphone distribution designed for the GFIT. Liners ranging in length from 51 to 610 mm are investigated to determine whether acceptable impedance eduction can be achieved with microphones placed on the wall opposite the liner. This analysis indicates the best results are achieved for liner lengths of at least 203 mm. Next, the effects of moving this GFIT microphone array to the wall adjacent to the liner are evaluated, and acceptable results are achieved if the microphones are placed off the centerline. Finally, the code is used to investigate potential microphone placements in the CDTR rigid wall adjacent to the wall containing an acoustic liner, to determine if sufficient fidelity can be

  2. Acoustic Detection Of Loose Particles In Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, Lloyd C.

    1995-01-01

    Particle-impact-noise-detector (PIND) apparatus used in conjunction with computer program analyzing output of apparatus to detect extraneous particles trapped in pressure sensors. PIND tester essentially shaker equipped with microphone measuring noise in pressure sensor or other object being shaken. Shaker applies controlled vibration. Output of microphone recorded and expressed in terms of voltage, yielding history of noise subsequently processed by computer program. Data taken at sampling rate sufficiently high to enable identification of all impacts of particles on sensor diaphragm and on inner surfaces of sensor cavities.

  3. The Dynamics of Vapor Bubbles in Acoustic Pressure Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hao, Y.; Prosperetti, A.

    1999-01-01

    In spite of a superficial similarity with gas bubbles, the intimate coupling between dynamical and thermal processes confers to oscillating vapor bubbles some unique characteristics. This paper examines numerically the validity of some asymptotic-theory predictions such as the existence of two resonant radii and a limit size for a given sound amplitude and frequency. It is found that a small vapor bubble in a sound field of sufficient amplitude grows quickly through resonance and continues to grow thereafter at a very slow rate, seemingly indefinitely. Resonance phenomena therefore play a role for a few cycles at most, and reaching a limit size-if one exists at all-is found to require far more than several tens of thousands of cycles. It is also found that some small bubbles may grow or collapse depending on the phase of the sound field. The model accounts in detail for the thermo-fluid-mechanic processes in the vapor. In the second part of the paper, an approximate formulation valid for bubbles small with respect to the thermal penetration length in the vapor is derived and its accuracy examined, The present findings have implications for acoustically enhanced boiling heat transfer and other special applications such as boiling in microgravity.

  4. Determination of hydrocarbon levels in water via laser-induced acoustics wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidin, Noriah; Hossenian, Raheleh; Duralim, Maisarah; Krishnan, Ganesan; Marsin, Faridah Mohd; Nughro, Waskito; Zainal, Jasman

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination in water is a major environmental concern in terms of foreseen collapse of the natural ecosystem. Hydrocarbon level in water was determined by generating acoustic wave via an innovative laser-induced breakdown in conjunction with high-speed photographic coupling with piezoelectric transducer to trace acoustic wave propagation. A Q-switched Nd:YAG (40 mJ) was focused in cuvette-filled hydrocarbon solution at various concentrations (0-2000 ppm) to induce optical breakdown, shock wave generation and later acoustic wave propagation. A nitro-dye (ND) laser (10 mJ) was used as a flash to illuminate and frozen the acoustic wave propagation. Lasers were synchronised using a digital delay generator. The image of acoustic waves was grabbed and recorded via charged couple device (CCD) video camera at the speed of 30 frames/second with the aid of Matrox software version 9. The optical delay (0.8-10.0 μs) between the acoustic wave formation and its frozen time is recorded through photodetectors. A piezo-electric transducer (PZT) was used to trace the acoustic wave (sound signal), which cascades to a digital oscilloscope. The acoustic speed is calculated from the ratio of acoustic wave radius (1-8 mm) and optical time delay. Acoustic wave speed is found to linearly increase with hydrocarbon concentrations. The acoustic signal generation at higher hydrocarbon levels in water is attributed to supplementary mass transfer and impact on the probe. Integrated high-speed photography with transducer detection system authenticated that the signals indeed emerged from the laser-induced acoustic wave instead of photothermal processes. It is established that the acoustic wave speed in water is used as a fingerprint to detect the hydrocarbon levels.

  5. Active Control of Jet Noise Using High Resolution TRPIV Part 2: Velocity-Pressure-Acoustic Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Kerwin; Kostka, Stanislav; Berger, Zachary; Berry, Matthew; Gogineni, Sivaram; Glauser, Mark

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the pressure, velocity and acoustic field of a transonic jet. Test conditions comprise a 2 inch nozzle, analyzing two flow speeds, Mach 0.6 and 0.85, with open loop control explored for the Mach 0.6 case. We make simultaneous measurements of the near-field pressure and far-field acoustics at 40 kHz, alongside 10 kHz time resolved PIV measurements in the r-z plane. Cross correlations are performed exploring how both the near-field Fourier filtered pressure and low dimensional POD modes relate to the far-field acoustics. Of interest are those signatures witch exhibit the strongest correlation with far-field, and subsequently how these structures can be controlled. The goal is to investigate how flow-induced perturbations, via synthetic jet actuators, of the developing shear layer might bring insight into how one may alter the flow such that the far-field acoustic signature is mitigated. The TR-PIV measurements will prove to be a powerful tool in being able to track the propagation of physical structures for both the controlled and uncontrolled jet.

  6. Nonlinear Response of Composite Panels Under Combined Acoustic Excitation and Aerodynamic Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Motagaly, K.; Duan, B.; Mei, C.

    1999-01-01

    A finite element formulation is presented for the analysis of large deflection response of composite panels subjected to aerodynamic pressure- at supersonic flow and high acoustic excitation. The first-order shear deformation theory is considered for laminated composite plates, and the von Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relations are employed for the analysis of large deflection panel response. The first-order piston theory aerodynamics and the simulated Gaussian white noise are employed for the aerodynamic and acoustic loads, respectively. The nonlinear equations of motion for an arbitrarily laminated composite panel subjected to a combined aerodynamic and acoustic pressures are formulated first in structure node degrees-of-freedom. The system equations are then transformed and reduced to a set of coupled nonlinear equations in modal coordinates. Modal participation is defined and the in-vacuo modes to be retained in the analysis are based on the modal participation values. Numerical results include root mean square values of maximum deflections, deflection and strain response time histories, probability distributions, and power spectrum densities. Results showed that combined acoustic and aerodynamic loads have to be considered for panel analysis and design at high dynamic pressure values.

  7. One-dimensional pressure transfer models for acoustic-electric transmission channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilt, K. R.; Lawry, T. J.; Scarton, H. A.; Saulnier, G. J.

    2015-09-01

    A method for modeling piezoelectric-based ultrasonic acoustic-electric power and data transmission channels is presented. These channels employ piezoelectric disk transducers to convey signals across a series of physical layers using ultrasonic waves. This model decomposes the mechanical pathway of the signal into individual ultrasonic propagation layers which are generally independent of the layer's adjacent domains. Each layer is represented by a two-by-two traveling pressure wave transfer matrix which relates the forward and reverse pressure waves on one side of the layer to the pressure waves on the opposite face, where each face is assumed to be in contact with a domain of arbitrary reference acoustic impedance. A rigorous implementation of ultrasonic beam spreading is introduced and implemented within applicable domains. Compatible pressure-wave models for piezoelectric transducers are given, which relate the electric voltage and current interface of the transducer to the pressure waves on one mechanical interface while also allowing for passive acoustic loading of the secondary mechanical interface. It is also shown that the piezoelectric model's electrical interface is compatible with transmission line parameters (ABCD-parameters), allowing for connection of electronic components and networks. The model is shown to be capable of reproducing the behavior of realistic physical channels.

  8. Acoustic performance of low pressure axial fan rotors with different blade chord length and radial load distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carolus, Thomas

    The paper examines the acoustic and aerodynamic performance of low-pressure axial fan rotors with a hub/tip ratio of 0.45. Six rotors were designed for the same working point by means of the well-known airfoil theory. The condition of an equilibrium between the static pressure gradient and the centrifugal forces is maintained. All rotors have unequally spaced blades to diminish tonal noise. The rotors are tested in a short cylindrical housing without guide vanes. All rotors show very similar flux-pressure difference characteristics. The peak efficiency and the noise performance is considerably influenced by the chosen blade design. The aerodynamically and acoustically optimal rotor is the one with the reduced load at the hub and increased load in the tip region under satisfied equilibrium conditions. It runs at the highest aerodynamic efficiency, and its noise spectrum is fairly smooth. The overall sound pressure level of this rotor is up to 8 dB (A) lower compared to the other rotors under consideration.

  9. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission SHM of PRSEUS Composite Pressure Cube Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2013-01-01

    A series of tests of the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) pressure cube were conducted during third quarter 2011 at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in the Combined Loads Test facility (COLTS). This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests. The AE signals of the later tests are consistent with the final failure progression through two of the pressure cube panels. Calibration tests and damage precursor AE indications, from preliminary checkout pressurizations, indicated areas of concern that eventually failed. Hence those tests have potential for vehicle health monitoring.

  10. Ultrasonic Quantification of Tumor Interstitial Fluid Pressure Through Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflanzer, Ralph; Shelke, Amit; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen; Hofmann, Matthias

    High tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) is characteristic of solid tumors. Elevated TIFP inhibits the assimilation of macromolecular therapeutics in tumor tissue as well as it induces mechanical strain triggering cell proliferation in solid tumors. Common solid epithelial tumors of A431 carcinoma cells exhibit a TIFP of about 10-15 mmHg measured conventionally through wick-in-needle technique. A new scheme to determine topography and acoustic impedance in solid tumor is proposed through scanning acoustic microscopy. The change in amplitude and time of flight at 30 MHz acoustic signal is used to quantify the growth pattern and to calibrate elevation of TIFP. The wide variability of amplitude and frequency in topographic sections indicate discrete envelopes of individual tumors with localized TIFP. Further investigations in applying this non-invasive method as a means of measuring TIFP in subcutaneous mice xenograft tumors in situ could also enhance understanding of tumor microenvironment and vessel architecture in living tissue.

  11. Sound pressure level in a municipal preschool

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Adriana Aparecida Tahara; Delecrode, Camila Ribas; Guida, Heraldo Lorena; Ribeiro, André Knap; Cardoso, Ana Claúdia Vieira

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aim: To evaluate the sound pressure level to which preschool students are exposed. Method: This was a prospective, quantitative, nonexperimental, and descriptive study. To achieve the aim of the study we used an audio dosimeter. The sound pressure level (SPL) measurements were obtained for 2 age based classrooms. Preschool I and II. The measurements were obtained over 4 days in 8-hour sessions, totaling 1920 minutes. Results: Compared with established standards, the SPL measured ranged from 40.6 dB (A) to 105.8 dB (A). The frequency spectrum of the SPL was concentrated in the frequency range between 500 Hz and 4000 Hz. The older children produced higher SPLs than the younger ones, and the levels varied according to the activity performed. Painting and writing were the quietest activities, while free activities period and games were the noisiest. Conclusion: The SPLs measured at the preschool were higher and exceeded the maximum permitted level according to the reference standards. Therefore, the implementation of actions that aim to minimize the negative impact of noise in this environment is essential. PMID:25992013

  12. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  13. An Acoustic Emission and Acousto-Ultrasonic Analysis of Impact Damaged Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The research presented herein summarizes the development of acoustic emission (AE) and acousto-ultrasonic (AU) techniques for the nondestructive evaluation of filament wound composite pressure vessels. Vessels fabricated from both graphite and kevlar fibers with an epoxy matrix were examined prior to hydroburst using AU and during hydroburst using AE. A dead weight drop apparatus featuring both blunt and sharp impactor tips was utilized to produce a single known energy 'damage' level in each of the vessels so that the degree to which the effects of impact damage could be measured. The damage levels ranged from barely visible to obvious fiber breakage and delamination. Independent neural network burst pressure prediction models were developed from a sample of each fiber/resin material system. Here, the cumulative AE amplitude distribution data collected from low level proof test (25% of the expected burst for undamaged vessels) were used to measure the effects of the impact on the residual burst pressure of the vessels. The results of the AE/neural network model for the inert propellant filled graphite/epoxy vessels 'IM7/3501-6, IM7/977-2 and IM7/8553-45' demonstrated that burst pressures can be predicted from low level AE proof test data, yielding an average error of 5.0%. The trained network for the IM7/977-2 class vessels was also able to predict the expected burst pressure of taller vessels (three times longer hoop region length) constructed of the same material and using the same manufacturing technique, with an average error of 4.9%. To a lesser extent, the burst pressure prediction models could also measure the effects of impact damage to the kevlar/epoxy 'Kevlar 49/ DPL862' vessels. Here though, due to the higher attenuation of the material, an insufficient amount of AE amplitude information was collected to generate robust network models. Although, the worst case trial errors were less than 6%, when additional blind predictions were attempted, errors as

  14. Three-dimensional visualization of shear wave propagation generated by dual acoustic radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Yuta; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    An elastic property of biological soft tissue is an important indicator of the tissue status. Therefore, quantitative and noninvasive methods for elasticity evaluation have been proposed. Our group previously proposed a method using acoustic radiation pressure irradiated from two directions for elastic property evaluation, in which by measuring the propagation velocity of the shear wave generated by the acoustic radiation pressure inside the object, the elastic properties of the object were successfully evaluated. In the present study, we visualized the propagation of the shear wave in a three-dimensional space by the synchronization of signals received at various probe positions. The proposed method succeeded in visualizing the shear wave propagation clearly in the three-dimensional space of 35 × 41 × 4 mm3. These results show the high potential of the proposed method to estimate the elastic properties of the object in the three-dimensional space.

  15. A modal test method using sound pressure transducers based on vibro-acoustic reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W. D.; Liu, J. M.; Xu, Y. F.; Ying, H. Q.

    2014-06-01

    A modal test method that uses sound pressure transducers at fixed locations and an impact hammer roving over a test structure is developed in this work. Since sound pressure transducers are used, the current method deals with a coupled structural-acoustic system. Based on the vibro-acoustic reciprocity, the method is equivalent to one, where acoustic excitations at fixed locations are given and the resulting acceleration of the test structure is measured. The current method can eliminate mass loading due to use of accelerometers, which can destroy existence of repeated or close natural frequencies of a symmetric structure. It can also avoid effects of a nodal line of a mode and an inactive area of a local mode, and measure all the out-of-plane modes within a frequency range of interest, including global and local ones. The coupling between the structure and the acoustic field in a structural-acoustic system introduces asymmetry in the model formulation. An equivalent state space formulation is used for a damped structural-acoustic system and the associated eigenvalue problem is derived. The biorthonormality relations between the left and right eigenvectors and the relations between the structural and acoustic components in the left and right eigenvectors are proved. The frequency response functions associated with the current method are derived and their physical meanings are explained. The guidelines for using the current method, including the types of structures that are suitable for the method, the positions of the sound pressure transducers, and the orientation of the test structure relative to the transducers, are provided. Modal tests were carried out on an automotive disk brake using the traditional and current methods, where multiple accelerometers and microphones were used to measure its dynamic responses induced by impacts, respectively. The differences between the measured natural frequencies using the current method and those from the finite element

  16. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission NDE of Kevlar Composite Over Wrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurization and failure tests of small Kevlar/epoxy COPV bottles were conducted during 2006 and 2007 by Texas Research Institute Austin, Inc., at TRI facilities. This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests. Results of some of the tests indicate a possibility that AE can be used to track the stress-rupture degradation of COPV vessels.

  17. Analytic Formulation and Numerical Implementation of an Acoustic Pressure Gradient Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seongkyu; Brentner, Kenneth S.; Farassat, F.; Morris, Philip J.

    2008-01-01

    Two new analytical formulations of the acoustic pressure gradient have been developed and implemented in the PSU-WOPWOP rotor noise prediction code. The pressure gradient can be used to solve the boundary condition for scattering problems and it is a key aspect to solve acoustic scattering problems. The first formulation is derived from the gradient of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation. This formulation has a form involving the observer time differentiation outside the integrals. In the second formulation, the time differentiation is taken inside the integrals analytically. This formulation avoids the numerical time differentiation with respect to the observer time, which is computationally more efficient. The acoustic pressure gradient predicted by these new formulations is validated through comparison with available exact solutions for a stationary and moving monopole sources. The agreement between the predictions and exact solutions is excellent. The formulations are applied to the rotor noise problems for two model rotors. A purely numerical approach is compared with the analytical formulations. The agreement between the analytical formulations and the numerical method is excellent for both stationary and moving observer cases.

  18. The effects of external acoustic pressure fields on a free-running supercavitating projectile.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Peter J K; Rogers, Peter H; Doane, John W

    2010-12-01

    Proliferation of supercavitating torpedoes has motivated research on countermeasures against them as well as on the fluid phenomenon which makes them possible. The goal of this research was to investigate an envisaged countermeasure, an acoustic field capable of slowing or diverting the weapon by disrupting the cavitation envelope. The research focused on the interactions between high pressure amplitude sound waves and a supercavity produced by a small free-flying projectile. The flight dynamics and cavity geometry measurements were compared to control experiments and theoretical considerations were made for evaluating the effects. Corrugations on the cavity/water interface caused by the pressure signal have been observed and characterized. Results also show that the accuracy of a supercavitating projectile can be adversely affected by the sound signal. This research concludes with results that indicate that it is acoustic cavitation in the medium surrounding the supercavity, caused by the high pressure amplitude sound, that is responsible for the reduced accuracy. A hypothesis has been presented addressing the means by which the acoustic cavitation could cause this effect. PMID:21218872

  19. Baseline acoustic levels of the NASA Active Noise Control Fan rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Elliott, David M.; Nallasamy, M.

    1996-01-01

    Extensive measurements of the spinning acoustic mode structure in the NASA 48 inch Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF) test rig have been taken. A continuously rotating microphone rake system with a least-squares data reduction technique was employed to measure these modes in the inlet and exhaust. Farfield directivity patterns in an anechoic environment were also measured at matched corrected rotor speeds. Several vane counts and spacings were tested over a range of rotor speeds. The Eversman finite element radiation code was run with the measured in-duct modes as input and the computed farfield results were compared to the experimentally measured directivity pattern. The experimental data show that inlet spinning mode measurements can be made very accurately. Exhaust mode measurements may have wake interference, but the least-squares reduction does a good job of rejecting the non-acoustic pressure. The Eversman radiation code accurately extrapolates the farfield levels and directivity pattern when all in-duct modes are included.

  20. Simplified combustion noise theory yielding a prediction of fluctuating pressure level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The first order equations for the conservation of mass and momentum in differential form are combined for an ideal gas to yield a single second order partial differential equation in one dimension and time. Small perturbation analysis is applied. A Fourier transformation is performed that results in a second order, constant coefficient, nonhomogeneous equation. The driving function is taken to be the source of combustion noise. A simplified model describing the energy addition via the combustion process gives the required source information for substitution in the driving function. This enables the particular integral solution of the nonhomogeneous equation to be found. This solution multiplied by the acoustic pressure efficiency predicts the acoustic pressure spectrum measured in turbine engine combustors. The prediction was compared with the overall sound pressure levels measured in a CF6-50 turbofan engine combustor and found to be in excellent agreement.

  1. Pressure measurement in supersonic air flow by differential absorptive laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, G. C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey

    2007-06-01

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach 2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, the streamwise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature, and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  2. Pressure Measurement in Supersonic Air Flow by Differential Absorptive Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, Gregory C.; Balla, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach-2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, stream-wise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially-resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  3. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  4. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  5. A Study of Standing Pressure Waves Within Open and Closed Acoustic Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, C.; Steinetz, B.; Finkbeiner, J.; Raman, G.; Li, X.

    2002-01-01

    The first section of the results presented herein was conducted on an axisymmetric resonator configured with open ventilation ports on either end of the resonator, but otherwise closed and free from obstruction. The remaining section presents the results of a similar resonator shape that was closed, but contained an axisymmetric blockage centrally located through the axis of the resonator. Ambient air was used as the working fluid. In each of the studies, the resonator was oscillated at the resonant frequency of the fluid contained within the cavity while the dynamic pressure, static pressure, and temperature of the fluid were recorded at both ends of the resonator. The baseline results showed a marked reduction in the amplitude of the dynamic pressure waveforms over previous studies due to the use of air instead of refrigerant as the working fluid. A sharp reduction in the amplitude of the acoustic pressure waves was expected and recorded when the configuration of the resonators was modified from closed to open. A change in the resonant frequency was recorded when blockages of differing geometries were used in the closed resonator, while acoustic pressure amplitudes varied little from baseline measurements.

  6. Hydrophone arrays for instantaneous measurement of high-pressure acoustic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2010-03-01

    Electrohydraulic lithotripter acoustic fields are measured with single-element hydrophones even though the acoustic fields are not highly repeatable. The ability to obtain an instantaneous "snapshot" of the sound field would have broad implications for advancing the understanding of how lithotripters fragment stones and damage kidney tissue. To better characterize the acoustic field of lithotripters, linear hydrophone arrays were fabricated by bonding a 9 μm piezopolymer film to a copper-clad polyimide which had an array pattern etched on the copper layer. After bonding, the devices were backed with an epoxy plug in order to provide structural support. The array elements were each 0.5 by 0.5 mm, spaced 1.25 mm center to center, and there were 20 elements. The relative sensitivity of each hydrophone element was measured at 5.25 MHz for an acoustic pressure of 4.5 kPa and the elements were found to vary by ≈ 6%. The arrays were then placed in the focus of a piezoelectric lithotripter and were found to maintain their sensitivity for roughly 500 shock waves before gradually losing sensitivity.

  7. Pressure and temperature dependences of the acoustic behaviors of biocompatible silk studied by using Brillouin spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoung Wan; Ryeom, Junho; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Chan Hum; Park, Jaehoon; Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kwang Joo

    2016-07-01

    The elastic properties of a biocompatible silk film were investigated under temperature and pressure variations by using Brillouin spectroscopy. The Brillouin frequency shift decreased monotonically upon heating and showed a sudden change at the glass transition temperature. The existence of water molecules in the film increased the longitudinal modulus by approximately 10% and induced a relaxation peak in the hypersonic damping at ~60 ◦ C. The pressure dependences of the sound velocities of the longitudinal and the transverse acoustic modes and the refractive index were determined for the first time at pressures up to ~15.5 GPa. All these properties increased upon compression; these changes indicated that the free volume in the silk film collapsed at a pressure of about 3 GPa.

  8. Modeling of Structural-Acoustic Interaction Using Coupled FE/BE Method and Control of Interior Acoustic Pressure Using Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Shi, Yacheng

    1997-01-01

    A coupled finite element (FE) and boundary element (BE) approach is presented to model full coupled structural/acoustic/piezoelectric systems. The dual reciprocity boundary element method is used so that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the coupled system can be obtained, and to extend this approach to time dependent problems. The boundary element method is applied to interior acoustic domains, and the results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structural-acoustic problems are then analyzed with the coupled finite element/boundary element method, where the finite element method models the structural domain and the boundary element method models the acoustic domain. Results for a system consisting of an isotropic panel and a cubic cavity are in good agreement with exact solutions and experiment data. The response of a composite panel backed cavity is then obtained. The results show that the mass and stiffness of piezoelectric layers have to be considered. The coupled finite element and boundary element equations are transformed into modal coordinates, which is more convenient for transient excitation. Several transient problems are solved based on this formulation. Two control designs, a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and a feedforward controller, are applied to reduce the acoustic pressure inside the cavity based on the equations in modal coordinates. The results indicate that both controllers can reduce the interior acoustic pressure and the plate deflection.

  9. Experimental source characterization techniques for studying the acoustic properties of perforates under high level acoustic excitation.

    PubMed

    Bodén, Hans

    2011-11-01

    This paper discusses experimental techniques for obtaining the acoustic properties of in-duct samples with non-linear acoustic characteristic. The methods developed are intended both for studies of non-linear energy transfer to higher harmonics for samples only accessible from one side such as wall treatment in aircraft engine ducts or automotive exhaust systems and for samples accessible from both sides such as perforates or other top sheets. When harmonic sound waves are incident on the sample nonlinear energy transfer results in sound generation at higher harmonics at the sample (perforate) surface. The idea is that these sources can be characterized using linear system identification techniques similar to one-port or two-port techniques which are traditionally used for obtaining source data for in-duct sources such as IC-engines or fans. The starting point will be so called polyharmonic distortion modeling which is used for characterization of nonlinear properties of microwave systems. It will be shown how acoustic source data models can be expressed using this theory. Source models of different complexity are developed and experimentally tested. The results of the experimental tests show that these techniques can give results which are useful for understanding non-linear energy transfer to higher harmonics. PMID:22087890

  10. A model for the pressure excitation spectrum and acoustic impedance of sound absorbers in the presence of grazing flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The acoustic impedance of sound absorbers in the presence of grazing flow is essential information when analyzing sound propagation within ducts. A unification of the theory of the nonlinear acoustic resistance of Helmholtz resonators including grazing flow is presented. The nonlinear resistance due to grazing flow is considered to be caused by an exciting pressure spectrum produced by the interaction of the grazing flow and the jets flowing from the resonator orifices. With this exciting pressure spectrum the resonator can be treated in the same manner as a resonator without grazing flow but with an exciting acoustic spectrum.

  11. Temperature and Pressure Dependence of Signal Amplitudes for Electrostriction Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    The relative signal strength of electrostriction-only (no thermal grating) laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) in gas-phase air is reported as a function of temperature T and pressure P. Measurements were made in the free stream of a variable Mach number supersonic wind tunnel, where T and P are varied simultaneously as Mach number is varied. Using optical heterodyning, the measured signal amplitude (related to the optical reflectivity of the acoustic grating) was averaged for each of 11 flow conditions and compared to the expected theoretical dependence of a pure-electrostriction LITA process, where the signal is proportional to the square root of [P*P /( T*T*T)].

  12. Picosecond acoustics method for measuring the thermodynamical properties of solids and liquids at high pressure and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Decremps, F; Gauthier, M; Ayrinhac, S; Bove, L; Belliard, L; Perrin, B; Morand, M; Le Marchand, G; Bergame, F; Philippe, J

    2015-02-01

    Based on the original combination of picosecond acoustics and diamond anvils cell, recent improvements to accurately measure hypersonic sound velocities of liquids and solids under extreme conditions are described. To illustrate the capability of this technique, results are given on the pressure and temperature dependence of acoustic properties for three prototypical cases: polycrystal (iron), single-crystal (silicon) and liquid (mercury) samples. It is shown that such technique also enables the determination of the density as a function of pressure for liquids, of the complete set of elastic constants for single crystals, and of the melting curve for any kind of material. High pressure ultrafast acoustic spectroscopy technique clearly opens opportunities to measure thermodynamical properties under previously unattainable extreme conditions. Beyond physics, this state-of-the-art experiment would thus be useful in many other fields such as nonlinear acoustics, oceanography, petrology, in of view. A brief description of new developments and future directions of works conclude the article. PMID:24852260

  13. Computation of the pressure field generated by surface acoustic waves in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Darinskii, A N; Weihnacht, M; Schmidt, H

    2016-07-01

    The high-frequency pressure induced by a surface acoustic wave in the fluid filling a microchannel is computed by solving the full scattering problem. The microchannel is fabricated inside a container attached to the top of a piezoelectric substrate where the surface wave propagates. The finite element method is used. The pressure found in this way is compared with the pressure obtained by solving boundary-value problems formulated on the basis of simplifications which have been introduced in earlier papers by other research studies. The considered example shows that the difference between the results can be significant, ranging from several tens of percent up to several times in different points inside the channel. PMID:27314212

  14. Role of transient water pressure in quarrying: A subglacial experiment using acoustic emissions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, D.; Hooyer, T.S.; Iverson, N.R.; Thomason, J.F.; Jackson, M.

    2006-01-01

    Probably the most important mechanism of glacial erosion is quarrying: the growth and coalescence of cracks in subglacial bedrock and dislodgement of resultant rock fragments. Although evidence indicates that erosion rates depend on sliding speed, rates of crack growth in bedrock may be enhanced by changing stresses on the bed caused by fluctuating basal water pressure in zones of ice-bed separation. To study quarrying in real time, a granite step, 12 cm high with a crack in its stoss surface, was installed at the bed of Engabreen, Norway. Acoustic emission sensors monitored crack growth events in the step as ice slid over it. Vertical stresses, water pressure, and cavity height in the lee of the step were also measured. Water was pumped to the lee of the step several times over 8 days. Pumping initially caused opening of a leeward cavity, which then closed after pumping was stopped and water pressure decreased. During cavity closure, acoustic emissions emanating mostly from the vicinity of the base of the crack in the step increased dramatically. With repeated pump tests this crack grew with time until the step's lee surface was quarried. Our experiments indicate that fluctuating water pressure caused stress thresholds required for crack growth to be exceeded. Natural basal water pressure fluctuations should also concentrate stresses on rock steps, increasing rates of crack growth. Stress changes on the bed due to water pressure fluctuations will increase in magnitude and duration with cavity size, which may help explain the effect of sliding speed on erosion rates. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Theoretical estimation of the temperature and pressure within collapsing acoustical bubbles.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2014-01-01

    Formation of highly reactive species such as OH, H, HO2 and H2O2 due to transient collapse of cavitation bubbles is the primary mechanism of sonochemical reaction. The crucial parameters influencing the formation of radicals are the temperature and pressure achieved in the bubble during the strong collapse. Experimental determinations estimated a temperature of about 5000 K and pressure of several hundreds of MPa within the collapsing bubble. In this theoretical investigation, computer simulations of chemical reactions occurring in an O2-bubble oscillating in water irradiated by an ultrasonic wave have been performed for diverse combinations of various parameters such as ultrasound frequency (20-1000 kHz), acoustic amplitude (up to 0.3 MPa), static pressure (0.03-0.3 MPa) and liquid temperature (283-333 K). The aim of this series of computations is to correlate the production of OH radicals to the temperature and pressure achieved in the bubble during the strong collapse. The employed model combines the dynamic of bubble collapse in acoustical field with the chemical kinetics of single bubble. The results of the numerical simulations revealed that the main oxidant created in an O2 bubble is OH radical. The computer simulations clearly showed the existence of an optimum bubble temperature of about 5200±200 K and pressure of about 250±20 MPa. The predicted value of the bubble temperature for the production of OH radicals is in excellent agreement with that furnished by the experiments. The existence of an optimum bubble temperature and pressure in collapsing bubbles results from the competitions between the reactions of production and those of consumption of OH radicals at high temperatures. PMID:23769748

  16. Producing ion waves from acoustic pressure waves in pulsed ICP: Modeling vs. Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despiau-Pujo, Emilie; Cunge, Gilles; Darnon, Maxime; Sadeghi, Nader; Braithwaite, Nicholas

    2015-09-01

    Neutral depletion is an important phenomenon in CW high-density plasmas, mostly caused by gas heating - with a small contribution due to electron pressure Pe - under typical material processing conditions. In pulsed ICP, neutral depletion plays an important role on radical transport in the afterglow. At the beginning of the afterglow, Pe drops rapidly (10 μs) by electron cooling and the gas cools down as well. It generates a neutral pressure gradient between the plasma bulk and the reactor walls, which in turn forces the cold surrounding gas to move rapidly towards the center, thus launching an acoustic wave in the reactor. Fast gas displacement is evidenced by measuring Al atoms drift velocity in the early afterglow of a Cl2/Ar discharge by time-resolved LIF, the acoustic wave in the chamber being observed by mass spectrometry. 2D fluid simulations of Cl2 pulsed ICP predict similar results. These phenomena are further studied during both the plasma ignition and afterglow using modeling and experiments. Strong oscillations are observed both on the Cl2 neutral densities and on the ion flux. As neutrals are pushed towards (or outwards) the chamber walls by the pressure gradient, ions are also pushed in that direction through collisions, as well captured by our ion flux probe.

  17. Detecting leaks in gas-filled pressure vessels using acoustic resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, K. A.; Moldover, M. R.; Mehl, J. B.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that a leak from a large, unthermostatted pressure vessel into ambient air can be detected an order of magnitude more effectively by measuring the time dependence of the ratio p/f2 than by measuring the ratio p/T. Here f is the resonance frequency of an acoustic mode of the gas inside the pressure vessel, p is the pressure of the gas, and T is the kelvin temperature measured at one point in the gas. In general, the resonance frequencies are determined by a mode-dependent, weighted average of the square of the speed-of-sound throughout the volume of the gas. However, the weighting usually has a weak dependence on likely temperature gradients in the gas inside a large pressure vessel. Using the ratio p/f2, we measured a gas leak (dM/dt)/M ≈ - 1.3 × 10-5 h-1 = - 0.11 yr-1 from a 300-liter pressure vessel filled with argon at 450 kPa that was exposed to sunshine-driven temperature and pressure fluctuations as large as (dT/dt)/T ≈ (dp/dt)/p ≈ 5 × 10-2 h-1 using a 24-hour data record. This leak could not be detected in a 72-hour record of p/T. (Here M is the mass of the gas in the vessel and t is the time.)

  18. Detecting leaks in gas-filled pressure vessels using acoustic resonances.

    PubMed

    Gillis, K A; Moldover, M R; Mehl, J B

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that a leak from a large, unthermostatted pressure vessel into ambient air can be detected an order of magnitude more effectively by measuring the time dependence of the ratio p/f(2) than by measuring the ratio p/T. Here f is the resonance frequency of an acoustic mode of the gas inside the pressure vessel, p is the pressure of the gas, and T is the kelvin temperature measured at one point in the gas. In general, the resonance frequencies are determined by a mode-dependent, weighted average of the square of the speed-of-sound throughout the volume of the gas. However, the weighting usually has a weak dependence on likely temperature gradients in the gas inside a large pressure vessel. Using the ratio p/f(2), we measured a gas leak (dM/dt)/M ≈ - 1.3 × 10(-5) h(-1) = - 0.11 yr(-1) from a 300-liter pressure vessel filled with argon at 450 kPa that was exposed to sunshine-driven temperature and pressure fluctuations as large as (dT/dt)/T ≈ (dp/dt)/p ≈ 5 × 10(-2) h(-1) using a 24-hour data record. This leak could not be detected in a 72-hour record of p/T. (Here M is the mass of the gas in the vessel and t is the time.). PMID:27250456

  19. An analysis of collegiate band directors' exposure to sound pressure levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roebuck, Nikole Moore

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a significant but unfortunate common occupational hazard. The purpose of the current study was to measure the magnitude of sound pressure levels generated within a collegiate band room and determine if those sound pressure levels are of a magnitude that exceeds the policy standards and recommendations of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). In addition, reverberation times were measured and analyzed in order to determine the appropriateness of acoustical conditions for the band rehearsal environment. Sound pressure measurements were taken from the rehearsal of seven collegiate marching bands. Single sample t test were conducted to compare the sound pressure levels of all bands to the noise exposure standards of OSHA and NIOSH. Multiple regression analysis were conducted and analyzed in order to determine the effect of the band room's conditions on the sound pressure levels and reverberation times. Time weighted averages (TWA), noise percentage doses, and peak levels were also collected. The mean Leq for all band directors was 90.5 dBA. The total accumulated noise percentage dose for all band directors was 77.6% of the maximum allowable daily noise dose under the OSHA standard. The total calculated TWA for all band directors was 88.2% of the maximum allowable daily noise dose under the OSHA standard. The total accumulated noise percentage dose for all band directors was 152.1% of the maximum allowable daily noise dose under the NIOSH standards, and the total calculated TWA for all band directors was 93dBA of the maximum allowable daily noise dose under the NIOSH standard. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the room volume, the level of acoustical treatment and the mean room reverberation time predicted 80% of the variance in sound pressure levels in this study.

  20. Measuring Gas Composition and Pressure Within Sealed Containers Using Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Veirs, D.K.; Heiple, C.R.; Rosenblatt, G.M.; Baiardo, J.P.

    1997-05-19

    Interim and long-term storage of carefully prepared plutonium material within hermetically sealed containers may generate dangerous gas pressures and compositions. The authors have been investigating the application of acoustic resonance spectroscopy to non-intrusively monitor changes in these parameters within sealed containers. In this approach a drum-like gas cavity is formed within the storage container which is excited using a piezoelectric transducer mounted on the outside of the container. The frequency response spectrum contains a series of peaks whose positions and widths are determined by the composition of the gas and the geometry of the cylindrical resonator; the intensities are related to the gas pressure. Comparing observed gas frequencies with theory gives excellent agreement. Small changes in gas composition, better than 1:1000, are readily measurable.

  1. The Effect of the 226-Hz Probe Level on Contralateral Acoustic Stapedius Reflex Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Jessica E.; Feeney, M. Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the 226-Hz probe level on the acoustic stapedius reflex threshold. Method: Contralateral reflex thresholds for a 1000-Hz pure-tone stimulus were obtained from 40 young adults with normal hearing using an experimental system at four 226-Hz probe levels (70, 75, 80, and 85 dB SPL) with…

  2. An alternative to reduction of surface pressure to sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deardorff, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The pitfalls of the present method of reducing surface pressure to sea level are reviewed, and an alternative, adjusted pressure, P, is proposed. P is obtained from solution of a Poisson equation over a continental region, using the simplest boundary condition along the perimeter or coastline where P equals the sea level pressure. The use of P would avoid the empiricisms and disadvantages of pressure reduction to sea level, and would produce surface pressure charts which depict the true geostrophic wind at the surface.

  3. MEMS Biomimetic Acoustic Pressure Gradient Sensitive Structure for Sound Source Localization

    PubMed Central

    An, Peng; Yuan, Weizheng; Ren, Sen

    2009-01-01

    The parasitoid fly Ormia ochracea shows an astonishing localization ability with its tiny hearing organ. A novel MEMS biomimetic acoustic pressure gradient sensitive structure was designed and fabricated by mimicking the mechanically coupled tympana of the fly. Firstly, the analytic representation formulas of the resultant force and resultant moment of the incoming plane wave acting on the structure were derived. After that, structure modal analysis was performed and the results show that the structure has out-of-phase and in-phase vibration modes, and the corresponding eigenfrequency is decided by the stiffness of vertical torsional beam and horizontal beam respectively. Acoustic-structural coupled analysis was performed and the results show that phase difference and amplitude difference between the responses of the two square diaphragms of the sensitive structure are effectively enlarged through mechanical coupling beam. The phase difference and amplitude difference increase with increasing incident angle and can be used to distinguish the direction of sound arrival. At last, the fabrication process and results of the device is also presented. PMID:22346718

  4. Experimental investigation of the unsteady response of premixed flame fronts to acoustic pressure waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wangher, Athena; Searby, Geoff; Quinard, Joel

    2008-07-15

    Using OH{sup *} chemiluminescence, we measure the experimental unsteady response of a 1-D premixed flame to an acoustic pressure wave for a range of frequencies below and above the inverse of the flame transit time. We find that the response is positive and, at low frequency, the order of magnitude is comparable with existing theoretical analyses. However, if it is assumed that the chemiluminescence is proportional to the mass consumption rate, despite some uncertainty in the interpretation of the chemiluminescence signal we find that the frequency dependence of the measured response is not compatible with the predictions of the standard flame model for one-step Arrhenius kinetics. A better, but not perfect, correlation is obtained for the heat release rate. We conclude that the standard model does not provide an adequate description of the unsteady response of real flames and that it is necessary to investigate more realistic chemical models. (author)

  5. Stabilization and Low-Frequency Oscillation of Capillary Bridges with Modulated Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Marr-Lyon, Mark J.; Morse, S. F.; Thiessen, David B.

    1996-01-01

    In the work reported here it is demonstrated that acoustic radiation pressure may be used in simulated low gravity to produce stable bridges significantly beyond the Rayleigh limit with S as large as 3.6. The bridge (PDMS mixed with a dense liquid) has the same density as the surrounding water bath containing an ultrasonic standing wave. Modulation was first used to excite specific bridge modes. In the most recent work reported here the shape of the bridge is optically sensed and the ultrasonic drive is electronically adjusted such that the radiation stress distribution dynamically quenches the most unstable mode. This active control simulates passive stabilization suggested for low gravity. Feedback increases the mode frequency in the naturally stable region since the effective stiffness of the mode is increased.

  6. Acoustic radiation pressure: A 'phase contrast' agent for x-ray phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bailat, Claude J.; Hamilton, Theron J.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J.

    2004-11-08

    We show that the radiation pressure exerted by a beam of ultrasound can be used for contrast enhancement in high-resolution x-ray imaging of tissue and soft materials. Interfacial features of objects are highlighted as a result of both the displacement introduced by the ultrasound and the inherent sensitivity of x-ray phase contrast imaging to density variations. The potential of the method is demonstrated by imaging microscopic tumor phantoms embedded into tissue with a thickness typically presented in mammography. The detection limit of micrometer size masses exceeds the resolution of currently available mammography imaging systems. The directionality of the acoustic radiation force and its localization in space permits the imaging of ultrasound-selected tissue volumes. The results presented here suggest that the method may permit the detection of tumors in soft tissue in their early stage of development.

  7. Quantitative measurement of ultrasound pressure field by optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Seiji; Yasuda, Jun; Hanayama, Hiroki; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    A fast and accurate measurement of an ultrasound field with various exposure sequences is necessary to ensure the efficacy and safety of various ultrasound applications in medicine. The most common method used to measure an ultrasound pressure field, that is, hydrophone scanning, requires a long scanning time and potentially disturbs the field. This may limit the efficiency of developing applications of ultrasound. In this study, an optical phase contrast method enabling fast and noninterfering measurements is proposed. In this method, the modulated phase of light caused by the focused ultrasound pressure field is measured. Then, a computed tomography (CT) algorithm used to quantitatively reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) pressure field is applied. For a high-intensity focused ultrasound field, a new approach that combines the optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography was attempted. First, the optical measurement of focused ultrasound was rapidly performed over the field near a transducer. Second, the nonlinear propagation of the measured ultrasound was simulated. The result of the new approach agreed well with that of the measurement using a hydrophone and was improved from that of the phase contrast method alone with phase unwrapping.

  8. Pressure transfer function of a JT15D nozzle due to acoustic and convected entropy fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic transmission matrix analysis of sound propagation in a variable area duct with and without flow is extended to include convected entropy fluctuations. The boundary conditions used in the analysis are a transfer function relating entropy and pressure at the nozzle inlet and the nozzle exit impedance. The nozzle pressure transfer function calculated is compared with JT15D turbofan engine nozzle data. The one dimensional theory for sound propagation in a variable area nozzle with flow but without convected entropy is good at the low engine speeds where the nozzle exit Mach number is low (M=0.2) and the duct exit impedance model is good. The effect of convected entropy appears to be so negligible that it is obscured by the inaccuracy of the nozzle exit impedance model, the lack of information on the magnitude of the convected entropy and its phase relationship with the pressure, and the scatter in the data. An improved duct exit impedance model is required at the higher engine speeds where the nozzle exit Mach number is high (M=0.56) and at low frequencies (below 120 Hz).

  9. Ambient pressure laser desorption and laser-induced acoustic desorption ion mobility spectrometry detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Sven; Walte, Andreas; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-11-19

    The development of fast, mobile, and sensitive detection systems for security-relevant substances is of enormous importance. Because of the low vapor pressures of explosives and improvised explosive devices, adequate sampling procedures are crucial. Ion mobility spectrometers (IMSs) are fast and sensitive instruments that are used as detection systems for explosives. Ambient pressure laser desorption (APLD) and ambient pressure laser-induced acoustic desorption (AP-LIAD) are new tools suitable to evaporate explosives in order to detect them in the vapor phase. Indeed, the most important advantage of APLD or AP-LIAD is the capability to sample directly from the surface of interest without any transfer of the analyte to other surfaces such as wipe pads. A much more gentle desorption, compared to classical thermal-based desorption, is possible with laser-based desorption using very short laser pulses. With this approach the analyte molecules are evaporated in a very fast process, comparable to a shock wave. The thermal intake is reduced considerably. The functionality of APLD and AP-LIAD techniques combined with a hand-held IMS system is shown for a wide range of common explosives such as EGDN (ethylene glycol dinitrate), urea nitrate, PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate), HMTD (hexamethylene triperoxide diamine), RDX (hexogen), tetryl (2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine), and TNT (trinitrotoluene). Detection limits down to the low nanogram range are obtained. The successful combination of IMS detection and APLD/AP-LIAD sampling is shown. PMID:24116702

  10. Experimental feasibility of investigating acoustic waves in Couette flow with entropy and pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Zorumski, William E.; Rawls, John W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility is discussed for an experimental program for studying the behavior of acoustic wave propagation in the presence of strong gradients of pressure, temperature, and flow. Theory suggests that gradients effects can be experimentally observed as resonant frequency shifts and mode shape changes in a waveguide. A convenient experimental geometry for such experiments is the annular region between two co-rotating cylinders. Radial temperature gradients in a spinning annulus can be generated by differentially heating the two cylinders via electromagnetic induction. Radial pressure gradients can be controlled by varying the cylinder spin rates. Present technology appears adequate to construct an apparatus to allow independent control of temperature and pressure gradients. A complicating feature of a more advanced experiment, involving flow gradients, is the requirement for independently controlled cylinder spin rates. Also, the boundary condition at annulus terminations must be such that flow gradients are minimally disturbed. The design and construction of an advanced apparatus to include flow gradients will require additional technology development.

  11. Acoustic scattering by circular cylinders of various aspect ratios. [pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maciulaitis, A.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of acoustic scattering on the useful frequency range of pressure gradient microphones were investigated experimentally between ka values of 0.407 and 4.232 using two circular cylindrical models (L/D = 0.5 and 0.25) having a 25 cm outside diameter. Small condenser microphones, attached to preamplifiers by flexible connectors, were installed from inside the cylindrical bodies, and flush mounted on the exterior surface of the cylinders. A 38 cm diameter woofer in a large speaker enclosure was used as the sound source. Surface pressure augmentation and phase differences were computed from measured data for various sound wave incidence angles. Results are graphically compared with theoretical predictions supplied by NASA for ka = 0.407, 2.288, and 4.232. All other results are tabulated in the appendices. With minor exceptions, the experimentally determined pressure augmentations agreed within 0.75 dB with theoretical predictions. The agreement for relative phase angles was within 5 percent without any exceptions. Scattering parameter variations with ka and L/D ratio, as computed from experimental data, are also presented.

  12. Pressure probe and hot-film probe rsponses to acoustic excitation in mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, T. L.; Jones, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to compare the relative responses of a hot-film probe and a pressure probe positioned in a flow duct carrying mean flow and progressive acoustic waves. The response of each probe was compared with that of a condenser-type microphone flush mounted in the duct wall for flow Mach numbers up to about 0.5. The response of the pressure probe was less than that of the flush-mounted microphone by not more than about 2.1 dB at the highest centerline Mach number. This decreased response of the probe can likely be attributed to flow-induced impedance changes at the probe sensor orifices. The response of the hot-film probe, expressed in terms of fluctuating pressure, was greater than that of the flush-mounted microphone by as much as 6.0 dB at the two higher centerline Mach numbers. Removal of the contribution from fluctuating temperature in the hot-film analytical model greatly improved the agreement between the two transducer responses.

  13. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  14. Overall evaluation light-weight composite pressure vessel with alloy liner by acoustic emission and Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun-qing; He, Xiao-dong; Wang, Rong-guo; Liu, Wen-bo

    2013-04-01

    Light-weight carbon fiber composite pressure vessel with inner thin-wall aluminum alloy liner has main problem of local buckling during manufacture and working process. The approach of acoustic emission and Bragg grating are adapted to monitoring the light-weight composite vessel under water pressure. Two channels of acoustic emission (AE) were bonded to front dome and cylinder to monitoring the performance of the vessel withstanding maximum 4.5MPa water pressure during loading, maintaining and unloading. Meantime six fiber Bragg sensors (FBG)were attached to front dome and cylinder of the outer surface by hoop and meridian direction respectively in order to monitor the vessel behavior. Analysis indicated Bragg sensors can evaluate outer surface behavior of the vessel with pressure. AE character parameters analysis illustrated the local buckling of inner thin-wall liner.

  15. Social Support, Assimilation and Biological Effective Blood Pressure Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Anthony; Walsh, Patricia Ann

    1987-01-01

    The twin processes of migration and assimilation are highly stressful. This stress can be manifested in elevated blood pressure. According to this study, immigrants receiving high levels of social support had significantly lower blood pressure levels than those receiving less social support. (VM)

  16. A comparison between heterodyne and homodyne interferometry to realise the SI unit of acoustic pressure in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos; Robinson, Stephen; Rajagopal, Srinath; Zeqiri, Bajram

    2016-04-01

    Optical approaches for hydrophone calibrations offer significant advantages over existing methods based on reciprocity. In particular, heterodyne and homodyne interferometry can accurately measure particle velocity and displacements at a specific point in space thus enabling the acoustical pressure to be measured in an absolute, direct, assumption-free manner, with traceability through the SI definition of the metre. The calibration of a hydrophone can then be performed by placing the active element of the sensor at the point where the acoustic pressure field was measured and monitoring its electrical output. However, it is crucial to validate the performance and accuracy of such optical methods by direct comparison rather than through device calibration. Here we report on the direct comparison of two such optical interferometers used in underwater acoustics and ultrasonics in terms of acoustic pressure estimation and their associated uncertainties in the frequency range 200 kHz-3.5 MHz, with results showing agreement better than 1% in terms of pressure and typical expanded uncertainties better than 3% for both reported methods.

  17. Laser-Doppler acoustic probing of granular media with in-depth property gradient and varying pore pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bodet, L.; Dhemaied, A.; Mourgues, R.; Tournat, V.; Rejiba, F.

    2012-05-24

    Non-contacting ultrasonic techniques recently proved to be efficient in the physical modeling of seismic-wave propagation at various application scales, as for instance in the context of geological analogue and seismic modeling. An innovative experimental set-up is proposed here to perform laser-Doppler acoustic probing of unconsolidated granular media with varying pore pressures. The preliminary experiments presented here provide reproducible results and exploitable data, thus validating both the proposed medium preparation and pressure gradient generation procedure.

  18. Numerical study of the direct pressure effect of acoustic waves in planar premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H.; Jimenez, C.

    2010-08-15

    Recently the unsteady response of 1-D premixed flames to acoustic pressure waves for the range of frequencies below and above the inverse of the flame transit time was investigated experimentally using OH chemiluminescence Wangher (2008). They compared the frequency dependence of the measured response to the prediction of an analytical model proposed by Clavin et al. (1990), derived from the standard flame model (one-step Arrhenius kinetics) and to a similar model proposed by McIntosh (1991). Discrepancies between the experimental results and the model led to the conclusion that the standard model does not provide an adequate description of the unsteady response of real flames and that it is necessary to investigate more realistic chemical models. Here we follow exactly this suggestion and perform numerical studies of the response of lean methane flames using different reaction mechanisms. We find that the global flame response obtained with both detailed chemistry (GRI3.0) and a reduced multi-step model by Peters (1996) lies slightly above the predictions of the analytical model, but is close to experimental results. We additionally used an irreversible one-step Arrhenius reaction model and show the effect of the pressure dependence of the global reaction rate in the flame response. Our results suggest first that the current models have to be extended to capture the amplitude and phase results of the detailed mechanisms, and second that the correlation between the heat release and the measured OH* chemiluminescence should be studied deeper. (author)

  19. Near-Field Acoustic Power Level Analysis of F31/A31 Open Rotor Model at Simulated Cruise Conditions, Technical Report II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Near-field acoustic power level analysis of F31A31 open rotor model has been performed to determine its noise characteristics at simulated cruise flight conditions. The non-proprietary parts of the test data obtained from experiments in the 8x6 supersonic wind tunnel were provided by NASA-Glenn Research Center. The tone and broadband components of total noise have been separated from raw test data by using a new data analysis tool. Results in terms of sound pressure levels, acoustic power levels, and their variations with rotor speed, freestream Mach number, and input shaft power, with different blade-pitch setting angles at simulated cruise flight conditions, are presented and discussed. Empirical equations relating models acoustic power level and input shaft power have been developed. The near-field acoustic efficiency of the model at simulated cruise conditions is also determined. It is hoped that the results presented in this work will serve as a database for comparison and improvement of other open rotor blade designs and also for validating open rotor noise prediction codes.

  20. Recovery of Neonatal Head Turning to Decreased Sound Pressure Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarquinio, Nancy; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigated newborns' responses to decreased sound pressure level (SPL) by means of a localized head turning habituation procedure. Findings, which demonstrated recovery of neonatal head turning to decreased SPL, were inconsistent with the selective receptor adaptation model. (RH)

  1. 9. POWERHOUSE, LOWER LEVEL, LOOKING NORTHWEST, PRESSURE CASE WHICH CONTAINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. POWERHOUSE, LOWER LEVEL, LOOKING NORTHWEST, PRESSURE CASE WHICH CONTAINS THE WATER TURBINE - Dayville Mills Hydroelectric Facility, Powerhouse, North side of Route 101, .5 mile west of Route 395, Killingly Center, Windham County, CT

  2. Effects of mean flow convection, quadrupole sources and vortex shedding on airfoil overall sound pressure level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, William R.; Azevedo, João L. F.; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a further analysis of results of airfoil self-noise prediction obtained in the previous work using large eddy simulation and acoustic analogy. The physical mechanisms responsible for airfoil noise generation in the aerodynamic flows analyzed are a combination of turbulent and laminar boundary layers, as well as vortex shedding (VS) originated due to trailing edge bluntness. The primary interest here consists of evaluating the effects of mean flow convection, quadrupole sources and vortex shedding tonal noise on the overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of a NACA0012 airfoil at low and moderate freestream Mach numbers. The overall sound pressure level is the measured quantity which eventually would be the main concern in terms of noise generation for aircraft and wind energy companies, and regulating agencies. The Reynolds number based on the airfoil chord is fixed at Rec=408,000 for all flow configurations studied. The results demonstrate that, for moderate Mach numbers, mean flow effects and quadrupole sources considerably increase OASPL and, therefore, should be taken into account in the acoustic prediction. For a low Mach number flow with vortex shedding, it is observed that OASPL is higher when laminar boundary layer separation is the VS driving mechanism compared to trailing edge bluntness.

  3. Acoustic detection of cracks in the anvil of a large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhaoli; Chen, Bin; Tian, Hao; Cheng, Xiaobin; Yang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    A large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus with three pairs of tungsten carbide anvils is the most popular device for synthetic diamond production. Currently, the consumption of anvils is one of the important costs for the diamond production industry. If one of the anvils is fractured during the production process, the other five anvils in the apparatus may be endangered as a result of a sudden loss of pressure. It is of critical importance to detect and replace cracked anvils before they fracture for reduction of the cost of diamond production and safety. An acoustic detection method is studied in this paper. Two new features, nested power spectrum centroid and modified power spectrum variance, are proposed and combined with linear prediction coefficients to construct a feature vector. A support vector machine model is trained for classification. A sliding time window is proposed for decision-level information fusion. The experiments and analysis show that the recognition rate of anvil cracks is 95%, while the false-alarm rate is as low as 5.8 × 10-4 during a time window; this false-alarm rate indicates that at most one false alarm occurs every 2 months at a confidence level of 90%. An instrument to monitor anvil cracking was designed based on a digital signal processor and has been running for more than eight months in a diamond production field. In this time, two anvil-crack incidents occurred and were detected by the instrument correctly. In addition, no false alarms occurred.

  4. Acoustic detection of cracks in the anvil of a large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhaoli; Chen, Bin; Tian, Hao; Cheng, Xiaobin; Yang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    A large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus with three pairs of tungsten carbide anvils is the most popular device for synthetic diamond production. Currently, the consumption of anvils is one of the important costs for the diamond production industry. If one of the anvils is fractured during the production process, the other five anvils in the apparatus may be endangered as a result of a sudden loss of pressure. It is of critical importance to detect and replace cracked anvils before they fracture for reduction of the cost of diamond production and safety. An acoustic detection method is studied in this paper. Two new features, nested power spectrum centroid and modified power spectrum variance, are proposed and combined with linear prediction coefficients to construct a feature vector. A support vector machine model is trained for classification. A sliding time window is proposed for decision-level information fusion. The experiments and analysis show that the recognition rate of anvil cracks is 95%, while the false-alarm rate is as low as 5.8 × 10(-4) during a time window; this false-alarm rate indicates that at most one false alarm occurs every 2 months at a confidence level of 90%. An instrument to monitor anvil cracking was designed based on a digital signal processor and has been running for more than eight months in a diamond production field. In this time, two anvil-crack incidents occurred and were detected by the instrument correctly. In addition, no false alarms occurred. PMID:26724059

  5. Acoustic detection of cracks in the anvil of a large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Zhaoli Tian, Hao; Cheng, Xiaobin; Yang, Jun; Chen, Bin

    2015-12-15

    A large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus with three pairs of tungsten carbide anvils is the most popular device for synthetic diamond production. Currently, the consumption of anvils is one of the important costs for the diamond production industry. If one of the anvils is fractured during the production process, the other five anvils in the apparatus may be endangered as a result of a sudden loss of pressure. It is of critical importance to detect and replace cracked anvils before they fracture for reduction of the cost of diamond production and safety. An acoustic detection method is studied in this paper. Two new features, nested power spectrum centroid and modified power spectrum variance, are proposed and combined with linear prediction coefficients to construct a feature vector. A support vector machine model is trained for classification. A sliding time window is proposed for decision-level information fusion. The experiments and analysis show that the recognition rate of anvil cracks is 95%, while the false-alarm rate is as low as 5.8 × 10{sup −4} during a time window; this false-alarm rate indicates that at most one false alarm occurs every 2 months at a confidence level of 90%. An instrument to monitor anvil cracking was designed based on a digital signal processor and has been running for more than eight months in a diamond production field. In this time, two anvil-crack incidents occurred and were detected by the instrument correctly. In addition, no false alarms occurred.

  6. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance of a 1.83-meter (6-ft) diameter 1.25-pressure-ratio fan (QF-8)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Lucas, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    A 1.25-pressure-ratio 1.83-meter (6-ft) tip diameter experimental fan stage with characteristics suitable for engine application on STOL aircraft was tested for acoustic and aerodynamic performance. The design incorporated proven features for low noise, including absence of inlet guide vanes, low rotor blade tip speed, low aerodynamic blade loading, and long axial spacing between the rotor and stator blade rows. The fan was operated with five exhaust nozzle areas. The stage noise levels generally increased with a decrease in nozzle area. Separation of the acoustic one-third octave results into broadband and pure-tone components showed the broadband noise to be greater than the corresponding pure-tone components. The sideline perceived noise was highest in the rear quadrants. The acoustic results of QF-8 were compared with those of two similar STOL application fans in the test series. The QF-8 had somewhat higher relative noise levels than those of the other two fans. The aerodynamic results of QF-8 and the other two fans were compared with corresponding results from 50.8-cm (20-in.) diam scale models of these fans and design values. Although the results for the full-scale and scale models of the other two fans were in reasonable agreement for each design, the full-scale fan QF-8 results showed poor performance compared with corresponding model results and design expectations. Facility effects of the full-scale fan QF-8 installation were considered in analyzing this discrepancy.

  7. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J.; Owen, Benjamin C.; Jin, Zhicheng; Hurt, Matt; Amundson, Lucas M.; Madden, Jeremy T.; Qian, Kuangnan; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) was successfully coupled to a conventional atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source in a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (LQIT). Model compounds representing a wide variety of different types, including basic nitrogen and oxygen compounds, aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, were tested separately and as a mixture. These model compounds were successfully evaporated into the gas phase by using LIAD and then ionized by using APCI with different reagents. Four APCI reagent systems were tested: the traditionally used mixture of methanol and water, neat benzene, neat carbon disulfide, and nitrogen gas (no liquid reagent). The mixture of methanol and water produced primarily protonated molecules, as expected. However, only the most basic compounds yielded ions under these conditions. In sharp contrast, using APCI with either neat benzene or neat carbon disulfide as the reagent resulted in the ionization of all the analytes studied to predominantly yield stable molecular ions. Benzene yielded a larger fraction of protonated molecules than carbon disulfide, which is a disadvantage. A similar amount of fragmentation was observed for these reagents. When the experiment was performed without a liquid reagent(nitrogen gas was the reagent), more fragmentation was observed. Analysis of a known mixture as well as a petroleum cut was also carried out. In summary, the new experiment presented here allows the evaporation of thermally labile compounds, both polar and nonpolar, without dissociation or aggregation, and their ionization to form stable molecular ions. PMID:21472571

  8. Abnormal acoustic wave velocities in basaltic and (Fe,Al)-bearing silicate glasses at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin; Lin, Jung-Fu

    2014-12-01

    We have measured acoustic VP and VS velocities of (Fe,Al)-bearing MgSiO3 silicate glasses and an Icelandic basalt glass up to 25 GPa. The velocity profiles of the (Fe,Al)-bearing and basaltic silicate glasses display decreased VP and VS with minima at approximately 5 and 2 GPa, respectively, which could be explained by the mode softening in the aluminosilicate networks. Our results represent the first observation of such velocity softening extending into the chemically complex basaltic glass at a relatively low transition pressure, which is likely due to its degree of polymerization, while the Fe and Al substitutions reduce sound velocities in MgSiO3 glass. If the velocity softening in the basaltic and silicate glasses can be used as analogs for understanding melts in Earth's interior, these observations suggest that the melt fraction needed to account for the velocity reduction in the upper mantle low-velocity zone may be smaller than previously thought.

  9. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J.; Owen, Benjamin C.; Jin, Zhicheng; Hurt, Matt; Amundson, Lucas M.; Madden, Jeremy T.; Qian, Kuangnan; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2011-03-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) was successfully coupled to a conventional atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source in a commercial linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (LQIT). Model compounds representing a wide variety of different types, including basic nitrogen and oxygen compounds, aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, were tested separately and as a mixture. These model compounds were successfully evaporated into the gas phase by using LIAD and then ionized by using APCI with different reagents. From the four APCI reagent systems tested, neat carbon disulfide provided the best results. The mixture of methanol and water produced primarily protonated molecules, as expected. However, only the most basic compounds yielded ions under these conditions. In sharp contrast, using APCI with either neat benzene or neat carbon disulfide as the reagent resulted in the ionization of all the analytes studied to predominantly yield stable molecular ions. Benzene yielded a larger fraction of protonated molecules than carbon disulfide, which is a disadvantage. A similar but minor amount of fragmentation was observed for these two reagents. When the experiment was performed without a liquid reagent (nitrogen gas was the reagent), more fragmentation was observed. Analysis of a known mixture as well as a petroleum cut was also carried out. In summary, the new experiment presented here allows the evaporation of thermally labile compounds, both polar and nonpolar, without dissociation or aggregation, and their ionization to predominantly form stable molecular ions.

  10. Dependence of phonation threshold pressure on vocal tract acoustics and vocal fold tissue mechanics.

    PubMed

    Chan, Roger W; Titze, Ingo R

    2006-04-01

    Analytical and computer simulation studies have shown that the acoustic impedance of the vocal tract as well as the viscoelastic properties of vocal fold tissues are critical for determining the dynamics and the energy transfer mechanism of vocal fold oscillation. In the present study, a linear, small-amplitude oscillation theory was revised by taking into account the propagation of a mucosal wave and the inertive reactance (inertance) of the supraglottal vocal tract as the major energy transfer mechanisms for flow-induced self-oscillation of the vocal fold. Specifically, analytical results predicted that phonation threshold pressure (Pth) increases with the viscous shear properties of the vocal fold, but decreases with vocal tract inertance. This theory was empirically tested using a physical model of the larynx, where biological materials (fat, hyaluronic acid, and fibronectin) were implanted into the vocal fold cover to investigate the effect of vocal fold tissue viscoelasticity on Pth. A uniform-tube supraglottal vocal tract was also introduced to examine the effect of vocal tract inertance on Pth. Results showed that Pth decreased with the inertive impedance of the vocal tract and increased with the viscous shear modulus (G") or dynamic viscosity (eta') of the vocal fold cover, consistent with theoretical predictions. These findings supported the potential biomechanical benefits of hyaluronic acid as a surgical bioimplant for repairing voice disorders involving the superficial layer of the lamina propria, such as scarring, sulcus vocalis, atrophy, and Reinke's edema. PMID:16642848

  11. Atmospheric pressure laser-induced acoustic desorption chemical ionization mass spectrometry for analysis of saturated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Nyadong, Leonard; Quinn, John P; Hsu, Chang S; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Rodgers, Ryan P; Marshall, Alan G

    2012-08-21

    We present atmospheric pressure laser-induced acoustic desorption chemical ionization (AP/LIAD-CI) with O(2) carrier/reagent gas as a powerful new approach for the analysis of saturated hydrocarbon mixtures. Nonthermal sample vaporization with subsequent chemical ionization generates abundant ion signals for straight-chain, branched, and cycloalkanes with minimal or no fragmentation. [M - H](+) is the dominant species for straight-chain and branched alkanes. For cycloalkanes, M(+•) species dominate the mass spectrum at lower capillary temperature (<100 °C) and [M - H](+) at higher temperature (>200 °C). The mass spectrum for a straight-chain alkane mixture (C(21)-C(40)) shows comparable ionization efficiency for all components. AP/LIAD-CI produces molecular weight distributions similar to those for gel permeation chromatography for polyethylene polymers, Polywax 500 and Polywax 655. Coupling of the technique to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) for the analysis of complex hydrocarbon mixtures provides unparalleled mass resolution and accuracy to facilitate unambiguous elemental composition assignments, e.g., 1754 peaks (rms error = 175 ppb) corresponding to a paraffin series (C(12)-C(49), double-bond equivalents, DBE = 0) and higher DBE series corresponding to cycloparaffins containing one to eight rings. Isoabundance-contoured plots of DBE versus carbon number highlight steranes (DBE = 4) of carbon number C(27)-C(30) and hopanes of C(29)-C(35) (DBE = 5), with sterane-to-hopane ratio in good agreement with field ionization (FI) mass spectrometry analysis, but performed at atmospheric pressure. The overall speciation of nonpolar, aliphatic hydrocarbon base oil species offers a promising diagnostic probe to characterize crude oil and its products. PMID:22881221

  12. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio, low tip speed fan (QEP fan B scale model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Minzner, W. R.; Paas, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A scale model (0.484 scale factor) of a single stage fan designed for a 1.5 pressure ratio and 1160 ft/sec tip speed was tested to determine its noise characteristics. The fan had 26 blades and 60 outlet guide vanes, with vanes spaced two rotor blade aerodynamic chords from the blades. The effects of speed, exhaust nozzle area and fan frame acoustic treatment on the scale model's noise characteristics were investigated.

  13. Further assessment of forward pressure level for in situ calibration

    PubMed Central

    Scheperle, Rachel A.; Goodman, Shawn S.; Neely, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying ear-canal sound level in forward pressure has been suggested as a more accurate and practical alternative to sound pressure level (SPL) calibrations used in clinical settings. The mathematical isolation of forward (and reverse) pressure requires defining the Thévenin-equivalent impedance and pressure of the sound source and characteristic impedance of the load; however, the extent to which inaccuracies in characterizing the source and/or load impact forward pressure level (FPL) calibrations has not been specifically evaluated. This study examined how commercially available probe tips and estimates of characteristic impedance impact the calculation of forward and reverse pressure in a number of test cavities with dimensions chosen to reflect human ear-canal dimensions. Results demonstrate that FPL calibration, which has already been shown to be more accurate than in situ SPL calibration, can be improved particularly around standing-wave null frequencies by refining estimates of characteristic impedance. Better estimates allow FPL to be accurately calculated at least through 10 kHz using a variety of probe tips in test cavities of different sizes, suggesting that FPL calibration can be performed in ear canals of all sizes. Additionally, FPL calibration appears a reasonable option when quantifying the levels of extended high-frequency (10–18 kHz) stimuli. PMID:22225044

  14. Microbubble-induced sonoporation involved in ultrasound-mediated DNA transfection in vitro at low acoustic pressures.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Chunbing; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong

    2012-05-11

    In the present work, human breast cancer cells MCF-7 mixed with polyethylenimine: deoxyribonucleic acid complex and microbubbles were exposed to 1-MHz ultrasound at low acoustic driving pressures ranging from 0.05 to 0.3 MPa. The sonoporation pores generated on the cell membrane were examined with scanning electron microscopy. The transfection efficiency and cell viability were evaluated with flow cytometry. The results showed that ultrasound sonication under the current exposure condition could generate cell pores with mean size ranging from about 100 nm to 1.25 μm, and that larger sonoporation pores would be generated with the increasing acoustic pressure or longer treatment time, leading to the enhancement of transfection efficiency and the reduction of cell viability. The simulations based on the Marmottant model were performed to test the hypothesis that the microstreaming-induced shear stress might be involved in the mechanisms of the low-intensity ultrasound induced sonoporation. The calculated shear stress resulting from the micro-streaming ranged from 15 to 680 Pa corresponding to the applied acoustic pressures 0.05-0.3 MPa, which is sufficient to induce reversible sonoporation. This study indicates that the shear stress related bio-effects may provide a base for strategies aimed at targeted drug delivery. PMID:22498312

  15. Perceptual and acoustic evidence for species-level differences in meow vocalizations by domestic cats (Felis catus) and African wild cats (Felis silvestris lybica).

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Nicholas

    2004-09-01

    To test for possible anthropogenic selection effects on meows in domestic felids, vocalizations by domestic cats (Felis catus) were compared with cries by their closest wild relative, the African wild cat (Felis silvestris lybica). Comparisons included analysis of acoustic characteristics and perceptual studies with human (Homo sapiens) listeners. The perceptual studies obtained human listener ratings of call pleasantness. Both the acoustic and perceptual comparisons revealed clear species-level differences: The domestic cat meows were significantly shorter in mean duration than the wild cat meows, showed higher mean formant frequencies, and exhibited higher mean fundamental frequencies. Human listeners at all levels of experience and affinity for cats rated domestic cat meows as far more pleasant sounding than wild cat vocalizations. These results are consistent with a model of cat domestication that posits selective pressure on meows based on human perceptual biases. PMID:15482056

  16. An aneroid pressure sensor for constant-level balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levanon, N.; Afanasjevs, J.; Oehlkers, R. A.; Suomi, V. E.

    1975-01-01

    The pressure sensor for the Tropical Wind Energy conversion and Reference Level Experiment (TWERLE) is described. Key design features of the sensor are: capacitive coupling, reference at midrange, up-down counting, passive oven, storage at flight pressure and prelaunch calibration. Sensor specifications are given which are based on the production results of 440 units. Drift, as estimated from simulated life tests, is 1 mb per 6 months. The overall weight of the sensor, including thermal package, is 180 g.

  17. Charge transfer and atomic-level pressure in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Jun; Cheng, Yongqiang

    2014-02-03

    This paper presents a systematic study on the charge transfer and ionicity in various metallic-glass forming systems, as well as its relationship with other atomic-level structure indicators, using the Bader analysis method and molecular dynamics simulation. It is shown that in a binary or multicomponent system, the chemical effects (when more than one elements present) appear to play a more important role in setting the absolute level of the atomic-level pressure, compared to the topological fluctuation.

  18. Geosat observations of sea level response to barometric pressure forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoar, Timothy J.; Wilson, Clark R.

    1994-01-01

    Altimeter and sea level pressure data from the Geosat mission are analyzed for evidence of inverted barometer responses of sea level to atmospheric pressure forcing. Estimates of the inverted barometer coefficient are given for a variety of geographic regions and time scales using various orbit error removal strategies. There is some sensitivity to the orbit error removal method, but the estimated coefficients show a clear latitudinal dependence and are generally between -0.5 cm/mbar and -0.9 cm/mbar. The southern oceans respond slightly more like an inverted barometer than the northern oceans for similar latitudes. The regression exhibits significant geographic variability, particularly near major circulation features and in the northern hemisphere. The results suggest that the inverted barometer approximation is resonable over much of the oceans, but that some sea level variability may be correlated with barometric pressure by means other than the inverted barometer effect.

  19. Fatigue level estimation of monetary bills based on frequency band acoustic signals with feature selection by supervised SOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teranishi, Masaru; Omatu, Sigeru; Kosaka, Toshihisa

    Fatigued monetary bills adversely affect the daily operation of automated teller machines (ATMs). In order to make the classification of fatigued bills more efficient, the development of an automatic fatigued monetary bill classification method is desirable. We propose a new method by which to estimate the fatigue level of monetary bills from the feature-selected frequency band acoustic energy pattern of banking machines. By using a supervised self-organizing map (SOM), we effectively estimate the fatigue level using only the feature-selected frequency band acoustic energy pattern. Furthermore, the feature-selected frequency band acoustic energy pattern improves the estimation accuracy of the fatigue level of monetary bills by adding frequency domain information to the acoustic energy pattern. The experimental results with real monetary bill samples reveal the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Ultrasonic level sensors for liquids under high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Mazel, D. S.; Hodges, D. Y.

    1986-01-01

    An ultrasonic level sensor of novel design continuously measures the level of a liquid subjected to a high pressure (up to about 40 MPa), as is sometimes required for the effective transfer of the liquid. The sensor operates as a composite resonator fabricated from a standard high-pressure plug. A flat-bottom hole is machined into the plug along its center line. An ultrasonic transducer is bonded rigidly to the interior surface of the bottom wall, while the exterior surface is in contact with the liquid. Although the bottom wall is designed to satisfy the pressure code, it is still sufficiently thin to permit ready excitation of the axisymmetric plate modes of vibration. The liquid level is measured by a conventional pulse-echo technique. A prototype sensor was tested successfully in a 2300-l water vessel at pressures up to about 37 MPa. A spectral analysis of the transmitted pulse reveals that the flexural, extensional, thickness-shear, and radial plate modes are excited into vibration, but none of these appears to be significantly affected by the pressurization of the liquid.

  1. Ultrasonic level sensors for liquids under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Mazel, D. S.; Hodges, D. Y.

    1986-09-01

    An ultrasonic level sensor of novel design continuously measures the level of a liquid subjected to a high pressure (up to about 40 MPa), as is sometimes required for the effective transfer of the liquid. The sensor operates as a composite resonator fabricated from a standard high-pressure plug. A flat-bottom hole is machined into the plug along its center line. An ultrasonic transducer is bonded rigidly to the interior surface of the bottom wall, while the exterior surface is in contact with the liquid. Although the bottom wall is designed to satisfy the pressure code, it is still sufficiently thin to permit ready excitation of the axisymmetric plate modes of vibration. The liquid level is measured by a conventional pulse-echo technique. A prototype sensor was tested successfully in a 2300-l water vessel at pressures up to about 37 MPa. A spectral analysis of the transmitted pulse reveals that the flexural, extensional, thickness-shear, and radial plate modes are excited into vibration, but none of these appears to be significantly affected by the pressurization of the liquid.

  2. Development of large-scale acoustic waveguides for liquid-level measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, J.F.; Kuzniak, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    Large-scale magnetostrictive ultrasonic waveguides are being developed and tested for liquid-level measurement. The use of inexpensive, commercially available, nickel tubing provides a homogeneous waveguide with nondispersive transmission properties and good independence of torsional and extensional wave modes. Because the entire waveguide is magnetostrictive, acoustic excitation and sensing is possible at any point along the length of the waveguide. The problems of establishing and maintaining circumferential fields for torsional wave generation have been solved by electromagnetic field generation. Prototype devices have been built and tested which exhibit a linear relationship between either torsional amplitude or phase velocity and depth of immersion.

  3. Acoustic travel time gauges for in-situ determination of pressure and temperature in multi-anvil apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Qi, Xintong; Zou, Yongtao; Kung, Jennifer; Yu, Tony; Wang, Yanbin; Liebermann, Robert C.; Li, Baosheng

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we developed a new method for in-situ pressure determination in multi-anvil, high-pressure apparatus using an acoustic travel time approach within the framework of acoustoelasticity. The ultrasonic travel times of polycrystalline Al2O3 were calibrated against NaCl pressure scale up to 15 GPa and 900 °C in a Kawai-type double-stage multi-anvil apparatus in conjunction with synchrotron X-radiation, thereby providing a convenient and reliable gauge for pressure determination at ambient and high temperatures. The pressures derived from this new travel time method are in excellent agreement with those from the fixed-point methods. Application of this new pressure gauge in an offline experiment revealed a remarkable agreement of the densities of coesite with those from the previous single crystal compression studies under hydrostatic conditions, thus providing strong validation for the current travel time pressure scale. The travel time approach not only can be used for continuous in-situ pressure determination at room temperature, high temperatures, during compression and decompression, but also bears a unique capability that none of the previous scales can deliver, i.e., simultaneous pressure and temperature determination with a high accuracy (±0.16 GPa in pressure and ±17 °C in temperature). Therefore, the new in-situ Al2O3 pressure gauge is expected to enable new and expanded opportunities for offline laboratory studies of solid and liquid materials under high pressure and high temperature in multi-anvil apparatus.

  4. Acoustic travel time gauges for in-situ determination of pressure and temperature in multi-anvil apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Qi, Xintong; Zou, Yongtao; Liebermann, Robert C.; Li, Baosheng; Kung, Jennifer; Yu, Tony; Wang, Yanbin

    2015-08-14

    In this study, we developed a new method for in-situ pressure determination in multi-anvil, high-pressure apparatus using an acoustic travel time approach within the framework of acoustoelasticity. The ultrasonic travel times of polycrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were calibrated against NaCl pressure scale up to 15 GPa and 900 °C in a Kawai-type double-stage multi-anvil apparatus in conjunction with synchrotron X-radiation, thereby providing a convenient and reliable gauge for pressure determination at ambient and high temperatures. The pressures derived from this new travel time method are in excellent agreement with those from the fixed-point methods. Application of this new pressure gauge in an offline experiment revealed a remarkable agreement of the densities of coesite with those from the previous single crystal compression studies under hydrostatic conditions, thus providing strong validation for the current travel time pressure scale. The travel time approach not only can be used for continuous in-situ pressure determination at room temperature, high temperatures, during compression and decompression, but also bears a unique capability that none of the previous scales can deliver, i.e., simultaneous pressure and temperature determination with a high accuracy (±0.16 GPa in pressure and ±17 °C in temperature). Therefore, the new in-situ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} pressure gauge is expected to enable new and expanded opportunities for offline laboratory studies of solid and liquid materials under high pressure and high temperature in multi-anvil apparatus.

  5. The acoustic environment of the Florida manatee: Correlation with level of habitat use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L.; Miller, James H.; Tyack, Peter L.

    2001-05-01

    The Florida manatee is regularly exposed to high volumes of vessel traffic and other human-related noise pollutants because of their coastal distribution. Quantifying specific aspects of the manatees' acoustic environment will allow for a better understanding of how these animals are responding to both natural and human induced changes in their environment. Acoustic recordings and transmission loss measurements were made in two critical manatee habitats: seagrass beds and dredged basins. Twenty-four sampling sites were chosen based on the frequency of manatee presence in specific areas from 2000-2003. Recordings were composed of both ambient noise levels and transient noise sources. The Monterey-Miami Parabolic Equation Model (MMPE) was used to relate environmental parameters to transmission loss, and model outputs were verified by field tests at all sites. Preliminary results indicate that high-use grassbeds have higher levels of transmission loss compared to low-use sites. Additionally, high-use grassbeds have lower ambient noise in the early morning and later afternoon hours compared to low-use grassbeds. The application of noise measurements and model results can now be used to predict received levels, signal-to-noise ratios, and reliable detection of biologically relevant signals in manatee habitats and in the many different environments that marine mammals live.

  6. Health Promotion to Reduce Blood Pressure Level among Older Blacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, David

    1986-01-01

    Low-income Black elders completed a 10-week health promotion program for the purpose of lowering or stabilizing blood pressure levels. Comparisons were made between classes that met weekly versus three times a week, and between yoga and aerobics formats. A peer-led program was developed that continued for 10 months after the professionally-led…

  7. Application of Relationship Between Groundwater Level and Atmospheric Pressure Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. J.; Lee, K.

    2013-12-01

    Change in atmospheric pressure affects ground water levels. Barometric efficiency, which is an indicator for different exposure to the atmospheric pressure of observation well and adjacent ground cover, can be used as an effective tool for estimating some groundwater properties. If the top of an observation well is sealed and contact with the atmosphere is blocked, there would be no pressure difference between the well and adjacent ground cover. As a result, the difference between barometric efficiency values of sealed and unsealed well of identical condition can indicates the effect of atmospheric pressure changes on the groundwater level. One month observation data of hydraulic head and atmospheric pressure at Wonju-si in Gangwon-do, Korea are used. Two different methods, Clark's method and graphical method, are adopted to estimate the barometric efficiency. Because the efficiency has implication on the properties of aquifer covering condition, mapping of this efficiency might be used for estimating groundwater vulnerability of contamination from surface-loaded sources.

  8. Cortisol levels in hair reflect behavioural reactivity of dogs to acoustic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Siniscalchi, M; McFarlane, J R; Kauter, K G; Quaranta, A; Rogers, L J

    2013-02-01

    Cortisol levels in hair samples were examined in fourteen domestic dogs and related to the dogs' responses to different acoustic stimuli. Stimuli were playbacks of species-typical vocalizations recorded during three different situations ("disturbance", "isolation" and "play" barks) and the sounds of a thunderstorm. Hair samples were collected at 9:00 h and 17:00 h two weeks after the behavioural tests. Results showed that behavioural reactivity to playback of the various stimuli correlates with cortisol levels in hair samples collected at 9:00 h, and the same was the case for the separate measures of behaviour (i.e. hiding, running away, seeking attention from the tester, panting and lowering of the body posture). Hence, levels of cortisol in hair appear to reflect the dog's chronic state of emotional reactivity, or temperament. PMID:22449333

  9. Helicopter far-field acoustic levels as a function of reduced rotor speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Arnold W.; Lemasurier, Philip; Smith, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper will present far-field measured noise levels relative to tests conducted with a model S-76A helicopter. The project was designed to provide supplemental experimental flight data which may be used to further study reduced helicopter rotor speeds (and thus, advancing blade-tip Mach number) effects on far-field acoustic levels. The aircraft was flown in straight and level flight while operating with both the rotor speed and flight speed as test variables. The rotor speed was varied over the range of 107 percent of the main-rotor speed (NR) to 90 percent NR and with the forward flight speed varied over the range of 155 to 35 knots indicated air speed. These conditions produced a wide range of advancing blade-tip Mach numbers to which the noise data are related.

  10. Environmental correction factors for predicting room sound pressure levels

    SciTech Connect

    Warnock, A.C.C.

    1998-10-01

    ARI Standard 885 provides a method for calculating sound pressure levels in room below plenums containing air-handling devices. An important step in the calculation is the correction of the sound power for the device from values provided by the manufacturer to values appropriate for use in occupied spaces. This correction is called the environmental adjustment factor. It compensates for the fact that sound power measured for a source placed outdoors or in a hemi-free field has been found to be greater at low frequencies than the sound power measured for the same source in a reverberation room. When making predictions of sound pressure level in a room using such sound power levels, one has to estimate the reduction in sound power caused by the room. Estimated reductions provided in ARI 885 were examined during ASHRAE research project RP-755 and found to be too large. Lower values are suggested in this paper.

  11. Plumbing noise: Pressure levels and perception in a luxury condominium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watry, Derek

    2005-09-01

    A consulting project has recently been completed that addressed a number of noise concerns in a 9-unit, 20-year-old luxury condominium building in the San Francisco Bay Area. Among other tasks, the noise levels of four bathroom plumbing functions (flushing, showering, bath filling, bath draining) were measured in adjoining units and an inventory of noise concerns was collected. This paper reports the measured noise levels (nearly a 20-dBA range for every function!) and looks at the corresponding resident assessments not always clearly correlated with sound-pressure level.

  12. Scanning Acoustic Microscopy—A Novel Noninvasive Method to Determine Tumor Interstitial Fluid Pressure in a Xenograft Tumor Model1

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Matthias; Pflanzer, Ralph; Habib, Anowarul; Shelke, Amit; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen; Bernd, August; Kaufmann, Roland; Sader, Robert; Kippenberger, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) is a prominent feature of solid tumors and hampers the transmigration of therapeutic macromolecules, for example, large monoclonal antibodies, from tumor-supplying vessels into the tumor interstitium. TIFP values of up to 40 mm Hg have been measured in experimental solid tumors using two conventional invasive techniques: the wick-in-needle and the micropuncture technique. We propose a novel noninvasive method of determining TIFP via ultrasonic investigation with scanning acoustic microscopy at 30-MHz frequency. In our experimental setup, we observed for the impedance fluctuations in the outer tumor hull of A431-vulva carcinoma–derived tumor xenograft mice. The gain dependence of signal strength was quantified, and the relaxation of tissue was calibrated with simultaneous hydrostatic pressure measurements. Signal patterns from the acoustical images were translated into TIFP curves, and a putative saturation effect was found for tumor pressures larger than 3 mm Hg. This is the first noninvasive approach to determine TIFP values in tumors. This technique can provide a potentially promising noninvasive assessment of TIFP and, therefore, can be used to determine the TIFP before treatment approach as well to measure therapeutic efficacy highlighted by lowered TFP values. PMID:27267834

  13. Scanning Acoustic Microscopy-A Novel Noninvasive Method to Determine Tumor Interstitial Fluid Pressure in a Xenograft Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Matthias; Pflanzer, Ralph; Habib, Anowarul; Shelke, Amit; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen; Bernd, August; Kaufmann, Roland; Sader, Robert; Kippenberger, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) is a prominent feature of solid tumors and hampers the transmigration of therapeutic macromolecules, for example, large monoclonal antibodies, from tumor-supplying vessels into the tumor interstitium. TIFP values of up to 40 mm Hg have been measured in experimental solid tumors using two conventional invasive techniques: the wick-in-needle and the micropuncture technique. We propose a novel noninvasive method of determining TIFP via ultrasonic investigation with scanning acoustic microscopy at 30-MHz frequency. In our experimental setup, we observed for the impedance fluctuations in the outer tumor hull of A431-vulva carcinoma-derived tumor xenograft mice. The gain dependence of signal strength was quantified, and the relaxation of tissue was calibrated with simultaneous hydrostatic pressure measurements. Signal patterns from the acoustical images were translated into TIFP curves, and a putative saturation effect was found for tumor pressures larger than 3 mm Hg. This is the first noninvasive approach to determine TIFP values in tumors. This technique can provide a potentially promising noninvasive assessment of TIFP and, therefore, can be used to determine the TIFP before treatment approach as well to measure therapeutic efficacy highlighted by lowered TFP values. PMID:27267834

  14. Nonlinear acoustic impedance of thermoacoustic stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Huan; Fan, Li; Xiao, Shu-yu; Tao, Sha; Qiu, Mei-chen; Zhang, Shu-yi; Zhang, Hui

    2012-09-01

    In order to optimize the performances of the thermoacoustic refrigerator working with the high sound pressure level, the nonlinear acoustic characteristics of the thermoacoustic stack in the resonant pipe are studied. The acoustic fluid impedance of the stack made of copper mesh and set up in a resonant pipe is measured in the acoustic fields with different intensities. It is found that when the sound pressure level in the pipe increases to a critical value, the resistance of the stack increases nonlinearly with the sound pressure, while the reactance of the stack keeps constant. Based on the experimental results, a theory model is set up to describe the acoustic characteristics of the stack, according to the rigid frame theory and Forchheimmer equation. Furthermore, the influences of the sound pressure level, operating frequency, volume porosity, and length of the stack on the nonlinear impedance of the stack are evaluated.

  15. Acoustic and combined methods for measuring the levels of two-layer liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardyshev, V. I.

    2002-09-01

    Methods for the simultaneous measurement of the levels of light and heavy liquid phases in a tank by using electroacoustic transducers, temperature sensors, and hydrostatic pressure gauges are considered. According to the calculations, the measurement of the levels of, e.g., oil, petroleum products, and underlying water is possible with relative standard errors of the order of 0.1 1%.

  16. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  17. Evolution of the electron acoustic signal as function of doping level in III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bresse, J.F.; Papadopoulo, A.C.

    1988-07-01

    The evolution of the electron acoustic signal has been measured for Be- and Si-doped GaAs and Ga/sub 0.28/Al/sub 0.19/In/sub 0.53/As layers with doping levels from10/sup 17/ to 10/sup 20/ at. cm/sup -3/. The samples have also been analyzed by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy for near-band-edge transition and deep level emission. The results are explained by the reduction of the mean free path of phonons, giving rise to a lattice thermal conductivity decrease. Meanwhile, the electronic part of the thermal conductivity of these compounds is found to be nearly negligible.

  18. Shape oscillations of acoustically levitated drops in water: Early research with Bob Apfel on modulated radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Philip L.

    2001-05-01

    In 1976, research in collaboration with Bob Apfel demonstrated that low-frequency shape oscillations of hydrocarbon drops levitated in water could be driven using modulated radiation pressure. While that response to modulated ultrasound was subsequently extended to a range of systems, the emphasis here is to recall the initial stages of development in Bob Apfel's laboratory leading to some publications [P. L. Marston and R. E. Apfel, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 68, 280-286 (1979); J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 67, 27-37 (1980)]. The levitation technology used at that time was such that it was helpful to develop a sensitive method for detecting weak oscillations using the interference pattern in laser light scattered by levitated drops. The initial experiments to verify this scattering method used shape oscillations induced by modulated electric fields within the acoustic levitator. Light scattering was subsequently used to detect shape oscillations induced by amplitude modulating a carrier having a high frequency (around 680 kHz) at a resonance of the transducer. Methods were also developed for quantitative measurements of the drop's response and with improved acoustic coupling drop fission was observed. The connection with research currently supported by NASA will also be noted.

  19. Pressure Inactivation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Oysters- Influence of Pressure level and Treatment Temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The overall objective of this study was to develop processing parameters (pressure level, time, and temperature) needed to achieve a 5-log reduction of V. parahaemolyticus within live oysters (Crassostrea virginica). Ten strains of V. parahaemolyticus were separately tested for their resistances to...

  20. Characterization of Titan 3-D acoustic pressure spectra by least-squares fit to theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnett, E. B.; Carleen, E.

    1980-01-01

    A theoretical model for the acoustic spectra of undeflected rocket plumes is fitted to computed spectra of a Titan III-D at varying times after ignition, by a least-squares method. Tests for the goodness of the fit are made.

  1. Simultaneous measurement of acoustic pressure and temperature in the HIFU fields using all-silica fiber optic Fabry-Perot hydorophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dai-Hua; Zeng, Lu-Yu; Jia, Ping-Gang; Liu, Lei; Jiang, Xin-Yin

    2014-11-01

    Accurately measuring the acoustic pressure distributions and the size of the focal regions of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields, as well as the temperature induced by the HIFUs, are significant for ensuring the efficiency and safety of treatments. In our previous work, a tip-sensitive all-silica fiber-optic Fabry-Perot (TAFOFP) ultrasonic hydrophone for measuring HIFU fields is developed. In this paper, we explore the possibility that utilizing the TAFOFP ultrasonic hydrophone to simultaneously measure the acoustic pressure of HIFU fields and the induced temperature. The TAFOFP ultrasonic hydrophone for simultaneously measuring the acoustic pressure and temperature is developed and the experiment setup for measuring the HIFU fields based on the developed TAFOFP ultrasonic hydrophone is established. The developed TAFOFP ultrasonic hydrophone is experimentally tested in the degassed water and tissue phantom to verify the possibility of simultaneously measuring the acoustic pressure and temperature. Experimental results show that the sensing system can simultaneously measure the acoustic pressure and temperature.

  2. Introducing DIASCoPE: Directly Integrated Acoustic System Combined with Pressure Experiments — Changing the Paradigm from Product to Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, M. L.; Baldwin, K. J.; Huebsch, W. B.; Tercé, N.; Bejina, F.; Bystricky, M.; Chen, H.; Vaughan, M. T.; Weidner, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the properties and behaviors of materials and multi-phase aggregates under conditions of high pressure and temperature is vital to unraveling the mysteries that lie beneath the surface of the planet. Advances in in situexperimental techniques using synchrotron radiation at these extreme conditions have helped to provide answers to fundamental questions that were previously unattainable. Synchrotron-based ultrasonic interferometry measurements have proven to be especially important in determining acoustic velocities and thermoelastic properties of materials at high pressures and temperatures. However, due to relatively slow data collection times, it has been difficult to measure the effects of processes as they occur, and instead the measurement is made on the end product of these processes. DIASCoPE is an important step toward addressing this problem.Over the last three years, we have designed and developed an on-board ultrasonic acoustic velocity measurement system that cuts data collection time down by over an order of magnitude. We can now measure P- and S-wave travel times in samples at extreme conditions in less than one second. Moreover, the system has been fully integrated with the multi-anvil apparatus and the EPICS control system at beamline X17B2 of the National Synchrotron Light Source, allowing for greater ease of control andfull automation of experimental data collection. The DIASCoPE has completed the testing and commissioning phase, and the first data collected using this powerful new system will be presented here.DIASCoPE represents a major step forward in acoustic velocity collection time reduction that will finally allow us to begin to witness what effects various processes in the deep Earth may have on the physical properties of materials at extreme conditions as they occur. These new capabilities will allow us to change the focus of study from the product to the process itself and will lead to a greater understanding of the

  3. Optical pressure/acoustic sensor with precise Fabry-Perot cavity length control using angle polished fiber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhui; Wu, Nan; Tian, Ye; Wang, Xingwei; Niezrecki, Christopher; Chen, Julie

    2009-09-14

    This paper presents a novel Fabry-Perot (FP) optical fiber pressure/acoustic sensor. It consists of two V-shaped grooves having different sized widths, a diaphragm on the surface of the larger V-groove, and a 45 degrees angle-polished fiber. The precision of FP cavity length is determined by the fabrication process of photolithography and anisotropic etching of a silicon crystal. Therefore, the cavity length can be controlled on the order of ten nm. Sensors were fabricated and tested. Test results indicate that the sensors' cavity lengths have been controlled precisely. The packaged sensor has demonstrated very good static and dynamic responses compared to a commercially available pressure sensor and a microphone. PMID:19770876

  4. Effect of anisotropic dust pressure and superthermal electrons on propagation and stability of dust acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, M. F.; Behery, E. E.; El-Taibany, W. F.

    2015-06-15

    Employing the reductive perturbation technique, Zakharov–Kuznetzov (ZK) equation is derived for dust acoustic (DA) solitary waves in a magnetized plasma which consists the effects of dust anisotropic pressure, arbitrary charged dust particles, Boltzmann distributed ions, and Kappa distributed superthermal electrons. The ZK solitary wave solution is obtained. Using the small-k expansion method, the stability analysis for DA solitary waves is also discussed. The effects of the dust pressure anisotropy and the electron superthermality on the basic characteristics of DA waves as well as on the three-dimensional instability criterion are highlighted. It is found that the DA solitary wave is rarefactive (compressive) for negative (positive) dust. In addition, the growth rate of instability increases rapidly as the superthermal spectral index of electrons increases with either positive or negative dust grains. A brief discussion for possible applications is included.

  5. Investigation on Furan Levels in Pressure-Cooked Foods.

    PubMed

    Arisseto, Adriana P; Vicente, Eduardo; Toledo, Maria Cecília F

    2013-01-01

    Furan is a food processing contaminant classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans. As the occurrence of furan has been reported in a variety of foods processed in sealed containers, the objective of this work was to investigate if the contaminant can be found in home-cooked foods prepared in a pressure cooker. For that, several foods including beans, soy beans, whole rice, beef, pork, potato, and cassava were pressure-cooked and analyzed for the furan content by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry preceded by a headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME-GC/MS). Furan was not found above the limit of quantification in the pressure-cooked samples. No furan has either been found in reheated samples after 24 hours under cold storage. Although levels up to 173 μg/kg were already reported for commercial canned/jarred foods, it seems that the cooking in a pressure cooker may not represent a concern in relation to the occurrence of furan in foods. PMID:26962536

  6. MODERATE LEVEL PRENATAL ALCOHOL EXPOSURE ENHANCES ACOUSTIC STARTLE MAGNITUDE AND DISRUPTS PREPULSE INHIBITION IN ADULT RHESUS MONKEYS

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Mary L.; Larson, Julie A.; Rypstat, Craig W.; Resch, Leslie M.; Roberts, Andrew; Moore, Colleen F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prenatal alcohol exposure can contribute to a wide range of neurodevelopmental impairments in children and adults including behavioral and neuropsychiatric disorders. In rhesus monkeys we examined whether moderate level prenatal alcohol exposure would alter acoustic startle responses and prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle (PPI). PPI is a highly quantifiable measure of inhibitory neural processes or sensorimotor gating associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. Methods Acoustic startle and PPI of the acoustic startle was tested in 37 adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) from four experimental conditions: (a) moderate level prenatal alcohol-exposed, (b) prenatally-stressed, (c) moderate level prenatal alcohol-exposed + prenatally-stressed, and (d) sucrose controls. Results Prenatal alcohol-exposed monkeys showed a higher magnitude of acoustic startle response and disrupted PPI compared with monkeys not exposed to alcohol prenatally. Monkeys in all conditions showed higher HPA-axis responses after undergoing the startle procedure, but HPA responses were unrelated to startle response magnitude, latency, or PPI. Conclusion Finding altered PPI in monkeys prenatally exposed to a moderate dose of alcohol suggests that reduced sensorimotor gating is one effect of prenatal alcohol exposure. Because reduced sensorimotor gating is observed in many neuropsychiatric disorders, sensorimotor gating deficits could be an aspect of the co-morbidity between FASD and mental health conditions. PMID:23763712

  7. An acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic analysis of impact damaged composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L. (Principal Investigator); Walker, James L.

    1996-01-01

    The use of acoustic emission to characterize impact damage in composite structures is being performed on composite bottles wrapped with graphite epoxy and kevlar bottles. Further development of the acoustic emission methodology will include neural net analysis and/or other multivariate techniques to enhance the capability of the technique to identify dominant failure mechanisms during fracture. The acousto-ultrasonics technique will also continue to be investigated to determine its ability to predict regions prone to failure prior to the burst tests. Characterization of the stress wave factor before, and after impact damage will be useful for inspection purposes in manufacturing processes. The combination of the two methods will also allow for simple nondestructive tests capable of predicting the performance of a composite structure prior to its being placed in service and during service.

  8. LOCATION OF LEAKS IN PRESSURIZED PETROLEUM PIPELINES BY MEANS OF PASSIVE-ACOUSTIC METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were conducted on the underground pipeline at the EPA's UST Test Apparatus n which three acoustic sensors separated by a maximum distance of 38m (125 ft) were used to monitor signals produced by 11.4-, 5.7-, and 3.8-L/h (3.0-, 1.5-, and 1.0-gal/h) leaks in the wall of...

  9. Influence of negative pressurization on airborne microbial and radon levels

    SciTech Connect

    Kalliokoski, P.; Korhonen, P.; Kokotti, H.; Pasanen, A.L.; Rautiala, S.; Rantamaeki, J.

    1999-07-01

    The negative pressure inside a building is the main driving force for the entry of both radon and fungal spores. This study was conducted to test the suitability of depressurization to facilitate simultaneously the detection of fungal growth within the lower parts of building envelope and the risk of radon entry. Pressure difference was increased in three steps to 24--28 Pa in two wooden buildings known to suffer from long-term water damages. At the end, pulses of negative pressure were generated. Airborne viable fungal counts, radon and particle counts were followed during the tests together with the ventilation rate and particle count. The absolute concentrations of the impurities studied did not increase significantly or even decreased during the tests due to enhanced ventilation. However, when the increase in the ventilation rate was taken into consideration it was found that the entry rate of all the contaminants increased. The changes were larger in the tighter building where the radon entry rate increased systematically with the pressure difference reaching finally 13.8-fold level compared to the initial value. In the less tight building, the corresponding highest radon entry rate ratio was 9.5. Very large increases, up to 42-fold, were observed in the viable spore count ratio in the tighter building during the tests. In the leaky building, the changes were again considerably smaller; the maximum ratio was 4.2. Increases in particle emissions were smaller than those observed in fungal counts. The pulses were less effective than continuous depressurization. The results show that negative pressurization can be used to increase the release of fungal spores in order to detect hidden fungal growth. This kind of test is especially effective if there are no major leaks in the clean part of the building envelope. The method allows simultaneous rapid checking of need for radon mitigation.

  10. Generation of ion-acoustic waves in an inductively coupled, low-pressure discharge lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Camparo, J. C.; Klimcak, C. M.

    2006-04-15

    For a number of years it has been known that the alkali rf-discharge lamps used in atomic clocks can exhibit large amplitude intensity oscillations. These oscillations arise from ion-acoustic plasma waves and have typically been associated with erratic clock behavior. Though large amplitude ion-acoustic plasma waves are clearly deleterious for atomic clock operation, it does not follow that small amplitude oscillations have no utility. Here, we demonstrate two easily implemented methods for generating small amplitude ion-acoustic plasma waves in alkali rf-discharge lamps. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the frequency of these waves is proportional to the square root of the rf power driving the lamp and therefore that their examination can provide an easily accessible parameter for monitoring and controlling the lamp's plasma conditions. This has important consequences for precise timekeeping, since the atomic ground-state hyperfine transition, which is the heart of the atomic clock signal, can be significantly perturbed by changes in the lamp's output via the ac-Stark shift.

  11. Detection of Cracking Levels in Brittle Rocks by Parametric Analysis of the Acoustic Emission Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradian, Zabihallah; Einstein, Herbert H.; Ballivy, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    Determination of the cracking levels during the crack propagation is one of the key challenges in the field of fracture mechanics of rocks. Acoustic emission (AE) is a technique that has been used to detect cracks as they occur across the specimen. Parametric analysis of AE signals and correlating these parameters (e.g., hits and energy) to stress-strain plots of rocks let us detect cracking levels properly. The number of AE hits is related to the number of cracks, and the AE energy is related to magnitude of the cracking event. For a full understanding of the fracture process in brittle rocks, prismatic specimens of granite containing pre-existing flaws have been tested in uniaxial compression tests, and their cracking process was monitored with both AE and high-speed video imaging. In this paper, the characteristics of the AE parameters and the evolution of cracking sequences are analyzed for every cracking level. Based on micro- and macro-crack damage, a classification of cracking levels is introduced. This classification contains eight stages (1) crack closure, (2) linear elastic deformation, (3) micro-crack initiation (white patch initiation), (4) micro-crack growth (stable crack growth), (5) micro-crack coalescence (macro-crack initiation), (6) macro-crack growth (unstable crack growth), (7) macro-crack coalescence and (8) failure.

  12. Numerical spatial marching techniques in duct acoustics. [noise source calculation from far field pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    Direct calculation of the internal structure of a ducted noise source from farfield pressure measurements is regarded as an initial value problem, where the pressure and pressure gradient (farfield impedance) are assumed to be known along a line in the farfield. If pressure and impedance are known at the boundary of the farfield, the pressure can be uniquely determined in the vicinity of the inlet and inside the inlet ducting. A marching procedure is developed which, with this information obtained from measurements, enables a description of a ducted noise source. The technique uses a finite difference representation of the homogeneous Helmholtz equation.

  13. Ultrahigh-pressure acoustic wave velocities of SiO2-Al2O3 glasses up to 200 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Itaru; Murakami, Motohiko; Kohara, Shinji; Ohara, Koji; Ohtani, Eiji

    2016-12-01

    Extensive experimental studies on the structure and density of silicate glasses as laboratory analogs of natural silicate melts have attempted to address the nature of dense silicate melts that may be present at the base of the mantle. Previous ultrahigh-pressure experiments, however, have been performed on simple systems such as SiO2 or MgSiO3, and experiments in more complex system have been conducted under relatively low-pressure conditions below 60 GPa. The effect of other metal cations on structural changes that occur in dense silicate glasses under ultrahigh pressures has been poorly understood. Here, we used a Brillouin scattering spectroscopic method up to pressures of 196.9 GPa to conduct in situ high-pressure acoustic wave velocity measurements of SiO2-Al2O3 glasses in order to understand the effect of Al2O3 on pressure-induced structural changes in the glasses as analogs of aluminosilicate melts. From 10 to 40 GPa, the transverse acoustic wave velocity ( V S ) of Al2O3-rich glass (SiO2 + 20.5 mol% Al2O3) was greater than that of Al2O3-poor glass (SiO2 + 3.9 mol% Al2O3). This result suggests that SiO2-Al2O3 glasses with higher proportions of Al ions with large oxygen coordination numbers (5 and 6) become elastically stiffer up to 40 GPa, depending on the Al2O3 content, but then soften above 40 GPa. At pressures from 40 to ~100 GPa, the increase in V S with increasing pressure became less steep than below 40 GPa. Above ~100 GPa, there were abrupt increases in the P-V S gradients ( dV S /dP) at 130 GPa in Al2O3-poor glass and at 116 GPa in Al2O3-rich glass. These changes resemble previous experimental results on SiO2 glass and MgSiO3 glass. Given that changes of dV S / dP have commonly been related to changes in the Si-O coordination states in the glasses, our results, therefore, may indicate a drastic structural transformation in SiO2-Al2O3 glasses above 116 GPa, possibly associated with an average Si-O coordination number change to higher than 6. Compared

  14. Estimating stream discharge using stage and multi-level acoustic Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen, J. B.; Rasmussen, K.; Ledet Jensen, J.; Bering Ovesen, N.

    2011-12-01

    For temperate region countries with small or moderately sized streams, such as those in Denmark, seasonal weed growth imposes a significant temporal change of the stage-discharge relation. In the past such problems were often avoided by using hydraulic structures, however, firm ecology based restrictions prevent that hydraulic structures are made at the discharge stations presently. As a consequence, the nonlinear drift in weed density and structure adds a significant uncertainty to the hydrograph. Furthermore, the expected increase in extreme discharge situations due to climate changes in the Northern part of Europe may further violate a stable relation between stage and discharge in streams. Extreme high flow situations cause abrupt rise in stage, and consequently weed can be partly uprooted and partly bend down along the bed, thereby changing the conveyance of the stream. In addition, extreme high flow situations can cause the streams to flood the banks. If these hydraulic changes occur in between direct measurements of discharge they are not detected or accounted for in the stage-discharge relation, and the hydrograph can be significantly biased. The objective of this research is to investigate how both seasonal and short duration changes in weed distribution and abrupt changes in stage are recognized in the stream's velocity gradient. It is examined whether the use of multi-level acoustic Doppler velocimetry can provide an improved method for hydrograph estimation with lower uncertainty than traditional stage-discharge methods. In this presentation we shall present results from a study where, at two sites in Denmark, the stream velocity field has been mapped by the use of three Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meter (ADVM) instruments. The ADVM instruments are mounted in three different depths, continuously measuring horizontal average water velocities. Velocity and stage data are selected from one summer and two winter periods, and a method for converting velocity

  15. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far-field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far-field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  16. Increased Intraocular Pressure and Hyperglycemic Level in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hymowitz, Maggie B.; Chang, Donny; Feinberg, Edward B.; Roy, Sayon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether hyperglycemic levels as determined from high hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels influence intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR). Methods A retrospective chart review was performed on subjects with a diagnosis of NPDR and a corresponding HbA1c level measured within 90 days before or after an IOP measurement over a two-year period. Exclusion criteria included a diagnosis of glaucoma or treatment with IOP lowering medications or oral or topical steroids. Results Using 14.5mmHg as a baseline mean value for IOP, 42 subjects had an IOP < 14.5mmHg and mean HbA1c of 8.1±1.1, while 72 subjects had an IOP ≥ 14.5mmHg and a mean HbA1c of 9.0±2.1. Although there was an overlap in the confidence intervals, a significant difference (P = 0.01) in the mean HbA1c level was observed in regression analysis between the two groups. Importantly, diabetic subjects with elevated HbA1c levels rarely (<1%) exhibited reduced IOP levels. Conclusions Diabetic subjects with elevated HbA1c levels exhibited significantly higher IOPs compared to those with lower HbA1c levels. Findings from this study indicate an association between hyperglycemia and elevated IOP and that poor glycemic control may contribute to increased IOP levels in long-term diabetic patients. PMID:27002725

  17. Assessment of Impulse Noise Level and Acoustic Trauma in Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Maryam; Mojtahed, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Mohammad; Saedi, Babak

    2012-01-01

    Background: Military personnel are usually exposed to high levels of impulse noise (IN) which can lead to hearing loss. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of relatively low level exposure of impulse noise (IN) during shooting practice on hearing using pure tone audiometry (PTA) and transiently evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) in military personnel. Materials and Methods: Forty male soldiers (mean age 20.08 years) were recruited for the study. Prior to their first shooting practice, PTA and TEOAE were recorded. After 15 minutes and one week post- practice PTA and TEOAE were compared. Results: Immediately after shooting practice significant differences in PTA at 500, 1000, and 4000 Hz were observed for the right ear and no significant difference at any frequency for the left ear. There was a significant difference in the amplitude of TEOAE 15 minutes after shooting practice at 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Hz in the right ear, while for the left ear the difference was significant at 1000 and 2000 Hz. One week after exposure a significant difference at 500 and 4000 Hz was found only in the right ear and a significant difference in the amplitude of TEOAE was observed at 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Hz. Conclusions: Even exposure lower than permissible levels may lead to acoustic trauma. TEOAE is more sensitive than PTA in detecting early hearing loss after military shooting exercises. Hearing protection equipment and appropriate surveillance programs are recommended. PMID:24749098

  18. Vibration and acoustic properties of honeycomb sandwich structures subject to variable incident plane-wave angle pressure loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiaxue

    Honeycomb structures are widely used in many areas for their material characteristics such as high strength-to-weight ratio, stiffness-to-weight, sound transmission, and other properties. Honeycomb structures are generally constructed from periodically spaced tessellations of unit cells. It can be shown that the effective stiffness and mass properties of honeycomb are controlled by the local geometry and wall thickness of the particular unit cells used. Of particular interest are regular hexagonal (6-sided) honeycomb unit cell geometries which exhibit positive effective Poisson's ratio, and modified 6-sided auxetic honeycomb unit cells with Poisson's ratio which is effectively negative; a property not found in natural materials. One important honeycomb meta-structure is sandwich composites designed with a honeycomb core bonded between two panel layers. By changing the geometry of the repetitive unit cell, and overall depth and material properties of the honeycomb core, sandwich panels with different vibration and acoustic properties can be designed to shift resonant frequencies and improve intensity and Sound Transmission Loss (STL). In the present work, a honeycomb finite element model based on beam elements is programmed in MATLAB and verified with the commercial finite element software ABAQUS for frequency extraction and direct frequency response analysis. The MATLAB program was used to study the vibration and acoustic properties of different kinds of honeycomb sandwich panels undergoing in-plane loading with different incident pressure wave angles and frequency. Results for the root mean square intensity IRMS based on normal velocity on the transmitted side of the panel measure vibration magnitude are reported for frequencies between 0 and 1000 Hz. The relationship between the sound transmission loss computed with ABAQUS and the inverse of the intensity of surface velocity is established. In the present work it is demonstrated that the general trend between the

  19. Phenomenological Description of Acoustic Emission Processes Occurring During High-Pressure Sand Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Martín, Jordi; Muñoz-Ibáñez, Andrea; Grande-García, Elisa; Rodríguez-Cedrún, Borja

    2016-04-01

    Compaction, pore collapse and grain crushing have a significant impact over the hydrodynamic properties of sand formations. The assessment of the crushing stress threshold constitutes valuable information in order to assess the behavior of these formations provided that it can be conveniently identified. Because of the inherent complexities of the direct observation of sand crushing, different authors have developed several indirect methods, being acoustic emission a promising one. However, previous researches have evidenced that there are different processes triggering acoustic emissions which need to be carefully accounted. Worth mentioning among them are grain bearing, grain to container friction, intergranular friction and crushing. The work presented here addresses this purpose. A broadband acoustic emission sensor (PA MicroHF200) connected to a high-speed data acquisition system and control software (AeWIN for PCI1 2.10) has been attached to a steel ram and used to monitor the different processes occurring during the oedometric compaction of uniform quartz sand up to an axial load of about 110 MPa and constant temperature. Load was stepwise applied using a servocontrolled hydraulic press acting at a constant load rate. Axial strain was simultaneously measured with the aid of a LDT device. Counts, energy, event duration, rise time and amplitude were recorded along each experiment and after completion selected waveforms were transformed from the time to the frequency domain via FFT transform. Additional simplified tests were performed in order to isolate the frequency characteristics of the dominant processes occurring during sand compaction. Our results show that, from simple tests, it is possible to determine process-dependent frequency components. When considering more complex experiments, many of the studied processes overlap but it is still possible to identify when a particular one dominates as well as the likely onset of crushing.

  20. Apparatus and method for non-contact, acoustic resonance determination of intraocular pressure

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Wray, William O.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and method for measuring intraocular pressure changes in an eye under investigation by detection of vibrational resonances therein. An ultrasonic transducer operating at its resonant frequency is amplitude modulated and swept over a range of audio frequencies in which human eyes will resonate. The output therefrom is focused onto the eye under investigation, and the resonant vibrations of the eye observed using a fiber-optic reflection vibration sensor. Since the resonant frequency of the eye is dependent on the pressure therein, changes in intraocular pressure may readily be determined after a baseline pressure is established.

  1. Apparatus and method for non-contact, acoustic resonance determination of intraocular pressure

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, D.N.; Wray, W.O.

    1994-12-27

    The apparatus and method for measuring intraocular pressure changes in an eye under investigation by detection of vibrational resonances therein. An ultrasonic transducer operating at its resonant frequency is amplitude modulated and swept over a range of audio frequencies in which human eyes will resonate. The output therefrom is focused onto the eye under investigation, and the resonant vibrations of the eye observed using a fiber-optic reflection vibration sensor. Since the resonant frequency of the eye is dependent on the pressure therein, changes in intraocular pressure may readily be determined after a baseline pressure is established. 3 figures.

  2. Non-invasive estimation of static and pulsatile intracranial pressure from transcranial acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Levinsky, Alexandra; Papyan, Surik; Weinberg, Guy; Stadheim, Trond; Eide, Per Kristian

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether a method for estimation of non-invasive ICP (nICP) from transcranial acoustic (TCA) signals mixed with head-generated sounds estimate the static and pulsatile invasive ICP (iICP). For that purpose, simultaneous iICP and mixed TCA signals were obtained from patients undergoing continuous iICP monitoring as part of clinical management. The ear probe placed in the right outer ear channel sent a TCA signal with fixed frequency (621 Hz) that was picked up by the left ear probe along with acoustic signals generated by the intracranial compartment. Based on a mathematical model of the association between mixed TCA and iICP, the static and pulsatile nICP values were determined. Total 39 patients were included in the study; the total number of observations for prediction of static and pulsatile iICP were 5789 and 6791, respectively. The results demonstrated a good agreement between iICP/nICP observations, with mean difference of 0.39 mmHg and 0.53 mmHg for static and pulsatile ICP, respectively. In summary, in this cohort of patients, mixed TCA signals estimated the static and pulsatile iICP with rather good accuracy. Further studies are required to validate whether mixed TCA signals may become useful for measurement of nICP. PMID:26997563

  3. Helicopter main-rotor speed effects on far-field acoustic levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Arnold W.; Childress, Otis S.; Hardesty, Mark

    1987-01-01

    The design of a helicopter is based on an understanding of many parameters and their interactions. For example, in the design stage of a helicopter, the weight, engine, and rotor speed must be considered along with the rotor geometry when considering helicopter operations. However, the relationship between the noise radiated from the helicopter and these parameters is not well understood, with only limited model and full-scale test data to study. In general, these data have shown that reduced rotor speeds result in reduced far-field noise levels. This paper reviews the status of a recent helicopter noise research project designed to provide experimental flight data to be used to better understand helicopter rotor-speed effects on far-field acoustic levels. Preliminary results are presented relative to tests conducted with a McDonnell Douglas model 500E helicopter operating with the rotor speed as the control variable over the range of 103% of the main-rotor speed (NR) to 75% NR, and with the forward speed maintained at a constant value of 80 knots.

  4. External and middle ear sound pressure distribution and acoustic coupling to the tympanic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bergevin, Christopher; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Sound energy is conveyed to the inner ear by the diaphanous, cone-shaped tympanic membrane (TM). The TM moves in a complex manner and transmits sound signals to the inner ear with high fidelity, pressure gain, and a short delay. Miniaturized sensors allowing high spatial resolution in small spaces and sensitivity to high frequencies were used to explore how pressure drives the TM. Salient findings are: (1) A substantial pressure drop exists across the TM, and varies in frequency from ∼10 to 30 dB. It thus appears reasonable to approximate the drive to the TM as being defined solely by the pressure in the ear canal (EC) close to the TM. (2) Within the middle ear cavity (MEC), spatial variations in sound pressure could vary by more than 20 dB, and the MEC pressure at certain locations/frequencies was as large as in the EC. (3) Spatial variations in pressure along the TM surface on the EC-side were typically less than 5 dB up to 50 kHz. Larger surface variations were observed on the MEC-side. PMID:24606269

  5. Serum testosterone levels and arterial blood pressure in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Fogari, Roberto; Preti, Paola; Zoppi, Annalisa; Fogari, Elena; Rinaldi, Andrea; Corradi, Luca; Mugellini, Amedeo

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between serum testosterone levels and arterial blood pressure (BP) in the elderly. We studied 356 non-diabetic, non-smoking, non-obese men aged 60 to 80 years and untreated for hypertension. All subjects were evaluated in the morning after an overnight fast. Evaluation included measurements of the following: BP (by mercury sphygmomanometer, Korotkoff I and V), body weight, height and free testosterone (T) plasma levels (by radioimmunoassay). According to the BP values, the subjects were classified as normotensives (NT; n=112; SBP/DBP<140/90 mmHg), systolic and diastolic hypertensives (HT; n=127; SBP/DBP>140/90 mmHg), and isolated systolic hypertensives (ISH; n=117; SBP>140 mmHg and DBP<90 mmHg). T values decreased with increasing age in all 3 groups and was significantly lower in HT (-15%) and ISH men (-21%) than in NT men (p<0.05). In each group, the T levels showed a highly significant negative correlation with BMI (p<0.001). A significant negative correlation was also found between T levels and SBP in NT (r=-0.35, p<0.001), ISH (r=-0.67, p<0.001), and HT (r=-0.19, p<0.05) men, whereas a negative correlation with DBP was observed only in the NT men (r=-0.19, p<0.05). Adjusting for the BMI confirmed a significant difference in plasma T levels between ISH and NT men, but not between HT and NT men. Multiple regression analysis employing BP as a dependent variable confirmed a strong relationship between T levels and SBP in all 3 groups, whereas a significant relationship between T levels and DBP was found only in NT men. In conclusion, although further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between plasma T levels and BP, our findings suggest that in elderly men with ISH, the reduced plasma levels of testosterone might contribute to the increased arterial stiffness typical of these subjects. PMID:16392765

  6. Acoustic radiation and surface pressure characteristics of an airfoil due to incident turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paterson, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of the noise and unsteady surface pressure characteristics of an isolated airfoil in a uniform mean velocity, homogeneous, nearly-isotropic turbulence field was conducted. Wind tunnel experiments were performed with a 23 cm chord, two dimensional NACA 0012 airfoil over a free stream Mach number range of 0.1 to 0.5. Far-field noise spectra and directivity were measured in an anechoic chamber that surrounded the tunnel open jet test section. Spanwise and chordwise distribution of unsteady airfoil surface pressure spectra and surface pressure cross-spectra were obtained. Incident turbulence intensities, length scales, spectra, and spanwise cross-spectra, required in the calculation of far-field noise and surface pressure characteristics were also measured.

  7. Far-Field Acoustic Power Level and Performance Analyses of F31/A31 Open Rotor Model at Simulated Scaled Takeoff, Nominal Takeoff, and Approach Conditions: Technical Report I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Far-field acoustic power level and performance analyses of open rotor model F31/A31 have been performed to determine its noise characteristics at simulated scaled takeoff, nominal takeoff, and approach flight conditions. The nonproprietary parts of the data obtained from experiments in 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (9?15 LSWT) tests were provided by NASA Glenn Research Center to perform the analyses. The tone and broadband noise components have been separated from raw test data by using a new data analysis tool. Results in terms of sound pressure levels, acoustic power levels, and their variations with rotor speed, angle of attack, thrust, and input shaft power have been presented and discussed. The effect of an upstream pylon on the noise levels of the model has been addressed. Empirical equations relating model's acoustic power level, thrust, and input shaft power have been developed. The far-field acoustic efficiency of the model is also determined for various simulated flight conditions. It is intended that the results presented in this work will serve as a database for comparison and improvement of other open rotor blade designs and also for validating open rotor noise prediction codes.

  8. Empirical estimation of peak pressure level from sound exposure level. Part II: Offshore impact pile driving noise.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Tristan; Galindo-Romero, Marta; Gavrilov, Alexander N; von Estorff, Otto

    2015-09-01

    Numerical models of underwater sound propagation predict the energy of impulsive signals and its decay with range with a better accuracy than the peak pressure. A semi-empirical formula is suggested to predict the peak pressure of man-made impulsive signals based on numerical predictions of their energy. The approach discussed by Galindo-Romero, Lippert, and Gavrilov [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 138, in press (2015)] for airgun signals is modified to predict the peak pressure from offshore pile driving, which accounts for impact and pile parameters. It is shown that using the modified empirical formula provides more accurate predictions of the peak pressure than direct numerical simulations of the signal waveform. PMID:26428828

  9. Acoustic interactions between inversion symmetric and asymmetric two-level systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churkin, A.; Barash, D.; Schechter, M.

    2014-08-01

    Amorphous solids, as well as many disordered lattices, display remarkable universality in their low temperature acoustic properties. This universality is attributed to the attenuation of phonons by tunneling two-level systems (TLSs), facilitated by the interaction of the TLSs with the phonon field. TLS-phonon interaction also mediates effective TLS-TLS interactions, which dictates the existence of a glassy phase and its low energy properties. Here we consider KBr:CN, the archetypal disordered lattice showing universality. We calculate numerically, using conjugate gradients method, the effective TLS-TLS interactions for inversion symmetric (CN flips) and asymmetric (CN rotations) TLSs, in the absence and presence of disorder, in two and three dimensions. The observed dependence of the magnitude and spatial power law of the interaction on TLS symmetry, and its change with disorder, characterizes TLS-TLS interactions in disordered lattices in both extreme and moderate dilutions. Our results are in good agreement with the two-TLS model, recently introduced to explain long-standing questions regarding the quantitative universality of phonon attenuation and the energy scale of ≈1-3 K below which universality is observed.

  10. Acoustics Research of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Ximing; Houston, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces high acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are used in the prediction of the internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components. Present liftoff vehicle acoustic environment prediction methods utilize stationary data from previously conducted hold-down tests to generate 1/3 octave band Sound Pressure Level (SPL) spectra. In an effort to update the accuracy and quality of liftoff acoustic loading predictions, non-stationary flight data from the Ares I-X were processed in PC-Signal in two flight phases: simulated hold-down and liftoff. In conjunction, the Prediction of Acoustic Vehicle Environments (PAVE) program was developed in MATLAB to allow for efficient predictions of sound pressure levels (SPLs) as a function of station number along the vehicle using semi-empirical methods. This consisted of generating the Dimensionless Spectrum Function (DSF) and Dimensionless Source Location (DSL) curves from the Ares I-X flight data. These are then used in the MATLAB program to generate the 1/3 octave band SPL spectra. Concluding results show major differences in SPLs between the hold-down test data and the processed Ares I-X flight data making the Ares I-X flight data more practical for future vehicle acoustic environment predictions.

  11. Method specificity of non-invasive blood pressure measurement: oscillometry and finger pulse pressure vs acoustic methods.

    PubMed

    De Mey, C; Schroeter, V; Butzer, R; Roll, S; Belz, G G

    1995-10-01

    1. The agreement of blood pressure measurements by stethoscope auscultation (SBPa, DBPa-IV and DBPa-V), oscillometry (Dinamap; SBPo, and DBPo) and digital photoplethysmography (Finapres; SBPf, and DBPf) with the graphical analysis of the analogue microphone signals of vascular wall motion sound (SBPg and DBPg) was evaluated in eight healthy subjects in the presence of responses to the intravenous infusion of 1 microgram min-1 isoprenaline. 2. In general, there was good agreement between the SBP/DBP-measurements based on auscultatory Korotkoff-I- and IV-criteria and the reference method; the average method difference in estimating the isoprenaline responses for SBPa-SBPg was: -1.1, 95% CI: -5.4 to 3.1 mm Hg with a within-subject between-method repeatability coefficient (REP) of 11.6 mm Hg and for DBPa-IV-DBPg: 3.5, 95% CI: -0.5 to 6.5 mm Hg, REP: 11.5 mm Hg. The ausculatation of Korotkoff-V substantially overestimated the isoprenaline induced reduction of DBP: method difference DBPa-V-DBPg: -11.3, 95% CI: -17.8 to -4.7 mm Hg, REP: 31.8 mm Hg. 3. Oscillometry yielded good approximations for the SBP response to isoprenaline (average method difference SBPo-SBPg: -2.9, 95% CI: -9.0 to 3.3 mm Hg, REP: 17.6 mm Hg) but was poorly sensitive with regard to the DBP responses: method difference DBPo-DBPg: 6.5, 95% CI: -1.3 to 14.3 mm Hg, REP: 25.7 mm Hg. 4. Whilst the finger pulse pressure agreed well with regard to DBP (method difference for the DBP responses to isoprenaline: DBPf-DBPg: 1.8, 95% CI: -5.1 to 8.6 mm Hg, REP: 18.5 mm Hg) it was rather unsatisfactory with regard to SBP (method difference SBPf-SBPg: -14.1, 95% CI: -28.2 to -0.1 mm Hg, REP: 49.9 mm Hg).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8554929

  12. Estimating Discharge using Multi-level Velocity Data from Acoustic Doppler Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang Poulsen, J.; Rømer Rasmussen, K.; Bering Ovesen, N.

    2010-12-01

    been recorded at two depths since the water table drops below the uppermost sensor. A pressure transducer is also placed at the pole where it records the stage. The monthly control measurements made by the water authority office are made with an ADCP-instrument (Streampro, acoustic Doppler current profiler) which is pulled across the stream next to the in situ Doppler instruments. As part of the present project supplementary ADCP-data have been collected for different stage-values. For each stage many pull traverses (>20) have been combined in order to produce reliable high-density stream velocity profiles across the stream. Currently, the different sets of velocity data are being analyzed in order to investigate how well the discharge may be predicted from the in situ Dopplers. The poster will present the field-set up and the results of the data analysis.

  13. Acoustical modal analysis of the pressure field in the tailpipe of a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, E. A.; Karchmer, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a modal analysis of the pressure field in the tailpipe of a turbofan engine are presented. Modal amplitudes, at the tailpipe inlet and exit, are presented, as a function of frequency, for several operating conditions. The modal amplitudes were obtained using an optimization routine to obtain a best fit between measured cross spectra and an analytical expression for the cross spectra between pressures at circumferentially spaced locations. The measured pressure field was decomposed into a set of five modal amplitudes corresponding to the (0,0), (1,0), (2,0), (3,0), and (4,0) modes. The analysis was limited to frequencies below 1500 Hz where higher order modes are cutoff. The results of the analysis showed that at low frequencies, up to the cuton frequency of the (1,0) mode, the (0,0) mode (plane wave) dominated the pressure field. The frequency range from the cuton of the (1,0) mode to the cuton of the (2,0) mode was dominated by the (1,0) mode. The (2,0) mode dominated from its cuton frequency to the upper limit of the analysis, i.e., 1500 Hz. The contribution of modes other than the dominant mode was usually small.

  14. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  15. Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks: How Do Acoustic Propagation Models Impact the Performance of Higher-Level Protocols?

    PubMed Central

    Llor, Jesús; Malumbres, Manuel P.

    2012-01-01

    Several Medium Access Control (MAC) and routing protocols have been developed in the last years for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs). One of the main difficulties to compare and validate the performance of different proposals is the lack of a common standard to model the acoustic propagation in the underwater environment. In this paper we analyze the evolution of underwater acoustic prediction models from a simple approach to more detailed and accurate models. Then, different high layer network protocols are tested with different acoustic propagation models in order to determine the influence of environmental parameters on the obtained results. After several experiments, we can conclude that higher-level protocols are sensitive to both: (a) physical layer parameters related to the network scenario and (b) the acoustic propagation model. Conditions like ocean surface activity, scenario location, bathymetry or floor sediment composition, may change the signal propagation behavior. So, when designing network architectures for UWSNs, the role of the physical layer should be seriously taken into account in order to assert that the obtained simulation results will be close to the ones obtained in real network scenarios. PMID:22438712

  16. Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks: how do acoustic propagation models impact the performance of higher-level protocols?

    PubMed

    Llor, Jesús; Malumbres, Manuel P

    2012-01-01

    Several Medium Access Control (MAC) and routing protocols have been developed in the last years for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs). One of the main difficulties to compare and validate the performance of different proposals is the lack of a common standard to model the acoustic propagation in the underwater environment. In this paper we analyze the evolution of underwater acoustic prediction models from a simple approach to more detailed and accurate models. Then, different high layer network protocols are tested with different acoustic propagation models in order to determine the influence of environmental parameters on the obtained results. After several experiments, we can conclude that higher-level protocols are sensitive to both: (a) physical layer parameters related to the network scenario and (b) the acoustic propagation model. Conditions like ocean surface activity, scenario location, bathymetry or floor sediment composition, may change the signal propagation behavior. So, when designing network architectures for UWSNs, the role of the physical layer should be seriously taken into account in order to assert that the obtained simulation results will be close to the ones obtained in real network scenarios. PMID:22438712

  17. Assessing Acoustic Sound Levels Associated with Active Source Seismic Surveys in Shallow Marine Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Tolstoy, M.; Thode, A.; Diebold, J. B.; Webb, S. C.

    2004-12-01

    . At various times or positions along the ship's track, the predicted mean and maximum sound level in the water column are contoured. By reconstructing the possible positions of the whales during the survey, based on the time of their stranding and reasonable swim velocities, we constrain the sound levels that they may have been subjected to for a series of scenarios. It is hoped that this work will facilitate a better understanding of acoustic propagation during future airgun experiments in similar environments.

  18. Sound power and pressure level measurements in the inlet and outlet of an HRSG duct

    SciTech Connect

    Jungbauer, D.E.; Unruh, J.F.; Pantermuehl, P.J.; Rose, S.

    1995-04-01

    The ever-increasing size of cogeneration facilities has mandated the need for noise abatement in the design stage. Many noise projection models are available to the industry for predicting noise levels in an adjacent to new installations. However, the models all require accurate source noise information if valid noise predictions are to be expected. As a consequence of designing one of the world`s largest cogeneration installations involving eight Model W-701 turbine units and their Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSGs), it became apparent that the attention between the exhaust of the Generators (HRSGs), it became apparent that the attention between the exhaust of the turbine and the outlet of the HRSGs was not well known. Not having this information posed potentially expensive noise abatement modifications during the design and construction phases. In order to verify the adequacy of scaling studies from a W-501 turbine and HRSG to the W-701 system, a comprehensive field test of an existing W-501 installation was conducted. This paper describes the design of an acoustic intensity and sound pressure probe to operate inside the high-temperature ductwork, the access engineering required, data acquisition, and final results concerning noise attenuation across the HRSG.

  19. Design, fabrication, and optimization of photo acoustic gas sensor for the trace level detection of NO2 in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Gondal, Mohammed A; Dastageer, Mohamed A

    2010-09-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) gas sensor for the detection of hazardous NO(2) with detection limit as low as few part per billion by volume (ppbV) has been designed and tested with pulsed UV laser. Some design optimization factors such as the optimum cell geometry, buffer gas etc has been proposed. It was found that a cylindrical cell with many acoustic filters considerably dampens the noise level and also argon as a buffer gas improves the photoacoustic signal level and this combination substantially improved the signal to noise ratio and the limit of detection. Ambiguous decline of photo acoustic signal at higher NO(2) concentration due to the adsorption of NO(2) on the walls of the photoacoustic cells and the dependence of this effect on the buffer gases are also discussed. The PA signal dependence on incident laser energy for three cells was also investigated. PMID:20665325

  20. Comparison of measured and calculated sound pressure levels around a large horizontal axis wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Willshire, William L., Jr.; Hubbard, Harvey H.

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from a large number of simultaneous acoustic measurements around a large horizontal axis downwind configuration wind turbine generator. In addition, comparisons are made between measurements and calculations of both the discrete frequency rotational harmonics and the broad band noise components. Sound pressure time histories and noise radiation patterns as well as narrow band and broadband noise spectra are presented for a range of operating conditions. The data are useful for purposes of environmental impact assessment.

  1. A dynamic pressure view cell for acoustic stimulation of fluids—Micro-bubble generation and fluid movement in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Robert A.; Shaw, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The development and baseline operation of an acoustic view cell for observing fluids, and fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces in porous media over the frequency range of 10-5000 Hz is described. This range includes the industrially relevant frequency range 500-5000 Hz that is not covered by existing devices. Pressure waveforms of arbitrary shape are generated in a 17.46 mm ID by 200 mm and 690.5 mm long glass tubes at flow rates up to 200 ml/min using a syringe pump. Peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 80 kPa are readily realized at frequencies from 10 to 5000 Hz in bubble free fluids when actuated with 20 Vpp as exemplified using castor oil. At resonant frequencies, peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes exceeding 500 kPa were obtained (castor oil at 2100 Hz when actuated with 20 Vpp). Impacts of vibration on macroscopic liquid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces and interface movement are illustrated. Pressure wave transmission and attenuation in a fluid saturated porous medium, randomly packed 250-330 μm spherical silica beads, is also demonstrated. Attenuation differences and frequency shifts in resonant peaks are used to detect the presence and generation of dispersed micro-bubbles (<180 μm diameter), and bubbles within porous media that are not readily visualized. Envisioned applications include assessment of the impacts of vibration on reaction, mass transfer, and flow/flow pattern outcomes. This knowledge will inform laboratory and pilot scale process studies, where nuisance vibrations may affect the interpretation of process outcomes, and large scale or in situ processes in aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs where imposed vibration may be deployed to improve aspects of process performance. Future work will include miscible interface observation and quantitative measurements in the bulk and in porous media where the roles of micro-bubbles comprise subjects of special interest.

  2. A dynamic pressure view cell for acoustic stimulation of fluids--Micro-bubble generation and fluid movement in porous media.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Robert A; Shaw, J M

    2015-09-01

    The development and baseline operation of an acoustic view cell for observing fluids, and fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces in porous media over the frequency range of 10-5000 Hz is described. This range includes the industrially relevant frequency range 500-5000 Hz that is not covered by existing devices. Pressure waveforms of arbitrary shape are generated in a 17.46 mm ID by 200 mm and 690.5 mm long glass tubes at flow rates up to 200 ml/min using a syringe pump. Peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 80 kPa are readily realized at frequencies from 10 to 5000 Hz in bubble free fluids when actuated with 20 Vpp as exemplified using castor oil. At resonant frequencies, peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes exceeding 500 kPa were obtained (castor oil at 2100 Hz when actuated with 20 Vpp). Impacts of vibration on macroscopic liquid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces and interface movement are illustrated. Pressure wave transmission and attenuation in a fluid saturated porous medium, randomly packed 250-330 μm spherical silica beads, is also demonstrated. Attenuation differences and frequency shifts in resonant peaks are used to detect the presence and generation of dispersed micro-bubbles (<180 μm diameter), and bubbles within porous media that are not readily visualized. Envisioned applications include assessment of the impacts of vibration on reaction, mass transfer, and flow/flow pattern outcomes. This knowledge will inform laboratory and pilot scale process studies, where nuisance vibrations may affect the interpretation of process outcomes, and large scale or in situ processes in aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs where imposed vibration may be deployed to improve aspects of process performance. Future work will include miscible interface observation and quantitative measurements in the bulk and in porous media where the roles of micro-bubbles comprise subjects of special interest. PMID:26429474

  3. Acoustics Research of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Ximing; Houston, Janice D.

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces some of the highest acoustic loading over a broad frequency for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are used in the prediction of the internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle but there are challenges. Present liftoff vehicle acoustic environment prediction methods utilize stationary data from previously conducted hold-down tests; i.e. static firings conducted in the 1960's, to generate 1/3 octave band Sound Pressure Level (SPL) spectra. These data sets are used to predict the liftoff acoustic environments for launch vehicles. To facilitate the accuracy and quality of acoustic loading, predictions at liftoff for future launch vehicles such as the Space Launch System (SLS), non-stationary flight data from the Ares I-X were processed in PC-Signal in two forms which included a simulated hold-down phase and the entire launch phase. In conjunction, the Prediction of Acoustic Vehicle Environments (PAVE) program was developed in MATLAB to allow for efficient predictions of sound pressure levels (SPLs) as a function of station number along the vehicle using semiempirical methods. This consisted, initially, of generating the Dimensionless Spectrum Function (DSF) and Dimensionless Source Location (DSL) curves from the Ares I-X flight data. These are then used in the MATLAB program to generate the 1/3 octave band SPL spectra. Concluding results show major differences in SPLs between the hold-down test data and the processed Ares IX flight data making the Ares I-X flight data more practical for future vehicle acoustic environment predictions.

  4. General circulation model simulations of winter and summer sea-level pressures over North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J., Jr.; Legates, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, observed sea-level pressures were used to evaluate winter and summer sea-level pressures over North America simulated by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) general circulation models. The objective of the study is to determine how similar the spatial and temporal distributions of GCM-simulated daily sea-level pressures over North America are to observed distributions. Overall, both models are better at reproducing observed within-season variance of winter and summer sea-level pressures than they are at simulating the magnitude of mean winter and summer sea-level pressures. -from Authors

  5. The effects of pressure sensor acoustics on airdata derived from a High-angle-of-attack Flush Airdata Sensing (HI-FADS) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of a nonintrusive high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system was verified for quasi-steady flight conditions up to 55 deg angle of attack during the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) Program. The system is a matrix of nine pressure ports arranged in annular rings on the aircraft nose. The complete airdata set is estimated using nonlinear regression. Satisfactory frequency response was verified to the system Nyquist frequency (12.5 Hz). The effects of acoustical distortions within the individual pressure sensors of the nonintrusive pressure matrix on overall system performance are addressed. To quantify these effects, a frequency-response model describing the dynamics of acoustical distortion is developed and simple design criteria are derived. The model adjusts measured HI-FADS pressure data for the acoustical distortion and quantifies the effects of internal sensor geometries on system performance. Analysis results indicate that sensor frequency response characteristics very greatly with altitude, thus it is difficult to select satisfactory sensor geometry for all altitudes. The solution used presample filtering to eliminate resonance effects, and short pneumatic tubing sections to reduce lag effects. Without presample signal conditioning the system designer must use the pneumatic transmission line to attenuate the resonances and accept the resulting altitude variability.

  6. Aeroelastic-Acoustics Simulation of Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, kajal K.; Choi, S.; Ibrahim, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the details of a numerical finite element (FE) based analysis procedure and a resulting code for the simulation of the acoustics phenomenon arising from aeroelastic interactions. Both CFD and structural simulations are based on FE discretization employing unstructured grids. The sound pressure level (SPL) on structural surfaces is calculated from the root mean square (RMS) of the unsteady pressure and the acoustic wave frequencies are computed from a fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the unsteady pressure distribution as a function of time. The resulting tool proves to be unique as it is designed to analyze complex practical problems, involving large scale computations, in a routine fashion.

  7. Directional acoustic measurements by laser Doppler velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Overbey, R. L.; Testerman, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimeters (LDVs) are used as velocity microphones to measure sound pressure level in the range from 90 to 130 dB, spectral components, and two-point correlation functions for acoustic-noise source identification. Close agreement between LDV and microphone data is observed. Directional sensitivity and the ability to measure remotely make LDVs useful tools for acoustic measurement where placement of any physical probe is difficult or undesirable, as in the diagnosis of jet noise.

  8. 16 CFR 1500.47 - Method for determining the sound pressure level produced by toy caps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Method for determining the sound pressure... ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.47 Method for determining the sound pressure level produced by toy caps. (a... of the explosive. Measure the peak sound pressure level at each of the six designated orientations...

  9. Contact Pressure Level Indication Using Stepped Output Tactile Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eunsuk; Sul, Onejae; Kim, Juyoung; Kim, Kyumin; Kim, Jong-Seok; Kwon, Dae-Yong; Choi, Byong-Deok; Lee, Seung-Beck

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we report on a novel diaphragm-type tactile pressure sensor that produces stepwise output currents depending on varying low contact pressures. When contact pressures are applied to the stepped output tactile sensor (SOTS), the sensor’s suspended diaphragm makes contact with the substrate, which completes a circuit by connecting resistive current paths. Then the contact area, and therefore the number of current paths, would determine the stepped output current produced. This mechanism allows SOTS to have high signal-to-noise ratio (>20 dB) in the 3–500 Hz frequency range at contact pressures below 15 kPa. Moreover, since the sensor’s operation does not depend on a material’s pressure-dependent electrical properties, the SOTS is able to demonstrate high reproducibility and reliability. By forming a 4 × 4 array of SOTS with a surface bump structure, we demonstrated shear sensing as well as surface (1 × 1 cm2) pressure mapping capabilities. PMID:27070626

  10. Contact Pressure Level Indication Using Stepped Output Tactile Sensors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunsuk; Sul, Onejae; Kim, Juyoung; Kim, Kyumin; Kim, Jong-Seok; Kwon, Dae-Yong; Choi, Byong-Deok; Lee, Seung-Beck

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we report on a novel diaphragm-type tactile pressure sensor that produces stepwise output currents depending on varying low contact pressures. When contact pressures are applied to the stepped output tactile sensor (SOTS), the sensor's suspended diaphragm makes contact with the substrate, which completes a circuit by connecting resistive current paths. Then the contact area, and therefore the number of current paths, would determine the stepped output current produced. This mechanism allows SOTS to have high signal-to-noise ratio (>20 dB) in the 3-500 Hz frequency range at contact pressures below 15 kPa. Moreover, since the sensor's operation does not depend on a material's pressure-dependent electrical properties, the SOTS is able to demonstrate high reproducibility and reliability. By forming a 4 × 4 array of SOTS with a surface bump structure, we demonstrated shear sensing as well as surface (1 × 1 cm²) pressure mapping capabilities. PMID:27070626

  11. Acoustically detectable cellular-level lung injury induced by fluid mechanical stresses in microfluidic airway systems.

    PubMed

    Huh, Dongeun; Fujioka, Hideki; Tung, Yi-Chung; Futai, Nobuyuki; Paine, Robert; Grotberg, James B; Takayama, Shuichi

    2007-11-27

    We describe a microfabricated airway system integrated with computerized air-liquid two-phase microfluidics that enables on-chip engineering of human airway epithelia and precise reproduction of physiologic or pathologic liquid plug flows found in the respiratory system. Using this device, we demonstrate cellular-level lung injury under flow conditions that cause symptoms characteristic of a wide range of pulmonary diseases. Specifically, propagation and rupture of liquid plugs that simulate surfactant-deficient reopening of closed airways lead to significant injury of small airway epithelial cells by generating deleterious fluid mechanical stresses. We also show that the explosive pressure waves produced by plug rupture enable detection of the mechanical cellular injury as crackling sounds. PMID:18006663

  12. Inconsistencies in sea level pressure trends between different atmospheric products. Impact on sea level trend estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomis, D.; Jordà, G.

    2012-04-01

    Long term climate datasets are of great importance to understand the processes behind climate variability, to evaluate the performance of climate models and to identify signals of climate change. Among the different atmospheric variables, sea level pressure (SLP) is the basic dynamical variable and is the most widely analyzed quantity. From the ocean perspective, SLP is of crucial importance for a dynamical interpretation of sea level records. In order to isolate the contribution to sea level variability of circulation and heat and freshwater contents, a common practice is to remove the sea level fluctuations induced by SLP. At seasonal and longer time scales, sea level is expected to react as an inverted barometer (IB) to changes in SLP. Therefore, provided that accuracy of available SLP data is high enough, the atmospheric contribution to sea level variability can be isolated and removed from sea level records. This is routinely done for tide gauge records, altimetry or sea level reconstructions. Different atmospheric gridded products spanning the last decades are nowadays available. On the one hand, there are historical SLP datasets where observations from land stations and ocean observations have been interpolated into a regular grid. On the other hand, there are reanalyses where an atmospheric model is run assimilating the historical data. Both kind of products have been extensively used in recent years either directly (i.e. to analyse the SLP evolution) or indirectly (i.e. through the removal of IB effect on sea level records). However, it is well known that the quality of those products may not be homogeneous on time. In this contribution, we compare long term SLP trends from different atmospheric products (reanalysis and gridded historical datasets), and evaluate the uncertainties introduced by them in the sea level trend estimations. The results show that discrepancies between datasets can induce an uncertainty up to 0.5 mm/yr for the period 1958-2001 on

  13. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio low tip speed fan with casing tip bleed (QEP Fan B scale model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Minzner, W. R.; Paas, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    A scale model of the bypass flow region of a 1.5 pressure ratio, single stage, low tip speed fan was tested with a rotor tip casing bleed slot to determine its effects on noise generation. The bleed slot was located 1/2 inch (1.3 cm) upstream of the rotor leading edge and was configured to be a continuous opening around the circumference. The bleed manifold system was operated over a range of bleed rates corresponding to as much as 6% of the fan flow at approach thrust and 4.25% of the fan flow at takeoff thrust. Acoustic results indicate that a bleed rate of 4% of the fan flow reduces the fan maximum approach 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline PNL 0.5 PNdB and the corresponding takeoff thrust noise 1.1 PNdB below the level with zero bleed. However, comparison of the standard casing (no bleed slot) and the slotted bleed casing with zero bleed shows that the bleed slot itself caused a noise increase.

  14. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance of a variable-pitch 1.83-meter-(6-ft) diameter 1.20-pressure-ratio fan stage (QF-9)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, F. W.; Woodward, R. P.; Lucas, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Far field noise data and related aerodynamic performance are presented for a variable pitch fan stage having characteristics suitable for low noise, STOL engine application. However, no acoustic suppression material was used in the flow passages. The fan was externally driven by an electric motor. Tests were made at several forward thrust rotor blade pitch angles and one for reverse thrust. Fan speed was varied from 60 to 120 percent of takeoff (design) speed, and exhaust nozzles having areas 92 to 105 percent of design were tested. The fan noise level was at a minimum at the design rotor blade pitch angles of 64 deg for takeoff thrust and at 57 deg for approach (50 percent takeoff thrust). Perceived noise along a 152.4-m sideline reached 100.1 PNdb for the takeoff (design) configuration for a stage pressure ratio of 1.17 and thrust of 57,600 N. For reverse thrust the PNL values were 4 to 5 PNdb above the takeoff values at comparable fan speeds.

  15. Acoustic and Doppler radar detection of buried land mines using high-pressure water jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denier, Robert; Herrick, Thomas J.; Mitchell, O. Robert; Summers, David A.; Saylor, Daniel R.

    1999-08-01

    The goal of the waterjet-based mine location and identification project is to find a way to use waterjets to locate and differentiate buried objects. When a buried object is struck with a high-pressure waterjets, the impact will cause characteristic vibrations in the object depending on the object's shape and composition. These vibrations will be transferred to the ground and then to the water stream that is hitting the object. Some of these vibrations will also be transferred to the air via the narrow channel the waterjet cuts in the ground. Currently the ground vibrations are detected with Doppler radar and video camera sensing, while the air vibrations are detected with a directional microphone. Data is collected via a Labview based data acquisition system. This data is then manipulated in Labview to produce the associated power spectrums. These power spectra are fed through various signal processing and recognition routines to determine the probability of there being an object present under the current test location and what that object is likely to be. Our current test area consists of a large X-Y positioning system placed over approximately a five-foot circular test area. The positioning system moves both the waterjet and the sensor package to the test location specified by the Labview control software. Currently we are able to locate buried land mine models at a distance of approximately three inches with a high degree of accuracy.

  16. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos; Piper, Ben

    2015-04-01

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  17. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos Piper, Ben

    2015-04-20

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  18. Laboratory evaluation of the pressure water level data logger manufactured by Infinities USA, Inc.: results of pressure and temperature tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carnley, Mark V.

    2015-01-01

    The Pressure Water Level Data Logger manufactured by Infinities USA, Inc., was evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility for conformance with the manufacturer’s stated accuracy specifications for measuring pressure throughout the device’s operating temperature range and with the USGS accuracy requirements for water-level measurements. The Pressure Water Level Data Logger (Infinities Logger) is a submersible, sealed, water-level sensing device with an operating pressure range of 0 to 11.5 feet of water over a temperature range of −18 to 49 degrees Celsius. For the pressure range tested, the manufacturer’s accuracy specification of 0.1 percent of full scale pressure equals an accuracy of ±0.138 inch of water. Three Infinities Loggers were evaluated, and the testing procedures followed and results obtained are described in this report. On the basis of the test results, the device is poorly compensated for temperature. For the three Infinities Loggers, the mean pressure differences varied from –4.04 to 5.32 inches of water and were not within the manufacturer’s accuracy specification for pressure measurements made within the temperature-compensated range. The device did not meet the manufacturer’s stated accuracy specifications for pressure within its temperature-compensated operating range of –18 to 49 degrees Celsius or the USGS accuracy requirements of no more than 0.12 inch of water (0.01 foot of water) or 0.10 percent of reading, whichever is larger. The USGS accuracy requirements are routinely examined and reported when instruments are evaluated at the Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility. The estimated combined measurement uncertainty for the pressure cycling test was ±0.139 inch of water, and for temperature, the cycling test was ±0.127 inch of water for the three Infinities Loggers.

  19. Acoustic Test Results of Melamine Foam with Application to Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    A spacecraft at launch is subjected to a harsh acoustic and vibration environment resulting from the passage of acoustic energy, created during the liftoff of a launch vehicle, through the vehicle's payload fairing. In order to ensure the mission success of the spacecraft it is often necessary to reduce the resulting internal acoustic sound pressure levels through the usage of acoustic attenuation systems. Melamine foam, lining the interior walls of the payload fairing, is often utilized as the main component of such a system. In order to better understand the acoustic properties of melamine foam, with the goal of developing improved acoustic attenuation systems, NASA has recently performed panel level testing on numerous configurations of melamine foam acoustic treatments at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory. Parameters assessed included the foam's thickness and density, as well as the effects of a top outer cover sheet material and mass barriers embedded within the foam. This testing followed the ASTM C423 standard for absorption and the ASTM E90 standard for transmission loss. The acoustic test data obtained and subsequent conclusions are the subjects of this paper.

  20. Acoustic design of the QCSEE propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, I. J.; Smith, E. B.; Sowers, H. D.

    1976-01-01

    Acoustic design features and techniques employed in the Quiet Clean Short-Haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Program are described. The role of jet/flap noise in selecting the engine fan pressure ratio for powered lift propulsion systems is discussed. The QCSEE acoustic design features include a hybrid inlet (near-sonic throat velocity with acoustic treatment); low fan and core pressure ratios; low fan tip speeds; gear-driven fans; high and low frequency stacked core noise treatment; multiple-thickness treatment; bulk absorber treatment; and treatment on the stator vanes. The QCSEE designs represent and anticipated acoustic technology improvement of 12 to 16 PNdb relative to the noise levels of the low-noise engines used on current wide-body commercial jet transport aircraft.

  1. Effect of low-level laser treatment on cochlea hair-cell recovery after acute acoustic trauma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Chung-Ku; Bahk, Chan Woong; Kim, Se Hyung; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Jung, Jae Yun; Chung, Phil-Sang; Suh, Myung-Whan

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the effect of low-level laser radiation on rescuing hair cells of the cochlea after acute acoustic trauma and hearing loss. Nine rats were exposed to noise. Starting the following day, the left ears (NL ears) of the rats were irradiated at an energy output of 100 to 165 mW/cm2 for 60 min for 12 days in a row. The right ears (N ears) were considered as the control group. Frequency-specific hearing levels were measured before the noise exposure and also after the 1st, 3rd to 5th, 8th to 10th and 12th irradiations. After the 12th treatment, hair cells were observed using a scanning electron microscope. Compared to initial hearing levels at all frequencies, thresholds increased markedly after noise exposure. After the 12th irradiation, hearing threshold was significantly lower for the NL ears compared to the N ears. When observed using an electron microscope, the number of hair cells in the middle turn of the NL ears was significantly larger than that of the N ears. Our findings suggest that low-level laser irradiation promotes recovery of hearing thresholds after acute acoustic trauma.

  2. The clarinet: how blowing pressure, lip force, lip position and reed "hardness" affect pitch, sound level, and spectrum.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Andre; George, David; Smith, John; Wolfe, Joe

    2013-09-01

    Using an automated clarinet playing system, the frequency f, sound level L, and spectral characteristics are measured as functions of blowing pressure P and the force F applied by the mechanical lip at different places on the reed. The playing regime on the (P,F) plane lies below an extinction line F(P) with a negative slope of a few square centimeters and above a pressure threshold with a more negative slope. Lower values of F and P can produce squeaks. Over much of the playing regime, lines of equal frequency have negative slope. This is qualitatively consistent with passive reed behavior: Increasing F or P gradually closes the reed, reducing its equivalent acoustic compliance, which increases the frequency of the peaks of the parallel impedance of bore and reed. High P and low F produce the highest sound levels and stronger higher harmonics. At low P, sound level can be increased at constant frequency by increasing P while simultaneously decreasing F. At high P, where lines of equal f and of equal L are nearly parallel, this compensation is less effective. Applying F further from the mouthpiece tip moves the playing regime to higher F and P, as does a stiffer reed. PMID:23967954

  3. A method for reducing the level of spurious signals in surface acoustic wave filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodii, Iu. N.; Grankin, I. M.; Zapunnyi, A. P.; Kolomeiko, A. V.

    1986-03-01

    A method for reducing spurious signals in surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters is proposed whereby both bulk and reflected wave signals are attenuated by electrodes of special configuration providing synphase addition of the useful signal and nonsynphase addition of spurious signal components. The electrodes of the input and output converters are made with a common focus point and equal angular apertures. The shape of the electrodes of the focusing converters on anisotropic crystal surfaces is determined by the corresponding SAW group velocity curve. An implementation of the method proposed here is examined together with some test results.

  4. The global historical climatology network: Long-term monthly temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure data

    SciTech Connect

    Vose, R.S.; Schmoyer, R.L.; Steurer, P.M.; Peterson, T.C.

    1992-12-31

    This NDP contains monthly temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure data for thousands of meteorological stations worldwide. The database was compiled from pre-existing national, regional, and global collections of data as a part of the Global Historical Climatology Network (CHCN) project. It contains data from roughly 6000 temperature stations, 7500 precipitation stations, 1800 sea level pressure stations, and 1800 station pressure stations. Each station has at least 10 years of data, and about 40% have more than 50 years of data. Spatial coverage is good over most of the globe, particularly for the United States and Europe. Data gaps are evident over the Amazon rainforest, the Sahara desert, Greenland, and Antarctica.

  5. [Corrrelation between blood pressure levels in patients with glaucoma (Literature review)].

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Yu V; Kuroedov, A V; Baranova, N A; Ibragimova, F M

    2016-01-01

    The problem of correlation between blood pressure levels and intraocular pressure is one of the most talked about. Both, Russian and foreign literature, reflects the heterogeneity of views on the impact of blood pressure changes into the level of intraocular. pressure. At the same time it underestimated the role of systemic cardiovascular changes in the deterioration of visual function in case of primary open-angle glaucoma. Numerous data demonstrate the role of additional factors than average blood pressure levels in advance of glaucoma. More and more researchers tend to assess not only intraocular pressure, but also perfusion pressure as a risk predictor of advance of glaucoma. Correlation between blood pressure level and intraocular pressure has a particular relevance due to the significant improvement of the range of cardiovascular drugs that can affect on intraocular pressure indictors. A number of literature data confirm the need to research variations in blood pressure levels during the day and types of therapy that patients receive. PMID:27120953

  6. So Small, So Loud: Extremely High Sound Pressure Level from a Pygmy Aquatic Insect (Corixidae, Micronectinae)

    PubMed Central

    Sueur, Jérôme; Mackie, David; Windmill, James F. C.

    2011-01-01

    To communicate at long range, animals have to produce intense but intelligible signals. This task might be difficult to achieve due to mechanical constraints, in particular relating to body size. Whilst the acoustic behaviour of large marine and terrestrial animals has been thoroughly studied, very little is known about the sound produced by small arthropods living in freshwater habitats. Here we analyse for the first time the calling song produced by the male of a small insect, the water boatman Micronecta scholtzi. The song is made of three distinct parts differing in their temporal and amplitude parameters, but not in their frequency content. Sound is produced at 78.9 (63.6–82.2) SPL rms re 2.10−5 Pa with a peak at 99.2 (85.7–104.6) SPL re 2.10−5 Pa estimated at a distance of one metre. This energy output is significant considering the small size of the insect. When scaled to body length and compared to 227 other acoustic species, the acoustic energy produced by M. scholtzi appears as an extreme value, outperforming marine and terrestrial mammal vocalisations. Such an extreme display may be interpreted as an exaggerated secondary sexual trait resulting from a runaway sexual selection without predation pressure. PMID:21698252

  7. Development of acoustically lined ejector technology for multitube jet noise suppressor nozzles by model and engine tests over a wide range of jet pressure ratios and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atvars, J.; Paynter, G. C.; Walker, D. Q.; Wintermeyer, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental program comprising model nozzle and full-scale engine tests was undertaken to acquire parametric data for acoustically lined ejectors applied to primary jet noise suppression. Ejector lining design technology and acoustical scaling of lined ejector configurations were the major objectives. Ground static tests were run with a J-75 turbojet engine fitted with a 37-tube, area ratio 3.3 suppressor nozzle and two lengths of ejector shroud (L/D = 1 and 2). Seven ejector lining configurations were tested over the engine pressure ratio range of 1.40 to 2.40 with corresponding jet velocities between 305 and 610 M/sec. One-fourth scale model nozzles were tested over a pressure ratio range of 1.40 to 4.0 with jet total temperatures between ambient and 1088 K. Scaling of multielement nozzle ejector configurations was also studied using a single element of the nozzle array with identical ejector lengths and lining materials. Acoustic far field and near field data together with nozzle thrust performance and jet aerodynamic flow profiles are presented.

  8. Dynamic response of a transducer mounted at one end of an acoustical cavity which is subjected to a specified pressure at the open end of the cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetti, G.A.; Benson, J.Z.

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop a mathematical model for a pressure transducer mounted in a fluid filled cavity (a system) and examine the pressure ``measurement`` error of the cavity and transducer by computing the dynamic response (output pressure) of the system to a specified pressure time history (input pressure). The ``measurement`` error is determined by comparing the calculated output pressure to the specified input pressure. The dynamic response of a transducer mounted at one end of a one-dimensional acoustical cavity is determined. The cavity is filled with a compressible isentropic fluid, and the fluid at the open end of the cavity (i.e., the boundary at x = 0) is subjected to a specified uniform axial input pressure. At the other end of the cavity the transducer is represented as a mass, spring, and damper system. Consequently, the boundary condition at x = {ell} is also time dependent. The general solution to the boundary value problem, as well as the steady state solution for periodic excitation, is obtained by integrating a coupled set of ordinary differential equations.

  9. Acoustic Noise Levels of Dental Equipments and Its Association with Fear and Annoyance Levels among Patients Attending Different Dental Clinic Setups in Jaipur, India

    PubMed Central

    Ganta, Shravani; Nagaraj, Anup; Pareek, Sonia; Atri, Mansi; Singh, Kushpal; Sidiq, Mohsin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Noise is a source of pervasive occupational hazard for practicing dentists and the patients. The sources of dental sounds by various dental equipments can pose as a potential hazard to hearing system and add to the annoyance levels of the patients. The aim of the study was to analyze the noise levels from various equipments and evaluate the effect of acoustic noise stimulus on dental fear and annoyance levels among patients attending different dental clinic setups in Jaipur, India. Methodology: The sampling frame comprised of 180 patients, which included 90 patients attending 10 different private clinics and 90 patients attending a Dental College in Jaipur. The levels of Acoustic Noise Stimulus originating from different equipments were determined using a precision sound level meter/decibulometer. Dental fear among patients was measured using Dental Fear Scale (DFS). Results: Statistical analysis was performed using chi square test and unpaired t-test. The mean background noise levels were found to be maximum in the pre-clinical setup/ laboratory areas (69.23+2.20). Females and the patients attending dental college setup encountered more fear on seeing the drill as compared to the patients attending private clinics (p<0.001). Conclusion: The sources of dental sounds can pose as a potential hazard to hearing system. It was analyzed that the environment in the clinics can directly have an effect on the fear and annoyance levels of patients. Hence it is necessary control the noise from various dental equipments to reduce the fear of patients from visiting a dental clinic. PMID:24959512

  10. Understanding the relation between wind- and pressure-driven sea level variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponte, Rui M.

    1994-01-01

    Sea surface adjustment to combined wind and pressure forcing is examined using numerical solutions to the shallow water equations. The experiments use coastal geometry and bottom topography representative of the North Atlantic and are forced by realistic barometric pressure and wind stress fields. The repsonse to pressure is essentially static or close to the inverted barometer solution at periods longer than a few days and dominates the sea level variability, with wind-driven sea level signals being relatively small. With regard to the dynamic signals, wind-driven fluctuations dominate at long periods, as expected from quasi-geostrophic theory. Pressure becomes more important than wind stress as a source of dynamic signals only at periods shorter than approximately three days. Wind- and pressure-driven sea level fluctuations are anticorrelated over most regions. Hence, regressions of sea level on barometric pressure yield coefficients generally smaller than expected for the inverted barometer response known to be the case in the model. In the regions of significant wind-pressure correlation effects, to infer the correct pressure reponse using statistical methods, input fields must include winds as well as pressure. Because of the nonlocal character of the wind response, multivariate statistical models with local wind driving as input are not very successful. Inclusion of nonlocal wind variability over extensive regions is necessary to extract the correct pressure response. Implications of these results to the interpretation of sea level observations are discussed.

  11. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  12. Reduction of peak acoustic pressure and shaping of heated region by use of multifoci sonications in MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound mediated mild hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, Ari; Tillander, Matti; Yarmolenko, Pavel S.; Wood, Bradford J.; Dreher, Matthew R.; Köhler, Max O.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Ablative hyperthermia (>55 °C) has been used as a definitive treatment for accessible solid tumors not amenable to surgery, whereas mild hyperthermia (40–45 °C) has been shown effective as an adjuvant for both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. An optimal mild hyperthermia treatment is spatially accurate, with precise and homogeneous heating limited to the target region while also limiting the likelihood of unwanted thermal or mechanical bioeffects (tissue damage, vascular shutoff). Magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) can noninvasively heat solid tumors under image-guidance. In a mild hyperthermia setting, a sonication approach utilizing multiple concurrent foci may provide the benefit of reducing acoustic pressure in the focal region (leading to reduced or no mechanical effects), while providing better control over the heating. The objective of this study was to design, implement, and characterize a multifoci sonication approach in combination with a mild hyperthermia heating algorithm, and compare it to the more conventional method of electronically sweeping a single focus. Methods: Simulations (acoustic and thermal) and measurements (acoustic, with needle hydrophone) were performed. In addition, heating performance of multifoci and single focus sonications was compared using a clinical MR-HIFU platform in a phantom (target = 4–16 mm), in normal rabbit thigh muscle (target = 8 mm), and in a Vx2 tumor (target = 8 mm). A binary control algorithm was used for real-time mild hyperthermia feedback control (target range = 40.5–41 °C). Data were analyzed for peak acoustic pressure and intensity, heating energy efficiency, temperature accuracy (mean), homogeneity of heating (standard deviation [SD], T10 and T90), diameter and length of the heated region, and thermal dose (CEM43). Results: Compared to the single focus approach, multifoci sonications showed significantly lower (67% reduction) peak acoustic

  13. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  14. Multiple target tracking and classification improvement using data fusion at node level using acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damarla, T. R.; Whipps, Gene

    2005-05-01

    Target tracking and classification using passive acoustic signals is difficult at best as the signals are contaminated by wind noise, multi-path effects, road conditions, and are generally not deterministic. In addition, microphone characteristics, such as sensitivity, vary with the weather conditions. The problem is further compounded if there are multiple targets, especially if some are measured with higher signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) than the others and they share spectral information. At the U. S. Army Research Laboratory we have conducted several field experiments with a convoy of two, three, four and five vehicles traveling on different road surfaces, namely gravel, asphalt, and dirt roads. The largest convoy is comprised of two tracked vehicles and three wheeled vehicles. Two of the wheeled vehicles are heavy trucks and one is a light vehicle. We used a super-resolution direction-of-arrival estimator, specifically the minimum variance distortionless response, to compute the bearings of the targets. In order to classify the targets, we modeled the acoustic signals emanated from the targets as a set of coupled harmonics, which are related to the engine-firing rate, and subsequently used a multivariate Gaussian classifier. Independent of the classifier, we find tracking of wheeled vehicles to be intermittent as the signals from vehicles with high SNR dominate the much quieter wheeled vehicles. We used several fusion techniques to combine tracking and classification results to improve final tracking and classification estimates. We will present the improvements (or losses) made in tracking and classification of all targets. Although improvements in the estimates for tracked vehicles are not noteworthy, significant improvements are seen in the case of wheeled vehicles. We will present the fusion algorithm used.

  15. The phase transformation of methane caused by pressure change during its rising from seepage, revealed by acoustic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, C.; Aoyama, S.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this survey is to measure acoustical reflection from the methane plumes at close range by utilizing a remotely-operated vehicle, in order to quantify methane gas flux seeping out from shallow methane hydrates in the sea of japan. In the off-Joetsu area, we conducted acoustic survey for methane plumes distribution using quantitative echo sounder (Simrad EK60) and Multi beam echo sounder (SEABAT 8160) installed on R/V Natsushima, and then conducted underwater survey using ROV Hyper-Dolphin in the following methods, 1) Observing seafloor morphology, 2) Measurement methane discharge with a calibrated collecting equipment , 3) Measuring rising speed of methane bubbles with a ruler, 4) Collecting acoustic reflection data using quantitative echo sounder, 5) Observing rising methane bubbles. All processes in the underwater survey were recorded by a HD camera equipped on ROV, and those videos are used for after-cruise analysis. In the underwater survey by ROV, we found three methane plume points and successfully collected acoustic data which would detect each methane bubble. Based on videos and acoustic data obtained in this survey, detailed analysis conducted.

  16. EVALUATION OF ACOUSTIC FORCES ON A PARTICLE IN AEROSOL MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-09-27

    The acoustic force exerted on a solid particle was evaluated to develop a fundamental understanding of the critical physical parameters or constraints affecting particle motion and capture in a collecting device. The application of an acoustic force to the collection of a range of submicron-to-micron particles in a highly turbulent airflow stream laden with solid particles was evaluated in the presence of other assisting and competing forces. This scoping estimate was based on the primary acoustic force acting directly on particles in a dilute aerosol system, neglecting secondary interparticle effects such as agglomeration of the sub-micron particles. A simplified analysis assuming a stable acoustic equilibrium with an infinite sound speed in the solid shows that for a solid-laden air flow in the presence of a standing wave, particles will move toward the nearest node. The results also show that the turbulent drag force on a 1-{micro}m particle resulting from eddy motion is dominant when compared with the electrostatic force or the ultrasonic acoustic force. At least 180 dB acoustic pressure level at 1 MHz is required for the acoustic force to be comparable to the electrostatic or turbulent drag forces in a high-speed air stream. It is noted that particle size and pressure amplitude are dominant parameters for the acoustic force. When acoustic pressure level becomes very large, the acoustic energy will heat up the surrounding air medium, which may cause air to expand. With an acoustic power of about 600 watts applied to a 2000-lpm air flow, the air temperature can increase by as much as 15 C at the exit of the collector.

  17. A novel acoustically quiet coil for neonatal MRI system

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, Christopher M.; Giaquinto, Randy O.; Loew, Wolfgang; Tkach, Jean A.; Pratt, Ronald G.; Kline-Fath, Beth M.; Merhar, Stephanie L.; Dumoulin, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    MRI acoustic exposure has the potential to elicit physiological distress and impact development in preterm and term infants. To mitigate this risk, a novel acoustically quiet coil was developed to reduce the sound pressure level experienced by neonates during MR procedures. The new coil has a conventional high-pass birdcage RF design, but is built on a framework of sound abating material. We evaluated the acoustic and MR imaging performance of the quiet coil and a conventional body coil on two small footprint NICU MRI systems. Sound pressure level and frequency response measurements were made for six standard clinical MR imaging protocols. The average sound pressure level, reported for all six imaging pulse sequences, was 82.2 dBA for the acoustically quiet coil, and 91.1 dBA for the conventional body coil. The sound pressure level values measured for the acoustically quiet coil were consistently lower, 9 dBA (range 6-10 dBA) quieter on average. The acoustic frequency response of the two coils showed a similar harmonic profile for all imaging sequences. However, the amplitude was lower for the quiet coil, by as much as 20 dBA. PMID:26457072

  18. The Derivation of the Gradient of the Acoustic Pressure on a Moving Surface for Application to the Fast Scattering Code (FSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Brentner, Kenneth S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we develop an analytic expression for calculation of the the acoustic pressure from a rotating blade on a moving surface for application to the Fast Scattering Code (FSC). The analytic result is intended to be used in the helicopter noise prediction code PSU-WOPWOP. One of the goals of the derivation is obtaining a result that will not use any more information than are needed for the prediction of the thickness and loading noise. The result derived here achieves this goal and its incorporation in PSU-WOPWOP is straight forward and attainable.

  19. Elevated Acoustic Startle Responses in Humans: Relationship to Reduced Loudness Discomfort Level, but not Self-Report of Hyperacusis.

    PubMed

    Knudson, Inge M; Melcher, Jennifer R

    2016-06-01

    Increases in the acoustic startle response (ASR) of animals have been reported following experimental manipulations to induce tinnitus, an auditory disorder defined by phantom perception of sound. The increases in ASR have been proposed to signify the development of hyperacusis, a clinical condition defined by intolerance of normally tolerable sound levels. To test this proposal, the present study compared ASR amplitude to measures of sound-level tolerance (SLT) in humans, the only species in which SLT can be directly assessed. Participants had clinically normal/near-normal hearing thresholds, were free of psychotropic medications, and comprised people with tinnitus and without. ASR was measured as eyeblink-related electromyographic activity in response to a noise pulse presented at a range of levels and in two background conditions (noise and quiet). SLT was measured as loudness discomfort level (LDL), the lowest level of sound deemed uncomfortable, and via a questionnaire on the loudness of sounds in everyday life. Regardless of tinnitus status, ASR amplitude at a given stimulus level increased with decreasing LDL, but showed no relationship to SLT self-reported via the questionnaire. These relationships (or lack thereof) could not be attributed to hearing threshold, age, anxiety, or depression. The results imply that increases in ASR in the animal work signify decreases in LDL specifically and may not correspond to the development of hyperacusis as would be self-reported by a clinic patient. PMID:26931342

  20. GSOD Based Daily Global Mean Surface Temperature and Mean Sea Level Air Pressure (1982-2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Xuan Shi, Dali Wang

    2014-05-05

    This data product contains all the gridded data set at 1/4 degree resolution in ASCII format. Both mean temperature and mean sea level air pressure data are available. It also contains the GSOD data (1982-2011) from NOAA site, contains station number, location, temperature and pressures (sea level and station level). The data package also contains information related to the data processing methods

  1. A novel technique towards deployment of hydrostatic pressure based level sensor in nuclear fuel reprocessing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen, K.; Rajiniganth, M. P.; Arun, A. D.; Sahoo, P.; Satya Murty, S. A. V.

    2016-02-01

    A novel approach towards deployment of a hydrostatic pressure based level monitoring device is presented for continuous monitoring of liquid level in a reservoir with high resolution and precision. Some of the major drawbacks such as spurious information of measured level due to change in ambient temperature, requirement of high resolution pressure sensor, and bubbling effect by passing air or any gaseous fluid into the liquid are overcome by using such a newly designed hydrostatic pressure based level monitoring device. The technique involves precise measurement of hydrostatic pressure exerted by the process liquid using a high sensitive pulsating-type differential pressure sensor (capacitive type differential pressure sensor using a specially designed oil manometer) and correlating it to the liquid level. In order to avoid strong influence of temperature on liquid level, a temperature compensation methodology is derived and used in the system. A wireless data acquisition feature has also been provided in the level monitoring device in order to work in a remote area such as a radioactive environment. At the outset, a prototype level measurement system for a 1 m tank is constructed and its test performance has been well studied. The precision, accuracy, resolution, uncertainty, sensitivity, and response time of the prototype level measurement system are found to be less than 1.1 mm in the entire range, 1%, 3 mm, <1%, 10 Hz/mm, and ˜4 s, respectively.

  2. A novel technique towards deployment of hydrostatic pressure based level sensor in nuclear fuel reprocessing facility.

    PubMed

    Praveen, K; Rajiniganth, M P; Arun, A D; Sahoo, P; Murty, S A V Satya

    2016-02-01

    A novel approach towards deployment of a hydrostatic pressure based level monitoring device is presented for continuous monitoring of liquid level in a reservoir with high resolution and precision. Some of the major drawbacks such as spurious information of measured level due to change in ambient temperature, requirement of high resolution pressure sensor, and bubbling effect by passing air or any gaseous fluid into the liquid are overcome by using such a newly designed hydrostatic pressure based level monitoring device. The technique involves precise measurement of hydrostatic pressure exerted by the process liquid using a high sensitive pulsating-type differential pressure sensor (capacitive type differential pressure sensor using a specially designed oil manometer) and correlating it to the liquid level. In order to avoid strong influence of temperature on liquid level, a temperature compensation methodology is derived and used in the system. A wireless data acquisition feature has also been provided in the level monitoring device in order to work in a remote area such as a radioactive environment. At the outset, a prototype level measurement system for a 1 m tank is constructed and its test performance has been well studied. The precision, accuracy, resolution, uncertainty, sensitivity, and response time of the prototype level measurement system are found to be less than 1.1 mm in the entire range, 1%, 3 mm, <1%, 10 Hz/mm, and ∼4 s, respectively. PMID:26931895

  3. Comparison of Acoustic and Kinematic Approaches to Measuring Utterance-Level Speech Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Peter; Anderson, Andrew J.; Bartrip, Jon; Bailey, Eleanor

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The spatiotemporal index (STI) is one measure of variability. As currently implemented, kinematic data are used, requiring equipment that cannot be used with some patient groups or in scanners. An experiment is reported that addressed whether STI can be extended to an audio measure of sound pressure of the speech envelope over time that…

  4. Space Shuttle Orbiter Main Engine Ignition Acoustic Pressure Loads Issue: Recent Actions to Install Wireless Instrumentation on STS-129

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Nathan; Studor, George

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development and construction of the wireless acoustic instruments surrounding the space shuttle's main engines in preparation for STS-129. The presentation also includes information on end-of-life processing and the mounting procedure for the devices.

  5. Differences in heartbeat awareness among males with higher and lower levels of systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, W H; Reid, G J; Jones, K R

    1998-06-01

    Recent empirical findings related to the baroreceptor hypothesis indicate that elevated heart rate, pulse pressure, and blood pressure may dampen exteroception and interoception. We thus predicted that persons with elevated systolic blood pressure would be less able to accurately perceive their heartbeats and profit from feedback training. This study examined the plausibility of this hypothesis by exposing 57 male students (11 with elevated SBP levels and 46 with normotensive SBP levels) to the Whitehead heartbeat perception task with, and without, feedback training. Results indicated that participants with elevated SBP levels were more able to accurately perceive their heartbeats prior to, and after, feedback training. Participants with elevated SBP levels also showed a significant increase in heartbeat perception accuracy when they were provided with feedback training while participants with normotensive blood pressure levels did not show a significant response to feedback training. These findings are interpreted in terms of the ballistic perception model of cardiac awareness. PMID:9641248

  6. Calculating far-field radiated sound pressure levels from NASTRAN output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipman, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    FAFRAP is a computer program which calculates far field radiated sound pressure levels from quantities computed by a NASTRAN direct frequency response analysis of an arbitrarily shaped structure. Fluid loading on the structure can be computed directly by NASTRAN or an added-mass approximation to fluid loading on the structure can be used. Output from FAFRAP includes tables of radiated sound pressure levels and several types of graphic output. FAFRAP results for monopole and dipole sources compare closely with an explicit calculation of the radiated sound pressure level for those sources.

  7. Multi-level Monte Carlo finite volume methods for uncertainty quantification of acoustic wave propagation in random heterogeneous layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Schwab, Ch.; Šukys, J.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the very challenging problem of efficient uncertainty quantification for acoustic wave propagation in a highly heterogeneous, possibly layered, random medium, characterized by possibly anisotropic, piecewise log-exponentially distributed Gaussian random fields. A multi-level Monte Carlo finite volume method is proposed, along with a novel, bias-free upscaling technique that allows to represent the input random fields, generated using spectral FFT methods, efficiently. Combined together with a recently developed dynamic load balancing algorithm that scales to massively parallel computing architectures, the proposed method is able to robustly compute uncertainty for highly realistic random subsurface formations that can contain a very high number (millions) of sources of uncertainty. Numerical experiments, in both two and three space dimensions, illustrating the efficiency of the method are presented.

  8. Nasal high-flow therapy delivers low level positive airway pressure

    PubMed Central

    Parke, R.; McGuinness, S.; Eccleston, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this prospective study was to determine whether a level of positive airway pressure was generated in participants receiving nasal high flow (NHF) delivered by the Optiflow™ system (Fisher and Paykel Healthcare Ltd, Auckland, New Zealand) in a cardiothoracic and vascular intensive care unit (ICU). Methods Nasopharyngeal airway pressure was measured in 15 postoperative cardiac surgery adult patients who received both NHF and standard facemask therapy at a flow rate of 35 litre min−1. Measurements were repeated in the open mouth and closed mouth positions. Mean airway pressure was determined by averaging the pressures at the peak of inspiration of each breath within a 1 min period, allowing the entire pressure profile of each breath to be included within the calculation. Results Low level positive pressure was demonstrated with NHF at 35 litre min−1 with mouth closed when compared with a facemask. NHF generated a mean nasopharyngeal airway pressure of mean (sd) 2.7 (1.04) cm H2O with the mouth closed. Airway pressure was significantly higher when breathing with mouth closed compared with mouth open (P≤0.0001). Conclusions This study demonstrated that a low level of positive pressure was generated with NHF at 35 litre min−1 of gas flow. This is consistent with results obtained in healthy volunteers. Australian Clinical Trials Registry www.actr.org.au ACTRN012606000139572. PMID:19846404

  9. Acoustical and Flowfield Characterization of a Tabletop Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Margasahayam, Ravi; Norton, Michael P.; Caimi, Raoul E.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An analysis of the acoustical and flowfield environment for the scaled 1-pound-force (lbf) thrust tabletop motor was performed. The jet characterization is based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in conjunction with Kirchhoff surface integral formulation and compared with correlations developed for measured rocket noise and a pressure fluctuation scaling (PFS) method. Comparisons are made for the overall sound pressure levels (OASPL's) and spectral dependence of sound pressure level (SPL).

  10. Free-jet feasibility study of a thermal acoustic shield concept for AST/VCE application-dual stream nozzles. Comprehensive data report. Volume 2: Laser velocimeter and suppressor. Base pressure data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Brausch, J. F.; Price, A. O.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic and diagnostic data that were obtained to determine the influence of selected geometric and aerodynamic flow variables of coannular nozzles with thermal acoustic shields are summarized in this comprehensive data report. A total of 136 static and simulated flight acoustic test points were conducted with 9 scale-model nozzles. Aerodynamic laser velocimeter measurements were made for four selected plumes. In addition, static pressure data in the chute base region of the suppressor configurations were obtained to assess the influence of the shield stream on the suppressor base drag.

  11. A point acoustic device based on aluminum nanowires.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qian-Yi; Ju, Zhen-Yi; Tian, He; Xue, Qing-Tang; Chen, Yuan-Quan; Tao, Lu-Qi; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Zhang, Xue-Yue; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-03-14

    A point Electrical Thermal Acoustic (ETA) device based on aluminum nanowire contacts is designed and fabricated. Interdigitated structural aluminum nanowires are released from the substrate by Inductively Coupled Plasma Reactive Ion Etching (ICP-RIE). By releasing the interdigitated structure, the nanowires contact each other at approximately 1 mm above the wafer, forming a Point Contact Structure (PCS). It is found that the PCS acoustic device realizes high efficiency when a biased AC signal is applied. The PCS acoustic device reaches a sound pressure level as high as 67 dB at a distance of 1 cm with 74 mW AC input. The power spectrum is flat, ranging from 2 kHz to 20 kHz with a less than ±3 dB fluctuation. The highest normalized Sound Pressure Level (SPL) of the point contact structure acoustic device is 18 dB higher than the suspended aluminum wire acoustic device. Comparisons between the PCS acoustic device and the Suspended Aluminum Nanowire (SAN) acoustic device illustrate that the PCS acoustic device has a flatter power spectrum within the 20 kHz range, and enhances the SPL at a lower frequency. Enhancing the response at lower frequencies is extremely useful, which may enable earphone and loudspeaker applications within the frequency range of the human ear with the help of pulse density modulation. PMID:26787399

  12. [Effect of lipril on the level of blood pressure in rats with spontaneus blood hypertention].

    PubMed

    Zahorodnyĭ, M I

    2007-01-01

    The author studied influence of Ukrainian antyhypertensive drug--Lipril (Uzynopryl) on the level of blood pressure in rats with spontaneus blood hypertention. It was sound that daily (during 90 days) application of Lipril at 10 mg/kg per os decreases considerably blood pressure in rats. PMID:17682519

  13. Temperature and pressure effects on capacitance probe cryogenic liquid level measurement accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Lawrence G.; Haberbusch, Mark

    1993-01-01

    The inaccuracies of liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen level measurements by use of a coaxial capacitance probe were investigated as a function of fluid temperatures and pressures. Significant liquid level measurement errors were found to occur due to the changes in the fluids dielectric constants which develop over the operating temperature and pressure ranges of the cryogenic storage tanks. The level measurement inaccuracies can be reduced by using fluid dielectric correction factors based on measured fluid temperatures and pressures. The errors in the corrected liquid level measurements were estimated based on the reported calibration errors of the temperature and pressure measurement systems. Experimental liquid nitrogen (LN2) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) level measurements were obtained using the calibrated capacitance probe equations and also by the dielectric constant correction factor method. The liquid levels obtained by the capacitance probe for the two methods were compared with the liquid level estimated from the fluid temperature profiles. Results show that the dielectric constant corrected liquid levels agreed within 0.5 percent of the temperature profile estimated liquid level. The uncorrected dielectric constant capacitance liquid level measurements deviated from the temperature profile level by more than 5 percent. This paper identifies the magnitude of liquid level measurement error that can occur for LN2 and LH2 fluids due to temperature and pressure effects on the dielectric constants over the tank storage conditions from 5 to 40 psia. A method of reducing the level measurement errors by using dielectric constant correction factors based on fluid temperature and pressure measurements is derived. The improved accuracy by use of the correction factors is experimentally verified by comparing liquid levels derived from fluid temperature profiles.

  14. Cyclic Crack Growth Testing of an A.O. Smith Multilayer Pressure Vessel with Modal Acoustic Emission Monitoring and Data Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziola, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital Wave Corp. (DWC) was retained by Jacobs ATOM at NASA Ames Research Center to perform cyclic pressure crack growth sensitivity testing on a multilayer pressure vessel instrumented with DWC's Modal Acoustic Emission (MAE) system, with captured wave analysis to be performed using DWCs WaveExplorerTM software, which has been used at Ames since 2001. The objectives were to document the ability to detect and characterize a known growing crack in such a vessel using only MAE, to establish the sensitivity of the equipment vs. crack size and / or relevance in a realistic field environment, and to obtain fracture toughness materials properties in follow up testing to enable accurate crack growth analysis. This report contains the results of the testing.

  15. Relationships between objective acoustic indices and acoustic comfort evaluation in nonacoustic spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian

    2001-05-01

    Much attention has been paid to acoustic spaces such as concert halls and recording studios, whereas research on nonacoustic buildings/spaces has been rather limited, especially from the viewpoint of acoustic comfort. In this research a series of case studies has been carried out on this topic, considering various spaces including shopping mall atrium spaces, library reading rooms, football stadia, swimming spaces, churches, dining spaces, as well as urban open public spaces. The studies focus on the relationships between objective acoustic indices such as sound pressure level and reverberation time and perceptions of acoustic comfort. The results show that the acoustic atmosphere is an important consideration in such spaces and the evaluation of acoustic comfort may vary considerably even if the objective acoustic indices are the same. It is suggested that current guidelines and technical regulations are insufficient in terms of acoustic design of these spaces, and the relationships established from the case studies between objective and subjective aspects would be useful for developing further design guidelines. [Work supported partly by the British Academy.

  16. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  17. Analyzing panel acoustic contributions toward the sound field inside the passenger compartment of a full-size automobile.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F; Moondra, Manmohan; Beniwal, Ravi

    2015-04-01

    The Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS)-based nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is utilized to analyze panel acoustic contributions toward the acoustic field inside the interior region of an automobile. Specifically, the acoustic power flows from individual panels are reconstructed, and relative contributions to sound pressure level and spectrum at any point of interest are calculated. Results demonstrate that by correlating the acoustic power flows from individual panels to the field acoustic pressure, one can correctly locate the panel allowing the most acoustic energy transmission into the vehicle interior. The panel on which the surface acoustic pressure amplitude is the highest should not be used as indicative of the panel responsible for the sound field in the vehicle passenger compartment. Another significant advantage of this HELS-based NAH is that measurements of the input data only need to be taken once by using a conformal array of microphones in the near field, and ranking of panel acoustic contributions to any field point can be readily performed. The transfer functions between individual panels of any vibrating structure to the acoustic pressure anywhere in space are calculated not measured, thus significantly reducing the time and effort involved in panel acoustic contributions analyses. PMID:25920860

  18. Can Population-Level Laterality Stem from Social Pressures? Evidence from Cheek Kissing in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Chapelain, Amandine; Pimbert, Pauline; Aube, Lydiane; Perrocheau, Océane; Debunne, Gilles; Bellido, Alain; Blois-Heulin, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive research, the origins and functions of behavioural laterality remain largely unclear. One of the most striking unresolved issues is the fact that laterality generally occurs at the population-level. Why would the majority of the individuals of a population exhibit the same laterality, while individual-level laterality would yet provide the advantages in terms of improving behavioural efficiency? Are social pressures the key factor? Can social pressures induce alignment of laterality between the individuals of a population? Can the effect of social pressures overpass the effect of other possible determining factors (e.g. genes)? We tested this important new hypothesis in humans, for the first time. We asked whether population-level laterality could stem from social pressures. Namely, we assessed social pressures on laterality in an interactive social behaviour: kissing on the cheek as a greeting. We performed observations in 10 cities of France. The observations took place in spots where people of the city meet and greet each other. We showed that: a) there is a population-level laterality for cheek kissing, with the majority of individuals being aligned in each city, and b) there is a variation between populations, with a laterality that depends on the city. These results were confirmed by our complementary data from questionnaires and internet surveys. These findings show that social pressures are involved in determining laterality. They demonstrate that population-level laterality can stem from social pressures. PMID:26270648

  19. Does temperature affect the accuracy of vented pressure transducer in fine-scale water level measurement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Higgins, C. W.

    2015-03-01

    Submersible pressure transducers have been utilized for collecting water level data since the early 1960s. Together with a digital data logger, it is a convenient way to record water level fluctuations for long-term monitoring. Despite the wide use of pressure transducers for water level monitoring, little has been reported regarding their accuracy and performance under field conditions. The effects of temperature fluctuations on the output of vented pressure transducers were considered in this study. The pressure transducers were tested under both laboratory and field conditions. The results of this study indicate that temperature fluctuation has a strong effect on the transducer output. Rapid changes in temperature introduce noise and fluctuations in the water level readings under a constant hydraulic head while the absolute temperature is also related to sensor errors. The former is attributed to venting and the latter is attributed to temperature compensation effects in the strain gauges. Individual pressure transducers responded differently to the thermal fluctuations in the same testing environment. In the field of surface hydrology, especially when monitoring fine-scale water level fluctuations, ignoring or failing to compensate for the temperature effect can introduce considerable error into pressure transducer readings. It is recommended that a performance test for the pressure transducer is conducted before field deployment.

  20. Does temperature affect the accuracy of vented pressure transducer in fine-scale water level measurement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Higgins, C. W.

    2014-09-01

    Submersible pressure transducers have been utilized for collecting water level data since early 1960s. Together with a digital datalogger, it is a convenient way to record water level fluctuations for long-term monitoring. Despite the widely use of pressure transducers for water level monitoring, little has been reported for their accuracy and performance under field conditions. The effect of temperature fluctuations on the output of vented pressure transducers were discussed in this study. The pressure transducer was tested under both laboratory and field conditions. The results of this study indicate that temperature fluctuation has a strong effect on the transducer output. Rapid changes in temperature introduce noise and fluctuations in the water level readings under a constant hydraulic head while the absolute temperature is also related to sensor errors. The former is attributed to venting and the latter is attributed to temperature compensation effect in the strain gauges. Individual pressure transducers responded differently to the thermal fluctuations in the same testing environment. In the field of surface hydrology, especially when monitoring fine-scale water level fluctuations, ignoring or failing to compensate for the temperature effect can introduce considerable error into pressure transducer readings. It is recommended that a performance test for the pressure transducer is conducted before field deployment.

  1. The relationship between sea-level and bottom pressure variability in an eddy permitting ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Rory J.; Hughes, Chris W.

    2008-02-01

    We investigate the relationship between sea-level (after application of an inverse-barometer correction) and ocean bottom pressure, in an eddy-permitting ocean model. We find the presence of eddies can disrupt this relationship even on timescales as short as 10-20 days, but only in the regions of most energetic eddy variability. Away from eddies, the relationship is similar to that seen in a coarser-resolution model, with a tight relationship between sea-level and bottom pressure at high frequencies, but with significant correlations between sea-level and bottom pressure at interannual timescales seen only in shelf sea regions. In the deep ocean, regions where sea-level and bottom pressure remain related out to the longest timescales are in the Arctic Ocean and regions of the Southern Ocean, where particularly large amplitude barotropic fluctuations are found but where the mesoscale signal is weak.

  2. Fluid mechanical model of the acoustic impedance of small orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Rogers, T.

    1976-01-01

    A fluid mechanical model of the acoustic behavior of small orifices is presented which predicts orifice resistance and reactance as a function of incident sound pressure level, frequency, and orifice geometry. Agreement between predicted and measured values is excellent. The model shows the following: (1) The acoustic flow in immediate neighborhood of the orifice can be modeled as a locally spherical flow. Within this near field, the flow is, to a first approximation, unsteady and incompressible. (2) At very low sound pressure levels, the orifice viscous resistance is directly related to the effect of boundary-layer displacement along the walls containing the orifice, and the orifice reactance is directly related to the inertia of the oscillating flow in the neighborhood of the orifice. (3) For large values of the incident acoustic pressure, the impedance is dominated by nonlinear jet-like effects. (4) For low values of the pressure, the resistance and reactance are roughly equal.

  3. The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  4. The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  5. The preoperative intraocular pressure level predicts the amount of underestimated intraocular pressure after LASIK for myopia

    PubMed Central

    Chihara, E; Takahashi, H; Okazaki, K; Park, M; Tanito, M

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the statistical significance of the parameters that affect underestimation of intraocular pressure (IOP) after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for myopia. Methods: In this prospective case series study, patient age, axial length, preoperative corneal curvature, preoperative central corneal thickness (CCT), preoperative IOP, and ablation depth were studied to determine whether they affect the underestimation of IOP in the right eyes of 100 consecutive patients who underwent LASIK. Results: The preoperative IOP was the most important parameter for an amount of underestimated Goldmann applanation tonometric IOP (GAT) and non-contact tonometric IOP (ncIOP) at 1 month (r = 0.654, p<0.0001, R2 = 0.427, and r = 0.694, p<0.0001, R2 = 0.481, respectively) and 3 months (r = 0.637, p<0.0001, R2 = 0.406, and r = 0.726, p<0.0001, R2 = 0.527, respectively). Patient age was statistically significant for underestimating the GAT at 1 month, and both the ablation depth and CCT were statistically significant parameters for underestimating the ncIOP at 1 month and at 3 months by stepwise multiple regression analysis (F>4.000). However, these parameters had small bivariate correlation coefficients, and were considered as minor parameters. Conclusion: Preoperative IOP is the most important parameter that affects an underestimation of IOP after LASIK for myopia. Eyes with a higher true IOP have a larger underestimation of the IOP after LASIK for myopia. From these results, the importance of the modulus of elasticity on IOP measurements was discussed. PMID:15665345

  6. On the behavior of a shear-coaxial jet, spanning sub- to supercritical pressures, with and without an externally imposed transverse acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Dustin Wayne

    In the past, liquid rocket engines (LRE) have experienced high-frequency combustion instability, which impose an acoustic field in the combustion chamber. The acoustic field interacts with the fluid jets issuing from the injectors, thus altering the behavior of the jet compared to that of stable operation of the LRE. It is possible that this interaction could be a substantial feed back mechanism driving the combustion instability. In order to understand the problem of combustion instability, it is necessary to understand the interaction of the jet with the acoustic waves. From past combustion instability studies of the liquid oxygen and hydrogen propellant combination in a shear-coaxial injector configuration, a design guideline of outer-to-inner jet velocity ratio greater than about ten was proposed in order to avoid high-frequency acoustic combustion instability problems. However, no satisfactory physical explanation was provided. To promote this understanding, a cold-flow experimental investigation of a shear-coaxial jet interacting with a high-amplitude non-linear acoustic field was undertaken under chamber pressures extending into the supercritical regime. Liquid nitrogen (LN2) flowed from the inner tube of a coaxial injector while gaseous nitrogen (GN2) issued from its annular region. The injector fluids were directed into a chamber pressurized with gaseous nitrogen. The acoustic excitation was provided by an external driver capable of delivering acoustic field amplitudes up to 165 dB. The resonant modes of the chamber governed the two frequencies studied here, with the first two modes being about 3 and 5.2 kHz. High-speed images of the jet were taken with a Phantom CMOS camera. The so-called "dark core" of the jet is among the most salient features in the acquired images, and therefore, was defined and measured. The core length was found to decrease with increasing velocity and momentum flux ratio. Because of the ability of the camera to capture thousands of

  7. High sound pressure levels in Bavarian discotheques remain after introduction of voluntary agreements.

    PubMed

    Twardella, Dorothee; Wellhoefer, Andrea; Brix, Jutta; Fromme, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    While no legal rules or regulations exist in Germany, voluntary measures were introduced to achieve a reduction of sound pressure levels in discotheques to levels below 100 dB(A). To evaluate the current levels in Bavarian discotheques and to find out whether these voluntary measures ensured compliance with the recommended limits, sound pressure levels were measured in 20 Bavarian discotheques between 11 p.m. and 2 a.m. With respect to the equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure level for each 30-minute period (L Aeq,30min ), only 4/20 discotheques remained below the limit of 100 dB(A) in all time periods. Ten discotheques had sound pressure levels below 100 dB(A) for the total measurement period (L Aeq,180min ). None of the evaluated factors (weekday, size, estimated age of attendees, the use of voluntary measures such as participation of disc jockeys in a tutorial, or the availability of a sound level meter for the DJs) was significantly associated with the maximal L Aeq, 30min . Thus, the introduction of voluntary measures was not sufficient to ensure compliance with the recommended limits of sound pressure levels. PMID:19075456

  8. Acoustic loading in straight pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.

    1980-01-01

    Based on linear one-dimensional acoustics, a geometrically perfect elastic waveguide would respond to an oscillatory internal pressure only in the presence of path deflectors (elbows and branches). In practice, a significant elasto-acoustic interaction results even in straight conduits as a result of manufacturing tolerances. A theoretical model of the linear acoustic loading in straight pipes is developed that considers the acoustic wave distortion due to perimeter, axial, and wall thickness nonuniformities.

  9. Highly directional acoustic receivers.

    PubMed

    Cray, Benjamin A; Evora, Victor M; Nuttall, Albert H

    2003-03-01

    The theoretical directivity of a single combined acoustic receiver, a device that can measure many quantities of an acoustic field at a collocated point, is presented here. The formulation is developed using a Taylor series expansion of acoustic pressure about the origin of a Cartesian coordinate system. For example, the quantities measured by a second-order combined receiver, denoted a dyadic sensor, are acoustic pressure, the three orthogonal components of acoustic particle velocity, and the nine spatial gradients of the velocity vector. The power series expansion, which can be of any order, is cast into an expression that defines the directivity of a single receiving element. It is shown that a single highly directional dyadic sensor can have a directivity index of up to 9.5 dB. However, there is a price to pay with highly directive sensors; these sensors can be significantly more sensitive to nonacoustic noise sources. PMID:12656387

  10. Modeling the barotropic response of the Mediterranean sea level to atmospheric pressure forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsiopoulos, Dimitrios A.; Vergos, Georgios S.; Tziavos, Ilias N.

    2014-05-01

    An important characteristic of the Earth's atmosphere with direct impact on the marine environmental and Earth's gravity field are the variations of atmospheric pressure as it often determines wind and weather patterns across the globe. Variations in atmospheric pressure and especially low atmospheric systems affect the values of radar altimeter sea level anomalies (SLA). This response of sea level is closed to the Inverse Barometer (IB) correction given by the altimeters within their geophysical data records. In this work, altimetric data sets from the satellite remote sensing mission of Jason-2, along with their total IB corrections acquired by the on-board altimeters, have been used for a period of forty days between October and November 2013. This period was characterized by extreme low-pressure fields over the Mediterranean Sea and especially in the area of the Ionian and Adriatic Seas and over the island of Rhodes, Greece. The Jason-2 along-track records of the SLA have been used to study both the sea level response to atmospheric pressure change over short time scales (such as ten days) and examine if the barometer correction (local and global) given by the altimeter is close to the expected response (-1 cm/mbar) of sea level to atmospheric pressure change. For the latter, atmospheric pressure data for the period under study were available from the Live Access Server (LAS) of NOAA, as well, provided at four times per day intervals in a grid format. From the LAS atmospheric pressure data, the IB effect was computed and compared with the one provided by the altimeter for its external evaluation. Finally, a regional multiple regression analysis between sea level anomalies, the LAS atmospheric pressure and wind speed components is carried out to model the barotropic response of the Mediterranean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing.

  11. DC-9/JT8D refan, Phase 1. [technical and economic feasibility of retrofitting DC-9 aircraft with refan engine to achieve desired acoustic levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Analyses and design studies were conducted on the technical and economic feasibility of installing the JT8D-109 refan engine on the DC-9 aircraft. Design criteria included minimum change to the airframe to achieve desired acoustic levels. Several acoustic configurations were studied with two selected for detailed investigations. The minimum selected acoustic treatment configuration results in an estimated aircraft weight increase of 608 kg (1,342 lb) and the maximum selected acoustic treatment configuration results in an estimated aircraft weight increase of 809 kg (1,784 lb). The range loss for the minimum and maximum selected acoustic treatment configurations based on long range cruise at 10 668 m (35,000 ft) altitude with a typical payload of 6 804 kg (15,000 lb) amounts to 54 km (86 n. mi.) respectively. Estimated reduction in EPNL's for minimum selected treatment show 8 EPNdB at approach, 12 EPNdB for takeoff with power cutback, 15 EPNdB for takeoff without power cutback and 12 EPNdB for sideline using FAR Part 36. Little difference was estimated in EPNL between minimum and maximum treatments due to reduced performance of maximum treatment. No major technical problems were encountered in the study. The refan concept for the DC-9 appears technically feasible and economically viable at approximately $1,000,000 per airplane. An additional study of the installation of JT3D-9 refan engine on the DC-8-50/61 and DC-8-62/63 aircraft is included. Three levels of acoustic treatment were suggested for DC-8-50/61 and two levels for DC-8-62/63. Results indicate the DC-8 technically can be retrofitted with refan engines for approximately $2,500,000 per airplane.

  12. Acoustic fill factors for a 120 inch diameter fairing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y. Albert

    1992-01-01

    Data from the acoustic test of a 120-inch diameter payload fairing were collected and an analysis of acoustic fill factors were performed. Correction factors for obtaining a weighted spatial average of the interior sound pressure level (SPL) were derived based on this database and a normalized 200-inch diameter fairing database. The weighted fill factors were determined and compared with statistical energy analysis (VAPEPS code) derived fill factors. The comparison is found to be reasonable.

  13. Numerical analysis of sound propagation for acoustic lens array in different fluid mediums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Kei; Asada, Akira

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, an acoustic sound focusing method using acoustic lens array is investigated numerically. To understand the sound propagation in the acoustic field in water with a lens material of glycerin, compressible Navier-Stokes equation, the mass conservation, energy equation, state equation in cylindrical coordinate system are solved without applying parabolic approximation. The numerical method is based on the finite difference time domain method. The numerical calculation of the sound propagation is carried out in the near field of the acoustic lens array of variable thickness normal to the acoustic beam. The numerical result shows that the sound pressure level along the beam axis increases due to the influence of the acoustic lens array, which indicates the capability of the acoustic lens array to the sound focusing.

  14. Helicopter far-field acoustic levels as a function of reduced main-rotor advancing blade-tip Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Arnold W.; Smith, Charles D.; Lemasurier, Philip

    1990-07-01

    During the design of a helicopter, the weight, engine, rotor speed, and rotor geometry are given significant attention when considering the specific operations for which the helicopter will be used. However, the noise radiated from the helicopter and its relationship to the design variables is currently not well modeled with only a limited set of full-scale field test data to study. In general, limited field data have shown that reduced main-rotor advancing blade-tip Mach numbers result in reduced far-field noise levels. The status of a recent helicopter noise research project is reviewed. It is designed to provide flight experimental data which may be used to further understand helicopter main-rotor advancing blade-tip Mach number effects on far-field acoustic levels. Preliminary results are presented relative to tests conducted with a Sikorsky S-76A helicopter operating with both the rotor speed and the flight speed as the control variable. The rotor speed was operated within the range of 107 to 90 percent NR at nominal forward speeds of 35, 100, and 155 knots.

  15. Helicopter far-field acoustic levels as a function of reduced main-rotor advancing blade-tip Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Arnold W.; Smith, Charles D.; Lemasurier, Philip

    1990-01-01

    During the design of a helicopter, the weight, engine, rotor speed, and rotor geometry are given significant attention when considering the specific operations for which the helicopter will be used. However, the noise radiated from the helicopter and its relationship to the design variables is currently not well modeled with only a limited set of full-scale field test data to study. In general, limited field data have shown that reduced main-rotor advancing blade-tip Mach numbers result in reduced far-field noise levels. The status of a recent helicopter noise research project is reviewed. It is designed to provide flight experimental data which may be used to further understand helicopter main-rotor advancing blade-tip Mach number effects on far-field acoustic levels. Preliminary results are presented relative to tests conducted with a Sikorsky S-76A helicopter operating with both the rotor speed and the flight speed as the control variable. The rotor speed was operated within the range of 107 to 90 percent NR at nominal forward speeds of 35, 100, and 155 knots.

  16. Ultrasonic liquid-level detector for varying temperature and pressure environments

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.L.; Miller, G.N.

    1981-10-26

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use in varying temperature and pressure environments, such as a pressurized water nuclear reactor vessel, is provided. The detector employs ultrasonic extensional and torsional waves launched in a multiplexed alternating sequence into a common sensor. The sensor is a rectangular cross section stainless steel rod which extends into the liquid medium whose level is to be detected. The sensor temperature derived from the extensional wave velocity measurements is used to compensate for the temperature dependence of the torsional wave velocity measurements which are also level dependent. The torsional wave velocity measurements of a multiple reflection sensor then provide a measurement of liquid level over a range of several meters with a small uncertainty over a temperature range of 20 to 250/sup 0/C and pressures up to 15 MPa.

  17. The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-term monthly temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure data

    SciTech Connect

    Vose, R.S.; Schmoyer, R.L.; Steurer, P.M.; Peterson, T.C.; Heim, R.; Karl, T.R.; Eischeid, J.K.

    1992-07-01

    Interest in global climate change has risen dramatically during the last several years. In a similar fashion, the number of data sets available to study global change has also increased. Unfortunately, these data sets have been compiled by many different organizations/researchers, making it confusing and time consuming for individual researchers to acquire the ``best`` data. In response to this rapid growth in the number of global data sets, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) commenced the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) project. The purpose of this project is to compile an improved global base-line data set of long-term monthly mean temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure for a dense network. of worldwide meteorological stations. Specifically, the GHCN project seeks to consolidate the numerous preexisting national-, regional-, and global-scale data sets into a single global climate data base that can be updated, enhanced, and distributed at regular intervals. The first version of the GHCN data base was completed during the summer of 1992. It contains 6039 temperature, 7533 precipitation, 1883 sea level pressure, and 1873 station pressure stations. All stations have at least 10 years of data, 40% have more than 50 years of data, and 10% have more than 100 years of data. Spatial coverage is good over most of the globe, particularly for the United States and central Europe. In comparison to other major global data sets, dramatic improvements are evident over South America, Africa, and Asia. The GHCN data base is available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of this document and two magnetic tapes that contain machine-readable data files and accompanying retrieval codes. This document describes, in detail, both the GHCN data base and the contents of the magnetic tap

  18. The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-term monthly temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure data

    SciTech Connect

    Vose, R.S. . Energy, Environment and Resources Center); Schmoyer, R.L. ); Steurer, P.M.; Peterson, T.C.; Heim, R.; Karl, T.R. ); Eischeid, J.K. . Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences)

    1992-07-01

    Interest in global climate change has risen dramatically during the last several years. In a similar fashion, the number of data sets available to study global change has also increased. Unfortunately, these data sets have been compiled by many different organizations/researchers, making it confusing and time consuming for individual researchers to acquire the best'' data. In response to this rapid growth in the number of global data sets, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) commenced the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) project. The purpose of this project is to compile an improved global base-line data set of long-term monthly mean temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure for a dense network. of worldwide meteorological stations. Specifically, the GHCN project seeks to consolidate the numerous preexisting national-, regional-, and global-scale data sets into a single global climate data base that can be updated, enhanced, and distributed at regular intervals. The first version of the GHCN data base was completed during the summer of 1992. It contains 6039 temperature, 7533 precipitation, 1883 sea level pressure, and 1873 station pressure stations. All stations have at least 10 years of data, 40% have more than 50 years of data, and 10% have more than 100 years of data. Spatial coverage is good over most of the globe, particularly for the United States and central Europe. In comparison to other major global data sets, dramatic improvements are evident over South America, Africa, and Asia. The GHCN data base is available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of this document and two magnetic tapes that contain machine-readable data files and accompanying retrieval codes. This document describes, in detail, both the GHCN data base and the contents of the magnetic tap

  19. Comparative measurements of the level of turbulence atmosphere by optical and acoustic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. P.; Botugina, N. N.; Gladkih, V. A.; Emaleev, O. N.; Konyaev, P. A.; Odintsov, S. L.; Torgaev, A. V.

    2014-11-01

    The complex measurements of level of atmospheric turbulence are conducted by the differential measurement device of turbulence (DMT), wave-front sensor (WFS), and also by ultrasonic weather-stations. Daytime measurements of structure parameters of refractive index of atmospheric turbulence carried out on horizontal optical paths on the Base Experimental Complex (BEC) of V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS (IOA). A comparative analysis over of the got results is brought.

  20. Interaural sound pressure level differences associated with sound-source locations in the frontal hemifield of the domestic cat.

    PubMed

    Martin, R L; Webster, W R

    1989-04-01

    Interaural sound pressure level differences (ILDs) associated with a range of sound-source azimuths and elevations in the frontal hemifields of four cats were measured for each of seven pure-tone stimuli ranging in frequency from 2-32 kHz. The overall pattern of ILD across location at each frequency was remarkably similar in all cats. At 2, 4 and 8 kHz the relationships of ILD to azimuth and elevation were generally monotonic with ILD increasing with increasing azimuth. At 12 kHz and above, however, non-monotonic relationships developed and circumscribed regions of particularly large, positive and negative ILDs were apparent. That ILDs associated with many sound-source locations on the near side of the head are negative in sign has not been widely noted in the previous literature. The data obtained in this study were compared with those from previous studies and the acoustical mechanisms likely to have contributed to production of the observed ILDs were considered. Some implications of the data for auditory localization in three-dimensional space were discussed. PMID:2708168

  1. On the efficacy of spatial sampling using manual scanning paths to determine the spatial average sound pressure level in rooms.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Carl

    2011-05-01

    In architectural acoustics, noise control and environmental noise, there are often steady-state signals for which it is necessary to measure the spatial average, sound pressure level inside rooms. This requires using fixed microphone positions, mechanical scanning devices, or manual scanning. In comparison with mechanical scanning devices, the human body allows manual scanning to trace out complex geometrical paths in three-dimensional space. To determine the efficacy of manual scanning paths in terms of an equivalent number of uncorrelated samples, an analytical approach is solved numerically. The benchmark used to assess these paths is a minimum of five uncorrelated fixed microphone positions at frequencies above 200 Hz. For paths involving an operator walking across the room, potential problems exist with walking noise and non-uniform scanning speeds. Hence, paths are considered based on a fixed standing position or rotation of the body about a fixed point. In empty rooms, it is shown that a circle, helix, or cylindrical-type path satisfy the benchmark requirement with the latter two paths being highly efficient at generating large number of uncorrelated samples. In furnished rooms where there is limited space for the operator to move, an efficient path comprises three semicircles with 45°-60° separations. PMID:21568406

  2. Interactions of several genetic polymorphisms and alcohol consumption on blood pressure levels.

    PubMed

    Yin, Rui-Xing; Aung, Lynn Htet Htet; Long, Xing-Jiang; Yan, Ting-Ting; Cao, Xiao-Li; Huang, Feng; Wu, Jin-Zhen; Yang, De-Zhai; Lin, Wei-Xiong; Pan, Shang-Ling

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the interactions of several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and alcohol consumption on blood pressure levels. Genotypes of 10 SNPs in the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA-1), acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1), low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), hepatic lipase gene (LIPC), endothelial lipase gene (LIPG), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), the E3 ubiquitin ligase myosin regulatory light chain-interacting protein (MYLIP), proprotein convertase subtilisin-like kexin type 9 (PCSK9), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARD), and Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SCARB1) genes were determined in 616 nondrinkers and 608 drinkers. The genotypic frequencies of LDLR rs5925, LIPC rs2070895, MTHFR rs1801133, and MYLIP rs3757354 SNPs were significantly different between nondrinkers and drinkers. The levels of systolic blood pressure (ABCA-1 rs2066715 and rs2070895), diastolic blood pressure (rs2070895), and pulse pressure (PP) (rs2066715, ACAT-1 rs1044925, and rs1801133) in nondrinkers, and systolic blood pressure (rs1044925 and SCARB1 rs5888), diastolic blood pressure (rs1044925 and LIPG rs2000813), and PP (PCSK9 rs505151 and rs5888) in drinkers were different among the genotypes (P < 0.005-0.001). The interactions of several SNPs and alcohol consumption on systolic blood pressure (rs2066715, rs1044925, rs5925, rs2070895, rs1801133, rs3757354, PPARD rs2016520, and rs5888), diastolic blood pressure (rs2066715, rs1044925, rs5925, rs2000813, rs3757354, and rs2016520), and PP (rs1044925, rs2070895, rs1801133, rs3757354, rs505151, and rs5888) were observed (P < 0.005-0.001). The differences in blood pressure levels between the nondrinkers and drinkers might be partially attributed to the interactions of these SNPs and alcohol consumption. PMID:26354227

  3. Relationship of blood lead levels to blood pressure in exhaust battery storage workers.

    PubMed

    Fenga, Concettina; Cacciola, Anna; Martino, Lucia Barbaro; Calderaro, Santina Ricciardo; Di Nola, Carmelina; Verzera, Aurelio; Trimarchi, Giuseppe; Germanò, Domenico

    2006-04-01

    Several researches has focused the hypothesis that low blood lead levels could be associated with an increased risk of hypertension. To assess the relation between occupational lead exposure and elevated blood pressure a group of 27 workers, age range from 27 to 62 years, mean (SD) 36.52 (+/- 8.16) yr; length of employment mean (DS) 2.97 (+/- 1.67) yr, were recruited as study subjects. The following variables were measured: blood lead concentration (BPb), delta-Aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase (ALAD) activity, Zinc Protoporphirin (ZPP), creatinine, hematocrit, Body Mass Index (BMI) and Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP) and Diastolic Blood (DBP) Pressure. The results showed that long term occupational exposure was related to a slight increase of systolic and diastolic blood pressure among workers who had been exposed to higher level of lead with respect to workers exposed to lower level of lead. Furthermore, blood lead concentration (BPb) and ZPP resulted higher among workers exposed to higher level of ambient lead, while in the same group of workers ALAD activity resulted more inhibited. The authors concluded long term cumulative lead exposure can significantly increase blood pressure in low level Pb exposed workers. PMID:16716009

  4. Background Acoustics Levels in the 9x15 Wind Tunnel and Linear Array Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David

    2011-01-01

    The background noise level in the 9x15 foot wind tunnel at NASA Glenn has been documented, and the results compare favorably with historical measurements. A study of recessed microphone mounting techniques was also conducted, and a recessed cavity with a micronic wire mesh screen reduces hydrodynamic noise by around 10 dB. A three-microphone signal processing technique can provide additional benefit, rejecting up to 15 dB of noise contamination at some frequencies. The screen and cavity system offers considerable benefit to test efficiency, although there are additional calibration requirements.

  5. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-2 Upper Air Network Standard Pressure Level Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters interpolated at 0.5 kiloPascal increments of atmospheric pressure from data collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  6. High Pressure Studies of the Second Landau Level Region of a Two-Dimensional Electron System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Katherine; Samkharadze, Nodar; Gardner, Geoffrey; Fradkin, Eduardo; Manfra, Michael; Csathy, Gabor

    Hydrostatic pressure has become a prevalent tool in condensed matter systems because the application of pressure to crystalline structures results in the shrinking of the lattice constant. This allows one to tune the Bloch wavefunction of the electrons and therefore all band parameters such as effective carrier mass, carrier density, and effective g-factor. In this manner, pressure acts as a probe into various strongly interacting electronic states. Motivated in particular by the capability to discern the spin polarization of quantum Hall states, we apply hydrostatic pressure up to 10 kbar to a two dimensional electron system (2DES) in a high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well. This 2DES is subjected to milliKelvin temperatures and strong magnetic fields to observe the effect of pressure on fractional quantum Hall states, especially those in higher Landau levels, a regime not previously studied under pressure. We report our findings, focusing on the observation of a pressure-driven transition from a fractional quantum Hall state to the quantum Hall nematic phase in the second Landau level. Grants: Researchers at Purdue and N. Samkharadze: US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, DE-SC0006671. E. Fradkin: US NSF, DMR 1408713.

  7. Reading pulmonary vascular pressure tracings. How to handle the problems of zero leveling and respiratory swings.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gabor; Avian, Alexander; Pienn, Michael; Naeije, Robert; Olschewski, Horst

    2014-08-01

    The accuracy of pulmonary vascular pressure measurements is of great diagnostic and prognostic relevance. However, there is variability of zero leveling procedures, and the current recommendation of end-expiratory reading may not always be adequate. A review of physiological and anatomical data, supported by recent imaging, leads to the practical recommendation of zero leveling at the cross-section of three transthoracic planes, which are, respectively midchest frontal, transverse through the fourth intercostal space, and midsagittal. As for the inevitable respiratory pressure swings, end-expiratory reading at functional residual capacity allows for minimal influence of elastic lung recoil on pulmonary pressure reading. However, hyperventilation is associated with changes in end-expiratory lung volume and increased intrathoracic pressure, eventually exacerbated by expiratory muscle contraction and dynamic hyperinflation, all increasing pulmonary vascular pressures. This problem is amplified in patients with obstructed airways. With the exception of dynamic hyperinflation states, it is reasonable to assume that negative inspiratory and positive expiratory intrathoracic pressures cancel each other out, so averaging pulmonary vascular pressures over several respiratory cycles is most often preferable. This recommendation may be generalized for the purpose of consistency and makes sense, as pulmonary blood flow measurements are not corrected for phasic inspiratory and expiratory changes in clinical practice. PMID:24869464

  8. Determining the response of sea level to atmospheric pressure forcing using TOPEX/POSEIDON data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Pihos, Greg

    1994-01-01

    The static response of sea level to the forcing of atmospheric pressure, the so-called inverted barometer (IB) effect, is investigated using TOPEX/POSEIDON data. This response, characterized by the rise and fall of sea level to compensate for the change of atmospheric pressure at a rate of -1 cm/mbar, is not associated with any ocean currents and hence is normally treated as an error to be removed from sea level observation. Linear regression and spectral transfer function analyses are applied to sea level and pressure to examine the validity of the IB effect. In regions outside the tropics, the regression coefficient is found to be consistently close to the theoretical value except for the regions of western boundary currents, where the mesoscale variability interferes with the IB effect. The spectral transfer function shows near IB response at periods of 30 degrees is -0.84 +/- 0.29 cm/mbar (1 standard deviation). The deviation from = 1 cm /mbar is shown to be caused primarily by the effect of wind forcing on sea level, based on multivariate linear regression model involving both pressure and wind forcing. The regression coefficient for pressure resulting from the multivariate analysis is -0.96 +/- 0.32 cm/mbar. In the tropics the multivariate analysis fails because sea level in the tropics is primarily responding to remote wind forcing. However, after removing from the data the wind-forced sea level estimated by a dynamic model of the tropical Pacific, the pressure regression coefficient improves from -1.22 +/- 0.69 cm/mbar to -0.99 +/- 0.46 cm/mbar, clearly revealing an IB response. The result of the study suggests that with a proper removal of the effect of wind forcing the IB effect is valid in most of the open ocean at periods longer than 20 days and spatial scales larger than 500 km.

  9. Association of Blood Lead level with Elevated Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alghasham, Abdullah A.; Meki, Abdel-Raheim M.A.; Ismail, Hisham A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Lead is a metal with many important industrial uses. The relationship between lead exposure and the rise of blood pressure has received a great deal of attention as it was implicated that the mortality from cardiovascular diseases might be reduced by lowering lead levels in the environment. Objectives: The study was to investigate the correlation between the blood lead (B-Pb) levels and the values of blood pressure in hypertensive patients. Moreover, the plasma activities of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), plasma levels of nitric oxide (NO), total antioxidants (TAOX) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were estimated to investigate the correlations between the measured parameters and B-Pb levels in hypertensive patients. Methods: Fifty-five hypertensive patients were compared with fifty-three age and sex matched control group. The B-Pb levels were detected by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The plasma levels of ACE activities, NO, TAOX and MDA were measured by colorimetric methods. Results: In the hypertensive patients, B-Pb levels were significantly higher than controls. Concomitantly, the plasma levels of ACE activities and MDA were significantly increased while the plasma levels of NO and TAOX were significantly reduced in the hypertensive patients in comparison with controls. There were significant positive correlations between B-Pb and each of MDA, and systolic as well as diastolic blood pressure. Conversely, a significant negative correlation was found between B-Pb and NO. Conclusions: Our study indicated that a positive relationship exists between blood pressure and B-Pb levels. The increased B-Pb levels were associated with oxidative stress. Moreover, The B-Pb level was negatively correlated with NO and this may clarify the implication of Pb as leading risk factor for the cardiovascular diseases and hypertension. These findings provide support for continued efforts to reduce lead concentration in the population at Qassim region. PMID:22489226

  10. Pressure Dependence of Excitation Cross Sections for Resonant Levels of Rare Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Michael D.; Chilton, J. Ethan; Lin, Chun C.

    2000-06-01

    In the rare gases, the excited n'p^5ns and n'p^5nd levels with J = 1 are optically coupled to ground as well as lower lying p levels. Resonant photons emitted when the atom decays to ground can be reabsorbed by another ground-state atom. At low gas pressures this reabsorption occurs infrequently, but at higher pressures becomes increasingly likely until the resonant transition is completely suppressed. This enhances the cascade transitions into lower p levels, resulting in pressure dependent optical emission cross sections. This reabsorption process can be understood quantitatively with a model developed by Heddle et al(D. W. O. Heddle and N. J. Samuel, J. Phys. B 3), 1593 (1970).. The radiation from transitions into the nonresonant levels often lie in the ir, while the resonant radiation is always in the uv spectral region. Using a Fourier-transform spectrometer, one can measure the cross sections for the ir transitions as a function of pressure. The Heddle model can be fit to these data with the use of theoretical values for the Einstein A coefficients. This provides a test of the accuracy of calculated A values. Discussion will include cross section measurements for Ne, Ar, and Kr excited by electron impact over a range of gas pressures.

  11. Bivariate wavelet-based clustering of sea-level and atmospheric pressure time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Susana; Gouveia, Sonia; Scotto, Manuel; Alonso, Andres

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric pressure is responsible for a downward force acting on the sea surface which is compensated, to some extent, by corresponding sea-level variations. The static response of the sea surface can be linearly modelled, a decrease (increase) in atmospheric pressure of 1 mb raising (depressing) sea level by 1 cm. However, the dynamic sea surface response to atmospheric pressure loading, associated with ocean dynamics and wind effects, is scale-dependent and difficult to establish. The present study addresses the co-variability of sea-level and pressure time series in the Baltic Sea from the bivariate analysis of tide gauge and reanalysis records. The time series are normalised by the corresponding standard deviation and the wavelet covariance is computed as a measure of the association between sea-level and pressure across scales. A clustering procedure using a dissimilarity matrix based on the wavelet covariance is then implemented. Different classical clustering techniques, including average, single and complete linkage criteria are applied and the group linkage is selected in order to maximise the dendrogram's goodness-of-fit.

  12. Evaluation of pressure transducers to measure surface level in the waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.J.; Colson, J.B.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the results of tests conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine if pressure transducers can be used to measure the surface level in the waste tanks. A survey was first conducted to evaluate which, if any, commercially available pressure transducers were available that could meet the requirements for use in the waste tanks. More than 35 companies were contacted to determine if they manufactured a pressure transducer that could be used in the 101-SY waste tank. The three basic requirements for a pressure transducer for this application were that they were radiation-hardened, could withstand a caustic environment, and were certified to be intrinsically safe. No manufacturer was able to meet all three of these requirements with a commercially available product. Seven companies were able to meet the requirements for being radiation-hardened and being able to withstand the caustic environment. However, only two of the nine companies were willing to supply a pressure transducer for laboratory testing. The two pressure transducers that were tested in this program were the VEGA D36-38 from HiTech Technologies, Inc., and the KP-1911-A from Kaman Instrumentation Corporation. Pressure transducers operate on the principle that the pressure at the location of a sensor increases directly with the depth of the liquid above it. A liquid is required in order for these devices to operate. For these tests, water was first used to determine the ideal operation of the devices, then the devices were placed in a 101-SY waste tank simulant. The simulant had a specific gravity of 1.96 and had the consistency similar to the convective layer in the 101-SY waste tank. In order to determine the surface level with pressure transducers, the density of the material needs to be known.

  13. Force-endurance capabilities of extravehicular activity (EVA) gloves at different pressure levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishu, Ram R.; Klute, Glenn K.

    1993-01-01

    The human hand is a very useful multipurpose tool in all environments. However, performance capabilities are compromised considerably when gloves are donned. This is especially true to extravehicular activity (EVA) gloves. The primary intent was to answer the question of how long a person can perform tasks requiring certain levels of exertion. The objective was to develop grip force-endurance relations. Six subjects participated in a factorial experiment involving three hand conditions, three pressure differentials, and four levels of force exertion. The results indicate that, while the force that could be exerted depended on the glove, pressure differential, and the level of exertion, the endurance time at any exertion level depended just on the level of exertion expressed as a percentage of maximum exertion possible at that condition. The impact of these findings for practitioners as well as theoreticians is discussed.

  14. Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustic Measurements in a Highly Back-Pressured Scramjet Isolator Model: A Research Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Troy F.; Balla, Robert J.; Baurle, Robert A.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2008-01-01

    Under the Propulsion Discipline of NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program s Hypersonics Project, a test apparatus, for testing a scramjet isolator model, is being constructed at NASA's Langley Research Center. The test apparatus will incorporate a 1-inch by 2-inch by 15-inch-long scramjet isolator model supplied with 2.1 lbm/sec of unheated dry air through a Mach 2.5 converging-diverging nozzle. The planned research will incorporate progressively more challenging measurement techniques to characterize the flow field within the isolator, concluding with the application of the Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustic (LITA) measurement technique. The primary goal of this research is to use the data acquired to validate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models employed to characterize the complex flow field of a scramjet isolator. This paper describes the test apparatus being constructed, pre-test CFD simulations, and the LITA measurement technique.

  15. Simulation of the spatial distribution of the acoustic pressure in sonochemical reactors with numerical methods: a review.

    PubMed

    Tudela, Ignacio; Sáez, Verónica; Esclapez, María Deseada; Díez-García, María Isabel; Bonete, Pedro; González-García, José

    2014-05-01

    Numerical methods for the calculation of the acoustic field inside sonoreactors have rapidly emerged in the last 15 years. This paper summarizes some of the most important works on this topic presented in the past, along with the diverse numerical works that have been published since then, reviewing the state of the art from a qualitative point of view. In this sense, we illustrate and discuss some of the models recently developed by the scientific community to deal with some of the complex events that take place in a sonochemical reactor such as the vibration of the reactor walls and the nonlinear phenomena inherent to the presence of ultrasonic cavitation. In addition, we point out some of the upcoming challenges that must be addressed in order to develop a reliable tool for the proper designing of efficient sonoreactors and the scale-up of sonochemical processes. PMID:24355287

  16. Dietary Oily Fish Intake and Blood Pressure Levels: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Mera, Robertino M; Gillman, Jennifer; Castillo, Pablo R; Zambrano, Mauricio; Ha, Jung-Eun

    2016-04-01

    The effect of fish consumption on blood pressure is controversial. The authors measured blood pressure and calculated oily fish servings per week in 677 community-dwellers aged 40 years and older living in rural coastal Ecuador. Using regression models with linear splines, the authors evaluated whether dietary fish intake was related to blood pressure levels, after adjusting for relevant confounders. Mean oily fish consumption was 9.1±5.6 servings per week. There was a nonlinear relationship between systolic pressure and fish servings. In the group of individuals consuming up to five servings per week, each serving significantly reduced systolic pressure by 2.3 mm Hg (P=.020). Any extra serving provided no further effects. The study shows an inverse relationship between oily fish consumption and systolic pressure. Currently recommended amounts of dietary oily fish intake per week (1-2 servings) might be insufficient to exert beneficial effects of fish in the control of blood pressure. PMID:26395549

  17. A Lateral Differential Resonant Pressure Microsensor Based on SOI-Glass Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bo; Xing, Yonghao; Wang, Yanshuang; Chen, Jian; Chen, Deyong; Wang, Junbo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of a resonant pressure microsensor based on SOI-glass wafer-level vacuum packaging. The SOI-based pressure microsensor consists of a pressure-sensitive diaphragm at the handle layer and two lateral resonators (electrostatic excitation and capacitive detection) on the device layer as a differential setup. The resonators were vacuum packaged with a glass cap using anodic bonding and the wire interconnection was realized using a mask-free electrochemical etching approach by selectively patterning an Au film on highly topographic surfaces. The fabricated resonant pressure microsensor with dual resonators was characterized in a systematic manner, producing a quality factor higher than 10,000 (~6 months), a sensitivity of about 166 Hz/kPa and a reduced nonlinear error of 0.033% F.S. Based on the differential output, the sensitivity was increased to two times and the temperature-caused frequency drift was decreased to 25%. PMID:26402679

  18. A Lateral Differential Resonant Pressure Microsensor Based on SOI-Glass Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bo; Xing, Yonghao; Wang, Yanshuang; Chen, Jian; Chen, Deyong; Wang, Junbo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of a resonant pressure microsensor based on SOI-glass wafer-level vacuum packaging. The SOI-based pressure microsensor consists of a pressure-sensitive diaphragm at the handle layer and two lateral resonators (electrostatic excitation and capacitive detection) on the device layer as a differential setup. The resonators were vacuum packaged with a glass cap using anodic bonding and the wire interconnection was realized using a mask-free electrochemical etching approach by selectively patterning an Au film on highly topographic surfaces. The fabricated resonant pressure microsensor with dual resonators was characterized in a systematic manner, producing a quality factor higher than 10,000 (~6 months), a sensitivity of about 166 Hz/kPa and a reduced nonlinear error of 0.033% F.S. Based on the differential output, the sensitivity was increased to two times and the temperature-caused frequency drift was decreased to 25%. PMID:26402679

  19. Community Characteristics are Associated with Blood Pressure Levels in a Racially Integrated Community.

    PubMed

    Samuel, L J; Thorpe, R J; Bower, K M; LaVeist, T A

    2015-06-01

    Community problems have been associated with higher, and community resources and social cohesion with lower, blood pressure. However, prior studies have not accounted for potential confounding by residential racial segregation. This study tested associations between community characteristics and blood pressure levels and prevalent hypertension in a racially integrated community. The Exploring Health Disparities in Integrated Communities Study measured blood pressure in residents of two contiguous racially integrated and low-income US Census Tracts. Community characteristics included a standardized community problem score and binary indicators for community social cohesion, having a community leader available, and having at least one community resource observed on the participant's block. In adjusted models, greater community problems and proximity to resources were associated with lower systolic (β = -2.020, p = 0.028; β = -4.132, p = 0.010) and diastolic (β = -1.261, p = 0.038; β = -2.290, 0.031) blood pressure, respectively, among whites (n = 548). Social cohesion was associated with higher systolic (β = 4.905, p = 0.009) and diastolic blood pressure (β = 3.379, p = 0.008) among African Americans (n = 777). In one racially integrated low-income community, community characteristics were associated with blood pressure levels, and associations differed by race. Directions of associations for two findings differed from prior studies; greater community problem was associated with lower blood pressure in whites and community social cohesion was associated with higher blood pressure in African Americans. These findings may be due to exposure to adverse environmental conditions and hypertensive risk factors in this low-income community. PMID:25665523

  20. Hybrid optical and acoustic force based sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahoney, Paul; Brodie, Graham W.; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E. M.; Cochran, Sandy; Spalding, Gabriel C.; MacDonald, Michael P.

    2014-09-01

    We report the combined use of optical sorting and acoustic levitation to give particle sorting. Differing sizes of microparticles are sorted optically both with and without the aid of acoustic levitation, and the results compared to show that the use of acoustic trapping can increase sorting efficiency. The use of a transparent ultrasonic transducer is also shown to streamline the integration of optics and acoustics. We also demonstrate the balance of optical radiation pressure and acoustic levitation to achieve vertical sorting.

  1. Bilayer graphene under pressure: Electron-hole symmetry breaking, valley Hall effect, and Landau levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, F.; Collado, H. P. Ojeda; Usaj, Gonzalo; Sofo, Jorge O.; Balseiro, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    The electronic structure of bilayer graphene under pressure develops very interesting features with an enhancement of the trigonal warping and a splitting of the parabolic touching bands at the K point of the reciprocal space into four Dirac cones, one at K and three along the T symmetry lines. As pressure is increased, these cones separate in reciprocal space and in energy, breaking the electron-hole symmetry. Due to their energy separation, their opposite Berry curvature can be observed in valley Hall effect experiments and in the structure of the Landau levels. Based on the electronic structure obtained by density functional theory, we develop a low energy Hamiltonian that describes the effects of pressure on measurable quantities such as the Hall conductivity and the Landau levels of the system.

  2. An occultation satellite system for determining pressure levels in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, A. R.; Vngar, S. G.; Lusignan, B. B.

    1974-01-01

    A two-satellite microwave occultation system is described that will fix, as an absolute function of altitude, the pressure-temperature profile generated by a passive infrared sounder. The 300 mb pressure level is determined to within 24 m rms, assuming the temperture errors produced by the infrared sensor are not greater than 2 K rms. Error caused by water vapor in the radio path is corrected by climatological adjustments. A ground test of the proposed system is described. A microwave signal propagating between two mountain tops was found to be subject to periods of intense fading. Computer analysis of the raypath between the transmitting and receiving stations indicates that multipath and defocusing were responsible for this fading. It is unlikely that an operational pressure-reference-level system will be subject to the deep fades observed in the ground test, because the phenomena are associated with lower altitudes than the closest approach altitude of an occultation-system raypath.

  3. THE HABITABLE ZONE OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS WITH DIFFERENT LEVELS OF ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Vladilo, Giovanni; Murante, Giuseppe; Silva, Laura; Provenzale, Antonello; Ferri, Gaia; Ragazzini, Gregorio

    2013-04-10

    As a contribution to the study of the habitability of extrasolar planets, we implemented a one-dimensional energy balance model (EBM), the simplest seasonal model of planetary climate, with new prescriptions for most physical quantities. Here we apply our EBM to investigate the surface habitability of planets with an Earth-like atmospheric composition but different levels of surface pressure. The habitability, defined as the mean fraction of the planet's surface on which liquid water could exist, is estimated from the pressure-dependent liquid water temperature range, taking into account seasonal and latitudinal variations of surface temperature. By running several thousands of EBM simulations we generated a map of the habitable zone (HZ) in the plane of the orbital semi-major axis, a, and surface pressure, p, for planets in circular orbits around a Sun-like star. As pressure increases, the HZ becomes broader, with an increase of 0.25 AU in its radial extent from p = 1/3 to 3 bar. At low pressure, the habitability is low and varies with a; at high pressure, the habitability is high and relatively constant inside the HZ. We interpret these results in terms of the pressure dependence of the greenhouse effect, the efficiency of horizontal heat transport, and the extent of the liquid water temperature range. Within the limits discussed in the paper, the results can be extended to planets in eccentric orbits around non-solar-type stars. The main characteristics of the pressure-dependent HZ are modestly affected by variations of planetary properties, particularly at high pressure.

  4. Interactions of several lipid-related gene polymorphisms and cigarette smoking on blood pressure levels.

    PubMed

    Yin, Rui-Xing; Wu, Dong-Feng; Wu, Jin-Zhen; Cao, Xiao-Li; Aung, Lynn Htet Htet; Miao, Lin; Long, Xing-Jiang; Liu, Wan-Ying; Zhang, Lin; Li, Meng

    2012-01-01

    The interactions of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and cigarette smoking on blood pressure levels are limited. The present study was undertaken to detect nine lipid-related SNPs and their interactions with cigarette smoking on blood pressure levels. Genotyping of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA-1) V825I, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) rs1044925, low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) AvaⅡ, hepatic lipase gene (LIPC) -250G>A, endothelial lipase gene (LIPG) 584C>T, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C>T, proprotein convertase subtilisin-like kexin type 9 (PCSK9) E670G, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARD) +294T>C, and Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SCARB1) rs5888 was performed in 935 nonsmokers and 845 smokers. The interactions were detected by factorial regression analysis. The frequencies of genotypes (ACAT-1 and LIPG), alleles (ABCA-1), and both genotypes and alleles (LDL-R, LIPC, PPARD and SCARB1) were different between nonsmokers and smokers (P < 0.05-0.001). The levels of pulse pressure (PP, ABCA-1), and systolic, diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP) and PP (LIPC) in nonsmokers were different among the genotypes (P < 0.01-0.001). The levels of SBP (ABCA-1, ACAT-1, LIPG and PCSK9), DBP (ACAT-1, LDL-R, LIPC, PCSK9 and PPARD), and PP (LIPC, LIPG, MTHFR and PCSK9) in smokers were different among the genotypes (P < 0.01-0.001). The SNPs of ABCA-1, ACAT-1 and PCSK9; ACAT-1, LDL-R, MTHFR and PCSK9; and ABCA-1, LIPC, PCSK9 and PPARD were shown interactions with cigarette smoking to influence SBP, DBP and PP levels (P < 0.05-0.001); respectively. The differences in blood pressure levels between the nonsmokers and smokers might partly result from different interactions of several SNPs and cigarette smoking. PMID:22606049

  5. Carotid baroreceptor influence on forearm vascular resistance during low level lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Cynthia A.; Ludwig, David A.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    The degree of forearm vasoconstriction induced by low levels of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) provides a measure of the responsiveness of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex. The validity of this measurement is based on the assumption that this vasoconstriction response is not influenced by unloading of carotid baroreceptors. To test the hypothesis that arterial baroreceptor unloading does not alter the degree of forearm vascular resistance during low levels of LBNP, 12 subjects were exposed to -15 and -20 mm Hg LBNP with and without additional artificial (+ 10 mm Hg neck pressure) unloading of the carotid baroreceptors. There was no measurable influence of carotid unloading on forearm vascular resistance at either level of LBNP. It is concluded that forearm vascular resistance measured during cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading is unaffected by carotid baroreceptor unloading within the magnitude encountered during low levels of LBNP.

  6. Effect of Different Levels of Pressure Relieving Air-Mattress Firmness on Cough Strength

    PubMed Central

    Kamikawa, Norimichi; Taito, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Makoto; Sekikawa, Kiyokazu; Hamada, Hironobu

    2016-01-01

    Cough is an important host-defense mechanism. The elderly and patients who are severely ill cannot cough effectively when lying in the supine position. Furthermore, pressure relieving air-mattresses are recommended for preventing the development of pressure ulcers. In this study, we clarified whether or not the cough peak flow (CPF), an index of cough strength, is affected by different firmness levels of a pressure relieving air-mattress in healthy volunteers in the supine position. Fifty-two healthy young men participated. All the measurements were carried out on each participant in the supine position on a pressure relieving air-mattress. The participants were assessed at two firmness levels, a “hard” and “soft” mode. The CPF, forced vital capacity (FVC), maximal expiratory pressure (PEmax), and maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax) were determined for each mode. The sinking distance of the body into the mattress was measured without any activity and the difference between the sinking distances of the two firmness levels was determined. The CPF, FVC, PEmax, and PImax were determined for each mode. The sinking distance of the body into the mattress was measured and the difference between the sinking distances of the two firmness levels was determined. The CPF, FVC, PEmax and PImax values of the participants coughing on the mattress were significantly lower when the mattress was in “soft” than in “hard” mode. The differences between the sinking distances of the mattress in “soft” and “hard” modes were larger for the anterior superior iliac spine. A harder mattress may lead to increased CPF in healthy young men lying in the supine position, and increased CPF may be important for host defense. PMID:26741497

  7. Effect of Different Levels of Pressure Relieving Air-Mattress Firmness on Cough Strength.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Norimichi; Taito, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Makoto; Sekikawa, Kiyokazu; Hamada, Hironobu

    2016-01-01

    Cough is an important host-defense mechanism. The elderly and patients who are severely ill cannot cough effectively when lying in the supine position. Furthermore, pressure relieving air-mattresses are recommended for preventing the development of pressure ulcers. In this study, we clarified whether or not the cough peak flow (CPF), an index of cough strength, is affected by different firmness levels of a pressure relieving air-mattress in healthy volunteers in the supine position. Fifty-two healthy young men participated. All the measurements were carried out on each participant in the supine position on a pressure relieving air-mattress. The participants were assessed at two firmness levels, a "hard" and "soft" mode. The CPF, forced vital capacity (FVC), maximal expiratory pressure (PEmax), and maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax) were determined for each mode. The sinking distance of the body into the mattress was measured without any activity and the difference between the sinking distances of the two firmness levels was determined. The CPF, FVC, PEmax, and PImax were determined for each mode. The sinking distance of the body into the mattress was measured and the difference between the sinking distances of the two firmness levels was determined. The CPF, FVC, PEmax and PImax values of the participants coughing on the mattress were significantly lower when the mattress was in "soft" than in "hard" mode. The differences between the sinking distances of the mattress in "soft" and "hard" modes were larger for the anterior superior iliac spine. A harder mattress may lead to increased CPF in healthy young men lying in the supine position, and increased CPF may be important for host defense. PMID:26741497

  8. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  9. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  10. Theoretical model of ice nucleation induced by acoustic cavitation. Part 1: Pressure and temperature profiles around a single bubble.

    PubMed

    Cogné, C; Labouret, S; Peczalski, R; Louisnard, O; Baillon, F; Espitalier, F

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with the inertial cavitation of a single gas bubble in a liquid submitted to an ultrasonic wave. The aim was to calculate accurately the pressure and temperature at the bubble wall and in the liquid adjacent to the wall just before and just after the collapse. Two different approaches were proposed for modeling the heat transfer between the ambient liquid and the gas: the simplified approach (A) with liquid acting as perfect heat sink, the rigorous approach (B) with liquid acting as a normal heat conducting medium. The time profiles of the bubble radius, gas temperature, interface temperature and pressure corresponding to the above models were compared and important differences were observed excepted for the bubble size. The exact pressure and temperature distributions in the liquid corresponding to the second model (B) were also presented. These profiles are necessary for the prediction of any physical phenomena occurring around the cavitation bubble, with possible applications to sono-crystallization. PMID:26044460

  11. The Measurement of the Oral and Nasal Sound Pressure Levels of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Wayne M.

    1975-01-01

    A nasal separator was used to measure the oral and nasal components in the speech of a normal adult Australian population. Results indicated no difference in oral and nasal sound pressure levels for read versus spontaneous speech samples; however, females tended to have a higher nasal component than did males. (Author/TL)

  12. Assessment of Knowledge and Level of Satisfaction of Nursing Undergraduates in a Pressure Ulcer Online Course

    PubMed Central

    Aroldi, Juscilynne B. C.; Peres, Heloisa H. H.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the effectiveness of two different educational modalities in an online course on pressure ulcers by comparing the degree of knowledge and level of satisfaction of nursing undergraduate students. The result will ground the adoption of Information and Communication Technologies in the teaching process in nursing. PMID:24199036

  13. Data quality assurance in pressure transducer-based automatic water level monitoring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Submersible pressure transducers integrated with data loggers have become relatively common water-level measuring devices used in flow or well water elevation measurements. However, drift, linearity, hysteresis and other problems can lead to erroneous data. Researchers at the USDA-ARS in Watkinsvill...

  14. Love Deprivation and Blood Pressure Levels among a College Population: A Preliminary Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisca, Samuel S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Viewed within the general context of Selye's theory of environmentally induced stress, we tested the hypothesis that blood pressure levels would vary inversely with the degree of loving responses our subjects received from those with whom they interact on a frequent basis. Preliminary data support this hypothesis, especially among our older…

  15. Pressurized high frequency thermoacoustic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Nicholas D.

    Acoustic heat engines show much promise for converting waste heat to electricity. Since most applications require high power levels, high frequency thermoacoustic engines can reach such performance by operating with a pressurized working gas. Results on a 3 kHz prime mover, consisting of a quarter-wave resonator and a random stack material between two heat exchangers, show that the acoustic power from such a device is raised substantially as the working gas is pressurized. At pressures up to approximately 10 bar, the increase in acoustic power is approximately linear to the increase in pressure, and thus is an effective way to increase the power output of thermoacoustic engines. Since the heat input was not changed during the experiments, the increases in acoustic power translate directly to increases in engine efficiency which is calculated as the output acoustic power divided by the input heat power. In most experiments run in this study, the engine efficiency increased by a factor of at least 4 as the pressure was increased from 2 bar up to about 10 bar. Further increases in pressure lead to acoustic power saturation and eventual attenuation. This is most likely due to a combination of several factors including the shrinking thermal penetration depth, and the fact that the losses increase faster with pressure in a random stack material than in traditional parallel plates. Pressurization also leads to a lower DeltaT for onset of oscillations in the range of 10 bar of mean pressure, potentially opening up even more heat sources that can power a thermoacoustic engine. Results from another 3 kHz engine, one that was pressurized itself as opposed to being placed in a pressurized chamber, are also presented. The configuration of this engine solves the problem of how to simultaneously pressurize the engine and inject heat into the hot heat exchanger. It was also noted that the geometry of the resonator cavity in the quarter wavelength pressurized engine plays an

  16. Comment on "Increase in voice level and speaker comfort in lecture rooms" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 2072-2082 (2009)] (L).

    PubMed

    Pelegrín-García, David

    2011-03-01

    Recently, a paper written by Brunskog Gade, Payá-Ballester and Reig-Calbo, "Increase in voice level and speaker comfort in lecture rooms" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 2072-2082 (2009)] related teachers' variation in vocal intensity during lecturing to the room acoustic conditions, introducing an objective parameter called "room gain" to describe these variations. In a failed attempt to replicate the objective measurements by Brunskog et al., a simplified and improved method for the calculation of room gain is proposed, in addition with an alternative magnitude called "voice support." The measured parameters are consistent with those of other studies and are used here to build two empirical models relating the voice power levels measured by Brunskog et al., to the room gain and the voice support. PMID:21428479

  17. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2012-01-01

    Launch environments, such as Liftoff Acoustic (LOA) and Ignition Overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA which are used in the development of the vibro-acoustic environments. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe to mitigate at the component level, reduction of the launch environments is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I launch environments and to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to the Ares I LOA predictions and water suppression effectiveness results are presented.

  18. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2012-01-01

    Launch environments, such as Liftoff Acoustic (LOA) and Ignition Overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA which are used in the development of the vibro-acoustic environments. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe to mitigate at the component level, reduction of the launch environments is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I launch environments and to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to the Ares I LOA predictions and water suppression effectiveness results are presented.

  19. A national project to evaluate and reduce high sound pressure levels from music.

    PubMed

    Ryberg, Johanna Bengtsson

    2009-01-01

    The highest recommended sound pressure levels for leisure sounds (music) in Sweden are 100 dB LAeq and 115 dB LAFmax for adults, and 97 dB LAeq and 110 dB LAFmax where children under the age of 13 have access. For arrangements intended for children, levels should be consistently less than 90 dB LAeq. In 2005, a national project was carried out with the aim of improving environments with high sound pressure levels from music, such as concert halls, restaurants, and cinemas. The project covered both live and recorded music. Of Sweden's 290 municipalities, 134 took part in the project, and 93 of these carried out sound measurements. Four hundred and seventy one establishments were investigated, 24% of which exceeded the highest recommended sound pressure levels for leisure sounds in Sweden. Of festival and concert events, 42% exceeded the recommended levels. Those who visit music events/establishments thus run a relatively high risk of exposure to harmful sound levels. Continued supervision in this field is therefore crucial. PMID:19414933

  20. Acoustics Critical Readiness Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the status of the acoustic equipment from the medical operations perspective. Included is information about the acoustic dosimeters, sound level meter, and headphones that are planned for use while on orbit. Finally there is information about on-orbit hearing assessments.

  1. Particle analysis in an acoustic cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for acoustically manipulating one or more particles. Acoustically manipulated particles may be separated by size. The particles may be flowed in a flow stream and acoustic radiation pressure, which may be radial, may be applied to the flow stream. This application of acoustic radiation pressure may separate the particles. In one embodiment, the particles may be separated by size, and as a further example, the larger particles may be transported to a central axis.

  2. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  3. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  4. Vocal communication in a complex multi-level society: constrained acoustic structure and flexible call usage in Guinea baboons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To understand the evolution of acoustic communication in animals, it is important to distinguish between the structure and the usage of vocal signals, since both aspects are subject to different constraints. In terrestrial mammals, the structure of calls is largely innate, while individuals have a greater ability to actively initiate or withhold calls. In closely related taxa, one would therefore predict a higher flexibility in call usage compared to call structure. In the present study, we investigated the vocal repertoire of free living Guinea baboons (Papio papio) and examined the structure and usage of the animals’ vocal signals. Guinea baboons live in a complex multi-level social organization and exhibit a largely tolerant and affiliative social style, contrary to most other baboon taxa. To classify the vocal repertoire of male and female Guinea baboons, cluster analyses were used and focal observations were conducted to assess the usage of vocal signals in the particular contexts. Results In general, the vocal repertoire of Guinea baboons largely corresponded to the vocal repertoire other baboon taxa. The usage of calls, however, differed considerably from other baboon taxa and corresponded with the specific characteristics of the Guinea baboons’ social behaviour. While Guinea baboons showed a diminished usage of contest and display vocalizations (a common pattern observed in chacma baboons), they frequently used vocal signals during affiliative and greeting interactions. Conclusions Our study shows that the call structure of primates is largely unaffected by the species’ social system (including grouping patterns and social interactions), while the usage of calls can be more flexibly adjusted, reflecting the quality of social interactions of the individuals. Our results support the view that the primary function of social signals is to regulate social interactions, and therefore the degree of competition and cooperation may be more important

  5. Several lipid-related gene polymorphisms interact with overweight/obesity to modulate blood pressure levels.

    PubMed

    Yin, Rui-Xing; Wu, Dong-Feng; Aung, Lynn Htet Htet; Yan, Ting-Ting; Cao, Xiao-Li; Long, Xing-Jiang; Miao, Lin; Liu, Wan-Ying; Zhang, Lin; Li, Meng

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the interactions of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overweight/obesity on blood pressure levels. The present study was undertaken to detect 10 lipid-related gene SNPs and their interactions with overweight/obesity on blood pressure levels. Genotyping of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA-1) V825I, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) rs1044925, low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) AvaII hepatic lipase gene (LIPC) -250G > A, endothelial lipase gene (LIPG) 584C > T, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C > T, the E3 ubiquitin ligase myosin regulatory light chain-interacting protein (MYLIP) rs3757354, proprotein convertase subtilisin-like kexin type 9 (PCSK9) E670G, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARD) +294T > C, and Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SCARB1) rs5888 was performed in 978 normal weight and 751 overweight/obese subjects. The interactions were detected by factorial regression analysis. The genotypes of ACAT-1 AC, LIPC GA and AA, and SCARB1 TT; LDL-R A-A- and LIPC GA; and SCARB1 TT were interacted with overweight/obesity to increase systolic, diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP) and pulse pressure (PP) levels; respectively. The genotypes of ACAT-1 CC; ACAT-1 AA and CC were interacted with overweight/obesity to decrease SBP, PP levels (p < 0.01-0.001); respectively. The differences in blood pressure levels between normal weight and overweight/obese subjects might partly result from different interactions of several SNPs and overweight/obesity. PMID:23109900

  6. Several Lipid-Related Gene Polymorphisms Interact with Overweight/Obesity to Modulate Blood Pressure Levels

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Rui-Xing; Wu, Dong-Feng; Aung, Lynn Htet Htet; Yan, Ting-Ting; Cao, Xiao-Li; Long, Xing-Jiang; Miao, Lin; Liu, Wan-Ying; Zhang, Lin; Li, Meng

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the interactions of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overweight/obesity on blood pressure levels. The present study was undertaken to detect 10 lipid-related gene SNPs and their interactions with overweight/obesity on blood pressure levels. Genotyping of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA-1) V825I, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) rs1044925, low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) AvaII hepatic lipase gene (LIPC) −250G > A, endothelial lipase gene (LIPG) 584C > T, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C > T, the E3 ubiquitin ligase myosin regulatory light chain-interacting protein (MYLIP) rs3757354, proprotein convertase subtilisin-like kexin type 9 (PCSK9) E670G, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARD) +294T > C, and Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SCARB1) rs5888 was performed in 978 normal weight and 751 overweight/obese subjects. The interactions were detected by factorial regression analysis. The genotypes of ACAT-1 AC, LIPC GA and AA, and SCARB1 TT; LDL-R A-A- and LIPC GA; and SCARB1 TT were interacted with overweight/obesity to increase systolic, diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP) and pulse pressure (PP) levels; respectively. The genotypes of ACAT-1 CC; ACAT-1 AA and CC were interacted with overweight/obesity to decrease SBP, PP levels (p < 0.01–0.001); respectively. The differences in blood pressure levels between normal weight and overweight/obese subjects might partly result from different interactions of several SNPs and overweight/obesity. PMID:23109900

  7. Vesuvius acoustic emissions, deformation, seismicity - an inflating and deflating system by a time varying hot fluid pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparo, G.; Coppa, U.; Gregori, G. P.; Luongo, G.; Taloni, T.

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic Emissions (AE) allow for clear assessment of the times when AE sources appear 3D distributed in space, envisaging a likely origin by hot fluid diffusion through rock pores, in contrast to times when AE sources denote some more 2D than mere 3D spatial distribution, envisaging an origin by micro-cracks, much like e.g. along a cleavage plane of a crystal. Hence, the AE recorded on a dyke of a volcano recognize the role of hot fluids (having great mobility underground) compared to the role of plutonic intrusions (producing cracks, due to the extremely low mobility of magma underground). AE provide per se with a high sensitivity and time resolution, and recognise inflation and deflation times. AE ought to be correlated with soil degassing and topographical micro-deformations. In contrast, seismic monitoring has a much lower time resolution, as it is concerned with time- and energy-integrated effects, which appear likely to be triggered by the weight of the edifice. Vesuvius is a good test case history. The state of the art is reported about correlation studies between AE, precision topography, and seismicity.

  8. Linking Myometrial Physiology to Intrauterine Pressure; How Tissue-Level Contractions Create Uterine Contractions of Labor

    PubMed Central

    Young, Roger C.; Barendse, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms used to coordinate uterine contractions are not known. We develop a new model based on the proposal that there is a maximum distance to which action potentials can propagate in the uterine wall. This establishes “regions”, where one action potential burst can rapidly recruit all the tissue. Regions are recruited into an organ-level contraction via a stretch-initiated contraction mechanism (myometrial myogenic response). Each uterine contraction begins with a regional contraction, which slightly increases intrauterine pressure. Higher pressure raises tension throughout the uterine wall, which initiates contractions of more regions and further increases pressure. The positive feedback synchronizes regional contractions into an organ-level contraction. Cellular automaton (CA) simulations are performed with Mathematica. Each “cell” is a region that is assigned an action potential threshold. An anatomy sensitivity factor converts intrauterine pressure to regional tension through the Law of Laplace. A regional contraction occurs when regional tension exceeds regional threshold. Other input variables are: starting and minimum pressure, burst and refractory period durations, enhanced contractile activity during an electrical burst, and reduced activity during the refractory period. Complex patterns of pressure development are seen that mimic the contraction patterns observed in laboring women. Emergent behavior is observed, including global synchronization, multiple pace making regions, and system memory of prior conditions. The complex effects of nifedipine and oxytocin exposure are simulated. The force produced can vary as a nonlinear function of the number of regions. The simulation directly links tissue-level physiology to human labor. The concept of a uterine pacemaker is re-evaluated because pace making activity may occur well before expression of a contraction. We propose a new classification system for biological CAs that parallels the 4

  9. Techniques for Primary Acoustic Thermometry to 800 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripple, D. C.; Defibaugh, D. R.; Moldover, M. R.; Strouse, G. F.

    2003-09-01

    The NIST Primary Acoustic Thermometer will measure the difference between the International Temperature Scale of 1990 and the Kelvin Thermodynamic Scale throughout the range 273 K to 800 K with uncertainties of only a few millikelvins. The acoustic thermometer determines the frequencies of the acoustic resonances of pure argon gas contained within a spherical cavity with uncertainties approaching one part in 106. To achieve this small uncertainty at these elevated temperatures we developed new acoustic transducers and new techniques for the maintenance of gas purity and for temperature control. The new electro-acoustic transducers are based on the capacitance between a flexible silicon wafer and a rigid backing plate. Without the damping usually provided by polymers, mechanical vibrations caused unstable, spurious acoustic signals. We describe our techniques for suppression of these vibrations. Our acoustic thermometer allows the argon to be continuously flushed through the resonator, thereby preventing the build up of hydrogen that evolves from the stainless-steel resonator. We describe how the argon pressure is stabilized while flushing. The argon exiting from the resonator is analyzed with a customized gas chromatograph. Because the acoustic resonator was so large—it has an outer diameter of 20 cm—a sophisticated furnace, based on surrounding the resonator with three concentric aluminum shells, was designed to maintain thermal uniformity and stability of the resonator at a level of 1 mK. We describe the design, modeling, and operational characteristics of the furnace.

  10. GRAAL - Griggs-type Apparatus equipped with Acoustics in the Laboratory: a new instrument to explore the rheology of rocks at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, A.; Champallier, R.; Precigout, J.; Pinquier, Y.; Ferrand, T. P.; Incel, S.; Hilairet, N.; Labrousse, L.; Renner, J.; Green, H. W., II; Stunitz, H.; Jolivet, L.

    2015-12-01

    Two new generation solid-medium Griggs-type apparatus have been set up at the Laboratoire de Géologie of ENS PARIS, and the Institut des Sciences de la Terre d'Orléans (ISTO). These new set-ups allow to perform controlled rock deformation experiments on large volume samples, up to 5 GPa and 1300°C. Careful pressure - stress calibration will be performed (using D-DIA and/or Paterson-type experiments as standards), strain-stress-pressure will be measured using modern techniques and state of the art salt assemblies. Focusing on rheology, the pressure vessel at ISTO has been designed in a goal of deforming large sample diameter (8 mm) at confining pressure of up to 3 GPa. Thanks to this large sample size, this new vessel will allow to explore the microstructures related to the deformation processes occurring at pressures of the deep lithosphere and in subduction zones. In this new apparatus, we moreover included a room below the pressure vessel in order to develop a basal load cell as close as possible to the sample. This new design, in progress, aims at significantly improving the accuracy of stress measurements in the Griggs-type apparatus. The ultimate goal is to set up a new technique able to routinely quantify the rheology of natural rocks between 0.5 and 5 GPa. Although fundamental to document the rheology of the lithosphere, such a technique is still missing in rock mechanics. Focusing on the evolution of physical and mechanical properties during mineral phase transformations, the vessel at ENS is equipped with continuous acoustic emission (AE) multi-sensor monitoring in order to "listen" to the sample during deformation. Indeed, these continuous recordings enable to detect regular AE like signals during dynamic crack propagation, as well as non-impulsive signals, which might be instrumental to identify laboratory analogs to non-volcanic tremor and low frequency earthquake signals. P and S elastic wave velocities will also be measured contemporaneously during

  11. Sub-Poissonian phonon statistics in an acoustical resonator coupled to a pumped two-level emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Ceban, V. Macovei, M. A.

    2015-11-15

    The concept of an acoustical analog of the optical laser has been developed recently in both theoretical and experimental works. We here discuss a model of a coherent phonon generator with a direct signature of the quantum properties of sound vibrations. The considered setup is made of a laser-driven quantum dot embedded in an acoustical nanocavity. The system dynamics is solved for a single phonon mode in the steady-state and in the strong quantum dot—phonon coupling regime beyond the secular approximation. We demonstrate that the phonon statistics exhibits quantum features, i.e., is sub-Poissonian.

  12. Acoustic characteristics of twin jets.

    PubMed

    He, F; Zhang, X W

    2002-09-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the acoustic characteristics of underexpanded supersonic twin jets in different azimuthal measurement planes. Compared with two independent jets, the twin jets produced additional noise due to the enhanced mixing and entrainment. The larger pressure ratio for switching from the axisymmetric mode to the helical mode led to lower noise levels at 90 degrees than for two independent jets. For pressure ratios greater than 5.00, the noise reduction was due to cessation of screeching of the twin jets while screeching of a single jet was still detected. The apparent shielding phenomenon was measured for the screech helical mode. The screech tone intensities were attenuated largely due to the shielding effects. The noise reductions due to shielding were obtained over a wide range of pressure ratios relative to the sum of two independent jets. PMID:12243185

  13. An Evaluation of the Additional Acoustic Power Needed to Overcome the Effects of a Test-Article's Absorption During Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Testing of Spaceflight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of a customer's aerospace test-article to a simulated acoustic launch environment is typically performed in a reverberant acoustic test chamber. The acoustic pre-test runs that will ensure that the sound pressure levels of this environment can indeed be met by a test facility are normally performed without a test-article dynamic simulator of representative acoustic absorption and size. If an acoustic test facility's available acoustic power capability becomes maximized with the test-article installed during the actual test then the customer's environment requirement may become compromised. In order to understand the risk of not achieving the customer's in-tolerance spectrum requirement with the test-article installed, an acoustic power margin evaluation as a function of frequency may be performed by the test facility. The method for this evaluation of acoustic power will be discussed in this paper. This method was recently applied at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station's Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility for the SpaceX Falcon 9 Payload Fairing acoustic test program.

  14. An Evaluation of the Additional Acoustic Power Needed to Overcome the Effects of a Test-Article's Absorption during Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Testing of Spaceflight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of a customers aerospace test-article to a simulated acoustic launch environment is typically performed in a reverberant acoustic test chamber. The acoustic pre-test runs that will ensure that the sound pressure levels of this environment can indeed be met by a test facility are normally performed without a test-article dynamic simulator of representative acoustic absorption and size. If an acoustic test facilitys available acoustic power capability becomes maximized with the test-article installed during the actual test then the customers environment requirement may become compromised. In order to understand the risk of not achieving the customers in-tolerance spectrum requirement with the test-article installed, an acoustic power margin evaluation as a function of frequency may be performed by the test facility. The method for this evaluation of acoustic power will be discussed in this paper. This method was recently applied at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Stations Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility for the SpaceX Falcon 9 Payload Fairing acoustic test program.

  15. Measurement and Characterization of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Robert Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    NASA's current models to predict lift-off acoustics for launch vehicles are currently being updated using several numerical and empirical inputs. One empirical input comes from free-field acoustic data measured at three Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) static firings. The measurements were collected by a joint collaboration between NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center, Wyle Labs, and ATK Launch Systems. For the first time NASA measured large-thrust solid rocket motor plume acoustics for evaluation of both noise sources and acoustic radiation properties. Over sixty acoustic free-field measurements were taken over the three static firings to support evaluation of acoustic radiation near the rocket plume, far-field acoustic radiation patterns, plume acoustic power efficiencies, and apparent noise source locations within the plume. At approximately 67 m off nozzle centerline and 70 m downstream of the nozzle exit plan, the measured overall sound pressure level of the RSRM was 155 dB. Peak overall levels in the far field were over 140 dB at 300 m and 50-deg off of the RSRM thrust centerline. The successful collaboration has yielded valuable data that are being implemented into NASA's lift-off acoustic models, which will then be used to update predictions for Ares I and Ares V liftoff acoustic environments.

  16. Mild neurotrauma indicates a range-specific pressure response to low level shock wave exposure.

    PubMed

    Vandevord, Pamela J; Bolander, Richard; Sajja, Venkata Siva Sai Sujith; Hay, Kathryn; Bir, Cynthia A

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the level of overpressure required to create physiological deficits is vital to advance prevention, diagnostic, and treatment strategies for individuals exposed to blasts. In this study, a rodent model of primary blast neurotrauma was employed to determine the pressure at which acute neurological alterations occurred. Rats were exposed to a single low intensity shock wave at a pressure of 0, 97, 117, or 153 kPa. Following exposure, rats were assessed for acute cognitive alterations using the Morris water maze and motor dysfunction using the horizontal ladder test. Subsequently, histological analyses of three brain regions (primary motor cortex, the hippocampal dentate gyrus region, and the posteromedial cortical amygdala) were conducted. Histological parameters included measuring the levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) to identify astrocyte activation, cleaved caspase-3 for early apoptosis identification and Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) which labels degenerating neurons within the brain tissue. The results demonstrated that an exposure to a single 117 kPa shock wave revealed a significant change in overall neurological deficits when compared to controls and the other pressures. The animals showed significant alterations in water maze parameters and a histological increase in the number of GFAP, caspase-3, and FJB-positive cells. It is suggested that when exposed to a low level shock wave, there may be a biomechanical response elicited by a specific pressure range which can cause low level neurological deficits within the rat. These data indicate that neurotrauma induced from a shock wave may lead to cognitive deficits in short-term learning and memory of rats. Additional histological evidence supports significant and diffuse glial activation and cellular damage. Further investigation into the biomechanical aspects of shock wave exposure is required to elucidate this pressure range-specific phenomenon. PMID:21994066

  17. Producing undistorted acoustic sine waves.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Henri; Smith, John; Wolfe, Joe

    2014-04-01

    A simple digital method is described that can produce an undistorted acoustic sine wave using an amplifier and loudspeaker having considerable intrinsic distortion, a common situation at low frequencies and high power. The method involves, first, using a pure sine wave as the input and measuring the distortion products. An iterative procedure then progressively adds harmonics with appropriate amplitude and phase to cancel any distortion products. The method is illustrated by producing a pure 52 Hz sine wave at 107 dB sound pressure level with harmonic distortion reduced over the audible range to >65 dB below the fundamental. PMID:25234964

  18. A simplified physical model of pressure wave dynamics and acoustic wave generation induced by laser absorption in the retina.

    PubMed

    Till, S J; Milsom, P K; Rowlands, G

    2004-07-01

    Shock waves have been proposed in the literature as a mechanism for retinal damage induced by ultra-short laser pulses. For a spherical absorber, we derive a set of linear equations describing the propagation of pressure waves. We show that the formation of shock fronts is due to the form of the absorber rather than the inclusion of nonlinear terms in the equations. The analytical technique used avoids the need for a Laplace transform approach and is easily applied to other absorber profiles. Our analysis suggests that the 'soft' nature of the membrane surrounding retinal melanosomes precludes shock waves as a mechanism for the retinal damage induced by ultra-short pulse lasers. The quantitative estimates of the pressure gradients induced by laser absorption which are made possible by this work, together with detailed meso-scale or molecular modelling, will allow alternative damage mechanisms to be identified. PMID:15210319

  19. Equivalent Source Method Applied to Launch Acoustic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housman, Jeffrey A.; Barad, Michael F.; Kiris, Cetin

    2012-01-01

    Aeroacoustic simulations of the launch environment are described. A hybrid computational fluid dynamics (CFD)/computational aeroacoustic (CAA) approach is developed in order to accurately and efficiently predict the sound pressure level spectrum on the launch vehicle and surrounding structures. The high-fidelity CFD code LAVA (Launch Ascent and Vehicle Analysis), is used to generate pressure time history at select locations in the flow field. A 3D exterior Helmholtz solver is then used to iteratively determine a set of monopole sources which mimic the noise generating mechanisms identified by the CFD solver. The acoustic pressure field generated from the Helmholtz solver is then used to evaluate the sound pressure levels.

  20. Some far-field acoustics characteristics of the XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Robert A.; Conner, David A.; Becker, Lawrence E.; Rutledge, C. Kendall; Smith, Rita A.

    1990-01-01

    Far-field acoustics tests have been conducted on an instrumented XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft. The purpose of these acoustic measurements was to create an encompassing, high confidence (90 percent), and accurate (-1.4/ +1/8 dB theoretical confidence interval) far-field acoustics data base to validate ROTONET and other current rotorcraft noise prediction computer codes. This paper describes the flight techniques used, with emphasis on the care taken to obtain high-quality far-field acoustic data. The quality and extensiveness of the data base collected are shown by presentation of ground acoustic contours for level flyovers for the airplane flight mode and for several forward velocities and nacelle tilts for the transition mode and helicopter flight mode. Acoustic pressure time-histories and fully analyzed ensemble averaged far-field data results (spectra) are shown for each of the ground contour cases.

  1. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  2. Equilibrium shapes of acoustically levitated drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C.-J.

    1986-05-01

    The quantitative determination of the shape of liquid drops levitated in an ultrasonic standing wave has provided experimental data on the radiation pressure-induced deformations of freely suspended liquids. Within the limits of small deviations from the spherical shape and small drop diameter relative to the acoustic wavelength, an existing approximate theory yields a good agreement with experimental evidence. The data were obtained for millimeter and submillimeter drops levitated in air under 1 g, where g is the sea level gravitational acceleration.

  3. Analysis of heart rate variability in individuals subjected to different positive end expiratory pressure levels using expiratory positive airway pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Thiago Lorentz; Costa, Ivan Peres; Kawaguchi, Leandro Yukio Alves; de Carvalho, Flávio Aimbire Soares; de Carvalho, Regiane Albertini

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The increase in the number of studies has led to greater security in the application of this method and the determination of its effectiveness in adults.. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate heart rate variability in healthy individuals submitted to different levels of positive expiratory pressure using an expiratory positive airway pressure (EPAP) device. Material and methods The study involved 27 healthy male individuals ranging in age from 20 to 35 years. Patient histories were taken and the subjects were submitted to a physical examination. The volunteers were monitored using the Polar 810s® and submitted to the EPAP experiment. Analyses were performed on variables of the frequency domain. Sympathetic and parasympathetic bands and their relationship with sympathovagal response were also analyzed. Results The mean value of this variable was 526.89 (55.50) ms2 in the first period, 2811.0 (721.10) ms2 in the fourth period and 726.52 (123.41) ms2 in the fifth period. Regarding the parasympathetic area, significant differences were detected when Periods 1 and 5 (no load) were compared with periods in which the individuals were subjected to the use of the therapy. Sympathetic and parasympathetic areas together, a significant difference was detected regarding the sympathetic/parasympathetic ratio in the comparison between Periods 1 and 4 (p < 0.01) as well as Periods 2 and 4 (p < 0.05). Conclusions The findings of the present study suggest that the therapeutic use of EPAP significantly alters the parameters of heart rate variability in the frequency domain, highlighting the importance of monitoring and care during the practice of EPAP. PMID:24049524

  4. Velocity Structure of the Alpine Fault Zone, New Zealand: Laboratory and Log-Based Fault Rock Acoustic Properties at Elevated Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeppson, T.; Graham, J. L., II; Tobin, H. J.; Paris Cavailhes, J.; Celerier, B. P.; Doan, M. L.; Nitsch, O.; Massiot, C.

    2015-12-01

    The elastic properties of fault zone rocks at seismogenic depth play a key role in rupture nucleation, propagation, and damage associated with fault slip. In order to understand the seismic hazard posed by a fault we need to both measure these properties and understand how they govern that particular fault's behavior. The Alpine Fault is the principal component of the active transpressional plate boundary through the South Island of New Zealand. Rapid exhumation along the fault provides an opportunity to study near-surface rocks that have experienced similar histories to those currently deforming at mid-crustal depths. In this study, we examine the acoustic properties of the Alpine Fault in Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP)-1 drill core samples and borehole logs from the shallow fault zone, DFDP-2 borehole logs from the hanging wall, and outcrop samples from a number of field localities along the central Alpine Fault. P- and S-wave velocities were measured at ultrasonic frequencies on saturated 2.5 cm-diameter core plugs taken from DFDP-1 core and outcrops. Sampling focused on mylonites, cataclasites, and fault gouge from both the hanging and foot walls of the fault in order to provide a 1-D seismic velocity transect across the entire fault zone. Velocities were measured over a range of effective pressures between 1 and 68 MPa to determine the variation in acoustic properties with depth and pore pressure. When possible, samples were cut in three orthogonal directions and S-waves were measured in two polarization directions on all samples to constrain velocity anisotropy. XRD and petrographic characterization were used to examine how fault-related alteration and deformation change the composition and texture of the rock, and to elucidate how these changes affect the measured velocities. The ultrasonic velocities were compared to sonic logs from DFDP to examine the potential effects of frequency dispersion, brittle deformation, and temperature on the measured

  5. Using Nano-mechanics and Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) for Disease Monitoring and Diagnostics at a Cellular Level in Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivanantha, Ninnuja; Ma, Charles; Collins, David J.; Sesen, Muhsincan; Brenker, Jason; Coppel, Ross L.; Neild, Adrian; Alan, Tuncay

    A popular approach to monitoring diseases and their diagnosis is through biological, pathological or immunological characterization. However, at a cellular level progression of certain diseases manifests itself through mechanical effects as well. Here, we present a method which exploits localised flow; surface acoustic wave (SAW) induced acoustic streaming in a 9 μL droplet to characterize the adhesive properties of red blood cells (healthy, gluteraldehyde treated and malaria infected) in approximately 50 seconds. Our results show a 79% difference in cell mobilization between healthy malaria infected RBCs (and a 39% difference between healthy and treated ones), indicating that the method can serve as a platform for rapid clinical diagnosis; where separation of two or more different cell populations in a mixed solution is desirable. It can also act as a key biomarker for monitoring some diseases offering quantitative measures of disease progression and response to therapy.

  6. Fermi level pinning in Fe-doped PbTe under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Skipetrov, E. P. Kruleveckaya, O. V.; Skipetrova, L. A.; Slynko, E. I.; Slynko, V. E.

    2014-07-14

    We synthesize an iron-doped PbTe single-crystal ingot and investigate the phase and the elemental composition as well as galvanomagnetic properties in weak magnetic fields (4.2 K≤T≤300 K, B ≤ 0.07 T) of Pb{sub 1−y}Fe{sub y}Te alloys upon varying the iron content, at atmospheric pressure and under hydrostatic compression up to 10 kilobars. We find an increase of iron concentration along the length of the ingot and the appearance of microscopic inclusions enriched with iron in the heavily doped samples. Lightly doped alloys are characterized by the p-type metal conductivity. An increase of the iron impurity content leads to a decrease in the free hole concentration, a stabilization of galvanomagnetic parameters, indicating the pinning of the Fermi energy by the iron resonant impurity level lying under the bottom of the valence band, and to the p-n inversion of the conductivity type. Under pressure, the free hole concentration in the sample, in which the stabilization of galvanomagnetic parameters takes place, increases by approximately a factor of four due to the flow of electrons from the valence band to the iron-induced resonant level. Using the two-band Kane and the six-band Dimmock dispersion relations, the pressure dependence of the Fermi energy is calculated. The model of the electronic structure rearrangement of Pb{sub 1−y}Fe{sub y}Te under pressure is proposed. The energy position and the pressure coefficient of the resonant iron impurity level are determined.

  7. Strongly correlated valence electrons and core-level chemical bonding of Lithium at terapascal pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Anguang; Zhang, Fan

    2015-03-01

    As the simplest pure metal, lithium exhibits some novel properties on electrical conductivity and crystal structures under high pressure. All-electron density functional theory simulations, recently developed by using the linear combination of localized Slater atomic orbitals, revealed that the bandwidth of its valence bands remains almost unchanged within about 3.5 eV even up to a terapascal pressure range. This indicates that the development from delocalized to strongly correlated electronic systems takes place under compression, resulting in metal-semiconductor and superconductivity transitions together with a sequence of new high-pressure crystal phases, discovered experimentally. In contrast to the valence bands, the core-level bands become broadening up to about 10 eV at terapascal pressures. It means the transformation from chemical non-bonding to bonding for core electrons. Thus, dense lithium under compression can be characterized as core-level chemical bonding and a completely new class of strongly correlated materials with narrow bands filled in s-electron shells only.

  8. A computer program for the determination of the acoustic pressure signature of helicopter rotors due to blade thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, G. H.; Farassat, F.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program is presented for the determination of the thickness noise of helicopter rotors. The results were obtained in the form of an acoutic pressure time history. The parameters of the program are the rotor geometry and the helicopter motion descriptors, and the formulation employed is valid in the near and far fields. The blade planform must be rectangular, but the helicopter motion is arbitrary; the observer position is fixed with respect to the ground with a maximum elevation of 45 deg above or below the rotor plane. With these restrictions, the program can also be used for the calculation of thickness noise of propellers.

  9. Water-Level Responses to Barometric-Pressure Fluctuations in Wells in Semi-Confined Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, W.; Butler, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrologists have long recognized that changes in barometric pressure can produce changes in water levels in wells. The relationship between barometric pressure and water level has traditionally been characterized using the barometric efficiency (BE), the ratio of the change in water level to the change in barometric pressure head. Although BE has proven to be an effective means of characterizing the short-term response of a well to a change in barometric pressure, the barometric response function (BRF) is a more effective means to characterize the longer-term response. The BRF, which can be determined through a regression deconvolution procedure developed by Rasmussen and co-workers (Rasmussen and Crawford, 1997; Toll and Rasmussen, 2007), characterizes the water level response over time to a step change in barometric pressure, essentially BE as a function of the time since the imposed load. We have extended earlier work of Rasmussen and Spane (Rasmussen and Crawford, 1997; Spane, 2002) to show that the BRF can be utilized to glean important insights into semi-confined aquifer systems. The form of the BRF indicates the degree of aquifer confinement, while a comparison of BRFs from different wells provides insight into aquitard continuity. Recently, we have developed a new approach for estimating aquitard K by fitting type curves to experimentally determined BRFs. We will demonstrate the power of the BRF using field data from a long-term monitoring site of the Kansas Geological Survey at which a four-day pumping test has previously been performed. The aquitard K estimates obtained from the BRFs are in good agreement at this site with the estimate determined from the pumping test. We will also show how the BRF for a well in a semi-confined aquifer can be used to gain insights into conditions in the overlying unconfined aquifer and vadose zone. Although the BE is considered an invariant parameter of a well, we will show that the BRF of a well in a semi

  10. Lava lake level as a gauge of magma reservoir pressure and eruptive hazard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Anderson, Kyle R.; Poland, Michael P.; Orr, Tim R.; Swanson, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    Forecasting volcanic activity relies fundamentally on tracking magma pressure through the use of proxies, such as ground surface deformation and earthquake rates. Lava lakes at open-vent basaltic volcanoes provide a window into the uppermost magma system for gauging reservoir pressure changes more directly. At Kīlauea Volcano (Hawaiʻi, USA) the surface height of the summit lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater fluctuates with surface deformation over short (hours to days) and long (weeks to months) time scales. This correlation implies that the lake behaves as a simple piezometer of the subsurface magma reservoir. Changes in lava level and summit deformation scale with (and shortly precede) changes in eruption rate from Kīlauea's East Rift Zone, indicating that summit lava level can be used for short-term forecasting of rift zone activity and associated hazards at Kīlauea.

  11. Oyster Creek RETRAN model benchmark to pressure and level perturbation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Alammar, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    As part of GPU Nuclear's program to establish an in-house reload capability for Oyster Creek, the RETRAN-02 MOD4 SPL Computer Code has been chosen to analyze Chapter 15 Final Safety Analysis Report transients. To qualify Oyster Creek RETRAN model, a series of startup tests has been chosen to benchmark the model. Two of those tests, involved water level and vessel pressure perturbations at 100% power. Both tests were analyzed using point kinetics and one-dimensional kinetics with no noticeable impact on level or pressure. A small impact was noticed on power but was thought to be of minor significance. This is because for such mild transients the neutron flux shape function does not change appreciably throughout the transient.

  12. Ocean Bottom Pressure Records at the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbert, Angela; Matthews, Andrew; Hughes, Chris W.; Tamisiea, Mark E.

    2014-05-01

    As part of a research effort funded by the U.K. Natural Environment Research Council, the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) has been developing a repository of data from in-situ ocean bottom pressure recorders (OBPRs) from all possible sources. The data are being processed to a common format using a consistent methodology so that time series are directly comparable. Efforts are also being made to ensure that data are accompanied by comprehensive metadata. The OBPR data are supplied primarily for hourly and daily intervals, making them ideal for studies of tidal to seasonal variability. In addition, because bottom pressure recorders measure changes in ocean mass, these data are an ideal complement to GRACE satellite data and a useful accompaniment to sea level data from tide gauges and altimetry. Consequently, it is anticipated that the PSMSL OBPR repository will become a valuable product to the scientific community.

  13. Relationship between sea-level pressure and sea-level height in the Camargue (French Mediterranean coast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moron, V.; Ullmann, A.

    2005-09-01

    A statistical study of daily maximum sea-level height at one station (Grau de la Dent) in the Camargue (Rhône delta, French Mediterranean coast) and daily sea-level pressure (SLP) at 12 h UTC over the eastern North Atlantic is used to identify the meteorological conditions associated with sea-level variations in the Camargue for the winters 1974-75 to 2000-01. Mean SLP composites during and 5 days before major surge events (defined as those with a daily maximum sea-level height >80 cm) suggest the dominant influence of storms, moving northwest to southeast across the North Atlantic and strengthening as they approach the Bay of Biscay. During such storms, strong onshore winds may persist for up to 4-5 days. These winds tend to strengthen from 3 days to 1 day before the surge events. The mean October-March correlation between daily maximum sea-level height in the Camargue and SLP averaged over the Bay of Biscay (10°W-0°, 40-50°N) is strong (r = 0.69). A methodology is developed for assessing the low-frequency SLP variability impact on sea-level height in the Camargue. A cross-validated linear regression is used to hindcast the interannual and intraseasonal variability of the monthly 75th and 90th percentiles of the daily maximum sea-level height from the monthly mean SLP over the Bay of Biscay. The linear correlation between the cross-validated hindcast and observed time series is 0.83 (0.77) for the 75th (90th) percentile on the 1974-75 to 2000-01 period. The mean bias error, reflecting systematic errors in predicting the monthly percentiles, is close to zero.

  14. Mediterranean sea level oscillations as a response to the atmospheric pressure variations, altimetric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Enri, Jesus; Bruno Mejias, Miguel; Villares Duran, Pilar

    2004-02-01

    The real sea level response to atmospheric pressure variations is quantified and compared with the one deduced from the isostatic assumption, which is normally used to correct the effect of the atmospheric pressure oscillations in the ocean, the so-called Inverse Barometer Correction (IBC). We have analysed the first four years of ERS-2 altimetric records in the Mediterranean Sea. We obtained the regression coefficients at each geographical point of the satellite tracks and in the crossover track points, estimating the relation between the surface atmospheric pressure and the sea level anomalies. The geographical distribution of the regression coefficients obtained, demonstrates that there are important local deviations from the hypothetical value (-0.998 cm/bar), being more evident when we reduce the time sampling from 35 days to 10.5 days. We have obtained the variance associated to the inverse barometer correction, and the one obtained by using the individual regression coefficients obtained at each geographical position in both, collinear and crossover method. We observe a variance reduction of approximately 30% in the sea level anomalies series, when barometric corrections are applied, in the case of collinear track method, and around 15% when we use the crossover track method. We have also quantified the difference in the variance reduction of the sea level anomalies when the standard IBC and the atmospheric pressure correction (use of the regression coefficients estimated on each geographical position, instead of the isostatic value: -0.998 cm/mbar) are applied. We also observe a reduction of approximately 2% in the variance when the atmospheric correction is applied, instead of IBC (in both cases, CM and XM).

  15. Borehole water level response to barometric pressure as an indicator of aquifer vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Mahmoud E. A.; Odling, Noelle E.; Clark, Roger A.

    2013-10-01

    The response of borehole water levels to barometric pressure changes in semiconfined aquifers can be used to determine barometric response functions from which aquifer and confining layer properties can be obtained. Following earlier work on barometric response functions and aquifer confinement, we explore the barometric response function as a tool to improve the assessment of groundwater vulnerability in semiconfined aquifers, illustrated through records from two contrasting boreholes in the semiconfined Chalk Aquifer, East Yorkshire, UK. After removal of recharge and Earth tide influences on the water level signal, barometric response functions were estimated and aquifer and confining layer properties determined through an analytical model of borehole water level response to barometric pressure. A link between the thickness and vertical diffusivity of the confining layer determined from the barometric response function, and groundwater vulnerability is proposed. The amplitude spectrum for barometric pressure and instrument resolution favor determination of the barometric response function at frequencies to which confining layer diffusivities are most sensitive. Numerical modeling indicates that while the high frequency response reflects confining layer properties in the immediate vicinity of the borehole, the low frequency response reflects vertical, high diffusivity pathways though the confining layer some hundreds of meters distant. A characteristic time scale parameter, based on vertical diffusivities and thicknesses of the saturated and unsaturated confining layer, is introduced as a measure of semiconfined aquifer vulnerability. The study demonstrates that the barometric response function has potential as a tool for quantitative aquifer vulnerability assessment in semiconfined aquifers.

  16. Adjacent segment disc pressures following two-level cervical disc replacement versus simulated anterior cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Laxer, Eric B; Darden, Bruce V; Murrey, Daniel B; Milam, R Alden; Rhyne, Alfred L; Claytor, Brian; Nussman, Donna S; Powers, Timothy W; Davies, Matthew A; Bryant, S Chad; Larsen, Scott P; Bhatt, Meghal; Brodziak, John; Polic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion (ACF) has been shown to alter the biomechanics of adjacent segments of the cervical spine. The goal of total disc replacement is to address pathology at a given disc with minimal disruption of the operated or adjacent segments. This study compares the pressure within discs adjacent to either a two-level simulated ACDF or a two-level total disc replacement with the ProDisc-C. A special automated motion testing apparatus was constructed. Four fresh cadaveric cervical spine specimens were affixed to the test stand and tested in flexion and extension under specific loads. Intradiscal, miniature strain-gauge-based transducers were placed in the discs above and below the "treated" levels. The specimens were then tested in flexion and extension. Pressure and overall angular displacement were measured. In the most extreme and highest quality specimen the difference at C3/C4 registered 800 kPa and the difference at C6/C7 registered 50 kPa. This same quality specimen treated with the ProDisc reached a flexion angle at much lower moments, 24.3 degrees at 5 N-m, when compared to the the SACF 12.2 degrees at 8.6 N-m. Therefore, the moment needed to achieve 15 degrees of flexion with the SACF treatment was 5.5 N-m and the ProDisc treatment was only 2.9 N-m. This initial data would indicate that adjacent level discs experience substantially lower pressure after two-level disc replacement when compared to two-level SACF. Additional testing to further support these observations is ongoing. PMID:17108473

  17. Intestinal and plasma VEGF levels in cirrhosis: the role of portal pressure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui-Chun; Haq, Omar; Utsumi, Teruo; Sethasine, Supatsri; Abraldes, Juan G; Groszmann, Roberto J; Iwakiri, Yasuko

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Increased levels of intestinal VEGF are thought to worsen portal hypertension. The cause of the increase in the level of intestinal VEGF found during cirrhosis is not known. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a relationship between portal pressure (PP) and intestinal/ plasma VEGF levels in different stages of fibrosis/cirrhosis. In this experiment, rats were exposed to carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) for 6, 8 and 12 weeks. At the end of exposure, the three groups of rats exhibited three different stages of pathology: non-cirrhotic, early fibrotic and cirrhotic, respectively. For those rats and their age-matched controls, PP and intestinal/plasma VEGF levels were measured. Rats inhaling CCl4 for 12 weeks developed portal hypertension (18.02 ± 1.07 mmHg), while those exposed for 6 weeks (7.26 ± 0.58 mmHg) and for 8 weeks (8.55 ± 0.53 mmHg) did not. The rats exposed for 12 weeks also showed a 40% increase in the level of intestinal VEGF compared to the controls (P < 0.05), while those rats exposed to CCl4 inhalation for 6 and 8 weeks did not. There was a significant positive correlation between PP and intestinal VEGF levels (r2 = 0.4, P < 0.005). Plasma VEGF levels were significantly elevated in those rats exposed to 12 weeks of CCl4 inhalation (63.7 pg/ml, P < 0.01), compared to the controls (8.5 pg/ml). However, no correlation was observed between PP and plasma VEGF levels. It is concluded that portal pressure modulates intestinal VEGF levels during the development of cirrhosis. PMID:21801303

  18. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  19. Intelligibility of Telephone Speech for the Hearing Impaired When Various Microphones Are Used for Acoustic Coupling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janota, Claus P.; Janota, Jeanette Olach

    1991-01-01

    Various candidate microphones were evaluated for acoustic coupling of hearing aids to a telephone receiver. Results from testing by 9 hearing-impaired adults found comparable listening performance with a pressure gradient microphone at a 10 decibel higher level of interfering noise than with a normal pressure-sensitive microphone. (Author/PB)

  20. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio low tip speed fan with a serrated rotor (QEP fan B scale model). [reduction of engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Paas, J. E.; Minzner, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A scale model of the bypass flow region of a 1.5 pressure ratio, single stage, low tip speed fan was tested with a serrated rotor leading edge to determine its effects on noise generation. The serrated rotor was produced by cutting teeth into the leading edge of the nominal rotor blades. The effects of speed and exhaust nozzle area on the scale models noise characteristics were investigated with both the nominal rotor and serrated rotor. Acoustic results indicate the serrations reduced front quadrant PNL's at takeoff power. In particular, the 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline noise was reduced from 3 to 4 PNdb at 40 deg for nominal and large nozzle operation. However, the rear quadrant maximum sideline PNL's were increased 1.5 to 3 PNdb at approach thust and up to 2 PNdb at takeoff thust with these serrated rotor blades. The configuration with the serrated rotor produced the lowest maximum 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline PNL for any given thust when the large nozzle (116% of design area) was employed.

  1. Electronic dummy for acoustical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, B. B.; Di Mattia, A. L.; Rosencheck, A. J.; Stern, M.; Torick, E. L.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic Dummy /ED/ used for acoustical testing represents the average male torso from the Xiphoid process upward and includes an acoustic replica of the human head. This head simulates natural flesh, and has an artificial voice and artificial ears that measure sound pressures at the eardrum or the entrance to the ear canal.

  2. Measurement and analysis of 8-hour time-weighted average sound pressure levels in a vivarium decontamination facility.

    PubMed

    Pate, William; Charlton, Michael; Wellington, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Occupational noise exposure is a recognized hazard for employees working near equipment and processes that generate high levels of sound pressure. High sound pressure levels have the potential to result in temporary or permanent alteration in hearing perception. The cleaning of cages used to house laboratory research animals is a process that uses equipment capable of generating high sound pressure levels. The purpose of this research study was to assess occupational exposure to sound pressure levels for employees operating cage decontamination equipment. This study reveals the potential for overexposure to hazardous noise as defined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit and consistent surpassing of the OSHA action level. These results emphasize the importance of evaluating equipment and room design when acquiring new cage decontamination equipment in order to minimize employee exposure to potentially hazardous noise pressure levels. PMID:23566325

  3. Flowfield characteristics of an aerodynamic acoustic levitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarin, A. L.; Brenn, G.; Keller, J.; Pfaffenlehner, M.; Ryssel, E.; Tropea, C.

    1997-11-01

    A droplet held in a single-axis ultrasonic levitator will principally sustain a certain external blowing along the levitation axis, which introduces the possibility of investigating heat and/or mass transfer from the droplet under conditions which are not too remote from those in spray systems. The focus of the present work is on the influence of the acoustic field on the external flow. More specifically, an axisymmetric submerged gas jet in an axial standing acoustic wave is examined, both in the absence and presence of a liquid droplet. Flow visualization is first presented to illustrate the global flow effects and the operating windows of jet velocities and acoustic powers which are suitable for further study. An analytic and numeric solution, based on the parabolic boundary layer equations are then given for the case of no levitated droplet, providing quantitative estimates of the acoustic field/flow interaction. Detailed velocity measurements using a laser Doppler anemometer verify the analytic results and extend these to the case of a levitated droplet. Some unresolved discrepancy remains in predicting the maximum velocity attainable before the droplet is blown out of the levitator. Two methods are developed to estimate the sound pressure level in the levitator by comparing flowfield patterns with analytic results. These results and observations are used to estimate to what extent acoustic aerodynamic levitators can be used in the future for investigating transport properties of individual droplets.

  4. Pressure-induced crossing of the core levels in 5 d metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal, Alexey A.; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Ekholm, Marcus; Jönsson, H. Johan M.; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2016-05-01

    A pressure-induced interaction between core electrons, the core-level crossing (CLC) transition, has been observed in hcp Os at P ≈400 GPa [L. Dubrovinsky et al., Nature (London) 525, 226 (2015)], 10.1038/nature14681. By carrying out a systematic theoretical study for all metals of the 5 d series (Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au) we have found that the CLC transition is a general effect for this series of metals. While in Pt it occurs at ≈1500 GPa , at a pressure substantially higher than in Os, in Ir it occurs already at 80 GPa. Moreover, we predict that in Re the CLC transition may take place already at ambient pressure. We explain the effect of the CLC and analyze the shift of the transition pressure across the series within the Thomas-Fermi model. In particular, we show that the effect has many common features with the atomic collapse in rare-earth elements.

  5. A point acoustic device based on aluminum nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qian-Yi; Ju, Zhen-Yi; Tian, He; Xue, Qing-Tang; Chen, Yuan-Quan; Tao, Lu-Qi; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Zhang, Xue-Yue; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-03-01

    A point Electrical Thermal Acoustic (ETA) device based on aluminum nanowire contacts is designed and fabricated. Interdigitated structural aluminum nanowires are released from the substrate by Inductively Coupled Plasma Reactive Ion Etching (ICP-RIE). By releasing the interdigitated structure, the nanowires contact each other at approximately 1 mm above the wafer, forming a Point Contact Structure (PCS). It is found that the PCS acoustic device realizes high efficiency when a biased AC signal is applied. The PCS acoustic device reaches a sound pressure level as high as 67 dB at a distance of 1 cm with 74 mW AC input. The power spectrum is flat, ranging from 2 kHz to 20 kHz with a less than +/-3 dB fluctuation. The highest normalized Sound Pressure Level (SPL) of the point contact structure acoustic device is 18 dB higher than the suspended aluminum wire acoustic device. Comparisons between the PCS acoustic device and the Suspended Aluminum Nanowire (SAN) acoustic device illustrate that the PCS acoustic device has a flatter power spectrum within the 20 kHz range, and enhances the SPL at a lower frequency. Enhancing the response at lower frequencies is extremely useful, which may enable earphone and loudspeaker applications within the frequency range of the human ear with the help of pulse density modulation.A point Electrical Thermal Acoustic (ETA) device based on aluminum nanowire contacts is designed and fabricated. Interdigitated structural aluminum nanowires are released from the substrate by Inductively Coupled Plasma Reactive Ion Etching (ICP-RIE). By releasing the interdigitated structure, the nanowires contact each other at approximately 1 mm above the wafer, forming a Point Contact Structure (PCS). It is found that the PCS acoustic device realizes high efficiency when a biased AC signal is applied. The PCS acoustic device reaches a sound pressure level as high as 67 dB at a distance of 1 cm with 74 mW AC input. The power spectrum is flat, ranging from 2 k

  6. A pilot study of scanning acoustic microscopy as a tool for measuring arterial stiffness in aortic biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Riaz; Cruickshank, J. Kennedy; Zhao, Xuegen; Derby, Brian; Weber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the use of scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) as a potential tool for characterisation of arterial stiffness using aortic biopsies. SAM data is presented for human tissue collected during aortic bypass graft surgery for multi-vessel coronary artery disease. Acoustic wave speed as determined by SAM was compared to clinical data for the patients namely, pulse wave velocity (PWV), blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose levels. There was no obvious trend relating acoustic wave speed to PWV values, and an inverse relationship was found between systolic and diastolic blood pressure and acoustic wave speed. However, in patients with a higher cholesterol or glucose level, the acoustic wave speed increased. A more detailed investigation is needed to relate SAM data to clinical measurements. PMID:26985242

  7. Association of low-level blood lead and blood pressure in NHANES 1999-2006

    SciTech Connect

    Scinicariello, Franco; Abadin, Henry G.; Edward Murray, H.

    2011-11-15

    This study investigated whether low blood-lead levels ({<=}10 {mu}g/dL) were associated with blood pressure (BP) outcomes. The authors analyzed data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2006 and participants aged 20 years or older. Outcome variables were systolic and diastolic BP measurements, pulse pressure, and hypertension status. Multivariable linear and logistic regressions stratified by race/ethnicity and gender were performed. Blood lead levels (BLL) were significantly correlated with higher systolic BP among black men and women, but not white or Mexican-American participants. BLLs were significantly associated with higher diastolic BPs among white men and women and black men, whereas, a negative association was observed in Mexican-American men that had, also, a wider pulse pressure. Black men in the 90th percentile of blood lead distribution (BLL{>=}3.50 {mu}g/dL) compared to black men in the 10th percentile of blood lead distribution (BLL{<=}0.7 {mu}g/dL) had a significant increase of risk of having hypertension (adjusted POR=2.69; 95% CI: 1.08-6.72). In addition, blood cadmium was significantly associated with hypertension and systolic and diastolic blood. This study found that, despite the continuous decline in blood lead in the U.S. population, lead exposure disparities among race and gender still exist.

  8. Role of borehole pressure containment on surface ground vibration levels at close scaled distances

    SciTech Connect

    Taqieddin, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    A total of 84 reduced-scale single-hole test blasts were conducted to study the effects of collar stemming length, primer location, geophone orientation, and indirectly the borehole and detonation pressures on the generation of ground vibrations. Extra 60% dynamite and black powder explosives were tested. Charges of 144.5 and 276.5 gm having diameters of 0.5-, 0.75-, and 1.00-inch were confined within holes drilled in Jefferson City dolomite rock. Three collar stemming lengths, bottom and collar priming and two different orientation of joints were employed. Particle velocity measured by a recording seismograph, with its geophone placed at constant 15 feet, was used throughout this study. It was found at the close scaled-distances employed in this study that collar stemming length has a reciprocal relationship with the levels of ground vibration up to an optimum value beyond which it has minimal effect. Also, the length of collar stemming needed to suppress ground vibration is less than that needed to contain air blast and was dependent on charge diameter. It was also found that collar-primed charges produced higher levels of ground vibration than did the bottom-primed charges, and ground vibrations attenuated more rapidly parallel to the geologic jointing direction. Lastly it was found that the primary cause of ground vibrations was the explosive borehole pressure with little or no effect produced by detonation pressure.

  9. Dynamics of acoustically levitated disk samples.

    PubMed

    Xie, W J; Wei, B

    2004-10-01

    The acoustic levitation force on disk samples and the dynamics of large water drops in a planar standing wave are studied by solving the acoustic scattering problem through incorporating the boundary element method. The dependence of levitation force amplitude on the equivalent radius R of disks deviates seriously from the R3 law predicted by King's theory, and a larger force can be obtained for thin disks. When the disk aspect ratio gamma is larger than a critical value gamma(*) ( approximately 1.9 ) and the disk radius a is smaller than the critical value a(*) (gamma) , the levitation force per unit volume of the sample will increase with the enlargement of the disk. The acoustic levitation force on thin-disk samples ( gammaacoustic field for stable levitation of a large water drop is to adjust the reflector-emitter interval H slightly above the resonant interval H(n) . The simulation shows that the drop is flattened and the central parts of its top and bottom surface become concave with the increase of sound pressure level, which agrees with the experimental observation. The main frequencies of the shape oscillation under different sound pressures are slightly larger than the Rayleigh frequency because of the large shape deformation. The simulated translational frequencies of the vertical vibration under normal gravity condition agree with the theoretical analysis. PMID:15600551

  10. [Physical activity level and home blood pressure measurement: Pilot study "Acti-HTA"].

    PubMed

    Sosner, P; Ott, J; Steichen, O; Bally, S; Krummel, T; Brucker, M; Lequeux, B; Dourmap, C; Llaty, P; Le Coz, S; Baguet, S; Miranne, A; Labrunée, M; Gremeaux, V; Lopez-Sublet, M

    2015-06-01

    While physical activity (PA) is recommended for high blood pressure management, the level of PA practice of hypertensive patients remains unclear. We aimed to assess the association between the level of both PA and blood pressure of individuals consulting in 9 hypertension specialist centres. Eighty-five hypertensive patients were included (59 ± 14 years, 61% men, 12% smokers, 29% with diabetes). Following their consultation, they performed home blood pressure measurement (HBPM) over 7 days (2 in the morning+2 in the evening), they wrote in a dedicated form their daily activities to estimate the additional caloric expenditure using Acti-MET device (built from International physical Activity Questionnaire [IPAQ]). Thus, patients completed a self-administered questionnaire "score of Dijon" (distinguishing active subjects with a score>20/30, from sedentary<10/30). Subjects with normal HBPM value (<135/85 mm Hg) (55% of them) compared to those with high HBPM were older, had a non-significant trend towards higher weekly caloric expenditure (4959 ± 5045 kcal/week vs. 4048 ± 4199 kcal/week, P=0.3755) and score of Dijon (19.44 ± 5.81 vs. 18.00 ± 4.32, P=0.2094) with a higher proportion of "active" subjects (48.9% vs. 34.2%, P=0.1773). In conclusion, our results demonstrate a "tendency" to a higher level of reported PA for subjects whose hypertension was controlled. This encourages us to continue with a study that would include more subjects, which would assess PA level using an objective method such as wearing an accelerometer sensor. PMID:26047874

  11. Cell Deformation by Single-beam Acoustic Trapping: A Promising Tool for Measurements of Cell Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Kim, Jihun; Park, Jin Man; Lee, Changyang; Jung, Hayong; Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a noncontact single-beam acoustic trapping method for the quantification of the mechanical properties of a single suspended cell with label-free. Experimentally results show that the single-beam acoustic trapping force results in morphological deformation of a trapped cell. While a cancer cell was trapped in an acoustic beam focus, the morphological changes of the immobilized cell were monitored using bright-field imaging. The cell deformability was then compared with that of a trapped polystyrene microbead as a function of the applied acoustic pressure for a better understanding of the relationship between the pressure and degree of cell deformation. Cell deformation was found to become more pronounced as higher pressure levels were applied. Furthermore, to determine if this acoustic trapping method can be exploited in quantifying the cell mechanics in a suspension and in a non-contact manner, the deformability levels of breast cancer cells with different degrees of invasiveness due to acoustic trapping were compared. It was found that highly-invasive breast cancer cells exhibited greater deformability than weakly-invasive breast cancer cells. These results clearly demonstrate that the single-beam acoustic trapping technique is a promising tool for non-contact quantitative assessments of the mechanical properties of single cells in suspensions with label-free. PMID:27273365

  12. Cell Deformation by Single-beam Acoustic Trapping: A Promising Tool for Measurements of Cell Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Kim, Jihun; Park, Jin Man; Lee, Changyang; Jung, Hayong; Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a noncontact single-beam acoustic trapping method for the quantification of the mechanical properties of a single suspended cell with label-free. Experimentally results show that the single-beam acoustic trapping force results in morphological deformation of a trapped cell. While a cancer cell was trapped in an acoustic beam focus, the morphological changes of the immobilized cell were monitored using bright-field imaging. The cell deformability was then compared with that of a trapped polystyrene microbead as a function of the applied acoustic pressure for a better understanding of the relationship between the pressure and degree of cell deformation. Cell deformation was found to become more pronounced as higher pressure levels were applied. Furthermore, to determine if this acoustic trapping method can be exploited in quantifying the cell mechanics in a suspension and in a non-contact manner, the deformability levels of breast cancer cells with different degrees of invasiveness due to acoustic trapping were compared. It was found that highly-invasive breast cancer cells exhibited greater deformability than weakly-invasive breast cancer cells. These results clearly demonstrate that the single-beam acoustic trapping technique is a promising tool for non-contact quantitative assessments of the mechanical properties of single cells in suspensions with label-free.

  13. Cell Deformation by Single-beam Acoustic Trapping: A Promising Tool for Measurements of Cell Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Kim, Jihun; Park, Jin Man; Lee, Changyang; Jung, Hayong; Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, K Kirk

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a noncontact single-beam acoustic trapping method for the quantification of the mechanical properties of a single suspended cell with label-free. Experimentally results show that the single-beam acoustic trapping force results in morphological deformation of a trapped cell. While a cancer cell was trapped in an acoustic beam focus, the morphological changes of the immobilized cell were monitored using bright-field imaging. The cell deformability was then compared with that of a trapped polystyrene microbead as a function of the applied acoustic pressure for a better understanding of the relationship between the pressure and degree of cell deformation. Cell deformation was found to become more pronounced as higher pressure levels were applied. Furthermore, to determine if this acoustic trapping method can be exploited in quantifying the cell mechanics in a suspension and in a non-contact manner, the deformability levels of breast cancer cells with different degrees of invasiveness due to acoustic trapping were compared. It was found that highly-invasive breast cancer cells exhibited greater deformability than weakly-invasive breast cancer cells. These results clearly demonstrate that the single-beam acoustic trapping technique is a promising tool for non-contact quantitative assessments of the mechanical properties of single cells in suspensions with label-free. PMID:27273365

  14. Anarctic gridded sea level pressure data: An analysis and reconstruction back to 1957

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.

    1988-12-01

    The reliability of the Australian (June 1972--April 1985) and NOTOS (1957--62) gridded monthly-mean, mean sea level pressure datasets over Antarctica is examined by comparison with station data from 29 sites over the continent. After rejecting about 30% of the months in both sets of gridded data, the remaining ''good'' months are used in a principal component regression technique to reconstruct gridded data from the station data for 1957 to 1985. The regression technique uses the ''good'' Australian data for calibration and verifies the statistical relationships developed between station and grid point pressure data with the ''good'' NOTOS data. The reconstructions are shown to be reliable over all of Antarctica between 60/sup 0/ and 75 /sup 0/S except in the area to the east of the Ross Sea and adjacent areas of the southern Pacific Ocean.

  15. Acoustic energy harvesting based on a planar acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuibao; Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically report on an innovative and practical acoustic energy harvester based on a defected acoustic metamaterial (AMM) with piezoelectric material. The idea is to create suitable resonant defects in an AMM to confine the strain energy originating from an acoustic incidence. This scavenged energy is converted into electrical energy by attaching a structured piezoelectric material into the defect area of the AMM. We show an acoustic energy harvester based on a meta-structure capable of producing electrical power from an acoustic pressure. Numerical simulations are provided to analyze and elucidate the principles and the performances of the proposed system. A maximum output voltage of 1.3 V and a power density of 0.54 μW/cm3 are obtained at a frequency of 2257.5 Hz. The proposed concept should have broad applications on energy harvesting as well as on low-frequency sound isolation, since this system acts as both acoustic insulator and energy harvester.

  16. Association between Glucose Levels and Intraocular Pressure: Pre- and Postprandial Analysis in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Luis Guilherme Milesi; Gracitelli, Carolina P. B.; da Silva, Leticia Sant'Ana Cardoso; Souza, Aline Katia Siqueira; Prata, Tiago Santos

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between glucose levels and intraocular pressure (IOP) fluctuation in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Seventeen nondiabetic and 20 diabetic subjects underwent a complete ophthalmic examination, capillary glucose testing, and applanation tonometry in two distinct situations: first, fasting for at least 8 hours and, second, postprandial measurements. Baseline glucose levels were higher in diabetic patients (P < 0.001). Postprandial IOP was significantly higher than baseline IOP in diabetic (P < 0.001) and nondiabetic patients (P = 0.006). Postprandial glucose levels were significantly higher than baseline measurements in both diabetic (P = 0.005) and nondiabetic patients (P = 0.015). There was a significant association between glucose levels variation and IOP change in both diabetic patients (R2 = 0.540; P < 0.001) and nondiabetic individuals (R2 = 0.291; P = 0.025). There is also a significant association between the baseline glucose levels and IOP change in diabetic group (R2 = 0.445; P = 0.001). In a multivariable model, the magnitude of glucose level change remained significantly associated with IOP variation even including age, baseline IOP, ancestry, and gender as a confounding factor (P < 0.001). We concluded that there is a significant association between blood glucose levels and IOP variation, especially in diabetic patients. PMID:25642344

  17. Acoustic levitator for containerless measurements on low temperature liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Benmore, Chris J; Weber, Richard; Neuefeind, Joerg C; Rey, Charles A A

    2009-01-01

    A single-axis acoustic levitator was constructed and used to levitate liquid and solid drops at temperatures from -40 to +40 C. The levitator consisted of: (i) two acoustic transducers mounted on a rigid vertical support that was bolted to an optical breadboard, (ii) a acoustic power supply that controlled acoustic intensity, relative phase of the drive to the transducers, and could modulate the acoustic forces at frequencies up to 1kHz, (iii) a video camera, and (iv) a system for providing a stream of controlled temperature gas flow over the sample. The acoustic transducers were operated at their resonant frequency of ~ 22 kHz and could produce sound pressure levels up to 160 dB. The force applied by the acoustic field could be modulated using a frequency generator to excite oscillations in the sample. Sample temperature was controlled using a modified Cryostream Plus and measured using thermocouples and an infrared thermal imager. The levitator was installed at x-ray beamline 11 ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source and used to investigate the structure of supercooled liquids.

  18. Acoustic levitator for structure measurements on low temperature liquid droplets.

    PubMed

    Weber, J K R; Rey, C A; Neuefeind, J; Benmore, C J

    2009-08-01

    A single-axis acoustic levitator was constructed and used to levitate liquid and solid drops of 1-3 mm in diameter at temperatures in the range -40 to +40 degrees C. The levitator comprised (i) two acoustic transducers mounted on a rigid vertical support that was bolted to an optical breadboard, (ii) an acoustic power supply that controlled acoustic intensity, relative phase of the drive to the transducers, and could modulate the acoustic forces at frequencies up to 1 kHz, (iii) a video camera, and (iv) a system for providing a stream of controlled temperature gas flow over the sample. The acoustic transducers were operated at their resonant frequency of approximately 22 kHz and could produce sound pressure levels of up to 160 dB. The force applied by the acoustic field could be modulated to excite oscillations in the sample. Sample temperature was controlled using a modified Cryostream Plus and measured using thermocouples and an infrared thermal imager. The levitator was installed at x-ray beamline 11 ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source and used to investigate the structure of supercooled liquids. PMID:19725664

  19. Effect of external pressure environment on the internal noise level due to a source inside a cylindrical tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenson, S. A.; Roussos, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    A small cylindrical tank was used to study the effect on the noise environment within a tank of conditions of atmospheric (sea level) pressure or vacuum environments on the exterior. Experimentally determined absorption coefficients were used to calculate transmission loss, transmissibility coefficients and the sound pressure (noise) level differences in the interior. The noise level differences were also measured directly for the two exterior environments and compared to various analytical approximations with limited agreement. Trend study curves indicated that if the tank transmission loss is above 25 dB, the difference in interior noise level between the vacuum and ambient pressure conditions are less than 2 dB.

  20. Noise trauma induced by a mousetrap--sound pressure level measurement of vole captive bolt devices.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias; Napp, Matthias; Lange, Joern; Grossjohann, Rico; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Beule, Achim G

    2010-05-01

    While ballistic parameters of vole captive bolt devices have been reported, there is no investigation on their hazardous potential to cause noise trauma. The aim of this experimental study was to measure the sound pressure levels of vole captive bolt devices. Two different shooting devices were examined with a modular precision sound level meter on an outdoor firing range. Measurements were taken in a semi-circular configuration with measuring points 0 degrees in front of the muzzle, 90 degrees at right angle of the muzzle, and 180 degrees behind the shooting device. Distances between muzzle and microphone were 0.5, 1, 2, 10, and 20 m. Sound pressure levels exceeded 130 dB(C) at any measuring point within the 20-m area. Highest measurements (more than 172 dB[C]) were taken in the 0 degrees direction at the 0.5-m distance for both shooting devices proving the hazardous potential of these gadgets to cause noise trauma. PMID:20345785

  1. Animal-Borne Acoustic Transceivers Reveal Patterns of at-Sea Associations in an Upper-Trophic Level Predator

    PubMed Central

    Lidgard, Damian C.; Bowen, W. Don; Jonsen, Ian D.; Iverson, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    Satellite telemetry data have substantially increased our understanding of habitat use and foraging behaviour of upper-trophic marine predators, but fall short of providing an understanding of their social behaviour. We sought to determine whether novel acoustic and archival GPS data could be used to examine at-sea associations among grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) during the fall foraging period. Fifteen grey seals from Sable Island, Canada were deployed with Vemco Mobile Transceivers and Satellite-GPS transmitters in October 2009, 13 of which were recaptured and units retrieved 79±2.3 days later during the following breeding season, December 2009–January 2010. An association between two individuals was defined as a cluster of acoustic detections where the time between detections was <30 min. Bathymetry, travel rate, and behavioural state (slow and fast movement) were determined for each GPS archival point (3.7±0.1 locations recorded per hour). Behavioural state was estimated using a hidden Markov model. All seals had been involved in associations with other instrumented seals while at sea, with a total of 1,872 acoustic detections recorded in 201 associations. The median number of detections per association was 3 (range: 1–151) and the median duration of an association was 0.17 h (range: <0.1–11.3 h). Linear mixed-effects models showed that associations occurred when seals were exhibiting slow movement (0.24±0.01 ms−1) on shallow (53.4±3.7 m) offshore banks where dominant prey is known to occur. These results suggest the occurrence of short-term associations among multiple individuals at foraging grounds and provide new insights into the foraging ecology of this upper-trophic marine predator. PMID:23155435

  2. Acoustic Liner Drag: Measurements on Novel Facesheet Perforate Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in characterization of the aerodynamic drag of acoustic liners has increased in the past several years. This paper details experiments in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube to quantify the relative drag of several perforate-over-honeycomb liner configurations at flow speeds of centerline flow Mach number equals 0.3 and 0.5. Various perforate geometries and orientations are investigated to determine their resistance factors using a static pressure drop approach. Comparison of these resistance factors gives a relative measurement of liner drag. For these same flow conditions, acoustic measurements are performed with tonal excitation from 400 to 3000 hertz at source sound pressure levels of 140 and 150 decibels. Educed impedance and attenuation spectra are used to determine the impact of variations in perforate geometry on acoustic performance.

  3. Development of a nuclear technique for monitoring water levels in pressurized vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Mall, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for monitoring water levels in pressurized stainless steel cylinders was developed. It is based on differences in attenuation coefficients of water and air for Cs137 (662 keV) gamma rays. Experimentally observed gamma ray counting rates with and without water in model reservoir cylinder were compared with corresponding calculated values for two different gamma ray detection theshold energies. Calculated values include the effects of multiple scattering and attendant gamma ray energy reductions. The agreement between the measured and calculated values is reasonably good. Computer programs for calculating angular and spectral distributions of scattered radition in various media are included.

  4. Effects of Pressure on Optically Active Deep Levels in Phosphorus Doped ZnSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, B. A.; Iota, V.

    1998-03-01

    We report high pressure photoluminescence (PL) and PL-excitation (PLE) studies at 8K of the 'midgap' emission in P-doped ZnSe using a diamond-cell with He medium. The dominant emission at low pressure is due to donor-acceptor-pair (DAP) transitions between shallow donors and deep trigonally relaxed P_Se acceptors.(J. Davies, et al., J. Luminescence 18/19, 322 (1979)) Its PL and PLE peaks shift by 8.2meV/kbar and 5.9meV/kbar, respectively -- Stokes shift decreasing with pressure. At 35kbar a new PL band, shifting to lower energy (-5.4meV/kbar), emerges from above the absorption edge, and concurrently the original DAP PL quenches. This shows that a resonant level, a deep donor or possibly a P_Se antibonding state,(R. Watts, et al., Phys. Rev. B3), 404 (1971) crosses the conduction edge into the gap. A third PL band is seen only with internse UV excitation. It occurs initially as a high energy shoulder of the original DAP peak, but shifts more rapidly upward (9.4meV/kbar) until it crosses the edge and quenches at 40kbar. We discuss candidates for this band, including donor-P_Se complexes, and we compare our results to similar work on the Zn vacancy in ZnSe. (figures)

  5. [Blood pressure levels of Suruí indigenous adults in Rondônia, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Tavares, Felipe Guimarães; Coimbra Junior, Carlos Everaldo Alvares; Cardoso, Andrey Moreira

    2013-05-01

    Indigenous peoples in Brazil are experiencing rapid epidemiologic and nutritional transition, with non-communicable diseases such as hypertension emerging in their health profile. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 9 Suruí Indian villages (n-251 subjects) in Rondônia, Brazilian Amazon, in 2005, in order to assess blood pressure levels in adults (>20 years of age), as well as to investigate its possible relationship with nutritional and socioeconomic status (SES). Mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were higher in men. On average, an increase in SBP of 7.9 mmHg and of 1.4 mmHg in women and men, respectively, was detected. SBP was positively correlated with waist-hip ratio (WHR) in both sexes and with age in women. DBP showed statistically significant correlations with all anthropometric variables, except height and arm muscle area. The prevalence of hypertension was 2.8% (M: 2.4%, F: 3.1%), being higher in subjects > 40 years with PC or high WHR, especially in women and also in the group that manifested lower SES. The study concludes that hypertension is an emerging health problem among the Suruí. PMID:23670468

  6. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  7. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-07-20

    The Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) has been designed to record and monitor the acoustic signal in natural gas transmission lines. In particular the three acoustic signals associated with a line leak. The system is portable ({approx}30 lbs) and is designed for line pressures up to 1000 psi. It has become apparent that cataloging of the various background acoustic signals in natural gas transmission line is very important if a system to identify leak signals is to be developed. The low-pressure (0-200 psig) laboratory test phase has been completed and a number of field trials have been conducted. Before the cataloging phase could begin, a few problems identified in field trials identified had to be corrected such as: (1) Decreased microphone sensitivity at line pressures above 250 psig. (2) The inability to deal with large data sets collected when cataloging the variety of signals in a transmission line. (3) The lack of an available online acoustic calibration system. These problems have been solved and the WVU PAMP is now fully functional over the entire pressure range found in the Natural Gas transmission lines in this region. Field portability and reliability have been greatly improved. Data collection and storage have also improved to the point were the full acoustic spectrum of acoustic signals can be accurately cataloged, recorded and described.

  8. Comparison of Two Acoustic Waveguide Methods for Determining Liner Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.; Tracy, Maureen B.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2001-01-01

    Acoustic measurements taken in a flow impedance tube are used to assess the relative accuracy of two waveguide methods for impedance eduction in the presence of grazing flow. The aeroacoustic environment is assumed to contain forward and backward-traveling acoustic waves, consisting of multiple modes, and uniform mean flow. Both methods require a measurement of the complex acoustic pressure profile over the length of the test liner. The Single Mode Method assumes that the sound pressure level and phase decay-rates of a single progressive mode can be extracted from this measured complex acoustic pressure profile. No a priori assumptions are made in the Finite Element. Method regarding the modal or reflection content in the measured acoustic pressure profile. The integrity of each method is initially demonstrated by how well their no-flow impedances match those acquired in a normal incidence impedance tube. These tests were conducted using ceramic tubular and conventional perforate liners. Ceramic tubular liners were included because of their impedance insensitivity to mean flow effects. Conversely, the conventional perforate liner was included because its impedance is known to be sensitive to mean flow velocity effects. Excellent comparisons between impedance values educed with the two waveguide methods in the absence of mean flow and the corresponding values educed with the normal incident impedance tube were observed. The two methods are then compared for mean flow Mach numbers up to 0.5, and are shown to give consistent results for both types of test liners. The quality of the results indicates that the Single Mode Method should be used when the measured acoustic pressure profile is clearly dominated by a single progressive mode, and the Finite Element Method should be used for all other cases.

  9. Directional acoustic measurements by laser Doppler velocimeters. [for jet aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Overbey, R. L.; Testerman, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimeters (LDVs) were used as velocity microphones to measure sound pressure level in the range of 90-130 db, spectral components, and two-point cross correlation functions for acoustic noise source identification. Close agreement between LDV and microphone data is observed. It was concluded that directional sensitivity and the ability to measure remotely make LDVs useful tools for acoustic measurement where placement of any physical probe is difficult or undesirable, as in the diagnosis of jet aircraft noise.

  10. A preliminary design study on an acoustic muffler for the laminar flow transition research apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrahamson, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    An acoustic muffler design of a research tool for studying laminar flow and the mechanisms of transition, the Laminar Flow and Transition Research Apparatus (LFTRA) is investigated. Since the presence of acoustic pressure fluctuations is known to affect transition, low background noise levels in the test section of the LFTRA are mandatory. The difficulties and tradeoffs of various muffler design concepts are discussed and the most promising candidates are emphasized.

  11. Development and testing of cabin sidewall acoustic resonators for the reduction of cabin tone levels in propfan-powered aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, H. L.; Gatineau, R. J.; Prydz, R. A.; Balena, F. J.

    1991-01-01

    The use of Helmholtz resonators to increase the sidewall transmission loss (TL) in aircraft cabin sidewalls is evaluated. Development, construction, and test of an aircraft cabin acoustic enclosure, built in support of the Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) program, is described. Laboratory and flight test results are discussed. Resonators (448) were located between the enclosure trim panels and the fuselage shell. In addition, 152 resonators were placed between the enclosure and aircraft floors. The 600 resonators were each tuned to a propfan fundamental blade passage frequency (235 Hz). After flight testing on the PTA aircraft, noise reduction (NR) tests were performed with the enclosure in the Kelly Johnson Research and Development Center Acoustics Laboratory. Broadband and tonal excitations were used in the laboratory. Tonal excitation simulated the propfan flight test excitation. The resonators increase the NR of the cabin walls around the resonance frequency of the resonator array. Increases in NR of up to 11 dB were measured. The effects of flanking, sidewall absorption, cabin absorption, resonator loading of trim panels, and panel vibrations are presented. Resonator and sidewall panel design and test are discussed.

  12. Designing piping systems against acoustically-induced structural fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, F.L.

    1996-12-01

    Piping systems adapted for handling fluids such as steam and various process and hydrocarbon gases through a pressure-reducing device at high pressure and velocity conditions can produce severe acoustic vibration and metal fatigue in the system. It has been determined that such vibrations and fatigue are minimized by relating the acoustic power level (PWL) to being a function of the ratio of downstream pipe inside diameter D{sub 2} to its thickness t{sub 2}. Additionally, such vibration and fatigue can be further minimized by relating the fluid pressure drop and downstream mach number to a function of the ratio of downstream piping inside diameter to the pipe wall thickness, as expressed by M{sub 2} {Delta}p = f(D{sub 2}/t{sub 2}). Pressure-reducing piping systems designed according to these criteria exhibit minimal vibrations and metal fatigue failures and have long operating life.

  13. Aero-acoustics of Drag Generating Swirling Exhaust Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, P. N.; Mobed, D.; Spakovszky, Z. S.; Brooks, T. F.; Humphreys, W. M. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft on approach in high-drag and high-lift configuration create unsteady flow structures which inherently generate noise. For devices such as flaps, spoilers and the undercarriage there is a strong correlation between overall noise and drag such that, in the quest for quieter aircraft, one challenge is to generate drag at low noise levels. This paper presents a rigorous aero-acoustic assessment of a novel drag concept. The idea is that a swirling exhaust flow can yield a steady, and thus relatively quiet, streamwise vortex which is supported by a radial pressure gradient responsible for pressure drag. Flows with swirl are naturally limited by instabilities such as vortex breakdown. The paper presents a first aero-acoustic assessment of ram pressure driven swirling exhaust flows and their associated instabilities. The technical approach combines an in-depth aerodynamic analysis, plausibility arguments to qualitatively describe the nature of acoustic sources, and detailed, quantitative acoustic measurements using a medium aperture directional microphone array in combination with a previously established Deconvolution Approach for Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS). A model scale engine nacelle with stationary swirl vanes was designed and tested in the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility at a full-scale approach Mach number of 0.17. The analysis shows that the acoustic signature is comprised of quadrupole-type turbulent mixing noise of the swirling core flow and scattering noise from vane boundary layers and turbulent eddies of the burst vortex structure near sharp edges. The exposed edges are the nacelle and pylon trailing edge and the centerbody supporting the vanes. For the highest stable swirl angle setting a nacelle area based drag coefficient of 0.8 was achieved with a full-scale Overall Sound Pressure Level (OASPL) of about 40dBA at the ICAO approach certification point.

  14. Sea level pressure variability in the Amundsen Sea region inferred from a West Antarctic glaciochemical record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutz, K. J.; Mayewski, P. A.; Pittalwala, I. I.; Meeker, L. D.; Twickler, M. S.; Whitlow, S. I.

    2000-02-01

    Using European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) numerical operational analyses, sea ice extent records, and station pressure data, we investigate the influence of sea level pressure variability in the Amundsen Sea region on a West Antarctic (Siple Dome) glaciochemical record. Empirical orthogonal function analysis of the high-resolution Siple Dome multivariate ice core chemical time series record (SDEOF1) documents lower tropospheric transport of sea-salt aerosols to the site. During 1985-1994 the SDEOF1 record of high (low) aerosol transport corresponds to anomalously low (high) sea level pressure (SLP) in the Amundsen Sea region. Spatial correlation patterns between ECMWF monthly SLP fields and the annual SDEOF1 record suggest that a majority of sea-salt aerosol is transported to Siple Dome during spring (September, October, and November). Analysis of zonal and meridional wind fields supports the SLP/SDEOF1 correlation and suggests the SDEOF1 record is sensitive to changes in regional circulation strength. No relationship is found between sea ice extent and the SDEOF1 record for the period 1973-1994. To investigate the SDEOF1 record prior to ECMWF coverage, a spring transpolar index (STPI) is created, using normalized SLP records from the New Zealand and South America/Antarctic Peninsula sectors, and is significantly correlated (at least 95% c.l.) with the SDEOF1 record on an annual (r = 0.32, p < 0.001) and interannual (3 years; r = 0.51, p < 0.001) basis. Dominant periodicities (3.3 and 7.1 years) in the annual SDEOF1 record (1890-1994 A.D.) suggest that a portion of the recorded interannual variability may be related tropical/extratropical ENSO teleconnections. Changes in the periodic structure of the full (850-1994 A.D.) Siple Dome record suggests a shift in SLP forcing during the Little Ice Age (˜1400-1900 A.D.) interval.

  15. Does the accuracy of fine-scale water level measurements by vented pressure transducers permit for diurnal evapotranspiration estimation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribovszki, Zoltán; Kalicz, Péter; Szilágyi, József

    2013-04-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) estimation methods based on diurnal water level (surface or groundwater) fluctuations are sensitive to measurement accuracy (McLaughlin and Cohen, 2011; Cuevas et al., 2010). Water level fluctuations are often measured by pressure transducers of varying design and precision. Available total pressure transducers require a compensation for barometric pressure change supplied by barometric pressure transducers. Recently McLaughlin and Cohen (2011) as well as Cuevas et al. (2010) analyzed the 'thermal artifacts' of such transducer-pair data questioning the applicability of sub-daily water level measurements in non-buffered thermal mode for diurnal ET estimation. Similar problems should not, in principle, occur for so-called vented pressure transducers. With the help of ancillary manual measurements, this study verifies the accuracy of vented pressure transducer obtained ultra-fine scale (temporal resolution of 1-10 min) stream- and groundwater level data. Thermal effects were examined by a statistical analysis of concurrent water level and temperature data. The results support the thermal artifact-free nature of vented pressure transducers and therefore their suitability for diurnal ET estimation purposes when proper maintenance and periodic calibrations are provided. In the lack of such measures, diurnal temperature changes can induce errors in vented pressure transducer readings as well.

  16. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  17. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers. PMID:25839273

  18. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  19. Influence of Oxygen Partial Pressure on the Fermi Level of ZnO Films Investigated by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ting; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2012-12-01

    The influence of oxygen partial pressure on the Fermi level of ZnO films prepared by pulsed laser deposition is investigated. The contact potential difference of the ZnO films fabricated under various oxygen partial pressures is studied systematically using Kelvin probe force microscopy. The Fermi level shifted by 0.35 eV as oxygen partial pressure increased. This indicates a significant change in the electronic structure and energy balance in ZnO films. This fact provides a consistent explanation that the changes in carrier concentration, resistivity and mobility of ZnO films are attributed to oxygen vacancy induced shift of the Fermi level.

  20. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Vargas, Magda B.

    2013-01-01

    Subscale rocket acoustic data is used to predict acoustic environments for full scale rockets. Over the last several years acoustic data has been collected during horizontal tests of solid rocket motors. Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) was designed to evaluate the acoustics of the SLS vehicle including the liquid engines and solid rocket boosters. SMAT is comprised of liquid thrusters scalable to the Space Shuttle Main engines (SSME) and Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motors scalable to the 5-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSTMV). Horizontal testing of the liquid thrusters provided an opportunity to collect acoustic data from liquid thrusters to characterize the acoustic environments. Acoustic data was collected during the horizontal firings of a single thruster and a 4-thruster (Quad) configuration. Presentation scope. Discuss the results of the single and 4-thruster acoustic measurements. Compare the measured acoustic levels of the liquid thrusters to the Solid Rocket Test Motor V - Nozzle 2 (SRTMV-N2).

  1. Artillery/mortar type classification based on detected acoustic transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morcos, Amir; Grasing, David; Desai, Sachi

    2008-04-01

    Feature extraction methods based on the statistical analysis of the change in event pressure levels over a period and the level of ambient pressure excitation facilitate the development of a robust classification algorithm. The features reliably discriminates mortar and artillery variants via acoustic signals produced during the launch events. Utilizing acoustic sensors to exploit the sound waveform generated from the blast for the identification of mortar and artillery variants as type A, etcetera through analysis of the waveform. Distinct characteristics arise within the different mortar/artillery variants because varying HE mortar payloads and related charges emphasize varying size events at launch. The waveform holds various harmonic properties distinct to a given mortar/artillery variant that through advanced signal processing and data mining techniques can employed to classify a given type. The skewness and other statistical processing techniques are used to extract the predominant components from the acoustic signatures at ranges exceeding 3000m. Exploiting these techniques will help develop a feature set highly independent of range, providing discrimination based on acoustic elements of the blast wave. Highly reliable discrimination will be achieved with a feed-forward neural network classifier trained on a feature space derived from the distribution of statistical coefficients, frequency spectrum, and higher frequency details found within different energy bands. The processes that are described herein extend current technologies, which emphasis acoustic sensor systems to provide such situational awareness.

  2. Application of a methodology for categorizing and differentiating urban soundscapes using acoustical descriptors and semantic-differential attributes.

    PubMed

    Torija, Antonio J; Ruiz, Diego P; Ramos-Ridao, A F

    2013-07-01

    A subjective and physical categorization of an ambient sound is the first step to evaluate the soundscape and provides a basis for designing or adapting this ambient sound to match people's expectations. For this reason, the main goal of this work is to develop a categorization and differentiation analysis of soundscapes on the basis of acoustical and perceptual variables. A hierarchical cluster analysis, using 15 semantic-differential attributes and acoustical descriptors to include an equivalent sound-pressure level, maximum-minimum sound-pressure level, impulsiveness of the sound-pressure level, sound-pressure level time course, and spectral composition, was conducted to classify soundscapes into different typologies. This analysis identified 15 different soundscape typologies. Furthermore, based on a discriminant analysis the acoustical descriptors, the crest factor (impulsiveness of the sound-pressure level), and the sound level at 125 Hz were found to be the acoustical variables with the highest impact in the differentiation of the recognized types of soundscapes. Finally, to determine how the different soundscape typologies differed from each other, both subjectively and acoustically, a study was performed. PMID:23862885

  3. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... 177. Battista RA. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. Otolaryngol Clin North Am . 2009;42:635-654. ...

  4. High-Level Pressure Support Ventilation Attenuates Ventilator-Induced Diaphragm Dysfunction in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Huiqing; Xu, Peifeng; Zhu, Tao; Lu, Zhihua; Yuan, Yuehua; Zhou, Jiancang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Background: The effects of different modes of mechanical ventilation in the same ventilatory support level on ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction onset were assessed in healthy rabbits. Methods: Twenty New Zealand rabbits were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 5 in each group). Group 1: no mechanical ventilation; group 2: controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) for 24 hours; group 3: assist/control ventilation (A/C) mode for 24 hours; group 4: high-level pressure support ventilation (PSV) mode for 24 hours. Heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, PH, partial pressure of arterial oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen and partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide were monitored and diaphragm electrical activity was analyzed in the 4 groups. Caspase-3 was evaluated by protein analysis and diaphragm ultra structure was assessed by electron microscopy. Results: The centroid frequency and the ratio of high frequency to low frequency were significantly reduced in the CMV, A/C and PSV groups (P < 0.001). The percent change in centroid frequency was significantly lower in the PSV group than in the CMV and A/C groups (P = 0.001 and P = 0.028, respectively). Electromyography of diaphragm integral amplitude decreased by 90% ± 1.48%, 67.8% ± 3.13% and 70.2% ± 4.72% in the CMV, A/C and PSV groups, respectively (P < 0.001). Caspase-3 protein activation was attenuated in the PSV group compared with the CMV and A/C groups (P = 0.035 and P = 0.033, respectively). Irregular swelling of mitochondria along with fractured and fuzzy cristae was observed in the CMV group, whereas mitochondrial cristae were dense and rich in the PSV group. The mitochondrial injury scores (Flameng scores) in the PSV group were the lowest among the 3 ventilatory groups (0.93 ± 0.09 in PSV versus 2.69 ± 0.05 in the CMV [P < 0.01] and PSV versus A/C groups [2.02 ± 0.08, P < 0.01]). Conclusions: The diaphragm myoelectric activity was reduced in the PSV group, although excessive oxidative

  5. Intraocular pressure (IOP) in relation to four levels of daily geomagnetic and extreme yearly solar activity.

    PubMed

    Stoupel, E; Goldenfeld, M; Shimshoni, M; Siegel, R

    1993-02-01

    The link between geomagnetic field activity (GMA), solar activity and intraocular pressure (IOP) in healthy individuals was investigated. The IOP of 485 patients (970 eyes) was recorded over three nonconsecutive years (1979, 1986, 1989) which were characterized by maximal solar activity (1979, 1989) or minimal solar activity (1986). The measurements were also correlated with four categories of GMA activity: quiet (level I0), unsettled (II0), active (III0), and stormy (IV0). Participants were also differentiated by age and sex. We found that IOP was lowest on days of level IV0 (stromy) GMA. The drop in IOP concomitant with a decrease in GMA level was more significant during periods of low solar activity and in persons over 65 years of age. There was a trend towards higher IOP values on days of levels II0 and IV0 GMA in years of high solar activity. Differences between the sexes and among individuals younger than 65 years were not significant. Our results show an interesting aspect of environmental influence on the healthy population. PMID:8468099

  6. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  7. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  8. Effects of nitrendipine on blood pressure and blood ciclosporin A level in patients with posttransplant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Copur, M S; Tasdemir, I; Turgan, C; Yasavul, U; Caglar, S

    1989-01-01

    In order to evaluate the antihypertensive effectiveness and interaction with ciclosporin A (CS-A) nitrendipine, a dihydropyridine derivative calcium entry blocking agent, was used in 16 (13 men, 3 women) hypertensive renal posttransplant patients followed by the Nephrology Department of Hacettepe University Hospital. The patients did not receive any antihypertensive drug for a 7-day period. They were then given 20 mg/day nitrendipine for 3 weeks. At the end of this period, mean (+/- SE) supine blood pressure fell from 163/108 +/- 3.6/1.87 to 141/87 +/- 3.8/2.2 mm Hg (p less than 0.01), while the heart rate was unchanged. 14 of 16 patients achieved full control of blood pressure levels with 20 mg/day nitrendipine, and only 2 patients needed a higher dosage of 30 mg/day (20 + 10 mg). After 3 weeks of treatment no significant variations in blood chemistry or renal functional parameters were noticed. There was also no difference between blood CS-A levels before and after treatment with nitrendipine (218.06 +/- 33 vs. 222.68 +/- 26 ng/ml, p greater than 0.05). We conclude that short-term therapy with nitrendipine in renal post-transplant patients does not appear to be harmful and longer term studies are needed to fully evaluate safety and efficacy of this drug. Because it influences neither blood chemistry nor renal functional parameters and blood CS-A level, it may be preferable to other calcium channel blocking agents in this group of patients. PMID:2662047

  9. Acoustic design by topology optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dühring, Maria B.; Jensen, Jakob S.; Sigmund, Ole

    2008-11-01

    To bring down noise levels in human surroundings is an important issue and a method to reduce noise by means of topology optimization is presented here. The acoustic field is modeled by Helmholtz equation and the topology optimization method is based on continuous material interpolation functions in the density and bulk modulus. The objective function is the squared sound pressure amplitude. First, room acoustic problems are considered and it is shown that the sound level can be reduced in a certain part of the room by an optimized distribution of reflecting material in a design domain along the ceiling or by distribution of absorbing and reflecting material along the walls. We obtain well defined optimized designs for a single frequency or a frequency interval for both 2D and 3D problems when considering low frequencies. Second, it is shown that the method can be applied to design outdoor sound barriers in order to reduce the sound level in the shadow zone behind the barrier. A reduction of up to 10 dB for a single barrier and almost 30 dB when using two barriers are achieved compared to utilizing conventional sound barriers.

  10. Dynamic Mode Decomposition of Fast Pressure Sensitive Paint Data.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohd Y; Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W

    2016-01-01

    Fast-response pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is used in this work to measure and analyze the acoustic pressure field in a rectangular cavity. The high spatial resolution and fast frequency response of PSP effectively captures the spatial and temporal detail of surface pressure resulting in the acoustic pressure field. In this work, a high-speed camera is used to generate a continuous time record of the acoustic pressure fluctuations with PSP. Since the level of the acoustic pressure is near the resolution limit of the sensor system, advanced analysis techniques are used to extract the spatial modes of the pressure field. Both dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) are compared with phase averaging for data analysis. While all three techniques effectively extract the pressure field and reduce the impact of sensor noise, DMD and POD are more robust techniques that can be applied to aperiodic or multi-frequency signals. Furthermore, DMD is better than POD at suppressing noise in particular regions of the spectrum and at effectively separating spectral energy when multiple acoustic excitation frequencies are present. PMID:27294939

  11. Dynamic Mode Decomposition of Fast Pressure Sensitive Paint Data

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohd Y.; Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Fast-response pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is used in this work to measure and analyze the acoustic pressure field in a rectangular cavity. The high spatial resolution and fast frequency response of PSP effectively captures the spatial and temporal detail of surface pressure resulting in the acoustic pressure field. In this work, a high-speed camera is used to generate a continuous time record of the acoustic pressure fluctuations with PSP. Since the level of the acoustic pressure is near the resolution limit of the sensor system, advanced analysis techniques are used to extract the spatial modes of the pressure field. Both dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) are compared with phase averaging for data analysis. While all three techniques effectively extract the pressure field and reduce the impact of sensor noise, DMD and POD are more robust techniques that can be applied to aperiodic or multi-frequency signals. Furthermore, DMD is better than POD at suppressing noise in particular regions of the spectrum and at effectively separating spectral energy when multiple acoustic excitation frequencies are present. PMID:27294939

  12. A Brief Historical Survey of Rocket Testing Induced Acoustic Environments at NASA SSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    A survey was conducted of all the various rocket test programs that have been performed since the establishment of NASA Stennis Space Center. The relevant information from each of these programs were compiled and used to quantify the theoretical noise source levels using the NASA approved methodology for computing "acoustic loads generated by a propulsion system" (NASA SP ]8072). This methodology, which is outlined in Reference 1, has been verified as a reliable means of determining the noise source characteristics of rocket engines. This information is being provided to establish reference environments for new government/business residents to ascertain whether or not their activities will generate acoustic environments that are more "encroaching" in the NASA Fee Area. In this report, the designation of sound power level refers to the acoustic power of the rocket engine at the engine itself. This is in contrast to the sound pressure level associated with the propagation of the acoustic energy in the surrounding air. The first part of the survey documents the "at source" sound power levels and their dominant frequency bands for the range of engines tested at Stennis. The second part of the survey discusses how the acoustic energy levels will propagate non ]uniformly from the test stands. To demonstrate this, representative acoustic sound pressure mappings in the NASA Stennis Fee Area were computed for typical engine tests on the B ]1 and E ]1 test stands.

  13. Developmental Changes in Laryngeal and Respiratory Function with Variations in Sound Pressure Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stathopoulos, Elaine T.; Sapienza, Christine M.

    1997-01-01

    The development of the speech production system was investigated among 120 children (ages 4-14 years) and 20 adults. Aerodynamic and acoustic results suggest that men and 14-year-old boys function differently than women and all other groups of children. Data generally suggest that laryngeal and respiratory behavior of children is not easily…

  14. COMPARISON OF VENTED AND ABSOLUTE PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS FOR WATER-LEVEL MONITORING IN HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD JP

    2011-09-08

    Automated water-level data collected using vented pressure transducers deployed in Hanford Site Central Plateau wells commonly display more variability than manual tape measurements in response to barometric pressure fluctuations. To explain this difference, it was hypothesized that vented pressure transducers installed in some wells are subject to barometric pressure effects that reduce water-level measurement accuracy. Vented pressure transducers use a vent tube, which is open to the atmosphere at land surface, to supply air pressure to the transducer housing for barometric compensation so the transducer measurements will represent only the water pressure. When using vented transducers, the assumption is made that the air pressure between land surface and the well bore is in equilibrium. By comparison, absolute pressure transducers directly measure the air pressure within the wellbore. Barometric compensation is achieved by subtracting the well bore air pressure measurement from the total pressure measured by a second transducer submerged in the water. Thus, no assumption of air pressure equilibrium is needed. In this study, water-level measurements were collected from the same Central Plateau wells using both vented and absolute pressure transducers to evaluate the different methods of barometric compensation. Manual tape measurements were also collected to evaluate the transducers. Measurements collected during this study demonstrated that the vented pressure transducers over-responded to barometric pressure fluctuations due to a pressure disequilibrium between the air within the wellbores and the atmosphere at land surface. The disequilibrium is thought to be caused by the relatively long time required for barometric pressure changes to equilibrate between land surface and the deep vadose zone and may be exacerbated by the restriction of air flow between the well bore and the atmosphere due to the presence of sample pump landing plates and well caps. The

  15. Education in acoustics in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyara, Federico

    2002-11-01

    Over the last decades, education in acoustics (EA) in Argentina has experienced ups and downs due to economic and political issues interfering with long term projects. Unlike other countries, like Chile, where EA has reached maturity in spite of the acoustical industry having shown little development, Argentina has several well-established manufacturers of acoustic materials and equipment but no specific career with a major in acoustics. At the university level, acoustics is taught as a complementary--often elective--course for careers such as architecture, communication engineering, or music. In spite of this there are several research centers with programs covering environmental and community noise, effects of noise on man, acoustic signal processing, musical acoustics and acoustic emission, and several national and international meetings are held each year in which results are communicated and discussed. Several books on a variety of topics such as sound system, architectural acoustics, and noise control have been published as well. Another chapter in EA is technical and vocational education, ranging between secondary and postsecondary levels, with technical training on sound system operation or design. Over the last years there have been several attempts to implement master degrees in acoustics or audio engineering, with little or no success.

  16. Acoustic vector fields in underwater waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapids, Brian

    2005-09-01

    The ability to compute the sound pressure level as well as the vectors associated with the acoustic particle motion has existed for some time. However, propagation studies and ambient noise investigations have typically focused only upon the sound pressure levels that would be observed by an omnidirectional hydrophone or array of hydrophones. Recent interest in geophones and accelerometers for use as vector and dyadic sensors should encourage the investigation and analysis of the underlying vector fields contributing to the acoustic intensity and energy density fields. The frequency domain properties of the acoustic vector field generated by monopole sources having frequencies <1kHz in a simple iso-velocity waveguide are presented in order to build a fundamental understanding of the related quantities. Subsequently, similar field quantities computed for more realistic environments such as downward refracting profiles and deep-water profiles supporting convergence zone propagation will be discussed. Regions and phenomena associated with perturbations in the energy flux density will be highlighted.

  17. Acoustic radiation of a submerged cylindrical shell in low frequency.

    PubMed

    Van de Loock, Julien; Décultot, Dominique; Léon, Fernand; Chati, Farid; Maze, Gérard; Rajaona, Dominique Raphael; Klauson, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of sound pressure levels produced by submerged structures is a part of regulations on underwater noise pollution. The purpose of this work is the study of the underwater acoustic radiation of a stainless steel tube subjected to vibrations generated by a shock obtained by using a hammer. The vibrations of the tube, placed successively in air and in water, are measured by using accelerometers. In water, the acoustic radiation measurements are performed by using a hydrophone. Results are presented as frequency spectra and are confronted with results of the elastic theory. PMID:23298014

  18. QCSEE Over-the-Wing Engine Acoustic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomer, H. E.; Loeffler, I. J.

    1982-01-01

    The over the wing (OTW) Quiet, Clean, Short Haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) was tested at the NASA Lewis Engine Noise Test Facility. A boilerplate (nonflight weight), high throat Mach number, acoustically treated inlet and a D shaped OTW exhaust nozzle with variable position side doors were used in the tests along with wing and flap segments to simulate an installation on a short haul transport aircraft. All of the acoustic test data from 10 configurations are documented in tabular form. Some selected narrowband and 1/3 octave band plots of sound pressure level are presented.

  19. Acoustic measurement study 40 by 80 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An acoustical study conducted during the period from September 1, 1973 to April 30, 1974 measured sound pressure levels and vibration amplitudes inside and outside of the subsonic tunnel and on the tunnel structure. A discussion of the technical aspects of the study, the field measurement and data reduction procedures, and results are presentd, and conclusions resulting from the study which bear upon near field and far field tunnel noise, upon the tunnel as an acoustical enclosure, and upon the sources of noise within the tunnel drive system are given.

  20. Variable day/night bias in 24-h non-invasive finger pressure against intrabrachial artery pressure is removed by waveform filtering and level correction.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, Berend E; Guelen, Ilja; Parati, Gianfranco; Groppelli, Antonella; van Montfrans, Gert A; Wieling, Wouter; Wesseling, Karel H; Bos, Willem Jan W

    2002-10-01

    BACKGROUND Twenty-four-hour finger arterial pressure (FAP) recordings show a negative bias against intrabrachial artery pressure (BAP) and the bias is greater during the night, thereby overestimating the nocturnal blood pressure dip. We have available a methodology with which to reconstruct BAP from FAP by waveform filtering (transfer function) and generalized level (bias) correction that reduces the bias for short-term blood pressure records. OBJECTIVE To investigate if this methodology also decreases the extra bias during the night, thereby yielding a better estimate of the nocturnal dip. METHODS Twenty-four-hour FAP and BAP blood pressure recordings were simultaneously obtained in eight healthy normotensive volunteers and 14 patients with hypertension (ages 19-60 years), during standardized scheduled activities. The data were analysed off-line, applying the brachial reconstruction technique (reBAP) consisting of a waveform filter and level correction. Simultaneous beats yielded systolic, diastolic and mean pressures that were averaged per 30 min, per day, per night, per activity, over the 24-h period, and for volunteers and patients separately. RESULTS Over the full 24 h, FAP systolic, diastolic and mean values for the total group differed from BAP by +1 +/- 10, -8 +/- 7 and -10 +/- 8 mmHg (mean +/- SD), respectively. Similarly, reBAPs differed by +1 +/- 11, -2 +/- 7 and -2 +/- 7 mmHg. BAPs dipped by 20 +/- 8, 13 +/- 6 and 15 +/- 6 mmHg, respectively, during the night. These dips were overestimated by +8, +4 and +4 mmHg by FAP, but not by reBAP: -1, +1 and +1 mmHg. The volunteer and the patient groups showed slight differences in results, but these were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS The generalized reconstruction technique to obtain near-brachial pressure from non-invasive FAP almost completely removed bias over the full 24-h day-night period and improved tracking of diurnal changes for all three blood pressure values. PMID:12359976

  1. Blood pressure (BP) assessment-from BP level to BP variability.

    PubMed

    Feber, Janusz; Litwin, Mieczyslaw

    2016-07-01

    The assessment of blood pressure (BP) can be challenging in children, especially in very young individuals, due to their variable body size and lack of cooperation. In the absence of data relating BP with cardiovascular outcomes in children, there is a need to convert absolute BP values (in mmHg) into age-, gender- and height appropriate BP percentiles or Z-scores in order to compare a patient's BP with the BP of healthy children of the same age, but also of children of different ages. Traditionally, the interpretation of BP has been based mainly on the assessment of the BP level obtained by office, home or 24-h BP monitoring. Recent studies suggest that it is not only BP level (i.e. average BP) but also BP variability that is clinically important for the development of target organ damage, including the progression of chronic kidney disease. In this review we describe current methods to evaluate of BP level, outline available methods for BP variability assessment and discuss the clinical consequences of BP variability, including its potential role in the management of hypertension. PMID:26201477

  2. Springtime large-scale sea level pressure-wind gusts interactions over the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M. L.; Valero, F.; Pascual, A.; Morata, A.; Luna, M. Y.; Sebastian, L. I.

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the springtime relationships between the mean sea level pressure field over the North Atlantic and the regional wind gusts over the Iberian Peninsula. The Singular Value Decomposition analysis is used to identify the main atmospheric circulation patterns linked to gust wind speed anomaly configurations. After applied a Monte Carlo procedure, the statistical significance of the modes is investigated, obtaining two first leading modes. Iberian above-normal gust wind speeds is related in the first covariability mode to the Scandinavian pattern. Positive (negative) wind gust correlations over the northern (southern) Iberia are related to reinforced spring NAO pattern in the second covariability mode. True relationships between large-scale atmospheric field and gust wind speeds are studied by means of composite maps, giving average atmospheric circulation associated with coherent wind gust variability over Iberia.

  3. Study on osteogenesis promoted by low sound pressure level infrasound in vivo and some underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Long, Hua; Zheng, Liheng; Gomes, Fernando Cardoso; Zhang, Jinhui; Mou, Xiang; Yuan, Hua

    2013-09-01

    To clarify the effects of low sound pressure level (LSPL) infrasound on local bone turnover and explore its underlying mechanisms, femoral defected rats were stabilized with a single-side external fixator. After exposure to LSPL infrasound for 30min twice everyday for 6 weeks, the pertinent features of bone healing were assessed by radiography, peripheral quantitative computerized tomography (pQCT), histology and immunofluorescence assay. Infrasound group showed a more consecutive and smoother process of fracture healing and modeling in radiographs and histomorphology. It also showed significantly higher average bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD). Immunofluorescence showed increased expression of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and decreased Neuropeptide Y (NPY) innervation in microenvironment. The results suggested the osteogenesis promotion effects of LSPL infrasound in vivo. Neuro-osteogenic network in local microenvironment was probably one target mediating infrasonic osteogenesis, which might provide new strategy to accelerate bone healing and remodeling. PMID:23770453

  4. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  5. Acoustic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Uwe J.

    2005-09-01

    A speaker, driven by an amplified audio signal is used to set up a standing wave in a 3b-ft-long, 4-in.-diam transparent tube. Initially the tube is oriented horizontally, and Styrofoam packing peanuts accumulate near the pressure nodes. When the tube is turned to a position with the axis oriented vertically, the peanuts drop slightly, until the gravitational force on the peanuts is balanced by the force due to the sound pressure, at which point levitation is observed. Sound-pressure level measurements are used to map the air column normal mode pattern. Similarly, standing waves are established between an ultrasonic horn and a metal reflector and millimeter size Styrofoam balls are levitated.

  6. An investigation of the acoustic characteristics of a compression ignition engine operating with biodiesel blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, D.; Tesfa, B.; Yuan, X.; Wang, R.; Gu, F.; Ball, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, an experimental investigation has been carried out on the acoustic characteristics of a compression ignition (CI) engine running with biodiesel blends under steady state operating conditions. The experiment was conducted on a four-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection and turbocharged diesel engine which runs with biodiesel (B50 and B100) and pure diesel. The signals of acoustic, vibration and in-cylinder pressure were measured during the experiment. To correlate the combustion process and the acoustic characteristics, both phenomena have been investigated. The acoustic analysis resulted in the sound level being increased with increasing of engine loads and speeds as well as the sound characteristics being closely correlated to the combustion process. However, acoustic signals are highly sensitive to the ambient conditions and intrusive background noise. Therefore, the spectral subtraction was employed to minimize the effects of background noise in order to enhance the signal to noise ratio. In addition, the acoustic characteristics of CI engine running with different fuels (biodiesel blends and diesel) was analysed for comparison. The results show that the sound energy level of acoustic signals is slightly higher when the engine fuelled by biodiesel and its blends than that of fuelled by normal diesel. Hence, the acoustic characteristics of the CI engine will have useful information for engine condition monitoring and fuel content estimation.

  7. Gas pressure and electron density at the level of the active zone of hollow cathode arc discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minoo, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    A model for the longitudinal variations of the partial pressures of electrons, ions, and neutral particles is proposed as a result of an experimental study of pressure variations at the level of the active zone as a function of the various discharge parameters of a hollow cathode arc. The cathode region where the temperature passes through its maximum is called active zone. The proposed model embodies the very important variations which the partial electron and neutral particles pressures undergo at the level of the active zone.

  8. Portal pressure and blood nitric oxide levels as predictors of outcome in biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Vikram; Bhatnagar, Veereshwar; Agarwala, Sandeep; Srinivas, Maddur; Das, Nibhriti; Singh, Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the incidence of portal hypertension (PHT) in biliary atresia (BA) patients and to monitor its progress after Kasai portoenterostomy (KP) by measuring nitric oxide (NO) levels in peripheral blood. Materials and Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study conducted over a period of 2 years. Intraoperative portal pressure (PP) and blood NO levels at presentation, 1-month, 3-month, and 6-month follow-up, were correlated with clinical and biochemical parameters in BA patients. The mean NO level in age-matched control group was 4.64 ± 2.32 μmol/L. Results: Thirty-four BA patients underwent KP over a period of 2 years. The mean age of presentation was 2.7 months (range 1-4 months). The mean intraoperative PP was 21.3 ± 5.4 mmHg. The mean PP in patients aged <60 days, 61–90 days, and >90 days was 18.53 ± 4.45 mmHg, 20.33 ± 3.07 mmHg, and 26.5 ± 5.01 mmHg, respectively. The mean PP in the patients who underwent successful KP was 16.75 ± 3.54 mmHg while for those who continued to have jaundice it was 23.94 ± 4.63 mmHg (P < 0.001). NO levels closely followed the PP as shown by the regression equation NO = 4.79 + 0.64 PP mmHg, R2 = 0.69. The mean NO level at presentation was 18.48 ± 4.17 μmol/L and at 1-month, 3-month, and 6-month follow-up was 11.94 ± 5.62 μmol/L, 10.79 ± 6.02 μmol/L, and 9.93 ± 6.53 μmol/L, respectively (P < 0.001). The difference in NO levels was also statistically significant between the patients who cleared jaundice and those with persisting jaundice. Conclusion: All BA patients had PHT at presentation. PHT worsens with age and has an adverse effect on outcome of KP. NO levels in blood closely follow PP and higher levels are associated with poor outcome. PMID:27046973

  9. Stratigraphic analysis of lake level fluctuations in Lake Ohrid: an integration of high resolution hydro-acoustic data and sediment cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindhorst, K.; Vogel, H.; Krastel, S.; Wagner, B.; Hilgers, A.; Zander, A.; Schwenk, T.; Wessels, M.; Daut, G.

    2010-05-01

    Ancient Lake Ohrid is a steep sided, oligotrophic, karst lake of likely Pliocene age and often referred to as a hotspot of endemic biodiversity. This study aims on tracing significant lake level fluctuations at Lake Ohrid using high-resolution acoustic data in combination with lithological, geochemical, and chronological information from two sediment cores recovered from sub-aquatic terrace levels at ca. 32 and 55 m. According to our data, significant lake level fluctuations with prominent lowstands of ca. 60 and 35 m below the present water level occurred during MIS 6 and MIS 5, respectively. The effect of these lowstands on biodiversity in most coastal parts of the lake is negligible, due to only small changes in lake surface area, coastline, and habitat. In contrast, biodiversity in shallower areas was more severely affected due to disconnection of today sub-lacustrine springs from the main water body. Multichannel seismic data from deeper parts of the lake clearly imaged several clinoform structures stacked on top of each other. These stacked clinoforms indicate significantly lower lake levels prior to MIS 6 and a stepwise rise of water level with intermittent stillstands since its existence as water filled body, which might have caused enhanced expansion of endemic species within Lake Ohrid.

  10. Stratigraphic analysis of lake level fluctuations in Lake Ohrid: an integration of high resolution hydro-acoustic data and sediment cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindhorst, K.; Vogel, H.; Krastel, S.; Wagner, B.; Hilgers, A.; Zander, A.; Schwenk, T.; Wessels, M.; Daut, G.

    2010-11-01

    Ancient Lake Ohrid is a steep-sided, oligotrophic, karst lake that was tectonically formed most likely within the Pliocene and often referred to as a hotspot of endemic biodiversity. This study aims on tracing significant lake level fluctuations at Lake Ohrid using high-resolution acoustic data in combination with lithological, geochemical, and chronological information from two sediment cores recovered from sub-aquatic terrace levels at ca. 32 and 60 m water depth. According to our data, significant lake level fluctuations with prominent lowstands of ca. 60 and 35 m below the present water level occurred during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 and MIS 5, respectively. The effect of these lowstands on biodiversity in most coastal parts of the lake is negligible, due to only small changes in lake surface area, coastline, and habitat. In contrast, biodiversity in shallower areas was more severely affected due to disconnection of today sub-lacustrine springs from the main water body. Multichannel seismic data from deeper parts of the lake clearly image several clinoform structures stacked on top of each other. These stacked clinoforms indicate significantly lower lake levels prior to MIS 6 and a stepwise rise of water level with intermittent stillstands since its existence as water-filled body, which might have caused enhanced expansion of endemic species within Lake Ohrid.

  11. The Testing Behind the Test Facility: the Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, U.S.A. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, U.S.A. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent ongoing construction.

  12. The Testing Behind The Test Facility: The Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC?s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA?s space exploration program. T he large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world?s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada?s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic de-sign and subsequent on-going construction.

  13. The Testing Behind The Test Facility: The Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada's acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  14. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas; Houston, Janice

    2012-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I liftoff acoustic environments and to determine the acoustic reduction gained by using an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and Mobile Launcher with tower. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by over 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to Ares I-X flight data.

  15. Hybrid acoustic energy harvesting using combined electromagnetic and piezoelectric conversion.

    PubMed

    Khan, Farid Ullah; Izhar

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports a novel hybrid acoustic energy harvester. The harvester utilizes both the electromagnetic and piezoelectric conversion mechanisms simultaneously to convert the ambient acoustical noise into electrical power for self-powered wireless sensor nodes. The proposed harvester is comprised of a Helmholtz resonator, two magnets mounted on a piezoelectric plate, and a wound coil located under the magnets. The harvester is characterized both under harmonic and real random acoustical excitations. In-lab, under harmonic acoustical excitation at a sound pressure level of 130 dB and frequency of 2.1 kHz, an optimum power of 2.86 μW (at 114 Ω optimum load) is obtained from electromagnetic conversion and 50 μW (at 1000 Ω optimum load) is generated by the piezoelectric harvester's part. Moreover, in real acoustical environment of a domestic electric generator the peak voltages of 40 and 123 mV are produced by the electromagnetic and piezoelectric portions of the acoustic energy harvester. PMID:26931884

  16. Hybrid acoustic energy harvesting using combined electromagnetic and piezoelectric conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Farid Ullah; Izhar

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports a novel hybrid acoustic energy harvester. The harvester utilizes both the electromagnetic and piezoelectric conversion mechanisms simultaneously to convert the ambient acoustical noise into electrical power for self-powered wireless sensor nodes. The proposed harvester is comprised of a Helmholtz resonator, two magnets mounted on a piezoelectric plate, and a wound coil located under the magnets. The harvester is characterized both under harmonic and real random acoustical excitations. In-lab, under harmonic acoustical excitation at a sound pressure level of 130 dB and frequency of 2.1 kHz, an optimum power of 2.86 μW (at 114 Ω optimum load) is obtained from electromagnetic conversion and 50 μW (at 1000 Ω optimum load) is generated by the piezoelectric harvester's part. Moreover, in real acoustical environment of a domestic electric generator the peak voltages of 40 and 123 mV are produced by the electromagnetic and piezoelectric portions of the acoustic energy harvester.

  17. Acoustic resonance in the combustion conduits of a steam locomotive

    SciTech Connect

    Ziada, S.; Oengoeren, A.; Vogel, H.H.

    1996-12-01

    The sound emission of a modern, oil fired steam rack locomotive increased sharply when the locomotive speed exceeded the design value of 12 km/hr. The results of pressure and noise measurements, together with an acoustical model of the combustion conduits indicated that the acoustic resonance modes of the combustion conduits are excited by the pressure pulsations generated by the exhaust from the steam cylinders at multiples of the piston frequency. Additionally, when the acoustic resonance is initiated, the resulting pulsations trigger the flame instability of the oil burners which, in turn, enhances the resonance. By means of the acoustical model, a Helmholtz resonator has been designed and optimized to reduce the acoustic response such that it does not excite the flame instability. A second set of measurements, after installing the resonator, has shown a reduction in the noise level by an amount exceeding 21 dBA. The paper focuses upon the identification of the excitation source and the implementation of the countermeasure which are of interest to other applications involving combustion oscillations.

  18. Parvulescu Revisited: Small Tank Acoustics for Bioacousticians.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Peter H; Hawkins, Anthony D; Popper, Arthur N; Fay, Richard R; Gray, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Researchers often perform hearing studies on fish in small tanks. The acoustic field in such a tank is considerably different from the acoustic field that occurs in the animal's natural environment. The significance of these differences is magnified by the nature of the fish's auditory system where either acoustic pressure (a scalar), acoustic particle velocity (a vector), or both may serve as the stimulus. It is essential for the underwater acoustician to understand the acoustics of small tanks to be able to carry out valid auditory research in the laboratory and to properly compare and interpret the results of others. PMID:26611052

  19. The application of high-pressure treatment in the reduction of phosphate levels in breakfast sausages.

    PubMed

    O'Flynn, C C; Cruz-Romero, M C; Troy, D J; Mullen, A M; Kerry, J P

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated effects of high pressure (HP) treatment of pork meat at 150 or 300 MPa for 5 min before manufacturing sausages on the reduction of phosphate levels and compared to sausages manufactured with untreated pork meat (control sausages). Improvement in perceived saltiness, juiciness and overall flavour was observed in sausages manufactured using HP-treated meat at 150 MPa and 0% phosphate, compared to control sausages. Sausages manufactured using meat HP-treated at 150 MPa and 0.25% phosphate (P<0.05) improved hardness of sausages. HP-treated meat at 300 MPa and 0% phosphate decreased juiciness and adhesiveness, while at 0.25% phosphate, adversely affected emulsion stability and sensory attributes. HP treatment did not affect significantly the lightness of the sausages; however, elimination of phosphate reduced (P<0.05) the yellowness, while HP treatment at 150 MPa with 0.25 or 0.5% phosphate increased (P<0.05) redness. HP reatment at 150 MPa has potential for reducing phosphate levels in sausages without significant changes in their functionality and improved acceptability. PMID:24056406

  20. Estimation of sound pressure levels of voiced speech from skin vibration of the neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švec, Jan G.; Titze, Ingo R.; Popolo, Peter S.

    2005-03-01

    How accurately can sound pressure levels (SPLs) of speech be estimated from skin vibration of the neck? Measurements using a small accelerometer were carried out in 27 subjects (10 males and 17 females) who read Rainbow and Marvin Williams passages in soft, comfortable, and loud voice, while skin acceleration levels (SALs) and SPLs were simultaneously registered and analyzed every 30 ms. The results indicate that the mean SPL of voiced speech can be estimated with accuracy better than +/-2.8 dB in 95% of the cases when the subjects are individually calibrated. This makes the accelerometer an interesting sensor for SPL measurement of speech when microphones are problematic to use (e.g., noisy environments or in voice dosimetry). The estimates of equivalent SPL, which is the logarithm of averaged relative energy of voiced speech, were found to be up to 1.5 dB less accurate than the mean SPL. The estimation accuracy for instantaneous SPLs was worse than for the mean and equivalent SPLs (on average +/-6 and +/-5 dB for males and females, respectively). .

  1. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  2. Development of an accelerometer-based underwater acoustic intensity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kang; Gabrielson, Thomas B.; Lauchle, Gerald C.

    2004-12-01

    An underwater acoustic intensity sensor is described. This sensor derives acoustic intensity from simultaneous, co-located measurement of the acoustic pressure and one component of the acoustic particle acceleration vector. The sensor consists of a pressure transducer in the form of a hollow piezoceramic cylinder and a pair of miniature accelerometers mounted inside the cylinder. Since this sensor derives acoustic intensity from measurement of acoustic pressure and acoustic particle acceleration, it is called a p-a intensity probe. The sensor is ballasted to be nearly neutrally buoyant. It is desirable for the accelerometers to measure only the rigid body motion of the assembled probe and for the effective centers of the pressure sensor and accelerometer to be coincident. This is achieved by symmetric disposition of a pair of accelerometers inside the ceramic cylinder. The response of the intensity probe is determined by comparison with a reference hydrophone in a predominantly reactive acoustic field. .

  3. Theory and modeling of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Lihong; Lim, C. W.; Zhao, Xiushao; Geng, Daxing

    2016-06-01

    Models both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed and the corresponding acoustic pressure solutions are obtained. The acoustic pressure for an individual carbon nanotube (CNT) as a function of input power is investigated analytically and it is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. Further numerical analysis on the acoustic pressure response and characteristics for varying input frequency and distance are also examined both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions. Through detailed theoretical and numerical studies on the acoustic pressure solution for thinfilm-solid cylindrical transduction, it is concluded that a solid with smaller thermal conductivity favors to improve the acoustic performance. In general, the proposed models are applicable to a variety of cylindrical thermo-acoustic devices performing in different gaseous media.

  4. The acoustic vector sensor: a versatile battlefield acoustics sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bree, Hans-Elias; Wind, Jelmer W.

    2011-06-01

    The invention of the Microflown sensor has made it possible to measure acoustic particle velocity directly. An acoustic vector sensor (AVS) measures the particle velocity in three directions (the source direction) and the pressure. The sensor is a uniquely versatile battlefield sensor because its size is a few millimeters and it is sensitive to sound from 10Hz to 10kHz. This article shows field tests results of acoustic vector sensors, measuring rifles, heavy artillery, fixed wing aircraft and helicopters. Experimental data shows that the sensor is suitable as a ground sensor, mounted on a vehicle and on a UAV.

  5. Numerical Simulations of Acoustically Driven, Burning Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.-C.; Karagozian, A. R.; Smith, O. I.; Urban, Dave (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This computational study focuses on understanding and quantifying the effects of external acoustical perturbations on droplet combustion. A one-dimensional, axisymmetric representation of the essential diffusion and reaction processes occurring in the vicinity of the droplet stagnation point is used here in order to isolate the effects of the imposed acoustic disturbance. The simulation is performed using a third order accurate, essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) numerical scheme with a full methanol-air reaction mechanism. Consistent with recent microgravity and normal gravity combustion experiments, focus is placed on conditions where the droplet is situated at a velocity antinode in order for the droplet to experience the greatest effects of fluid mechanical straining of flame structures. The effects of imposed sound pressure level and frequency are explored here, and conditions leading to maximum burning rates are identified.

  6. Age and hypertension strongly induce aortic stiffening in rats at basal and matched blood pressure levels.

    PubMed

    Lindesay, George; Ragonnet, Christophe; Chimenti, Stefano; Villeneuve, Nicole; Vayssettes-Courchay, Christine

    2016-05-01

    Age and hypertension are major causes of large artery remodeling and stiffening, a cardiovascular risk factor for heart and kidney damage. The aged spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model is recognized for human cardiovascular pathology, but discrepancies appeared in studies of arterial stiffness. We performed experiments using a robust analysis via echo tracking in 20-week adult (n = 8) and 80-week-old SHR (n = 7), with age-matched normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY, n = 6;6) at basal and matched levels of blood pressure (BP). After anesthesia with pentobarbital, abdominal aortic diameter and pressure were recorded and BP was decreased by clonidine i.v. At basal BP, aortic pulse distension, compliance, and distensibility (AD) were reduced and stiffness index increased with age and hypertension and further altered with age + hypertension. When BP was adjusted in SHR to that of normotensive rats (130 mmHg), there was no difference between 20-week-old SHR and WKY Importantly, the age effect was maintained in both WKY and SHR and accentuated by hypertension in old rats. At 130 mmHg, with similar pulse pressure in the four groups, AD (kPa(-3)) = 24.2 ± 1 in 20 weeks WKY, 19.7 ± 1.4 in 20 weeks SHR, 12.4 ± 1.3 in 80 weeks WKY and 6.6 ± 0.6 in 80 weeks SHR; distension = 7.6 ± 0.4%, 6.7 ± 0.6%, 3.7 ± 0.3%, and 1.8 ± 0.2% in the same groups. In conclusion, reduced distensibility, that is, stiffening due to age is clearly shown here in both WKY and SHR as well as a synergistic effect of age and hypertension. This technique will allow new studies on the mechanisms responsible and drug intervention. PMID:27233301

  7. Field data on testing of natural gas vehicle (NGV) containers using proposed ASTM standard test method for examination of gas-filled filament-wound pressure vessels using acoustic emission (ASTM-E070403-95/1)

    SciTech Connect

    Fultineer, R.D. Jr.; Mitchell, J.R.

    1999-07-01

    There are many composite wrapped pressure vessels in service. These containers are most widely used for gas storage in natural gas vehicles (NGV). A standard has been developed for the testing of these vessels by the subcommittee ASTM E07.04.03 Acoustic Emission (AE) applications. The AE test method is supported by both field test data and laboratory destructive testing. The test method describes a global volumetric testing technique which is offered as an alternative to the current practice of visual inspection.

  8. Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael D.; Kaduchak, Gregory

    2010-11-23

    An apparatus for acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

  9. Comparison of Two Levels of Pressure Support Ventilation on Success of Extubation in Preterm Neonates: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Roya; Lotfi, Hamid Reza; Alipour, Abbas; Nakhshab, Maryam; Ghaffari, Vajiheh; Hashemi, Seyyed Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pressure Support Ventilation (PSV) is one of the modes of mechanical ventilation that can be used alone as a weaning strategy in neonates. However, studies on the appropriate pressure level for this mode in neonates are limited. Objectives: Because the use of adequate pressure support in this mode, keeping the appropriate neonate’s tidal volume, and preventing the respiratory complications, this study was aimed to compare extubation failure in the two levels of pressure support ventilation of 10 and 14 cmH2O when removing the neonates from the ventilator. Materials & Methods: In this randomized clinical trial 50 premature infants of 27-37 weeks with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) were under mechanical ventilation for at least 48 hours, were randomly assigned to two groups. One group was extubated in PSV mode with pressure of 14 cmH2O and the other with 10 cmH2O. Extubation failure rate and complications such as pneumothorax, death and respiratory parameters were compared in the two groups. Results: Twenty five neonates in each group were assessed. Weaning time, extubation failure rate, and mean airway pressure was lesser in PSV of 10 cmH20 group than Level of 14 cmH2O and those differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). Difference between work of breathing, ventilation time, pneumothorax and mortality rate between two groups were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: The results of our study show that extubation of the neonates using 10 CmH2O in PSV mode increases the success rate of extubation. Although when Volume- assured PSV can be used, it is more logical to use it for guaranteeing tidal volume, but using the appropriate level of pressure support when the PSV mode is used alone is inevitable and further studies are necessary to demonstrate the level of pressure in this mode. PMID:26383214

  10. Sound Pressure Levels Measured in a University Concert Band: A Risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Nicholas V., III

    2008-01-01

    Researchers have reported public school band directors as experiencing noise-induced hearing loss. Little research has focused on collegiate band directors and university student musicians. The present study measures the sound pressure levels generated within a university concert band and compares sound levels with the criteria set by the…

  11. Acoustic Test Characterization of Melamine Foam for Usage in NASA's Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The external acoustic liftoff levels predicted for NASA's future heavy lift launch vehicles are expected to be significantly higher than the environment created by today's commercial launch vehicles. This creates a need to develop an improved acoustic attenuation system for future NASA payload fairings. NASA Glenn Research Center initiated an acoustic test series to characterize the acoustic performance of melamine foam, with and without various acoustic enhancements. This testing was denoted as NEMFAT, which stands for NESC Enhanced Melamine Foam Acoustic Test, and is the subject of this paper. Both absorption and transmission loss testing of numerous foam configurations were performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory in July 2013. The NEMFAT test data provides an initial acoustic characterization and database of melamine foam for NASA. Because of its acoustic performance and lighter mass relative to fiberglass blankets, melamine foam is being strongly considered for use in the acoustic attenuation systems of NASA's future launch vehicles.

  12. Acoustically-driven microfluidic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A W; Benett, W J; Tarte, L R

    2000-06-23

    We have demonstrated a non-contact method of concentrating and mixing particles in a plastic microfluidic chamber employing acoustic radiation pressure. A flaw cell package has also been designed that integrates liquid sample interconnects, electrical contacts and a removable sample chamber. Experiments were performed on 1, 3, 6, and 10 {micro}m polystyrene beads. Increased antibody binding to a solid-phase substrate was observed in the presence of acoustic mixing due to improve mass transport.

  13. Acoustic techniques in nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, C.T.; Sinha, D.N.

    1995-07-01

    Acoustic techniques can be employed to address many questions relevant to current nuclear technology needs. These include establishing and monitoring intrinsic tags and seals, locating holdup in areas where conventional radiation-based measurements have limited capability, process monitoring, monitoring containers for corrosion or changes in pressure, and facility design verification. These acoustics applications are in their infancy with respect to safeguards and nuclear material management, but proof-of-principle has been demonstrated in many of the areas listed.

  14. Effects of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on pressured human osteoblasts: A histomorphologic and quantitative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo, S. J.; Song, W. W.; Kim, I. R.; Park, B. S.; Kim, C. H.; Kim, S. S.; Chung, I. K.; Kim, Y. D.

    2012-03-01

    Previous research has investigated the effects of LLLT during titanium implantation, tooth movement and bone graft using deproteinized bovine bone and recognized that these circumstances were nothing more than intentional controlled overpressure against static cells since this controlled trauma could affect cell function/malfunction, or cell recovery/apoptosis. The present preliminary study was conducted to prove if LLL would influence cell viability and cell function after excessive damage, which is enough to diminish cell numbers and distort the features of cells. Our aim is to evaluate whether low level laser irradiation (LLLi) could be helpful in the recovery of traumatized osteoblasts (pressure damaged cells) by observing the morphology and the survival rate of those cells. This model used bone cell cultures which were traumatized by a pressure with 250 G of centripetal force and observed their response to such trauma and low level laser irradiation. In this experiment, a Ga-Al-As diode LLL (IMPRA-ORT, NDLux, Seoul, KOREA) was used with a wavelength of 808 nm, a focus of 14 × 24 mm, which was wide enough to cover the whole dish surface or well within at least 2 times radiation, and an output of 100 mW. Statistical analysis showed a higher recovery rate of damaged osteoblasts in the radiation group than the non-radiation group ( p < 0.05). The nonradiation group had a very poor proliferation rate in comparison to the control group ( p < 0.05) in every time period. In the control group, actin filaments showed a random orientation and cell process branched variously around each cell. In contrast, compressed cells, these patterns were turned into thicker and shorter cytoskeletons. As time progressed, every living cell recovered from the severe stress and recovered both form and function. In summary, the present study showed the capacity of LLLT to aid the recovery of the cell skeleton and affect cell viability on overpressured osteoblasts. These results may

  15. Acoustic agglomeration of fine particles based on a high intensity acoustical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun; Zeng, Xinwu; Tian, Zhangfu

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic agglomeration (AA) is considered to be a promising method for reducing the air pollution caused by fine aerosol particles. Removal efficiency and energy consuming are primary parameters and generally have a conflict with each other for the industry applications. It was proved that removal efficiency is increased with sound intensity and optimal frequency is presented for certain polydisperse aerosol. As a result, a high efficiency and low energy cost removal system was constructed using acoustical resonance. High intensity standing wave is generated by a tube system with abrupt section driven by four loudspeakers. Numerical model of the tube system was built base on the finite element method, and the resonance condition and SPL increase were confirmd. Extensive tests were carried out to investigate the acoustic field in the agglomeration chamber. Removal efficiency of fine particles was tested by the comparison of filter paper mass and particle size distribution at different operating conditions including sound pressure level (SPL), and frequency. The experimental study has demonstrated that agglomeration increases with sound pressure level. Sound pressure level in the agglomeration chamber is between 145 dB and 165 dB from 500 Hz to 2 kHz. The resonance frequency can be predicted with the quarter tube theory. Sound pressure level gain of more than 10 dB is gained at resonance frequency. With the help of high intensity sound waves, fine particles are reduced greatly, and the AA effect is enhanced at high SPL condition. The optimal frequency is 1.1kHz for aerosol generated by coal ash. In the resonace tube, higher resonance frequencies are not the integral multiplies of the first one. As a result, Strong nonlinearity is avoided by the dissonant characteristic and shock wave is not found in the testing results. The mechanism and testing system can be used effectively in industrial processes in the future.

  16. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence; Beach, Kirk; Carter, Stephen; Chandler, Wayne; Curra, Francesco; Kaczkowski, Peter; Keilman, George; Khokhlova, Vera; Martin, Roy; Mourad, Pierre; Vaezy, Shahram

    2000-07-01

    In cases of severe injury, physicians speak of a "golden hour"—a brief grace period in which quickly applied, proper therapy can save the life of the patient. Much of this mortality results from exsanguination, i.e., bleeding to death—often from internal hemorrhage. The inability of a paramedic to treat breaches in the vascular system deep within the body or to stem the loss of blood from internal organs is a major reason for the high level of mortality associated with blunt trauma. We have undertaken an extensive research program to treat the problem of internal bleeding. Our approach is as follows: (a) We use scanning ultrasound to identify internal bleeding and hemorrhage, (b) we use ultrasound imaging to locate specific breaches in the vascular system, both from damaged vessels and gross damage to the capillary bed, and (c) we use High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to treat the damaged region and to induce hemostasis. We present a general review of this research with some emphasis on the role of nonlinear acoustics.

  17. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  18. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  19. Underwater Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperman, William A.; Roux, Philippe

    It is well underwater established that sound waves, compared to electromagnetic waves, propagate long distances in the ocean. Hence, in the ocean as opposed to air or a vacuum, one uses sound navigation and ranging (SONAR) instead navigation and ranging (SONAR) of radar, acoustic communication instead of radio, and acoustic imaging and tomography instead of microwave or optical imaging or X-ray tomography. Underwater acoustics is the science of sound in water (most commonly in the ocean) and encompasses not only the study of sound propagation, but also the masking of sound signals by interfering phenomenon and signal processing for extracting these signals from interference. This chapter we will present the basics physics of ocean acoustics and then discuss applications.

  20. Non-linear generation of acoustic noise in the IAR spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westley, R.; Nguyen, K.; Westley, M. S.

    1990-01-01

    The requirement to produce high level acoustic noise fields with increasing accuracy in environmental test facilities dictates that a more precise understanding is required of the factors controlling nonlinear noise generation. Details are given of various nonlinear effects found in acoustic performance data taken from the IAR Spacecraft Acoustic Chamber. This type of data has enabled the IAR to test large spacecraft to relatively tight acoustic tolerances over a wide frequency range using manually set controls. An analog random noise automatic control system was available and modified to provide automatic selection of the chamber's spectral sound pressure levels. The automatic control system when used to complete a typical qualification test appeared to equal the accuracy of the manual system and had the added advantage that parallel spectra could be easily achieved during preset tests.

  1. Observation of ice nucleation in acoustically levitated water drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Y. J.; Xie, W. J.; Wei, B.

    2005-10-01

    The supercooling and nucleation of acoustically levitated water drops were investigated at two different sound pressure levels (SPL). These water drops were supercooled by 13to16K at the low SPL of 160.6dB, whereas their supercoolings varied from 5to11K at the high SPL of 164.4dB. The maximum supercooling obtained in the experiments is 32K. Statistical analyses based on the classical nucleation theory reveal that the occurrence of ice nucleation in water drops is mainly confined to the surface region under acoustic levitation conditions and the enlargement of drop surface area caused by the acoustic radiation pressure reduces water supercoolability remarkably. A comparison of the nucleation rates at the two SPLs indicates that the sound pressure can strengthen the surface-dominated nucleation of water drops. The acoustic stream around levitated water drops and the cavitation effect associated with ultrasonic field are the main factors that induce surface-dominated nucleation.

  2. Vascular flow reserve as a link between long-term blood pressure level and physical performance capacity in mammals.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Christian B; Damkjær, Mads; Hald, Bjørn O; Wang, Tobias; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Jacobsen, Jens Christian B

    2016-06-01

    Mean arterial pressure (MAP) is surprisingly similar across different species of mammals, and it is, in general, not known which factors determine the arterial pressure level. Mammals often have a pronounced capacity for sustained physical performance. This capacity depends on the vasculature having a flow reserve that comes into play as tissue metabolism increases. We hypothesize that microvascular properties allowing for a large vascular flow reserve is linked to the level of the arterial pressure.To study the interaction between network properties and network inlet pressure, we developed a generic and parsimonious computational model of a bifurcating microvascular network where diameter and growth of each vessel evolves in response to changes in biomechanical stresses. During a simulation, the network develops well-defined arterial and venous vessel characteristics. A change in endothelial function producing a high precapillary resistance and thus a high vascular flow reserve is associated with an increase in network inlet pressure. Assuming that network properties are independent of body mass, and that inlet pressure of the microvascular network is a proxy for arterial pressure, the study provides a conceptual explanation of why high performing animals tend to have a high MAP. PMID:27255360

  3. Beneficial Effects of Dietary Nitrate on Endothelial Function and Blood Pressure Levels.

    PubMed

    d'El-Rei, Jenifer; Cunha, Ana Rosa; Trindade, Michelle; Neves, Mario Fritsch

    2016-01-01

    Poor eating habits may represent cardiovascular risk factors since high intake of fat and saturated fatty acids contributes to dyslipidemia, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Thus, nutritional interventions are recognized as important strategies for primary prevention of hypertension and as adjuvants to pharmacological therapies to reduce cardiovascular risk. The DASH (Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension) plan is one of the most effective strategies for the prevention and nonpharmacological management of hypertension. The beneficial effects of DASH diet on blood pressure might be related to the high inorganic nitrate content of some food products included in this meal plan. The beetroot and other food plants considered as nitrate sources account for approximately 60-80% of the daily nitrate exposure in the western population. The increased levels of nitrite by nitrate intake seem to have beneficial effects in many of the physiological and clinical settings. Several clinical trials are being conducted to determine the broad therapeutic potential of increasing the bioavailability of nitrite in human health and disease, including studies related to vascular aging. In conclusion, the dietary inorganic nitrate seems to represent a promising complementary therapy to support hypertension treatment with benefits for cardiovascular health. PMID:27088010

  4. Beneficial Effects of Dietary Nitrate on Endothelial Function and Blood Pressure Levels

    PubMed Central

    d'El-Rei, Jenifer; Cunha, Ana Rosa; Trindade, Michelle; Neves, Mario Fritsch

    2016-01-01

    Poor eating habits may represent cardiovascular risk factors since high intake of fat and saturated fatty acids contributes to dyslipidemia, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Thus, nutritional interventions are recognized as important strategies for primary prevention of hypertension and as adjuvants to pharmacological therapies to reduce cardiovascular risk. The DASH (Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension) plan is one of the most effective strategies for the prevention and nonpharmacological management of hypertension. The beneficial effects of DASH diet on blood pressure might be related to the high inorganic nitrate content of some food products included in this meal plan. The beetroot and other food plants considered as nitrate sources account for approximately 60–80% of the daily nitrate exposure in the western population. The increased levels of nitrite by nitrate intake seem to have beneficial effects in many of the physiological and clinical settings. Several clinical trials are being conducted to determine the broad therapeutic potential of increasing the bioavailability of nitrite in human health and disease, including studies related to vascular aging. In conclusion, the dietary inorganic nitrate seems to represent a promising complementary therapy to support hypertension treatment with benefits for cardiovascular health. PMID:27088010

  5. Maladaptive rumination moderates the effects of written emotional disclosure on ambulatory blood pressure levels in females

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Daryl B.; Ashley, Laura; Jones, Fiona; Ferguson, Eamonn

    2014-01-01

    Written emotional disclosure (WED) has beneficial effects on health outcomes. However, its effectiveness is influenced by a number of variables. This exploratory study tested whether trait rumination, which comprises brooding, a maladaptive component, and reflection, an adaptive component, moderated the effects of WED on ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in female participants. Fifty-two participants were randomized to write about their most stressful/traumatic life experience(s) or non-emotive topics, for 20 minutes, on 3 consecutive days. Two weeks and 14 weeks later, ABP was recorded over a single day. Using hierarchical linear modelling, an effect of condition was found at 2 weeks but not at 14 weeks indicating that higher levels of ABP were observed following WED. There was also a significant condition by brooding interaction at two weeks such that higher ABP was observed in low brooders in the WED condition compared with low brooders in the control condition. However, within the WED condition, the lowest ABP was exhibited by participants high in brooding. The findings indicated that WED led to short-lived increases in ABP which disappeared in the medium term. Researchers ought to build upon this exploratory study and investigate further the potential moderating role of brooding within WED. Individual differences in brooding may account for (some of) the mixed and inconsistent findings in past WED research. PMID:25750835

  6. Temperature Humidity and Sea Level Pressure Increments Induced by 1DVAR Analysis of GPS Refractivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poli, Paul; Joiner, Joanna; Kursinski, Emil Robert; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) transmitted signals are affected by the atmosphere. Using the radio occultation technique, where a receiver is placed on a low-Earth-orbiting platform. it is possible to perform soundings. by measuring the bending angles of the rays. The information can be converted into atmospheric refractivity. We have developed a one dimensional variational (1DVAR) analysis that uses GPS/MET 1995 refractivity and 6-hour FVDAS (Finite Volume Data Assimilation System) forecasts as background information to constrain the retrievals. The analysis increments are defined as 1DVAR minus background temperature, humidity and sea level pressure. Before assimilating the 1DVAR profiles into the FVDAS. the increments need to be understood. First, some bias could be induced in the retrievals when confronted with actual biased data: second. bias in the back-round could create undesired bias in the retrievals. Anv bias in the analyses will ultimately change the climatology of the model the retrievals will be assimilated into. We relate the increments to the reduction of the difference between observed minus computed refractivity profiles. We also point out the difference in the mean increments using backgrounds which have assimilated either NESDIS TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) operational retrievals or Data Assimilation Office (DAO) TOVS interactive retrievals. The climatology of the model in terms of refractivity is significantly different and this impacts the GPS 1DVAR increments. This testifies that changing the basic load of assimilated data has an influence on the impact the GPS data may have in a DAS.

  7. Is there any association between blood pressure and education level? The CroHort study.

    PubMed

    Erceg, Marijan; Ivicević-Uhernik, Ana; Kern, Josipa; Vuletić, Silvije

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how the association of 5-year cumulative incidence of arterial hypertension (further 5-CIAH) and education varies according to body weight, age and sex. The study was conducted on cohort of 1383 subjects aged 18+ with initially normal blood pressure (systolic < 140 mmHg and diastolic < 90 mmHg, and not taking medication). Data were collected in 2003 and repeated in 2008. Methods of descriptive statistics, chi2 test and logistic regression were used. No association between education level and hypertension development was recorded in the group of men and in the group of woman aged 65+. In the group of women with normal body weight, younger than 65 years, significantly higher 5-CIAH values were recorded in those with less than 12 years of education (32.5% [22.0 to 42.9]) compared to those with 12 or more years of education (9.6% [6.1 to 13.1]). PMID:22338760

  8. Predicting the June 2013 European Flooding based on Precipitation, Soil Moisture and Sea Level Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, Monica; Dima, Mihai; Lohmann, Gerrit; Scholz, Patrick; Rimbu, Norel

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decades Europe has experienced heavy floods with major consequences for thousands of people and billions of Euros worth of damage. In particular, the summer 2013 flood in Central Europe showed how vulnerable modern society is to hydrological extremes and emphasizes once more the need for improved forecast methods of such extreme climatic events. Based on a multiple linear regression model, it is shown here that 55% of the June 2013 Elbe River extreme discharge could have been predicted using May precipitation, soil moisture and sea level pressure. Moreover, our model was able to predict more than 75% of the total Elbe River discharge for June 2013 (in terms of magnitude) by incorporating also the amount of precipitation recorded during the days prior the flood, but the predicted discharge for the June 2013 event was still underestimated by 25%. Given that all predictors used in the model are available at the end of each month, the forecast scheme can be used to predict extreme events and to provide early warnings for upcoming floods. The forecast methodology could be efficient for other rivers also, depending on their location and their climatic background.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Liquid-Level Measuring Accuracy in a Low Pressure Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, D.J.

    1996-10-01

    Dip Tubes which are used for determining liquid level in many processes at SRS will be used to measure the liquid level of the Am/Cm solution in the Feed Tank at the MPPF. The Feed Tank operates under a vacuum, therefore the Dip Tubes will operate under a vacuum. Uncertainty in how accurate the Dip Tubes would perform in a vacuum environment led to testing. The Am/Cm Melter Liquid-Feed Tank measurement test was mocked-up per Figure 1. The Feed Tank was designed to simulate actual conditions in which the Dip Tubes would measure the differential pressure. The Feed Tank was made of Stainless Steel with a Lexan window to view inside the tank during testing. The Feed Tank was built per Drawing SRT-ETF-DD-96008, Revision A. The accuracy of the Dip Tubes was checked first by filling the Feed Tank at a flow rate of 3.5 L/min and venting it to the atmosphere. Figure 2 shows that the Dip Tubes were responsive and accurate when compared to the data from the measuring scale on the view window. Then tests were conducted with 23y Hg vacuum inside the tank and water flow rates of 3.9 L/min, 1.8 L/min, and 0.7 L/min being fed to the tank. The data from each test are depicted in Figure 3, Figure 4, and Figure 5, respectively. The Dip Tubes responded accurately for the three test with a maximum error range of +0.31y to -0.19y when compared to the measuring scale located next to the view window on the Feed Tank.

  10. Earth's air pressure 2.7 billion years ago constrained to less than half of modern levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, Sanjoy M.; Buick, Roger; Hagadorn, James W.; Blake, Tim S.; Perreault, John M.; Harnmeijer, Jelte P.; Catling, David C.

    2016-06-01

    How the Earth stayed warm several billion years ago when the Sun was considerably fainter is the long-standing problem of the `faint young Sun paradox'. Because of negligible O2 and only moderate CO2 levels in the Archaean atmosphere, methane has been invoked as an auxiliary greenhouse gas. Alternatively, pressure broadening in a thicker atmosphere with a N2 partial pressure around 1.6-2.4 bar could have enhanced the greenhouse effect. But fossilized raindrop imprints indicate that air pressure 2.7 billion years ago (Gyr) was below twice modern levels and probably below 1.1 bar, precluding such pressure enhancement. This result is supported by nitrogen and argon isotope studies of fluid inclusions in 3.0-3.5 Gyr rocks. Here, we calculate absolute Archaean barometric pressure using the size distribution of gas bubbles in basaltic lava flows that solidified at sea level ~2.7 Gyr in the Pilbara Craton, Australia. Our data indicate a surprisingly low surface atmospheric pressure of Patm = 0.23 +/- 0.23 (2σ) bar, and combined with previous studies suggests ~0.5 bar as an upper limit to late Archaean Patm. The result implies that the thin atmosphere was rich in auxiliary greenhouse gases and that Patm fluctuated over geologic time to a previously unrecognized extent.

  11. Fluid mechanical model of the acoustic impedance of small orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Rogers, T.

    1975-01-01

    A fluid mechanical model of the acoustic behavior of small orifices is presented which predicts orifice impedance as a function of incident sound pressure level, frequency, and orifice geometry. Agreement between predicted and measured values (in both water and air) of orifice impedance is excellent. The model shows that (1) the acoustic flow in the immediate neighborhood of the orifice can be modelled as a locally spherical flow, (2) within this near field, the flow is, to a first approximation, unsteady and incompressible, and (3) at very low sound pressure levels, the orifice viscous resistance is directly related to the effect of boundary-layer displacement along the walls containing the orifice, and the orifice reactance is directly related to the inertia of the oscillating flow in the orifice neighborhood.-

  12. Finite Element Prediction of Acoustic Scattering and Radiation from Submerged Elastic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, G. C.; Henderson, F. M.; Lipman, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    A finite element formulation is derived for the scattering and radiation of acoustic waves from submerged elastic structures. The formulation uses as fundamental unknowns the displacement in the structure and a velocity potential in the field. Symmetric coefficient matrices result. The outer boundary of the fluid region is terminated with an approximate local wave-absorbing boundary condition which assumes that outgoing waves are locally planar. The finite element model is capable of predicting only the near-field acoustic pressures. Far-field sound pressure levels may be determined by integrating the surface pressures and velocities over the wet boundary of the structure using the Helmholtz integral. Comparison of finite element results with analytic results show excellent agreement. The coupled fluid-structure problem may be solved with general purpose finite element codes by using an analogy between the equations of elasticity and the wave equation of linear acoustics.

  13. Effect of Buddhist meditation on serum cortisol and total protein levels, blood pressure, pulse rate, lung volume and reaction time.

    PubMed

    Sudsuang, R; Chentanez, V; Veluvan, K

    1991-09-01

    Serum cortisol and total protein levels, blood pressure, heart rate, lung volume, and reaction time were studied in 52 males 20-25 years of age practicing Dhammakaya Buddhist meditation, and in 30 males of the same age group not practicing meditation. It was found that after meditation, serum cortisol levels were significantly reduced, serum total protein level significantly increased, and systolic pressure, diastolic pressure and pulse rate significantly reduced. Vital capacity, tidal volume and maximal voluntary ventilation were significantly lower after meditation than before. There were also significant decreases in reaction time after mediation practice. The percentage decrease in reaction time during meditation was 22%, while in subjects untrained in meditation, the percentage decrease was only 7%. Results from these studies indicate that practising Dhammakaya Buddhist meditation produces biochemical and physiological changes and reduces the reaction time. PMID:1801007

  14. The effect of chronic peripheral nesfatin-1 application on blood pressure in normal and chronic restraint stressed rats: related with circulating level of blood pressure regulators.

    PubMed

    Ayada, Ceylan; Turgut, Günfer; Turgut, Sebahat; Güçlü, Zuhal

    2015-01-01

    Nesfatin is a peptide secreted by peripheral tissues, central and peripheral nervous system. It is involved in the regulation of homeostasis. Although the effects of nesfatin-1 on nutrition have been studied widely in the literature, the mechanisms of nesfatin-1 action and also relations with other physiological parameters are still not clarified well. We aimed to investigate the effect of peripheral chronic nesfatin-1 application on blood pressure regulation in normal and in rats exposed to restraint immobilization stress. In our study, three month-old male Wistar rats were used. Rats were divided into 4 groups as Control, Stress, Control+Nesfatin-1, Nesfatin-1+Stress. Angiotensinogen, angiotensin converting enzyme 2, angiotensin II, endothelin-1, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, aldosterone, cortisol, nesfatin-1 levels were determined in plasma samples by ELISA. Our results have shown that chronic peripheral nesfatin-1 administration increases blood pressure in normal and in rats exposed to chronic restraint stress. Effect of nesfatin-1 on circulating level of angiotensinogen, angiotensin converting enzyme 2, angiotensin II, endothelin-1, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, aldosterone and cortisol has been identified. We can conclude that elevated high blood pressure after chronic peripheral nesfatin-1 administration in rats exposed to chronic restraint stress may be related to decreased plasma level of endothelial nitric oxide synthase concentration. PMID:25504061

  15. Self-pressurization of a flightweight liquid hydrogen tank: Effects of fill level at low wall heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandresar, N. T.; Hasan, M. M.; Lin, C.-S.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the self pressurization and thermal stratification of a 4.89 cu m liquid hydrogen storage tank subjected to low heat flux (2.0 and 3.5 W/sq m) in normal gravity. The test tank was representative of future spacecraft tankage, having a low mass to volume ratio and high performance multilayer thermal insulation. Tests were performed at fill levels of 29 and 49 pcts. (by volume) and complement previous tests at 83 pct. fill. As the heat flux increases, the pressure rise rate at each fill level exceeds the homogeneous rate by an increasing ratio. Herein, this ratio did not exceed a value of 2. The slowest pressure rise rate was observed for the 49 pct. fill level at both heat fluxes. This result is attributed to the oblate spheroidal tank geometry which introduces the variables of wetted wall area, liquid-vapor interfacial area, and ratio of side wall to bottom heating as a function of fill level or liquid depth. Initial tank thermal conditions were found to affect the initial pressure rise rate. Quasi steady pressure rise rates are independent of starting conditions.

  16. Self-pressurization of a flightweight liquid hydrogen tank - Effects of fill level at low wall heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dresar, N. T.; Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the self pressurization and thermal stratification of a 4.89 cu m liquid hydrogen storage tank subjected to low heat flux (2.0 and 3.5 W/sq m) in normal gravity. The test tank was representative of future spacecraft tankage, having a low mass to volume ratio and high performance multilayer thermal insulation. Tests were performed at fill levels of 29 and 49 pcts. (by volume) and complement previous tests at 83 pct. fill. As the heat flux increases, the pressure rise rate at each fill level exceeds the homogeneous rate by an increasing ratio. Herein, this ratio did not exceed a value of 2. The slowest pressure rise rate was observed for the 49 pct. fill level at both heat fluxes. This result is attributed to the oblate spheroidal tank geometry which introduces the variables of wetted wall area, liquid-vapor interfacial area, and ratio of side wall to bottom heating as a function of fill level or liquid depth. Initial tank thermal conditions were found to affect the initial pressure rise rate. Quasi steady pressure rise rates are independent of starting conditions.

  17. Regional Fat Distribution and Blood Pressure Level and Variability: The Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yuichiro; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Ayers, Colby; Turer, Aslan; Chandra, Alvin; Carnethon, Mercedes R; Greenland, Philip; de Lemos, James A; Neeland, Ian J

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to investigate the associations of regional fat distribution with home and office blood pressure (BP) levels and variability. Participants in the Dallas Heart Study, a multiethnic cohort, underwent 5 BP measurements on 3 occasions during 5 months (2 in home and 1 in office) and quantification of visceral adipose tissue, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue, and liver fat by magnetic resonance imaging, and lower body subcutaneous fat by dual x-ray absorptiometry. The relation of regional adiposity with short-term (within-visit) and long-term (overall visits) mean BP and average real variability was assessed with multivariable linear regression. We have included 2595 participants with a mean age of 44 years (54% women; 48% black), and mean body mass index was 29 kg/m(2) Mean systolic BP/diastolic BP was 127/79 mm Hg and average real variability systolic BP was 9.8 mm Hg during 3 visits. In multivariable-adjusted models, higher amount of visceral adipose tissue was associated with higher short-term (both home and office) and long-term mean systolic BP (β[SE]: 1.9[0.5], 2.7[0.5], and 2.1[0.5], respectively; all P<0.001) and with lower long-term average real variability systolic BP (β[SE]: -0.5[0.2]; P<0.05). In contrast, lower body fat was associated with lower short-term home and long-term mean BP (β[SE]: -0.30[0.13] and -0.24[0.1], respectively; both P<0.05). Neither subcutaneous adipose tissue or liver fat was associated with BP levels or variability. In conclusion, excess visceral fat was associated with persistently higher short- and long-term mean BP levels and with lower long-term BP variability, whereas lower body fat was associated with lower short- and long-term mean BP. Persistently elevated BP, coupled with lower variability, may partially explain increased risk for cardiac hypertrophy and failure related to visceral adiposity. PMID:27432862

  18. Acoustic effects of single electrostatic discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzech, Łukasz

    2015-10-01

    Electric discharges, depending on their character, can emit different types of energy, resulting in different effects. Single electrostatic discharges besides generation of electromagnetic pulses are also the source of N acoustic waves. Their specified parameters depending on amount of discharging charge enable determination of value of released charge in a function of acoustic descriptor (e.g. acoustic pressure). Presented approach is the basics of acoustic method for measurement of single electrostatic discharges, enabling direct and contactless measurement of value of charge released during ESD. Method for measurement of acoustic effect of impact of a single electrostatic discharge on the environment in a form of pressure shock wave and examples of acoustic descriptors in a form of equation Q=f(pa) are described. The properties of measuring system as well as the results of regression static analyses used to determine the described relationships are analysed in details.

  19. Electrochemical Processes Enhanced by Acoustic Liquid Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic liquid manipulation is a family of techniques that employ the nonlinear acoustic effects of acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming to manipulate the behavior of liquids. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are exploring new methods of manipulating liquids for a variety of space applications, and we have found that acoustic techniques may also be used in the normal Earth gravity environment to enhance the performance of existing fluid processes. Working in concert with the NASA Commercial Technology Office, the Great Lakes Industrial Technology Center, and Alchemitron Corporation (Elgin, IL), researchers at Glenn have applied nonlinear acoustic principles to industrial applications. Collaborating with Alchemitron Corporation, we have adapted the devices to create acoustic streaming in a conventional electroplating process.

  20. Measuring acoustic habitats

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies. PMID:25954500