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Sample records for acoustic pressure response

  1. Nonlinear Response of Composite Panels Under Combined Acoustic Excitation and Aerodynamic Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Motagaly, K.; Duan, B.; Mei, C.

    1999-01-01

    A finite element formulation is presented for the analysis of large deflection response of composite panels subjected to aerodynamic pressure- at supersonic flow and high acoustic excitation. The first-order shear deformation theory is considered for laminated composite plates, and the von Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relations are employed for the analysis of large deflection panel response. The first-order piston theory aerodynamics and the simulated Gaussian white noise are employed for the aerodynamic and acoustic loads, respectively. The nonlinear equations of motion for an arbitrarily laminated composite panel subjected to a combined aerodynamic and acoustic pressures are formulated first in structure node degrees-of-freedom. The system equations are then transformed and reduced to a set of coupled nonlinear equations in modal coordinates. Modal participation is defined and the in-vacuo modes to be retained in the analysis are based on the modal participation values. Numerical results include root mean square values of maximum deflections, deflection and strain response time histories, probability distributions, and power spectrum densities. Results showed that combined acoustic and aerodynamic loads have to be considered for panel analysis and design at high dynamic pressure values.

  2. Acoustic pressure-vector sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dehua; Elswick, Roy C.; McEachern, James F.

    2001-05-01

    Pressure-vector sensors measure both scalar and vector components of the acoustic field. December 2003 measurements at the NUWC Seneca Lake test facility verify previous observations that acoustic ambient noise spectrum levels measured by acoustic intensity sensors are reduced relative to either acoustic pressure or acoustic vector sensor spectrum levels. The Seneca measurements indicate a reduction by as much as 15 dB at the upper measurement frequency of 2500 Hz. A nonlinear array synthesis theory for pressure-vector sensors will be introduced that allows smaller apertures to achieve narrow beams. The significantly reduced ambient noise of individual pressure-vector elements observed in the ocean by others, and now at Seneca Lake, should allow a nonlinearly combined array to detect significantly lower levels than has been observed in previous multiplicative processing of pressure sensors alone. Nonlinear array synthesis of pressure-vector sensors differs from conventional super-directive algorithms that linearly combine pressure elements with positive and negative weights, thereby reducing the sensitivity of conventional super-directive arrays. The much smaller aperture of acoustic pressure-vector sensor arrays will be attractive for acoustic systems on underwater vehicles, as well as for other applications that require narrow beam acoustic receivers. [The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of ONR and NUWC.

  3. Acoustic waves in gases with strong pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, William E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of strong pressure gradients on the acoustic modes (standing waves) of a rectangular cavity is investigated analytically. When the cavity response is represented by a sum of modes, each mode is found to have two resonant frequencies. The lower frequency is near the Viaesaela-Brundt frequency, which characterizes the buoyant effect, and the higher frequency is above the ordinary acoustic resonance frequency. This finding shows that the propagation velocity of the acoustic waves is increased due to the pressure gradient effect.

  4. Quantitative measurement of acoustic pressure in the focal zone of acoustic lens-line focusing using the Schlieren method.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xueping; Cheng, Qian; Xu, Zheng; Qian, Menglu; Han, Qingbang

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a theory and method for quantitative measurement of the acoustic lens-line focusing ultrasonic (ALLFU) field in its focal spot size and acoustic pressure using the Schlieren imaging technique. Using Fourier transformation, the relationship between the brightness of the Schlieren image and the acoustic pressure was introduced. The ALLFU field was simulated using finite element method and compared with the Schlieren acoustic field image. The measurement of the focal spot size was performed using the Schlieren method. The acoustic pressure in the focal zone of the ALLFU field and the transducer-transmitting voltage response were quantitatively determined by measuring the diffraction light fringe intensity. The results show that the brightness of the Schlieren image is a linear function of the acoustic intensity when the acousto-optic interaction length remains constant and the acoustic field is weak. PMID:27139646

  5. Methods for reconstructing acoustic quantities based on acoustic pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the acoustic imaging methods developed over the past three decades that enable one to reconstruct all acoustic quantities based on the acoustic pressure measurements taken around a target source at close distances. One such method that has received the most attention is known as near-field acoustical holography (NAH). The original NAH relies on Fourier transforms that are suitable for a surface containing a level of constant coordinate in a source-free region. Other methods are developed to reconstruct the acoustic quantities in three-dimensional space and on an arbitrary three-dimensional source surface. Note that there is a fine difference between Fourier transform based NAH and other methods that is largely overlooked. The former can offer a wave number spectrum, thus enabling visualization of various structural waves of different wavelengths that travel on the surface of a structure; the latter cannot provide such information, which is critical to acquire an in-depth understanding of the interrelationships between structural vibrations and sound radiation. All these methods are discussed in this paper, their advantages and limitations are compared, and the need for further development to analyze the root causes of noise and vibration problems is discussed.

  6. Acoustic oscillatory pressure control for ramjet

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.S.; Dunlap, R.

    1988-08-02

    A method for controlling the acoustic oscillatory pressures generated by gas flow at the combustor inlet to a ramjet engine, the inlet including a sudden geometry expansion is described characterized by; restricting the inlet at the sudden expansion geometry such that the gas flow separates upstream and has a vena contracta downstream of the restricted inlet.

  7. Nonlinear Bubble Interactions in Acoustic Pressure Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbat, Tiberiu; Ashgriz, Nasser; Liu, Ching-Shi

    1996-01-01

    The systems consisting of a two-phase mixture, as clouds of bubbles or drops, have shown many common features in their responses to different external force fields. One of particular interest is the effect of an unsteady pressure field applied to these systems, case in which the coupling of the vibrations induced in two neighboring components (two drops or two bubbles) may result in an interaction force between them. This behavior was explained by Bjerknes by postulating that every body that is moving in an accelerating fluid is subjected to a 'kinetic buoyancy' equal with the product of the acceleration of the fluid multiplied by the mass of the fluid displaced by the body. The external sound wave applied to a system of drops/bubbles triggers secondary sound waves from each component of the system. These secondary pressure fields integrated over the surface of the neighboring drop/bubble may result in a force additional to the effect of the primary sound wave on each component of the system. In certain conditions, the magnitude of these secondary forces may result in significant changes in the dynamics of each component, thus in the behavior of the entire system. In a system containing bubbles, the sound wave radiated by one bubble at the location of a neighboring one is dominated by the volume oscillation mode and its effects can be important for a large range of frequencies. The interaction forces in a system consisting of drops are much smaller than those consisting of bubbles. Therefore, as a first step towards the understanding of the drop-drop interaction subject to external pressure fluctuations, it is more convenient to study the bubble interactions. This paper presents experimental results and theoretical predictions concerning the interaction and the motion of two levitated air bubbles in water in the presence of an acoustic field at high frequencies (22-23 KHz).

  8. Nucleation pressure threshold in acoustic droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Christopher J.; Doering, Charles R.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.

    2016-07-01

    We combine classical nucleation theory with superharmonic focusing to predict necessary pressures to induce nucleation in acoustic droplet vaporization. We show that linear acoustics is a valid approximation to leading order when particle displacements in the sound field are small relative to the radius of the droplet. This is done by perturbation analysis of an axisymmetric compressible inviscid flow about a droplet with small surface perturbations relative to the mean radius subjected to an incoming ultrasonic wave. The necessary nucleation pressure threshold inside the droplet is calculated to be -9.33 ± 0.30 MPa for typical experimental parameters by employing results from classical homogeneous nucleation theory. As a result, we are able to predict if a given incident pressure waveform will induce nucleation.

  9. Pressure distribution based optimization of phase-coded acoustical vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Haixiang; Gao, Lu; Dai, Yafei; Ma, Qingyu; Zhang, Dong

    2014-02-28

    Based on the acoustic radiation of point source, the physical mechanism of phase-coded acoustical vortices is investigated with formulae derivations of acoustic pressure and vibration velocity. Various factors that affect the optimization of acoustical vortices are analyzed. Numerical simulations of the axial, radial, and circular pressure distributions are performed with different source numbers, frequencies, and axial distances. The results prove that the acoustic pressure of acoustical vortices is linearly proportional to the source number, and lower fluctuations of circular pressure distributions can be produced for more sources. With the increase of source frequency, the acoustic pressure of acoustical vortices increases accordingly with decreased vortex radius. Meanwhile, increased vortex radius with reduced acoustic pressure is also achieved for longer axial distance. With the 6-source experimental system, circular and radial pressure distributions at various frequencies and axial distances have been measured, which have good agreements with the results of numerical simulations. The favorable results of acoustic pressure distributions provide theoretical basis for further studies of acoustical vortices.

  10. Fast Pressure-Sensitive Paint for Flow and Acoustic Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, James W.; Sakaue, Hirotaka; Liu, Tianshu; Sullivan, John P.

    2014-01-01

    The development and capabilities of fast-responding pressure-sensitive paint (fast PSP) are reviewed within the context of recent applications to aerodynamic and acoustic investigations. PSP is an optical technique for determining surface pressure distributions by measuring changes in the intensity of emitted light, whereas fast PSP is an extension applicable to unsteady flows and acoustics. Most fast PSP formulations are based on the development of porous binders that allow for rapid oxygen diffusion and interaction with the chemical sensor. This article reviews the development of porous binders, the selection of luminophore molecules suitable for unsteady testing, dynamic calibrations of PSP, data-acquisition methods, and noteworthy applications for flow and acoustic diagnostics. Calibrations of the dynamic response of fast PSP show a flat frequency response to at least 6 kHz, with some paint formulations exceeding a response of 1 MHz. Various applications of fast PSP are discussed that highlight the capabilities of the technique, and concluding remarks highlight the need for the future development of fast PSP.

  11. Inlet total pressure loss due to acoustic wall treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of diffuser wall acoustic treatment on inlet total pressure loss was experimentally determined. Data were obtained by testing an inlet model with 10 different acoustically treated diffusers differing only in the design of the Helmholtz resonator acoustic treatment. Tests were conducted in a wind tunnel at forward velocities to 41 meters per second for inlet throat Mach numbers of .5 to .8 and angles of attack as high as 50 degrees. Results indicate a pressure loss penalty due to acoustic treatment that increases linearly with the porosity of the acoustic facing sheet. For a surface porosity of 14 percent the total pressure loss was 21 percent greater than that for an untreated inlet.

  12. Acoustics of the piezo-electric pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutt, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    Acoustical properties of a piezoelectric device are reported for measuring the pressure in the plasma flow from an MPD arc. A description and analysis of the acoustical behavior in a piezoelectric probe is presented for impedance matching and damping. The experimental results are presented in a set of oscillographic records.

  13. Development of acoustic agglomerator. Test plan for high temperature high pressure acoustic agglomerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-08-01

    The design specifications for the HTHP AA Facility are listed. The facility is an open-loop, air flow system with subsystems and components to provide the high temperature, high pressure, residence time, dust loading and acoustic irradiation to simulate the aerosol and Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) AA system of a Pressurized Fluid Bed Combustor (PFBC), Combined Cycle Power Plant. Data sampling, instrumentation, and automatic controls and data analysis systems are also provided. This test plan describes the testing to be done on the high temperature, high pressure acoustic agglomerator (HTHP AA) at Pen State University's High Intensity Acoustic Laboratory.

  14. Acoustic response of a rectangular levitator with orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, Michael; Wagner, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The acoustic response of a rectangular cavity to speaker-generated excitation through waveguides terminating at orifices in the cavity walls is analyzed. To find the effects of orifices, acoustic pressure is expressed by eigenfunctions satisfying Neumann boundary conditions as well as by those satisfying Dirichlet ones. Some of the excess unknowns can be eliminated by point constraints set over the boundary, by appeal to Lagrange undetermined multipliers. The resulting transfer matrix must be further reduced by partial condensation to the order of a matrix describing unmixed boundary conditions. If the cavity is subjected to an axial temperature dependence, the transfer matrix is determined numerically.

  15. Acoustic response of a rectangular levitator with orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Raheb, Michael; Wagner, Paul

    1990-11-01

    The acoustic response of a rectangular cavity to speaker-generated excitation through waveguides terminating at orifices in the cavity walls is analyzed. To find the effects of orifices, acoustic pressure is expressed by eigenfunctions satisfying Neumann boundary conditions as well as by those satisfying Dirichlet ones. Some of the excess unknowns can be eliminated by point constraints set over the boundary, by appeal to Lagrange undetermined multipliers. The resulting transfer matrix must be further reduced by partial condensation to the order of a matrix describing unmixed boundary conditions. If the cavity is subjected to an axial temperature dependence, the transfer matrix is determined numerically.

  16. Acoustic response analysis of large light space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defosse, H.; Mercier, F.

    1989-10-01

    The dynamic behavior of large lightweight aerospace structures under reverberant acoustic excitation is investigated. A review of the modal superposition theory is presented, along with an improved analysis method of air mass and acoustic radiation damping effects. An efficient postprocessor uses classic finite element codes to compute structural responses up to medium frequencies. Experiments performed on a honeycomb panel demonstrate the importance of two factors for the accurate analysis of the vibroacoustic responses of such aerospace structures: specifically, it is shown that the low frequency response calculations should include correlation characteristics of the excitation pressure field, and the test data processing should include pressure cross spectra calculations. Theoretical and analytical results are compared to assess air effects on a rigid circular plate. Dynamic analysis of large lightweight aerospace structures under a vacuum hypothesis may lead to a significant overestimation of predicted levels.

  17. Measurement of cochlear acoustic pressure in guinea pigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, R.; Dancer, A.

    1983-10-01

    Guinea pig cochlear acoustic pressure was measured in the 3 to 200 Hz range. The cochlear microphonic potential was recorded. The experimental results agree with the Peterson and Bogert model. The pressure transducers and the calibrating device are confirmed to be excellent tools for this type of research.

  18. Manipulating Liquids With Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    1999-01-01

    High-intensity ultrasound waves can produce the effects of "Acoustic Radiation Pressure" (ARP) and "acoustic streaming." These effects can be used to propel liquid flows and to apply forces that can be used to move or manipulate floating objects or liquid surfaces. NASA's interest in ARP includes the remote-control agitation of liquids and the manipulation of bubbles and drops in liquid experiments and propellant systems. A high level of flexibility is attained by using a high-power acoustic phased array to generate, steer, and focus a beam of acoustic waves. This is called an Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Array, or ARPPA. In this approach, many acoustic transducer elements emit wavelets that converge into a single beam of sound waves. Electronically coordinating the timing, or "phase shift," of the acoustic waves makes it possible to form a beam with a predefined direction and focus. Therefore, a user can direct the ARP force at almost any desired point within a liquid volume. ARPPA lets experimenters manipulate objects anywhere in a test volume. This flexibility allow it to be used for multiple purposes, such as to agitate liquids, deploy and manipulate drops or bubbles, and even suppress sloshing in spacecraft propellant tanks.

  19. Standing wave pressure fields generated in an acoustic levitation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Andrew; Allen, John S.; Kruse, Dustin E.; Dayton, Paul A.; Kargel, Christian M.; Insana, Michael F.

    2001-05-01

    We are developing an acoustic levitation chamber for measuring adhesion force strengths among biological cells. Our research has four phases. Phase I, presented here, is concerned with the design and construction of a chamber for trapping cell-sized microbubbles with known properties in acoustic standing waves, and examines the theory that describes the standing wave field. A cylindrical chamber has been developed to generate a stable acoustic standing wave field. The pressure field was mapped using a 0.4-mm needle hydrophone, and experiments were performed using 100 micron diameter unencapsulated air bubbles, 9 micron diameter isobutane-filled microbubbles, and 3 micron diameter decafluorobutane (C4F10)-filled microbubbles, confirming that the net radiation force from the standing wave pressure field tends to band the microbubbles at pressure antinodes, in accordance with theory.

  20. Wall pressure fluctuations and acoustics in turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, M. A.; Lauchle, G. C.

    1986-09-01

    Measurements of the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) wall pressure spectrum and the facility's propagating acoustic field were conducted in the Boundary Layer Research Facility. Subminiature, piezoresistive-type pressure transducers were used. Detailed calibration of the pressure transducers was performed using a standing wave tube. Measured sensitivities of the transducers were within 0.5 dB of factory specifications and measured phase differences between individual transducers were insignificant. The TBL wall pressure spectrum was obtained using a novel signal-processing technique that allowed a minimization of both acoustic and vibration-induced noise. This technique uses pairs of transducer difference signals from an exisymmetric array of three flush-mounted pressure sensors and permits cancellation of the propagating acoustic and vibrationally induced pressure fields. A measurement involving the coherence function between these transducer signals was shown to validate the measured TBL wall pressure spectra and all assumptions used in developing the measurement technique. Non-dimensionalized spectra of the TBL fluctuating wall pressure measured in this investigation are compared to those measured previously. These comparisons substantiated a maximum, normalized transducer diameter for the complete resolution of the high-frequency part of the TBL wall pressure spectrum.

  1. Measurement of transient acoustic fields using a single-shot pressure-sensitive paint system.

    PubMed

    Disotell, Kevin J; Gregory, James W

    2011-07-01

    A pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) system capable of measuring high-frequency acoustic fields with non-periodic, acoustic-level pressure changes is described. As an optical measurement technique, PSP provides the experimenter with a global distribution of pressure on a painted surface. To demonstrate frequency response and enhanced sensitivity to pressure changes, a PSP system consisting of a polymer∕ceramic matrix binder with platinum tetra(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin (PtTFPP) as the oxygen probe was applied to a wall inside an acoustic resonance cavity excited at 1.3 kHz. A data acquisition technique based on the luminescent decay lifetime of the oxygen sensors excited by a single pulse of light afforded the ability to capture instantaneous pressure fields with no phase-averaging. Superimposed wave-like structures were observed with a wavelength corresponding to a 4.7% difference from the theoretical value for a sound wave emanating from the speaker. High sound pressure cases upwards of 145 dB (re 20 μPa) exhibited skewed nodal lines attributed to a nonlinear acoustic field. The lowest sound pressure level of 125.4 dB--corresponding to an amplitude of 52.7 Pa, or approximately 0.05% of standard sea-level atmospheric pressure--showed that the paint could resolve the spatial details of the mode shape at the given resonance condition.

  2. Measurement of transient acoustic fields using a single-shot pressure-sensitive paint system.

    PubMed

    Disotell, Kevin J; Gregory, James W

    2011-07-01

    A pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) system capable of measuring high-frequency acoustic fields with non-periodic, acoustic-level pressure changes is described. As an optical measurement technique, PSP provides the experimenter with a global distribution of pressure on a painted surface. To demonstrate frequency response and enhanced sensitivity to pressure changes, a PSP system consisting of a polymer∕ceramic matrix binder with platinum tetra(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin (PtTFPP) as the oxygen probe was applied to a wall inside an acoustic resonance cavity excited at 1.3 kHz. A data acquisition technique based on the luminescent decay lifetime of the oxygen sensors excited by a single pulse of light afforded the ability to capture instantaneous pressure fields with no phase-averaging. Superimposed wave-like structures were observed with a wavelength corresponding to a 4.7% difference from the theoretical value for a sound wave emanating from the speaker. High sound pressure cases upwards of 145 dB (re 20 μPa) exhibited skewed nodal lines attributed to a nonlinear acoustic field. The lowest sound pressure level of 125.4 dB--corresponding to an amplitude of 52.7 Pa, or approximately 0.05% of standard sea-level atmospheric pressure--showed that the paint could resolve the spatial details of the mode shape at the given resonance condition. PMID:21806232

  3. Analyzing excitation forces acting on a plate based on measured acoustic pressure.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F; Zhou, Pan

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on "seeing" through an elastic structure to uncover the root cause of sound and vibration by using nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) and normal modes expansion. This approach is of generality because vibro-acoustic responses on the surface of a vibrating structure can always be reconstructed, exactly or approximately. With these vibro-acoustic responses, excitation forces acting on the structure can always be determined, analytically or numerically, given any set of boundary conditions. As an example, the explicit formulations for reconstructing time-harmonic excitation forces, including point, line and surface forces, and their arbitrary combinations acting on a rectangular thin plate in vacuum mounted on an infinite baffle are presented. The reason for choosing this example is that the analytic solutions to vibro-acoustic responses are available, and in-depth analyses of results are possible. Results demonstrate that this approach allows one to identify excitation forces based on measured acoustic pressures and reveal their characteristics such as locations, types and amplitudes, as if one could "see" excitation forces acting behind the plate based on acoustic pressure measured on the opposite side. This approach is extendable to general elastic structures, except that in such circumstance numerical results must be sought. PMID:27475174

  4. Measurement of transient acoustic fields using a single-shot pressure-sensitive paint system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disotell, Kevin J.; Gregory, James W.

    2011-07-01

    A pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) system capable of measuring high-frequency acoustic fields with non-periodic, acoustic-level pressure changes is described. As an optical measurement technique, PSP provides the experimenter with a global distribution of pressure on a painted surface. To demonstrate frequency response and enhanced sensitivity to pressure changes, a PSP system consisting of a polymer/ceramic matrix binder with platinum tetra(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin (PtTFPP) as the oxygen probe was applied to a wall inside an acoustic resonance cavity excited at 1.3 kHz. A data acquisition technique based on the luminescent decay lifetime of the oxygen sensors excited by a single pulse of light afforded the ability to capture instantaneous pressure fields with no phase-averaging. Superimposed wave-like structures were observed with a wavelength corresponding to a 4.7% difference from the theoretical value for a sound wave emanating from the speaker. High sound pressure cases upwards of 145 dB (re 20 μPa) exhibited skewed nodal lines attributed to a nonlinear acoustic field. The lowest sound pressure level of 125.4 dB—corresponding to an amplitude of 52.7 Pa, or approximately 0.05% of standard sea-level atmospheric pressure—showed that the paint could resolve the spatial details of the mode shape at the given resonance condition.

  5. Cardiorespiratory Responses to Acoustic Noise in Belugas.

    PubMed

    Lyamin, Oleg I; Korneva, Svetlana M; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav V; Mukhametov, Lev M

    2016-01-01

    To date, most research on the adverse effects of anthropogenic noise on marine mammals has focused on auditory and behavioral responses. Other responses have received little attention and are often ignored. In this study, the effect of acoustic noise on heart rate was examined in captive belugas. The data suggest that (1) heart rate can be used as a measure of physiological response (including stress) to noise in belugas and other cetaceans, (2) cardiac response is influenced by parameters of noise and adaptation to repeated exposure, and (3) cetacean calves are more vulnerable to the adverse effect of noise than adults. PMID:26611017

  6. Acoustic Wave Propagation in Pressure Sense Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitarius, Patrick; Gregory, Don A.; Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin

    2003-01-01

    Sense lines are used in pressure measurements to passively transmit information from hostile environments to areas where transducers can be used. The transfer function of a sense line can be used to obtain information about the measured environment from the protected sensor. Several properties of this transfer function are examined, including frequency dependence, Helmholtz resonance, and time of flight delay.

  7. Neural network/acoustic emission burst pressure prediction for impact damaged composite pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.L.; Workman, G.L.; Russell, S.S.; Hill, E.V.K.

    1997-08-01

    Acoustic emission signal analysis has been used to measure the effect impact damage has on the burst pressure of 146 mm (5.75 in.) diameter graphite/epoxy and the organic polymer, Kevlar/epoxy filament wound pressure vessels. Burst pressure prediction models were developed by correlating the differential acoustic emission amplitude distribution collected during low level hydroproof tests to known burst pressures using backpropagation artificial neural networks. Impact damage conditions ranging from barely visible to obvious fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination were included in this work. A simulated (inert) propellant was also cast into a series of the vessels from each material class, before impact loading, to provide boundary conditions during impact that would simulate those found on solid rocket motors. The results of this research effort demonstrate that a quantitative assessment of the effects that impact damage has on burst pressure can be made for both organic polymer/epoxy and graphite/epoxy pressure vessels. Here, an artificial neural network analysis of the acoustic emission parametric data recorded during low pressure hydroproof testing is used to relate burst pressure to the vessel`s acoustic signature. Burst pressure predictions within 6.0% of the actual failure pressure are demonstrated for a series of vessels.

  8. Acoustics and Surface Pressure Measurements from Tandem Cylinder Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic and unsteady surface pressure measurements from two cylinders in tandem configurations were acquired to study the effect of spacing, surface trip and freestream velocity on the radiated noise. The Reynolds number ranged from 1.15x10(exp 5) to 2.17x10(exp 5), and the cylinder spacing varied between 1.435 and 3.7 cylinder diameters. The acoustic and surface pressure spectral characteristics associated with the different flow regimes produced by the cylinders' wake interference were identified. The dependence of the Strouhal number, peak Sound Pressure Level and spanwise coherence on cylinder spacing and flow velocity was examined. Directivity measurements were performed to determine how well the dipole assumption for the radiation of vortex shedding noise holds for the largest and smallest cylinder spacing tested.

  9. Tongue-Palate Contact Pressure, Oral Air Pressure, and Acoustics of Clear Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searl, Jeff; Evitts, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared articulatory contact pressure (ACP), oral air pressure (Po), and speech acoustics for conversational versus clear speech. They also assessed the relationship of these measures to listener perception. Method: Twelve adults with normal speech produced monosyllables in a phrase using conversational and clear speech.…

  10. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  11. Dual mode acoustic wave sensor for precise pressure reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Xiaojing; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Wang, Yong; Randles, Andrew Benson; Chuan Chai, Kevin Tshun; Cai, Hong; Gu, Yuan Dong

    2014-09-01

    In this letter, a Microelectromechanical system acoustic wave sensor, which has a dual mode (lateral field exited Lamb wave mode and surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode) behavior, is presented for precious pressure change read out. Comb-like interdigital structured electrodes on top of piezoelectric material aluminium nitride (AlN) are used to generate the wave modes. The sensor membrane consists of single crystalline silicon formed by backside-etching of the bulk material of a silicon on insulator wafer having variable device thickness layer (5 μm-50 μm). With this principle, a pressure sensor has been fabricated and mounted on a pressure test package with pressure applied to the backside of the membrane within a range of 0 psi to 300 psi. The temperature coefficient of frequency was experimentally measured in the temperature range of -50 °C to 300 °C. This idea demonstrates a piezoelectric based sensor having two modes SAW/Lamb wave for direct physical parameter—pressure readout and temperature cancellation which can operate in harsh environment such as oil and gas exploration, automobile and aeronautic applications using the dual mode behavior of the sensor and differential readout at the same time.

  12. Acoustic power measurement of high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer using a pressure sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-03-01

    The acoustic power of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an important parameter that should be measured prior to each treatment to guarantee effective and safe outcomes. A new calibration technique was developed that involves estimating the pressure distribution, calculating the acoustic power using an underwater pressure blast sensor, and compensating the contribution of harmonics to the acoustic power. The output of a clinical extracorporeal HIFU system (center frequency of ~1 MHz, p+ = 2.5-57.2 MPa, p(-) = -1.8 to -13.9 MPa, I(SPPA) = 513-22,940 W/cm(2), -6 dB size of 1.6 × 10 mm: lateral × axial) was measured using this approach and then compared with that obtained using a radiation force balance. Similarities were found between each method at acoustic power ranging from 18.2 W to 912 W with an electrical-to-acoustic conversion efficiency of ~42%. The proposed method has advantages of low weight, smaller size, high sensitivity, quick response, high signal-to-noise ratio (especially at low power output), robust performance, and easy operation of HIFU exposimetry measurement.

  13. Acoustic power measurement of high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer using a pressure sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-03-01

    The acoustic power of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an important parameter that should be measured prior to each treatment to guarantee effective and safe outcomes. A new calibration technique was developed that involves estimating the pressure distribution, calculating the acoustic power using an underwater pressure blast sensor, and compensating the contribution of harmonics to the acoustic power. The output of a clinical extracorporeal HIFU system (center frequency of ~1 MHz, p+ = 2.5-57.2 MPa, p(-) = -1.8 to -13.9 MPa, I(SPPA) = 513-22,940 W/cm(2), -6 dB size of 1.6 × 10 mm: lateral × axial) was measured using this approach and then compared with that obtained using a radiation force balance. Similarities were found between each method at acoustic power ranging from 18.2 W to 912 W with an electrical-to-acoustic conversion efficiency of ~42%. The proposed method has advantages of low weight, smaller size, high sensitivity, quick response, high signal-to-noise ratio (especially at low power output), robust performance, and easy operation of HIFU exposimetry measurement. PMID:25659300

  14. Sound Pressure Level Gain in an Acoustic Metamaterial Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Kiwon; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Park, Jihyun; Yoon, Jong Rak; Kim, Jedo

    2014-01-01

    The inherent attenuation of a homogeneous viscous medium limits radiation propagation, thereby restricting the use of many high-frequency acoustic devices to only short-range applications. Here, we design and experimentally demonstrate an acoustic metamaterial localization cavity which is used for sound pressure level (SPL) gain using double coiled up space like structures thereby increasing the range of detection. This unique behavior occurs within a subwavelength cavity that is 1/10th of the wavelength of the incident acoustic wave, which provides up to a 13 dB SPL gain. We show that the amplification results from the Fabry-Perot resonance of the cavity, which has a simultaneously high effective refractive index and effective impedance. We also experimentally verify the SPL amplification in an underwater environment at higher frequencies using a sample with an identical unit cell size. The versatile scalability of the design shows promising applications in many areas, especially in acoustic imaging and underwater communication. PMID:25502279

  15. Nonlinear response - A time domain approach. [with applications to acoustic fatigue, spacecraft and composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, R.

    1986-01-01

    The present paper reviews the basic concepts of nonlinear response of panels to surface flow and acoustic pressures, simulation of random processes, time domain solutions and the Monte Carlo Method. Applications of this procedure to the orbit-on-demand space vehicles, acoustic fatigue and composite materials are discussed. Numerical examples are included for a variety of nonlinear problems to illustrate the applicability of this method.

  16. The trade-off characteristics of acoustic and pressure sensors for the NASP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, Martin; Bush, Chuck

    1992-01-01

    Results of a trade study for the development of pressure and acoustic sensors for use on the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) are summarized. Pressure sensors are needed to operate to 100 psia; acoustic sensors are needed that can give meaningful information about a 200 dB sound pressure level (SPL) environment. Both sensors will have to operate from a high temperature of 2000 F down to absolute zero. The main conclusions of the study are the following: (1) Diaphragm materials limit minimum size and maximum frequency response attainable. (2) No transduction is available to meet all the NASP requirements with existing technology. (3) Capacitive sensors are large relative to the requirement, have limited resolution and frequency response due to noise, and cable length is limited to approximately 20 feet. (4) Eddy current sensors are large relative to the requirement and have limited cable lengths. (5) Fiber optic sensors provide the possibility for a small sensor, even though present developments do not exhibit that characteristic. The need to use sapphire at high temperature complicates the design. Present high temperature research sensors suffer from poor resolution. A significant development effort will be required to realize the potential of fiber optics. (6) Short-term development seems to favor eddy current techniques with the penalty of larger size and reduced dynamic range for acoustic sensors. (7) Long-term development may favor fiber optics with the penalties of cost, schedule, and uncertainty.

  17. The trade-off characteristics of acoustic and pressure sensors for the NASP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Martin; Bush, Chuck

    1992-09-01

    Results of a trade study for the development of pressure and acoustic sensors for use on the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) are summarized. Pressure sensors are needed to operate to 100 psia; acoustic sensors are needed that can give meaningful information about a 200 dB sound pressure level (SPL) environment. Both sensors will have to operate from a high temperature of 2000 F down to absolute zero. The main conclusions of the study are the following: (1) Diaphragm materials limit minimum size and maximum frequency response attainable. (2) No transduction is available to meet all the NASP requirements with existing technology. (3) Capacitive sensors are large relative to the requirement, have limited resolution and frequency response due to noise, and cable length is limited to approximately 20 feet. (4) Eddy current sensors are large relative to the requirement and have limited cable lengths. (5) Fiber optic sensors provide the possibility for a small sensor, even though present developments do not exhibit that characteristic. The need to use sapphire at high temperature complicates the design. Present high temperature research sensors suffer from poor resolution. A significant development effort will be required to realize the potential of fiber optics. (6) Short-term development seems to favor eddy current techniques with the penalty of larger size and reduced dynamic range for acoustic sensors. (7) Long-term development may favor fiber optics with the penalties of cost, schedule, and uncertainty.

  18. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  19. Modeling of Structural-Acoustic Interaction Using Coupled FE/BE Method and Control of Interior Acoustic Pressure Using Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Shi, Yacheng

    1997-01-01

    A coupled finite element (FE) and boundary element (BE) approach is presented to model full coupled structural/acoustic/piezoelectric systems. The dual reciprocity boundary element method is used so that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the coupled system can be obtained, and to extend this approach to time dependent problems. The boundary element method is applied to interior acoustic domains, and the results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structural-acoustic problems are then analyzed with the coupled finite element/boundary element method, where the finite element method models the structural domain and the boundary element method models the acoustic domain. Results for a system consisting of an isotropic panel and a cubic cavity are in good agreement with exact solutions and experiment data. The response of a composite panel backed cavity is then obtained. The results show that the mass and stiffness of piezoelectric layers have to be considered. The coupled finite element and boundary element equations are transformed into modal coordinates, which is more convenient for transient excitation. Several transient problems are solved based on this formulation. Two control designs, a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and a feedforward controller, are applied to reduce the acoustic pressure inside the cavity based on the equations in modal coordinates. The results indicate that both controllers can reduce the interior acoustic pressure and the plate deflection.

  20. Transient analysis of acoustically derived pressure and rate data

    SciTech Connect

    Kabir, C.S.; Kuchuk, F.J.; Hasan, A.R.

    1988-09-01

    A pressure-buildup test conducted on a sucker-rod pumping well is often by long-duration wellbore storage. In fact, this distortion could be so severe that even a week's shut-in period may not allow a semilog analysis. A longer shut-in period becomes economically discouraging because of lost production. Low energy and low transmissivity in the reservoir, coupled with increased fluid compressibility, contribute to this long-duration storage phenomenon. One way of reducing the storage effect clearly lies in the simultaneous analysis of downhole pressure and flow rate, estimated from casinghead pressure and rising annular liquid-level measurement made by acoustic well sounding (AWS). Ascertaining the quality of the indirectly measured pressure and rate data constitutes one of the objectives of this study. Several methods exist to translate the AWS measurement to downhole pressure and rate data for the subsequent transient analysis. The authors show that even an empirical hydrodynamic correlation provides satisfactory transient-pressure/flow-rate data for convolution and deconvolution analyses for moderate pumping-liquid columns. When long annular liquid columns are encountered, translating the AWS measurement with a mechanistically based hydrodynamic model appears to be a prudent approach. Interpretation of several transient tests show that automated convolved-type-curve or history matching of field data is a powerful tool for reservoir-parameter (total mobility, skin, fracture half-length, and storage coefficient) estimation. A simple algorithm for computing the Laplace transform of the wellbore pressure for an infinite-conductivity vertically fractured well in an infinite reservoir is developed in this work for a rapid, iterative-type computation used in automated convolved-type-curve analysis.

  1. The effects of external acoustic pressure fields on a free-running supercavitating projectile.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Peter J K; Rogers, Peter H; Doane, John W

    2010-12-01

    Proliferation of supercavitating torpedoes has motivated research on countermeasures against them as well as on the fluid phenomenon which makes them possible. The goal of this research was to investigate an envisaged countermeasure, an acoustic field capable of slowing or diverting the weapon by disrupting the cavitation envelope. The research focused on the interactions between high pressure amplitude sound waves and a supercavity produced by a small free-flying projectile. The flight dynamics and cavity geometry measurements were compared to control experiments and theoretical considerations were made for evaluating the effects. Corrugations on the cavity/water interface caused by the pressure signal have been observed and characterized. Results also show that the accuracy of a supercavitating projectile can be adversely affected by the sound signal. This research concludes with results that indicate that it is acoustic cavitation in the medium surrounding the supercavity, caused by the high pressure amplitude sound, that is responsible for the reduced accuracy. A hypothesis has been presented addressing the means by which the acoustic cavitation could cause this effect. PMID:21218872

  2. Acoustic response variability in automotive vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hills, E.; Mace, B. R.; Ferguson, N. S.

    2009-03-01

    A statistical analysis of a series of measurements of the audio-frequency response of a large set of automotive vehicles is presented: a small hatchback model with both a three-door (411 vehicles) and five-door (403 vehicles) derivative and a mid-sized family five-door car (316 vehicles). The sets included vehicles of various specifications, engines, gearboxes, interior trim, wheels and tyres. The tests were performed in a hemianechoic chamber with the temperature and humidity recorded. Two tests were performed on each vehicle and the interior cabin noise measured. In the first, the excitation was acoustically induced by sets of external loudspeakers. In the second test, predominantly structure-borne noise was induced by running the vehicle at a steady speed on a rough roller. For both types of excitation, it is seen that the effects of temperature are small, indicating that manufacturing variability is larger than that due to temperature for the tests conducted. It is also observed that there are no significant outlying vehicles, i.e. there are at most only a few vehicles that consistently have the lowest or highest noise levels over the whole spectrum. For the acoustically excited tests, measured 1/3-octave noise reduction levels typically have a spread of 5 dB or so and the normalised standard deviation of the linear data is typically 0.1 or higher. Regarding the statistical distribution of the linear data, a lognormal distribution is a somewhat better fit than a Gaussian distribution for lower 1/3-octave bands, while the reverse is true at higher frequencies. For the distribution of the overall linear levels, a Gaussian distribution is generally the most representative. As a simple description of the response variability, it is sufficient for this series of measurements to assume that the acoustically induced airborne cabin noise is best described by a Gaussian distribution with a normalised standard deviation between 0.09 and 0.145. There is generally

  3. Acoustic field and array response uncertainties in stratified ocean media.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Thomas J; Dhakal, Sagar

    2012-07-01

    The change-of-variables theorem of probability theory is applied to compute acoustic field and array beam power probability density functions (pdfs) in uncertain ocean environments represented by stratified, attenuating ocean waveguide models. Computational studies for one and two-layer waveguides investigate the functional properties of the acoustic field and array beam power pdfs. For the studies, the acoustic parameter uncertainties are represented by parametric pdfs. The field and beam response pdfs are computed directly from the parameter pdfs using the normal-mode representation and the change-of-variables theorem. For two-dimensional acoustic parameter uncertainties of sound speed and attenuation, the field and beam power pdfs exhibit irregular functional behavior and singularities associated with stationary points of the mapping, defined by acoustic propagation, from the parameter space to the field or beam power space. Implications for the assessment of orthogonal polynomial expansion and other methods for computing acoustic field pdfs are discussed.

  4. Active control of acoustic pressure fields using smart material technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    An overview describing the use of piezoceramic patches in reducing noise in a structural acoustics setting is presented. The passive and active contributions due to patches which are bonded to an Euler-Bernoulli beam or thin shell are briefly discussed and the results are incorporated into a 2-D structural acoustics model. In this model, an exterior noise source causes structural vibrations which in turn lead to interior noise as a result of nonlinear fluid/structure coupling mechanism. Interior sound pressure levels are reduced via patches bonded to the flexible boundary (a beam in this case) which generate pure bending moments when an out-of-phase voltage is applied. Well-posedness results for the infinite dimensional system are discussed and a Galerkin scheme for approximating the system dynamics is outlined. Control is implemented by using linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control theory to calculate gains for the linearized system and then feeding these gains back into the nonlinear system of interest. The effectiveness of this strategy for this problem is illustrated in an example.

  5. Systems and methods of monitoring acoustic pressure to detect a flame condition in a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Krull, Anthony Wayne; Healy, Timothy Andrew , Yilmaz, Ertan

    2011-05-17

    A method may detect a flashback condition in a fuel nozzle of a combustor. The method may include obtaining a current acoustic pressure signal from the combustor, analyzing the current acoustic pressure signal to determine current operating frequency information for the combustor, and indicating that the flashback condition exists based at least in part on the current operating frequency information.

  6. Combining COMSOL modeling with acoustic pressure maps to design sono-reactors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zongsu; Weavers, Linda K

    2016-07-01

    Scaled-up and economically viable sonochemical systems are critical for increased use of ultrasound in environmental and chemical processing applications. In this study, computational simulations and acoustic pressure maps were used to design a larger-scale sono-reactor containing a multi-stepped ultrasonic horn. Simulations in COMSOL Multiphysics showed ultrasonic waves emitted from the horn neck and tip, generating multiple regions of high acoustic pressure. The volume of these regions surrounding the horn neck were larger compared with those below the horn tip. The simulated acoustic field was verified by acoustic pressure contour maps generated from hydrophone measurements in a plexiglass box filled with water. These acoustic pressure contour maps revealed an asymmetric and discrete distribution of acoustic pressure due to acoustic cavitation, wave interaction, and water movement by ultrasonic irradiation. The acoustic pressure contour maps were consistent with simulation results in terms of the effective scale of cavitation zones (∼ 10 cm and <5 cm above and below horn tip, respectively). With the mapped acoustic field and identified cavitation location, a cylindrically-shaped sono-reactor with a conical bottom was designed to evaluate the treatment capacity (∼ 5 L) for the multi-stepped horn using COMSOL simulations. In this study, verification of simulation results with experiments demonstrates that coupling of COMSOL simulations with hydrophone measurements is a simple, effective and reliable scientific method to evaluate reactor designs of ultrasonic systems. PMID:26964976

  7. Enhanced acoustic sensing through wave compression and pressure amplification in anisotropic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongyao; Liu, Haijun; Reilly, Michael; Bae, Hyungdae; Yu, Miao

    2014-10-01

    Acoustic sensors play an important role in many areas, such as homeland security, navigation, communication, health care and industry. However, the fundamental pressure detection limit hinders the performance of current acoustic sensing technologies. Here, through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, we show that anisotropic acoustic metamaterials can be designed to have strong wave compression effect that renders direct amplification of pressure fields in metamaterials. This enables a sensing mechanism that can help overcome the detection limit of conventional acoustic sensing systems. We further demonstrate a metamaterial-enhanced acoustic sensing system that achieves more than 20 dB signal-to-noise enhancement (over an order of magnitude enhancement in detection limit). With this system, weak acoustic pulse signals overwhelmed by the noise are successfully recovered. This work opens up new vistas for the development of metamaterial-based acoustic sensors with improved performance and functionalities that are highly desirable for many applications.

  8. Response of Building Components to Launch Acoustic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BALAKRISHNA RAO, S. V. S.; DHARANEEPATHY, M. V.; NARAYANAMOORTHY, N.; NAGENDRA, P.

    2000-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for calculating the response of building components to acoustic loads due to spacecraft launch. The methodology described is in-built as routines into a software module “ACOUP” which forms part of the OSTA software package for off-shore and on-shore structural analysis using finite elements [1]. The software developed can be used to predict the acoustic response of any structure/structural component. One wall panel and one roof panel in each of the two buildings in launch acoustic environment at SHAR, INDIA and KSC, U.S.A. are analysed and the computed acoustic responses are compared with the responses measured at the respective places during the launches.

  9. Study on demodulated signal distribution and acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ying; Yang, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Chen; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2016-06-01

    We propose a demodulated signal distribution theory for a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system. The distribution region of Rayleigh backscattering including the acoustic sensing signal in the sensing fiber is investigated theoretically under different combinations of both the path difference and pulse width Additionally we determine the optimal solution between the path difference and pulse width to obtain the maximum phase change per unit length. We experimentally test this theory and realize a good acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of  -150 dB re rad/(μPa·m) of fiber in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 1 kHz.

  10. Model helicopter rotor high-speed impulsive noise: Measured acoustics and blade pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    A 1/17-scale research model of the AH-1 series helicopter main rotor was tested. Model-rotor acoustic and simultaneous blade pressure data were recorded at high speeds where full-scale helicopter high-speed impulsive noise levels are known to be dominant. Model-rotor measurements of the peak acoustic pressure levels, waveform shapes, and directively patterns are directly compared with full-scale investigations, using an equivalent in-flight technique. Model acoustic data are shown to scale remarkably well in shape and in amplitude with full-scale results. Model rotor-blade pressures are presented for rotor operating conditions both with and without shock-like discontinuities in the radiated acoustic waveform. Acoustically, both model and full-scale measurements support current evidence that above certain high subsonic advancing-tip Mach numbers, local shock waves that exist on the rotor blades ""delocalize'' and radiate to the acoustic far-field.

  11. Response of a thermal barrier system to acoustic excitation in a gas turbine nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, W.S. Jr.; Blevins, R.D.

    1980-11-01

    A gas turbine located within a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) induces high acoustic sound pressure levels into the primary coolant (helium). This acoustic loading induces high cycle fatigue stresses which may control the design of the thermal barrier system. This study examines the dynamic response of a thermal barrier configuration consisting of a fibrous insulation compressed against the reactor vessel by a coverplate which is held in position by a central attachment fixture. The results of dynamic vibration analyses indicate the effect of the plate size and curvature and the attachment size on the response of the thermal barrier.

  12. Dynamic response and acoustic fatigue of stiffened composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soovere, J.

    1984-01-01

    The results of acoustic fatigue and dynamic response tests performed on L-1011 graphite-epoxy (GrE) aileron and panel components are reported. The aileron featured glass microballoons between the GrE skins. Tests yielded random fatigue data from double and single cantilever coupons and modal data from impedance hammer and loudspeaker impulses. Numerical and sample test data were obtained on combined acoustic and shear loads, acoustic and thermal loads, random fatigue and damping of the integrally stiffened and secondary bonded panels. The fatigue data indicate a fatigue life beyond 10 million cycles. The acoustic data suggested that noise transmission could be enhanced in the integrally stiffened panels, which were more acoustic-fatigue resistant than were the secondary bonded panels.

  13. Effects of Non-Homogeneities on the Eigenmodes of Acoustic Pressure in Combustion Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. S.; Williams, F. A.

    1998-02-01

    Modifications to acoustic eigenmodes in combustion chambers such as those of liquid propellant rocket engines, produced by spatial variations of density and sound speed that arise mainly through progress of combustion processes, are analyzed by using a variational method. The variational principle shows that the eigenvalue is the ratio of a weighted acoustic kinetic energy to a weighted acoustic potential energy, and the eigenfunction is the minimizing function of this ratio. A sample calculation is made for the case in which variations of the properties occur dominantly in the longitudinal direction, with lower temperatures and higher densities prevailing near the injector. The results of the calculation exhibit two major characteristics: the longitudinal density variation aids transfer of acoustic kinetic energy from a lower mode to the adjacent higher mode, so that the pure transverse modes have substantially larger reductions (sometimes exceeding 50%) of their eigenvalues than the combined modes; and variations of the acoustic pressure gradients are found to be larger in high-density regions, so that the acoustic pressure amplitude for purely tangential modes is found to be much higher near the injector than near the nozzle. The higher head acoustic pressure may contribute to the greater sensitivity of acoustic instability to characteristics of the flames near the injectors, as commonly found in engine tests. The improved acoustic eigensolutions can also be helpful in sizing damping devices, such as baffles or acoustic liners.

  14. Numerical solution of acoustic response due to hydro/aerodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roknaldin, Farzam

    In this work, a new methodology has been proposed which determines the acoustic response due to interaction of unsteady hydro/aero-dynamic sources with rigid/flexible structures. This methodology is based on Lighthill's acoustic analogy in which acoustic sources are pre-determined from unsteady flow calculations. The key feature of this methodology is the numerical solution of the acoustic problem. For this purpose, a new variational formulation of Lighthill's acoustic analogy has been developed which can be solved using the finite element method. This enables the true geometry of the structure and acoustically non-compact sources to be considered with relative ease. The feasibility of the approach has been investigated by studying the trailing-edge noise of the Eppler 387 airfoil due to a single quadrupole source, and the noise due to vortices shed from the NACA 0018 airfoil. In both cases the results are compared with analytical solutions that are available for certain limits. As an application to a practical problem, this methodology is used to compute the acoustic signature due to the boundary layer/wake turbulence over and behind the Eppler 387 wing at a cruise condition. Turbulent sources were obtained via Large Eddy Simulation, over an infinite span wing, using an unstructured grid finite element method in conjunction with the Dynamic Smagorinsky subgrid model. For this problem, sufficient numbers of grid points were used to resolve the wall layer. Flow separation, transition and turbulent reattachment were all captured and compared with the experimental data available from other sources. Finally, the acoustic problem is solved to obtain directivity patterns of acoustic pressures. The analysis indicates the importance of both wing geometry and the extent of acoustic sources on directivity.

  15. Coupled vibro-acoustic model updating using frequency response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehete, D. V.; Modak, S. V.; Gupta, K.

    2016-03-01

    Interior noise in cavities of motorized vehicles is of increasing significance due to the lightweight design of these structures. Accurate coupled vibro-acoustic FE models of such cavities are required so as to allow a reliable design and analysis. It is, however, experienced that the vibro-acoustic predictions using these models do not often correlate acceptably well with the experimental measurements and hence require model updating. Both the structural and the acoustic parameters addressing the stiffness as well as the damping modeling inaccuracies need to be considered simultaneously in the model updating framework in order to obtain an accurate estimate of these parameters. It is also noted that the acoustic absorption properties are generally frequency dependent. This makes use of modal data based methods for updating vibro-acoustic FE models difficult. In view of this, the present paper proposes a method based on vibro-acoustic frequency response functions that allow updating of a coupled FE model by considering simultaneously the parameters associated with both the structural as well as the acoustic model of the cavity. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical studies on a 3D rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate. Updating parameters related to the material property, stiffness of joints between the plate and the rectangular cavity and the properties of absorbing surfaces of the acoustic cavity are considered. The robustness of the method under presence of noise is also studied.

  16. Predicting burst pressures in filament-wound composite pressure vessels by using acoustic emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Eric V. K.

    1992-12-01

    Multivariate statistical analysis was used to generate equations for predicting burst pressures in 14.6 cm dia. fiberglass-epoxy and 45.7 cm dia. graphite-epoxy pressure vessels from acoustic emission (AE) data taken during hydroproof. Using the AE energy and amplitude measurements as the primary independent variables, the less accurate of the two linear equations was able to predict burst pressures to within +/- 0.841 MPa of the value given by the 95 percent prediction interval. Moreover, this equation included the effects of two bottles that contained simulated manufacturing defects. Because the AE data used to generate the burst-pressure equations were both taken at or below 25 percent of the expected burst pressures, it is anticipated that by using this approach, it would be possible to lower proof pressures in larger filament-wound composite pressure vessels such as rocket motor cases. This would minimize hydroproof damage to the composite structure and the accompanying potential for premature failure in service.

  17. Liquid-membrane coupling response of submersible electrostatic acoustic transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for the liquid-membrane coupling response of the submersible electrostatic acoustic transducer (ESAT) described by Cantrell et al. (1979). The model accounts for the ESAT's rolloff response and predicts the essential features of the ESAT frequency response. Model predictions were found to agree well with measurements taken over the frequency range from 1 to 11 MHz.

  18. Pressure probe and hot-film probe rsponses to acoustic excitation in mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, T. L.; Jones, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to compare the relative responses of a hot-film probe and a pressure probe positioned in a flow duct carrying mean flow and progressive acoustic waves. The response of each probe was compared with that of a condenser-type microphone flush mounted in the duct wall for flow Mach numbers up to about 0.5. The response of the pressure probe was less than that of the flush-mounted microphone by not more than about 2.1 dB at the highest centerline Mach number. This decreased response of the probe can likely be attributed to flow-induced impedance changes at the probe sensor orifices. The response of the hot-film probe, expressed in terms of fluctuating pressure, was greater than that of the flush-mounted microphone by as much as 6.0 dB at the two higher centerline Mach numbers. Removal of the contribution from fluctuating temperature in the hot-film analytical model greatly improved the agreement between the two transducer responses.

  19. Instability of sonoluminescing bubbles under a nonspherical symmetrical acoustic-pressure perturbation.

    PubMed

    An, Yu; Lu, Tao; Yang, Bing

    2005-02-01

    The perturbation of nonspherical symmetrical acoustic pressure is added to the equation governing the spherical stability of sonoluminescing bubbles. The numerical calculations of the shape instability of sonoluminescing bubbles with the modified equation are conducted and the results are illustrated accordingly in the p(a) - R0 phase diagrams. The calculated results indicate that the stability region vanishes as the amplitude of the driving acoustic pressure p(a) arrives at the upper threshold ( approximately 1.6 atm) due to the perturbation of a small nonspherical symmetrical acoustic pressure (about a few Pa), which is in consistence with the experimental observations.

  20. Neural Network Burst Pressure Prediction in Graphite/Epoxy Pressure Vessels from Acoustic Emission Amplitude Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric v. K.; Walker, James L., II; Rowell, Ginger H.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data were taken during hydroproof for three sets of ASTM standard 5.75 inch diameter filament wound graphite/epoxy bottles. All three sets of bottles had the same design and were wound from the same graphite fiber; the only difference was in the epoxies used. Two of the epoxies had similar mechanical properties, and because the acoustic properties of materials are a function of their stiffnesses, it was thought that the AE data from the two sets might also be similar; however, this was not the case. Therefore, the three resin types were categorized using dummy variables, which allowed the prediction of burst pressures all three sets of bottles using a single neural network. Three bottles from each set were used to train the network. The resin category, the AE amplitude distribution data taken up to 25 % of the expected burst pressure, and the actual burst pressures were used as inputs. Architecturally, the network consisted of a forty-three neuron input layer (a single categorical variable defining the resin type plus forty-two continuous variables for the AE amplitude frequencies), a fifteen neuron hidden layer for mapping, and a single output neuron for burst pressure prediction. The network trained on all three bottle sets was able to predict burst pressures in the remaining bottles with a worst case error of + 6.59%, slightly greater than the desired goal of + 5%. This larger than desired error was due to poor resolution in the amplitude data for the third bottle set. When the third set of bottles was eliminated from consideration, only four hidden layer neurons were necessary to generate a worst case prediction error of - 3.43%, well within the desired goal.

  1. Considerations for acoustic emission monitoring of spherical Kevlar/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.; Patterson, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    We are continuing to research the applications of acoustic emission testing for predicting burst pressure of filament-wound Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels. This study has focused on three specific areas. The first area involves development of an experimental technique and the proper instrumentation to measure the energy given off by the acoustic emission transducer per acoustic emission burst. The second area concerns the design of a test fixture in which to mount the composite vessel so that the acoustic emission transducers are held against the outer surface of the composite. Included in this study area is the calibration of the entire test setup including couplant, transducer, electronics, and the instrument measuring the energy per burst. In the third and final area of this study, we consider the number, location, and sensitivity of the acoustic emission transducers used for proof testing composite pressure vessels.

  2. Acoustic environmental accuracy requirements for response determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettitt, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    A general purpose computer program was developed for the prediction of vehicle interior noise. This program, named VIN, has both modal and statistical energy analysis capabilities for structural/acoustic interaction analysis. The analytic models and their computer implementation were verified through simple test cases with well-defined experimental results. The model was also applied in a space shuttle payload bay launch acoustics prediction study. The computer program processes large and small problems with equal efficiency because all arrays are dynamically sized by program input variables at run time. A data base is built and easily accessed for design studies. The data base significantly reduces the computational costs of such studies by allowing the reuse of the still-valid calculated parameters of previous iterations.

  3. Computation of Generalized Modal Loads in an Acoustic Field Defined by a Distribution of Correlated Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepcenko, Valentin

    1989-01-01

    This report is an aid to designers of structures with large area-to-mass ratios that are subject to high acoustic pressures during rocket launches. A means is provided for determining generalized modal loads using AJ-coefficients. AJ-coefficients are a measure of a vibroacoustic coupling between the structure and the acoustic field.

  4. Frequency response calibration of recess-mounted pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcolini, M. A.; Lorber, P. F.; Miller, W. T., Jr.; Covino, A. F., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is described for measuring the frequency response of pressure transducers mounted inside a model, where a narrow pipette leads to an orifice at the surface. An acoustic driver is mounted to a small chamber which has an opening at the opposite end with an O-ring seal to place over the orifice. A 3.18 mm (1/8 inch) reference microphone is mounted to one side of the chamber. The acoustic driver receives an input of white noise, and the transducer and reference microphone outputs are compared to obtain the frequency response of the pressure transducer. Selected results are presented in the form of power spectra for both the transducer and the reference, as well as the amplitude variation and phase shift between the two signals as a function of frequency. The effect of pipette length and the use of this technique for identifying both blocked orifices and faulty transducers are described.

  5. Acoustic Response to Playback of Pile-Driving Sounds by Snapping Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Spiga, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    There is concern about the effects of noise from impact pile driving as this constructional technique becomes increasingly widespread in coastal areas. The habitats of most marine invertebrate species are likely to overlap with the areas of human activities along the coast and be affected by the increased levels of noise produced. This paper investigates the acoustic response of chorusing snapping shrimp to different sound pressure levels. A significant increase in the snap number and snap amplitude was recorded during the playback of piling noise, suggesting that noise exposure affected the acoustic behavior of these animals.

  6. Effect of static pressure on acoustic energy radiated by cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Towata, Atsuya; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2011-11-01

    The effect of static pressure on acoustic emissions including shock-wave emissions from cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound has been studied by numerical simulations in order to investigate the effect of static pressure on dispersion of nano-particles in liquids by ultrasound. The results of the numerical simulations for bubbles of 5 μm in equilibrium radius at 20 kHz have indicated that the optimal static pressure which maximizes the energy of acoustic waves radiated by a bubble per acoustic cycle increases as the acoustic pressure amplitude increases or the viscosity of the solution decreases. It qualitatively agrees with the experimental results by Sauter et al. [Ultrason. Sonochem. 15, 517 (2008)]. In liquids with relatively high viscosity (∼200 mPa s), a bubble collapses more violently than in pure water when the acoustic pressure amplitude is relatively large (∼20 bar). In a mixture of bubbles of different equilibrium radius (3 and 5 μm), the acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is much larger than that by a 3 μm bubble due to the interaction with bubbles of different equilibrium radius. The acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is substantially increased by the interaction with 3 μm bubbles.

  7. A system for acoustical and optical analysis of encapsulated microbubbles at ultrahigh hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed

    Zhushma, Aleksandr; Lebedeva, Natalia; Sen, Pabitra; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei S; Dayton, Paul A

    2013-05-01

    Acoustics are commonly used for borehole (i.e., oil well) imaging applications, under conditions where temperature and pressure reach extremes beyond that of conventional medical ultrasonics. Recently, there has been an interest in the application of encapsulated microbubbles as borehole contrast agents for acoustic assessment of fluid composition and flow. Although such microbubbles are widely studied under physiological conditions for medical imaging applications, to date there is a paucity of information on the behavior of encapsulated gas-filled microbubbles at high pressures. One major limitation is that there is a lack of experimental systems to assess both optical and acoustic data of micrometer-sized particles data at these extremes. In this paper, we present the design and application of a high-pressure cell designed for acoustical and optical studies of microbubbles at hydrostatic pressures up to 27.5 MPa (271 atm). PMID:23742587

  8. A system for acoustical and optical analysis of encapsulated microbubbles at ultrahigh hydrostatic pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhushma, Aleksandr; Lebedeva, Natalia; Sen, Pabitra; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei S.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2013-05-01

    Acoustics are commonly used for borehole (i.e., oil well) imaging applications, under conditions where temperature and pressure reach extremes beyond that of conventional medical ultrasonics. Recently, there has been an interest in the application of encapsulated microbubbles as borehole contrast agents for acoustic assessment of fluid composition and flow. Although such microbubbles are widely studied under physiological conditions for medical imaging applications, to date there is a paucity of information on the behavior of encapsulated gas-filled microbubbles at high pressures. One major limitation is that there is a lack of experimental systems to assess both optical and acoustic data of micrometer-sized particles data at these extremes. In this paper, we present the design and application of a high-pressure cell designed for acoustical and optical studies of microbubbles at hydrostatic pressures up to 27.5 MPa (271 atm).

  9. High Frequency Acoustic Response Characterization and Analysis of the Deep Throttling Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Common Extensive Cryogenic Engine program demonstrated the operation of a deep throttling engine design. The program, spanning five years from August 2005 to July 2010, funded testing through four separate engine demonstration test series. Along with successful completion of multiple objectives, a discrete response of approximately 4000 Hz was discovered and explored throughout the program. The typical low-amplitude acoustic response was evident in the chamber measurement through almost every operating condition; however, at certain off-nominal operating conditions, the response became discrete with higher amplitude. This paper summarizes the data reduction, characterization, and analysis of the 4,000 Hz response for the entire program duration, using the large amount of data collected. Upon first encountering the response, new objectives and instrumentation were incorporated in future test series to specifically collect 4,000 Hz data. The 4,000 Hz response was identified as being related to the first tangential acoustic mode by means of frequency estimation and spatial decomposition. The latter approach showed that the effective node line of the mode was aligned with the manifold propellant inlets with standing waves and quasi-standing waves present at various times. Contour maps that contain instantaneous frequency and amplitude trackings of the response were generated as a significant improvement to historical manual approaches of data reduction presentation. Signal analysis and dynamic data reduction also uncovered several other features of the response including a stable limit cycle, the progressive engagement of subsequent harmonics, the U-shaped time history, an intermittent response near the test-based neutral stability region, other acoustic modes, and indications of modulation with a separate subsynchronous response. Although no engine damage related to the acoustic mode was noted, the peak-to-peak fluctuating pressure amplitude achieved 12.1% of the

  10. Vibration and acoustic response of an orthotropic composite laminated plate in a hygroscopic environment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Geng, Qian; Li, Yueming

    2013-03-01

    This paper is a study of the vibration and acoustic response characteristics of orthotropic laminated composite plate with simple supported boundary conditions excited by a harmonic concentrated force in a hygroscopic environment. First the natural vibration of the plate with the in-plane forces induced by hygroscopic stress is obtained analytically. Secondly, the sound pressure distribution of the plate at the far field is obtained using the Rayleigh integral. Furthermore, the sound radiation efficiency is deduced. Third, different ratios of elastic modulus in material principal directions are set to research the effects of increasing stiffness of the orthotropic plate on the vibration and acoustic radiation characteristics. Finally, to verify the theoretical solution, numerical simulations are also carried out with commercial finite software. It is found that the natural frequencies decrease with the increase of the moisture content and the first two order modes interconvert at high moisture content. The dynamic response and sound pressure level float to lower frequencies with elevated moisture content. Acoustic radiation efficiency generally floats to the low frequencies and decreases with an increase of moisture content. The dynamic and acoustic responses reduce and the coincidence frequency decreases with the enhanced stiffness.

  11. Vibration and acoustic response of an orthotropic composite laminated plate in a hygroscopic environment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Geng, Qian; Li, Yueming

    2013-03-01

    This paper is a study of the vibration and acoustic response characteristics of orthotropic laminated composite plate with simple supported boundary conditions excited by a harmonic concentrated force in a hygroscopic environment. First the natural vibration of the plate with the in-plane forces induced by hygroscopic stress is obtained analytically. Secondly, the sound pressure distribution of the plate at the far field is obtained using the Rayleigh integral. Furthermore, the sound radiation efficiency is deduced. Third, different ratios of elastic modulus in material principal directions are set to research the effects of increasing stiffness of the orthotropic plate on the vibration and acoustic radiation characteristics. Finally, to verify the theoretical solution, numerical simulations are also carried out with commercial finite software. It is found that the natural frequencies decrease with the increase of the moisture content and the first two order modes interconvert at high moisture content. The dynamic response and sound pressure level float to lower frequencies with elevated moisture content. Acoustic radiation efficiency generally floats to the low frequencies and decreases with an increase of moisture content. The dynamic and acoustic responses reduce and the coincidence frequency decreases with the enhanced stiffness. PMID:23464015

  12. Observed acoustic and aeroelastic spectral responses of a MOD-2 turbine blade to turbulence excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, N. D.; Mckenna, H. E.; Jacobs, E. W.

    1995-01-01

    Early results from a recent experiment designed to directly evaluate the aeroacoustic/elastic spectral responses of a MOD-2 turbine blade to turbulence-induced unsteady blade loads are discussed. The experimental procedure consisted of flying a hot-film anemometer from a tethered balloon in the turbine inflow and simultaneously measuring the fluctuating airload and aeroelastic response at two blade span stations (65% and 87% spans) using surface-mounted, subminiature pressure transducers and standard strain gage instrumentation. The radiated acoustic pressure field was measured with a triad of very-low-frequency microphones placed at ground level, 1.5 rotor diameters upwind of the disk. Initial transfer function estimates for acoustic radiation, blade normal forces, flapwise acceleration/displacement, and chord/flapwise moments are presented.

  13. Wavenumber-frequency Spectra of Pressure Fluctuations Measured via Fast Response Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Roozeboom, N. H.; Ross, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement in fast-response Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) allows time-resolved measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuations from a dense grid of spatial points on a wind tunnel model. This capability allows for direct calculations of the wavenumber-frequency (k-?) spectrum of pressure fluctuations. Such data, useful for the vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, are difficult to obtain otherwise. For the present work, time histories of pressure fluctuations on a flat plate subjected to vortex shedding from a rectangular bluff-body were measured using PSP. The light intensity levels in the photographic images were then converted to instantaneous pressure histories by applying calibration constants, which were calculated from a few dynamic pressure sensors placed at selective points on the plate. Fourier transform of the time-histories from a large number of spatial points provided k-? spectra for pressure fluctuations. The data provides first glimpse into the possibility of creating detailed forcing functions for vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, albeit for a limited frequency range.

  14. The Influence of Stuttering Severity on Acoustic Startle Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, John B.; Finan, Donald S.; Ramig, Peter R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the potential impact of stuttering severity, as measured by the Perceptions of Stuttering Inventory (Woolf, 1967) on acoustic startle responses. Method: Three groups, consisting of 10 nonstuttering adults, 9 mild stutterering adults, and 11 moderate/severe stutterering adults, were presented with identical 95-dB…

  15. Modulated acoustic radiation pressure and stress-coupling projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Thiessen, David B.

    2005-09-01

    Low-frequency deformation can be induced at a single frequency using radiation stress oscillations of double-sideband suppressed-carrier ultrasound [P. L. Marston and R. E. Apfel, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 67, 27 (1980)]. The transducer voltage is proportional to a product of low- and high-frequency sine waves. To anticipate the shape and magnitude of induced deformations, it is helpful to expand the distribution of the radiation stress on the object to be deformed as a series of projections [P. L. Marston, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 67, 15 (1980)]. Stress projections are also useful for unmodulated waves: the radiation force is an example. In addition to spherical and nearly spherical objects, recent experiments and calculations have concerned cylindrical objects [S. F. Morse, D. B. Thiessen, and P. L. Marston, Phys. Fluids 8, 3 (1996); W. Wei, D. B. Thiessen, and P. L. Marston, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116, 202 (2004)]. In standing waves the following projections are nonvanishing in the low acoustic frequency limit for appropriately situated dense objects: radial projection [M. J. Marr-Lyon, D. B. Thiessen, and P. L. Marston, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 2293 (2001)] and quadrupole projection [P. L. Marston et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 69, 1499 (1981)].

  16. Investigations of High Pressure Acoustic Waves in Resonators with Seal-Like Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Li, Xiao-Fan; Raman, Ganesh

    2004-01-01

    1) Standing waves with maximum pressures of 188 kPa have been produced in resonators containing ambient pressure air; 2) Addition of structures inside the resonator shifts the fundamental frequency and decreases the amplitude of the generated pressure waves; 3) Addition of holes to the resonator does reduce the magnitude of the acoustic waves produced, but their addition does not prohibit the generation of large magnitude non-linear standing waves; 4) The feasibility of reducing leakage using non-linear acoustics has been confirmed.

  17. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.

    2014-01-01

    For several decades large reverberant chambers and most recently direct field acoustic testing have been used in the aerospace industry to test larger structures with low surface densities such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify them and to detect faults in the design and fabrication. It has been reported that in reverberant chamber and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes may strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware (Reference 1). In this paper results from a recent reverberant chamber acoustic test of a composite reflector are discussed. These results provide further convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave and structural modes coupling phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to alert test organizations to this phenomenon so that they can account for the potential increase in structural responses and ensure that flight hardware undergoes safe testing. An understanding of the coupling phenomenon may also help minimize the over and/or under testing that could pose un-anticipated structural and flight qualification issues.

  18. Measured wavenumber: frequency spectrum associated with acoustic and aerodynamic wall pressure fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Arguillat, Blandine; Ricot, Denis; Bailly, Christophe; Robert, Gilles

    2010-10-01

    Direct measurements of the wavenumber-frequency spectrum of wall pressure fluctuations beneath a turbulent plane channel flow have been performed in an anechoic wind tunnel. A rotative array has been designed that allows the measurement of a complete map, 63×63 measuring points, of cross-power spectral densities over a large area. An original post-processing has been developed to separate the acoustic and the aerodynamic exciting loadings by transforming space-frequency data into wavenumber-frequency spectra. The acoustic part has also been estimated from a simple Corcos-like model including the contribution of a diffuse sound field. The measured acoustic contribution to the surface pressure fluctuations is 5% of the measured aerodynamic surface pressure fluctuations for a velocity and boundary layer thickness relevant for automotive interior noise applications. This shows that for aerodynamically induced car interior noise, both contributions to the surface pressure fluctuations on car windows have to be taken into account.

  19. Analytical and experimental investigations of gas turbine model combustor acoustics operated at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richecoeur, Franck; Schuller, Thierry; Lamraoui, Ammar; Ducruix, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    When coupled to acoustics, unsteady heat release oscillations may cause recurrent problems in many combustion chambers, potentially leading to dramatic damages to the structure. Accumulation of acoustic energy around the eigenmodes of the combustor results from the resonant coupling between pressure disturbances in the flame region with synchronized heat release rate perturbations. Predicting these frequencies and the corresponding sound pressure field is a key issue to design passive or active control systems to prevent the growth of these instabilities. In this study, an acoustically controlled combustion test bench CESAM is used to stabilize a partially premixed swirling propane-air flame. In the premixing tube, reactants are injected tangentially to generate the swirling flow, the flame being stabilized in the combustion chamber by a sudden expansion of the cross section. The premixer backplane is equipped with an Impedance Control System (ICS) allowing to adjust the acoustic reflection coefficient at this location. Acoustics of the coupled-cavity system formed by the premixer and the combustion chamber is investigated analytically by taking into account the measured acoustic impedances at the premixer backplane and in the feeding lines. The chamber length is also modified to examine the effects of the geometry on these predictions. It is shown that the premixer and combustion chamber can be considered as acoustically decoupled for small values of the acoustic coupling index, defined in the article. This offers flexible solutions to control the pressure distribution within the combustor, except when these frequencies match. When the frequencies are close to each other, only the analysis of the damping of the different cavities enables to indicate whether the system is coupled or not. Modifying either the acoustic coupling index or the damping values featuring the same frequency appears then as alternative solutions to decouple cavities.

  20. Deformation of drop due to radiation pressure of acoustic standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, T.; Saito, M.; Kamimura, H.

    To investigate the deformation of a liquid drop due to radiation pressure of acoustic standing waves, an analytical and experimental study was carried out. An approximate axisymmetric figure of equilibrium is obtained. The experimental study was carried out in the laboratory by using a triaxial acoustic chamber. An injection syringe was placed at the center of the triaxial acoustic resonance chamber. Holding a small liquid drop at the pointed end of the syringe, deformations of the liquid drop were measured. Assuming an oblate spheroid for the deformation, the experimental results were compared with theory.

  1. Design and Characterization of Fibrin-Based Acoustically Responsive Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Moncion, Alexander; Arlotta, Keith J; Kripfgans, Oliver D; Fowlkes, J Brian; Carson, Paul L; Putnam, Andrew J; Franceschi, Renny T; Fabiilli, Mario L

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogel scaffolds are used in tissue engineering as a delivery vehicle for regenerative growth factors. Spatiotemporal patterns of growth factor signaling are critical for tissue regeneration, yet most scaffolds afford limited control of growth factor release, especially after implantation. We previously found that acoustic droplet vaporization can control growth factor release from a fibrin scaffold doped with a perfluorocarbon emulsion. This study investigates properties of the acoustically responsive scaffold (ARS) critical for further translation. At 2.5 MHz, acoustic droplet vaporization and inertial cavitation thresholds ranged from 1.5 to 3.0 MPa and from 2.0 to 7.0 MPa peak rarefactional pressure, respectively, for ARSs of varying composition. Viability of C3H/10T1/2 cells, encapsulated in the ARS, did not decrease significantly for pressures below 4 MPa. ARSs with perfluorohexane emulsions displayed higher stability versus those with perfluoropentane emulsions, while surrogate payload release was minimal without ultrasound. These results enable the selection of ARS compositions and acoustic parameters needed for optimized spatiotemporally controlled release.

  2. The acoustics and unsteady wall pressure of a circulation control airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Jonathan C.

    A Circulation Control (CC) airfoil uses a wall jet exiting onto a rounded trailing edge to generate lift via the Coanda effect. The aerodynamics of the CC airfoil have been studied extensively. The acoustics of the airfoil are, however, much less understood. The primary goal of the present work was to study the radiated sound and unsteady surface pressures of a CC airfoil. The focus of this work can be divided up into three main categories: characterizing the unsteady surface pressures, characterizing the radiated sound, and understanding the acoustics from surface pressures. The present work is the first to present the unsteady surface pressures from the trailing edge cylinder of a circulation control airfoil. The auto-spectral density of the unsteady surface pressures at various locations around the trailing edge are presented over a wide range of the jets momentum coefficient. Coherence of pressure and length scales were computed and presented. Single microphone measurements were made at a range of angles for a fixed observer distance in the far field. Spectra are presented for select angles to show the directivity of the airfoil's radiated sound. Predictions of the acoustics were made from unsteady surface pressures via Howe's curvature noise model and a modified Curle's analogy. A summary of the current understanding of the acoustics from a CC airfoil is given along with suggestions for future work.

  3. ACOUSTIC LOCATION OF LEAKS IN PRESSURIZED UNDER- GROUND PETROLEUM PIPELINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were conducted at the Underground Storage Tank (UST) Test Apparatus Pipeline in which three acoustic sensors separated by a maximum distance of 38.1 m (125 ft) were used to monitor signals produced by 11.4-, 5.7-, and 3.8-L/h (3.0-, 1.5-, and 1.0-gal/h) leaks in th...

  4. Influence of acoustic pressure and bubble sizes on the coalescence of two contacting bubbles in an acoustic field.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Junjie; He, Yong; Yasui, Kyuichi; Kentish, Sandra E; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Manasseh, Richard; Lee, Judy

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the coalescence time between two contacting sub-resonance size bubbles was measured experimentally under an acoustic pressure ranging from 10kPa to 120kPa, driven at a frequency of 22.4kHz. The coalescence time obtained under sonication was much longer compared to that calculated by the film drainage theory for a free bubble surface without surfactants. It was found that under the influence of an acoustic field, the coalescence time could be probabilistic in nature, exhibiting upper and lower limits of coalescence times which are prolonged when both the maximum surface approach velocity and secondary Bjerknes force increases. The size of the two contacting bubbles is also important. For a given acoustic pressure, bubbles having a larger average size and size difference were observed to exhibit longer coalescence times. This could be caused by the phase difference between the volume oscillations of the two bubbles, which in turn affects the minimum film thickness reached between the bubbles and the film drainage time. These results will have important implications for developing film drainage theory to account for the effect of bubble translational and volumetric oscillations, bubble surface fluctuations and microstreaming.

  5. Program for the feasibility of developing a high pressure acoustic levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rey, Charles A.; Merkley, Dennis R.; Hammarlund, Gregory R.

    1988-01-01

    This is the final report for the program for the feasibility of developing a high-pressure acoustic levitator (HPAL). It includes work performed during the period from February 15, 1987 to October 26, 1987. The program was conducted for NASA under contract number NAS3-25115. The HPAL would be used for containerless processing of materials in the 1-g Earth environment. Results show that the use of increased gas pressure produces higher sound pressure levels. The harmonics produced by the acoustic source are also reduced. This provides an improvement in the capabilities of acoustic levitation in 1-g. The reported processing capabilities are directly limited by the design of the Medium Pressure Acoustic Levitator used for this study. Data show that sufficient acoustic intensities can be obtained to levitate and process a specimen of density 5 g/cu cm at 1500 C. However, it is recommended that a working engineering model of the HPAL be developed. The model would be used to establish the maximum operating parameters of furnace temperature and sample density.

  6. Habituation of the acoustic and the tactile startle responses in mice: two independent sensory processes.

    PubMed

    Pilz, Peter K D; Carl, Thomas D; Plappert, Claudia F

    2004-10-01

    To test whether habituation is specific to the stimulus modality, the authors analyzed cross-habituation between the tactile startle response' (TSR) and the acoustic startle response (ASR). The acoustic artifacts of airpuffs used to elicit the TSR were reduced by using a silencer and were effectively masked by background noise of 90-100 dB sound-pressure level. ASR was elicited by 14-kHz tones. TSR and ASR habituated in DBA and BALB mice: both the TSR and ASR habituated to a greater extent in DBA mice than in BALB mice. In both strains, habituation of the TSR did not generalize to the ASR, and vice versa. From this, the authors concluded that habituation of startle is located in the sensory afferent branches of the pathway.

  7. Response of stiffened panels for applications to acoustic fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, R.; Choi, S. T.

    1987-01-01

    The surface protection systems of aerospace and aircraft structures are often constructed from discretely stiffened panels. This paper presents an analytical study on dynamic stress response of these structures to random surface flow and acoustic loads. To account for aerodynamic heating of high speed flow, thermal effects are included in the structural model. A generalized transfer matrix procedure is developed to obtain the required dynamic response solutions. Numerical results include spectral densities of stress, response root mean square values and fatigue damage for a variety of loading and thermal conditions.

  8. Experimental and numerical characterization of the sound pressure in standing wave acoustic levitators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stindt, A.; Andrade, M. A. B.; Albrecht, M.; Adamowski, J. C.; Panne, U.; Riedel, J.

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for predictions of the sound pressure distribution in acoustic levitators is based on a matrix representation of the Rayleigh integral. This method allows for a fast calculation of the acoustic field within the resonator. To make sure that the underlying assumptions and simplifications are justified, this approach was tested by a direct comparison to experimental data. The experimental sound pressure distributions were recorded by high spatially resolved frequency selective microphone scanning. To emphasize the general applicability of the two approaches, the comparative studies were conducted for four different resonator geometries. In all cases, the results show an excellent agreement, demonstrating the accuracy of the matrix method.

  9. Effects of selected anticholinergics on acoustic startle response in rats.

    PubMed

    Sipos, M L; Burchnell, V; Galbicka, G

    2001-12-01

    The present study compared the effects of the anticholinergics aprophen hydrochloride, atropine sulfate, azaprophen hydrochloride, benactyzine hydrochloride, biperiden hydrochloride, diazepam, procyclidine hydrochloride, scopolamine hydrobromide and trihexyphenidyl hydrochloride on acoustic startle response in rats. Peak startle amplitude, latency to peak startle amplitude and prepulse inhibition following 100- and 120-dB tones were recorded 15 min following drug administration in food-restricted rats. Aprophen, atropine, azaprophen, benactyzine, biperiden and scopolamine significantly increased peak startle amplitude and decreased latency to peak startle amplitude following 100-dB pulses. In contrast, only biperiden increased peak startle amplitude following 120-dB pulses, whereas atropine and trihexyphenidyl decreased latency to peak startle amplitude following 120-dB pulses. Benactyzine decreased prepulse inhibition following both 100- and 120-dB pulses, whereas both biperiden and scopolamine decreased prepulse inhibition following 120-dB pulses. Acoustic startle response measures were effective in differentiating the effects of anticholinergic compounds. The comparison of drug effects on the acoustic startle response may be useful in selecting efficacious anticholinergic drug therapies with a minimal range of side-effects. In addition, these data may be useful in down-selecting the number of anticholinergic drugs that need to be tested in comparison studies involving more complex behavioral tests. PMID:11920928

  10. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for component-loaded curved orthogrid panels typical of launch vehicle skin structures. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was applied to correlate the measured input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application quantifies the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software developed for the RPTF method allows easy replacement of the diffuse acoustic field with other pressure fields such as a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) model suitable for vehicle ascent. Structural responses

  11. Full bandwidth calibration procedure for acoustic probes containing a pressure and particle velocity sensor.

    PubMed

    Basten, Tom G H; de Bree, Hans-Elias

    2010-01-01

    Calibration of acoustic particle velocity sensors is still difficult due to the lack of standardized sensors to compare with. Recently it is shown by Jacobsen and Jaud [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120, 830-837 (2006)] that it is possible to calibrate a sound pressure and particle velocity sensor in free field conditions at higher frequencies. This is done by using the known acoustic impedance at a certain distance of a spherical loudspeaker. When the sound pressure is measured with a calibrated reference microphone, the particle velocity can be calculated from the known impedance and the measured pressure. At lower frequencies, this approach gives unreliable results. The method is now extended to lower frequencies by measuring the acoustic pressure inside the spherical source. At lower frequencies, the sound pressure inside the sphere is proportional to the movement of the loudspeaker membrane. If the movement is known, the particle velocity in front of the loudspeaker can be derived. This low frequency approach is combined with the high frequency approach giving a full bandwidth calibration procedure which can be used in free field conditions using a single calibration setup. The calibration results are compared with results obtained with a standing wave tube.

  12. Acoustic properties of pistonphones at low frequencies in the presence of pressure leakage and heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; He, Wen; He, Longbiao; Rong, Zuochao

    2015-12-01

    The wide concern on absolute pressure calibration of acoustic transducers at low frequencies prompts the development of the pistonphone method. At low frequencies, the acoustic properties of pistonphones are governed by the pressure leakage and the heat conduction effects. However, the traditional theory for these two effects applies a linear superposition of two independent correction models, which differs somewhat from their coupled effect at low frequencies. In this paper, acoustic properties of pistonphones at low frequencies in full consideration of the pressure leakage and heat conduction effects have been quantitatively studied, and the explicit expression for the generated sound pressure has been derived. With more practical significance, a coupled correction expression for these two effects of pistonphones has been derived. In allusion to two typical pistonphones, the NPL pistonphone and our developed infrasonic pistonphone, comparisons were done for the coupled correction expression and the traditional one, whose results reveal that the traditional one produces maximum insufficient errors of about 0.1 dB above the lower limiting frequencies of two pistonphones, while at lower frequencies, excessive correction errors with an explicit limit of about 3 dB are produced by the traditional expression. The coupled correction expression should be adopted in the absolute pressure calibration of acoustic transducers at low frequencies. Furthermore, it is found that the heat conduction effect takes a limiting deviation of about 3 dB for the pressure amplitude and a small phase difference as frequency decreases, while the pressure leakage effect remarkably drives the pressure amplitude to attenuate and the phase difference tends to be 90° as the frequency decreases. The pressure leakage effect plays a more important role on the low frequency property of pistonphones.

  13. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    A rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for a curved orthogrid panel typical of launch vehicle skin structures. Several test article configurations were produced by adding component equipment of differing weights to the flight-like vehicle panel. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was employed to describe the assumed correlation of phased input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application demonstrates the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software modules developed for the RPTF method can be easily adapted for

  14. Manipulation of Liquids Using Phased Array Generation of Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A phased array of piezoelectric transducers is used to control and manipulate contained as well as uncontained fluids in space and earth applications. The transducers in the phased array are individually activated while being commonly controlled to produce acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. The phased array is activated to produce a single pulse, a pulse burst or a continuous pulse to agitate, segregate or manipulate liquids and gases. The phased array generated acoustic radiation pressure is also useful in manipulating a drop, a bubble or other object immersed in a liquid. The transducers can be arranged in any number of layouts including linear single or multi- dimensional, space curved and annular arrays. The individual transducers in the array are activated by a controller, preferably driven by a computer.

  15. Experimental Study on Effects of Frequency and Mean Pressure on Heat Pumping by Acoustic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Akira; Ozawa, Mamoru; Kataoka, Masaki; Takifuji, Tomonari

    Experimental studies were conducted for the fundamental understanding of the thermoacoustic behavior in the simulated resonance-tube refrigerator with special reference to the effect of imposed frequency and mean pressure. The resonance frequency in the case of helium was lower by about 20% than the theoretical prediction, while the experimental value in the case of air was almost the same as the theoretical one. The temperature difference observed along the stack increased with the increase in the amplitude of acoustic pressure, and decreased with the increase in the mean pressure, Based on the simplified model of heat pumping process, the relationship between the temperature variation and the acoustic pressure field was formulated, and thus the characteristic parameter which represents overall heat transfer between gas and stack plates or heat exchangers was obtained.

  16. Experimental investigation on dynamic response of aircraft panels excited by high-intensity acoustic loads in thermal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WU, Z. Q.; LI, H. B.; ZHANG, W.; CHENG, H.; KONG, F. J.; LIU, B. R.

    2016-09-01

    Metallic and composite panels are the major components for thermal protection system of aircraft vehicles, which are exposed to a severe combination of aerodynamic, thermal and acoustic environments during hypersonic flights. A thermal-acoustic testing apparatus which simulates thermal and acoustic loads was used to validate the integrity and the reliability of these panels. Metallic and ceramic matrix composite flat panels were designed. Dynamic response tests of these panels were carried out using the thermal acoustic apparatus. The temperature of the metallic specimen was up to 400 °C, and the temperature of the composite specimen was up to 600 °C. Moreover, the acoustic load was over 160 dB. Acceleration responses of these testing panels were measured using high temperature instruments during the testing process. Results show that the acceleration root mean square values are dominated by sound pressure level of acoustic loads. Compared with testing data in room environment, the peaks of the acceleration dynamic response shifts obviously to the high frequency in thermal environment.

  17. Correlation of combustor acoustic power levels inferred from internal fluctuating pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.

    1978-01-01

    Combustion chamber acoustic power levels inferred from internal fluctuating pressure measurements are correlated with operating conditions and chamber geometries over a wide range. The variables include considerations of chamber design (can, annular, and reverse-flow annular) and size, number of fuel nozzles, burner staging and fuel split, airflow and heat release rates, and chamber inlet pressure and temperature levels. The correlated data include those obtained with combustion component development rigs as well as engines.

  18. Method for predicting pump-induced acoustic pressures in fluid-handling systems. [ACSTIC code

    SciTech Connect

    Schwirian, R.E.; Shockling, L.A.; Singleton, N.R.; Riddell, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described for predicting the amplitudes of pump-induced acoustic pressures in fluid-handling systems using a node-flow path discretization methodology and a harmonic analysis algorithm. A computer model of a Westinghouse test loop using the volumetric forcing function model of the pump is presented. Comparisons of measured pressure amplitude profiles in the loop with model prediction are shown to be in good agreement for both the first and second pump blade-passing frequencies. 10 refs.

  19. Acoustic microscopy and nonlinear effects in pressurized superfluid helium. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Moulthrop, A.A.; Muha, M.S.; Kozlowski, G.C.; Silva, C.P.; Hadimioglu, B.

    1993-08-31

    The operation of an acoustic microscope having a resolution of 15 nm has been demonstrated. It uses as a coupling medium superfluid 4He colder than 0.9 K and pressurized to greater than 20 bar. The microscope is now being used to image objects that show little or no contrast on a scanning electron microscope. In addition, the acoustic microscope is being used to study the properties of sound propagation in the coupling fluid. At low acoustic intensities, the coupling fluid has very low acoustic attenuation at the microscope's operating frequency (15.3 GHz), but near the focal point the acoustic intensity can be high enough that the helium behaves with extreme nonlinearity. In fact, this medium is capable of entering new regimes of nonlinear interaction. Plots of the received signal versus input power display a nearly complete pump depletion at certain input power levels and a reconversion to the pump frequency at higher power levels. Such behavior has never before been observed. The authors present arguments that the process underlying this nonlinear behavior is harmonic generation. Cryogenic microscopy, Harmonic generation, Nonlinear acoustics.

  20. Acoustic Detection Of Loose Particles In Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, Lloyd C.

    1995-01-01

    Particle-impact-noise-detector (PIND) apparatus used in conjunction with computer program analyzing output of apparatus to detect extraneous particles trapped in pressure sensors. PIND tester essentially shaker equipped with microphone measuring noise in pressure sensor or other object being shaken. Shaker applies controlled vibration. Output of microphone recorded and expressed in terms of voltage, yielding history of noise subsequently processed by computer program. Data taken at sampling rate sufficiently high to enable identification of all impacts of particles on sensor diaphragm and on inner surfaces of sensor cavities.

  1. Optimization of Acoustic Pressure Measurements for Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; Nark, D. M.

    2007-01-01

    As noise constraints become increasingly stringent, there is continued emphasis on the development of improved acoustic liner concepts to reduce the amount of fan noise radiated to communities surrounding airports. As a result, multiple analytical prediction tools and experimental rigs have been developed by industry and academia to support liner evaluation. NASA Langley has also placed considerable effort in this area over the last three decades. More recently, a finite element code (Q3D) based on a quasi-3D implementation of the convected Helmholtz equation has been combined with measured data acquired in the Langley Grazing Incidence Tube (GIT) to reduce liner impedance in the presence of grazing flow. A new Curved Duct Test Rig (CDTR) has also been developed to allow evaluation of liners in the presence of grazing flow and controlled, higher-order modes, with straight and curved waveguides. Upgraded versions of each of these two test rigs are expected to begin operation by early 2008. The Grazing Flow Impedance Tube (GFIT) will replace the GIT, and additional capabilities will be incorporated into the CDTR. The current investigation uses the Q3D finite element code to evaluate some of the key capabilities of these two test rigs. First, the Q3D code is used to evaluate the microphone distribution designed for the GFIT. Liners ranging in length from 51 to 610 mm are investigated to determine whether acceptable impedance eduction can be achieved with microphones placed on the wall opposite the liner. This analysis indicates the best results are achieved for liner lengths of at least 203 mm. Next, the effects of moving this GFIT microphone array to the wall adjacent to the liner are evaluated, and acceptable results are achieved if the microphones are placed off the centerline. Finally, the code is used to investigate potential microphone placements in the CDTR rigid wall adjacent to the wall containing an acoustic liner, to determine if sufficient fidelity can be

  2. The Dynamics of Vapor Bubbles in Acoustic Pressure Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hao, Y.; Prosperetti, A.

    1999-01-01

    In spite of a superficial similarity with gas bubbles, the intimate coupling between dynamical and thermal processes confers to oscillating vapor bubbles some unique characteristics. This paper examines numerically the validity of some asymptotic-theory predictions such as the existence of two resonant radii and a limit size for a given sound amplitude and frequency. It is found that a small vapor bubble in a sound field of sufficient amplitude grows quickly through resonance and continues to grow thereafter at a very slow rate, seemingly indefinitely. Resonance phenomena therefore play a role for a few cycles at most, and reaching a limit size-if one exists at all-is found to require far more than several tens of thousands of cycles. It is also found that some small bubbles may grow or collapse depending on the phase of the sound field. The model accounts in detail for the thermo-fluid-mechanic processes in the vapor. In the second part of the paper, an approximate formulation valid for bubbles small with respect to the thermal penetration length in the vapor is derived and its accuracy examined, The present findings have implications for acoustically enhanced boiling heat transfer and other special applications such as boiling in microgravity.

  3. One-dimensional pressure transfer models for acoustic-electric transmission channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilt, K. R.; Lawry, T. J.; Scarton, H. A.; Saulnier, G. J.

    2015-09-01

    A method for modeling piezoelectric-based ultrasonic acoustic-electric power and data transmission channels is presented. These channels employ piezoelectric disk transducers to convey signals across a series of physical layers using ultrasonic waves. This model decomposes the mechanical pathway of the signal into individual ultrasonic propagation layers which are generally independent of the layer's adjacent domains. Each layer is represented by a two-by-two traveling pressure wave transfer matrix which relates the forward and reverse pressure waves on one side of the layer to the pressure waves on the opposite face, where each face is assumed to be in contact with a domain of arbitrary reference acoustic impedance. A rigorous implementation of ultrasonic beam spreading is introduced and implemented within applicable domains. Compatible pressure-wave models for piezoelectric transducers are given, which relate the electric voltage and current interface of the transducer to the pressure waves on one mechanical interface while also allowing for passive acoustic loading of the secondary mechanical interface. It is also shown that the piezoelectric model's electrical interface is compatible with transmission line parameters (ABCD-parameters), allowing for connection of electronic components and networks. The model is shown to be capable of reproducing the behavior of realistic physical channels.

  4. Acoustic response of superheated droplet detectors to neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Size; Zhang, Guiying; Ni, Bangfa; Zhao, Changjun; Zhang, Huanqiao; Guan, Yongjing; Chen, Zhe; Xiao, Caijin; Liu, Chao; Liu, Cunxiong

    2012-03-01

    The search for dark matter (DM) is a hot field nowadays, a number of innovative techniques have emerged. The superheated droplet technique is relatively mature; however, it is recently revitalized in a number of frontier fields including the search for DM. In this work, the acoustic response of Superheated Droplet Detectors (SDDs) to neutrons was studied by using a 252Cf neutron source, SDDs developed by the China Institute of Atomic Energy, a sound sensor, a sound card and a PC. Sound signals were filtered. The characteristics of FFT spectra, power spectra and time constants were used to determine the authenticity of the bubbles analyzed.

  5. Brillouin-scattering determination of the acoustic properties and their pressure dependence for three polymeric elastomers.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Lewis L; Orler, E Bruce; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Ahart, Muhtar; Hemley, Russell J

    2007-09-14

    The acoustic properties of three polymer elastomers, a cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) (Sylgard 184), a cross-linked terpolymer poly(ethylene-vinyl acetate-vinyl alcohol), and a segmented thermoplastic poly(ester urethane) copolymer (Estane 5703), have been measured from ambient pressure to approximately 12 GPa by using Brillouin scattering in high-pressure diamond anvil cells. The Brillouin-scattering technique is a powerful tool for aiding in the determination of equations of state for a variety of materials, but to date has not been applied to polymers at pressures exceeding a few kilobars. For the three elastomers, both transverse and longitudinal acoustic modes were observed, though the transverse modes were observed only at elevated pressures (>0.7 GPa) in all cases. From the Brillouin frequency shifts, longitudinal and transverse sound speeds were calculated, as were the C(11) and C(12) elastic constants, bulk, shear, and Young's moduli, and Poisson's ratios, and their respective pressure dependencies. P-V isotherms were then constructed, and fit to several empirical/semiempirical equations of state to extract the isothermal bulk modulus and its pressure derivative for each material. Finally, the lack of shear waves observed for any polymer at ambient pressure, and the pressure dependency of their appearance is discussed with regard to instrumental and material considerations.

  6. Brillouin-scattering determination of the acoustic properties and their pressure dependence for three polymeric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Lewis L.; Orler, E. Bruce; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Ahart, Muhtar; Hemley, Russell J.

    2007-09-01

    The acoustic properties of three polymer elastomers, a cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) (Sylgard® 184), a cross-linked terpolymer poly(ethylene-vinyl acetate-vinyl alcohol), and a segmented thermoplastic poly(ester urethane) copolymer (Estane® 5703), have been measured from ambient pressure to approximately 12GPa by using Brillouin scattering in high-pressure diamond anvil cells. The Brillouin-scattering technique is a powerful tool for aiding in the determination of equations of state for a variety of materials, but to date has not been applied to polymers at pressures exceeding a few kilobars. For the three elastomers, both transverse and longitudinal acoustic modes were observed, though the transverse modes were observed only at elevated pressures (>0.7GPa) in all cases. From the Brillouin frequency shifts, longitudinal and transverse sound speeds were calculated, as were the C11 and C12 elastic constants, bulk, shear, and Young's moduli, and Poisson's ratios, and their respective pressure dependencies. P-V isotherms were then constructed, and fit to several empirical/semiempirical equations of state to extract the isothermal bulk modulus and its pressure derivative for each material. Finally, the lack of shear waves observed for any polymer at ambient pressure, and the pressure dependency of their appearance is discussed with regard to instrumental and material considerations.

  7. Shape oscillations of acoustically levitated drops in water: Early research with Bob Apfel on modulated radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Philip L.

    2001-05-01

    In 1976, research in collaboration with Bob Apfel demonstrated that low-frequency shape oscillations of hydrocarbon drops levitated in water could be driven using modulated radiation pressure. While that response to modulated ultrasound was subsequently extended to a range of systems, the emphasis here is to recall the initial stages of development in Bob Apfel's laboratory leading to some publications [P. L. Marston and R. E. Apfel, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 68, 280-286 (1979); J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 67, 27-37 (1980)]. The levitation technology used at that time was such that it was helpful to develop a sensitive method for detecting weak oscillations using the interference pattern in laser light scattered by levitated drops. The initial experiments to verify this scattering method used shape oscillations induced by modulated electric fields within the acoustic levitator. Light scattering was subsequently used to detect shape oscillations induced by amplitude modulating a carrier having a high frequency (around 680 kHz) at a resonance of the transducer. Methods were also developed for quantitative measurements of the drop's response and with improved acoustic coupling drop fission was observed. The connection with research currently supported by NASA will also be noted.

  8. The non-linear response of bubble clouds to pressure excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuster, D.; Bergamasco, L.

    2015-12-01

    In this article we numerically investigate the non-linear response of a bubble cloud against a periodic pressure excitation. By exciting a planar bubble curtain with an external acoustic pulse of given amplitude and frequency, we characterize the global dynamic response of the system using phase diagrams representing the void fraction against the excitation pressure. Even in the absence of mass transfer, the void fraction around which the system oscillates increases when increasing the excitation amplitude. We show how the maximum pressures reached during the collapse of bubbles are higher in polydisperse bubble clouds than in monodisperse clouds for strong pressure pulses.

  9. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission SHM of PRSEUS Composite Pressure Cube Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2013-01-01

    A series of tests of the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) pressure cube were conducted during third quarter 2011 at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in the Combined Loads Test facility (COLTS). This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests. The AE signals of the later tests are consistent with the final failure progression through two of the pressure cube panels. Calibration tests and damage precursor AE indications, from preliminary checkout pressurizations, indicated areas of concern that eventually failed. Hence those tests have potential for vehicle health monitoring.

  10. Optical measurement of acoustic pressure amplitudes-at the sensitivity limits of Rayleigh scattering.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Anne; Fischer, André; Kings, Nancy; Bake, Friedrich; Roehle, Ingo

    2012-07-01

    Rayleigh scattering is a measurement technique applicable for the determination of density distributions in various technical or natural flows. The current sensitivity limits of the Rayleigh scattering technique were investigated experimentally. It is shown that it is possible to measure density oscillations caused by acoustic pressure oscillations noninvasively and directly. Acoustical standing waves in a rectangular duct were investigated using Rayleigh scattering and compared to microphone measurements. The comparison showed a sensitivity of the Rayleigh scattering technique of 75 Pa (7·10(-4) kg/m(3)) and a precision of 14 Pa (1·10(-4) kg/m(3)). Therefore, it was also shown that Rayleigh scattering is applicable for acoustic measurements. PMID:22743495

  11. Acoustic response of cemented granular sedimentary rocks: molecular dynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    García, Xavier; Medina, Ernesto

    2007-06-01

    The effect of cementation processes on the acoustical properties of sands is studied via molecular dynamics simulation methods. We propose numerical methods where the initial uncemented sand is built by simulating the settling process of sediments. Uncemented samples of different porosity are considered by emulating natural mechanical compaction of sediments due to overburden. Cementation is considered through a particle-based model that captures the underlying physics behind the process. In our simulations, we consider samples with different degrees of compaction and cementing materials with distinct elastic properties. The microstructure of cemented sands is taken into account while adding cement at specific locations within the pores, such as grain-to-grain contacts. Results show that the acoustical properties of cemented sands are strongly dependent on the amount of cement, its stiffness relative to the hosting medium, and its location within the pores. Simulation results are in good correspondence with available experimental data and compare favorably with some theoretical predictions for the sound velocity within a range of cement saturation, porosity, and confining pressure.

  12. Dynamic response analysis of an aircraft structure under thermal-acoustic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, H.; Li, H. B.; Zhang, W.; Wu, Z. Q.; Liu, B. R.

    2016-09-01

    Future hypersonic aircraft will be exposed to extreme combined environments includes large magnitude thermal and acoustic loads. It presents a significant challenge for the integrity of these vehicles. Thermal-acoustic test is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to combined loads. In this research, the numerical simulation process for the thermal acoustic test is presented, and the effects of thermal loads on vibro-acoustic response are investigated. To simulate the radiation heating system, Monte Carlo theory and thermal network theory was used to calculate the temperature distribution. Considering the thermal stress, the high temperature modal parameters are obtained with structural finite element methods. Based on acoustic finite element, modal-based vibro-acoustic analysis is carried out to compute structural responses. These researches are very vital to optimum thermal-acoustic test and structure designs for future hypersonic vehicles structure

  13. Comparison of occlusion pressure and ventilatory responses.

    PubMed Central

    Lederer, D H; Altose, M D; Kelsen, S G; Cherniack, N S

    1977-01-01

    The airway pressure 100 msec after the onset of an inspiratory effort against a closed airway (P100, occlusion pressure) is theoretically a more accurate index of respiratory neuron motor output than ventilation. Occlusion pressure and ventilation responses to hypercapnia were compared in repeated trials in 10 normal subjects while in the seated and supine positions. During progressive hypercapnia changes in P100 were also compared to changes in tidal volume and inspiratory airflow. These studies show that occlusion pressure increases linearly with hypercapnia in both sitting and supine subjects. Changing from the seated to the supine position, or vice versa, had no significant effect on either ventilation or occlusion pressure responses to CO2. Correlations between P100 and ventilation or airflow rate were significantly higher than correlations between P100 and tidal volume or breathing frequency. Intermittent random airway occlusion had no effect on either ventilation or pattern of breathing during hypercapnia. Occlusion pressure responses were no less variable than ventilation responses in groups of subjects whether studied seated or supine. However, maintenance of a constant moderate breathing frequency (20 breaths per minute) reduced the interindividual variability in ventilation and occlusion pressure responses to hypercapnia. PMID:867336

  14. Inconsistent Definitions of the Pressure-Coupled Response and the Admittance of Solid Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardiff, Eric H.

    2003-01-01

    When an acoustic wave is present in a solid propellant combustion environment, the mass flux from the combustion zone oscillates at the same frequency as the acoustics. The acoustic wave is either amplified or attenuated by the response of the combustion to the acoustic disturbance. When the acoustic wave is amplified, this process is called combustion instability. The amplification is quantitatively measured by a response function. The ability to predict combustion stability for a solid propellant formulation is essential to the formulator to prevent or minimize the effects of instabilities, such as an oscillatory thrust. Unfortunately, the prediction of response values for a particular propellant remains a technical challenge. Most predictions of the response of propellants are based on test data, but there are a number of questions about the reliability of the standard test method, the T-burner. Alternate methods have been developed to measure the response of a propellant, including the ultrasound burner, the magnetic flowmeter and the rotating valve burner, but there are still inconsistencies between the results obtained by these different methods. Aside from the experimental differences, the values of the pressure-coupled responses obtained by different researchers are often compared erroneously, for the simple reason that inconsistencies in the definitions of the responses and admittances are not considered. The use of different definitions has led to substantial confusion since the first theoretical treatments of the problem by Hart and McClure in 1959. The definitions and relations derived here seek to alleviate this problem.

  15. Three-dimensional visualization of shear wave propagation generated by dual acoustic radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Yuta; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    An elastic property of biological soft tissue is an important indicator of the tissue status. Therefore, quantitative and noninvasive methods for elasticity evaluation have been proposed. Our group previously proposed a method using acoustic radiation pressure irradiated from two directions for elastic property evaluation, in which by measuring the propagation velocity of the shear wave generated by the acoustic radiation pressure inside the object, the elastic properties of the object were successfully evaluated. In the present study, we visualized the propagation of the shear wave in a three-dimensional space by the synchronization of signals received at various probe positions. The proposed method succeeded in visualizing the shear wave propagation clearly in the three-dimensional space of 35 × 41 × 4 mm3. These results show the high potential of the proposed method to estimate the elastic properties of the object in the three-dimensional space.

  16. Dynamic response of an array of flexural plates in acoustic medium

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kwan Kyu; Khuri-Yakub, Brutus T.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic response of a transducer array made up of circular flexural plates in immersion is analytically calculated. The calculation method includes three steps: (1) the calculation of parallel resonant frequency and the velocity profile of each plate, (2) the calculation of mutual acoustic impedance between the plates, and (3) the calculation of velocity response, including the mechanical and acoustic impedance. The calculation method is validated by both finite element analysis and measurement results of a fabricated capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer. Based on the calculated velocity, the near-field pressure and the near-to-far field radiation patterns are presented. The flexural plate array in immersion displays two modes of operation. At low frequency, the mode shape of the transducer array is similar to that of a suspended plate and, at certain frequencies, two groups of plates move in opposite phase, which results in the cancellation of the average velocity. At high frequency, the mode shape is similar to that of a piston transducer; however, the near-field pressure distribution is similar to that of a resilient disk. PMID:23039426

  17. Numerical simulation of the nonlinear response of composite plates under combined thermal and acoustic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Moorthy, Jayashree

    1995-01-01

    A time-domain study of the random response of a laminated plate subjected to combined acoustic and thermal loads is carried out. The features of this problem also include given uniform static inplane forces. The formulation takes into consideration a possible initial imperfection in the flatness of the plate. High decibel sound pressure levels along with high thermal gradients across thickness drive the plate response into nonlinear regimes. This calls for the analysis to use von Karman large deflection strain-displacement relationships. A finite element model that combines the von Karman strains with the first-order shear deformation plate theory is developed. The development of the analytical model can accommodate an anisotropic composite laminate built up of uniformly thick layers of orthotropic, linearly elastic laminae. The global system of finite element equations is then reduced to a modal system of equations. Numerical simulation using a single-step algorithm in the time-domain is then carried out to solve for the modal coordinates. Nonlinear algebraic equations within each time-step are solved by the Newton-Raphson method. The random gaussian filtered white noise load is generated using Monte Carlo simulation. The acoustic pressure distribution over the plate is capable of accounting for a grazing incidence wavefront. Numerical results are presented to study a variety of cases.

  18. Reconstruction of an acoustic pressure field in a resonance tube by particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Kuzuu, K; Hasegawa, S

    2015-11-01

    A technique for estimating an acoustic field in a resonance tube is suggested. The estimation of an acoustic field in a resonance tube is important for the development of the thermoacoustic engine, and can be conducted employing two sensors to measure pressure. While this measurement technique is known as the two-sensor method, care needs to be taken with the location of pressure sensors when conducting pressure measurements. In the present study, particle image velocimetry (PIV) is employed instead of a pressure measurement by a sensor, and two-dimensional velocity vector images are extracted as sequential data from only a one- time recording made by a video camera of PIV. The spatial velocity amplitude is obtained from those images, and a pressure distribution is calculated from velocity amplitudes at two points by extending the equations derived for the two-sensor method. By means of this method, problems relating to the locations and calibrations of multiple pressure sensors are avoided. Furthermore, to verify the accuracy of the present method, the experiments are conducted employing the conventional two-sensor method and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Then, results by the proposed method are compared with those obtained with the two-sensor method and LDV.

  19. Nonlinear Acoustic Response of an Aircraft Fuselage Sidewall Structure by a Reduced-Order Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Groen, David S.

    2006-01-01

    A reduced-order nonlinear analysis of a structurally complex aircraft fuselage sidewall panel is undertaken to explore issues associated with application of such analyses to practical structures. Of primary interest is the trade-off between computational efficiency and accuracy. An approach to modal basis selection is offered based upon the modal participation in the linear regime. The nonlinear static response to a uniform pressure loading and nonlinear random response to a uniformly distributed acoustic loading are computed. Comparisons of the static response with a nonlinear static solution in physical degrees-of-freedom demonstrate the efficacy of the approach taken for modal basis selection. Changes in the modal participation as a function of static and random loading levels suggest a means for improvement in the basis selection.

  20. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission NDE of Kevlar Composite Over Wrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurization and failure tests of small Kevlar/epoxy COPV bottles were conducted during 2006 and 2007 by Texas Research Institute Austin, Inc., at TRI facilities. This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests. Results of some of the tests indicate a possibility that AE can be used to track the stress-rupture degradation of COPV vessels.

  1. PACT - a bottom pressure based, compact deep-ocean tsunameter with acoustic surface coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrander, A.; Gouretski, V.; Boebel, O.

    2009-04-01

    The German-Indonsian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) processes a multitude of information to comprehensively and accurately evaluate the possible risks inherent to seismic events around Indonesia. Within just a few minutes, measurements of the vibration and horizontal movements off the coastal regions of Indonesia provide a clear picture of the location and intensity of a seaquake. However, not every seaquake causes a tsunami, nor is every tsunami caused by a seaquake. To avoid nerve-wrecking and costly false alarms and to protect against tsunamis caused by landslides, the oceanic sea-level must be measured directly. This goal is pursued in the GITEWS work package "ocean instrumentation", aiming at a a highest reliability and redundancy by developing a set of independent instruments, which measure the sea-level both offshore in the deep ocean and at the coast on the islands off Indonesia. Deep ocean sea-level changes less than a centimetre can be detected by pressure gauges deployed at the sea floor. Based on some of the concepts developed as part of the US DART system, a bottom pressure based, acoustically coupled tsunami detector (PACT) was developed under the auspices of the AWI in collaboration with two German SME and with support of University of Bremen and University of Rhode Island. The PACT system records ocean bottom pressure, performs on-board tsunami detection and acoustically relays the data to the surface buoy. However, employing computational powers and communication technologies of the new millennium, PACT integrates the entire sea-floor package (pressure gauge, data logger and analyzer, acoustic modem, acoustic release and relocation aids) into a single unit, i.e. a standard benthos sphere. PACT thereby reduces costs, minimizes the deployment efforts, while maximizing reliability and maintenance intervals. Several PACT systems are scheduled for their first deployment off Indonesia during 2009. In this presentation, the technical specifications

  2. Improved method of measuring pressure coupled response for composite solid propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wanxing; Wang, Ningfei; Li, Junwei; Zhao, Yandong; Yan, Mi

    2014-04-01

    Pressure coupled response is one of the main causes of combustion instability in the solid rocket motor. It is also a characteristic parameter for predicting the stability. The pressure coupled response function is usually measured by different methods to evaluate the performance of new propellant. Based on T-burner and "burning surface doubled and secondary attenuation", an improved method for measuring the pressure coupled response of composite propellant is introduced in this article. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study has also been conducted to validate the method and to understand the pressure oscillation phenomenon in T-burner. Three rounds of tests were carried out on the same batch of aluminized AP/HTPB composite solid propellant. The experimental results show that the sample propellant had a high response function under the conditions of high pressure (~11.5 MPa) and low frequency (~140 Hz). The numerically predicted oscillation frequency and amplitude are consistent with the experimental results. One practical solid rocket motor using this sample propellant was found to experience pressure oscillation at the end of burning. This confirms that the sample propellant is prone to combustion instability. Finally, acoustic pressure distribution and phase difference in T-burner were analyzed. Both the experimental and numerical results are found to be associated with similar acoustic pressure distribution. And the phase difference analysis showed that the pressure oscillations at the head end of the T-burner are 180° out of phase from those in the aft end of the T-burner.

  3. Optical pressure/acoustic sensor with precise Fabry-Perot cavity length control using angle polished fiber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhui; Wu, Nan; Tian, Ye; Wang, Xingwei; Niezrecki, Christopher; Chen, Julie

    2009-09-14

    This paper presents a novel Fabry-Perot (FP) optical fiber pressure/acoustic sensor. It consists of two V-shaped grooves having different sized widths, a diaphragm on the surface of the larger V-groove, and a 45 degrees angle-polished fiber. The precision of FP cavity length is determined by the fabrication process of photolithography and anisotropic etching of a silicon crystal. Therefore, the cavity length can be controlled on the order of ten nm. Sensors were fabricated and tested. Test results indicate that the sensors' cavity lengths have been controlled precisely. The packaged sensor has demonstrated very good static and dynamic responses compared to a commercially available pressure sensor and a microphone. PMID:19770876

  4. Numerical simulation of the processes in the normal incidence tube for high acoustic pressure levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, E. S.; Khramtsov, I. V.; Kustov, O. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    Numerical simulation of the acoustic processes in an impedance tube at high levels of acoustic pressure is a way to solve a problem of noise suppressing by liners. These studies used liner specimen that is one cylindrical Helmholtz resonator. The evaluation of the real and imaginary parts of the liner acoustic impedance and sound absorption coefficient was performed for sound pressure levels of 130, 140 and 150 dB. The numerical simulation used experimental data having been obtained on the impedance tube with normal incidence waves. At the first stage of the numerical simulation it was used the linearized Navier-Stokes equations, which describe well the imaginary part of the liner impedance whatever the sound pressure level. These equations were solved by finite element method in COMSOL Multiphysics program in axisymmetric formulation. At the second stage, the complete Navier-Stokes equations were solved by direct numerical simulation in ANSYS CFX in axisymmetric formulation. As the result, the acceptable agreement between numerical simulation and experiment was obtained.

  5. Validation of Vehicle Panel/Equipment Response from Diffuse Acoustic Field Excitation Using Spatially Correlated Transfer Function Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Fulcher, Clay; Hunt, Ron

    2012-01-01

    An approach for predicting the vibration, strain, and force responses of a flight-like vehicle panel assembly to acoustic pressures is presented. Important validation for the approach is provided by comparison to ground test measurements in a reverberant chamber. The test article and the corresponding analytical model were assembled in several configurations to demonstrate the suitability of the approach for response predictions when the vehicle panel is integrated with equipment. Critical choices in the analysis necessary for convergence of the predicted and measured responses are illustrated through sensitivity studies. The methodology includes representation of spatial correlation of the pressure field over the panel surface. Therefore, it is possible to demonstrate the effects of hydrodynamic coincidence in the response. The sensitivity to pressure patch density clearly illustrates the onset of coincidence effects on the panel response predictions.

  6. Pressure Measurement in Supersonic Air Flow by Differential Absorptive Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, Gregory C.; Balla, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach-2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, stream-wise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially-resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  7. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  8. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  9. The effects of pressure sensor acoustics on airdata derived from a High-angle-of-attack Flush Airdata Sensing (HI-FADS) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of a nonintrusive high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system was verified for quasi-steady flight conditions up to 55 deg angle of attack during the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) Program. The system is a matrix of nine pressure ports arranged in annular rings on the aircraft nose. The complete airdata set is estimated using nonlinear regression. Satisfactory frequency response was verified to the system Nyquist frequency (12.5 Hz). The effects of acoustical distortions within the individual pressure sensors of the nonintrusive pressure matrix on overall system performance are addressed. To quantify these effects, a frequency-response model describing the dynamics of acoustical distortion is developed and simple design criteria are derived. The model adjusts measured HI-FADS pressure data for the acoustical distortion and quantifies the effects of internal sensor geometries on system performance. Analysis results indicate that sensor frequency response characteristics very greatly with altitude, thus it is difficult to select satisfactory sensor geometry for all altitudes. The solution used presample filtering to eliminate resonance effects, and short pneumatic tubing sections to reduce lag effects. Without presample signal conditioning the system designer must use the pneumatic transmission line to attenuate the resonances and accept the resulting altitude variability.

  10. A Study of Standing Pressure Waves Within Open and Closed Acoustic Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, C.; Steinetz, B.; Finkbeiner, J.; Raman, G.; Li, X.

    2002-01-01

    The first section of the results presented herein was conducted on an axisymmetric resonator configured with open ventilation ports on either end of the resonator, but otherwise closed and free from obstruction. The remaining section presents the results of a similar resonator shape that was closed, but contained an axisymmetric blockage centrally located through the axis of the resonator. Ambient air was used as the working fluid. In each of the studies, the resonator was oscillated at the resonant frequency of the fluid contained within the cavity while the dynamic pressure, static pressure, and temperature of the fluid were recorded at both ends of the resonator. The baseline results showed a marked reduction in the amplitude of the dynamic pressure waveforms over previous studies due to the use of air instead of refrigerant as the working fluid. A sharp reduction in the amplitude of the acoustic pressure waves was expected and recorded when the configuration of the resonators was modified from closed to open. A change in the resonant frequency was recorded when blockages of differing geometries were used in the closed resonator, while acoustic pressure amplitudes varied little from baseline measurements.

  11. Acoustic Beam Forming Array Using Feedback-Controlled Microphones for Tuning and Self-Matching of Frequency Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radcliffe, Eliott (Inventor); Naguib, Ahmed (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A feedback-controlled microphone includes a microphone body and a membrane operatively connected to the body. The membrane is configured to be initially deflected by acoustic pressure such that the initial deflection is characterized by a frequency response. The microphone also includes a sensor configured to detect the frequency response of the initial deflection and generate an output voltage indicative thereof. The microphone additionally includes a compensator in electric communication with the sensor and configured to establish a regulated voltage in response to the output voltage. Furthermore, the microphone includes an actuator in electric communication with the compensator, wherein the actuator is configured to secondarily deflect the membrane in opposition to the initial deflection such that the frequency response is adjusted. An acoustic beam forming microphone array including a plurality of the above feedback-controlled microphones is also disclosed.

  12. Pressure and temperature dependences of the acoustic behaviors of biocompatible silk studied by using Brillouin spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoung Wan; Ryeom, Junho; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Chan Hum; Park, Jaehoon; Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kwang Joo

    2016-07-01

    The elastic properties of a biocompatible silk film were investigated under temperature and pressure variations by using Brillouin spectroscopy. The Brillouin frequency shift decreased monotonically upon heating and showed a sudden change at the glass transition temperature. The existence of water molecules in the film increased the longitudinal modulus by approximately 10% and induced a relaxation peak in the hypersonic damping at ~60 ◦ C. The pressure dependences of the sound velocities of the longitudinal and the transverse acoustic modes and the refractive index were determined for the first time at pressures up to ~15.5 GPa. All these properties increased upon compression; these changes indicated that the free volume in the silk film collapsed at a pressure of about 3 GPa.

  13. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  14. Calibration of acoustic transients.

    PubMed

    Burkard, Robert

    2006-05-26

    This article reviews the appropriate stimulus parameters (click duration, toneburst envelope) that should be used when eliciting auditory brainstem responses from mice. Equipment specifications required to calibrate these acoustic transients are discussed. Several methods of calibrating the level of acoustic transients are presented, including the measurement of peak equivalent sound pressure level (peSPL) and peak sound pressure level (pSPL). It is hoped that those who collect auditory brainstem response thresholds in mice will begin to use standardized methods of acoustic calibration, so that hearing thresholds across mouse strains obtained in different laboratories can more readily be compared.

  15. Dynamics and response of polymer-coated acoustic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.J.; Frye, G.C.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we consider the dynamic behavior and the electrical response of a thickness-shear mode resonator with a polymer film coating one face. With glassy polymers (shear stiffness G{prime} {approx} 10{sup 10} dyne/cm{sup 2}), this film tends to move synchronously with the oscillating resonator surface, while with rubbery polymers (G{prime} {approx} 10{sup 7} dyne/cm{sup 2}), the upper portions of the film lag behind the driven resonator/film interface, causing shear deformation of the film. As polymer properties change, interesting dynamic film behavior results, notably a film resonance when the acoustic phase shift across the film is an odd multiple of {pi}2. This dynamic behavior influences the electrical response of the resonator due to the coupling between shear displacement and electric field in the piezoelectric quartz. Utilizing the fact that the polymer shear modulus changes rapidly as a function of temperature, these film behavior trends were demonstrated by measuring the electrical characteristics of a polyisobutylene-coated resonator as a function of frequency and at several temperatures. We show how these changing film dynamics can be correlated with changes in the measured electrical response. 11 refs.

  16. Dynamics and response of polymer-coated acoustic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.J.; Frye, G.C.

    1992-06-01

    In this paper we consider the dynamic behavior and the electrical response of a thickness-shear mode resonator with a polymer film coating one face. With glassy polymers (shear stiffness G{prime} {approx} 10{sup 10} dyne/cm{sup 2}), this film tends to move synchronously with the oscillating resonator surface, while with rubbery polymers (G{prime} {approx} 10{sup 7} dyne/cm{sup 2}), the upper portions of the film lag behind the driven resonator/film interface, causing shear deformation of the film. As polymer properties change, interesting dynamic film behavior results, notably a film resonance when the acoustic phase shift across the film is an odd multiple of {pi}2. This dynamic behavior influences the electrical response of the resonator due to the coupling between shear displacement and electric field in the piezoelectric quartz. Utilizing the fact that the polymer shear modulus changes rapidly as a function of temperature, these film behavior trends were demonstrated by measuring the electrical characteristics of a polyisobutylene-coated resonator as a function of frequency and at several temperatures. We show how these changing film dynamics can be correlated with changes in the measured electrical response. 11 refs.

  17. Picosecond acoustics method for measuring the thermodynamical properties of solids and liquids at high pressure and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Decremps, F; Gauthier, M; Ayrinhac, S; Bove, L; Belliard, L; Perrin, B; Morand, M; Le Marchand, G; Bergame, F; Philippe, J

    2015-02-01

    Based on the original combination of picosecond acoustics and diamond anvils cell, recent improvements to accurately measure hypersonic sound velocities of liquids and solids under extreme conditions are described. To illustrate the capability of this technique, results are given on the pressure and temperature dependence of acoustic properties for three prototypical cases: polycrystal (iron), single-crystal (silicon) and liquid (mercury) samples. It is shown that such technique also enables the determination of the density as a function of pressure for liquids, of the complete set of elastic constants for single crystals, and of the melting curve for any kind of material. High pressure ultrafast acoustic spectroscopy technique clearly opens opportunities to measure thermodynamical properties under previously unattainable extreme conditions. Beyond physics, this state-of-the-art experiment would thus be useful in many other fields such as nonlinear acoustics, oceanography, petrology, in of view. A brief description of new developments and future directions of works conclude the article.

  18. Picosecond acoustics method for measuring the thermodynamical properties of solids and liquids at high pressure and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Decremps, F; Gauthier, M; Ayrinhac, S; Bove, L; Belliard, L; Perrin, B; Morand, M; Le Marchand, G; Bergame, F; Philippe, J

    2015-02-01

    Based on the original combination of picosecond acoustics and diamond anvils cell, recent improvements to accurately measure hypersonic sound velocities of liquids and solids under extreme conditions are described. To illustrate the capability of this technique, results are given on the pressure and temperature dependence of acoustic properties for three prototypical cases: polycrystal (iron), single-crystal (silicon) and liquid (mercury) samples. It is shown that such technique also enables the determination of the density as a function of pressure for liquids, of the complete set of elastic constants for single crystals, and of the melting curve for any kind of material. High pressure ultrafast acoustic spectroscopy technique clearly opens opportunities to measure thermodynamical properties under previously unattainable extreme conditions. Beyond physics, this state-of-the-art experiment would thus be useful in many other fields such as nonlinear acoustics, oceanography, petrology, in of view. A brief description of new developments and future directions of works conclude the article. PMID:24852260

  19. Temperature and Pressure Dependence of Signal Amplitudes for Electrostriction Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    The relative signal strength of electrostriction-only (no thermal grating) laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) in gas-phase air is reported as a function of temperature T and pressure P. Measurements were made in the free stream of a variable Mach number supersonic wind tunnel, where T and P are varied simultaneously as Mach number is varied. Using optical heterodyning, the measured signal amplitude (related to the optical reflectivity of the acoustic grating) was averaged for each of 11 flow conditions and compared to the expected theoretical dependence of a pure-electrostriction LITA process, where the signal is proportional to the square root of [P*P /( T*T*T)].

  20. Effect of grazing flow on structural-acoustic response of an elastic plate with sound in a duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchakattil Sucheendran, Mahesh

    The design of supersonic and hypersonic vehicles involves the challenging task of designing thin panels that can withstand severe unsteady pressure and thermal loads. A good understanding and accurate prediction of the coupled structural-acoustic response of thin panels subjected to sound waves are key elements of this design process. Due to the cost of in-flight testing, the experimental assessment of the structural-acoustic response of skin panels is usually conducted in ground-based facilities consisting of a duct in which acoustic waves propagate at grazing incidence with skin panels mounted along the duct walls. A key limitation of such facility is the absence of flow, the impact of which on the structural-acoustic response of the skin panel is still poorly understood. To shed some insight on this key contribution, this analytical and numerical study focuses on the structural-acoustic interaction of sound with a thin elastic plate mounted flush on a wall in a rectangular duct in the presence of a uniform mean subsonic and supersonic flow. A linear, time-harmonic theory based on modal descriptions of the plate velocity and duct acoustic fields is first developed. The theory includes the effect of uniform mean flow in the duct and clamped and simply-supported boundary conditions for the plate. The sound radiated by the plate is calculated using Doak's theory [22], extended in this work to account for subsonic and supersonic uniform mean flow in the duct, and verified using the numerical solver. The theoretical model provides important insight on the effect of flow in the duct on the coupled response of the plate. Four metrics characterizing the coupled response are considered: the deviation of the peak response frequency from the in vacuo natural frequency of plate, the amplitude of the peak response, the effective acoustic damping of the plate, and the plate modal coupling through the duct acoustic field. The theory is extended to estimate the onset of

  1. Bulimia: A Coping Response to Societal Pressures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Patricia A. M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This article discusses bulimia and illustrates how the problem develops as a coping response to societal pressures. The incidence, physiological complications, personality characteristics, food behavior diagnosis, and treatment of bulimia are reviewed to show the complexity of the problem and the proposed treatment. (CT)

  2. Response of cyanobacteria to low atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lifeng; Yu, Qingni; Ai, Weidang; Tang, Yongkang; Ren, Jin; Guo, Shuangsheng

    2014-10-01

    Maintaining a low pressure environment in a controlled ecological life support system would reduce the technological complexity and resupply cost in the course of the construction of a future manned lunar base. To estimate the effect of a hypobaric environment in a lunar base on biological components, such as higher plants, microbes, and algae, cyanobacteria was used as the model by determining their response of growth, morphology, and physiology when exposed to half of standard atmospheric pressure for 16 days (brought back to standard atmospheric pressure 30 minutes every two days for sampling). The results indicated that the decrease of atmospheric pressure from 100 kPa to 50 kPa reduced the growth rates of Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia sp., Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and Anabaena flos-aquae. The ratio of carotenoid to chlorophyll a content in the four tested strains increased under low pressure conditions compared to ambient conditions, resulting from the decrease of chlorophyll a and the increase of carotenoid in the cells. Moreover, low pressure induced the reduction of the phycocyanin content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and Anabaena flos-aquae. The result from the ultrastructure observed using SEM indicated that low pressure promoted the production of more extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) compared to ambient conditions. The results implied that the low pressure environment of 50 kPa in a future lunar base would induce different effects on biological components in a CELSS, which must be considered during the course of designing a future lunar base. The results will be a reference for exploring the response of other biological components, such as plants, microbes, and animals, living in the life support system of a lunar base.

  3. Acoustic investigation of pressure-dependent resonance and shell elasticity of lipid-coated monodisperse microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yanjun; Cabodi, Mario; Porter, Tyrone M.

    2014-02-01

    In this study, frequency-dependent attenuation was measured acoustically for monodisperse lipid-coated microbubble suspensions as a function of excitation pressure and radius. The resonance frequency was identified from the attenuation spectra and had an inverse relationship with mean microbubble diameter and excitation pressure. A reduction in the estimated shell elasticity constant from 0.50 N/m to 0.29 N/m was observed as the excitation pressure was increased from 25 kPa to 100 kPa, respectively, which suggests a nonlinear relationship exists between lipid shell stiffness and applied strain. These findings support the viewpoint that lipid shells coating microbubbles exist as heterogeneous mixtures that undergo dynamic and rapid variations in mechanical properties under applied strains.

  4. Near field acoustic holography based on the equivalent source method and pressure-velocity transducers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Bin; Jacobsen, Finn; Bi, Chuan-Xing; Chen, Xin-Zhao

    2009-09-01

    The advantage of using the normal component of the particle velocity rather than the sound pressure in the hologram plane as the input of conventional spatial Fourier transform based near field acoustic holography (NAH) and also as the input of the statistically optimized variant of NAH has recently been demonstrated. This paper examines whether there might be a similar advantage in using the particle velocity as the input of NAH based on the equivalent source method (ESM). Error sensitivity considerations indicate that ESM-based NAH is less sensitive to measurement errors when it is based on particle velocity input data than when it is based on measurements of sound pressure data, and this is confirmed by a simulation study and by experimental results. A method that combines pressure- and particle velocity-based reconstructions in order to distinguish between contributions to the sound field generated by sources on the two sides of the hologram plane is also examined.

  5. Computation of the pressure field generated by surface acoustic waves in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Darinskii, A N; Weihnacht, M; Schmidt, H

    2016-07-01

    The high-frequency pressure induced by a surface acoustic wave in the fluid filling a microchannel is computed by solving the full scattering problem. The microchannel is fabricated inside a container attached to the top of a piezoelectric substrate where the surface wave propagates. The finite element method is used. The pressure found in this way is compared with the pressure obtained by solving boundary-value problems formulated on the basis of simplifications which have been introduced in earlier papers by other research studies. The considered example shows that the difference between the results can be significant, ranging from several tens of percent up to several times in different points inside the channel. PMID:27314212

  6. Theoretical estimation of the temperature and pressure within collapsing acoustical bubbles.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2014-01-01

    Formation of highly reactive species such as OH, H, HO2 and H2O2 due to transient collapse of cavitation bubbles is the primary mechanism of sonochemical reaction. The crucial parameters influencing the formation of radicals are the temperature and pressure achieved in the bubble during the strong collapse. Experimental determinations estimated a temperature of about 5000 K and pressure of several hundreds of MPa within the collapsing bubble. In this theoretical investigation, computer simulations of chemical reactions occurring in an O2-bubble oscillating in water irradiated by an ultrasonic wave have been performed for diverse combinations of various parameters such as ultrasound frequency (20-1000 kHz), acoustic amplitude (up to 0.3 MPa), static pressure (0.03-0.3 MPa) and liquid temperature (283-333 K). The aim of this series of computations is to correlate the production of OH radicals to the temperature and pressure achieved in the bubble during the strong collapse. The employed model combines the dynamic of bubble collapse in acoustical field with the chemical kinetics of single bubble. The results of the numerical simulations revealed that the main oxidant created in an O2 bubble is OH radical. The computer simulations clearly showed the existence of an optimum bubble temperature of about 5200±200 K and pressure of about 250±20 MPa. The predicted value of the bubble temperature for the production of OH radicals is in excellent agreement with that furnished by the experiments. The existence of an optimum bubble temperature and pressure in collapsing bubbles results from the competitions between the reactions of production and those of consumption of OH radicals at high temperatures. PMID:23769748

  7. Role of transient water pressure in quarrying: A subglacial experiment using acoustic emissions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, D.; Hooyer, T.S.; Iverson, N.R.; Thomason, J.F.; Jackson, M.

    2006-01-01

    Probably the most important mechanism of glacial erosion is quarrying: the growth and coalescence of cracks in subglacial bedrock and dislodgement of resultant rock fragments. Although evidence indicates that erosion rates depend on sliding speed, rates of crack growth in bedrock may be enhanced by changing stresses on the bed caused by fluctuating basal water pressure in zones of ice-bed separation. To study quarrying in real time, a granite step, 12 cm high with a crack in its stoss surface, was installed at the bed of Engabreen, Norway. Acoustic emission sensors monitored crack growth events in the step as ice slid over it. Vertical stresses, water pressure, and cavity height in the lee of the step were also measured. Water was pumped to the lee of the step several times over 8 days. Pumping initially caused opening of a leeward cavity, which then closed after pumping was stopped and water pressure decreased. During cavity closure, acoustic emissions emanating mostly from the vicinity of the base of the crack in the step increased dramatically. With repeated pump tests this crack grew with time until the step's lee surface was quarried. Our experiments indicate that fluctuating water pressure caused stress thresholds required for crack growth to be exceeded. Natural basal water pressure fluctuations should also concentrate stresses on rock steps, increasing rates of crack growth. Stress changes on the bed due to water pressure fluctuations will increase in magnitude and duration with cavity size, which may help explain the effect of sliding speed on erosion rates. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Effect of Pressure Gradients on Plate Response and Radiation in a Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader

    1997-01-01

    Using the model developed by the author for zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers, results are obtained for adverse and favorable pressure gradients. It is shown that when a flexible plate is located in an adverse pressure gradient area, it vibrates more than if it were in a favorable pressure gradient one. Therefore the noise generated by the plate in an adverse pressure gradient is much greater than that due to the plate in a favorable pressure gradient. The effects of Reynolds number and boundary layer thickness are also analyzed and found to have the same effect in both adverse and favorable pressure gradient cases. Increasing the Reynolds number is found to increase the loading on the plate and therefore acoustic radiation. An increase in boundary layer thickness is found to decrease the level of the high frequencies and therefore the response and radiation at these frequencies. The results are in good qualitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  9. Articulatory-to-Acoustic Relations in Response to Speaking Rate and Loudness Manipulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mefferd, Antje S.; Green, Jordan R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this investigation, the authors determined the strength of association between tongue kinematic and speech acoustics changes in response to speaking rate and loudness manipulations. Performance changes in the kinematic and acoustic domains were measured using two aspects of speech production presumably affecting speech clarity:…

  10. Baseline and Modulated Acoustic Startle Responses in Adolescent Girls with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipschitz, Deborah S.; Mayes, Linda M.; Rasmusson, Ann M.; Anyan, Walter; Billingslea, Eileen; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Southwick, Steven M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess baseline and modulated acoustic startle responses in adolescent girls with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Method: Twenty-eight adolescent girls with PTSD and 23 healthy control girls were recruited for participation in the study. Acoustic stimuli were bursts of white noise of 104 dB presented biaurally through…

  11. Detecting leaks in gas-filled pressure vessels using acoustic resonances.

    PubMed

    Gillis, K A; Moldover, M R; Mehl, J B

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that a leak from a large, unthermostatted pressure vessel into ambient air can be detected an order of magnitude more effectively by measuring the time dependence of the ratio p/f(2) than by measuring the ratio p/T. Here f is the resonance frequency of an acoustic mode of the gas inside the pressure vessel, p is the pressure of the gas, and T is the kelvin temperature measured at one point in the gas. In general, the resonance frequencies are determined by a mode-dependent, weighted average of the square of the speed-of-sound throughout the volume of the gas. However, the weighting usually has a weak dependence on likely temperature gradients in the gas inside a large pressure vessel. Using the ratio p/f(2), we measured a gas leak (dM/dt)/M ≈ - 1.3 × 10(-5) h(-1) = - 0.11 yr(-1) from a 300-liter pressure vessel filled with argon at 450 kPa that was exposed to sunshine-driven temperature and pressure fluctuations as large as (dT/dt)/T ≈ (dp/dt)/p ≈ 5 × 10(-2) h(-1) using a 24-hour data record. This leak could not be detected in a 72-hour record of p/T. (Here M is the mass of the gas in the vessel and t is the time.).

  12. Detecting leaks in gas-filled pressure vessels using acoustic resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, K. A.; Moldover, M. R.; Mehl, J. B.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that a leak from a large, unthermostatted pressure vessel into ambient air can be detected an order of magnitude more effectively by measuring the time dependence of the ratio p/f2 than by measuring the ratio p/T. Here f is the resonance frequency of an acoustic mode of the gas inside the pressure vessel, p is the pressure of the gas, and T is the kelvin temperature measured at one point in the gas. In general, the resonance frequencies are determined by a mode-dependent, weighted average of the square of the speed-of-sound throughout the volume of the gas. However, the weighting usually has a weak dependence on likely temperature gradients in the gas inside a large pressure vessel. Using the ratio p/f2, we measured a gas leak (dM/dt)/M ≈ - 1.3 × 10-5 h-1 = - 0.11 yr-1 from a 300-liter pressure vessel filled with argon at 450 kPa that was exposed to sunshine-driven temperature and pressure fluctuations as large as (dT/dt)/T ≈ (dp/dt)/p ≈ 5 × 10-2 h-1 using a 24-hour data record. This leak could not be detected in a 72-hour record of p/T. (Here M is the mass of the gas in the vessel and t is the time.)

  13. Near and Far Field Acoustic Pressure Skewness in a Heated Supersonic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Mora, Pablo; Kastner, Jeff; Heeb, Nick; Kailasanath, Kailas; Liu, Junhui; University of Cincinnati Collaboration; Naval Research Laboratory Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The dominant component of turbulent mixing noise in high speed jets is the Mach wave radiation generated by large turbulent structures in the shear layer The Over-All Sound Pressure Level (OASPL) in the far field peaks in a direction near the Mach wave angle. ``Crackle'' is another important component of high speed jet noise. Crackle cannot be recognized in the spectrum of the acoustic pressure signal, but it appears in the temporal waveform of the pressure as sharply rising peaks. Skewness levels of the pressure and dP/dt have been used as a measure of crackle in high specific thrust engines and rockets. In this paper, we focus on recognizing a technique that identifies the impact of different test conditions on the near-field and far-field statistics of the pressure and dP/dt signals of a supersonic jet with a design Mach number of Md=1.5 produced by a C-D conical nozzle. Cold and hot jets, T0=300K and 600K, are tested at over, design, and under-expanded conditions, with NPRs=2.5, 3.671, 4.5, respectively. Second, Third and Forth order statistics are examined in the near and far fields. Rms, skewness and kurtosis intensity levels and propagation are better identified in the dP/dt than in the pressure signal. Statistics of the dP/dt demonstrate to be a better measure for crackle. Project funded by ONR grant.

  14. Detecting leaks in gas-filled pressure vessels using acoustic resonances.

    PubMed

    Gillis, K A; Moldover, M R; Mehl, J B

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that a leak from a large, unthermostatted pressure vessel into ambient air can be detected an order of magnitude more effectively by measuring the time dependence of the ratio p/f(2) than by measuring the ratio p/T. Here f is the resonance frequency of an acoustic mode of the gas inside the pressure vessel, p is the pressure of the gas, and T is the kelvin temperature measured at one point in the gas. In general, the resonance frequencies are determined by a mode-dependent, weighted average of the square of the speed-of-sound throughout the volume of the gas. However, the weighting usually has a weak dependence on likely temperature gradients in the gas inside a large pressure vessel. Using the ratio p/f(2), we measured a gas leak (dM/dt)/M ≈ - 1.3 × 10(-5) h(-1) = - 0.11 yr(-1) from a 300-liter pressure vessel filled with argon at 450 kPa that was exposed to sunshine-driven temperature and pressure fluctuations as large as (dT/dt)/T ≈ (dp/dt)/p ≈ 5 × 10(-2) h(-1) using a 24-hour data record. This leak could not be detected in a 72-hour record of p/T. (Here M is the mass of the gas in the vessel and t is the time.). PMID:27250456

  15. Advances in Fast Response Acoustically Derived Air Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, Ivan; Jacobsen, Larry; Horst, Thomas; Conrad, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity. The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  16. Conditionally Increased Acoustic Pressures in Nonfetal Diagnostic Ultrasound Examinations Without Contrast Agents: A Preliminary Assessment.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, Kathryn R; Church, Charles C; Harris, Gerald; Wear, Keith A; Bailey, Michael R; Carson, Paul L; Jiang, Hui; Sandstrom, Kurt L; Szabo, Thomas L; Ziskin, Marvin C

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical index (MI) has been used by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) since 1992 for regulatory decisions regarding the acoustic output of diagnostic ultrasound equipment. Its formula is based on predictions of acoustic cavitation under specific conditions. Since its implementation over 2 decades ago, new imaging modes have been developed that employ unique beam sequences exploiting higher-order acoustic phenomena, and, concurrently, studies of the bioeffects of ultrasound under a range of imaging scenarios have been conducted. In 2012, the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine Technical Standards Committee convened a working group of its Output Standards Subcommittee to examine and report on the potential risks and benefits of the use of conditionally increased acoustic pressures (CIP) under specific diagnostic imaging scenarios. The term "conditionally" is included to indicate that CIP would be considered on a per-patient basis for the duration required to obtain the necessary diagnostic information. This document is a result of that effort. In summary, a fundamental assumption in the MI calculation is the presence of a preexisting gas body. For tissues not known to contain preexisting gas bodies, based on theoretical predications and experimentally reported cavitation thresholds, we find this assumption to be invalid. We thus conclude that exceeding the recommended maximum MI level given in the FDA guidance could be warranted without concern for increased risk of cavitation in these tissues. However, there is limited literature assessing the potential clinical benefit of exceeding the MI guidelines in these tissues. The report proposes a 3-tiered approach for CIP that follows the model for employing elevated output in magnetic resonance imaging and concludes with summary recommendations to facilitate Institutional Review Board (IRB)-monitored clinical studies investigating CIP in specific tissues.

  17. Conditionally Increased Acoustic Pressures in Nonfetal Diagnostic Ultrasound Examinations Without Contrast Agents: A Preliminary Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Church, Charles C.; Harris, Gerald; Wear, Keith A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Carson, Paul L.; Jiang, Hui; Sandstrom, Kurt L.; Szabo, Thomas L.; Ziskin, Marvin C.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical index (MI) has been used by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) since 1992 for regulatory decisions regarding the acoustic output of diagnostic ultrasound equipment. Its formula is based on predictions of acoustic cavitation under specific conditions. Since its implementation over 2 decades ago, new imaging modes have been developed that employ unique beam sequences exploiting higher-order acoustic phenomena, and, concurrently, studies of the bioeffects of ultrasound under a range of imaging scenarios have been conducted. In 2012, the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine Technical Standards Committee convened a working group of its Output Standards Subcommittee to examine and report on the potential risks and benefits of the use of conditionally increased acoustic pressures (CIP) under specific diagnostic imaging scenarios. The term “conditionally” is included to indicate that CIP would be considered on a per-patient basis for the duration required to obtain the necessary diagnostic information. This document is a result of that effort. In summary, a fundamental assumption in the MI calculation is the presence of a preexisting gas body. For tissues not known to contain preexisting gas bodies, based on theoretical predications and experimentally reported cavitation thresholds, we find this assumption to be invalid. We thus conclude that exceeding the recommended maximum MI level given in the FDA guidance could be warranted without concern for increased risk of cavitation in these tissues. However, there is limited literature assessing the potential clinical benefit of exceeding the MI guidelines in these tissues. The report proposes a 3-tiered approach for CIP that follows the model for employing elevated output in magnetic resonance imaging and concludes with summary recommendations to facilitate Institutional Review Board (IRB)-monitored clinical studies investigating CIP in specific tissues. PMID:26112617

  18. Conditionally Increased Acoustic Pressures in Nonfetal Diagnostic Ultrasound Examinations Without Contrast Agents: A Preliminary Assessment.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, Kathryn R; Church, Charles C; Harris, Gerald; Wear, Keith A; Bailey, Michael R; Carson, Paul L; Jiang, Hui; Sandstrom, Kurt L; Szabo, Thomas L; Ziskin, Marvin C

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical index (MI) has been used by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) since 1992 for regulatory decisions regarding the acoustic output of diagnostic ultrasound equipment. Its formula is based on predictions of acoustic cavitation under specific conditions. Since its implementation over 2 decades ago, new imaging modes have been developed that employ unique beam sequences exploiting higher-order acoustic phenomena, and, concurrently, studies of the bioeffects of ultrasound under a range of imaging scenarios have been conducted. In 2012, the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine Technical Standards Committee convened a working group of its Output Standards Subcommittee to examine and report on the potential risks and benefits of the use of conditionally increased acoustic pressures (CIP) under specific diagnostic imaging scenarios. The term "conditionally" is included to indicate that CIP would be considered on a per-patient basis for the duration required to obtain the necessary diagnostic information. This document is a result of that effort. In summary, a fundamental assumption in the MI calculation is the presence of a preexisting gas body. For tissues not known to contain preexisting gas bodies, based on theoretical predications and experimentally reported cavitation thresholds, we find this assumption to be invalid. We thus conclude that exceeding the recommended maximum MI level given in the FDA guidance could be warranted without concern for increased risk of cavitation in these tissues. However, there is limited literature assessing the potential clinical benefit of exceeding the MI guidelines in these tissues. The report proposes a 3-tiered approach for CIP that follows the model for employing elevated output in magnetic resonance imaging and concludes with summary recommendations to facilitate Institutional Review Board (IRB)-monitored clinical studies investigating CIP in specific tissues. PMID:26112617

  19. Low-frequency acoustic pressure, velocity, and intensity thresholds in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and white whale (Delphinapterus leucas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finneran, James J.; Carder, Donald A.; Ridgway, Sam H.

    2002-01-01

    The relative contributions of acoustic pressure and particle velocity to the low-frequency, underwater hearing abilities of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and white whale (Delphinapterus leucas) were investigated by measuring (masked) hearing thresholds while manipulating the relationship between the pressure and velocity. This was accomplished by varying the distance within the near field of a single underwater sound projector (experiment I) and using two underwater sound projectors and an active sound control system (experiment II). The results of experiment I showed no significant change in pressure thresholds as the distance between the subject and the sound source was changed. In contrast, velocity thresholds tended to increase and intensity thresholds tended to decrease as the source distance decreased. These data suggest that acoustic pressure is a better indicator of threshold, compared to particle velocity or mean active intensity, in the subjects tested. Interpretation of the results of experiment II (the active sound control system) was difficult because of complex acoustic conditions and the unknown effects of the subject on the generated acoustic field; however, these data also tend to support the results of experiment I and suggest that odontocete thresholds should be reported in units of acoustic pressure, rather than intensity.

  20. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  1. Acoustic diffraction effects at the Hellenistic amphitheater of Epidaurus: seat rows responsible for the marvelous acoustics.

    PubMed

    Declercq, Nico F; Dekeyser, Cindy S A

    2007-04-01

    The Hellenistic theater of Epidaurus, on the Peloponnese in Greece, attracts thousands of visitors every year who are all amazed by the fact that sound coming from the middle of the theater reaches the outer seats, apparently without too much loss of intensity. The theater, renowned for its extraordinary acoustics, is one of the best conserved of its kind in the world. It was used for musical and poetical contests and theatrical performances. The presented numerical study reveals that the seat rows of the theater, unexpectedly play an essential role in the acoustics--at least when the theater is not fully filled with spectators. The seats, which constitute a corrugated surface, serve as an acoustic filter that passes sound coming from the stage at the expense of surrounding acoustic noise. Whether a coincidence or not, the theater of Epidaurus was built with optimized shape and dimensions. Understanding and application of corrugated surfaces as filters rather than merely as diffuse scatterers of sound, may become imperative in the future design of modern theaters.

  2. PRSEUS Pressure Cube Test Data and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    NASA s Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program is examining the hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft, among others, in an effort to increase the fuel efficiency of commercial aircraft. The HWB design combines features of a flying wing with features of conventional transport aircraft, and has the advantage of simultaneously increasing both fuel efficiency and payload. Recent years have seen an increased focus on the structural performance of the HWB. The key structural challenge of a HWB airframe is the ability to create a cost and weight efficient, non-circular, pressurized shell. Conventional round fuselage sections react cabin pressure by hoop tension. However, the structural configuration of the HWB subjects the majority of the structural panels to bi-axial, in-plane loads in addition to the internal cabin pressure, which requires more thorough examination and analysis than conventional transport aircraft components having traditional and less complex load paths. To address this issue, while keeping structural weights low, extensive use of advanced composite materials is made. This report presents the test data and preliminary conclusions for a pressurized cube test article that utilizes Boeing's Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), and which is part of the building block approach used for HWB development.

  3. Indirect measurement of cylinder pressure from diesel engines using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ghamry, M.; Steel, J. A.; Reuben, R. L.; Fog, T. L.

    2005-07-01

    Indirect measurement of the cylinder pressure from diesel engines is possible using acoustic emission (AE). A method is demonstrated for a large two-stroke marine diesel engine and a small four-stroke diesel engine, which involves reconstructing the cylinder crank angle domain diagram from the AE generated during the combustion phase. Raw AE was used for modelling and reconstructing the pressure waveform in the time domain but this could not be used to model the pressure rise (compression). To overcome this problem the signal was divided into two sections representing the compression part of the signal and the fuel injection/expansion stroke. The compression part of the pressure signal was reconstructed by using polynomial fitting. An auto-regressive technique was used during the injection/expansion stroke. The rms AE signal is well correlated with the pressure signal in the time and frequency domain and complex cepstrum analysis was used to model the pressure signal for the complete combustion phase (compression, injection and expansion). The main advantage of using cepstral analysis is that the model uses the frequency content of the rms AE signal rather than the energy content of the rms AE signal, which gives an advantage when the signal has lower energy content, during the compression process. By calculating the engine running speed from the rms AE signal and selecting the proper cepstrum model correlated to the combustion rms AE energy content, an analytical algorithm was developed to give a wide range of applicability over the different conditions of engine speed, engine type and load. The pressure reconstructed from both AE and acceleration data are compared. AE has the advantage of a much higher signal-to-noise ratio and improved time resolution and is shown to be better than the acceleration.

  4. Response of cyanobacteria to low atmosphere pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lifeng; Ai, Weidang; Guo, Shuangsheng; Tang, Yongkang; Yu, Qingni; Shen, Yunze; Ren, Jin

    Maintaining a low pressure environment would reduce the technological complexity and constructed cost of future lunar base. To estimate the effect of hypobaric of controlled ecological life support system in lunar base on terrestrial life, cyanobacteria was used as the model to exam the response of growth, morphology, physiology to it. The decrease of atmosphere pressure from 100 KPa to 50 KPa reducing the growth rates of Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Anabaena Hos-aquae, the chlorophyll a content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp, Anabaena Hos-aquae, the carotenoid content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the phycocyanin content in Microcystis aeruginosa. This study explored the biological characteristics of the cyanobacteria under low pressure condition, which aimed at understanding the response of the earth's life to environment for the future moon base, the results enrich the research contents of the lunar biology and may be referred for the research of other terrestrial life, such as human, plant, microbe and animal living in life support system of lunar base.

  5. Laboratory calibration of the seismo-acoustic response of CO2 saturated sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siggins, A. F.; Lwin, M.; Wisman, P.

    2009-04-01

    Geological sequestration can be regarded as one of the promising mitigation strategies against the negative effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide on global climate change. Injection of CO2into depleted natural gas reservoirs in particular, sandstone formations at depth with suitable porosity and seals, seems to be a promising scenario for on-land storage. In fact, a demonstration project is currently underway in the Otway Basin in South Eastern Australia under the auspices of the Australian CO2CRC. One of the most useful geophysical remote sensing tools for monitoring sub surface CO2 injection is seismic imaging. Interpretation of seismic data for the quantitative measurement of the distribution and saturations of CO2 in the subsurface requires a knowledge of the effects of CO2as a pore fluid on the seismo-acoustic response of the reservoir rocks. This report describes some recent experiments that we have conducted to investigate this aspect under controlled laboratory conditions at pressures representative of in-situ reservoir conditions. Prior to the availability of core from the actual Otway injection site, two synthetic sandstones were tested ultrasonically in a computer controlled triaxial testing rig under a range of confining pressures and pore pressures representative of in-situ reservoir pressures. These sandstones comprised; (1) a synthetic material with calcite intergranular cement (CIPS) and (2), a synthetic sandstone with silica intergranular cement. Porosities of the sandstones were respectively, 32%,and 33%. Initial testing was carried on the cores at room temperature-dried condition with confining pressures up to 65MPa in steps of 5 MPa. Cores were then flooded with CO2, initially at 6MPa, 22 degrees C, then with liquid phase CO2at pressures from 7MPa to 17 MPa in steps of 5 MPa. Confining pressures varied from 10 MPa to 65 MPa. A limited number of experiments were also conducted in an additional rig at 50oC with supercritical phase CO2. Ultrasonic

  6. Tumour response and morphological changes of acoustic neurinomas after radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Valentino, V; Raimondi, A J

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-seven of the 1560 patients treated by radiosurgery during the period 1984-1993 had acoustic neurinomas. Four cases were excluded from this study because they had a follow-up of less than 2 years. There were 24 neurinomas treated in 23 patients as one patient had a bilateral tumour. Seven patients underwent radiosurgery for a recurrent tumour (already operated on once or twice), while it was the first treatment for 16 patients. The tumour volume ranged from 1.99 cm3 to 18.30 cm3, and the patient follow-up was from 2 to 8 years. To determine the target on CT/NMR for linear accelerator stereotactic irradiation, the Greitz-Bergström non-invasive head fixation device was used. It was again adopted for subsequent serial imaging, and for repeat radiosurgery when necessary. The total peripheral tumour dose ranged from 12 to 45 Gy. In 9 patients there was a reduction in tumour volume varying from 39 to 100%, while 14 of the neurinomas appeared stable after an average follow-up of 3 years. In one patient there was an increase in size of the tumour. Variable morphological changes were present in 66% of the neurinomas treated. Radiosurgery is indicated as an alternative to microsurgery for inoperable patients and for those who refuse surgery, for recurrent tumours, and as a post-operative complementary treatment for partially removed tumours. A gradual approach to radiosurgery, depending on tumour response, allows a greater efficacy with minimal risk. In the present series no complications were observed. Hearing was preserved at almost the same level as that prior to radiosurgery in all patients.

  7. Voice acoustic measures of depression severity and treatment response collected via interactive voice response (IVR) technology

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, James C.; Snyder, Peter J.; Cannizzaro, Michael S.; Chappie, Kara; Geralts, Dayna S.

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to develop more effective depression treatments are limited by assessment methods that rely on patient-reported or clinician judgments of symptom severity. Depression also affects speech. Research suggests several objective voice acoustic measures affected by depression can be obtained reliably over the telephone. Thirty-five physician-referred patients beginning treatment for depression were assessed weekly, using standard depression severity measures, during a six-week observational study. Speech samples were also obtained over the telephone each week using an IVR system to automate data collection. Several voice acoustic measures correlated significantly with depression severity. Patients responding to treatment had significantly greater pitch variability, paused less while speaking, and spoke faster than at baseline. Patients not responding to treatment did not show similar changes. Telephone standardization for obtaining voice data was identified as a critical factor influencing the reliability and quality of speech data. This study replicates and extends previous research with a larger sample of patients assessing clinical change associated with treatment. The feasibility of obtaining voice acoustic measures reflecting depression severity and response to treatment using computer-automated telephone data collection techniques is also established. Insight and guidance for future research needs are also identified. PMID:21253440

  8. Fluid displacement fronts in porous media: pore scale interfacial jumps, pressure bursts and acoustic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Franziska; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    The macroscopically smooth and regular motion of fluid fronts in porous media is composed of numerous rapid pore-scale interfacial jumps and pressure bursts that involve intense interfacial energy release in the form of acoustic emissions. The characteristics of these pore scale events affect residual phase entrapment and transport properties behind the front. We present experimental studies using acoustic emission technique (AE), rapid imaging, and liquid pressure measurements to characterize these processes during drainage and imbibition in simple porous media. Imbibition and drainage produce different AE signatures (AE amplitudes obey a power law). For rapid drainage, AE signals persist long after cessation of front motion reflecting fluid redistribution and interfacial relaxation. Imaging revealed that the velocity of interfacial jumps often exceeds front velocity by more than 50 fold and is highly inertial component (Re>1000). Pore invasion volumes reduced deduced from pressure fluctuations waiting times (for constant withdrawal rates) show remarkable agreement with geometrically-deduced pore volumes. Discrepancies between invaded volumes and geometrical pores increase with increasing capillary numbers due to constraints on evacuation opportunity times and simultaneous invasion events. A mechanistic model for interfacial motions in a pore-throat network was developed to investigate interfacial dynamics focusing on the role of inertia. Results suggest that while pore scale dynamics were sensitive to variations in pore geometry and boundary conditions, inertia exerted only a minor effect on phase entrapment. The study on pore scale invasion events paints a complex picture of rapid and inertial motions and provides new insights on mechanisms at displacement fronts that are essential for improved macroscopic description of multiphase flows in porous media.

  9. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  10. Influences of non-uniform pressure field outside bubbles on the propagation of acoustic waves in dilute bubbly liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuning; Du, Xiaoze

    2015-09-01

    Predictions of the propagation of the acoustic waves in bubbly liquids is of great importance for bubble dynamics and related applications (e.g. sonochemistry, sonochemical reactor design, biomedical engineering). In the present paper, an approach for modeling the propagation of the acoustic waves in dilute bubbly liquids is proposed through considering the non-uniform pressure field outside the bubbles. This approach is validated through comparing with available experimental data in the literature. Comparing with the previous models, our approach mainly improves the predictions of the attenuation of acoustic waves in the regions with large kR0 (k is the wave number and R0 is the equilibrium bubble radius). Stability of the oscillating bubbles under acoustic excitation are also quantitatively discussed based on the analytical solution.

  11. Saturation diving with heliox to 350 meters. Observation on hearing threshold, brainstem evoked response and acoustic impedance.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Jiang, W; Gong, J H; Zheng, X Y

    1994-12-01

    Four divers were compressed to 350 m to observe changes in hearing threshold, brainstem evoked response and acoustic impedance. The divers experienced no tinnitus, impairment of hearing, earache during compression. Examination showed that the threshold of lower frequency range of hearing was elevated because of the masking effect of the noise in the hyperbaric chamber. Changes in waveform and latency of brainstem evoked response were due to changes in sound wave transmission affected by the chamber pressure and a poor ratio of signal to noise in the hyperbaric environment with heliox. All these changes were transient. After leaving the chamber, the hearing threshold and brainstem evoked response returned to normal. Besides, there were no changes in tympanogram, acoustic compliance and stapedius reflex before and after diving. This indicated the designed speed of compression and decompression in the experiment caused no damage to the divers' acoustic system, and the functions of their Eustachain tubes, middle and inner ears were normal during the diving test. PMID:7882734

  12. A Fabry-Perot fiber-optic ultrasonic hydrophone for the simultaneous measurement of temperature and acoustic pressure.

    PubMed

    Morris, Paul; Hurrell, Andrew; Shaw, Adam; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul

    2009-06-01

    A dual sensing fiber-optic hydrophone that can make simultaneous measurements of acoustic pressure and temperature at the same location has been developed for characterizing ultrasound fields and ultrasound-induced heating. The transduction mechanism is based on the detection of acoustically- and thermally-induced thickness changes in a polymer film Fabry-Perot interferometer deposited at the tip of a single mode optical fiber. The sensor provides a peak noise-equivalent pressure of 15 kPa (at 5 MHz, over a 20 MHz measurement bandwidth), an acoustic bandwidth of 50 MHz, and an optically defined element size of 10 microm. As well as measuring acoustic pressure, temperature changes up to 70 degrees C can be measured, with a resolution of 0.34 degrees C. To evaluate the thermal measurement capability of the sensor, measurements were made at the focus of a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) field in a tissue mimicking phantom. These showed that the sensor is not susceptible to viscous heating, is able to withstand high intensity fields, and can simultaneously acquire acoustic waveforms while monitoring induced temperature rises. These attributes, along with flexibility, small physical size (OD approximately 150 microm), immunity to Electro-Magnetic Interference (EMI), and low sensor cost, suggest that this type of hydrophone may provide a practical alternative to piezoelectric based hydrophones. PMID:19507943

  13. A Correlated Study of the Response of a Satellite to Acoustic Radiation Using Statistical Energy Analysis and Acoustic Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    CAP,JEROME S.; TRACEY,BRIAN

    1999-11-15

    Aerospace payloads, such as satellites, are subjected to vibroacoustic excitation during launch. Sandia's MTI satellite has recently been certified to this environment using a combination of base input random vibration and reverberant acoustic noise. The initial choices for the acoustic and random vibration test specifications were obtained from the launch vehicle Interface Control Document (ICD). In order to tailor the random vibration levels for the laboratory certification testing, it was necessary to determine whether vibration energy was flowing across the launch vehicle interface from the satellite to the launch vehicle or the other direction. For frequencies below 120 Hz this issue was addressed using response limiting techniques based on results from the Coupled Loads Analysis (CLA). However, since the CLA Finite Element Analysis FEA model was only correlated for frequencies below 120 Hz, Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) was considered to be a better choice for predicting the direction of the energy flow for frequencies above 120 Hz. The existing SEA model of the launch vehicle had been developed using the VibroAcoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) computer code [1]. Therefore, the satellite would have to be modeled using VAPEPS as well. As is the case for any computational model, the confidence in its predictive capability increases if one can correlate a sample prediction against experimental data. Fortunately, Sandia had the ideal data set for correlating an SEA model of the MTI satellite--the measured response of a realistic assembly to a reverberant acoustic test that was performed during MTI's qualification test series. The first part of this paper will briefly describe the VAPEPS modeling effort and present the results of the correlation study for the VAPEPS model. The second part of this paper will present the results from a study that used a commercial SEA software package [2] to study the effects of in-plane modes and to

  14. Stabilization and Low-Frequency Oscillation of Capillary Bridges with Modulated Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Marr-Lyon, Mark J.; Morse, S. F.; Thiessen, David B.

    1996-01-01

    In the work reported here it is demonstrated that acoustic radiation pressure may be used in simulated low gravity to produce stable bridges significantly beyond the Rayleigh limit with S as large as 3.6. The bridge (PDMS mixed with a dense liquid) has the same density as the surrounding water bath containing an ultrasonic standing wave. Modulation was first used to excite specific bridge modes. In the most recent work reported here the shape of the bridge is optically sensed and the ultrasonic drive is electronically adjusted such that the radiation stress distribution dynamically quenches the most unstable mode. This active control simulates passive stabilization suggested for low gravity. Feedback increases the mode frequency in the naturally stable region since the effective stiffness of the mode is increased.

  15. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization via VUV-Generating Microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benham, Kevin; Hodyss, Robert; Fernández, Facundo M.; Orlando, Thomas M.

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate the first application of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) as a mass spectrometric method for detecting low-polarity organics. This was accomplished using a Lyman-α (10.2 eV) photon generating microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) microplasma photon source in conjunction with the addition of a gas-phase molecular dopant. This combination provided a soft desorption and a relatively soft ionization technique. Selected compounds analyzed include α-tocopherol, perylene, cholesterol, phenanthrene, phylloquinone, and squalene. Detectable surface concentrations as low as a few pmol per spot sampled were achievable using test molecules. The combination of LIAD and APPI provided a soft desorption and ionization technique that can allow detection of labile, low-polarity, structurally complex molecules over a wide mass range with minimal fragmentation.

  16. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization via VUV-Generating Microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benham, Kevin; Hodyss, Robert; Fernández, Facundo M.; Orlando, Thomas M.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the first application of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) as a mass spectrometric method for detecting low-polarity organics. This was accomplished using a Lyman-α (10.2 eV) photon generating microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) microplasma photon source in conjunction with the addition of a gas-phase molecular dopant. This combination provided a soft desorption and a relatively soft ionization technique. Selected compounds analyzed include α-tocopherol, perylene, cholesterol, phenanthrene, phylloquinone, and squalene. Detectable surface concentrations as low as a few pmol per spot sampled were achievable using test molecules. The combination of LIAD and APPI provided a soft desorption and ionization technique that can allow detection of labile, low-polarity, structurally complex molecules over a wide mass range with minimal fragmentation.

  17. Quantitative measurement of ultrasound pressure field by optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Seiji; Yasuda, Jun; Hanayama, Hiroki; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    A fast and accurate measurement of an ultrasound field with various exposure sequences is necessary to ensure the efficacy and safety of various ultrasound applications in medicine. The most common method used to measure an ultrasound pressure field, that is, hydrophone scanning, requires a long scanning time and potentially disturbs the field. This may limit the efficiency of developing applications of ultrasound. In this study, an optical phase contrast method enabling fast and noninterfering measurements is proposed. In this method, the modulated phase of light caused by the focused ultrasound pressure field is measured. Then, a computed tomography (CT) algorithm used to quantitatively reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) pressure field is applied. For a high-intensity focused ultrasound field, a new approach that combines the optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography was attempted. First, the optical measurement of focused ultrasound was rapidly performed over the field near a transducer. Second, the nonlinear propagation of the measured ultrasound was simulated. The result of the new approach agreed well with that of the measurement using a hydrophone and was improved from that of the phase contrast method alone with phase unwrapping.

  18. Pressure transfer function of a JT15D nozzle due to acoustic and convected entropy fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, J. H.

    An acoustic transmission matrix analysis of sound propagation in a variable area duct with and without flow is extended to include convected entropy fluctuations. The boundary conditions used in the analysis are a transfer function relating entropy and pressure at the nozzle inlet and the nozzle exit impedance. The nozzle pressure transfer function calculated is compared with JT15D turbofan engine nozzle data. The one dimensional theory for sound propagation in a variable area nozzle with flow but without convected entropy is good at the low engine speeds where the nozzle exit Mach number is low (M=0.2) and the duct exit impedance model is good. The effect of convected entropy appears to be so negligible that it is obscured by the inaccuracy of the nozzle exit impedance model, the lack of information on the magnitude of the convected entropy and its phase relationship with the pressure, and the scatter in the data. An improved duct exit impedance model is required at the higher engine speeds where the nozzle exit Mach number is high (M=0.56) and at low frequencies (below 120 Hz).

  19. Extension of the angular spectrum method to calculate pressure from a spherically curved acoustic source.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Urvi; Christensen, Douglas A

    2011-11-01

    The angular spectrum method is an accurate and computationally efficient method for modeling acoustic wave propagation. The use of the typical 2D fast Fourier transform algorithm makes this a fast technique but it requires that the source pressure (or velocity) be specified on a plane. Here the angular spectrum method is extended to calculate pressure from a spherical transducer-as used extensively in applications such as magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery-to a plane. The approach, called the Ring-Bessel technique, decomposes the curved source into circular rings of increasing radii, each ring a different distance from the intermediate plane, and calculates the angular spectrum of each ring using a Fourier series. Each angular spectrum is then propagated to the intermediate plane where all the propagated angular spectra are summed to obtain the pressure on the plane; subsequent plane-to-plane propagation can be achieved using the traditional angular spectrum method. Since the Ring-Bessel calculations are carried out in the frequency domain, it reduces calculation times by a factor of approximately 24 compared to the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld method and about 82 compared to the Field II technique, while maintaining accuracies of better than 96% as judged by those methods for cases of both solid and phased-array transducers.

  20. Acoustic scattering by circular cylinders of various aspect ratios. [pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maciulaitis, A.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of acoustic scattering on the useful frequency range of pressure gradient microphones were investigated experimentally between ka values of 0.407 and 4.232 using two circular cylindrical models (L/D = 0.5 and 0.25) having a 25 cm outside diameter. Small condenser microphones, attached to preamplifiers by flexible connectors, were installed from inside the cylindrical bodies, and flush mounted on the exterior surface of the cylinders. A 38 cm diameter woofer in a large speaker enclosure was used as the sound source. Surface pressure augmentation and phase differences were computed from measured data for various sound wave incidence angles. Results are graphically compared with theoretical predictions supplied by NASA for ka = 0.407, 2.288, and 4.232. All other results are tabulated in the appendices. With minor exceptions, the experimentally determined pressure augmentations agreed within 0.75 dB with theoretical predictions. The agreement for relative phase angles was within 5 percent without any exceptions. Scattering parameter variations with ka and L/D ratio, as computed from experimental data, are also presented.

  1. Pressure transfer function of a JT15D nozzle due to acoustic and convected entropy fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic transmission matrix analysis of sound propagation in a variable area duct with and without flow is extended to include convected entropy fluctuations. The boundary conditions used in the analysis are a transfer function relating entropy and pressure at the nozzle inlet and the nozzle exit impedance. The nozzle pressure transfer function calculated is compared with JT15D turbofan engine nozzle data. The one dimensional theory for sound propagation in a variable area nozzle with flow but without convected entropy is good at the low engine speeds where the nozzle exit Mach number is low (M=0.2) and the duct exit impedance model is good. The effect of convected entropy appears to be so negligible that it is obscured by the inaccuracy of the nozzle exit impedance model, the lack of information on the magnitude of the convected entropy and its phase relationship with the pressure, and the scatter in the data. An improved duct exit impedance model is required at the higher engine speeds where the nozzle exit Mach number is high (M=0.56) and at low frequencies (below 120 Hz).

  2. Experimental feasibility of investigating acoustic waves in Couette flow with entropy and pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Zorumski, William E.; Rawls, John W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility is discussed for an experimental program for studying the behavior of acoustic wave propagation in the presence of strong gradients of pressure, temperature, and flow. Theory suggests that gradients effects can be experimentally observed as resonant frequency shifts and mode shape changes in a waveguide. A convenient experimental geometry for such experiments is the annular region between two co-rotating cylinders. Radial temperature gradients in a spinning annulus can be generated by differentially heating the two cylinders via electromagnetic induction. Radial pressure gradients can be controlled by varying the cylinder spin rates. Present technology appears adequate to construct an apparatus to allow independent control of temperature and pressure gradients. A complicating feature of a more advanced experiment, involving flow gradients, is the requirement for independently controlled cylinder spin rates. Also, the boundary condition at annulus terminations must be such that flow gradients are minimally disturbed. The design and construction of an advanced apparatus to include flow gradients will require additional technology development.

  3. Ambient pressure laser desorption and laser-induced acoustic desorption ion mobility spectrometry detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Sven; Walte, Andreas; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-11-19

    The development of fast, mobile, and sensitive detection systems for security-relevant substances is of enormous importance. Because of the low vapor pressures of explosives and improvised explosive devices, adequate sampling procedures are crucial. Ion mobility spectrometers (IMSs) are fast and sensitive instruments that are used as detection systems for explosives. Ambient pressure laser desorption (APLD) and ambient pressure laser-induced acoustic desorption (AP-LIAD) are new tools suitable to evaporate explosives in order to detect them in the vapor phase. Indeed, the most important advantage of APLD or AP-LIAD is the capability to sample directly from the surface of interest without any transfer of the analyte to other surfaces such as wipe pads. A much more gentle desorption, compared to classical thermal-based desorption, is possible with laser-based desorption using very short laser pulses. With this approach the analyte molecules are evaporated in a very fast process, comparable to a shock wave. The thermal intake is reduced considerably. The functionality of APLD and AP-LIAD techniques combined with a hand-held IMS system is shown for a wide range of common explosives such as EGDN (ethylene glycol dinitrate), urea nitrate, PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate), HMTD (hexamethylene triperoxide diamine), RDX (hexogen), tetryl (2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine), and TNT (trinitrotoluene). Detection limits down to the low nanogram range are obtained. The successful combination of IMS detection and APLD/AP-LIAD sampling is shown.

  4. Second harmonic acoustic responses induced in matter by quasi continuous radiofrequency fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellnberger, Stephan; Omar, Murad; Sergiadis, George; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2013-10-01

    We subjected conductive matter and tissue to intermittent continuous-wave radiofrequency fields and investigated whether acoustic responses could be recorded. By placing samples in the near-field of the excitation, we observed frequency-domain acoustic responses from tissues responding to CW radiofrequency excitation. Frequency analysis revealed the generation of 2nd harmonic mechanical waves. This discovery of non-linear responses can lead to alternative measurement concepts of CW radiofrequency deposition in matter and tissues. We offer the theoretical mainframe and discuss sensing applications involving the direct measurement of second harmonic responses representative of CW RF energy deposition in matter.

  5. Laser-Doppler acoustic probing of granular media with in-depth property gradient and varying pore pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bodet, L.; Dhemaied, A.; Mourgues, R.; Tournat, V.; Rejiba, F.

    2012-05-24

    Non-contacting ultrasonic techniques recently proved to be efficient in the physical modeling of seismic-wave propagation at various application scales, as for instance in the context of geological analogue and seismic modeling. An innovative experimental set-up is proposed here to perform laser-Doppler acoustic probing of unconsolidated granular media with varying pore pressures. The preliminary experiments presented here provide reproducible results and exploitable data, thus validating both the proposed medium preparation and pressure gradient generation procedure.

  6. Receptor potentials of lizard hair cells with free-standing stereocilia: responses to acoustic clicks.

    PubMed Central

    Baden-Kristensen, K; Weiss, T F

    1983-01-01

    Receptor potentials of single hair cells in the free-standing region of the basilar papilla of the anaesthetized alligator lizard were measured intracellularly with micropipettes. Stimuli were primarily acoustic pulses (clicks) delivered to the tympanic membrane. The receptor potential was independent of click repetition rate for the range 10-150 clicks/s. This property is presumed to be the basis of the rate independence of the extracellular cochlear microphonic potential. The receptor potential wave-form consisted of a fast oscillatory component (or oscillation) superimposed on a usually positive (depolarizing) slow component. Reversal of the stimulus polarity resulted in a reversal of the polarity of the oscillations; the polarity of the slow component remained unchanged. The relative magnitudes of the two components depended on click level. At the higher click levels the magnitudes of the slow and oscillatory components were comparable. The relation of the receptor potential to the stimulus was non-linear; the peak-to-peak magnitude of the receptor potential increased less than proportionately with increasing sound-pressure level, and reversal of the stimulus polarity did not result in a reversal of the receptor potential. The receptor-potential magnitude for high-level clicks ranged from 1-13 mV peak-to-peak with an average value of 3.5 mV. At the lower click levels the magnitude of the slow component was much smaller than that of the oscillatory component. The relation of the receptor potential to the acoustic stimulus approached that of a linear system, the magnitude of the receptor potential became approximately proportional to the sound-pressure level, and reversal of the stimulus polarity resulted in approximate reversal of the receptor potential. For low-level stimuli the frequency of the oscillations of the receptor potential in response to clicks was approximately equal to the frequency of maximal a.c. response to tones. Apparently, both phenomena

  7. Acoustics of fish shelters: frequency response and gain properties.

    PubMed

    Lugli, Marco

    2012-11-01

    Many teleosts emit sounds from cavities beneath stones and other types of submerged objects, yet the acoustical properties of fish shelters are virtually unexplored. This study examines the gain properties of shelters commonly used by Mediterranean gobies as hiding places and/or nest sites in the field (flat stones, shells belonging to five bivalve species), or within aquarium tanks (tunnel-shaped plastic covers, concrete blocks, concrete cylinder pipe, halves of terracotta flower pots). All shelters were acoustically stimulated using a small underwater buzzer, placed inside or around the shelter to mimic a fish calling from the nest site, and different types of driving stimuli (white noise, pure tones, and artificial pulse trains). Results showed the presence of significant amplitude gain (3-18 dB) at frequencies in the range 100-150 Hz in all types of natural shelters but one (Mytilus), terracotta flower pots, and concrete blocks. Gain was higher for stones and artificial shelters than for shells. Gain peak amplitude increased with the weight of stones and shells. Conclusions were verified by performing analogous acoustical tests on flat stones in the stream. Results draw attention to the use of suitable shelters for proper recording of sounds produced by fishes kept within laboratory aquaria.

  8. Vibro-acoustic response and sound transmission loss analysis of functionally graded plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, N.; Raja, S.; Nagendra Gopal, K. V.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents analytical studies on the vibro-acoustic and sound transmission loss characteristics of functionally graded material (FGM) plates using a simple first-order shear deformation theory. The material properties of the plate are assumed to vary according to power law distribution of the constituent materials in terms of volume fraction. The sound radiation due to sinusoidally varying point load, uniformly distributed load and obliquely incident sound wave is computed by solving the Rayleigh integral with a primitive numerical scheme. Displacement, velocity, acceleration, radiated sound power level, radiated sound pressure level and radiation efficiency of FGM plate for varying power law index are examined. The sound transmission loss of the FGM plate for several incidence angles and varying power law index is studied in detail. It has been found that, for the plate being considered, the sound power level increases monotonically with increase in power law index at lower frequency range (0-500 Hz) and a non-monotonic trend is appeared towards higher frequencies for both point and distributed force excitations. Increased vibration and acoustic response is observed for ceramic-rich FGM plate at higher frequency band; whereas a similar trend is seen for metal-rich FGM plate at lower frequency band. The dBA values are found to be decreasing with increase in power law index. The radiation efficiency of ceramic-rich FGM plate is noticed to be higher than that of metal and metal-rich FGM plates. The transmission loss below the first resonance frequency is high for ceramic-rich FGM plate and low for metal-rich FGM plate and further depends on the specific material property. The study has found that increased transmission loss can be achieved at higher frequencies with metal-rich FGM plates.

  9. Acoustic receptivity due to weak surface inhomogeneities in adverse pressure gradient boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Ng, Lian; Streett, Craig

    1995-01-01

    The boundary layer receptivity to free-stream acoustic waves in the presence of localized surface disturbances is studied for the case of incompressible Falkner-Skan flows with adverse pressure gradients. These boundary layers are unstable to both viscous and inviscid (i.e., inflectional) modes, and the finite Reynolds number extension of the Goldstein-Ruban theory provides a convenient method to compare the efficiency of the localized receptivity processes in these two cases. The value of the efficiency function related to the receptivity caused by localized distortions in surface geometry is relatively insensitive to the type of instability mechanism, provided that the same reference length scale is used to normalize the efficiency function for each type of instability. In contrast, when the receptivity is induced by variations in wall suction velocity or in wall admittance distribution, the magnitudes of the related efficiency functions, as well as the resulting coupling coefficients, are smaller for inflectional (i.e., Rayleigh) modes than for the viscous Tollmien-Schlichting waves. The reduced levels of receptivity can be attributed mainly to the shorter wavelengths and higher frequencies of the inflectional modes. Because the most critical band of frequencies shifts toward higher values, the overall efficiency of the wall suction- and the wall admittance-induced receptivity decreases with an increase in the adverse pressure gradient.

  10. Acoustic controlled rotation and orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Allen, James L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic energy is applied to a pair of locations spaced about a chamber, to control rotation of an object levitated in the chamber. Two acoustic transducers applying energy of a single acoustic mode, one at each location, can (one or both) serve to levitate the object in three dimensions as well as control its rotation. Slow rotation is achieved by initially establishing a large phase difference and/or pressure ratio of the acoustic waves, which is sufficient to turn the object by more than 45 deg, which is immediately followed by reducing the phase difference and/or pressure ratio to maintain slow rotation. A small phase difference and/or pressure ratio enables control of the angular orientation of the object without rotating it. The sphericity of an object can be measured by its response to the acoustic energy.

  11. Development of an accelerometer-based underwater acoustic intensity sensor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang; Gabrielson, Thomas B; Lauchle, Gerald C

    2004-12-01

    An underwater acoustic intensity sensor is described. This sensor derives acoustic intensity from simultaneous, co-located measurement of the acoustic pressure and one component of the acoustic particle acceleration vector. The sensor consists of a pressure transducer in the form of a hollow piezoceramic cylinder and a pair of miniature accelerometers mounted inside the cylinder. Since this sensor derives acoustic intensity from measurement of acoustic pressure and acoustic particle acceleration, it is called a p-a intensity probe. The sensor is ballasted to be nearly neutrally buoyant. It is desirable for the accelerometers to measure only the rigid body motion of the assembled probe and for the effective centers of the pressure sensor and accelerometer to be coincident. This is achieved by symmetric disposition of a pair of accelerometers inside the ceramic cylinder. The response of the intensity probe is determined by comparison with a reference hydrophone in a predominantly reactive acoustic field.

  12. Theory and modeling of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Lihong; Lim, C. W.; Zhao, Xiushao; Geng, Daxing

    2016-06-01

    Models both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed and the corresponding acoustic pressure solutions are obtained. The acoustic pressure for an individual carbon nanotube (CNT) as a function of input power is investigated analytically and it is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. Further numerical analysis on the acoustic pressure response and characteristics for varying input frequency and distance are also examined both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions. Through detailed theoretical and numerical studies on the acoustic pressure solution for thinfilm-solid cylindrical transduction, it is concluded that a solid with smaller thermal conductivity favors to improve the acoustic performance. In general, the proposed models are applicable to a variety of cylindrical thermo-acoustic devices performing in different gaseous media.

  13. Characterizing Response to Elemental Unit of Acoustic Imaging Noise: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Luh, Wen-Ming; Talavage, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic imaging noise produced during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies can hinder auditory fMRI research analysis by altering the properties of the acquired time-series data. Acoustic imaging noise can be especially confounding when estimating the time course of the hemodynamic response (HDR) in auditory event-related fMRI (fMRI) experiments. This study is motivated by the desire to establish a baseline function that can serve not only as a comparison to other quantities of acoustic imaging noise for determining how detrimental is one's experimental noise, but also as a foundation for a model that compensates for the response to acoustic imaging noise. Therefore, the amplitude and spatial extent of the HDR to the elemental unit of acoustic imaging noise (i.e., a single ping) associated with echoplanar acquisition were characterized and modeled. Results from this fMRI study at 1.5 T indicate that the group-averaged HDR in left and right auditory cortex to acoustic imaging noise (duration of 46 ms) has an estimated peak magnitude of 0.29% (right) to 0.48% (left) signal change from baseline, peaks between 3 and 5 s after stimulus presentation, and returns to baseline and remains within the noise range approximately 8 s after stimulus presentation. PMID:19304477

  14. Numerical investigation of amplitude-dependent dynamic response in acoustic metamaterials with nonlinear oscillators.

    PubMed

    Manimala, James M; Sun, C T

    2016-06-01

    The amplitude-dependent dynamic response in acoustic metamaterials having nonlinear local oscillator microstructures is studied using numerical simulations on representative discrete mass-spring models. Both cubically nonlinear hardening and softening local oscillator cases are considered. Single frequency, bi-frequency, and wave packet excitations at low and high amplitude levels were used to interrogate the models. The propagation and attenuation characteristics of harmonic waves in a tunable frequency range is found to correspond to the amplitude and nonlinearity-dependent shifts in the local resonance bandgap for such nonlinear acoustic metamaterials. A predominant shift in the propagated wave spectrum towards lower frequencies is observed. Moreover, the feasibility of amplitude and frequency-dependent selective filtering of composite signals consisting of individual frequency components which fall within propagating or attenuating regimes is demonstrated. Further enrichment of these wave manipulation mechanisms in acoustic metamaterials using different combinations of nonlinear microstructures presents device implications for acoustic filters and waveguides.

  15. Tropospheric Response to Modulational Excitation of Dust Acoustic Perturbartions in Earth's Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopnin, S. I.; Popel, S. I.; Yu, M. Y.

    2011-11-01

    It is shown that, during Perseid, Geminid, Orionid, and Leonid meteor showers, the excitation of low-frequency dust acoustic perturbations by modulational instability in the Earth's ionosphere can lead to the generation of infrasonic waves. The processes accompanying the propagation of these waves in Earth's troposphere are considered, and the possibility of observing the waves from the Earth's surface is discussed, as well as the possible onset of acoustic gravitational vortex structures in the region of dust acoustic perturbations. The generation of such structures during Perseid, Geminid, Orionid, and Leonid meteor showers can show up as an increase in the intensity of green nightglow by an amount on the order of 10% and can be attributed to the formation of nonlinear (vortex) structures at altitudes of 110-120 km. Thus the modulational excitation of the dust acoustic perturbations in the ionosphere has tropospherical response: it influences physical processes and observations in Earth's troposphere.

  16. Numerical investigation of amplitude-dependent dynamic response in acoustic metamaterials with nonlinear oscillators.

    PubMed

    Manimala, James M; Sun, C T

    2016-06-01

    The amplitude-dependent dynamic response in acoustic metamaterials having nonlinear local oscillator microstructures is studied using numerical simulations on representative discrete mass-spring models. Both cubically nonlinear hardening and softening local oscillator cases are considered. Single frequency, bi-frequency, and wave packet excitations at low and high amplitude levels were used to interrogate the models. The propagation and attenuation characteristics of harmonic waves in a tunable frequency range is found to correspond to the amplitude and nonlinearity-dependent shifts in the local resonance bandgap for such nonlinear acoustic metamaterials. A predominant shift in the propagated wave spectrum towards lower frequencies is observed. Moreover, the feasibility of amplitude and frequency-dependent selective filtering of composite signals consisting of individual frequency components which fall within propagating or attenuating regimes is demonstrated. Further enrichment of these wave manipulation mechanisms in acoustic metamaterials using different combinations of nonlinear microstructures presents device implications for acoustic filters and waveguides. PMID:27369163

  17. Towards a reference cavitating vessel Part III—design and acoustic pressure characterization of a multi-frequency sonoreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lian; Memoli, Gianluca; Hodnett, Mark; Butterworth, Ian; Sarno, Dan; Zeqiri, Bajram

    2015-08-01

    A multi-frequency cavitation vessel (RV-multi) has been commissioned at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL, UK), with the aim of establishing a standard source of acoustic cavitation in water, with reference to which details of the cavitation process can be studied and cavitation measurement techniques evaluated. The vessel is a cylindrical cavity with a maximum capacity up to 17 L, and is designed to work at six frequency ranges, from 21 kHz to 136 kHz, under controlled temperature conditions. This paper discusses the design of RV-multi and reports experiments carried out to establish the reproducibility of the acoustic pressure field established within the vessel and its operating envelope, including sensitivity to aspects such as water depth and temperature. The acoustic field distribution was determined along the radial and depth directions within the vessel using a miniature hydrophone, for two input voltage levels under low power transducer excitation conditions (e.g. below the cavitation threshold). Particular care was taken in determining peak acoustic pressure locations, as these are critical for accompanying cavitation studies. Perturbations of the vessel by the measuring hydrophone were also monitored with a bottom-mounted pressure sensor.

  18. Ultrasound and microbubble mediated drug delivery: acoustic pressure as determinant for uptake via membrane pores or endocytosis.

    PubMed

    De Cock, Ine; Zagato, Elisa; Braeckmans, Kevin; Luan, Ying; de Jong, Nico; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Lentacker, Ine

    2015-01-10

    Although promising results are achieved in ultrasound mediated drug delivery, its underlying biophysical mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Pore formation as well as endocytosis has been reported during ultrasound application. Due to the plethora of ultrasound settings used in literature, it is extremely difficult to draw conclusions on which mechanism is actually involved. To our knowledge, we are the first to show that acoustic pressure influences which route of drug uptake is addressed, by inducing different microbubble-cell interactions. To investigate this, FITC-dextrans were used as model drugs and their uptake was analyzed by flow cytometry. In fluorescence intensity plots, two subpopulations arose in cells with FITC-dextran uptake after ultrasound application, corresponding to cells having either low or high uptake. Following separation of the subpopulations by FACS sorting, confocal images indicated that the low uptake population showed endocytic uptake. The high uptake population represented uptake via pores. Moreover, the distribution of the subpopulations shifted to the high uptake population with increasing acoustic pressure. Real-time confocal recordings during ultrasound revealed that membrane deformation by microbubbles may be the trigger for endocytosis via mechanostimulation of the cytoskeleton. Pore formation was shown to be caused by microbubbles propelled towards the cell. These results provide a better insight in the role of acoustic pressure in microbubble-cell interactions and the possible consequences for drug uptake. In addition, it pinpoints the need for a more rational, microbubble behavior based choice of acoustic parameters in ultrasound mediated drug delivery experiments.

  19. Dynamic response of CFRP plates under the action of random acoustic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. G.; Mousley, R. F.

    Acoustic fatigue design procedures for metallic, stiffened skin, and plate-type structures have been well established and validated in the past for aircraft structures. The advent of CFRP and its use in aircraft has necessitated reappraisal of dynamic design techniques. Experimental and theoretical studies of CFRP plates under the action of random acoustic loading are discussed. Attention is given to the nature and levels of the dynamic strains induced in terms of statistical properties and relative modal contributions, the latter being important in consideration of using simple single mode formulas for dynamic response prediction. The effects of high levels of excitation, up to 160 dB, which can produce nonlinear responses are discussed. The case of forced response of plates under the action of combined static in-plane compressive loading and acoustic excitation is also considered.

  20. Magnetically Responsive Negative Acoustic Contrast Microparticles for Bioanalytical Applications.

    PubMed

    Ohiri, Korine A; Evans, Benjamin A; Shields, C Wyatt; Gutiérrez, Robert A; Carroll, Nick J; Yellen, Benjamin B; López, Gabriel P

    2016-09-28

    Smart colloidal particles are routinely used as carriers for biological molecules, fluorescent reporters, cells, and other analytes for the purposes of sample preparation and detection. However, such particles are typically engineered to respond to a single type of stimulus (e.g., commercial magnetic beads to magnetic fields). Here, we demonstrate a unique class of particles that display both positive magnetic contrast and negative acoustic contrast in water. This dual functionality allows for fine spatiotemporal control, enabling multiple separation modalities and increasing the utility of the particles in various chemical and biological assays.

  1. Magnetically Responsive Negative Acoustic Contrast Microparticles for Bioanalytical Applications.

    PubMed

    Ohiri, Korine A; Evans, Benjamin A; Shields, C Wyatt; Gutiérrez, Robert A; Carroll, Nick J; Yellen, Benjamin B; López, Gabriel P

    2016-09-28

    Smart colloidal particles are routinely used as carriers for biological molecules, fluorescent reporters, cells, and other analytes for the purposes of sample preparation and detection. However, such particles are typically engineered to respond to a single type of stimulus (e.g., commercial magnetic beads to magnetic fields). Here, we demonstrate a unique class of particles that display both positive magnetic contrast and negative acoustic contrast in water. This dual functionality allows for fine spatiotemporal control, enabling multiple separation modalities and increasing the utility of the particles in various chemical and biological assays. PMID:27622731

  2. Comparison of structural response and fatigue endurance of aircraft flap-like box structures subjected to acoustic loading.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; White, R G; Aglietti, G S

    2005-05-01

    The results of an extensive test program to characterize the behavior of typical aircraft structures under acoustic loading and to establish their fatigue endurance are presented. The structures tested were the three flap-like box-type of structures. Each structure consisted of one flat (bottom) and one curved (top) stiffener stiffened skin panel, front, and rear spars, and ribs that divided the structures into three bays. The three structures, constructed from three different materials (aircraft standard aluminum alloy, Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic, and a Glass Fibre Metal Laminate, i.e., GLARE) had the same size and configuration, with only minor differences due to the use of different materials. A first set of acoustic tests with excitations of intensity ranging from 140 to 160 dB were carried out to obtain detailed data on the dynamic response of the three structures. The FE analysis of the structures is also briefly described and the results compared with the experimental data. The fatigue endurance of the structures was then determined using random acoustic excitation with an overall sound pressure level of 161 dB, and details of crack propagation are reported.

  3. Analysis of the acoustic response in water and sand of different fiber optic sensing cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Joachim; Facchini, Massimo; Lowell, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) is a highly promising technology to efficiently monitor assets for energy production and transportation, both off- and on-shore, such as boreholes, pipelines and risers. The aim of the hereby-presented measurements is to evaluate the sensitivity of the different optical fiber cables to acoustic signals in sand and water, independently from the DAS read-out unit type and manufacturer. Acoustic sensing cables specifically designed by BRUGG Cables are characterized and compared to standard telecommunication cables. The spectral response of each cable was quantified using an all-fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The response was also measured with calibrated microphones in order to convert the measurements into absolute physical units (Pascal). The measurement campaign is part of an investigation program for a reliable DAS system, which comprises the sensing cable (including installation procedure), the interrogator unit and suitable software.

  4. Abnormal acoustic wave velocities in basaltic and (Fe,Al)-bearing silicate glasses at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin; Lin, Jung-Fu

    2014-12-01

    We have measured acoustic VP and VS velocities of (Fe,Al)-bearing MgSiO3 silicate glasses and an Icelandic basalt glass up to 25 GPa. The velocity profiles of the (Fe,Al)-bearing and basaltic silicate glasses display decreased VP and VS with minima at approximately 5 and 2 GPa, respectively, which could be explained by the mode softening in the aluminosilicate networks. Our results represent the first observation of such velocity softening extending into the chemically complex basaltic glass at a relatively low transition pressure, which is likely due to its degree of polymerization, while the Fe and Al substitutions reduce sound velocities in MgSiO3 glass. If the velocity softening in the basaltic and silicate glasses can be used as analogs for understanding melts in Earth's interior, these observations suggest that the melt fraction needed to account for the velocity reduction in the upper mantle low-velocity zone may be smaller than previously thought.

  5. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J.; Owen, Benjamin C.; Jin, Zhicheng; Hurt, Matt; Amundson, Lucas M.; Madden, Jeremy T.; Qian, Kuangnan; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) was successfully coupled to a conventional atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source in a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (LQIT). Model compounds representing a wide variety of different types, including basic nitrogen and oxygen compounds, aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, were tested separately and as a mixture. These model compounds were successfully evaporated into the gas phase by using LIAD and then ionized by using APCI with different reagents. Four APCI reagent systems were tested: the traditionally used mixture of methanol and water, neat benzene, neat carbon disulfide, and nitrogen gas (no liquid reagent). The mixture of methanol and water produced primarily protonated molecules, as expected. However, only the most basic compounds yielded ions under these conditions. In sharp contrast, using APCI with either neat benzene or neat carbon disulfide as the reagent resulted in the ionization of all the analytes studied to predominantly yield stable molecular ions. Benzene yielded a larger fraction of protonated molecules than carbon disulfide, which is a disadvantage. A similar amount of fragmentation was observed for these reagents. When the experiment was performed without a liquid reagent(nitrogen gas was the reagent), more fragmentation was observed. Analysis of a known mixture as well as a petroleum cut was also carried out. In summary, the new experiment presented here allows the evaporation of thermally labile compounds, both polar and nonpolar, without dissociation or aggregation, and their ionization to form stable molecular ions. PMID:21472571

  6. Optical Verification of Microbubble Response to Acoustic Radiation Force in Large Vessels with In Vivo Results

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiying; Wang, Claudia Y.; Unnikrishnan, Sunil; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hossack, John A.; Mauldin, F. William

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To optically verify the dynamic behaviors of adherent microbubbles in large blood vessel environments in response to a new ultrasound technique using modulated acoustic radiation force. Materials and Methods Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) flow channels coated with streptavidin were used in targeted groups to mimic large blood vessels. The custom modulated acoustic radiation force beam sequence was programmed on a Verasonics research scanner. In vitro experiments were performed by injecting a biotinylated lipid-perfluorobutane microbubble dispersion through flow channels. The dynamic response of adherent microbubbles was detected acoustically and simultaneously visualized using a video camera connected to a microscope. In vivo verification was performed in a large abdominal blood vessel of a murine model for inflammation with injection of biotinylated microbubbles conjugated with P-selectin antibody. Results Aggregates of adherent microbubbles were observed optically under the influence of acoustic radiation force. Large microbubble aggregates were observed solely in control groups without targeted adhesion. Additionally, the dispersion of microbubble aggregates were demonstrated to lead to a transient acoustic signal enhancement in control groups (a new phenomenon we refer to as “control peak”). In agreement with in vitro results, the “control peak” phenomenon was observed in vivo in a murine model. Conclusions This study provides the first optical observation of microbubble binding dynamics in large blood vessel environments with application of a modulated acoustic radiation force beam sequence. With targeted adhesion, secondary radiation forces were unable to produce large aggregates of adherent microbubbles. Additionally, the new phenomenon called “control peak” was observed both in vitro and in vivo in a murine model for the first time. The findings in this study provide us with a better understanding of microbubble behaviors in large blood

  7. Flat acoustic sources with frequency response correction based on feedback and feed-forward distributed control.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jen-Hsuan; Berkhoff, Arthur P

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an acoustic source with a small thickness and high bending stiffness. The high bending stiffness is obtained with a sandwich structure in which the face of the sandwich structure internal to the source is perforated to increase the acoustic compliance, thereby leading to increased electroacoustic conversion efficiency. Multiple actuators are used to drive the moving component of the acoustic source. Control of the acoustic resonances and structural resonances is required to obtain an even frequency response. The use of collocated decentralized feedback control based on velocity sensing was found to be ineffective for controlling these resonances due to the destabilizing asymmetric modes caused by the coupling of the internal acoustic cavity and the rigid body vibration of the moving component. Resonances can be controlled by a set of independent combinations of symmetric driving patterns with corresponding velocity feedback controllers such that the fundamental mass-air resonance is effectively controlled, as is the lowest bending mode of the moving component. Finally, a compensation scheme for low frequencies is used which enables a flat frequency response in the range of 30 Hz to 1 kHz with deviations smaller than 3 dB.

  8. An Acoustic Emission and Acousto-Ultrasonic Analysis of Impact Damaged Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The research presented herein summarizes the development of acoustic emission (AE) and acousto-ultrasonic (AU) techniques for the nondestructive evaluation of filament wound composite pressure vessels. Vessels fabricated from both graphite and kevlar fibers with an epoxy matrix were examined prior to hydroburst using AU and during hydroburst using AE. A dead weight drop apparatus featuring both blunt and sharp impactor tips was utilized to produce a single known energy 'damage' level in each of the vessels so that the degree to which the effects of impact damage could be measured. The damage levels ranged from barely visible to obvious fiber breakage and delamination. Independent neural network burst pressure prediction models were developed from a sample of each fiber/resin material system. Here, the cumulative AE amplitude distribution data collected from low level proof test (25% of the expected burst for undamaged vessels) were used to measure the effects of the impact on the residual burst pressure of the vessels. The results of the AE/neural network model for the inert propellant filled graphite/epoxy vessels 'IM7/3501-6, IM7/977-2 and IM7/8553-45' demonstrated that burst pressures can be predicted from low level AE proof test data, yielding an average error of 5.0%. The trained network for the IM7/977-2 class vessels was also able to predict the expected burst pressure of taller vessels (three times longer hoop region length) constructed of the same material and using the same manufacturing technique, with an average error of 4.9%. To a lesser extent, the burst pressure prediction models could also measure the effects of impact damage to the kevlar/epoxy 'Kevlar 49/ DPL862' vessels. Here though, due to the higher attenuation of the material, an insufficient amount of AE amplitude information was collected to generate robust network models. Although, the worst case trial errors were less than 6%, when additional blind predictions were attempted, errors as

  9. Acoustic Responses after Total Destruction of the Cochlear Receptor: Brainstem and Auditory Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazals, Yves; Aran, Jean-Marie; Erre, Jean-Paul; Guilhaume, Anne

    1980-10-01

    Acoustically evoked neural activity has been recorded from the brainstem and auditory cortex of guinea pigs after complete destruction of the organ of Corti by the aminoglycosidic antibiotic amikacin. These responses to sound differ in important respects from the evoked potentials normally recorded from the auditory pathways. At the brainstem level they resemble the potentials reported by others after stimulation of the vestibular nerve.

  10. Enhanced frequency response of a highly transparent PVDF-graphene based thin film acoustic actuator.

    PubMed

    Lee, James S; Shin, Keun-Young; Kim, Chanhoi; Jang, Jyongsik

    2013-12-01

    A high-performance polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) based thin film acoustic actuator with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene electrodes was successfully fabricated. Importantly, it showed 60, 19, and 22% enhancement in the bass, middle and treble frequency response, respectively. PMID:24136447

  11. Prediction of response of aircraft panels subjected to acoustic and thermal loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh

    1992-01-01

    The primary effort of this research project has been focused on the development of analytical methods for the prediction of random response of structural panels subjected to combined and intense acoustic and thermal loads. The accomplishments on various acoustic fatigue research activities are described first, then followed by publications and theses. Topics covered include: transverse shear deformation; finite element models of vibrating composite laminates; large deflection vibration modeling; finite element analysis of thermal buckling; and prediction of three dimensional duct using boundary element method.

  12. Modeling hemodynamic responses in auditory cortex at 1.5 T using variable duration imaging acoustic noise.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuowen; Olulade, Olumide; Castillo, Javier Gonzalez; Santos, Joseph; Kim, Sungeun; Tamer, Gregory G; Luh, Wen-Ming; Talavage, Thomas M

    2010-02-15

    A confound for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), especially for auditory studies, is the presence of imaging acoustic noise generated mainly as a byproduct of rapid gradient switching during volume acquisition and, to a lesser extent, the radiofrequency transmit. This work utilized a novel pulse sequence to present actual imaging acoustic noise for characterization of the induced hemodynamic responses and assessment of linearity in the primary auditory cortex with respect to noise duration. Results show that responses to brief duration (46 ms) imaging acoustic noise is highly nonlinear while responses to longer duration (>1 s) imaging acoustic noise becomes approximately linear, with the right primary auditory cortex exhibiting a higher degree of nonlinearity than the left for the investigated noise durations. This study also assessed the spatial extent of activation induced by imaging acoustic noise, showing that the use of modeled responses (specific to imaging acoustic noise) as the reference waveform revealed additional activations in the auditory cortex not observed with a canonical gamma variate reference waveform, suggesting an improvement in detection sensitivity for imaging acoustic noise-induced activity. Longer duration (1.5 s) imaging acoustic noise was observed to induce activity that expanded outwards from Heschl's gyrus to cover the superior temporal gyrus as well as parts of the middle temporal gyrus and insula, potentially affecting higher level acoustic processing.

  13. Development of Microbubble Contrast Agents with Biochemical Recognition and Tunable Acoustic Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, Matthew Allan Masao

    Microbubbles, consisting of gas-filled cores encapsulated within phospholipid or polymer shells, are the most widely used ultrasound contrast agents in the world. Because of their acoustic impedance mismatch with surrounding tissues and compressible gaseous interiors, they have high echogenicities that allow for efficient backscatter of ultrasound. They can also generate unique harmonic frequencies when insonated near their resonance frequency, depending on physical microbubble properties such as the stiffness and thickness of the encapsulating shell. Microbubbles are used to detect a number of cardiovascular diseases, but current methodologies lack the ability to detect and distinguish small, rapidly growing abnormalities that do not produce visible blockage or slowing of blood flow. This work describes the development, formulation, and validation of microbubbles with various polymer shell architectures designed to modulate their acoustic ability. We demonstrate that the addition of a thick disulfide crosslinked, poly(acrylic acid) encapsulating shell increases a bubble's resistance to cavitation and changes its resonance frequency. Modification of this shell architecture to use hybridized DNA strands to form crosslinks between the polymer chains allows for tuning of the bubble acoustic response. When the DNA crosslinks are in place, shell stiffness is increased so the bubbles do not oscillate and acoustic signal is muted. Subsequently, when these DNA strands are displaced, partial acoustic activity is restored. By using aptamer sequences with a specific affinity towards the biomolecule thrombin as the DNA crosslinking strand, this acoustic "ON/OFF" behavior can be specifically tailored towards the presence of a specific biomarker, and produces a change in acoustic signal at concentrations of thrombin consistent with acute deep venous thrombosis. Incorporation of the emulsifying agent poly(ethylene glycol) into the encapsulating shell improves microbubble yield

  14. Response time characterization of fast responding pressure-sensitive paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2010-11-01

    Response time characterization of a fast responding pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is important information in measuring an unsteady flow field. PSP is an optical pressure sensor. The luminescent image from the PSP is related to a pressure map. In the previous works, a time delay from a step change of pressure is generally used to characterize the response time. The thickness of the PSP as well as the PSP binding material greatly influences the response time. Because the temperature influences the diffusion or permeation of a PSP binder, it is also an important parameter to influence the response time. We build a shock tube to create a step change of pressure for response time characterization. This can control the temperature of the PSP. We discuss the PSP response times related to the temperature of the binder as well as the binding materials.

  15. Acoustic startle responses and temperament in individuals who stutter.

    PubMed

    Guitar, Barry

    2003-02-01

    Fourteen individuals who stutter and 14 individuals who do not stutter were presented with 10 bursts of white noise to assess the magnitude of their eyeblink responses as a measure of temperament. Both the magnitude of the eyeblink response to the initial noise burst and the mean of the 10 responses were significantly greater for the stuttering group. The Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis (R. M. Taylor & L P. Morrison, 1996) did not distinguish between the two groups, but informal follow-up statistics indicated that the Nervous subscale showed a significant group difference. Scores on this subscale were also significantly positively correlated with the magnitude of the startle response. A discriminant analysis demonstrated that although both the startle response and the nervous trait differentiated the two groups, the startle response measures were more powerful in making this differentiation.

  16. Response of composite plates subjected to acoustic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, E. Thomas, Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of the project were to investigate numerical methodology for the determination of narrowband response in the geometrically nonlinear regime, to determine response characteristics for geometrically nonlinear plates subjected to random loading and to compare the predictions with experiments to be performed at NASA-Langley. The first two objectives were met. The response of composite plates subjected to both narrowband and broadband excitation were studied and the results are presented and discussed.

  17. Response of a viscoelastic halfspace to subsurface distributed acoustic sources with application to medical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royston, Thomas J.; Yazicioglu, Yigit; Loth, Francis

    2003-04-01

    The response within and at the surface of an isotropic viscoelastic medium to subsurface distributed low audible frequency acoustic sources is considered. Spherically and cylindrically distributed sources are approximated as arrays of infinitesimal point sources. Analytical approximations for the acoustic field radiating from these sources are then obtained as a summation of tractable point source expressions. These theoretical approximations are compared to computational finite element predictions and experimental studies in selected cases. The objective is to better understand low audible frequency sound propagation in soft biological tissue caused by subsurface sources. Distributed acoustic sources could represent vibratory motion of the vascular wall caused by turbulent blood flow past a constriction (stenosis). Additionally focused vibratory stimulation using a dynamic radiation force caused by interfering ultrasound beams effectively creates a distributed subsurface acoustic source. A dynamic radiation force has been investigated as a means of probing subsurface tissue anomalies, including calcified vascular plaque and tumorous growths. In these cases, there is an interest in relating acoustic measurements at the skin surface and within the medium to the underlying flow/constriction environment or tissue anomaly. [Research supported by NIH NCRR 14250 and Whitaker Foundation BME RG 01-0198.

  18. Use of the acoustic impulse-response technique for the nondestructive assessment of Manchego cheese texture.

    PubMed

    Benedito, J; Conde, T; Clemente, G; Mulet, A

    2006-12-01

    Manchego cheese pieces were hit with an impact probe and the acoustic response was recorded, analyzed, and used to assess the textural characteristics of the cheese pieces. The textural parameters measured by traditional instrumental methods increased during ripening, although the pattern of the increase was different for different batches. For the 2 acoustic impact probes used in this study, a change in the frequency spectrum took place as cheese matured, increasing higher frequencies and the energy content. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and partial least square regression (PLSR), considering the acoustical variables extracted from the spectrum, allowed for a good estimation of cheese texture. The textural characteristics of the cheese surface and in particular the maximum force in compression experiments (R(2) > 0.937 for MLR and R(2) > 0.852 for PLSR) were accurately predicted by the acoustic method; however, the texture of the central layers of the cheese are poorly assessed (R(2) < 0.720). The results obtained show the feasibility of using acoustic systems to assess Manchego cheese texture, aiding its classification. PMID:17106079

  19. Vibroacoustic Response of the NASA ACTS Spacecraft Antenna to Launch Acoustic Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larko, Jeffrey M.; Cotoni, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite was an experimental NASA satellite launched from the Space Shuttle Discovery. As part of the ground test program, the satellite s large, parabolic reflector antennas were exposed to a reverberant acoustic loading to simulate the launch acoustics in the Shuttle payload bay. This paper describes the modelling and analysis of the dynamic response of these large, composite spacecraft antenna structure subjected to a diffuse acoustic field excitation. Due to the broad frequency range of the excitation, different models were created to make predictions in the various frequency regimes of interest: a statistical energy analysis (SEA) model to capture the high frequency response and a hybrid finite element-statistical energy (hybrid FE-SEA) model for the low to mid-frequency responses. The strengths and limitations of each of the analytical techniques are discussed. The predictions are then compared to the measured acoustic test data and to a boundary element (BEM) model to evaluate the performance of the hybrid techniques.

  20. Numerical investigation of the seismo-acoustic responses of the Source Physics Experiment underground explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoun, T.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Vorobiev, O.; Glenn, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    We have performed three-dimensional high resolution simulations of underground explosions conducted recently in jointed rock outcrop as part of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) being conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The main goal of the current study is to investigate the effects of the structural and geomechanical properties on the spall phenomena due to underground explosions and its subsequent effect on the seismo-acoustic signature at far distances. Two parametric studies have been undertaken to assess the impact of different 1) conceptual geological models including a single layer and two layers model, with and without joints and with and without varying geomechanical properties, and 2) depth of bursts of the explosions and explosion yields. Through these investigations we have explored not only the near-field response of the explosions but also the far-field responses of the seismic and the acoustic signatures. The near-field simulations were conducted using the Eulerian and Lagrangian codes, GEODYN and GEODYN -L, respectively, while the far-field seismic simulations were conducted using the elastic wave propagation code, WPP, and the acoustic response using the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz-Rayleigh time-dependent approximation code, KHR. Though a series of simulations, we have recorded the velocity field histories a) at the ground surface on an acoustic-source-patch for the acoustic simulations, and 2) on a seismic-source-box for the seismic simulations. We first analyzed the SPE3 and SPE4-prime experimental data and simulated results, and then simulated SPE5, SPE6/7 to anticipate their seismo-acoustic responses given conditions of uncertainties. SPE experiments were conducted in a granitic formation; we have extended the parametric study to include other geological settings such dolomite and alluvial formations. These parametric studies enabled us 1) investigating the geotechnical and geophysical key parameters that impact the seismo-acoustic

  1. Acoustic wave absorption as a probe of dynamical geometrical response of fractional quantum Hall liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun

    2016-04-01

    We show that an acoustic crystalline wave gives rise to an effect similar to that of a gravitational wave to an electron gas. Applying this idea to a two-dimensional electron gas in the fractional quantum Hall regime, this allows for experimental study of its intra-Landau level dynamical response in the long-wavelength limit. To study such response we generalize Haldane's geometrical description of fractional quantum Hall states to situations where the external metric is time dependent. We show that such time-dependent metric (generated by acoustic wave) couples to collective modes of the system, including a quadrapolar mode at long wavelength, and magnetoroton at finite wavelength. Energies of these modes can be revealed in spectroscopic measurements, controlled by strain-induced Fermi velocity anisotropy. We argue that such geometrical probe provides a potentially highly useful alternative probe of quantum Hall liquids, in addition to the usual electromagnetic response.

  2. Response variability observed in reverberant acoustic test of a model aerospace structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Robert E.

    One of the most difficult concepts to grasp in Statistical Energy Analysis is that structural response can be considered a random variable. It is instructive to perform statistical analyses on actual test data in order to investigate assumptions about the distribution of response. These types of analyses are rarely carried out because of the relatively low number of measurements typically obtained during a test. This paper presents a statistical analysis of the structural response during a reverberant acoustic test of a prototype aerospace component. The test article was the mass/thermal/acoustic model of the photovoltaic power management and distribution system for the NASA Space Station Freedom. The analysis takes advantage of the large number of acceleration sensors located on component attachment screws to conclude that the spatial variation of power spectral density (PSD) averaged in third octave bands can be described by a lognormal probability distribution.

  3. Impulse source versus dodecahedral loudspeaker for measuring parameters derived from the impulse response in room acoustics.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Ricardo; Arana, Miguel; Machín, Jorge; Arregui, Abel

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the performance of dodecahedral and impulse sources when measuring acoustic parameters in enclosures according to ISO 3382-1 [Acoustics-Measurement of room acoustic parameters. Part 1: Performance spaces (International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2009)]. In general, methods using speakers as a sound source are limited by their frequency response and directivity. On the other hand, getting impulse responses from impulse sources typically involves a lack of repeatability, and it is usually necessary to average several measurements for each position. Through experiments in different auditoriums that recreate typical situations in which the measurement standard is applied, it is found that using impulse sources leads to greater variation in the results, especially at low frequencies. However, this prevents subsequent dispersions due to variables that this technique does not require, such as the orientation of the emitting source. These dispersions may be relevant at high frequencies exceeding the established tolerance criteria for certain parameters. Finally, a new descriptor for dodecahedral sources reflecting the influence their lack of omnidirectionality produces on measuring acoustic parameters is proposed.

  4. Ionospheric response to infrasonic-acoustic waves generated by natural hazard events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, M. D.; Snively, J. B.

    2015-09-01

    Recent measurements of GPS-derived total electron content (TEC) reveal acoustic wave periods of ˜1-4 min in the F region ionosphere following natural hazard events, such as earthquakes, severe weather, and volcanoes. Here we simulate the ionospheric responses to infrasonic-acoustic waves, generated by vertical accelerations at the Earth's surface or within the lower atmosphere, using a compressible atmospheric dynamics model to perturb a multifluid ionospheric model. Response dependencies on wave source geometry and spectrum are investigated at middle, low, and equatorial latitudes. Results suggest constraints on wave amplitudes that are consistent with observations and that provide insight on the geographical variability of TEC signatures and their dependence on the geometry of wave velocity field perturbations relative to the ambient geomagnetic field. Asymmetries of responses poleward and equatorward from the wave sources indicate that electron perturbations are enhanced on the equatorward side while field aligned currents are driven principally on the poleward side, due to alignments of acoustic wave velocities parallel and perpendicular to field lines, respectively. Acoustic-wave-driven TEC perturbations are shown to have periods of ˜3-4 min, which are consistent with the fraction of the spectrum that remains following strong dissipation throughout the thermosphere. Furthermore, thermospheric acoustic waves couple with ion sound waves throughout the F region and topside ionosphere, driving plasma disturbances with similar periods and faster phase speeds. The associated magnetic perturbations of the simulated waves are calculated to be observable and may provide new observational insight in addition to that provided by GPS TEC measurements.

  5. Acoustic performance of low pressure axial fan rotors with different blade chord length and radial load distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carolus, Thomas

    The paper examines the acoustic and aerodynamic performance of low-pressure axial fan rotors with a hub/tip ratio of 0.45. Six rotors were designed for the same working point by means of the well-known airfoil theory. The condition of an equilibrium between the static pressure gradient and the centrifugal forces is maintained. All rotors have unequally spaced blades to diminish tonal noise. The rotors are tested in a short cylindrical housing without guide vanes. All rotors show very similar flux-pressure difference characteristics. The peak efficiency and the noise performance is considerably influenced by the chosen blade design. The aerodynamically and acoustically optimal rotor is the one with the reduced load at the hub and increased load in the tip region under satisfied equilibrium conditions. It runs at the highest aerodynamic efficiency, and its noise spectrum is fairly smooth. The overall sound pressure level of this rotor is up to 8 dB (A) lower compared to the other rotors under consideration.

  6. Acoustic travel time gauges for in-situ determination of pressure and temperature in multi-anvil apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Qi, Xintong; Zou, Yongtao; Liebermann, Robert C.; Li, Baosheng; Kung, Jennifer; Yu, Tony; Wang, Yanbin

    2015-08-14

    In this study, we developed a new method for in-situ pressure determination in multi-anvil, high-pressure apparatus using an acoustic travel time approach within the framework of acoustoelasticity. The ultrasonic travel times of polycrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were calibrated against NaCl pressure scale up to 15 GPa and 900 °C in a Kawai-type double-stage multi-anvil apparatus in conjunction with synchrotron X-radiation, thereby providing a convenient and reliable gauge for pressure determination at ambient and high temperatures. The pressures derived from this new travel time method are in excellent agreement with those from the fixed-point methods. Application of this new pressure gauge in an offline experiment revealed a remarkable agreement of the densities of coesite with those from the previous single crystal compression studies under hydrostatic conditions, thus providing strong validation for the current travel time pressure scale. The travel time approach not only can be used for continuous in-situ pressure determination at room temperature, high temperatures, during compression and decompression, but also bears a unique capability that none of the previous scales can deliver, i.e., simultaneous pressure and temperature determination with a high accuracy (±0.16 GPa in pressure and ±17 °C in temperature). Therefore, the new in-situ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} pressure gauge is expected to enable new and expanded opportunities for offline laboratory studies of solid and liquid materials under high pressure and high temperature in multi-anvil apparatus.

  7. Loudness Change in Response to Dynamic Acoustic Intensity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Kirk N.; Stevens, Catherine J.; Tardieu, Julien

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments investigate psychological, methodological, and domain-specific characteristics of loudness change in response to sounds that continuously increase in intensity (up-ramps), relative to sounds that decrease (down-ramps). Timbre (vowel, violin), layer (monotone, chord), and duration (1.8 s, 3.6 s) were manipulated in Experiment 1.…

  8. Ionospheric Responses to Nonlinear Acoustic Waves Generated by Natural Hazard Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, M. D.; Snively, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Ionospheric total electron content (TEC) fluctuations following large-magnitude earthquakes and resulting tsunamis, e.g. Tohoku in 2011, have been noted in many recent investigations [e.g., Galvan et al., Radio Science, 47(4), 2012]. Earthquakes impact the atmosphere through vertical displacements of the Earth's crust or ocean surfaces producing, as one effect, low-frequency acoustic waves. These waves can achieve significant amplitudes during propagation through the rarefied upper atmosphere, and are capable of driving sizable ionospheric electron density (TEC) fluctuations and electrical currents. Earthquake-generated acoustic waves are readily identifiable in GPS observations as 0.1-2 TECU, 3-5 mHz, oscillations, which are delayed from the quake occurrence by roughly the sound travel time between the ground and ionosphere. In some extreme cases, the onset of acoustic oscillations is concurrent with a persistent, sharp decrease in TEC (~5 TECU) above the epicenter [e.g., Kakinami et al., GRL, 39(13), 2012]. Ionospheric responses to large amplitude acoustic waves are investigated using a coupled atmosphere-ionosphere model [Zettergren and Snively, GRL, 40(20), 2013]. Of particular interest are effects of acoustic wave amplitude and nonlinearity on ionospheric responses, including production of detectable TEC oscillations and longer-lived responses like TEC depletions. The atmospheric dynamics model solves a Navier-Stokes' system of equations and incorporates generation of acoustic waves through acceleration source terms at ground-level. The ionospheric model solves a fluid system of equations for each of the major ionospheric species, and includes an electrostatic description of dynamo currents. The coupled model enables direct computation of observable quantities, such as vertical TEC and magnetic field fluctuations. Here we construct simulation case studies for realistic earthquake events and compare results against published TEC and magnetic field data. This

  9. Detection of internal cracks in Manchego cheese using the acoustic impulse-response technique and ultrasounds.

    PubMed

    Conde, T; Mulet, A; Clemente, G; Benedito, J

    2008-03-01

    Nowadays, due to the more global nature of markets, the commercialization of cheese relies on the high quality of the product. Internal defects such as cracks or flaws may affect quality. Two different nondestructive inspection techniques (ultrasonic and acoustic experiments) were used to detect cracks in Manchego cheese. The existence of small eyes in this type of cheese limited the use of ultrasonic pulse-echo experiments due to high scattering, and only cracks close to the surface of the cheese could be detected. The acoustic impulse-response technique, however, allowed us to study wheel pieces with cracks located elsewhere in the cheese. Two different impact probes (A and B) were assayed. The energy content of the acoustic spectrum was higher for cracked wheel pieces (7,116 and 17,520 V Hz(1/2) for probes A and B, respectively) than for normal ones (6,841 and 16,821 V Hz(1/2)). The differences were mainly found for frequencies higher than 150 Hz, which made the centroid for cracked pieces higher (162 and 170 Hz for probes A and B, respectively) than that for normal cheeses (132 and 148 Hz for probes A and B, respectively). Discriminant functions were developed to classify wheel pieces, and the input variables used were the acoustic parameters from the spectrum and the principal components extracted from the whole spectrum. The best classification procedure used the principal components from the principal components analysis of the spectrum for probe B. In this case, the 50 wheel pieces used in this study were correctly classified. These results showed that a simple and low-cost acoustic impulse-response technique could be used to detect cheese cracks, formed at different moments of Manchego cheese maturation. PMID:18292247

  10. The influence of proscenium boxes on acoustic response in historical opera halls.

    PubMed

    Šumarac Pavlović, Dragana; Mijić, Miomir; Mašović, Draško

    2015-09-01

    In some historical opera halls there are boxes located around the proscenium, commonly called proscenium or "director" boxes. These boxes have a certain influence on the initial part of the impulse response of an opera hall on the singer-auditorium, singer-singer, and singer-orchestra pit paths. During the reconstruction of the Ljubljana opera hall, measurement of a scaled model was performed to quantify the influence of proscenium boxes on the hall's impulse response. Some variation in box configuration on the acoustic response was also tested. This paper describes the results of this research.

  11. Analytical modeling of the acoustic field during a direct field acoustic test.

    SciTech Connect

    Stasiunas, Eric Carl; Rouse, Jerry W.; Mesh, Mikhail

    2010-12-01

    The acoustic field generated during a Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT) has been analytically modeled in two space dimensions using a properly phased distribution of propagating plane waves. Both the pure-tone and broadband acoustic field were qualitatively and quantitatively compared to a diffuse acoustic field. The modeling indicates significant non-uniformity of sound pressure level for an empty (no test article) DFAT, specifically a center peak and concentric maxima/minima rings. This spatial variation is due to the equivalent phase among all propagating plane waves at each frequency. The excitation of a simply supported slender beam immersed within the acoustic fields was also analytically modeled. Results indicate that mid-span response is dependent upon location and orientation of the beam relative to the center of the DFAT acoustic field. For a diffuse acoustic field, due to its spatial uniformity, mid-span response sensitivity to location and orientation is nonexistent.

  12. Receptivity and Forced Response to Acoustic Disturbances in High-Speed Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.; King, Rudolph A.; Chou, Amanda; Owens, Lewis R.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic boundary-layer receptivity to freestream acoustic disturbances is investigated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for Mach 3.5 flow over a sharp flat plate and a 7-deg half-angle cone. The freestream disturbances are generated from a wavy wall placed at the nozzle wall. The freestream acoustic disturbances radiated by the wavy wall are obtained by solving the linearized Euler equations. The results for the flat plate show that instability modes are generated at all the incident angles ranging from zero to highly oblique. However, the receptivity coefficient decreases by about 20 times when the incident angle increases from zero to a highly oblique angle of 68 degrees. The results for the cone show that no instability modes are generated when the acoustic disturbances impinge the cone obliquely. The results show that the perturbations generated inside the boundary layer by the acoustic disturbances are the response of the boundary layer to the external forcing. The amplitude of the forced disturbances inside the boundary layer are about 2.5 times larger than the incoming field for zero azimuthal wavenumber and they are about 1.5 times for large azimuthal wavenumbers.

  13. Comparative evaluation of test methods to simulate acoustic response of shroud-enclosed spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    On, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    Test methods were evaluated to ascertain whether a spacecraft, properly tested within its shroud, could be vibroacoustic tested without the shroud, with adjustments made in the acoustic input spectra to simulate the acoustic response of the missing shroud. The evaluation was based on vibroacoustic test results obtained from a baseline model composed (1) of a spacecraft with adapter, lower support structure, and shroud; (2) of the spacecraft, adapter, and lower structure, but without the shroud; and (3) of the spacecraft and adapter only. Emphasis was placed on the magnitude of the acoustic input changes required to substitute for the shroud and the difficulty of making such input changes, and the degree of missimulation which can result from the performance of a particular, less-than optimum test. Conclusions are drawn on the advantages and disadvantages derived from the use of input spectra adjustment methods and lower support structure simulations. Test guidelines were also developed for planning and performing a launch acoustic-environmental test.

  14. Scanning Acoustic Microscopy-A Novel Noninvasive Method to Determine Tumor Interstitial Fluid Pressure in a Xenograft Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Matthias; Pflanzer, Ralph; Habib, Anowarul; Shelke, Amit; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen; Bernd, August; Kaufmann, Roland; Sader, Robert; Kippenberger, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) is a prominent feature of solid tumors and hampers the transmigration of therapeutic macromolecules, for example, large monoclonal antibodies, from tumor-supplying vessels into the tumor interstitium. TIFP values of up to 40 mm Hg have been measured in experimental solid tumors using two conventional invasive techniques: the wick-in-needle and the micropuncture technique. We propose a novel noninvasive method of determining TIFP via ultrasonic investigation with scanning acoustic microscopy at 30-MHz frequency. In our experimental setup, we observed for the impedance fluctuations in the outer tumor hull of A431-vulva carcinoma-derived tumor xenograft mice. The gain dependence of signal strength was quantified, and the relaxation of tissue was calibrated with simultaneous hydrostatic pressure measurements. Signal patterns from the acoustical images were translated into TIFP curves, and a putative saturation effect was found for tumor pressures larger than 3 mm Hg. This is the first noninvasive approach to determine TIFP values in tumors. This technique can provide a potentially promising noninvasive assessment of TIFP and, therefore, can be used to determine the TIFP before treatment approach as well to measure therapeutic efficacy highlighted by lowered TFP values. PMID:27267834

  15. Pressure-specific and multiple pressure response of fish assemblages in European running waters☆

    PubMed Central

    Schinegger, Rafaela; Trautwein, Clemens; Schmutz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    We classified homogenous river types across Europe and searched for fish metrics qualified to show responses to specific pressures (hydromorphological pressures or water quality pressures) vs. multiple pressures in these river types. We analysed fish taxa lists from 3105 sites in 16 ecoregions and 14 countries. Sites were pre-classified for 15 selected pressures to separate unimpacted from impacted sites. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to split unimpacted sites into four homogenous river types based on species composition and geographical location. Classification trees were employed to predict associated river types for impacted sites with four environmental variables. We defined a set of 129 candidate fish metrics to select the best reacting metrics for each river type. The candidate metrics represented tolerances/intolerances of species associated with six metric types: habitat, migration, water quality sensitivity, reproduction, trophic level and biodiversity. The results showed that 17 uncorrelated metrics reacted to pressures in the four river types. Metrics responded specifically to water quality pressures and hydromorphological pressures in three river types and to multiple pressures in all river types. Four metrics associated with water quality sensitivity showed a significant reaction in up to three river types, whereas 13 metrics were specific to individual river types. Our results contribute to the better understanding of fish assemblage response to human pressures at a pan-European scale. The results are especially important for European river management and restoration, as it is necessary to uncover underlying processes and effects of human pressures on aquatic communities. PMID:24003262

  16. Race and blood pressure status influences cardiovascular responses to challenge.

    PubMed

    Saab, P G; Tischenkel, N; Spitzer, S B; Gellman, M D; Pasin, R D; Schneiderman, N

    1991-03-01

    The influence of race and blood pressure status on cardiovascular responses to three challenges (interview, video game and cold pressor) was investigated in 50 healthy normotensive and 30 unmedicated mild-to-moderate hypertensive black and white men, aged 25-44 years old. Group differences were obtained for two tasks. The interview evoked race and blood pressure status differences: higher heart rate responses were elicited from normotensives compared with hypertensives and larger diastolic blood pressure (DBP) responses were elicited from whites compared with blacks. For the video game, black hypertensives displayed larger DBP responses than white hypertensives and greater systolic blood pressure and DBP responses than black normotensives. The video game heart rate response of white normotensives exceeded that of black normotensives and white hypertensives. These findings suggest that cardiovascular responses to challenge are affected by race and blood pressure status. The blood pressure hyperresponsiveness of black hypertensives compared with black normotensives to a psychological challenge (video game) provides generality to previous research conducted only on whites. PMID:1851788

  17. Neural network burst pressure prediction in impact damaged Kevlar/epoxy bottles from acoustic emission amplitude data

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.L.; Workman, G.L.; Russell, S.S.

    1994-12-31

    Acoustic emission (AE) signal analysis has been used to measure the effect of impact damage on the burst pressure of 5.75 inch diameter filament wound Kevlar/epoxy pressure vessels. A calibrated dead weight drop fixture, featuring both sharp and blunt hemispherical impact tups, generated impact damages with energies up to twenty ft-lb{sub f} in the mid hoop region of each vessel. Burst pressures were obtained by hydrostatically testing twenty-seven damaged and undamaged bottles, eleven of which were filled with inert propellant to simulate a rocket motor. Burst pressure prediction models were developed by correlating the differential AE amplitude distributions, Generated during the first pressure ramp to 25% of the expected burst pressure for the undamaged vessels, to known burst pressures using back propagation neural networks. Independent networks were created for the inert propellant filled vessels and the unfilled vessels using a small subset of each during the training phases. The remaining bottles served as the test sets. The eleven filled vessels had an average prediction error of 5.6%, while the unfilled bottles averaged 5.4%. Both of these results were within the 95% prediction interval, but a portion of the vessel burst pressure errors were greater than the {+-}5% worst case error obtained in previous work. in conclusion, the AE amplitude distribution data collected at low proof loads provided a suitable input for neural network burst pressure prediction in damaged and undamaged Kevlar/epoxy bottles. This included pressure vessels both with and without propellant backing. Work is ongoing to decrease the magnitude of the prediction error through network restructuring.

  18. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  19. Unusual blood pressure response during standing therapy in tetraplegic man.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hisayoshi; Ogata, Toru; Hoshikawa, Shinya; Uematsu, Azusa; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Saitou, Sakiko; Kitamura, Taku; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2010-02-01

    We report a case of an individual with cervical spinal cord injury who showed a unique blood pressure response during passive standing and passive walking-like leg movement, i.e., hypertension with standing and hypotension with leg movement.

  20. Characterization of intense ion beam energy density and beam induced pressure on the target with acoustic diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkarev, A. I.; Isakova, Yu. I.; Khailov, I. P.; Yu, Xiao

    2013-08-15

    We have developed the acoustic diagnostics based on a piezoelectric transducer for characterization of high-intensity pulsed ion beams. The diagnostics was tested using the TEMP-4M accelerator (150 ns, 250–300 kV). The beam is composed of C{sup +} ions (85%) and protons, the beam energy density is 0.5–5 J/cm{sup 2} (depending on diode geometry). A calibration dependence of the signal from a piezoelectric transducer on the ion beam energy density is obtained using thermal imaging diagnostics. It is shown that the acoustic diagnostics allows for measurement of the beam energy density in the range of 0.1–2 J/cm{sup 2}. The dependence of the beam generated pressure on the input energy density is also determined and compared with the data from literature. The developed acoustic diagnostics do not require sophisticated equipment and can be used for operational control of pulsed ion beam parameters with a repetition rate of 10{sup 3} pulses/s.

  1. Characterization of intense ion beam energy density and beam induced pressure on the target with acoustic diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Pushkarev, A I; Isakova, Yu I; Yu, Xiao; Khailov, I P

    2013-08-01

    We have developed the acoustic diagnostics based on a piezoelectric transducer for characterization of high-intensity pulsed ion beams. The diagnostics was tested using the TEMP-4M accelerator (150 ns, 250-300 kV). The beam is composed of C(+) ions (85%) and protons, the beam energy density is 0.5-5 J∕cm(2) (depending on diode geometry). A calibration dependence of the signal from a piezoelectric transducer on the ion beam energy density is obtained using thermal imaging diagnostics. It is shown that the acoustic diagnostics allows for measurement of the beam energy density in the range of 0.1-2 J∕cm(2). The dependence of the beam generated pressure on the input energy density is also determined and compared with the data from literature. The developed acoustic diagnostics do not require sophisticated equipment and can be used for operational control of pulsed ion beam parameters with a repetition rate of 10(3) pulses∕s.

  2. Technical aspects of acoustic myography (AMG) of human skeletal muscle: contact pressure and force/AMG relationships.

    PubMed

    Smith, T G; Stokes, M J

    1993-04-01

    The effect of contact pressure on acoustic myographic (AMG) recordings was examined during voluntary isometric contractions of the human quadriceps muscle in 20 normal males. A piezoelectric disk for recording muscle sounds was placed over rectus femoris at approximately mid-thigh and secured with a rubber electromyography (EMG) strap. Contact pressure was monitored by a load cell placed between the AMG device and the strap. With the subject seated, force at different percentage levels of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) were held for 5 s each. Both AMG and EMG recordings were full-wave rectified and integrated (IAMG and IEMG) and expressed as a percentage of activity at MVC. Two contraction series were performed with 2 different contact pressures. Pressure 1 (P1), of 180 Pa was applied in all subjects. A higher pressure of either 790 Pa (P2; in 5 subjects) or 1200 Pa (P3; in 15 subjects) was also applied. No significant changes in IAMG activity (P > 0.1) occurred between P1 and P2 but P3 produced increases in IAMG at all force levels (P < 0.05 at 10, 50 and 75% MVC). Both linear and non-linear relationships between force and IAMG were observed in different subjects but the relationship also varied with the 2 contact pressures within some subjects. The force/IEMG relationship was linear in all cases. These results provide quantitative evidence that contact pressure can influence the degree of IAMG activity if the pressure is high enough. The change in the force/IAMG relationship with pressure in some subjects suggests that the different relationships observed are not determined by physiological differences between subjects but rather by technical factors.

  3. Acoustic change responses to amplitude modulation: a method to quantify cortical temporal processing and hemispheric asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji Hye; Dimitrijevic, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Sound modulation is a critical temporal cue for the perception of speech and environmental sounds. To examine auditory cortical responses to sound modulation, we developed an acoustic change stimulus involving amplitude modulation (AM) of ongoing noise. The AM transitions in this stimulus evoked an acoustic change complex (ACC) that was examined parametrically in terms of rate and depth of modulation and hemispheric symmetry. Methods: Auditory cortical potentials were recorded from 64 scalp electrodes during passive listening in two conditions: (1) ACC from white noise to 4, 40, 300 Hz AM, with varying AM depths of 100, 50, 25% lasting 1 s and (2) 1 s AM noise bursts at the same modulation rate. Behavioral measures included AM detection from an attend ACC condition and AM depth thresholds (i.e., a temporal modulation transfer function, TMTF). Results: The N1 response of the ACC was large to 4 and 40 Hz and small to the 300 Hz AM. In contrast, the opposite pattern was observed with bursts of AM showing larger responses with increases in AM rate. Brain source modeling showed significant hemispheric asymmetry such that 4 and 40 Hz ACC responses were dominated by right and left hemispheres respectively. Conclusion: N1 responses to the ACC resembled a low pass filter shape similar to a behavioral TMTF. In the ACC paradigm, the only stimulus parameter that changes is AM and therefore the N1 response provides an index for this AM change. In contrast, an AM burst stimulus contains both AM and level changes and is likely dominated by the rise time of the stimulus. The hemispheric differences are consistent with the asymmetric sampling in time hypothesis suggesting that the different hemispheres preferentially sample acoustic time across different time windows. Significance: The ACC provides a novel approach to studying temporal processing at the level of cortex and provides further evidence of hemispheric specialization for fast and slow stimuli. PMID:25717291

  4. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far-field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far-field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  5. Binding Dynamics of Targeted Microbubbles in Response to Modulated Acoustic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiying; Hossack, John A; Klibanov, Alexander L; Mauldin, F William

    2014-01-01

    Detection of molecular targeted microbubbles plays a foundational role in ultrasound-based molecular imaging and targeted gene or drug delivery. In this paper, an empirical model describing the binding dynamics of targeted microbubbles in response to modulated acoustic radiation forces in large vessels is presented and experimentally verified using tissue-mimicking flow phantoms. Higher flow velocity and microbubble concentration led to faster detaching rates for specifically bound microbubbles (p < 0.001). Higher time-averaged acoustic radiation force intensity led to faster attaching rates and a higher saturation level of specifically bound microbubbles (p < 0.05). The level of residual microbubble signal in targeted experiments after cessation of radiation forces was the only response parameter that was reliably different between targeted and control experiments (p < 0.05). A related parameter, the ratio of residual-to-saturated microbubble signal (Rresid), is proposed as a measurement that is independent of absolute acoustic signal magnitude and therefore able to reliably detect targeted adhesion independently of control measurements (p < 0.01). These findings suggest the possibility of enhanced detection of specifically bound microbubbles in real-time, using relatively short imaging protocols (approximately 3 min), without waiting for free microbubble clearance. PMID:24374866

  6. Vibro-Acoustic Response of Buildings Due to Sonic Boom Exposure: July 2007 Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    During the month of July 2007, a series of structural response measurements were made on a house on Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) property that was exposed to sonic booms of various amplitudes. The purpose of this report is to document the measurements that were made, the structure on which they were made, the conditions under which they were made, the sensors and other hardware that were used, and the data that were collected. To that end, Chapter 2 documents the house, its location, the physical layout of the house, the surrounding area, and summarizes the transducers placed in and around the house. Chapter 3 details the sensors and other hardware that were placed in the house during the experiment. In addition, day-to-day variations of hardware configurations and transducer calibrations are documented in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 documents the boom generation process, flight conditions, and ambient weather conditions during the test days. Chapter 5 includes information about sub-experiments that were performed to characterize the vibro-acoustic response of the structure, the acoustic environment inside the house, and the acoustic environment outside the house. Chapter 6 documents the data format and presents examples of reduced data that were collected during the test days.

  7. Surface response of a viscoelastic medium to subsurface acoustic sources with application to medical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royston, Thomas J.; Yazicioglu, Yigit; Loth, Francis

    2003-02-01

    The response at the surface of an isotropic viscoelastic medium to buried fundamental acoustic sources is studied theoretically, computationally and experimentally. Finite and infinitesimal monopole and dipole sources within the low audible frequency range (40-400 Hz) are considered. Analytical and numerical integral solutions that account for compression, shear and surface wave response to the buried sources are formulated and compared with numerical finite element simulations and experimental studies on finite dimension phantom models. It is found that at low audible frequencies, compression and shear wave propagation from point sources can both be significant, with shear wave effects becoming less significant as frequency increases. Additionally, it is shown that simple closed-form analytical approximations based on an infinite medium model agree well with numerically obtained ``exact'' half-space solutions for the frequency range and material of interest in this study. The focus here is on developing a better understanding of how biological soft tissue affects the transmission of vibro-acoustic energy from biological acoustic sources below the skin surface, whose typical spectral content is in the low audible frequency range. Examples include sound radiated from pulmonary, gastro-intestinal and cardiovascular system functions, such as breath sounds, bowel sounds and vascular bruits, respectively.

  8. Prenatal features of Pena-Shokeir sequence with atypical response to acoustic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pittyanont, Sirida; Jatavan, Phudit; Suwansirikul, Songkiat; Tongsong, Theera

    2016-09-01

    A fetal sonographic screening examination performed at 23 weeks showed polyhydramnios, micrognathia, fixed postures of all long bones, but no movement and no breathing. The fetus showed fetal heart rate acceleration but no movement when acoustic stimulation was applied with artificial larynx. All these findings persisted on serial examinations. The neonate was stillborn at 37 weeks and a final diagnosis of Pena-Shokeir sequence was made. In addition to typical sonographic features of Pena-Shokeir sequence, fetal heart rate accelerations with no movement in response to acoustic stimulation suggests that peripheral myopathy may possibly play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 44:459-462, 2016. PMID:27312123

  9. Structural Acoustic Response of a Shape Memory Alloy Hybrid Composite Panel (Lessons Learned)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2002-01-01

    This study presents results from an effort to fabricate a shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) panel specimen and test the structure for dynamic response and noise transmission characteristics under the action of thermal and random acoustic loads. A method for fabricating a SMAHC laminate with bi-directional SMA reinforcement is described. Glass-epoxy unidirectional prepreg tape and Nitinol ribbon comprise the material system. Thermal activation of the Nitinol actuators was achieved through resistive heating. The experimental hardware required for mechanical support of the panel/actuators and for establishing convenient electrical connectivity to the actuators is presented. Other experimental apparatus necessary for controlling the panel temperature and acquiring structural acoustic data are also described. Deficiency in the thermal control system was discovered in the process of performing the elevated temperature tests. Discussion of the experimental results focuses on determining the causes for the deficiency and establishing means for rectifying the problem.

  10. Acoustically determined linear piezoelectric response of lithium niobate up to 1100 V

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.; Branch, D. W.; Cular, S.; Schamiloglu, E.

    2014-04-21

    We present a method to measure high voltages using the piezoelectric crystal lithium niobate without using voltage dividers. A 36° Y-X cut lithium niobate crystal was coupled to two acoustic transducers, where direct current voltages were applied from 128–1100 V. The time-of-flight through the crystal was determined to be linearly dependent on the applied voltage. A model was developed to predict the time-delay in response to the applied voltage. The results show a sensitivity of 17 fs/V with a measurement error of 1 fs/V was achievable using this method. The sensitivity of this method can be increased by measuring the acoustic wave after multiple passes through the crystal. This method has many advantages over traditional techniques such as: favorable scalability for larger voltages, ease of use, cost effectiveness, and compactness.

  11. Effect of anisotropic dust pressure and superthermal electrons on propagation and stability of dust acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, M. F.; Behery, E. E.; El-Taibany, W. F.

    2015-06-15

    Employing the reductive perturbation technique, Zakharov–Kuznetzov (ZK) equation is derived for dust acoustic (DA) solitary waves in a magnetized plasma which consists the effects of dust anisotropic pressure, arbitrary charged dust particles, Boltzmann distributed ions, and Kappa distributed superthermal electrons. The ZK solitary wave solution is obtained. Using the small-k expansion method, the stability analysis for DA solitary waves is also discussed. The effects of the dust pressure anisotropy and the electron superthermality on the basic characteristics of DA waves as well as on the three-dimensional instability criterion are highlighted. It is found that the DA solitary wave is rarefactive (compressive) for negative (positive) dust. In addition, the growth rate of instability increases rapidly as the superthermal spectral index of electrons increases with either positive or negative dust grains. A brief discussion for possible applications is included.

  12. Procedures for ambient-pressure and tympanometric tests of aural acoustic reflectance and admittance in human infants and adults.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Douglas H; Hunter, Lisa L; Feeney, M Patrick; Fitzpatrick, Denis F

    2015-12-01

    Procedures are described to measure acoustic reflectance and admittance in human adult and infant ears at frequencies from 0.2 to 8 kHz. Transfer functions were measured at ambient pressure in the ear canal, and as down- or up-swept tympanograms. Acoustically estimated ear-canal area was used to calculate ear reflectance, which was parameterized by absorbance and group delay over all frequencies (and pressures), with substantial data reduction for tympanograms. Admittance measured at the probe tip in adults was transformed into an equivalent admittance at the eardrum using a transmission-line model for an ear canal with specified area and ear-canal length. Ear-canal length was estimated from group delay around the frequency above 2 kHz of minimum absorbance. Illustrative measurements in ears with normal function are described for an adult, and two infants at 1 month of age with normal hearing and a conductive hearing loss. The sensitivity of this equivalent eardrum admittance was calculated for varying estimates of area and length. Infant-ear patterns of absorbance peaks aligned in frequency with dips in group delay were explained by a model of resonant canal-wall mobility. Procedures will be applied in a large study of wideband clinical diagnosis and monitoring of middle-ear and cochlear function.

  13. A primer for structural response to random pressure fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.; Vaicaitis, R.

    1975-01-01

    A review was made of power spectral methods for determining linear response of structures to random pressure fluctuations. Various simplifying assumptions are made for the purpose of obtaining useful formula for structural response. The transmission of sound through a flexible structure into an interior cavity was also treated.

  14. An acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic analysis of impact damaged composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L. (Principal Investigator); Walker, James L.

    1996-01-01

    The use of acoustic emission to characterize impact damage in composite structures is being performed on composite bottles wrapped with graphite epoxy and kevlar bottles. Further development of the acoustic emission methodology will include neural net analysis and/or other multivariate techniques to enhance the capability of the technique to identify dominant failure mechanisms during fracture. The acousto-ultrasonics technique will also continue to be investigated to determine its ability to predict regions prone to failure prior to the burst tests. Characterization of the stress wave factor before, and after impact damage will be useful for inspection purposes in manufacturing processes. The combination of the two methods will also allow for simple nondestructive tests capable of predicting the performance of a composite structure prior to its being placed in service and during service.

  15. Plant adaptation to low atmospheric pressures: potential molecular responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert J.; Schuerger, Andrew C.; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Gurley, William B.; Corey, Kenneth; Bucklin, Ray

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing realization that it may be impossible to attain Earth normal atmospheric pressures in orbital, lunar, or Martian greenhouses, simply because the construction materials do not exist to meet the extraordinary constraints imposed by balancing high engineering requirements against high lift costs. This equation essentially dictates that NASA have in place the capability to grow plants at reduced atmospheric pressure. Yet current understanding of plant growth at low pressures is limited to just a few experiments and relatively rudimentary assessments of plant vigor and growth. The tools now exist, however, to make rapid progress toward understanding the fundamental nature of plant responses and adaptations to low pressures, and to develop strategies for mitigating detrimental effects by engineering the growth conditions or by engineering the plants themselves. The genomes of rice and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have recently been sequenced in their entirety, and public sector and commercial DNA chips are becoming available such that thousands of genes can be assayed at once. A fundamental understanding of plant responses and adaptation to low pressures can now be approached and translated into procedures and engineering considerations to enhance plant growth at low atmospheric pressures. In anticipation of such studies, we present here the background arguments supporting these contentions, as well as informed speculation about the kinds of molecular physiological responses that might be expected of plants in low-pressure environments.

  16. Plant adaptation to low atmospheric pressures: potential molecular responses.

    PubMed

    Ferl, Robert J; Schuerger, Andrew C; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Gurley, William B; Corey, Kenneth; Bucklin, Ray

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing realization that it may be impossible to attain Earth normal atmospheric pressures in orbital, lunar, or Martian greenhouses, simply because the construction materials do not exist to meet the extraordinary constraints imposed by balancing high engineering requirements against high lift costs. This equation essentially dictates that NASA have in place the capability to grow plants at reduced atmospheric pressure. Yet current understanding of plant growth at low pressures is limited to just a few experiments and relatively rudimentary assessments of plant vigor and growth. The tools now exist, however, to make rapid progress toward understanding the fundamental nature of plant responses and adaptations to low pressures, and to develop strategies for mitigating detrimental effects by engineering the growth conditions or by engineering the plants themselves. The genomes of rice and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have recently been sequenced in their entirety, and public sector and commercial DNA chips are becoming available such that thousands of genes can be assayed at once. A fundamental understanding of plant responses and adaptation to low pressures can now be approached and translated into procedures and engineering considerations to enhance plant growth at low atmospheric pressures. In anticipation of such studies, we present here the background arguments supporting these contentions, as well as informed speculation about the kinds of molecular physiological responses that might be expected of plants in low-pressure environments. PMID:11987308

  17. Generation of ion-acoustic waves in an inductively coupled, low-pressure discharge lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Camparo, J. C.; Klimcak, C. M.

    2006-04-15

    For a number of years it has been known that the alkali rf-discharge lamps used in atomic clocks can exhibit large amplitude intensity oscillations. These oscillations arise from ion-acoustic plasma waves and have typically been associated with erratic clock behavior. Though large amplitude ion-acoustic plasma waves are clearly deleterious for atomic clock operation, it does not follow that small amplitude oscillations have no utility. Here, we demonstrate two easily implemented methods for generating small amplitude ion-acoustic plasma waves in alkali rf-discharge lamps. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the frequency of these waves is proportional to the square root of the rf power driving the lamp and therefore that their examination can provide an easily accessible parameter for monitoring and controlling the lamp's plasma conditions. This has important consequences for precise timekeeping, since the atomic ground-state hyperfine transition, which is the heart of the atomic clock signal, can be significantly perturbed by changes in the lamp's output via the ac-Stark shift.

  18. Laboratory Simulation of Response to a Distributed Pressure Load

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, R.; Simmermacher, T.

    1998-10-21

    Responses to a distributed pressure load are typically predicted through the use of a finite-element model. This procedure depends on the model to represent the actual structure accurately. Another technique that is developed in this work is to predict the response based upon an experi- mentally derived model. This model consists of frequency response functions. The pressure distribution is assumed to be known. In this work, the pressure load will be a blast load. The focus of this work will be to simulate a harsh, shock-like environment. Data from a reverse Hopkinson bar (RHB) test is used to generate the response to a symmetric, distributed load. The reverse Hopkinson bar generates a high ampli- tude, high frequency content pulse that excites components at near-blast levels. The frequency response functions gen- erated from the RHB are used to generate an experimental model of the structure, which is then used in conjunction with the known pressure distribution, to estimate the component response to a blast. This result can then be used with a model correlation technique to adjust a finite element model such that data from a true blast test can be used to only fine tune the model. This work details the estimation response due to the blast.

  19. Experimental and numerical investigation of the acoustic response of multi-slit Bunsen burners

    SciTech Connect

    Kornilov, V.N.; de Goey, L.P.H.

    2009-10-15

    Experimental and numerical techniques to characterize the response of premixed methane-air flames to acoustic waves are discussed and applied to a multi-slit Bunsen burner. The steady flame shape, flame front kinematics and flow field of acoustically exited flames, as well as the flame transfer function and matrix are computed. The numerical results are compared with experiments. The influence of changes in the mean flow velocity, mixture equivalence ratio, slit width and distance between the slits on the transfer function is studied, both numerically and experimentally. Good agreement is found which indicates the suitability of both the experimental and numerical approach and shows the importance of predicting the influence of the flow on the flame and vice versa. On the basis of the results obtained, the role and physical nature of convective flow structures, heat transfer between the flame and burner plate and interaction between adjacent flames are discussed. Suggestions for analytical models of premixed flame-acoustics interaction are formulated. (author)

  20. Plant responses to reduced air pressure: advanced techniques and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daunicht, H.-J.; Brinkjans, H. J.

    1996-01-01

    Knowledge on air pressure impacts on plant processes and growth is essential for understanding responses to altitude and for comprehending the way of action of aerial gasses in general, and is of potential importance for life support systems in space. Our research on reduced air pressure was extended by help of a new set-up comprising two constantly ventilated chambers (283 L each), allowing pressure gradients of +/- 100 kPa. They provide favourable general growth conditions while maintaining all those factors constant or at desired levels which modify the action of air pressure, e.g. water vapour pressure deficit and air mass flow over the plants. Besides plant growth parameters, transpiration and CO_2 gas exchange are determined continuously. Results are presented on young tomato plants grown hydroponically, which had been treated with various combinations of air pressure (400 - 700 - 1000 hPa), CO_2 concentration and wind intensity for seven days. At the lowest pressure transpiration was enhanced considerably, and the plants became sturdier. On the other hand growth was retarded to a certain extent, attributable to secondary air pressure effects. Therefore, even greater limitations of plant productivity are expected after more extended periods of low pressure treatment.

  1. Time-dependent response of filamentary composite spherical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel is modeled as a pseudoisotropic (or transversely isotropic) composite shell, with the effects of the liner and fill tubes omitted. Equations of elasticity, macromechanical and micromechanical formulations, and laminate properties are derived for the application of an internally pressured spherical composite vessel. Viscoelastic properties for the composite matrix are used to characterize time-dependent behavior. Using the maximum strain theory of failure, burst pressure and critical strain equations are formulated, solved in the Laplace domain with an associated elastic solution, and inverted back into the time domain using the method of collocation. Viscoelastic properties of HBFR-55 resin are experimentally determined and a Kevlar/HBFR-55 system is evaluated with a FORTRAN program. The computed reduction in burst pressure with respect to time indicates that the analysis employed may be used to predict the time-dependent response of a filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel.

  2. Pressure responses of portlandite and H-D isotope effects on pressure-induced phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Riko; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Komatsu, Kazuki; Ushijima, Daichi; Nakano, Satoshi; Sano-Furukawa, Asami; Nagai, Takaya; Yagi, Takehiko

    2011-12-01

    The pressure responses of portlandite and the isotope effect on the phase transition were investigated at room temperature from single-crystal Raman and IR spectra and from powder X-ray diffraction using diamond anvil cells under quasi-hydrostatic conditions in a helium pressure-transmitting medium. Phase transformation and subsequent peak broadening (partial amorphization) observed from the Raman and IR spectra of Ca(OH)2 occurred at lower pressures than those of Ca(OD)2. In contrast, no isotope effect was found on the volume and axial compressions observed from powder X-ray diffraction patterns. X-ray diffraction lines attributable to the high-pressure phase remained up to 28.5 GPa, suggesting no total amorphization in a helium pressure medium within the examined pressure region. These results suggest that the H-D isotope effect is engendered in the local environment surrounding H(D) atoms. Moreover, the ratio of sample-to-methanol-ethanol pressure medium (i.e., packing density) in the sample chamber had a significant effect on the increase in the half widths of the diffraction lines, even at pressures below the hydrostatic limit of the pressure medium.

  3. Physiological response to ''pressure-demand'' respirator wear

    SciTech Connect

    Raven, P.B.; Bradley, O.; Rohm-Young, D.; McClure, F.L.; Skaggs, B.

    1982-07-01

    This investigation determined cardiorespiratory responses of subjects with normal lung function and exercise tolerance and compared them with subjects with moderate impairment of lung function and exercise tolerance. The respirator was an air-line full-face mask (MSA-Ultravue) ''pressure-demand'' breathing type equipped with an inspiratory resistance of 85 mmH/sub 2/0 at 85 L/min air flow. This resistance was operable in conjunction with the fixed 25 mmH/sub 2/O inspiratory and expiratory resistance required to pressurize the face piece. Physiologically and subjectively the response of the normal and moderately impaired subjects to respirator wear during rest, 35%, 50% and 80% of their maximal aerobic capacity (VO/sub 2//sub max/) were not different. However, the pressure swings inside the face piece exceeded 24 cm H/sub 2/O and resulted in 50% of the subjects being unable to finish 10 minutes of work at 80% VO/sub 2//sub max/. The greater the ventilatory demand placed upon the respirator due to increasing workload, the more like a ''demand'' system pressure-flow response the ''pressure-demand'' system produced. Hence, the concept of increased protection and reduced inspiratory resistance as a result of pressurizing the facepiece during heavy work is seriously questioned.

  4. A Patch Density Recommendation based on Convergence Studies for Vehicle Panel Vibration Response resulting from Excitation by a Diffuse Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Jones, Douglas; Towner, Robert; Waldon, James; Hunt, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Producing fluid structural interaction estimates of panel vibration from an applied pressure field excitation are quite dependent on the spatial correlation of the pressure field. There is a danger of either over estimating a low frequency response or under predicting broad band panel response in the more modally dense bands if the pressure field spatial correlation is not accounted for adequately. It is a useful practice to simulate the spatial correlation of the applied pressure field over a 2d surface using a matrix of small patch area regions on a finite element model (FEM). Use of a fitted function for the spatial correlation between patch centers can result in an error if the choice of patch density is not fine enough to represent the more continuous spatial correlation function throughout the intended frequency range of interest. Several patch density assumptions to approximate the fitted spatial correlation function are first evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative illustrations. The actual response of a typical vehicle panel system FEM is then examined in a convergence study where the patch density assumptions are varied over the same model. The convergence study results illustrate the impacts possible from a poor choice of patch density on the analytical response estimate. The fitted correlation function used in this study represents a diffuse acoustic field (DAF) excitation of the panel to produce vibration response.

  5. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject.

  6. Identification of laser generated acoustic waves in the two-dimensional transient response of cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Rossignol, C.; Audoin, B.

    2005-06-01

    The published model [Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 4379-4381 (2003)] for the two-dimensional transient wave propagation in a cylinder is modified to avoid the inherited integration of the numerical inverse scheme. The Fourier series expansion is introduced for one spatial coordinate to resolve the transient response problem: theoretical radial displacements in either the ablation or the thermoelastic regime are obtained with little numerical noise and short computation time. The normal mode expansion method fails to deliver results with the same accuracy. Acoustic waves are fully identified by the ray trajectory analysis. These identified waves are further verified on the experimental results observed with the laser ultrasonic technique. .

  7. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject. PMID:26520354

  8. Phenomenological Description of Acoustic Emission Processes Occurring During High-Pressure Sand Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Martín, Jordi; Muñoz-Ibáñez, Andrea; Grande-García, Elisa; Rodríguez-Cedrún, Borja

    2016-04-01

    Compaction, pore collapse and grain crushing have a significant impact over the hydrodynamic properties of sand formations. The assessment of the crushing stress threshold constitutes valuable information in order to assess the behavior of these formations provided that it can be conveniently identified. Because of the inherent complexities of the direct observation of sand crushing, different authors have developed several indirect methods, being acoustic emission a promising one. However, previous researches have evidenced that there are different processes triggering acoustic emissions which need to be carefully accounted. Worth mentioning among them are grain bearing, grain to container friction, intergranular friction and crushing. The work presented here addresses this purpose. A broadband acoustic emission sensor (PA MicroHF200) connected to a high-speed data acquisition system and control software (AeWIN for PCI1 2.10) has been attached to a steel ram and used to monitor the different processes occurring during the oedometric compaction of uniform quartz sand up to an axial load of about 110 MPa and constant temperature. Load was stepwise applied using a servocontrolled hydraulic press acting at a constant load rate. Axial strain was simultaneously measured with the aid of a LDT device. Counts, energy, event duration, rise time and amplitude were recorded along each experiment and after completion selected waveforms were transformed from the time to the frequency domain via FFT transform. Additional simplified tests were performed in order to isolate the frequency characteristics of the dominant processes occurring during sand compaction. Our results show that, from simple tests, it is possible to determine process-dependent frequency components. When considering more complex experiments, many of the studied processes overlap but it is still possible to identify when a particular one dominates as well as the likely onset of crushing.

  9. Apparatus and method for non-contact, acoustic resonance determination of intraocular pressure

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Wray, William O.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and method for measuring intraocular pressure changes in an eye under investigation by detection of vibrational resonances therein. An ultrasonic transducer operating at its resonant frequency is amplitude modulated and swept over a range of audio frequencies in which human eyes will resonate. The output therefrom is focused onto the eye under investigation, and the resonant vibrations of the eye observed using a fiber-optic reflection vibration sensor. Since the resonant frequency of the eye is dependent on the pressure therein, changes in intraocular pressure may readily be determined after a baseline pressure is established.

  10. Apparatus and method for non-contact, acoustic resonance determination of intraocular pressure

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, D.N.; Wray, W.O.

    1994-12-27

    The apparatus and method for measuring intraocular pressure changes in an eye under investigation by detection of vibrational resonances therein. An ultrasonic transducer operating at its resonant frequency is amplitude modulated and swept over a range of audio frequencies in which human eyes will resonate. The output therefrom is focused onto the eye under investigation, and the resonant vibrations of the eye observed using a fiber-optic reflection vibration sensor. Since the resonant frequency of the eye is dependent on the pressure therein, changes in intraocular pressure may readily be determined after a baseline pressure is established. 3 figures.

  11. Acoustic behaviour and equation of state of amorphous ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer studied by means of high-pressure Brillouin scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kwang Joo

    2014-06-01

    The determination of the equation of state (EOS) of amorphous materials is very important for fundamental understanding of the glass transition and applications as well. Simultaneous observation of both longitudinal and transverse acoustic modes by Brillouin scattering spectroscopy has been one of the major methods to obtain EOS of amorphous materials. However, the transverse acoustic mode is hardly seen from some of the amorphous polymers, which makes it difficult to derive EOS. The temperature and pressure dependences of the acoustic properties of amorphous ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) copolymer were measured by using high-pressure Brillouin scattering spectroscopy. The temperature variation induced large changes in the frequency shift and linewidth of the longitudinal acoustic mode due to strong coupling between the structural relaxation process and the propagating density fluctuations. The residual linewidth in the glassy state was attributed to the remnant intramolecular motions of EVA, the activation energy of which was estimated to be ∼3.30 ± 0.27 kcal/mol. The pressure-density relationship of EVA could be obtained for the first time by measuring the refractive index and using the Lorentz-Lorenz equation. The density and the refractive index exhibited monotonic increase up to approximately 12 GPa. The strong reduction of the acoustic damping at low pressures below ∼3 GPa was attributed to the collapsing free volume in EVA. The present study clearly shows that measuring the refractive index by high-pressure Brillouin spectroscopy may be an alternative method to get the EOS of polymeric materials whose transverse acoustic mode is too weak to be observed.

  12. Burning rate response of liquid monopropellants to imposed pressure oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, C. B.

    1974-01-01

    The combustion characteristics of hydrazine strands were studied under both steady state and oscillatory conditions. A steady strand burner was used to measure steady strand burning rates, liquid temperature distributions and surface temperatures as a function of pressure in the pressure range of 0.32 to 42 atm. It was found that for subatmospheric pressures the burning rate varied as the square root of pressure; for pressures greater than atmospheric the burning rate varied linearly with pressure. A theoretical model of the strand combustion system was developed and matched to the steady burning rates by assuming a reaction order of one for subatmospheric pressures and a reaction order of two for pressures greater than atmospheric. The model was also found to be in good agreement with measurements of liquid temperature distributions and surface temperatures. The results show an increse in the response of the combustion process as interaction occurs with transient liquid phase effects, yielding a band of frequencies where the combustion process exerts sufficient amplifying power to provide a mechanism for driving combustion instability.

  13. Acoustic study of the elastic and inelastic properties of high-pressure polyethylene samples with different irradiation histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardashev, B. K.; Nikanorov, S. P.; Kravchenko, V. S.; Malinov, V. I.; Punin, V. T.

    2007-11-01

    The influence of vibrational deformation amplitude ɛ on the dynamic elasticity modulus (Young’s modulus E) and internal friction (logarithmic decrement δ) of high-pressure polyethylene samples with different histories is studied. Acoustic measurements are made by a resonance method using the longitudinal vibrations of a composite piezoelectric vibrator at a frequency of ≈ 100 kHz. The dependences E(ɛ) and δ(ɛ) are taken at room temperature. From the acoustic data, the elasticity and microplasticity of the samples are estimated. It is found that the microplasticity remains almost unaffected upon irradiation and aging, while the elasticity modulus and breaking elongation per unit length considerably depend on the history and clearly correlated with each other. The observed effects are explained by the fact that atom-atom interaction and defects inside polymer macromolecules substantially influence the elastic modulus and breaking strength, while the inelastic microplastic strain is most likely associated with molecule-molecule interaction, which is affected by irradiation insignificantly.

  14. Non-invasive estimation of static and pulsatile intracranial pressure from transcranial acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Levinsky, Alexandra; Papyan, Surik; Weinberg, Guy; Stadheim, Trond; Eide, Per Kristian

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether a method for estimation of non-invasive ICP (nICP) from transcranial acoustic (TCA) signals mixed with head-generated sounds estimate the static and pulsatile invasive ICP (iICP). For that purpose, simultaneous iICP and mixed TCA signals were obtained from patients undergoing continuous iICP monitoring as part of clinical management. The ear probe placed in the right outer ear channel sent a TCA signal with fixed frequency (621 Hz) that was picked up by the left ear probe along with acoustic signals generated by the intracranial compartment. Based on a mathematical model of the association between mixed TCA and iICP, the static and pulsatile nICP values were determined. Total 39 patients were included in the study; the total number of observations for prediction of static and pulsatile iICP were 5789 and 6791, respectively. The results demonstrated a good agreement between iICP/nICP observations, with mean difference of 0.39 mmHg and 0.53 mmHg for static and pulsatile ICP, respectively. In summary, in this cohort of patients, mixed TCA signals estimated the static and pulsatile iICP with rather good accuracy. Further studies are required to validate whether mixed TCA signals may become useful for measurement of nICP. PMID:26997563

  15. Use of acoustic tools to reveal otherwise cryptic responses of forest elephants to oil exploration.

    PubMed

    Wrege, Peter H; Rowland, Elizabeth D; Thompson, Bruce G; Batruch, Nikolas

    2010-12-01

    Most evaluations of the effects of human activities on wild animals have focused on estimating changes in abundance and distribution of threatened species; however, ecosystem disturbances also affect aspects of animal behavior such as short-term movement, activity budgets, and reproduction. It may take a long time for changes in behavior to manifest as changes in abundance or distribution. Therefore, it is important to have methods with which to detect short-term behavioral responses to human activity. We used continuous acoustic and seismic monitoring to evaluate the short-term effects of seismic prospecting for oil on forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis) in Gabon, Central Africa. We monitored changes in elephant abundance and activity as a function of the frequency and intensity of acoustic and seismic signals from dynamite detonation and human activity. Elephants did not flee the area being explored; the relative number of elephants increased in a seasonal pattern typical of elsewhere in the ecosystem. In the exploration area, however, they became more nocturnal. Neither the intensity nor the frequency of dynamite blasts affected the frequency of calling or the daily pattern of elephant activity. Nevertheless, the shift of activity to nocturnal hours became more pronounced as human activity neared each monitored area of forest. This change in activity pattern and its likely causes would not have been detected through standard monitoring methods, which are not sensitive to behavioral changes over short time scales (e.g., dung transects, point counts) or cover a limited area (e.g., camera traps). Simultaneous acoustic monitoring of animal communication, human, and environmental sounds allows the documentation of short-term behavioral changes in response to human disturbance.

  16. The Intracranial Volume Pressure Response in Increased Intracranial Pressure Patients: Clinical Significance of the Volume Pressure Indicator

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background For patients suffering from primary brain injury, monitoring intracranial pressure alone is not enough to reflect the dynamic intracranial condition. In our previous study, a segment of the pressure-volume curve can be expressed by the parabolic regression model with single indicator “a”. The aim of this study is to evaluate if the indicator “a” can reflect intracranial conditions. Methods Patients with traumatic brain injury, spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage, and/or hydrocephalus who had external ventricular drainage from January 2009 to February 2010 were included. The successive volume pressure response values were obtained by successive drainage of cerebral spinal fluid from intracranial pressure 20–25 mm Hg to 10 mm Hg. The relationship between withdrawn cerebral spinal fluid volume and intracranial pressure was analyzed by the parabolic regression model with single parameter “a”. Results The overall mean for indicator “a” was 0.422 ± 0.046. The mean of “a” in hydrocephalus was 0.173 ± 0.024 and in severe intracranial mass with slender ventricle, it was 0.663 ± 0.062. The two extreme intracranial conditions had a statistical significant difference (p<0.001). Conclusion The indicator “a” of a pressure-volume curve can reflect the dynamic intracranial condition and is comparable in different situations. A significantly larger indicator “a” with increased intracranial pressure is always observed in severe intracranial mass lesions with cerebral edema. A significantly smaller indicator “a” with increased intracranial pressure is observed in hydrocephalus. Brain computed tomography should be performed early if a rapid elevation of indicator “a” is detected, as it can reveal some ongoing intracranial pathology prior to clinical deterioration. Increased intracranial pressure was frequently observed in patients with intracranial pathology. The progression can be differentiated using the pattern of the volume

  17. External and middle ear sound pressure distribution and acoustic coupling to the tympanic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bergevin, Christopher; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Sound energy is conveyed to the inner ear by the diaphanous, cone-shaped tympanic membrane (TM). The TM moves in a complex manner and transmits sound signals to the inner ear with high fidelity, pressure gain, and a short delay. Miniaturized sensors allowing high spatial resolution in small spaces and sensitivity to high frequencies were used to explore how pressure drives the TM. Salient findings are: (1) A substantial pressure drop exists across the TM, and varies in frequency from ∼10 to 30 dB. It thus appears reasonable to approximate the drive to the TM as being defined solely by the pressure in the ear canal (EC) close to the TM. (2) Within the middle ear cavity (MEC), spatial variations in sound pressure could vary by more than 20 dB, and the MEC pressure at certain locations/frequencies was as large as in the EC. (3) Spatial variations in pressure along the TM surface on the EC-side were typically less than 5 dB up to 50 kHz. Larger surface variations were observed on the MEC-side. PMID:24606269

  18. External and middle ear sound pressure distribution and acoustic coupling to the tympanic membrane.

    PubMed

    Bergevin, Christopher; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2014-03-01

    Sound energy is conveyed to the inner ear by the diaphanous, cone-shaped tympanic membrane (TM). The TM moves in a complex manner and transmits sound signals to the inner ear with high fidelity, pressure gain, and a short delay. Miniaturized sensors allowing high spatial resolution in small spaces and sensitivity to high frequencies were used to explore how pressure drives the TM. Salient findings are: (1) A substantial pressure drop exists across the TM, and varies in frequency from ∼10 to 30 dB. It thus appears reasonable to approximate the drive to the TM as being defined solely by the pressure in the ear canal (EC) close to the TM. (2) Within the middle ear cavity (MEC), spatial variations in sound pressure could vary by more than 20 dB, and the MEC pressure at certain locations/frequencies was as large as in the EC. (3) Spatial variations in pressure along the TM surface on the EC-side were typically less than 5 dB up to 50 kHz. Larger surface variations were observed on the MEC-side.

  19. The structural response of gadolinium phosphate to pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Heffernan, Karina M.; Ross, Nancy L.; Spencer, Elinor C.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2016-06-16

    In this study, accurate elastic constants for gadolinium phosphate (GdPO4) have been measured by single-crystal high-pressure diffraction methods. The bulk modulus of GdPO4 determined under hydrostatic conditions, 128.1(8) GPa (K'=5.8(2)), is markedly different from that obtained with GdPO4 under non-hydrostatic conditions (160(2) GPa), which indicates the importance of shear stresses on the elastic response of this phosphate. Finally, high pressure Raman and diffraction analysis indicate that the PO4 tetrahedra behave as rigid units in response to pressure and that contraction of the GdPO4 structure is facilitated by bending/twisting of the Gd–O–P links that result in increased distortion in the GdO9more » polyhedra.« less

  20. The structural response of gadolinium phosphate to pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Karina M.; Ross, Nancy L.; Spencer, Elinor C.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate elastic constants for gadolinium phosphate (GdPO4) have been measured by single-crystal high-pressure diffraction methods. The bulk modulus of GdPO4 determined under hydrostatic conditions, 128.1(8) GPa (Kʹ=5.8(2)), is markedly different from that obtained with GdPO4 under non-hydrostatic conditions (160(2) GPa), which indicates the importance of shear stresses on the elastic response of this phosphate. High pressure Raman and diffraction analysis indicate that the PO4 tetrahedra behave as rigid units in response to pressure and that contraction of the GdPO4 structure is facilitated by bending/twisting of the Gd-O-P links that result in increased distortion in the GdO9 polyhedra.

  1. Down-regulation of otospiralin mRNA in response to acoustic stress in guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, Antonella; Pianese, Luigi; Saulino, Claudio; Di Leva, Francesca; Sequino, Luigi; Cocozza, Sergio; Marciano, Elio; Franzé, Annamaria

    2004-12-01

    Noise over-stimulation will induce or influence molecular pathways in the cochlea; one approach to the identification of the components of these pathways in the cochlea is to examine genes and proteins that change following different types and levels of stress. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction provides a method to look at differential expression of genes in the acoustic stress response. By using this technique we have revealed a down-regulation of the level of otospiralin mRNA in the cochlea of guinea pigs after white noise over-stimulation for 2 h at 108 dB SPL. Otospiralin represents an inner ear specific protein found in fibrocytes of spiral limbus and spiral ligament in the cochlea, and some regions of the vestibule as the stroma underlying the utricle and crista sensory epithelia and the subepithelial layer of the walls of semicircular canals and maculae. It has been recently reported that transient down-regulation of otospiralin in guinea pigs causes vestibular syndrome and deafness. Our results suggest a possible role of this gene in response to acoustical stress, although the exact mechanism remains to be resolved. PMID:15567600

  2. A Corticosteroid-Responsive Transcription Factor, Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger Protein, Mediates Protection of the Cochlea from Acoustic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Peppi, Marcello; Kujawa, Sharon G.; Sewell, William F.

    2012-01-01

    Animals can be induced to resist cochlear damage associated with acoustic trauma by exposure to a variety of “conditioning” stimuli, including restraint stress, moderate level sound, heat stress, hypoxia, and corticosteroids. Here we identify in mice a corticosteroid-responsive transcription factor, PLZF (promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein), which mediates conditioned protection of the cochlea from acoustic trauma. PLZF mRNA levels in the cochlea are increased following conditioning stimuli, including restraint stress, dexamethasone administration, and moderate-to-high level acoustic stimulation. Heterozygous mutant (luxoid.Zbtb16LU/J) mice deficient in PLZF have hearing and responses to acoustic trauma similar to their wild type littermates but are unable to generate conditioning-induced protection from acoustic trauma. PLZF immunoreactivity is present in the spiral ganglion, lateral wall of the cochlea, and organ of Corti, all targets for acoustic trauma. PLZF is also present in the brain and PLZF mRNA in brain is elevated following conditioning stimuli. The identification of a transcription factor that mediates conditioned protection from trauma provides a tool for understanding the protective action of corticosteroids, which are widely used in treating acute hearing loss, and has relevance to understanding the role of corticosteroids in trauma protection. PMID:21228182

  3. Contrast agent response to chirp reversal: simulations, optical observations, and acoustical verification.

    PubMed

    Novell, Anthony; van der Meer, Sander; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2009-06-01

    Active response of a microbubble is characterized by its resonance behavior where the microbubble might oscillate after the excitation waveform has been turned off. We investigate in this paper an excitation approach based on this resonance phenomenon using chirps. The technique, called chirp reversal, consists in transmitting a first excitation signal, the up-sweep chirp (UPF) of increasing frequency with time, and a second excitation signal, the down-sweep (DNF) that is a replica of the first signal, but time reversed with a sweep of decreasing frequency with time. Simulations using a modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation were carried out to determine bubble response to chirp reversal. In addition, optical observations and acoustical measurements were carried out to corroborate the theoretical findings. Results of simulations show differences between bubbles' oscillations in response to up-sweep and down-sweep chirps mainly for transmitted center frequencies above the bubble's resonance frequency. Bubbles that are at resonance or far away from resonance engender identical responses. From the optical data, the larger bubbles showed different dynamics when up-sweep or down-sweep chirps were transmitted. Smaller bubbles (< 2 microm diameter) appear to be less sensitive to frequency sweep at 1.7 MHz center frequency. However, driven at a higher center frequency, smaller bubbles tend to be more sensitive. These results were confirmed through the acoustical measurements. We concluded that simulations and experimental data show that significant differences might be observed between bubbles' responses to UPF and DNF chirps. We demonstrate in this study that, for an optimal use of chirp reversal, the transmit frequency should be higher than the resonance frequency of the contrast microbubbles.

  4. Comparative evaluation of Space Transportation System (STS)-3 flight and acoustic test random vibration response of the OSS-1 payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    On, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of the Space Transportation System (STS)-3 flight and acoustic test random vibration response of the Office of Space Science-1 (OSS-1) payload is presented. The results provide insight into the characteristics of vibroacoustic response of pallet payload components in the payload bay during STS flights.

  5. Acoustic radiation and surface pressure characteristics of an airfoil due to incident turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paterson, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of the noise and unsteady surface pressure characteristics of an isolated airfoil in a uniform mean velocity, homogeneous, nearly-isotropic turbulence field was conducted. Wind tunnel experiments were performed with a 23 cm chord, two dimensional NACA 0012 airfoil over a free stream Mach number range of 0.1 to 0.5. Far-field noise spectra and directivity were measured in an anechoic chamber that surrounded the tunnel open jet test section. Spanwise and chordwise distribution of unsteady airfoil surface pressure spectra and surface pressure cross-spectra were obtained. Incident turbulence intensities, length scales, spectra, and spanwise cross-spectra, required in the calculation of far-field noise and surface pressure characteristics were also measured.

  6. Transition and acoustic response of recirculation structures in an unconfined co-axial isothermal swirling flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, R.; Miglani, Ankur; Basu, Saptarshi

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports the first observations of transition from a pre-vortex breakdown (Pre-VB) flow reversal to a fully developed central toroidal recirculation zone in a non-reacting, double-concentric swirling jet configuration and its response to longitudinal acoustic excitation. This transition proceeds with the formation of two intermediate, critical flow regimes. First, a partially penetrated vortex breakdown bubble (VBB) is formed that indicates the first occurrence of an enclosed structure as the centre jet penetration is suppressed by the growing outer roll-up eddy; resulting in an opposed flow stagnation region. Second, a metastable transition structure is formed that marks the collapse of inner mixing vortices. In this study, the time-averaged topological changes in the coherent recirculation structures are discussed based on the non-dimensional modified Rossby number (Rom) which appears to describe the spreading of the zone of swirl influence in different flow regimes. Further, the time-mean global acoustic response of pre-VB and VBB is measured as a function of pulsing frequency using the relative aerodynamic blockage factor (i.e., maximum radial width of the inner recirculation zone). It is observed that all flow modes except VBB are structurally unstable as they exhibit severe transverse radial shrinkage (˜20%) at the burner Helmholtz resonant modes (100-110 Hz). In contrast, all flow regimes show positional instability as seen by the large-scale, asymmetric spatial shifting of the vortex core centres. Finally, the mixing transfer function M (f) and magnitude squared coherence λ2(f) analysis is presented to determine the natural coupling modes of the system dynamic parameters (u', p'), i.e., local acoustic response. It is seen that the pre-VB flow mode exhibits a narrow-band, low pass filter behavior with a linear response window of 100-105 Hz. However, in the VBB structure, presence of critical regions such as the opposed flow stagnation region

  7. Use of large-scale acoustic monitoring to assess anthropogenic pressures on Orthoptera communities.

    PubMed

    Penone, Caterina; Le Viol, Isabelle; Pellissier, Vincent; Julien, Jean-François; Bas, Yves; Kerbiriou, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Biodiversity monitoring at large spatial and temporal scales is greatly needed in the context of global changes. Although insects are a species-rich group and are important for ecosystem functioning, they have been largely neglected in conservation studies and policies, mainly due to technical and methodological constraints. Sound detection, a nondestructive method, is easily applied within a citizen-science framework and could be an interesting solution for insect monitoring. However, it has not yet been tested at a large scale. We assessed the value of a citizen-science program in which Orthoptera species (Tettigoniidae) were monitored acoustically along roads. We used Bayesian model-averaging analyses to test whether we could detect widely known patterns of anthropogenic effects on insects, such as the negative effects of urbanization or intensive agriculture on Orthoptera populations and communities. We also examined site-abundance correlations between years and estimated the biases in species detection to evaluate and improve the protocol. Urbanization and intensive agricultural landscapes negatively affected Orthoptera species richness, diversity, and abundance. This finding is consistent with results of previous studies of Orthoptera, vertebrates, carabids, and butterflies. The average mass of communities decreased as urbanization increased. The dispersal ability of communities increased as the percentage of agricultural land and, to a lesser extent, urban area increased. Despite changes in abundances over time, we found significant correlations between yearly abundances. We identified biases linked to the protocol (e.g., car speed or temperature) that can be accounted for ease in analyses. We argue that acoustic monitoring of Orthoptera along roads offers several advantages for assessing Orthoptera biodiversity at large spatial and temporal extents, particularly in a citizen science framework.

  8. Use of large-scale acoustic monitoring to assess anthropogenic pressures on Orthoptera communities.

    PubMed

    Penone, Caterina; Le Viol, Isabelle; Pellissier, Vincent; Julien, Jean-François; Bas, Yves; Kerbiriou, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Biodiversity monitoring at large spatial and temporal scales is greatly needed in the context of global changes. Although insects are a species-rich group and are important for ecosystem functioning, they have been largely neglected in conservation studies and policies, mainly due to technical and methodological constraints. Sound detection, a nondestructive method, is easily applied within a citizen-science framework and could be an interesting solution for insect monitoring. However, it has not yet been tested at a large scale. We assessed the value of a citizen-science program in which Orthoptera species (Tettigoniidae) were monitored acoustically along roads. We used Bayesian model-averaging analyses to test whether we could detect widely known patterns of anthropogenic effects on insects, such as the negative effects of urbanization or intensive agriculture on Orthoptera populations and communities. We also examined site-abundance correlations between years and estimated the biases in species detection to evaluate and improve the protocol. Urbanization and intensive agricultural landscapes negatively affected Orthoptera species richness, diversity, and abundance. This finding is consistent with results of previous studies of Orthoptera, vertebrates, carabids, and butterflies. The average mass of communities decreased as urbanization increased. The dispersal ability of communities increased as the percentage of agricultural land and, to a lesser extent, urban area increased. Despite changes in abundances over time, we found significant correlations between yearly abundances. We identified biases linked to the protocol (e.g., car speed or temperature) that can be accounted for ease in analyses. We argue that acoustic monitoring of Orthoptera along roads offers several advantages for assessing Orthoptera biodiversity at large spatial and temporal extents, particularly in a citizen science framework. PMID:23692213

  9. Nanorod-Based Fast-Response Pressure-Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy; VanderWal, Randall

    2007-01-01

    A proposed program of research and development would be devoted to exploitation of nanomaterials in pressuresensitive paints (PSPs), which are used on wind-tunnel models for mapping surface pressures associated with flow fields. Heretofore, some success has been achieved in measuring steady-state pressures by use of PSPs, but success in measuring temporally varying pressures has been elusive because of the inherent slowness of the optical responses of these materials. A PSP contains a dye that luminesces in a suitable wavelength range in response to photoexcitation in a shorter wavelength range. The luminescence is quenched by oxygen at a rate proportional to the partial pressure of oxygen and thus proportional to the pressure of air. As a result, the intensity of luminescence varies inversely with the pressure of air. The major problem in developing a PSP that could be easily applied to a wind-tunnel model and could be useful for measuring rapidly varying pressure is to provide very high gas diffusivity for rapid, easy transport of oxygen to and from active dye molecules. Most PSPs include polymer-base binders, which limit the penetration of oxygen to dye molecules, thereby reducing responses to pressure fluctuations. The proposed incorporation of nanomaterials (somewhat more specifically, nanorods) would result in paints having nanostructured surfaces that, relative to conventional PSP surfaces, would afford easier and more nearly complete access of oxygen molecules to dye molecules. One measure of greater access is effective surface area: For a typical PSP as proposed applied to a given solid surface, the nanometer-scale structural features would result in an exposed surface area more than 100 times that of a conventional PSP, and the mass of proposed PSP needed to cover the surface would be less than tenth of the mass of the conventional PSP. One aspect of the proposed development would be to synthesize nanorods of Si/SiO2, in both tangle-mat and regular- array

  10. The Effect of Basis Selection on Thermal-Acoustic Random Response Prediction Using Nonlinear Modal Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Przekop, Adam

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this investigation is to further develop nonlinear modal numerical simulation methods for prediction of geometrically nonlinear response due to combined thermal-acoustic loadings. As with any such method, the accuracy of the solution is dictated by the selection of the modal basis, through which the nonlinear modal stiffness is determined. In this study, a suite of available bases are considered including (i) bending modes only; (ii) coupled bending and companion modes; (iii) uncoupled bending and companion modes; and (iv) bending and membrane modes. Comparison of these solutions with numerical simulation in physical degrees-of-freedom indicates that inclusion of any membrane mode variants (ii - iv) in the basis affects the bending displacement and stress response predictions. The most significant effect is on the membrane displacement, where it is shown that only the type (iv) basis accurately predicts its behavior. Results are presented for beam and plate structures in the thermally pre-buckled regime.

  11. Nonlinear and snap-through responses of curved panels to intense acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. F.

    1989-01-01

    Assuming a single-mode transverse displacement, a simple formula is derived for the transverse load-displacement relationship of a plate under in-plane compression. The formula is used to derive a simple analytical expression for the nonlinear dynamic response of postbuckled plates under sinusoidal or random excitation. The highly nonlinear motion of snap-through can be easily interpreted using the single-mode formula. Experimental results are obtained with buckled and cylindrical aluminum panels using discrete frequency and broadband excitation of mechanical and acoustic forces. Some important effects of the snap-through motion on the dynamic response of the postbuckled plates are described. Static tests were used to identify the deformation shape during snap-through.

  12. Response mechanism for surface acoustic wave gas sensors based on surface-adsorption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiansheng; Lu, Yanyan

    2014-04-16

    A theoretical model is established to describe the response mechanism of surface acoustic wave (SAW) gas sensors based on physical adsorption on the detector surface. Wohljent's method is utilized to describe the relationship of sensor output (frequency shift of SAW oscillator) and the mass loaded on the detector surface. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) formula and its improved form are introduced to depict the adsorption behavior of gas on the detector surface. By combining the two methods, we obtain a theoretical model for the response mechanism of SAW gas sensors. By using a commercial SAW gas chromatography (GC) analyzer, an experiment is performed to measure the frequency shifts caused by different concentration of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP). The parameters in the model are given by fitting the experimental results and the theoretical curve agrees well with the experimental data.

  13. Discrimination of Speech Stimuli Based on Neuronal Response Phase Patterns Depends on Acoustics But Not Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Poeppel, David

    2010-01-01

    Speech stimuli give rise to neural activity in the listener that can be observed as waveforms using magnetoencephalography. Although waveforms vary greatly from trial to trial due to activity unrelated to the stimulus, it has been demonstrated that spoken sentences can be discriminated based on theta-band (3–7 Hz) phase patterns in single-trial response waveforms. Furthermore, manipulations of the speech signal envelope and fine structure that reduced intelligibility were found to produce correlated reductions in discrimination performance, suggesting a relationship between theta-band phase patterns and speech comprehension. This study investigates the nature of this relationship, hypothesizing that theta-band phase patterns primarily reflect cortical processing of low-frequency (<40 Hz) modulations present in the acoustic signal and required for intelligibility, rather than processing exclusively related to comprehension (e.g., lexical, syntactic, semantic). Using stimuli that are quite similar to normal spoken sentences in terms of low-frequency modulation characteristics but are unintelligible (i.e., their time-inverted counterparts), we find that discrimination performance based on theta-band phase patterns is equal for both types of stimuli. Consistent with earlier findings, we also observe that whereas theta-band phase patterns differ across stimuli, power patterns do not. We use a simulation model of the single-trial response to spoken sentence stimuli to demonstrate that phase-locked responses to low-frequency modulations of the acoustic signal can account not only for the phase but also for the power results. The simulation offers insight into the interpretation of the empirical results with respect to phase-resetting and power-enhancement models of the evoked response. PMID:20484530

  14. Shock tube investigation of dynamic response of pressure transducers for validation of rotor performance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bershader, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    For some time now, NASA has had a program under way to aid in the validation of rotor performance and acoustics codes associated with the UH-60 rotary-wing aircraft; and to correlate results of such studies with those obtained from investigations of other selected aircraft rotor performance. A central feature of these studies concerns the dynamic measurement of surface pressure at various locations up to frequencies of 25 KHz. For this purpose, fast-response gauges of the Kulite type are employed. The latter need to be buried in the rotor; they record surface pressures which are transmitted by a pipette connected to the gauge. The other end of the pipette is cut flush with the surface. In certain locations, the pipette configuration includes a rather sharp right-angle bend. The natural question has arisen in this connection: In what way are the pipettes modifying the signals received at the rotor surface and subsequently transmitted to the sensitive Kulite transducer element. The basic details and results of the program performed and recently completed in the High Pressure Shock Tube Laboratory of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University are given.

  15. The Responsivity of a Miniaturized Passive Implantable Wireless Pressure Sensor.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Lan, Di; Goldman, Ken; Etemadi, Mozziyar; Shahnasser, Hamid; Roy, Shuvo

    2011-01-01

    A miniature batteryless implantable wireless pressure sensor that can be used deep inside the body is desired by the medical community. MEMS technology makes it possible to achieve high responsivity that directly determines the operating distance between a miniature implanted sensor and the external RF probe, while providing the read-out. In this paper, for the first time, an analytical expression of the system responsivity versus the sensor design is derived using an equivalent circuit model. Also, the integration of micro-coil inductors and pressure sensitive capacitors on a single silicon chip using MEMS fabrication techniques is demonstrated. Further, the derived analytical design theory is validated by the measured responsivity of these sensors. PMID:25309965

  16. The Responsivity of a Miniaturized Passive Implantable Wireless Pressure Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hao; Lan, Di; Goldman, Ken; Etemadi, Mozziyar; Shahnasser, Hamid; Roy, Shuvo

    2011-01-01

    A miniature batteryless implantable wireless pressure sensor that can be used deep inside the body is desired by the medical community. MEMS technology makes it possible to achieve high responsivity that directly determines the operating distance between a miniature implanted sensor and the external RF probe, while providing the read-out. In this paper, for the first time, an analytical expression of the system responsivity versus the sensor design is derived using an equivalent circuit model. Also, the integration of micro-coil inductors and pressure sensitive capacitors on a single silicon chip using MEMS fabrication techniques is demonstrated. Further, the derived analytical design theory is validated by the measured responsivity of these sensors. PMID:25309965

  17. Toward a reference ultrasonic cavitation vessel: Part 2--investigating the spatial variation and acoustic pressure threshold of inertial cavitation in a 25 kHz ultrasound field.

    PubMed

    Hodnett, Mark; Zeqiri, Bajram

    2008-08-01

    As part of an ongoing project to establish a reference facility for acoustic cavitation at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), carefully controlled studies on a 25 kHz, 1.8 kW cylindrical vessel are described. Using a patented high-frequency acoustic emission detection method and a sonar hydrophone, results are presented of the spatial variation of inertial acoustic cavitation with increasing peak-negative pressure. Results show that at low operating levels, inertial acoustic cavitation is restricted to, and is strongly localized on, the vessel axis. At intermediate power settings, inertial acoustic cavitation also occurs close to the vessel walls, and at higher settings, a complex spatial variation is seen that is not apparent in measurements of the 25 kHz driving field alone. At selected vessel locations, a systematic investigation of the inertial cavitation threshold is described. This was carried out by making simultaneous measurements of the peak-negative pressures leading to inertial cavitation and the resultant MHz-frequency emissions, and indicates an inertial cavitation threshold of 101 kPa +/- 14% (estimated expanded uncertainty). However, an intermediate threshold at 84 kPa +/- 14% (estimated expanded uncertainty) is also seen. The results are discussed alongside theoretical predictions and recent experimental findings.

  18. Acoustic stress responses in juvenile sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax induced by offshore pile driving.

    PubMed

    Debusschere, Elisabeth; Hostens, Kris; Adriaens, Dominique; Ampe, Bart; Botteldooren, Dick; De Boeck, Gudrun; De Muynck, Amelie; Sinha, Amit Kumar; Vandendriessche, Sofie; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Vincx, Magda; Degraer, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Underwater sound generated by pile driving during construction of offshore wind farms is a major concern in many countries. This paper reports on the acoustic stress responses in young European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (68 and 115 days old), based on four in situ experiments as close as 45 m from a pile driving activity. As a primary stress response, whole-body cortisol seemed to be too sensitive to 'handling' bias. On the other hand, measured secondary stress responses to pile driving showed significant reductions in oxygen consumption rate and low whole-body lactate concentrations. Furthermore, repeated exposure to impulsive sound significantly affected both primary and secondary stress responses. Under laboratory conditions, no tertiary stress responses (no changes in specific growth rate or Fulton's condition factor) were noted in young sea bass 30 days after the treatment. Still, the demonstrated acute stress responses and potentially repeated exposure to impulsive sound in the field will inevitably lead to less fit fish in the wild. PMID:26561450

  19. Cryogenic oxygen jet response to transverse acoustic excitation with the first transverse and the first combined longitudinal-transverse modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardi, J. S.; Oschwald, M.

    2016-07-01

    The intact length of the dense oxygen core from an oxygen-hydrogen shear coaxial rocket injector was measured. The measurements were made in a rectangular rocket combustor with optical access and acoustic forcing. The combustor was operated at chamber pressures of 40 and 60 bar, with either ambient temperature or cryogenic hydrogen. The multielement injection spray is subjected to forced transverse gas oscillations of two different acoustic resonance modes; the first transverse (1T) mode at 4200 Hz and the first combined longitudinal-transverse (1L1T) at 5500 Hz. Intact core length is measured from high-speed shadowgraph imaging. The dependence of intact core length with increasing acoustic amplitude is compared for the two modes of excitation.

  20. Survey of the Acoustic near Field of Three Nozzles at a Pressure Ratio of 30

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mull, Harold R; Erickson, John C , Jr

    1957-01-01

    The sound pressures radiating from the exhaust streams of two convergent-divergent and one convergent nozzle were measured. Exit diameters were 1.206 in. for the expanded nozzle and 0.625 in. for the convergent nozzle. The results are presented in a series of contour maps of overall and fine 1/3-octave-band sound pressures. The location of the source of the noise in each 1/3-octave band in the frequency range of 30 to 16,000 cps and the total power radiated were determined and compared with those of subsonic jets.

  1. Acoustic anisotropy of hcp metals at high pressure: the example of cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonangeli, D.; Occelli, F.; Aracne, C.; Farber, D.; Guyot, F.; Requardt, H.; Fiquet, G.; Krisch, M.

    2003-04-01

    Beyond studies of the bulk properties of the Earth's core, seismological studies show that the inner core is elastically anisotropic (e.g. Woodhouse et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 13, 1549, 1986). with an axial symmetry and an amplitude of about 3%, with the fast direction oriented parallel to the Earth's rotation axis. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this feature, however the anisotropy of hcp iron at very high pressure is not quantitatively known. Indeed, theoretical results predict a rather low intrinsic anisotropy, almost requiring a perfect alignment of iron hcp crystals in order to account for the observed seismic anisotropy (Stixrude and Cohen, Science, 267, 1972, 1995). On the other hand, texture x-ray diffraction measurements of iron at very high-pressure (Mao et al., Nature 399, 280, 1999; Wenk et al., Nature 405, 1044, 2000) indicate a large compressional-wave anisotropy which relieves the "perfect alignment" textural constraint. The anisotropy proposed by texture measurements, when compared to calculations, is not only different in magnitude, but as well in direction. In order to settle these discrepancies among the various indirect experimental techniques and theory, a direct experimental determination of the elastic constants of hcp iron and their evolution with pressure and temperature is needed. However, obtaining single crystals of hcp-Fe at high pressure is currently not possible. To address the issue of elastic anisotropy, we present results obtained on cobalt. Unlike iron, hcp cobalt is stable at room temperature and ambient pressure to at least 79 GPa (Fujihisa and Takemura, Phys. Rev. B 54, 5, 1996). Cobalt is located next to iron in the 3d transition metals classification and exhibits similar thermo-elastic behaviour in its highly compact hcp-structure, which should make of cobalt a good proxy for iron at high-pressure. The five independent elastic constants (C11, C33, C44, C12, C13) and their pressure dependence have been

  2. Influence of gradient acoustic noise on fMRI response in the human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nanyin; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Chen, Wei

    2005-08-01

    A paired-stimuli paradigm combined with fMRI was utilized to study the effect of gradient acoustic noise on fMRI response in the human primary visual cortex (V1) in terms of the auditory-visual cross-modal neural interaction. The gradient noise generated during the fMRI acquisition was used as the primary stimulus, and a single flashing light was used as the secondary stimulus. An interstimulus interval (ISI) separated the two. Six tasks were designed with different ISIs ranging from 50 to 700 ms. Both BOLD signal intensity and the number of activated pixels in V1 were analyzed and examined, and they showed a significant reduction when the gradient noise preceded the flashing light by approximately 300 ms. These results indicate that the gradient acoustic noise generated during fMRI acquisitions does interfere with neural behavior and the BOLD signal in the human visual cortex. This interference is modulated by the delay between the gradient noise and visual stimulation, and it can be studied quantitatively when the stimulation paradigm is designed appropriately. This study provides evidence of the auditory-visual interaction during fMRI studies, and the results should have an impact on fMRI applications.

  3. Effect of Fuel Composition on the Response of an Acoustically Forced Flat Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, Jan

    Interest in alternative fuels for power generation is growing, yet these fuels bring new challenges to gas turbine design and operation. Among these challenges are combustor operability issues, highlighted by problems with combustion instabilities. For this thesis, a fundamental study of the effects of fuel composition on combustion dynamics was undertaken. An acoustically forced flat flame burner was constructed, allowing measurement of the flame transfer function (FTF) relating acoustic perturbations to heat release rate fluctuations in the flame. Tests were done using methane, along with simulated syngas and biogas fuel mixtures over a variety of operating conditions. Large variations in methane concentration had a significant impact on the FTF, while variations in the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio did not impact the FTF in fuel mixtures of equal parts methane and syngas. The Strouhal number was found to be an important parameter in predicting phase response independent of the fuel type. Flame liftoff distance and fuel composition were the key parameters determining the peak FTF magnitude. A hypothesis on the role of the non-adiabatic nature of the flat flame and thermal-diffusive effects on the trends in peak FTF magnitude is presented and discussed.

  4. Response of arterial resistance and critical pressure to changes in perfusion pressure in canine hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Shrier, I; Magder, S

    1993-12-01

    The dynamic pressure-flow relationship in the canine hindlimb at normal arterial pressure is best explained by modeling a Starling resistor (critical pressure, Pcrit) at the level of the arterioles. Regulation of flow can therefore occur at the Starling resistor through changes in Pcrit or along the length of the vessel through changes in arterial resistance (Ra). We hypothesized that increasing perfusion pressure (Pper) would increase Pcrit due to the myogenic response but would decrease Ra because of flow-mediated vasodilation and passive effects. We pump-perfused vascularly isolated hindlimbs of anesthetized dogs and then measured Pcrit and calculated Ra over Pper range of 75-175 mmHg. When Pper was increased from 75 to 175 mmHg, Pcrit increased from 33 +/- 2 to 48 +/- 6 (means +/- SE) mmHg, whereas Ra decreased from 10.1 +/- 1.2 to 7.86 +/- 0.7 mmHg.min.100 g.ml-1 (P < 0.01). Thus the responses of Pcrit and Ra to an increase in Pper were dissociated. In a second part of the study, we lowered carotid sinus pressure to determine the effects of central factors on local autoregulation. A decrease in carotid sinus pressure increased Pcrit and Ra at each Pper (P < 0.05). We conclude that an increase in Pper causes the arterial vasculature to constrict at the level of the Starling resistor and dilate more proximally. The carotid baroreflex causes an increase in tone throughout the arterial vasculature but does not alter the local response to increases in Pper. PMID:8285232

  5. Effects of an acoustic diode on the pressure waveform and cavitation bubble dynamics produced by a piezoelectric shock wave generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Songlin; Zhong, Pei

    2003-10-01

    High-speed schlieren imaging, combined with fiber optical probe hydrophone (FOPH) and passive cavitation detection (PCD) were used to access the effects of an acoustic diode (AD) on the pressure waveform and associated cavitation activities produced by a piezoelectric shock wave (PSW) generator. Without the AD, a typical pressure waveform at the focus of the PSW generator consists of a leading shock wave, followed by a tensile wave and several oscillation waves (OWs) of gradually reduced amplitudes. When the AD was placed 30 mm in front of the focus, the amplitude of the tensile wave was reduced and the subsequent OWs were removed. The pulse intensity integral of the tensile wave was reduced by 58%, and subsequently, PSW-induced bubble dynamics were altered significantly. Based on PCD data, the collapse time of cavitation bubble(s) was reduced by about 11%. Although intensive collapse of microbubbles was observed in about 10 μs following the shock front of the original PSW, the forced collapse of microbubbles was not observed when the AD was used, presumably due to the removal of the OWs. Theoretical calculation based on the Gilmore model confirmed these experimental observations. [Work supported by the Whitaker Foundation and NIH.

  6. Development of the Acoustically Evoked Behavioral Response in Larval Plainfin Midshipman Fish, Porichthys notatus

    PubMed Central

    Alderks, Peter W.; Sisneros, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    The ontogeny of hearing in fishes has become a major interest among bioacoustics researchers studying fish behavior and sensory ecology. Most fish begin to detect acoustic stimuli during the larval stage which can be important for navigation, predator avoidance and settlement, however relatively little is known about the hearing capabilities of larval fishes. We characterized the acoustically evoked behavioral response (AEBR) in the plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, and used this innate startle-like response to characterize this species' auditory capability during larval development. Age and size of larval midshipman were highly correlated (r2 = 0.92). The AEBR was first observed in larvae at 1.4 cm TL. At a size ≥1.8 cm TL, all larvae responded to a broadband stimulus of 154 dB re1 µPa or −15.2 dB re 1 g (z-axis). Lowest AEBR thresholds were 140–150 dB re 1 µPa or −33 to −23 dB re 1 g for frequencies below 225 Hz. Larval fish with size ranges of 1.9–2.4 cm TL had significantly lower best evoked frequencies than the other tested size groups. We also investigated the development of the lateral line organ and its function in mediating the AEBR. The lateral line organ is likely involved in mediating the AEBR but not necessary to evoke the startle-like response. The midshipman auditory and lateral line systems are functional during early development when the larvae are in the nest and the auditory system appears to have similar tuning characteristics throughout all life history stages. PMID:24340003

  7. Acoustics Research of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Ximing; Houston, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces high acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are used in the prediction of the internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components. Present liftoff vehicle acoustic environment prediction methods utilize stationary data from previously conducted hold-down tests to generate 1/3 octave band Sound Pressure Level (SPL) spectra. In an effort to update the accuracy and quality of liftoff acoustic loading predictions, non-stationary flight data from the Ares I-X were processed in PC-Signal in two flight phases: simulated hold-down and liftoff. In conjunction, the Prediction of Acoustic Vehicle Environments (PAVE) program was developed in MATLAB to allow for efficient predictions of sound pressure levels (SPLs) as a function of station number along the vehicle using semi-empirical methods. This consisted of generating the Dimensionless Spectrum Function (DSF) and Dimensionless Source Location (DSL) curves from the Ares I-X flight data. These are then used in the MATLAB program to generate the 1/3 octave band SPL spectra. Concluding results show major differences in SPLs between the hold-down test data and the processed Ares I-X flight data making the Ares I-X flight data more practical for future vehicle acoustic environment predictions.

  8. Geosat observations of sea level response to barometric pressure forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoar, Timothy J.; Wilson, Clark R.

    1994-01-01

    Altimeter and sea level pressure data from the Geosat mission are analyzed for evidence of inverted barometer responses of sea level to atmospheric pressure forcing. Estimates of the inverted barometer coefficient are given for a variety of geographic regions and time scales using various orbit error removal strategies. There is some sensitivity to the orbit error removal method, but the estimated coefficients show a clear latitudinal dependence and are generally between -0.5 cm/mbar and -0.9 cm/mbar. The southern oceans respond slightly more like an inverted barometer than the northern oceans for similar latitudes. The regression exhibits significant geographic variability, particularly near major circulation features and in the northern hemisphere. The results suggest that the inverted barometer approximation is resonable over much of the oceans, but that some sea level variability may be correlated with barometric pressure by means other than the inverted barometer effect.

  9. Unsteady hydrodynamics of blade forces and acoustic responses of a model scaled submarine excited by propeller's thrust and side-forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yingsan; Wang, Yongsheng

    2013-04-01

    This study presents the unsteady hydrodynamics of the excitations from a 5-bladed propeller at two rotating speeds running in the wake of a small-scaled submarine and the behavior of the submarine's structure and acoustic responses under the propeller excitations. Firstly, the propeller flow and submarine flows are independently validated. The propulsion of the hull-propeller is simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), so as to obtain the transient responses of the propeller excitations. Finally, the structure and acoustic responses of the submarine under propeller excitations are predicted using a finite element/boundary element model in the frequency domain. Results show that (1) the propeller excitations are tonal at the propeller harmonics, and the propeller transversal force is bigger than vertical force. (2) The structure and acoustic responses of the submarine hull is tonal mainly at the propeller harmonics and the resonant mode frequencies of the hull, and the breathing mode in axial direction as well as the bending modes in vertical and transversal directions of the hull can generate strong structure vibration and underwater noise. (3) The maximum sound pressure of the field points increases with the increasing propeller rotating speed at structure resonances and propeller harmonics, and the rudders resonant mode also contributes a lot to the sound radiation. Lastly, the critical rotating speeds of the submarine propeller are determined, which should be carefully taken into consideration when match the propeller with prime mover in the propulsion system. This work shows the importance of the propeller's tonal excitation and the breathing mode plus the bending modes in evaluating submarine's noise radiation.

  10. A microacoustic analysis including viscosity and thermal conductivity to model the effect of the protective cap on the acoustic response of a MEMS microphone

    PubMed Central

    Homentcovschi, D.; Miles, R. N.; Loeppert, P. V.; Zuckerwar, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the effect of the protective cover on the acoustic response of a miniature silicon microphone. The microphone diaphragm is contained within a small rectangular enclosure and the sound enters through a small hole in the enclosure's top surface. A numerical model is presented to predict the variation in the sound field with position within the enclosure. An objective of this study is to determine up to which frequency the pressure distribution remains sufficiently uniform so that a pressure calibration can be made in free space. The secondary motivation for this effort is to facilitate microphone design by providing a means of predicting how the placement of the microphone diaphragm in the package affects the sensitivity and frequency response. While the size of the package is typically small relative to the wavelength of the sounds of interest, because the dimensions of the package are on the order of the thickness of the viscous boundary layer, viscosity can significantly affect the distribution of sound pressure around the diaphragm. In addition to the need to consider viscous effects, it is shown here that one must also carefully account for thermal conductivity to properly represent energy dissipation at the system's primary acoustic resonance frequency. The sound field is calculated using a solution of the linearized system consisting of continuity equation, Navier-Stokes equations, the state equation and the energy equation using a finite element approach. The predicted spatial variation of both the amplitude and phase of the sound pressure is shown over the range of audible frequencies. Excellent agreement is shown between the predicted and measured effects of the package on the microphone's sensitivity. PMID:24701031

  11. Fluid pressure response in poroelastic materials subjected to cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameo, Yoshitaka; Adachi, Taiji; Hojo, Masaki

    2009-11-01

    When cyclic loading is applied to poroelastic materials, a transient stage of interstitial fluid pressure occurs, preceding a steady state. In each stage, the fluid pressure exhibits a characteristic mechanical behavior. In this study, an analytical solution for fluid pressure in two-dimensional poroelastic materials, which is assumed to be isotropic, under cyclic axial and bending loading is presented, based on poroelasticity. The obtained analytical solution contains transient and steady-state responses. Both of these depend on three dimensionless parameters: the dimensionless stress coefficient; the dimensionless frequency; and, the axial-bending loading ratio. We focus particularly on the transient behavior of interstitial fluid pressure with changes in the dimensionless frequency and the axial-bending loading ratio. The transient properties, such as half-value period and contribution factor, depend largely on the dimensionless frequency and have peak values when its value is about 10. This suggests that, under these conditions, the transient response can significantly affect the mechanical behavior of poroelastic materials.

  12. A Patch Density Recommendation based on Convergence Studies for Vehicle Panel Vibration Response resulting from Excitation by a Diffuse Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Jones, Douglas; Towner, Robert; Hunt, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Fluid structural interaction problems that estimate panel vibration from an applied pressure field excitation are quite dependent on the spatial correlation of the pressure field. There is a danger of either over estimating a low frequency response or under predicting broad band panel response in the more modally dense bands if the pressure field spatial correlation is not accounted for adequately. Even when the analyst elects to use a fitted function for the spatial correlation an error may be introduced if the choice of patch density is not fine enough to represent the more continuous spatial correlation function throughout the intended frequency range of interest. Both qualitative and quantitative illustrations evaluating the adequacy of different patch density assumptions to approximate the fitted spatial correlation function are provided. The actual response of a typical vehicle panel system is then evaluated in a convergence study where the patch density assumptions are varied over the same finite element model. The convergence study results are presented illustrating the impact resulting from a poor choice of patch density. The fitted correlation function used in this study represents a Diffuse Acoustic Field (DAF) excitation of the panel to produce vibration response.

  13. Cardiovascular responses of women to lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, M. A. B.; Mathes, K. L.; Hoffler, G. W.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) on the cardiovascular response of 20 women between 23-43 years are evaluated. Calf circumference and cardiovascular data were recorded for women in the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle at -30, -40, and -50 mm Hg LBNP. The data reveal that the two menstrual phases did not cause differences in the way women respond to LBNP. It is observed that during LBNP calf circumference is enlarged; transthoracic impedance, and heart rate are increased; stroke volume, left ventricular ejection time, the Heather Index of contractility and systolic pressure, and cardiac output are reduced; and total peripheral resistance is elevated. The experimental data are compared to Montgomery et al. (1979). It is noted that the response of women to -50 mm Hg LBNP is similar to that of men; however, women adapt to stresses on the cardiovascular system with greater heart rate adjustments.

  14. A dynamic pressure view cell for acoustic stimulation of fluids—Micro-bubble generation and fluid movement in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Robert A.; Shaw, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The development and baseline operation of an acoustic view cell for observing fluids, and fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces in porous media over the frequency range of 10-5000 Hz is described. This range includes the industrially relevant frequency range 500-5000 Hz that is not covered by existing devices. Pressure waveforms of arbitrary shape are generated in a 17.46 mm ID by 200 mm and 690.5 mm long glass tubes at flow rates up to 200 ml/min using a syringe pump. Peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 80 kPa are readily realized at frequencies from 10 to 5000 Hz in bubble free fluids when actuated with 20 Vpp as exemplified using castor oil. At resonant frequencies, peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes exceeding 500 kPa were obtained (castor oil at 2100 Hz when actuated with 20 Vpp). Impacts of vibration on macroscopic liquid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces and interface movement are illustrated. Pressure wave transmission and attenuation in a fluid saturated porous medium, randomly packed 250-330 μm spherical silica beads, is also demonstrated. Attenuation differences and frequency shifts in resonant peaks are used to detect the presence and generation of dispersed micro-bubbles (<180 μm diameter), and bubbles within porous media that are not readily visualized. Envisioned applications include assessment of the impacts of vibration on reaction, mass transfer, and flow/flow pattern outcomes. This knowledge will inform laboratory and pilot scale process studies, where nuisance vibrations may affect the interpretation of process outcomes, and large scale or in situ processes in aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs where imposed vibration may be deployed to improve aspects of process performance. Future work will include miscible interface observation and quantitative measurements in the bulk and in porous media where the roles of micro-bubbles comprise subjects of special interest.

  15. A dynamic pressure view cell for acoustic stimulation of fluids--Micro-bubble generation and fluid movement in porous media.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Robert A; Shaw, J M

    2015-09-01

    The development and baseline operation of an acoustic view cell for observing fluids, and fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces in porous media over the frequency range of 10-5000 Hz is described. This range includes the industrially relevant frequency range 500-5000 Hz that is not covered by existing devices. Pressure waveforms of arbitrary shape are generated in a 17.46 mm ID by 200 mm and 690.5 mm long glass tubes at flow rates up to 200 ml/min using a syringe pump. Peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 80 kPa are readily realized at frequencies from 10 to 5000 Hz in bubble free fluids when actuated with 20 Vpp as exemplified using castor oil. At resonant frequencies, peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes exceeding 500 kPa were obtained (castor oil at 2100 Hz when actuated with 20 Vpp). Impacts of vibration on macroscopic liquid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces and interface movement are illustrated. Pressure wave transmission and attenuation in a fluid saturated porous medium, randomly packed 250-330 μm spherical silica beads, is also demonstrated. Attenuation differences and frequency shifts in resonant peaks are used to detect the presence and generation of dispersed micro-bubbles (<180 μm diameter), and bubbles within porous media that are not readily visualized. Envisioned applications include assessment of the impacts of vibration on reaction, mass transfer, and flow/flow pattern outcomes. This knowledge will inform laboratory and pilot scale process studies, where nuisance vibrations may affect the interpretation of process outcomes, and large scale or in situ processes in aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs where imposed vibration may be deployed to improve aspects of process performance. Future work will include miscible interface observation and quantitative measurements in the bulk and in porous media where the roles of micro-bubbles comprise subjects of special interest.

  16. The analysis of the transient pressure response of the shuttle EPS-ECS cryogenic tanks with external pressurization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. E.; Patterson, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of transient pressures in externally pressurized cryogenic hydrogen and oxygen tanks was conducted and the effects of design variables on pressure response determined. The analysis was conducted with a computer program which solves the compressible viscous flow equations in two-dimensional regions representing the tank and external loop. The external loop volume, thermal mass, and heat leak were the dominant design variables affecting the system pressure response. No significant temperature stratification occurred in the fluid contained in the tank.

  17. Responses to graded lower body negative pressure after space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortney, Suzanne M.; Charles, John B.; Wood, Margie; Dussack, Larry

    1992-01-01

    Lower body negative pressure tests (0 to -60 mm Hg) were administered 2-3 times preflight and 4 times postflight (L0 to L7), to evaluate the effect of space flight on orthostatic responses. This paper presents preliminary findings from the first 4 crew members who have completed this protocol. Overall the results suggest a greater orthostatic strain lasting approximately two days postflight, that may have been due to enhanced pooling of blood in body regions other than the calf.

  18. Acoustic response of a rectangular waveguide with a strong transverse temperature gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, William E.

    1989-01-01

    An acoustic wave equation was developed for a perfect gas with spatially-variable temperature. The strong-gradient wave equation was used to analyze the response of a rectangular wave guide containing a thermally-stratified gas. It was assumed that the temperature gradient is constant, representing one-dimensional heat transfer with a constant coefficient of conductivity. The analysis of the waveguide shows that the resonant frequencies of the waveguide are shifted away from the values that would be expected from the average temperature of the waveguide. For small gradients, the frequency shift is proportional to the square of the gradient. The factor of proportionality is a quadratic function of the natural frequency of the waveguide with uniform temperature. An experiment is designed to verify the essential features of the strong-gradient theory.

  19. Vessel noise affects beaked whale behavior: results of a dedicated acoustic response study.

    PubMed

    Pirotta, Enrico; Milor, Rachael; Quick, Nicola; Moretti, David; Di Marzio, Nancy; Tyack, Peter; Boyd, Ian; Hastie, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Some beaked whale species are susceptible to the detrimental effects of anthropogenic noise. Most studies have concentrated on the effects of military sonar, but other forms of acoustic disturbance (e.g. shipping noise) may disrupt behavior. An experiment involving the exposure of target whale groups to intense vessel-generated noise tested how these exposures influenced the foraging behavior of Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) in the Tongue of the Ocean (Bahamas). A military array of bottom-mounted hydrophones was used to measure the response based upon changes in the spatial and temporal pattern of vocalizations. The archived acoustic data were used to compute metrics of the echolocation-based foraging behavior for 16 targeted groups, 10 groups further away on the range, and 26 non-exposed groups. The duration of foraging bouts was not significantly affected by the exposure. Changes in the hydrophone over which the group was most frequently detected occurred as the animals moved around within a foraging bout, and their number was significantly less the closer the whales were to the sound source. Non-exposed groups also had significantly more changes in the primary hydrophone than exposed groups irrespective of distance. Our results suggested that broadband ship noise caused a significant change in beaked whale behavior up to at least 5.2 kilometers away from the vessel. The observed change could potentially correspond to a restriction in the movement of groups, a period of more directional travel, a reduction in the number of individuals clicking within the group, or a response to changes in prey movement.

  20. Vessel Noise Affects Beaked Whale Behavior: Results of a Dedicated Acoustic Response Study

    PubMed Central

    Pirotta, Enrico; Milor, Rachael; Quick, Nicola; Moretti, David; Di Marzio, Nancy; Tyack, Peter; Boyd, Ian; Hastie, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Some beaked whale species are susceptible to the detrimental effects of anthropogenic noise. Most studies have concentrated on the effects of military sonar, but other forms of acoustic disturbance (e.g. shipping noise) may disrupt behavior. An experiment involving the exposure of target whale groups to intense vessel-generated noise tested how these exposures influenced the foraging behavior of Blainville’s beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) in the Tongue of the Ocean (Bahamas). A military array of bottom-mounted hydrophones was used to measure the response based upon changes in the spatial and temporal pattern of vocalizations. The archived acoustic data were used to compute metrics of the echolocation-based foraging behavior for 16 targeted groups, 10 groups further away on the range, and 26 non-exposed groups. The duration of foraging bouts was not significantly affected by the exposure. Changes in the hydrophone over which the group was most frequently detected occurred as the animals moved around within a foraging bout, and their number was significantly less the closer the whales were to the sound source. Non-exposed groups also had significantly more changes in the primary hydrophone than exposed groups irrespective of distance. Our results suggested that broadband ship noise caused a significant change in beaked whale behavior up to at least 5.2 kilometers away from the vessel. The observed change could potentially correspond to a restriction in the movement of groups, a period of more directional travel, a reduction in the number of individuals clicking within the group, or a response to changes in prey movement. PMID:22880022

  1. Behaviour of a Premixed Flame Subjected to Acoustic Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Shafiq R.; Khan, Waqar A.; Prosser, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a one dimensional premixed laminar methane flame is subjected to acoustic oscillations and studied. The purpose of this analysis is to investigate the effects of acoustic perturbations on the reaction rates of different species, with a view to their respective contribution to thermoacoustic instabilities. Acoustically transparent non reflecting boundary conditions are employed. The flame response has been studied with acoustic waves of different frequencies and amplitudes. The integral values of the reaction rates, the burning velocities and the heat release of the acoustically perturbed flame are compared with the unperturbed case. We found that the flame's sensitivity to acoustic perturbations is greatest when the wavelength is comparable to the flame thickness. Even in this case, the perturbations are stable with time. We conclude that acoustic fields acting on the chemistry do not contribute significantly to the emergence of large amplitude pressure oscillations. PMID:24376501

  2. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance of a 1.83 meter (6 foot) diameter 1.2 pressure ratio fan (QF-6). [for short takeoff aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Lucas, J. G.; Stakolich, E. G.

    1974-01-01

    A 1.2-pressure-ratio, 1.83-meter-(6-ft-) diameter experimental fan stage with characteristics suitable for use in STOL aircraft engines was tested for acoustic and aerodynamic performance. The design incorporated features for low noise, including absence of inlet guide vanes, low rotor-blade-tip speed, low aerodynamic blade loading, and long axial spacing between the rotor and stator rows. The stage was run with four nozzles of different area. The perceived noise along a 152.4 meter (500-ft) sideline was rear-quadrant dominated with a maximum design-point level of 103.9 PNdb. The acoustic 1/3-octave results were analytically separated into broadband and pure-tone components. It was found that the stage noise levels generally increase with a decrease in nozzle area, with this increase observed primarily in the broadband noise component. A stall condition was documented acoustically with a 90-percent-of-design-area nozzle.

  3. Measurement of combustion response to transverse modes at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierman, Matthew Kenneth

    A two dimensional transverse combustor capable of producing and modulating an unstable flowfield was tested at Purdue. The combustor used an array of coaxial ox-centered shear injector elements. The oxidizer posts were able to be discretely changed in length between tests to investigate different post resonance conditions. A single Study element was placed in the middle of the driven unsteady flowfield so its response could be measured using pressure measurement and high speed imagery. This approach was supported by past testing of the longitudinal Continuously Variable Resonance Combustor and past transverse chambers. Mean flow rates and pressures were fixed across the series of tests. Phase lag data between pressure measurement locations support a simple linear post-to-chamber interaction mechanism. Phase lags between chamber measurements were unaffected by the change in oxidizer post length. Scaling was established between amplitude levels and post lengths between the longitudinal and transverse combustors, which further supported the proposed post-to-chamber response mechanism. High speed imaging of OH* chemiluminesence was used as a marker of heat release. Mean flame behavior showed broad distribution and flame shortening at high forcing amplitude and compact, elongated flame shape at low forcing amplitude. Multiple image analysis techniques were utilized to process these data. Proper orthogonal decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition showed spatial and temporal character of image time slices sorted by descriptive content and frequency, respectively. These analyses both identified significant behavior at the same frequencies as chamber pressure perturbations. A systematic code was developed to select relevant time slices to generate flame describing functions of image magnitude and phase lag as a function of pressure amplitude. The magnitude flame describing functions showed low amplitude linear behavior with a divergence at high amplitude. For phase lag

  4. Study of noise sources in a subsonic fan using measured blade pressures and acoustic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    Sources of noise in a 1.4 m (4.6 ft) diameter subsonic tip speed propulsive fan running statically outdoors are studied using a combination of techniques. Signals measured with pressure transducers on a rotor blade are plotted in a format showing the space-time history of inlet distortion. Study of these plots visually and with statistical correlation analysis confirms that the inlet flow contains long, thin eddies of turbulence. Turbulence generated in the boundary layer of the shroud upstream of the rotor tips was not found to be an important noise source. Fan noise is diagnosed by computing narrowband spectra of rotor and stator sound power and comparing these with measured sound power spectra. Rotor noise is computed from spectra of the measured blade pressures and stator noise is computed using the author's stator noise theory. It is concluded that the rotor and stator sources contribute about equally at frequencies in the vicinity of the first three harmonics of blade passing frequency. At higher frequencies, the stator contribution diminishes rapidly and the rotor/inlet turbulence mechanism dominates. Two parametric studies are performed by using the rotor noise calculation procedure which was correlated with test. In the first study, the effects on noise spectrum and directivity are calculated for changes in turbulence properties, rotational Mach number, number of blades, and stagger angle. In the second study the influences of design tip speed and blade number on noise are evaluated.

  5. Acoustics Research of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Ximing; Houston, Janice D.

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces some of the highest acoustic loading over a broad frequency for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are used in the prediction of the internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle but there are challenges. Present liftoff vehicle acoustic environment prediction methods utilize stationary data from previously conducted hold-down tests; i.e. static firings conducted in the 1960's, to generate 1/3 octave band Sound Pressure Level (SPL) spectra. These data sets are used to predict the liftoff acoustic environments for launch vehicles. To facilitate the accuracy and quality of acoustic loading, predictions at liftoff for future launch vehicles such as the Space Launch System (SLS), non-stationary flight data from the Ares I-X were processed in PC-Signal in two forms which included a simulated hold-down phase and the entire launch phase. In conjunction, the Prediction of Acoustic Vehicle Environments (PAVE) program was developed in MATLAB to allow for efficient predictions of sound pressure levels (SPLs) as a function of station number along the vehicle using semiempirical methods. This consisted, initially, of generating the Dimensionless Spectrum Function (DSF) and Dimensionless Source Location (DSL) curves from the Ares I-X flight data. These are then used in the MATLAB program to generate the 1/3 octave band SPL spectra. Concluding results show major differences in SPLs between the hold-down test data and the processed Ares IX flight data making the Ares I-X flight data more practical for future vehicle acoustic environment predictions.

  6. Forward acoustic masking enhances the auditory brainstem response in a diotic, but not dichotic, paradigm in salicylate-induced tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Lin

    2015-05-01

    We recently reported that forward acoustic masking can enhance the auditory brainstem response (ABR) in rats treated with a high dose of sodium salicylate (NaSal), a tinnitus inducer, when tested in open acoustic field (Liu and Chen, 2012, Brain Research 1485, 88-94). In the present study, we first replicated this experiment in closed acoustic field under two conditions: (1) the forward masker and the probe were presented to both ears (diotic paradigm); (2) the forward masker was presented to one ear and the probe to the other ear (dichotic paradigm). We found that only when the stimuli were presented by using the diotic, rather than the dichotic, paradigm could forward acoustic masking enhance the ABR in the rat treated with NaSal (300 mg/kg). The enhancement was obvious for ABR waves II and IV, but not for wave I, indicating a central origin. The enhancement occurred at the high frequencies (16, 24, 32 kHz) at which the animals demonstrated a tinnitus-like behavior as revealed by using the gap prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle paradigm. We then administered vigabatrin, a GABA transaminase inhibitor, in the animals to suppress NaSal-induced tinnitus. The vigabatrin treatment successfully prevented forward acoustic masking from enhancing the ABR. These findings demonstrate that the observed enhancement of ABRs by forward acoustic masking originates in the central auditory pathway ipsilateral to the stimulated ear. We propose that the enhancement is closely associated with NaSal-induced tinnitus. PMID:25668125

  7. Habituation of Auditory Steady State Responses Evoked by Amplitude-Modulated Acoustic Signals in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prado-Gutierrez, Pavel; Castro-Fariñas, Anisleidy; Morgado-Rodriguez, Lisbet; Velarde-Reyes, Ernesto; Martínez, Agustín D.; Martínez-Montes, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Generation of the auditory steady state responses (ASSR) is commonly explained by the linear combination of random background noise activity and the stationary response. Based on this model, the decrease of amplitude that occurs over the sequential averaging of epochs of the raw data has been exclusively linked to the cancelation of noise. Nevertheless, this behavior might also reflect the non-stationary response of the ASSR generators. We tested this hypothesis by characterizing the ASSR time course in rats with different auditory maturational stages. ASSR were evoked by 8-kHz tones of different supra-threshold intensities, modulated in amplitude at 115 Hz. Results show that the ASSR amplitude habituated to the sustained stimulation and that dishabituation occurred when deviant stimuli were presented. ASSR habituation increased as animals became adults, suggesting that the ability to filter acoustic stimuli with no-relevant temporal information increased with age. Results are discussed in terms of the current model of the ASSR generation and analysis procedures. They might have implications for audiometric tests designed to assess hearing in subjects who cannot provide reliable results in the psychophysical trials. PMID:26557360

  8. Pressure Tuning of Bragg Diffraction in Stimuli Responsive Microgel Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, R. G.; Tata, B. V. R.; Brijitta, J.

    2011-07-01

    Recently Lietor-Santos et al [Macromolecules 42, 6225 (2009)] have shown that thermo-responsive poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) microgel particles in aqueous medium shrink in size upon applying hundreds of mega-Pascals of pressure. We show here for the first time that, these particles when organized in a crystalline state can be shrunk using a few kilo-Pascals of osmotic pressure. In a novel way, we subject PNIPAM microgel suspensions to different amounts of osmotic compression by removing known amounts of water from the suspension using stirred cells equipped with an ultrafiltration membrane and freeze them into a crystalline state by repeated annealing. Bragg diffraction of these microgel crystals is recorded using UV-Visible spectroscopy. The Bragg peak has been used to determine the lattice spacing and the particle size. The Bragg peak is found to exhibit a blue shift upon increasing the osmotic pressure and is understood to arise from the increase in number density as well as due to decrease in particle size. The osmotic pressure calculated from the equation of state for hard-sphere colloidal crystals is found to agree well with that estimated experimentally.

  9. Dynamic response of a collidant impacting a low pressure airbag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreher, Peter A.

    There are many uses of low pressure airbags, both military and commercial. Many of these applications have been hampered by inadequate and inaccurate modeling tools. This dissertation contains the derivation of a four degree-of-freedom system of differential equations from physical laws of mass and energy conservation, force equilibrium, and the Ideal Gas Law. Kinematic equations were derived to model a cylindrical airbag as a single control volume impacted by a parallelepiped collidant. An efficient numerical procedure was devised to solve the simplified system of equations in a manner amenable to discovering design trends. The largest public airbag experiment, both in scale and scope, was designed and built to collect data on low-pressure airbag responses, otherwise unavailable in the literature. The experimental results were compared to computational simulations to validate the simplified numerical model. Experimental response trends are presented that will aid airbag designers. The two objectives of using a low pressure airbag to demonstrate the feasibility to (1) accelerate a munition to 15 feet per second velocity from a bomb bay, and (2) decelerate humans hitting trucks below the human tolerance level of 50 G's, were both met.

  10. Mechanisms and pharmacogenetic signals underlying thiazide diuretics blood pressure response.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Mohamed H; Johnson, Julie A

    2016-04-01

    Thiazide (TZD) diuretics are among the most commonly prescribed antihypertensives globally; however their chronic blood pressure (BP) lowering mechanism remains unclear. Herein we discuss the current evidence regarding specific mechanisms regulating the antihypertensive effects of TZDs, suggesting that TZDs act via multiple complex and interacting mechanisms, including natriuresis with short term use and direct vasodilatory effects chronically. Additionally, we review pharmacogenomics signals that have been associated with TZDs BP-response in several cohorts (i.e. NEDD4L, PRKCA, EDNRA-GNAS, and YEATS4) and discuss how these genes might be related to TZD BP-response mechanism. Understanding the association between these genes and TZD BP mechanism might facilitate the development of new drugs and therapeutic approaches based on a deeper understanding of the determinants of BP-response.

  11. Forced response sound radiation from acoustically or mechanically excited small plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1992-01-01

    Sound radiation from an acoustically excited, clamped aluminum plate is measured and expressed in terms of noise reduction to take into account the incident acoustic excitation field. Its mode shapes and modal frequencies are measured and show good agreement with the predictions from a finite element MSC/NASTRAN model. Noise reduction is measured at 15 points behind the plate and demonstrate good agreement with predictions employing the SYSNOISE numerical analysis system for acoustic-structure interaction.

  12. Slow breathing training reduces resting blood pressure and the pressure responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Jones, C U; Sangthong, B; Pachirat, O; Jones, D A

    2015-01-01

    Slow breathing training reduces resting blood pressure, probably by modifying central autonomic control, but evidence for this is lacking. The pressor response to static handgrip exercise is a measure of autonomic control and the aim of this study was to determine whether slow breathing training modulates the pressor responses to exercise of untrained muscles. Twenty hypertensive patients trained for 8 weeks, 10 with unloaded slow breathing (Unloaded) and 10 breathing against an inspiratory load of 20 cm H(2)O (Loaded). Ten subjects were untrained controls. Subjects performed a 2 min handgrip pressor test (30 % MVC) pre- and post-training, and blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were measured before the contraction, at the end and following 2 min recovery. Resting systolic (sBP) and HR were reduced as a result of training, as reported previously. After training there was both a smaller pressor response to hand grip exercise and a more rapid recovery of sBP and HR compared to pre-training. There were no changes in the Controls and no differences between the Unloaded and Loaded groups. Combining the two training groups, the sBP response to handgrip exercise after training was reduced by 10 mm Hg (95 % CI: -7, -13) and HR by 5 bpm (95 % CI: -4, -6), all p<0.05. These results are consistent with slow breathing training modifying central mechanisms regulating cardiovascular function. PMID:25804100

  13. Reproducing the seismic response of a cluster of buildings with acoustic meta-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombi, A.; Rupin, M.; Roux, P.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, new kind of meta-materials have appeared in the field of acoustics and electromagnetism. They are realized using so-called sub-wavelength resonators because of their characteristic size (in the plane of interest), far smaller compared to the wavelength. These objects offer the opportunity to manipulate the wave-field at will. We have realized an experiment allowing the study of their effect on elastic waves which is of strong interest in seismology. The experiment already reveals that when excited by an acoustic or a seismic source these meta-materials may give rise to (1) band-gap effects, i.e. frequency bands in which seismic energy cannot propagate, or (2) sub-wavelength focusing, i.e. energy conversion on wavelength much smaller than the original propagated signal. A cluster of aluminum beams, constituting the metamaterial and rigidly mounted on an aluminum plate where we propagate flexural modes, represents an ideal model to study the seismic response of a cluster of tall buildings and the so called site-city interactions, two important aspects of ';'the seismic vulnerability' yet poorly known. Using the analogy with metamaterials, we present some preliminary results that show how such complex phenomena may be downscaled to the laboratory size upon the choice of few relevant design parameters and used to model real-scale configurations. The research methodology equally relies on numerical simulations and laboratory experiments both reproducing the same plate-beams model. With numerical simulations in particular we characterize the effective properties of the cluster and we conduct a sensitivity analysis on the relevant design parameters. The study highlights the appearance of (1) band-gaps and (2) sub-wavelength energy focusing. The first could be potentially exploited to realize seismic-free buildings configuration, seismic cloaking or protection of strategic buildings. The second represent a potentially dangerous phenomenon that needs to be studied

  14. Modality of fear cues affects acoustic startle potentiation but not heart-rate response in patients with dental phobia.

    PubMed

    Wannemüller, André; Sartory, Gudrun; Elsesser, Karin; Lohrmann, Thomas; Jöhren, Hans P

    2015-01-01

    The acoustic startle response (SR) has consistently been shown to be enhanced by fear-arousing cross-modal background stimuli in phobics. Intra-modal fear-potentiation of acoustic SR was rarely investigated and generated inconsistent results. The present study compared the acoustic SR to phobia-related sounds with that to phobia-related pictures in 104 dental phobic patients and 22 controls. Acoustic background stimuli were dental treatment noises and birdsong and visual stimuli were dental treatment and neutral control pictures. Background stimuli were presented for 4 s, randomly followed by the administration of the startle stimulus. In addition to SR, heart-rate (HR) was recorded throughout the trials. Irrespective of their content, background pictures elicited greater SR than noises in both groups with a trend for phobic participants to show startle potentiation to phobia-related pictures but not noises. Unlike controls, phobics showed HR acceleration to both dental pictures and noises. HR acceleration of the phobia group was significantly positively correlated with SR in the noise condition only. The acoustic SR to phobia-related noises is likely to be inhibited by prolonged sensorimotor gating.

  15. Modality of fear cues affects acoustic startle potentiation but not heart-rate response in patients with dental phobia

    PubMed Central

    Wannemüller, André; Sartory, Gudrun; Elsesser, Karin; Lohrmann, Thomas; Jöhren, Hans P.

    2015-01-01

    The acoustic startle response (SR) has consistently been shown to be enhanced by fear-arousing cross-modal background stimuli in phobics. Intra-modal fear-potentiation of acoustic SR was rarely investigated and generated inconsistent results. The present study compared the acoustic SR to phobia-related sounds with that to phobia-related pictures in 104 dental phobic patients and 22 controls. Acoustic background stimuli were dental treatment noises and birdsong and visual stimuli were dental treatment and neutral control pictures. Background stimuli were presented for 4 s, randomly followed by the administration of the startle stimulus. In addition to SR, heart-rate (HR) was recorded throughout the trials. Irrespective of their content, background pictures elicited greater SR than noises in both groups with a trend for phobic participants to show startle potentiation to phobia-related pictures but not noises. Unlike controls, phobics showed HR acceleration to both dental pictures and noises. HR acceleration of the phobia group was significantly positively correlated with SR in the noise condition only. The acoustic SR to phobia-related noises is likely to be inhibited by prolonged sensorimotor gating. PMID:25774142

  16. Acoustic detection of cracks in the anvil of a large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhaoli; Chen, Bin; Tian, Hao; Cheng, Xiaobin; Yang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    A large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus with three pairs of tungsten carbide anvils is the most popular device for synthetic diamond production. Currently, the consumption of anvils is one of the important costs for the diamond production industry. If one of the anvils is fractured during the production process, the other five anvils in the apparatus may be endangered as a result of a sudden loss of pressure. It is of critical importance to detect and replace cracked anvils before they fracture for reduction of the cost of diamond production and safety. An acoustic detection method is studied in this paper. Two new features, nested power spectrum centroid and modified power spectrum variance, are proposed and combined with linear prediction coefficients to construct a feature vector. A support vector machine model is trained for classification. A sliding time window is proposed for decision-level information fusion. The experiments and analysis show that the recognition rate of anvil cracks is 95%, while the false-alarm rate is as low as 5.8 × 10-4 during a time window; this false-alarm rate indicates that at most one false alarm occurs every 2 months at a confidence level of 90%. An instrument to monitor anvil cracking was designed based on a digital signal processor and has been running for more than eight months in a diamond production field. In this time, two anvil-crack incidents occurred and were detected by the instrument correctly. In addition, no false alarms occurred.

  17. Acoustic detection of cracks in the anvil of a large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Zhaoli Tian, Hao; Cheng, Xiaobin; Yang, Jun; Chen, Bin

    2015-12-15

    A large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus with three pairs of tungsten carbide anvils is the most popular device for synthetic diamond production. Currently, the consumption of anvils is one of the important costs for the diamond production industry. If one of the anvils is fractured during the production process, the other five anvils in the apparatus may be endangered as a result of a sudden loss of pressure. It is of critical importance to detect and replace cracked anvils before they fracture for reduction of the cost of diamond production and safety. An acoustic detection method is studied in this paper. Two new features, nested power spectrum centroid and modified power spectrum variance, are proposed and combined with linear prediction coefficients to construct a feature vector. A support vector machine model is trained for classification. A sliding time window is proposed for decision-level information fusion. The experiments and analysis show that the recognition rate of anvil cracks is 95%, while the false-alarm rate is as low as 5.8 × 10{sup −4} during a time window; this false-alarm rate indicates that at most one false alarm occurs every 2 months at a confidence level of 90%. An instrument to monitor anvil cracking was designed based on a digital signal processor and has been running for more than eight months in a diamond production field. In this time, two anvil-crack incidents occurred and were detected by the instrument correctly. In addition, no false alarms occurred.

  18. Acoustic detection of cracks in the anvil of a large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhaoli; Chen, Bin; Tian, Hao; Cheng, Xiaobin; Yang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    A large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus with three pairs of tungsten carbide anvils is the most popular device for synthetic diamond production. Currently, the consumption of anvils is one of the important costs for the diamond production industry. If one of the anvils is fractured during the production process, the other five anvils in the apparatus may be endangered as a result of a sudden loss of pressure. It is of critical importance to detect and replace cracked anvils before they fracture for reduction of the cost of diamond production and safety. An acoustic detection method is studied in this paper. Two new features, nested power spectrum centroid and modified power spectrum variance, are proposed and combined with linear prediction coefficients to construct a feature vector. A support vector machine model is trained for classification. A sliding time window is proposed for decision-level information fusion. The experiments and analysis show that the recognition rate of anvil cracks is 95%, while the false-alarm rate is as low as 5.8 × 10(-4) during a time window; this false-alarm rate indicates that at most one false alarm occurs every 2 months at a confidence level of 90%. An instrument to monitor anvil cracking was designed based on a digital signal processor and has been running for more than eight months in a diamond production field. In this time, two anvil-crack incidents occurred and were detected by the instrument correctly. In addition, no false alarms occurred.

  19. Effects of Previous Acoustic Experience on Behavioral Responses to Experimental Sound Stimuli and Implications for Research.

    PubMed

    Voellmy, Irene K; Purser, Julia; Simpson, Stephen D; Radford, Andrew N

    2016-01-01

    Ambient noise differs considerably between habitats. Increased ambient noise can affect the physiology and behavior in a variety of taxa. Previous acoustic experience can modify behavior and potentially affect research conclusions in natural and laboratory environments. Acoustic conditions should thus be accounted for, especially in experiments involving experimental sound stimuli. Methods sections should contain acoustic specifications, and a consensus should be achieved over which measurements to include for comparability between researchers. Further investigation of how previous and repeated exposure to sound affects behavior and research conclusions is needed to improve our knowledge of acoustic long-term effects in animal welfare and conservation.

  20. New insights from well responses to fluctuations in barometric pressure.

    PubMed

    Butler, J J; Jin, W; Mohammed, G A; Reboulet, E C

    2011-01-01

    Hydrologists have long recognized that changes in barometric pressure can produce changes in water levels in wells. The barometric response function (BRF) has proven to be an effective means to characterize this relationship; we show here how it can also be utilized to glean valuable insights into semi-confined aquifer systems. The form of the BRF indicates the degree of aquifer confinement, while a comparison of BRFs between wells sheds light on hydrostratigraphic continuity. A new approach for estimating hydraulic properties of aquitards from BRFs has been developed and verified. The BRF is not an invariant characteristic of a well; in unconfined or semi-confined aquifers, it can change with conditions in the vadose zone. Field data from a long-term research site demonstrate the hydrostratigraphic insights that can be gained from monitoring water levels and barometric pressure. Such insights should be of value for a wide range of practical applications.

  1. Compaction and High-Pressure Response of Granular Tantalum Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogler, Tracy; Root, Seth; Knudson, Marcus; Thornhill, Tom; Reinhart, William

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic behavior of nearly fully-dense and porous tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) is studied. Two particle morphologies are used to obtain two distinct initial tap densities, which correspond to approximately 40% and 15% of crystalline density. The response is characterized from low pressures, which result in incomplete compaction, to very high pressures where the thermal component of the EOS dominates. Issues related to a possible phase transformation along the Hugoniot and to establishing reasonable error bars on the experimental data will be discussed. The suitability of continuum and mesoscale models to capture the experimental results will be examined. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Continuous loudness response to acoustic intensity dynamics in melodies: effects of melodic contour, tempo, and tonality.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Kirk N; Stevens, Catherine J; Dean, Roger T; Bailes, Freya

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate perceived loudness change in response to melodies that increase (up-ramp) or decrease (down-ramp) in acoustic intensity, and the interaction with other musical factors such as melodic contour, tempo, and tonality (tonal/atonal). A within-subjects design manipulated direction of linear intensity change (up-ramp, down-ramp), melodic contour (ascending, descending), tempo, and tonality, using single ramp trials and paired ramp trials, where single up-ramps and down-ramps were assembled to create continuous up-ramp/down-ramp or down-ramp/up-ramp pairs. Twenty-nine (Exp 1) and thirty-six (Exp 2) participants rated loudness continuously in response to trials with monophonic 13-note piano melodies lasting either 6.4s or 12s. Linear correlation coefficients >.89 between loudness and time show that time-series loudness responses to dynamic up-ramp and down-ramp melodies are essentially linear across all melodies. Therefore, 'indirect' loudness change derived from the difference in loudness at the beginning and end points of the continuous response was calculated. Down-ramps were perceived to change significantly more in loudness than up-ramps in both tonalities and at a relatively slow tempo. Loudness change was also greater for down-ramps presented with a congruent descending melodic contour, relative to an incongruent pairing (down-ramp and ascending melodic contour). No differential effect of intensity ramp/melodic contour congruency was observed for up-ramps. In paired ramp trials assessing the possible impact of ramp context, loudness change in response to up-ramps was significantly greater when preceded by down-ramps, than when not preceded by another ramp. Ramp context did not affect down-ramp perception. The contribution to the fields of music perception and psychoacoustics are discussed in the context of real-time perception of music, principles of music composition, and performance of musical dynamics.

  3. A computational simulation study on the acoustic pressure generated by a dental endosonic file: effects of intensity, file shape and volume.

    PubMed

    Tiong, T Joyce; Price, Gareth J; Kanagasingam, Shalini

    2014-09-01

    One of the uses of ultrasound in dentistry is in the field of endodontics (i.e. root canal treatment) in order to enhance cleaning efficiency during the treatment. The acoustic pressures generated by the oscillation of files in narrow channels has been calculated using the COMSOL simulation package. Acoustic pressures in excess of the cavitation threshold can be generated and higher values were found in narrower channels. This parallels experimental observations of sonochemiluminescence. The effect of varying the channel width and length and the dimensions and shape of the file are reported. As well as explaining experimental observations, the work provides a basis for the further development and optimisation of the design of endosonic files.

  4. Cerebrovascular Responses During Lower Body Negative Pressure-Induced Presyncope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriyama, Kana; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, Alan R.; Ueno, T.; Ballard, R. E.; Fortney, S. M.

    1996-01-01

    Reduced orthostatic tolerance is commonly observed after space flight, occasionally causing presyncopal conditions. Although the cerebrovascular system may play an important role in presyncope, there have been few reports concerning cerebral hemodynamics during presyncope. The purpose of this study was to investigate cerebrovascular responses during presyncope induced by lower body negative pressure (LBNP). Seven healthy male volunteers were exposed to LBNP in steps of -10 mmHg every 3 min until presyncopal symptoms were detected. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were measured with a finger cuff. Cerebral tissue oxy- and deoxy- hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations were estimated using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity at the middle cerebral artery was measured with Transcranial Doppler Sonography (TCD). We focused on the data during the 2 min before endpoint. BP marked a gradual decrease (91 to 86 mmHg from 2 min to 30 sec before endpoint), which was accelerated along with HR decrease during the final 30 sec (86 to 71 mmHg). Cerebral oxy-Hb concentration decreases as presyncope is approached while total-Hb concentration remains fairly constant. TCD reveals a decrease in the CBF velocity. The TCD and NIRS results suggest that CBF decreases along with the BP decrease. Cerebrovascular responses during presyncope are closely related to cardiovascular responses.

  5. Effect of positive end-expiratory pressure on acoustic wave propagation in experimental porcine lung injury.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Jukka; Nemergut, Michael E; Gavriely, Noam

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on sound propagation through injured lungs, we injected a multifrequency broad-band sound signal into the airway of eight anesthetized, intubated and mechanically ventilated pigs, while recording transmitted sound at three locations bilaterally on the chest wall. Oleic acid injections effected a severe pulmonary oedema predominately in the dependent lung regions, with an average increase in venous admixture from 19 ± 15 to 59 ± 14% (P < 0.001), and a reduction in dynamic respiratory system compliance from 34 ± 7 to 14 ± 4 ml cmH2 O(-1) (P < 0.001). A concomitant decrease in sound transit time was seen in the dependent lung regions (P < 0.05); no statistically significant change occurred in the lateral or non-dependent areas. The application of PEEP resulted in a decrease in venous admixture, increase in respiratory system compliance and return of the sound transit time to pre-injury levels in the dependent lung regions. Our results indicate that sound transmission velocity increases in lung tissue affected by permeability-type pulmonary oedema in a manner reversible during alveolar recruitment with PEEP.

  6. Acoustic and Doppler radar detection of buried land mines using high-pressure water jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denier, Robert; Herrick, Thomas J.; Mitchell, O. Robert; Summers, David A.; Saylor, Daniel R.

    1999-08-01

    The goal of the waterjet-based mine location and identification project is to find a way to use waterjets to locate and differentiate buried objects. When a buried object is struck with a high-pressure waterjets, the impact will cause characteristic vibrations in the object depending on the object's shape and composition. These vibrations will be transferred to the ground and then to the water stream that is hitting the object. Some of these vibrations will also be transferred to the air via the narrow channel the waterjet cuts in the ground. Currently the ground vibrations are detected with Doppler radar and video camera sensing, while the air vibrations are detected with a directional microphone. Data is collected via a Labview based data acquisition system. This data is then manipulated in Labview to produce the associated power spectrums. These power spectra are fed through various signal processing and recognition routines to determine the probability of there being an object present under the current test location and what that object is likely to be. Our current test area consists of a large X-Y positioning system placed over approximately a five-foot circular test area. The positioning system moves both the waterjet and the sensor package to the test location specified by the Labview control software. Currently we are able to locate buried land mine models at a distance of approximately three inches with a high degree of accuracy.

  7. Long-Lasting Suppression of Acoustic Startle Response after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Swamini; Avcu, Pelin; Roland, Jessica J.; Nadpara, Neil; Pfister, Bryan; Long, Mathew; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Servatius, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acoustic startle response (ASR) is a defensive reflex that is largely ignored unless greatly exaggerated. ASR is suppressed after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), but the effect of mild TBI (mTBI) on ASR has not been investigated. Because the neural circuitry for ASR resides in the pons in all mammals, ASR may be a good measure of brainstem function after mTBI. The present study assessed ASR in Sprague-Dawley rats after mTBI using lateral fluid percussion and compared these effects to those on spatial working memory. mTBI caused a profound, long-lasting suppression of ASR. Both probability of emitting a startle and startle amplitude were diminished. ASR suppression was observed as soon as 1 day after injury and remained suppressed for the duration of the study (21 days after injury). No indication of recovery was observed. mTBI also impaired spatial working memory. In contrast to the suppression of ASR, working memory impairment was transient; memory was impaired 1 and 7 days after injury, but recovered by 21 days. The long-lasting suppression of ASR suggests long-term dysfunction of brainstem neural circuits at a time when forebrain neural circuits responsible for spatial working memory have recovered. These results have important implications for return-to-activity decisions because recovery of cognitive impairments plays an important role in these decisions. PMID:25412226

  8. The two parts of the blackcap song: Acoustic analysis and male responses to playbacks.

    PubMed

    Linossier, Juliette; Courvoisier, Hélène; Aubin, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Bird songs are complex manifold acoustic signals serving two main functions: mate attraction and territorial defense. The way information is encoded in the song often reflects adaptation to proximate and ultimate constraints. Male blackcaps, Sylvia atricapilla, display versatile songs with two parts, a warble and a whistle, whose functions remain unclear. We showed that the two parts of songs differ in terms of intensity, frequency and temporal parameters. They also contain totally different sets of syllables. Furthermore, the warble is versatile whereas the whistle part shows syllable sharing between individuals leaving closeby. Altogether, the results of our analysis suggest that the two parts encode different information potentially directed to different audiences. In order to test the potential function of these two parts, we performed playback experiments by broadcasting entire songs and each part separately. Warble and whistle alone are sufficient to trigger male responses and males sing both parts in responses to all stimuli, showing that both parts of the song are used in male-male competition. It is suggested that the segregation of information in the blackcap song could be related to public versus private communication, used in both intra- and intersexual contexts, rather than directed to male versus female audiences only.

  9. The two parts of the blackcap song: Acoustic analysis and male responses to playbacks.

    PubMed

    Linossier, Juliette; Courvoisier, Hélène; Aubin, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Bird songs are complex manifold acoustic signals serving two main functions: mate attraction and territorial defense. The way information is encoded in the song often reflects adaptation to proximate and ultimate constraints. Male blackcaps, Sylvia atricapilla, display versatile songs with two parts, a warble and a whistle, whose functions remain unclear. We showed that the two parts of songs differ in terms of intensity, frequency and temporal parameters. They also contain totally different sets of syllables. Furthermore, the warble is versatile whereas the whistle part shows syllable sharing between individuals leaving closeby. Altogether, the results of our analysis suggest that the two parts encode different information potentially directed to different audiences. In order to test the potential function of these two parts, we performed playback experiments by broadcasting entire songs and each part separately. Warble and whistle alone are sufficient to trigger male responses and males sing both parts in responses to all stimuli, showing that both parts of the song are used in male-male competition. It is suggested that the segregation of information in the blackcap song could be related to public versus private communication, used in both intra- and intersexual contexts, rather than directed to male versus female audiences only. PMID:26522931

  10. Acoustic emission responses of plasma sprayed ceramics during four point bend tests

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chung-Kwei; Leigh, S.H.; Berndt, C.C.

    1996-12-31

    Free standing ceramics including alumina-13 wt.% titania (AT13), alumina-3 wt.% titania (AT3), alumina-40 wt.% zirconia (AZ40), and calcia-stabilized zirconia (CSZ), were produced by water-stabilized plasma spraying. Four point bend tests were performed in the in-plane direction (i.e., spray direction) to obtain the modulus of rupture of the materials. In situ acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was used to detect cracking during the tests. The AE characteristics such as ring down counts, event duration, peak amplitude, and energy were recorded and analyzed to evaluate different cracking mechanisms. The AE responses versus time for individual tests were evaluated and two basic types of cracking mechanisms; i.e., catastrophic failure and microcracking before failure, can be observed. AT3 and AZ40 tend to exhibit microcracking before failure and CSZ shows catastrophic failure. However, both mechanisms can be observed for AT13. For the total AE responses, the amplitude distributions are skewed to the right and the energy distributions show multi-modal distributions. Micro-, transitional, and macro-cracks can be better distinguished by the energy distribution. The relative proportion of these cracks was also determined.

  11. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos; Piper, Ben

    2015-04-01

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  12. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos Piper, Ben

    2015-04-20

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  13. Air Pressure Responses to Sudden Vocal Tract Pressure Bleeds during Production of Stop Consonants: New Evidence of Aeromechanical Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajac, David J.; Weissler, Mark C.

    2004-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate short-latency vocal tract air pressure responses to sudden pressure bleeds during production of voiceless bilabial stop consonants. It was hypothesized that the occurrence of respiratory reflexes would be indicated by distinct patterns of responses as a function of bleed magnitude. In Study 1, 19 adults…

  14. Physical fitness and cardiovascular response to lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raven, P. B.; Rohm-Young, D.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1984-01-01

    Klein et al. (1977) have questioned the concept of endurance training as an appropriate means of preparing for prolonged space flights. Their opinion was mainly based on reports of endurance athletes who had a decreased tolerance to orthostatic or gravitational stress induced by lower body negative pressure (LBNP), upright tilt, or whole body water immersion. The present investigation had the objective to determine if the hemodynamic response to LBNP is different between a high and average fit group of subjects. In addition, the discrete aspect of cardiovascular function which had been altered by chronic training was to be identified. On the basis of the results of experiments conducted with 14 young male volunteers, it is concluded that the reflex response to central hypovolemia is altered by endurance exercise training.

  15. A numerical method for the calculation of dynamic response and acoustic radiation from an underwater structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Q.; Joseph, P. F.

    2005-05-01

    An approach combining finite element with boundary element methods is proposed to calculate the elastic vibration and acoustic field radiated from an underwater structure. The FEM software NASTRAN is employed for computation of the structural vibration. An uncoupled boundary element method, based on the potential decomposition technique, is described to determine the acoustic added mass and damping coefficients that result due to fluid loading effects. The acoustic matrices of added mass and damping coefficients are then added to the structural mass and damping matrices, respectively, by the DMAP modules of NASTRAN. Numerical results are shown to be in good agreement with experimental data. The complex eigenvalue analyses of underwater structure are obtained by NASTRAN solution sequence SOL107. Results obtained from this study suggest that the natural frequencies of underwater structures are only weakly dependent on the acoustic frequency if the acoustic wavelength is roughly twice as large as the maximum structural dimension.

  16. Brainstem auditory evoked response in adolescents with acoustic mycotic neuroma due to environmental exposure to toxic molds.

    PubMed

    Anyanwu, Ebere; Campbell, Andrew W; High, William

    2002-01-01

    Indoor air contamination with toxic opportunistic molds is an emerging health risk worldwide. Some of the opportunistic molds include: Stachybotrys chartarum, Aspergillus species (A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, A. versicolor etc.), Cadosporium, Alternaria, Penicillium, Trichoderma, Fusarium graminearum etc. These molds flourish in homes that are moist and damp. Reports of floods are now evident in many parts of the world. With these global changes in climatic conditions that favor the opportunistic mode of living among these molds, some health authorities are beginning to feel concerned about the diversity and the extent to which opportunistic molds can cause adverse health effects in humans. Mycotoxicosis is the collective name for all the diseases caused by toxic molds. Frequently, we have cases of acoustic neuroma due to mycotoxicity in our Center. Mycotic neuroma probably has not been reported before and the application of brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) techniques in acoustic mycotic neuroma have not been reported either. The aim of this study, therefore, was to report cases and measurements of acoustic mycotic neuroma in adolescents using the brainstem auditory evoked response. The patients' case history, clinical neurological and neurobehavioral questionnaires were assessed. Then, the BAERs were recorded between Cz and Ai, with a second channel, Cz-Ac. The case histories and the questionnaires were analyzed in conjunction with the outcome of the objective brainstem auditory evoked response measurements. The prevalent subjective findings in the patients were headaches, memory loss, hearing loss, lack of concentration, fatigue, sleep disturbance, facial swelling, rashes, nosebleeds, diarrhea, abdominal pains and respiratory difficulties. Objective BAER showed overall abnormalities in all the patients. Although the waveform abnormalities varied, 1-3 interpeak latencies were abnormal in all the patients. Overall results showed the presence of

  17. Use of Strain Measurements from Acoustic Bench Tests of the Battleship Flowliner Test Articles To Link Analytical Model Results to In-Service Resonant Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Greg; Smaolloey, Kurt; LaVerde, Bruce; Bishop, Jim

    2004-01-01

    The paper will discuss practical and analytical findings of a test program conducted to assist engineers in determining which analytical strain fields are most appropriate to describe the crack initiating and crack propagating stresses in thin walled cylindrical hardware that serves as part of the Space Shuttle Main Engine's fuel system. In service the hardware is excited by fluctuating dynamic pressures in a cryogenic fuel that arise from turbulent flow/pump cavitation. A bench test using a simplified system was conducted using acoustic energy in air to excite the test articles. Strain measurements were used to reveal response characteristics of two Flowliner test articles that are assembled as a pair when installed in the engine feed system.

  18. Response Pattern Based on the Amplitude of Ear Canal Recorded Cochlear Microphonic Waveforms across Acoustic Frequencies in Normal Hearing Subjects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Low-frequency otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) are often concealed by acoustic background noise such as those from a patient’s breathing and from the environment during recording in clinics. When using electrocochleaography (ECochG or ECoG), such as cochlear microphonics (CMs), acoustic background noise do not contaminate the recordings. Our objective is to study the response pattern of CM waveforms (CMWs) to explore an alternative approach in assessing cochlear functions. In response to a 14-msec tone burst across several acoustic frequencies, CMWs were recorded at the ear canal from ten normal hearing subjects. A relatively long tone burst has a relatively narrow frequency band. The CMW amplitudes among different frequencies were compared. The CMW amplitudes among different frequencies were compared. Two features were observed in the response pattern of CMWs: the amplitude of CMWs decreased with an increase of stimulus frequency of the tone bursts; and such a decrease occurred at a faster rate at lower frequencies than at higher frequencies. Five factors as potential mechanisms for these features are proposed. Clinical applications such as hearing screening are discussed. Therefore, the response pattern of CMWs suggests that they may be used as an alternative to OAEs in the assessment of cochlear functions in the clinic, especially at low frequencies. PMID:22696071

  19. The Neuronal Responses to Repetitive Acoustic Pulses in Different Fields of the Auditory Cortex of Awake Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lanlan; Tai, Xuhui; Su, Liye; Shi, Lijuan; Wang, Enhua; Qin, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Cortical representation of time-varying features of acoustic signals is a fundamental issue of acoustic processing remaining unresolved. The rat is a widely used animal model for auditory cortical processing. Though some electrophysiological studies have investigated the neural responses to temporal repetitive sounds in the auditory cortex (AC) of rats, most of them were conducted under anesthetized condition. Recently, it has been shown that anesthesia could significantly alter the temporal patterns of neural response. For this reason, we systematically examined the single-unit neural responses to click-trains in the core region of rat AC under awake condition. Consistent with the reports on anesthetized rats, we confirmed the existence of characteristic tonotopic organizations, which were used to divide the AC into anterior auditory field (AAF), primary auditory cortex (A1) and posterior auditory field (PAF). We further found that the neuron's capability to synchronize to the temporal repetitive stimuli progressively decreased along the anterior-to-posterior direction of AC. The median of maximum synchronization rate was 64, 32 and 16 Hz in AAF, A1 and PAF, respectively. On the other hand, the percentage of neurons, which showed non-synchronized responses and could represent the stimulus repetition rate by the mean firing rate, increased from 7% in AAF and A1 to 20% in PAF. These results suggest that the temporal resolution of acoustic processing gradually increases from the anterior to posterior part of AC, and thus there may be a hierarchical stream along this direction of rat AC. PMID:23696877

  20. Prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex vs. auditory brainstem response for hearing assessment.

    PubMed

    Longenecker, R J; Alghamdi, F; Rosen, M J; Galazyuk, A V

    2016-09-01

    The high prevalence of noise-induced and age-related hearing loss in the general population has warranted the use of animal models to study the etiology of these pathologies. Quick and accurate auditory threshold determination is a prerequisite for experimental manipulations targeting hearing loss in animal models. The standard auditory brainstem response (ABR) measurement is fairly quick and translational across species, but is limited by the need for anesthesia and a lack of perceptual assessment. The goal of this study was to develop a new method of hearing assessment utilizing prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle reflex, a commonly used tool that measures detection thresholds in awake animals, and can be performed on multiple animals simultaneously. We found that in control mice PPI audiometric functions are similar to both ABR and traditional operant conditioning audiograms. The hearing thresholds assessed with PPI audiometry in sound exposed mice were also similar to those detected by ABR thresholds one day after exposure. However, three months after exposure PPI threshold shifts were still evident at and near the frequency of exposure whereas ABR thresholds recovered to the pre-exposed level. In contrast, PPI audiometry and ABR wave one amplitudes detected similar losses. PPI audiometry provides a high throughput automated behavioral screening tool of hearing in awake animals. Overall, PPI audiometry and ABR assessments of the auditory system are robust techniques with distinct advantages and limitations, which when combined, can provide ample information about the functionality of the auditory system. PMID:27349914

  1. Response of a Hypersonic Boundary Layer to Freestream Pulse Acoustic Disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenqing; Tang, Xiaojun; Lv, Hongqing

    2014-01-01

    The response of hypersonic boundary layer over a blunt wedge to freestream pulse acoustic disturbance was investigated. The stability characteristics of boundary layer for freestream pulse wave and continuous wave were analyzed comparatively. Results show that freestream pulse disturbance changes the thermal conductivity characteristics of boundary layer. For pulse wave, the number of main disturbance clusters decreases and the frequency band narrows along streamwise. There are competition and disturbance energy transfer among different modes in boundary layer. The dominant mode of boundary layer has an inhibitory action on other modes. Under continuous wave, the disturbance modes are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies, while under pulse wave, the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different modes. For both pulse and continuous waves, most of disturbance modes slide into a lower-growth or decay state in downstream, which is tending towards stability. The amplitude of disturbance modes in boundary layer under continuous wave is considerably larger than pulse wave. The growth rate for the former is also considerably larger than the later the disturbance modes with higher growth are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies for the former, while the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different frequencies for the latter. PMID:24737993

  2. Response of a hypersonic boundary layer to freestream pulse acoustic disturbance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenqing; Tang, Xiaojun; Lv, Hongqing

    2014-01-01

    The response of hypersonic boundary layer over a blunt wedge to freestream pulse acoustic disturbance was investigated. The stability characteristics of boundary layer for freestream pulse wave and continuous wave were analyzed comparatively. Results show that freestream pulse disturbance changes the thermal conductivity characteristics of boundary layer. For pulse wave, the number of main disturbance clusters decreases and the frequency band narrows along streamwise. There are competition and disturbance energy transfer among different modes in boundary layer. The dominant mode of boundary layer has an inhibitory action on other modes. Under continuous wave, the disturbance modes are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies, while under pulse wave, the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different modes. For both pulse and continuous waves, most of disturbance modes slide into a lower-growth or decay state in downstream, which is tending towards stability. The amplitude of disturbance modes in boundary layer under continuous wave is considerably larger than pulse wave. The growth rate for the former is also considerably larger than the later the disturbance modes with higher growth are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies for the former, while the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different frequencies for the latter.

  3. Response of a hypersonic boundary layer to freestream pulse acoustic disturbance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenqing; Tang, Xiaojun; Lv, Hongqing

    2014-01-01

    The response of hypersonic boundary layer over a blunt wedge to freestream pulse acoustic disturbance was investigated. The stability characteristics of boundary layer for freestream pulse wave and continuous wave were analyzed comparatively. Results show that freestream pulse disturbance changes the thermal conductivity characteristics of boundary layer. For pulse wave, the number of main disturbance clusters decreases and the frequency band narrows along streamwise. There are competition and disturbance energy transfer among different modes in boundary layer. The dominant mode of boundary layer has an inhibitory action on other modes. Under continuous wave, the disturbance modes are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies, while under pulse wave, the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different modes. For both pulse and continuous waves, most of disturbance modes slide into a lower-growth or decay state in downstream, which is tending towards stability. The amplitude of disturbance modes in boundary layer under continuous wave is considerably larger than pulse wave. The growth rate for the former is also considerably larger than the later the disturbance modes with higher growth are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies for the former, while the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different frequencies for the latter. PMID:24737993

  4. Response of acoustic imaging systems using convergent leaky waves to cylindrical flaws.

    PubMed

    Gunalp, N; Atalar, A

    1989-01-01

    A theoretical study of imaging systems utilizing focused leaky surface acoustic waves (SAWs), and their response to certain kind of defects is presented. In particular, circular cylindrical inhomogeneities with axes perpendicular to the surface are considered. The scattering of the SAW from this cylinder is formulated with some approximations. The surface wave incident on the inhomogeneity is initially found as an angular spectrum of plane waves. However, to apply the boundary conditions at the cylindrical surface, the incident field has to be transformed into a superposition of cylindrical waves. Similarly, the scattered field, which is found in the form of outgoing cylindrical SAWs, is converted back to a plane wave spectrum. A formula is obtained for the transducer output voltage in terms of the position and the radius of the cylinder, and it is suitable for computer evaluation. By considering various locations for the cylinder, the sensitivity of the system around the focal point is studied. By comparing the output voltages for cylinders of different radii, the sensitivity of the system to the size of the inhomogeneity is examined. The numerical results are in agreement with the experimental observations.

  5. High-acoustic-impedance tantalum oxide layers for insulating acoustic reflectors.

    PubMed

    Capilla, Jose; Olivares, Jimena; Clement, Marta; Sangrador, Jesús; Iborra, Enrique; Devos, Arnaud

    2012-03-01

    This work describes the assessment of the acoustic properties of sputtered tantalum oxide films intended for use as high-impedance films of acoustic reflectors for solidly mounted resonators operating in the gigahertz frequency range. The films are grown by sputtering a metallic tantalum target under different oxygen and argon gas mixtures, total pressures, pulsed dc powers, and substrate biases. The structural properties of the films are assessed through infrared absorption spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. Their acoustic impedance is assessed by deriving the mass density from X-ray reflectometry measurements and the acoustic velocity from picosecond acoustic spectroscopy and the analysis of the frequency response of the test resonators. PMID:22481769

  6. Continuous loudness response to acoustic intensity dynamics in melodies: effects of melodic contour, tempo, and tonality.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Kirk N; Stevens, Catherine J; Dean, Roger T; Bailes, Freya

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate perceived loudness change in response to melodies that increase (up-ramp) or decrease (down-ramp) in acoustic intensity, and the interaction with other musical factors such as melodic contour, tempo, and tonality (tonal/atonal). A within-subjects design manipulated direction of linear intensity change (up-ramp, down-ramp), melodic contour (ascending, descending), tempo, and tonality, using single ramp trials and paired ramp trials, where single up-ramps and down-ramps were assembled to create continuous up-ramp/down-ramp or down-ramp/up-ramp pairs. Twenty-nine (Exp 1) and thirty-six (Exp 2) participants rated loudness continuously in response to trials with monophonic 13-note piano melodies lasting either 6.4s or 12s. Linear correlation coefficients >.89 between loudness and time show that time-series loudness responses to dynamic up-ramp and down-ramp melodies are essentially linear across all melodies. Therefore, 'indirect' loudness change derived from the difference in loudness at the beginning and end points of the continuous response was calculated. Down-ramps were perceived to change significantly more in loudness than up-ramps in both tonalities and at a relatively slow tempo. Loudness change was also greater for down-ramps presented with a congruent descending melodic contour, relative to an incongruent pairing (down-ramp and ascending melodic contour). No differential effect of intensity ramp/melodic contour congruency was observed for up-ramps. In paired ramp trials assessing the possible impact of ramp context, loudness change in response to up-ramps was significantly greater when preceded by down-ramps, than when not preceded by another ramp. Ramp context did not affect down-ramp perception. The contribution to the fields of music perception and psychoacoustics are discussed in the context of real-time perception of music, principles of music composition, and performance of musical dynamics. PMID:24809252

  7. Development of acoustically lined ejector technology for multitube jet noise suppressor nozzles by model and engine tests over a wide range of jet pressure ratios and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atvars, J.; Paynter, G. C.; Walker, D. Q.; Wintermeyer, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental program comprising model nozzle and full-scale engine tests was undertaken to acquire parametric data for acoustically lined ejectors applied to primary jet noise suppression. Ejector lining design technology and acoustical scaling of lined ejector configurations were the major objectives. Ground static tests were run with a J-75 turbojet engine fitted with a 37-tube, area ratio 3.3 suppressor nozzle and two lengths of ejector shroud (L/D = 1 and 2). Seven ejector lining configurations were tested over the engine pressure ratio range of 1.40 to 2.40 with corresponding jet velocities between 305 and 610 M/sec. One-fourth scale model nozzles were tested over a pressure ratio range of 1.40 to 4.0 with jet total temperatures between ambient and 1088 K. Scaling of multielement nozzle ejector configurations was also studied using a single element of the nozzle array with identical ejector lengths and lining materials. Acoustic far field and near field data together with nozzle thrust performance and jet aerodynamic flow profiles are presented.

  8. Assessment of temporal state-dependent interactions between auditory fMRI responses to desired and undesired acoustic sources.

    PubMed

    Olulade, O; Hu, S; Gonzalez-Castillo, J; Tamer, G G; Luh, W-M; Ulmer, J L; Talavage, T M

    2011-07-01

    A confounding factor in auditory functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments is the presence of the acoustic noise inherently associated with the echo planar imaging acquisition technique. Previous studies have demonstrated that this noise can induce unwanted neuronal responses that can mask stimulus-induced responses. Similarly, activation accumulated over multiple stimuli has been demonstrated to elevate the baseline, thus reducing the dynamic range available for subsequent responses. To best evaluate responses to auditory stimuli, it is necessary to account for the presence of all recent acoustic stimulation, beginning with an understanding of the attenuating effects brought about by interaction between and among induced unwanted neuronal responses, and responses to desired auditory stimuli. This study focuses on the characterization of the duration of this temporal memory and qualitative assessment of the associated response attenuation. Two experimental parameters--inter-stimulus interval (ISI) and repetition time (TR)--were varied during an fMRI experiment in which participants were asked to passively attend to an auditory stimulus. Results present evidence of a state-dependent interaction between induced responses. As expected, attenuating effects of these interactions become less significant as TR and ISI increase and in contrast to previous work, persist up to 18s after a stimulus presentation. PMID:21426929

  9. New insights from well responses to fluctuations in barometric pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, J.J.; Jin, W.; Mohammed, G.A.; Reboulet, E.C.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrologists have long recognized that changes in barometric pressure can produce changes in water levels in wells. The barometric response function (BRF) has proven to be an effective means to characterize this relationship; we show here how it can also be utilized to glean valuable insights into semi-confined aquifer systems. The form of the BRF indicates the degree of aquifer confinement, while a comparison of BRFs between wells sheds light on hydrostratigraphic continuity. A new approach for estimating hydraulic properties of aquitards from BRFs has been developed and verified. The BRF is not an invariant characteristic of a well; in unconfined or semi-confined aquifers, it can change with conditions in the vadose zone. Field data from a long-term research site demonstrate the hydrostratigraphic insights that can be gained from monitoring water levels and barometric pressure. Such insights should be of value for a wide range of practical applications. ?? 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  10. Acoustic behaviors of unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Soils are unconsolidated granular materials, consisting of solid particles, water and air. Their mechanical and dynamic behaviors are determined by the discrete nature of the media as well as external and inter-particle forces. For unsaturated soils, two factors significantly affect soils acoustic/seismic responses: external pressure and internal water potential/matric suction. In triaxial cell tests, unsaturated soils were subjected to predefined stress paths to undergo stages of normal consolidation, unload-reload cycles, and failure. The stress deformation curve and stress-P-wave velocity were measured and compared. The study revealed that soil's dynamic response to external pressure are similar to those of the load-deformation behaviors and demonstrated that acoustic velocity can be used to monitor the state of stress of soils. In a long term field soil survey, the P-wave velocities were found to be correlated with water potential as expressed as a power-law relationship. The above phenomena can be understood by using the Terzaghi' s the principle of effective stress. The measured results were in good agreement with Brutsaert theory. The effective stress concept can also be applied to explain the observations in a soil pipe flow study in which soil internal erosion processes were monitored and interpreted by the temporal evolution of the P-wave velocity. In addition to above linear acoustic behaviors, soils, like other earth materials, exhibit astonishing non-classical nonlinear behaviors such as end-point memory, hysteresis, strain -dependent shear modulus, resonant frequency shift, and phase shift, harmonics generation, etc. A nonlinear acoustic study of a soil as a function of water content showed that the nonlinear acoustic parameter are much sensitive to the variations of soil water content than that of the acoustic velocity.

  11. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  12. The miR-183/Taok1 Target Pair Is Implicated in Cochlear Responses to Acoustic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Minal; Cai, Qunfeng; Ding, Dalian; Salvi, Richard; Hu, Zihua; Hu, Bo Hua

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic trauma, one of the leading causes of sensorineural hearing loss, induces sensory hair cell damage in the cochlea. Identifying the molecular mechanisms involved in regulating sensory hair cell death is critical towards developing effective treatments for preventing hair cell damage. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to participate in the regulatory mechanisms of inner ear development and homeostasis. However, their involvement in cochlear sensory cell degeneration following acoustic trauma is unknown. Here, we profiled the expression pattern of miRNAs in the cochlear sensory epithelium, defined miRNA responses to acoustic overstimulation, and explored potential mRNA targets of miRNAs that may be responsible for the stress responses of the cochlea. Expression analysis of miRNAs in the cochlear sensory epithelium revealed constitutive expression of 176 miRNAs, many of which have not been previously reported in cochlear tissue. Exposure to intense noise caused significant threshold shift and apoptotic activity in the cochleae. Gene expression analysis of noise-traumatized cochleae revealed time-dependent transcriptional changes in the expression of miRNAs. Target prediction analysis revealed potential target genes of the significantly downregulated miRNAs, many of which had cell death- and apoptosis-related functions. Verification of the predicted targets revealed a significant upregulation of Taok1, a target of miRNA-183. Moreover, inhibition of miR-183 with morpholino antisense oligos in cochlear organotypic cultures revealed a negative correlation between the expression levels of miR-183 and Taok1, suggesting the presence of a miR-183/Taok1 target pair. Together, miRNA profiling as well as the target analysis and validation suggest the involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of the degenerative process of the cochlea following acoustic overstimulation. The miR-183/Taok1 target pair is likely to play a role in this regulatory process. PMID

  13. Blood Pressure Response to Submaximal Exercise Test in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Szmigielska, Katarzyna; Leszczynska, Joanna; Jegier, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background. The assessment of blood pressure (BP) response during exercise test is an important diagnostic instrument in cardiovascular system evaluation. The study aim was to determine normal values of BP response to submaximal, multistage exercise test in healthy adults with regard to their age, gender, and workload. Materials and Methods. The study was conducted in randomly selected normotensive subjects (n = 1015), 512 females and 498 males, aged 18–64 years (mean age 42.1 ± 12.7 years) divided into five age groups. All subjects were clinically healthy with no chronic diseases diagnosed. Exercise stress tests were performed using Monark bicycle ergometer until a minimum of 85% of physical capacity was reached. BP was measured at rest and at peak of each exercise test stage. Results. The relations between BP, age, and workload during exercise test were determined by linear regression analysis and can be illustrated by the equations: systolic BP (mmHg) = 0.346 × load (W) + 135.76 for males and systolic BP (mmHg) = 0.103 × load (W) + 155.72 for females. Conclusions. Systolic BP increases significantly and proportionally to workload increase during exercise test in healthy adults. The relation can be described by linear equation which can be useful in diagnostics of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27703976

  14. Atmospheric pressure plasmas: infection control and bacterial responses.

    PubMed

    Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Murphy, Anthony B; McLean, Keith M; Kong, Michael G; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2014-06-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) is a recent, cutting-edge antimicrobial treatment. It has the potential to be used as an alternative to traditional treatments such as antibiotics and as a promoter of wound healing, making it a promising tool in a range of biomedical applications with particular importance for combating infections. A number of studies show very promising results for APP-mediated killing of bacteria, including removal of biofilms of pathogenic bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, the mode of action of APP and the resulting bacterial response are not fully understood. Use of a variety of different plasma-generating devices, different types of plasma gases and different treatment modes makes it challenging to show reproducibility and transferability of results. This review considers some important studies in which APP was used as an antibacterial agent, and specifically those that elucidate its mode of action, with the aim of identifying common bacterial responses to APP exposure. The review has a particular emphasis on mechanisms of interactions of bacterial biofilms with APP.

  15. The phase transformation of methane caused by pressure change during its rising from seepage, revealed by acoustic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, C.; Aoyama, S.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this survey is to measure acoustical reflection from the methane plumes at close range by utilizing a remotely-operated vehicle, in order to quantify methane gas flux seeping out from shallow methane hydrates in the sea of japan. In the off-Joetsu area, we conducted acoustic survey for methane plumes distribution using quantitative echo sounder (Simrad EK60) and Multi beam echo sounder (SEABAT 8160) installed on R/V Natsushima, and then conducted underwater survey using ROV Hyper-Dolphin in the following methods, 1) Observing seafloor morphology, 2) Measurement methane discharge with a calibrated collecting equipment , 3) Measuring rising speed of methane bubbles with a ruler, 4) Collecting acoustic reflection data using quantitative echo sounder, 5) Observing rising methane bubbles. All processes in the underwater survey were recorded by a HD camera equipped on ROV, and those videos are used for after-cruise analysis. In the underwater survey by ROV, we found three methane plume points and successfully collected acoustic data which would detect each methane bubble. Based on videos and acoustic data obtained in this survey, detailed analysis conducted.

  16. Gust Acoustic Response of a Swept Rectilinear Cascade Using The Space-Time CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Himansu, A.; Jorgenson, P. C.; Chang, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    The benchmark problem 3 in Category 3 of the third Computational Aero-Acoustics (CAA) Workshop sponsored by NASA Glenn Research Center is solved using the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. This problem concerns the unsteady response of a rectilinear swept cascade to an incident gust. The acoustic field generated by the interaction of the gust with swept at plates in the cascade is computed by solving the 3D nonlinear Euler equations using the space-time CE/SE method. A parallel version of the 3D CE/SE Euler solver is employed to obtain numerical solutions for several sweep angles. Numerical solutions are presented and compared with the analytical solutions.

  17. Acoustic and vibration response of a structure with added noise control treatment under various excitations.

    PubMed

    Rhazi, Dilal; Atalla, Noureddine

    2014-02-01

    The evaluation of the acoustic performance of noise control treatments is of great importance in many engineering applications, e.g., aircraft, automotive, and building acoustics applications. Numerical methods such as finite- and boundary elements allow for the study of complex structures with added noise control treatment. However, these methods are computationally expensive when used for complex structures. At an early stage of the acoustic trim design process, many industries look for simple and easy to use tools that provide sufficient physical insight that can help to formulate design criteria. The paper presents a simple and tractable approach for the acoustic design of noise control treatments. It presents and compares two transfer matrix-based methods to investigate the vibroacoustic behavior of noise control treatments. The first is based on a modal approach, while the second is based on wave-number space decomposition. In addition to the classical rain-on-the-roof and diffuse acoustic field excitations, the paper also addresses turbulent boundary layer and point source (monopole) excitations. Various examples are presented and compared to a finite element calculation to validate the methodology and to confirm its relevance along with its limitations. PMID:25234878

  18. Air Pressure Responses to Sudden Vocal Tract Pressure Bleeds During Production of Stop Consonants: New Evidence of Aeromechanical Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Zajac, David J.; Weissler, Mark C.

    2011-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate short-latency vocal tract air pressure responses to sudden pressure bleeds during production of voiceless bilabial stop consonants. It was hypothesized that the occurrence of respiratory reflexes would be indicated by distinct patterns of responses as a function of bleed magnitude. In Study 1, 19 adults produced syllable trains of /pΛ/ using a mouthpiece coupled to a computer-controlled perturbator. The device randomly created bleed apertures that ranged from 0 to 40 mm2 during production of the 2nd or 4th syllable of an utterance. Although peak oral air pressure dropped in a linear manner across bleed apertures, it averaged 2 to 3 cm H2O at the largest bleed. While slope of oral pressure also decreased in a linear trend, duration of the oral pressure pulse remained relatively constant. The patterns suggest that respiratory reflexes, if present, have little effect on oral air pressure levels. In Study 2, both oral and subglottal air pressure responses were monitored in 2 adults while bleed apertures of 20 and 40 mm2 were randomly created. For 1 participant, peak oral air pressure dropped across bleed apertures, as in Study 1. Subglottal air pressure and slope, however, remained relatively stable. These patterns provide some support for the occurrence of respiratory reflexes to regulate subglottal air pressure. Overall, the studies indicate that the inherent physiologic processes of the respiratory system, which may involve reflexes, and passive aeromechanical resistance of the upper airway are capable of developing oral air pressure in the face of substantial pressure bleeds. Implications for understanding speech production and the characteristics of individuals with velopharyngeal dysfunction are discussed. PMID:15324286

  19. Air pressure responses to sudden vocal tract pressure bleeds during production of stop consonants: new evidence of aeromechanical regulation.

    PubMed

    Zajac, David J; Weissler, Mark C

    2004-08-01

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate short-latency vocal tract air pressure responses to sudden pressure bleeds during production of voiceless bilabial stop consonants. It was hypothesized that the occurrence of respiratory reflexes would be indicated by distinct patterns of responses as a function of bleed magnitude. In Study 1, 19 adults produced syllable trains of "puh" using a mouthpiece coupled to a computer-controlled perturbator. The device randomly created bleed apertures that ranged from 0 to 40 mm2 during production of the 2nd or 4th syllable of an utterance. Although peak oral air pressure dropped in a linear manner across bleed apertures, it averaged 2 to 3 cm H2O at the largest bleed. While slope of oral pressure also decreased in a linear trend, duration of the oral pressure pulse remained relatively constant. The patterns suggest that respiratory reflexes, if present, have little effect on oral air pressure levels. In Study 2, both oral and subglottal air pressure responses were monitored in 2 adults while bleed apertures of 20 and 40 mm2 were randomly created. For 1 participant, peak oral air pressure dropped across bleed apertures, as in Study 1. Subglottal air pressure and slope, however, remained relatively stable. These patterns provide some support for the occurrence of respiratory reflexes to regulate subglottal air pressure. Overall, the studies indicate that the inherent physiologic processes of the respiratory system, which may involve reflexes, and passive aeromechanical resistance of the upper airway are capable of developing oral air pressure in the face of substantial pressure bleeds. Implications for understanding speech production and the characteristics of individuals with velopharyngeal dysfunction are discussed.

  20. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance of a 1.83-meter (6-ft) diameter 1.25-pressure-ratio fan (QF-8)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Lucas, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    A 1.25-pressure-ratio 1.83-meter (6-ft) tip diameter experimental fan stage with characteristics suitable for engine application on STOL aircraft was tested for acoustic and aerodynamic performance. The design incorporated proven features for low noise, including absence of inlet guide vanes, low rotor blade tip speed, low aerodynamic blade loading, and long axial spacing between the rotor and stator blade rows. The fan was operated with five exhaust nozzle areas. The stage noise levels generally increased with a decrease in nozzle area. Separation of the acoustic one-third octave results into broadband and pure-tone components showed the broadband noise to be greater than the corresponding pure-tone components. The sideline perceived noise was highest in the rear quadrants. The acoustic results of QF-8 were compared with those of two similar STOL application fans in the test series. The QF-8 had somewhat higher relative noise levels than those of the other two fans. The aerodynamic results of QF-8 and the other two fans were compared with corresponding results from 50.8-cm (20-in.) diam scale models of these fans and design values. Although the results for the full-scale and scale models of the other two fans were in reasonable agreement for each design, the full-scale fan QF-8 results showed poor performance compared with corresponding model results and design expectations. Facility effects of the full-scale fan QF-8 installation were considered in analyzing this discrepancy.

  1. Physiological responses of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores to high pressure.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Juhee; Balasubramaniam, V M

    2007-03-01

    Pressure inactivation behavior of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores was investigated in deionized water. The spores of B. amyloliquefaciens were subjected to 105 degrees C and 700 MPa. The magnitude of the decrease in viability after pressure treatment was similar to that after pressure treatment followed by heat shock. The increase of dipicolinic acid (DPA) release was correlated with the spore inactivation, and the hydrophobicity did not significantly change during the pressure-assisted thermal processing (PATP). Lag phase duration increased with increasing pressure process time. The mechanisms of spore germination and inactivation during the PATP were related to a complex physiological process.

  2. Analyzing panel acoustic contributions toward the sound field inside the passenger compartment of a full-size automobile.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F; Moondra, Manmohan; Beniwal, Ravi

    2015-04-01

    The Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS)-based nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is utilized to analyze panel acoustic contributions toward the acoustic field inside the interior region of an automobile. Specifically, the acoustic power flows from individual panels are reconstructed, and relative contributions to sound pressure level and spectrum at any point of interest are calculated. Results demonstrate that by correlating the acoustic power flows from individual panels to the field acoustic pressure, one can correctly locate the panel allowing the most acoustic energy transmission into the vehicle interior. The panel on which the surface acoustic pressure amplitude is the highest should not be used as indicative of the panel responsible for the sound field in the vehicle passenger compartment. Another significant advantage of this HELS-based NAH is that measurements of the input data only need to be taken once by using a conformal array of microphones in the near field, and ranking of panel acoustic contributions to any field point can be readily performed. The transfer functions between individual panels of any vibrating structure to the acoustic pressure anywhere in space are calculated not measured, thus significantly reducing the time and effort involved in panel acoustic contributions analyses.

  3. Fluctuating Wall Pressure and Vibratory Response of a Cylindrical Elastic Shell due to Confined Jet Excitations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Kam Wing

    A theoretical and experimental study was conducted to investigate the flow-induced noise and vibration caused by confined jet flows in a cylindrical duct. Unrestricted pipe flow and flows restricted by various orifices were tested for a wide range of velocities to simulate the flow in piping systems. Wall pressure data showed that the noise levels vary with the pipe's axial location and the peak noise is located at the vicinity of the end of the jet potential core. A non-dimensional wall pressure spectrum was established for the various confined jets by the Strouhal relationship, where the length scale is the jet hydraulic diameter. This jet pressure spectrum agrees with the wall pressure spectrum of a turbulent boundary layer above a rigid plane. Correlations of wall pressure fluctuations and pipe wall acceleration signals showed that jet flows generate more deterministic features than pipe flow. The coherence functions of the wall pressure and pipe wall acceleration signals are relatively high near the exit of the jet. The high coherence is probably due to the large-scale coherent structures. An analytical model was developed to study the effect of the turbulent jet flow field on the wall pressure and vibratory motion of the duct wall. Based on flow field measurements, the blocked surface pressure was calculated using Lighthill's method, and then used to drive the fluid -filled shell. The wall pressure and pipe wall acceleration were determined by solving the coupled fluid solid interaction problem. The wall pressure was obtained by summing the blocked surface pressure and the pressure due to the wall vibration. An amplitude modulated convecting wave field was used to simulate the moving acoustic sources of the jet. The random nature of the turbulent jet was incorporated into the analytical model. Specifically, the acoustic pressure was assumed to result from hydrodynamic pressure fluctuations which are uncorrelated in the radial direction, but are correlated in

  4. Space Shuttle Orbiter Main Engine Ignition Acoustic Pressure Loads Issue: Recent Actions to Install Wireless Instrumentation on STS-129

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Nathan; Studor, George

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development and construction of the wireless acoustic instruments surrounding the space shuttle's main engines in preparation for STS-129. The presentation also includes information on end-of-life processing and the mounting procedure for the devices.

  5. Increased sensitization of acoustic startle response in spasmodic mice with a mutation of the glycine receptor alpha1-subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Plappert, C F; Pilz, P K; Becker, K; Becker, C M; Schnitzler, H U

    2001-06-01

    The spontaneous mutant mouse spasmodic (spd) carries a missense mutation affecting the glycine receptor alpha1-subunit gene. This results in a decreased binding affinity to glycine. Spd mutants show exaggerated acoustic startle responses (ASR). The present study sought to elucidate whether this increased ASR is due to a changed auditory processing or to stronger motor output resulting from a disinhibited motor system or, alternatively, to changes in modulatory influences on the startle pathway, namely in the mechanisms underlying habituation and sensitization. We found that in homozygous spd/spd mutants the startle threshold was lower, and the recorded slope of input/output (i/o) function, which reflects the relation between sensory input and motor output, was steeper. During repetitive presentation of high sound pressure level (SPL) startle stimuli (25 dB above startle threshold), ASR amplitudes did not decrease in spd/spd mutants as they do in the wildtype. In contrast, ASR amplitudes decreased when low SPL startle stimuli were presented. Footshocks presented after high SPL startle stimuli did not cause a further increase in ASR amplitudes of spd/spd mutants as in the wildtype. In heterozygous spd/+ mutants all these parameters were between those of spd/spd mutants and wildtype mice but closer to those of the wildtype. The steeper slope of i/o function in spd/spd mutants may be caused by both an increased sensory input and an increased motor output. The altered course of ASR amplitudes during repetitive stimulation and the deficit in additional footshock sensitization, however, can only be explained by an increased sensitization level in the spd/spd mutants. In accordance with the "dual process theory" strong sensitization evoked by high SPL startle stimuli supposedly counteracts habituation, leading to a constant high ASR amplitude. Furthermore, additional footshock sensitization is prevented. The increased sensitization level may be due to a change in auditory

  6. Mechanical-Acoustic Multi-Objective Optimization of Honeycomb Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wang-Ying; Yang, Xiong-Wei; Li, Yue-Ming

    At present, optimal design against noise caused by vibrating structures is often formulated with the objective of minimizing sound power or sound pressure. In this paper, a mechanical and acoustic multi-objective optimization method is proposed aimed at minimizing static, dynamic and acoustic response of a honeycomb sandwich panel under given mass constraint. The multi-objective is defined as a weighted sum of static deflection, vibration response and sound power from the norm method. The static and dynamic responses are calculated using FEM and sound power radiated by structures is calculated using discrete Rayleigh integral. The sensitivities of static, dynamic and acoustic response are formulated to improve efficiency by the adjoint method. Numerical examples on the honeycomb plate are considered, which indicate that the proposed method can improve acoustical property without weakening mechanical property.

  7. Free-jet feasibility study of a thermal acoustic shield concept for AST/VCE application-dual stream nozzles. Comprehensive data report. Volume 2: Laser velocimeter and suppressor. Base pressure data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Brausch, J. F.; Price, A. O.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic and diagnostic data that were obtained to determine the influence of selected geometric and aerodynamic flow variables of coannular nozzles with thermal acoustic shields are summarized in this comprehensive data report. A total of 136 static and simulated flight acoustic test points were conducted with 9 scale-model nozzles. Aerodynamic laser velocimeter measurements were made for four selected plumes. In addition, static pressure data in the chute base region of the suppressor configurations were obtained to assess the influence of the shield stream on the suppressor base drag.

  8. Quantifying patterns of change in marine ecosystem response to multiple pressures.

    PubMed

    Large, Scott I; Fay, Gavin; Friedland, Kevin D; Link, Jason S

    2015-01-01

    The ability to understand and ultimately predict ecosystem response to multiple pressures is paramount to successfully implement ecosystem-based management. Thresholds shifts and nonlinear patterns in ecosystem responses can be used to determine reference points that identify levels of a pressure that may drastically alter ecosystem status, which can inform management action. However, quantifying ecosystem reference points has proven elusive due in large part to the multi-dimensional nature of both ecosystem pressures and ecosystem responses. We used ecological indicators, synthetic measures of ecosystem status and functioning, to enumerate important ecosystem attributes and to reduce the complexity of the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem (NES LME). Random forests were used to quantify the importance of four environmental and four anthropogenic pressure variables to the value of ecological indicators, and to quantify shifts in aggregate ecological indicator response along pressure gradients. Anthropogenic pressure variables were critical defining features and were able to predict an average of 8-13% (up to 25-66% for individual ecological indicators) of the variation in ecological indicator values, whereas environmental pressures were able to predict an average of 1-5 % (up to 9-26% for individual ecological indicators) of ecological indicator variation. Each pressure variable predicted a different suite of ecological indicator's variation and the shapes of ecological indicator responses along pressure gradients were generally nonlinear. Threshold shifts in ecosystem response to exploitation, the most important pressure variable, occurred when commercial landings were 20 and 60% of total surveyed biomass. Although present, threshold shifts in ecosystem response to environmental pressures were much less important, which suggests that anthropogenic pressures have significantly altered the ecosystem structure and functioning of the NES LME. Gradient response

  9. Cyclic Crack Growth Testing of an A.O. Smith Multilayer Pressure Vessel with Modal Acoustic Emission Monitoring and Data Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziola, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital Wave Corp. (DWC) was retained by Jacobs ATOM at NASA Ames Research Center to perform cyclic pressure crack growth sensitivity testing on a multilayer pressure vessel instrumented with DWC's Modal Acoustic Emission (MAE) system, with captured wave analysis to be performed using DWCs WaveExplorerTM software, which has been used at Ames since 2001. The objectives were to document the ability to detect and characterize a known growing crack in such a vessel using only MAE, to establish the sensitivity of the equipment vs. crack size and / or relevance in a realistic field environment, and to obtain fracture toughness materials properties in follow up testing to enable accurate crack growth analysis. This report contains the results of the testing.

  10. Driving time modulates accommodative response and intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Vera, Jesús; Diaz-Piedra, Carolina; Jiménez, Raimundo; Morales, José M; Catena, Andrés; Cardenas, David; Di Stasi, Leandro L

    2016-10-01

    Driving is a task mainly reliant on the visual system. Most of the time, while driving, our eyes are constantly focusing and refocusing between the road and the dashboard or near and far traffic. Thus, prolonged driving time should produce visual fatigue. Here, for the first time, we investigated the effects of driving time, a common inducer of driver fatigue, on two ocular parameters: the accommodative response (AR) and the intraocular pressure (IOP). A pre/post-test design has been used to assess the impact of driving time on both indices. Twelve participants (out of 17 recruited) completed the study (5 women, 24.42±2.84years old). The participants were healthy and active drivers with no visual impairment or pathology. They drove for 2h in a virtual driving environment. We assessed AR and IOP before and after the driving session, and also collected subjective measures of arousal and fatigue. We found that IOP and AR decreased (i.e., the accommodative lag increased) after the driving session (p=0.03 and p<0.001, respectively). Moreover, the nearest distances tested (20cm, 25cm, and 33cm) induced the highest decreases in AR (corrected p-values<0.05). Consistent with these findings, the subjective levels of arousal decreased and levels of fatigue increased after the driving session (all p-values<0.001). These results represent an innovative step towards an objective, valid, and reliable assessment of fatigue-impaired driving based on visual fatigue signs. PMID:27235337

  11. Fast Response and High Sensitivity ZnO/glass Surface Acoustic Wave Humidity Sensors Using Graphene Oxide Sensing Layer

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Weipeng; He, Mei; Meng, Nan; He, Xingli; Wang, Wenbo; Chen, Jinkai; Shi, Tianjin; Hasan, Tawfique; Xu, Zhen; Xu, Yang; Luo, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    We report ZnO/glass surface acoustic wave (SAW) humidity sensors with high sensitivity and fast response using graphene oxide sensing layer. The frequency shift of the sensors is exponentially correlated to the humidity change, induced mainly by mass loading effect rather than the complex impedance change of the sensing layer. The SAW sensors show high sensitivity at a broad humidity range from 0.5%RH to 85%RH with < 1 sec rise time. The simple design and excellent stability of our GO-based SAW humidity sensors, complemented with full humidity range measurement, highlights their potential in a wide range of applications. PMID:25425458

  12. The theoretical and experimental study of the nonlinear and chaotic response of curved panels to intense acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. F.

    1988-01-01

    Assuming a single-mode transverse displacement, a simple formula is derived for the transverse load-displacement relationship of a plate under in-plane compression. The formula is used to derive a simple analytical expression for the nonlinear dynamic response of postbuckled plates under sinusoidal or random excitation. The highly nonlinear motion of snap-through can be easily interpreted using the single-mode formula. Experimental results are obtained using buckled and cylindrical aluminum panels using discrete frequency and broadband excitation of mechanical and acoustic forces.

  13. Influence of central venous pressure upon sinus node responses to arterial baroreflex stimulation in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, A. L.; Takeshita, A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Abboud, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements were made of sinus node responses to arterial baroreceptor stimulation with phenylephrine injection or neck suction, before and during changes of central venous pressure provoked by lower body negative pressure or leg and lower truck elevation. Variations of central venous pressure between 1.1 and 9.0 mm Hg did not influence arterial baroreflex mediated bradycardia. Baroreflex sinus node responses were augmented by intravenous propranolol, but the level of responses after propranolol was comparable during the control state, lower body negative pressure, and leg and trunk elevation. Sinus node responses to very brief baroreceptor stimuli applied during the transitions of central venous pressure also were comparable in the three states. The authors conclude that physiological variations of central venous pressure do not influence sinus node responses to arterial baroreceptor stimulation in man.

  14. On the behavior of a shear-coaxial jet, spanning sub- to supercritical pressures, with and without an externally imposed transverse acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Dustin Wayne

    In the past, liquid rocket engines (LRE) have experienced high-frequency combustion instability, which impose an acoustic field in the combustion chamber. The acoustic field interacts with the fluid jets issuing from the injectors, thus altering the behavior of the jet compared to that of stable operation of the LRE. It is possible that this interaction could be a substantial feed back mechanism driving the combustion instability. In order to understand the problem of combustion instability, it is necessary to understand the interaction of the jet with the acoustic waves. From past combustion instability studies of the liquid oxygen and hydrogen propellant combination in a shear-coaxial injector configuration, a design guideline of outer-to-inner jet velocity ratio greater than about ten was proposed in order to avoid high-frequency acoustic combustion instability problems. However, no satisfactory physical explanation was provided. To promote this understanding, a cold-flow experimental investigation of a shear-coaxial jet interacting with a high-amplitude non-linear acoustic field was undertaken under chamber pressures extending into the supercritical regime. Liquid nitrogen (LN2) flowed from the inner tube of a coaxial injector while gaseous nitrogen (GN2) issued from its annular region. The injector fluids were directed into a chamber pressurized with gaseous nitrogen. The acoustic excitation was provided by an external driver capable of delivering acoustic field amplitudes up to 165 dB. The resonant modes of the chamber governed the two frequencies studied here, with the first two modes being about 3 and 5.2 kHz. High-speed images of the jet were taken with a Phantom CMOS camera. The so-called "dark core" of the jet is among the most salient features in the acquired images, and therefore, was defined and measured. The core length was found to decrease with increasing velocity and momentum flux ratio. Because of the ability of the camera to capture thousands of

  15. Sympathetic skin response following thermal, electrical, acoustic, and inspiratory gasp stimulation in familial dysautonomia patients and healthy persons.

    PubMed

    Hilz, M J; Azelrod, F B; Schweibold, G; Kolodny, E H

    1999-08-01

    To determine whether sympathetic skin response (SSR) testing evaluates afferent small or efferent sympathetic nerve fiber dysfunction, we studied SSR in patients with familial dysautonomia (FD) in whom both afferent small and efferent sympathetic fibers are largely reduced. We analyzed whether the response pattern to a combination of stimuli specific for large or small fiber activation allows differentiation between afferent and efferent small fiber dysfunction. In 52 volunteers and 13 FD patients, SSR was studied at palms and soles after warm, cold and heat as well as electrical, acoustic, and inspiratory gasp stimulation. In addition, thermal thresholds were assessed at four body sites using a Thermotest device (Somedic; Stockholm, Sweden). In volunteers, any stimulus induced reproducible SSRs. Only cold failed to evoke SSR in two volunteers. In all FD patients, electrical SSR was present, but amplitudes were reduced. Five patients had no acoustic SSR, four had no inspiratory SSR. Thermal SSR was absent in 10 patients with abnormal thermal perception and present in one patient with preserved thermal sensation. In two patients, thermal SSR was present only when skin areas with preserved temperature perception were stimulated. In patients with FD, preserved electrical SSR demonstrated the overall integrity of the SSR reflex but amplitude reduction suggested impaired sudomotor activation. SSR responses were dependent on the perception of the stimulus. In the presence of preserved electrical SSR, absent thermal SSR reflects afferent small fiber dysfunction. A combination of SSR stimulus types allows differentiation between afferent small or efferent sympathetic nerve fiber dysfunction. PMID:10574280

  16. Brain pressure responses in translational head impact: a dimensional analysis and a further computational study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Ruan, Shijie; Ji, Songbai

    2015-08-01

    Brain pressure responses resulting from translational head impact are typically related to focal injuries at the coup and contrecoup sites. Despite significant efforts characterizing brain pressure responses using experimental and modeling approaches, a thorough investigation of the key controlling parameters appears lacking. In this study, we identified three parameters specific and important for brain pressure responses induced by isolated linear acceleration a(lin) via a dimensional analysis: a(lin) itself (magnitude and directionality), brain size and shape. These findings were verified using our recently developed Dartmouth Head Injury Model (DHIM). Applying a(lin) to the rigid skull, we found that the temporal profile of the given a(lin) directly determined that of pressure. Brain pressure was also found to be linearly proportional to brain size and dependent on impact direction. In addition, we investigated perturbations to brain pressure responses as a result of non-rigid skull deformation. Finally, DHIM pressure responses were quantitatively validated against two representative cadaveric head impacts (categorized as "good" to "excellent" in performance). These results suggest that both the magnitude and directionality of a(lin) as well as brain size and shape should be considered when interpreting brain pressure responses. Further, a model validated against pressure responses alone is not sufficient to ensure its fidelity in strain-related responses. These findings provide important insights into brain pressure responses in translational head impact and the resulting risk of pressure-induced injury. In addition, they establish the feasibility of creating a pre-computed atlas for real-time tissue-level pressure responses without a direct simulation in the future.

  17. Brain pressure responses in translational head impact: a dimensional analysis and a further computational study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Ruan, Shijie; Ji, Songbai

    2014-01-01

    Brain pressure responses resulting from translational head impact are typically related to focal injuries at the coup and contrecoup sites. Despite significant efforts characterizing brain pressure responses using experimental and modeling approaches, a thorough investigation of the key controlling parameters appears lacking. In this study, we attempted to identify three parameters specific and important for brain pressure responses induced by isolated linear acceleration (alin) via a dimensional analysis: alin itself (magnitude and directionality), brain size and shape. These findings were verified using our recently developed Dartmouth Head Injury Model (DHIM). Applying alin to the rigid skull, we found that the temporal profile of the given alin directly determined that of pressure. Brain pressure was also found to be linearly proportional to brain size and dependent on impact direction. In addition, we investigated perturbations to brain pressure responses as a result of non-rigid skull deformation. Finally, DHIM pressure responses were quantitatively validated against two representative cadaveric head impacts (categorized as “good” to “excellent” in performance). These results suggest that both the magnitude and directionality of alin as well as brain size and shape should be considered when interpreting brain pressure responses. Further, a model validated against pressure responses alone is not sufficient to ensure its fidelity in strain-related responses. These findings provide important insights into brain pressure responses in translational head impact and the resulting risk of pressure-induced injury. In addition, they establish the feasibility of creating a pre-computed atlas for real-time tissue-level pressure responses without a direct simulation in the future. PMID:25412925

  18. Efficiency of drug delivery enhanced by acoustic pressure during blood–brain barrier disruption induced by focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Lee, Pei-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the delivery efficiency of intravenously injected large molecular agents, before and after disruption of the blood–brain barrier (BBB-D), induced by focused ultrasound (FUS) using various acoustic parameters. Materials and methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intravenously with Evans blue (EB) before or after BBB-D induction by pulsed FUS. We used a 1.0 MHz pulsed FUS with four acoustic power settings and an ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) at four different doses to induce BBB-D resulting from cavitation. The permeability of the BBB was assessed quantitatively based on the extravasation of EB. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to monitor the gadolinium deposition associated with FUS. Histological analysis was performed to examine tissue damage. Results The accumulation of EB in rat brain was found to be dependent on acoustic power and UCA dosage, regardless of whether EB administration occurred before or after FUS-induced BBB-D. Administration of EB followed by sonication resulted in greater EB extravasation than that for rats subjected to sonication prior to EB injection. To reduce tissue damage, EB extravasation was enhanced by first administering EB by intravenous injection, followed by sonication at reduced acoustic power or UCA dosage. The normalized signal intensity change in rat brains that received the same dose of UCA and sonicated after gadolinium injection was significantly greater than in rats undergoing sonication followed by gadolinium administration. Moreover, contrast enhanced MRI showed a more precise distribution of gadolinium in the brain when gadolinium was administered before sonication. Conclusion We demonstrated that a compound administered prior to sonication treatment promotes extravasation of the sonicated region. Thus, it is possible to optimize ultrasound parameters for lower sonication and reduced UCA doses, to induce BBB-D while minimizing damage to normal brain tissue. PMID

  19. The Effect of Basis Selection on Static and Random Acoustic Response Prediction Using a Nonlinear Modal Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Przekop, Adam

    2005-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of basis selection on geometric nonlinear response prediction using a reduced-order nonlinear modal simulation is presented. The accuracy is dictated by the selection of the basis used to determine the nonlinear modal stiffness. This study considers a suite of available bases including bending modes only, bending and membrane modes, coupled bending and companion modes, and uncoupled bending and companion modes. The nonlinear modal simulation presented is broadly applicable and is demonstrated for nonlinear quasi-static and random acoustic response of flat beam and plate structures with isotropic material properties. Reduced-order analysis predictions are compared with those made using a numerical simulation in physical degrees-of-freedom to quantify the error associated with the selected modal bases. Bending and membrane responses are separately presented to help differentiate the bases.

  20. Prediction of the Strain Response of Poly-AlN/(100)Si Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator and Experimental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuo; You, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The strain sensitivity of the Aluminum Nitride (AlN)/Silicon (Si) surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR) is predicted based on a modeling method introduced in this work, and further compared with experimental results. The strain influence on both the period of the inter-digital transducer (IDT) and the sound velocity is taken into consideration when modeling the strain response. From the modeling results, AlN and Si have opposite responses to strain; hence, for the AlN/Si-based SAWR, both a positive and a negative strain coefficient factor can be achieved by changing the thickness of the AlN layer, which is confirmed by strain response testing based on a silicon cantilever structure with two AlN configurations (1 μm and 3 μm in thickness, respectively). PMID:27128922

  1. Prediction of the Strain Response of Poly-AlN/(100)Si Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator and Experimental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuo; You, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The strain sensitivity of the Aluminum Nitride (AlN)/Silicon (Si) surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR) is predicted based on a modeling method introduced in this work, and further compared with experimental results. The strain influence on both the period of the inter-digital transducer (IDT) and the sound velocity is taken into consideration when modeling the strain response. From the modeling results, AlN and Si have opposite responses to strain; hence, for the AlN/Si-based SAWR, both a positive and a negative strain coefficient factor can be achieved by changing the thickness of the AlN layer, which is confirmed by strain response testing based on a silicon cantilever structure with two AlN configurations (1 μm and 3 μm in thickness, respectively). PMID:27128922

  2. Prediction of the Strain Response of Poly-AlN/(100)Si Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator and Experimental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuo; You, Zheng

    2016-04-27

    The strain sensitivity of the Aluminum Nitride (AlN)/Silicon (Si) surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR) is predicted based on a modeling method introduced in this work, and further compared with experimental results. The strain influence on both the period of the inter-digital transducer (IDT) and the sound velocity is taken into consideration when modeling the strain response. From the modeling results, AlN and Si have opposite responses to strain; hence, for the AlN/Si-based SAWR, both a positive and a negative strain coefficient factor can be achieved by changing the thickness of the AlN layer, which is confirmed by strain response testing based on a silicon cantilever structure with two AlN configurations (1 μm and 3 μm in thickness, respectively).

  3. Insights into environmental drivers of acoustic angular response using a self-organising map and hierarchical clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniell, James; Siwabessy, Justy; Nichol, Scott; Brooke, Brendan

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic backscatter from the seafloor is a complex function of signal frequency, seabed roughness, grain size distribution, benthos, bioturbation, volume reverberation, and other factors. Angular response is the variation in acoustic backscatter with incident angle and is considered be an intrinsic property of the seabed. An unsupervised classification technique combining a self-organising map (SOM) and hierarchical clustering was used to create an angular response facies map and explore the relationships between acoustic facies and ground truth data. Cluster validation routines indicated that a two cluster solution was optimal and separated sediment dominated environments from mixtures of sediment and hard ground. Low cluster separation limited cluster validation routines from identifying fine cluster structure visible with an AR density plot. Cluster validation, aided by a visual comparison with an AR density plot, indicated that a 14 cluster solution was also a suitable representation of the input dataset. Clusters that were a mixture of hard and unconsolidated substrates displayed an increase in backscatter with an increase in the occurrence of hard ground and highlighted the sensitivity of AR curves to the presence of even modest amounts of hard ground. Remapping video observations and sediment data onto the SOM matrix is innovative and depicts the relationship between ground truth data and cluster structure. Mapping environmental variables onto the SOM matrix can show broad trends and localised peaks and troughs and display the variability of ground truth data within designated clusters. These variables, when linked to AR curves via clusters, can indicate how environmental factors influence the shape of the curves. Once these links are established they can be incorporated into improved geoacoustic models that replicate field observations.

  4. Changes in Humpback Whale Song Occurrence in Response to an Acoustic Source 200 km Away

    PubMed Central

    Risch, Denise; Corkeron, Peter J.; Ellison, William T.; Van Parijs, Sofie M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of underwater anthropogenic sound on marine mammals is of increasing concern. Here we show that humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) song in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary (SBNMS) was reduced, concurrent with transmissions of an Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) experiment approximately 200 km away. We detected the OAWRS experiment in SBNMS during an 11 day period in autumn 2006. We compared the occurrence of song for 11 days before, during and after the experiment with song over the same 33 calendar days in two later years. Using a quasi-Poisson generalized linear model (GLM), we demonstrate a significant difference in the number of minutes with detected song between periods and years. The lack of humpback whale song during the OAWRS experiment was the most substantial signal in the data. Our findings demonstrate the greatest published distance over which anthropogenic sound has been shown to affect vocalizing baleen whales, and the first time that active acoustic fisheries technology has been shown to have this effect. The suitability of Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing technology for in-situ, long term monitoring of marine ecosystems should be considered, bearing in mind its possible effects on non-target species, in particular protected species. PMID:22253769

  5. Blood pressure responses of wild giraffes studied by radio telemetry.

    PubMed

    Van Citters, R L; Kemper, W S; Franklin, D L

    1966-04-15

    Blood pressure was telemetered from transducers chronically implanted in the carotid arteries of two adult, wild, male giraffes captured and released near Kiboko, Kenya. Cerebral perfusion pressure ranged from 280/180 mm-Hg while the animal was lying with its head on the ground to 125/75 mm-Hg when it was standing erect; it varied between these levels during spontaneous activity such as walking, grazing, and running.

  6. Respiratory and Laryngeal Responses to an Oral Air Pressure Bleed during Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Jessica E.; Stathopoulos, Elaine T.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers have hypothesized that the respiratory and laryngeal speech subsystems would respond to an air pressure bleed, but these responses have not been empirically studied. The present study examined the nature of the responses of the respiratory and laryngeal subsystems to an air pressure bleed in order to provide information relevant to the…

  7. Different mechanisms are responsible for dishabituation of electrophysiological auditory responses to a change in acoustic identity than to a change in stimulus location.

    PubMed

    Smulders, Tom V; Jarvis, Erich D

    2013-11-01

    Repeated exposure to an auditory stimulus leads to habituation of the electrophysiological and immediate-early-gene (IEG) expression response in the auditory system. A novel auditory stimulus reinstates this response in a form of dishabituation. This has been interpreted as the start of new memory formation for this novel stimulus. Changes in the location of an otherwise identical auditory stimulus can also dishabituate the IEG expression response. This has been interpreted as an integration of stimulus identity and stimulus location into a single auditory object, encoded in the firing patterns of the auditory system. In this study, we further tested this hypothesis. Using chronic multi-electrode arrays to record multi-unit activity from the auditory system of awake and behaving zebra finches, we found that habituation occurs to repeated exposure to the same song and dishabituation with a novel song, similar to that described in head-fixed, restrained animals. A large proportion of recording sites also showed dishabituation when the same auditory stimulus was moved to a novel location. However, when the song was randomly moved among 8 interleaved locations, habituation occurred independently of the continuous changes in location. In contrast, when 8 different auditory stimuli were interleaved all from the same location, a separate habituation occurred to each stimulus. This result suggests that neuronal memories of the acoustic identity and spatial location are different, and that allocentric location of a stimulus is not encoded as part of the memory for an auditory object, while its acoustic properties are. We speculate that, instead, the dishabituation that occurs with a change from a stable location of a sound is due to the unexpectedness of the location change, and might be due to different underlying mechanisms than the dishabituation and separate habituations to different acoustic stimuli.

  8. DIFFERENT MECHANISMS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR DISHABITUATION OF ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL AUDITORY RESPONSES TO A CHANGE IN ACOUSTIC IDENTITY THAN TO A CHANGE IN STIMULUS LOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Smulders, Tom V.; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated exposure to an auditory stimulus leads to habituation of the electrophysiological and immediate-early-gene (IEG) expression response in the auditory system. A novel auditory stimulus reinstates this response in a form of dishabituation. This has been interpreted as the start of new memory formation for this novel stimulus. Changes in the location of an otherwise identical auditory stimulus can also dishabituate the IEG expression response. This has been interpreted as an integration of stimulus identity and stimulus location into a single auditory object, encoded in the firing patterns of the auditory system. In this study, we further tested this hypothesis. Using chronic multi-electrode arrays to record multi-unit activity from the auditory system of awake and behaving zebra finches, we found that habituation occurs to repeated exposure to the same song and dishabituation with a novel song, similar to that described in head-fixed, restrained animals. A large proportion of recording sites also showed dishabituation when the same auditory stimulus was moved to a novel location. However, when the song was randomly moved among 8 interleaved locations, habituation occurred independently of the continuous changes in location. In contrast, when 8 different auditory stimuli were interleaved all from the same location, a separate habituation occurred to each stimulus. This result suggests that neuronal memories of the acoustic identity and spatial location are different, and that allocentric location of a stimulus is not encoded as part of the memory for an auditory object, while its acoustic properties are. We speculate that, instead, the dishabituation that occurs with a change from a stable location of a sound is due to the unexpectedness of the location change, and might be due to different underlying mechanisms than the dishabituation and separate habituations to different acoustic stimuli. PMID:23999220

  9. Acoustic intensity calculations for axisymmetrically modeled fluid regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambric, Stephen A.; Everstine, Gordon C.

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for calculating acoustic intensities from a time harmonic pressure field in an axisymmetric fluid region is presented. Acoustic pressures are computed in a mesh of NASTRAN triangular finite elements of revolution (TRIAAX) using an analogy between the scalar wave equation and elasticity equations. Acoustic intensities are then calculated from pressures and pressure derivatives taken over the mesh of TRIAAX elements. Intensities are displayed as vectors indicating the directions and magnitudes of energy flow at all mesh points in the acoustic field. A prolate spheroidal shell is modeled with axisymmetric shell elements (CONEAX) and submerged in a fluid region of TRIAAX elements. The model is analyzed to illustrate the acoustic intensity method and the usefulness of energy flow paths in the understanding of the response of fluid-structure interaction problems. The structural-acoustic analogy used is summarized for completeness. This study uncovered a NASTRAN limitation involving numerical precision issues in the CONEAX stiffness calculation causing large errors in the system matrices for nearly cylindrical cones.

  10. Intra-arterial pressure measurement in neonates: dynamic response requirements.

    PubMed

    van Genderingen, H R; Gevers, M; Hack, W W

    1995-02-01

    A computer simulation of a catheter manometer system was used to quantify measurement errors in neonatal blood pressure parameters. Accurate intra-arterial pressure recordings of 21 critically ill newborns were fed into this simulated system. The dynamic characteristics, natural frequency and damping coefficient, were varied from 2.5 to 60 Hz and from 0.1 to 1.4, respectively. As a result, errors in systolic, diastolic and pulse arterial pressure were obtained as a function of natural frequency and damping coefficient. Iso-error curves for 2%, 5% and 10% were constructed. Using these curves, the maximum inaccuracy of any neonatal catheter manometer system can be determined and used in the clinical setting.

  11. In situ observation of the pressure-induced phase transitions of portlandite and influential factors on the pressure response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, R.; Komatsu, K.; Kagi, H.; Nakano, S.

    2010-12-01

    Pressure-induced structural changes in portlandite, Ca(OH)2, draw attentions as a model system for understanding the behavior of hydrogen bonding in solids. There still remains a discrepancy in the pressure response of portlandite among the previous studies. A crystal-to-crystal phase transition or a pressure-induced amorphization occurs at 8-12 GPa at room temperature in powder samples in various pressure transmitting media [Meade and Jeanloz. 1990; Catalli et al., 2008 etc.], whereas a single crystal transforms to a high-pressure (high-P) form at 6 GPa [Ekbundit et al., 1996]. So far, the relationship between the phase transition mechanism and influential factors as possible driving forces, such as the grain size, the hydrostatic condition and the isotope effect, has not been fully established yet. In this study, pressure-responses of synthesized single crystals and powder of portlandite were investigated using diamond anvil cells under quasi-hydrostatic conditions. Powder samples of Ca(OH)2 were synthesized by dissolving CaO in H2O. Single crystal was obtained by recrystallization from the synthesized powder sample with excess H2O on the glass plates in a desiccator. Raman spectra, IR spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were conducted up to 25 GPa using a 4:1 methanol-ethanol mixture or helium was used as a pressure medium. Applied pressure and the hydrostaticity were estimated by ruby fluorescence. Angle-dispersive powder X-ray diffraction patterns were measured at the beamline 18C, Photon Factory, KEK. Single crystal XRD was measured using a micro focused X-ray diffractometer (MicroMax-007, Rigaku) with confocal multi layer mirrors. Our results show that both the grain size and the hydrostaticity serve independently as influential factors on the phase transition pressure and the process toward the subsequent amorphization. We first observed the difference in the phase transition pressure between Ca(OH)2 and Ca(OD)2 single crystals in helium

  12. Effect of Mixed Dislocations on Nonlinear Acoustic Responses in Plastic Deformation Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wujun; Xiang, Yanxun; Xuan, Fu-Zhen; Zhang, Haiyan

    An analytical model is proposed for describing the influence of mixed dislocation on the acoustic nonlinearity in the plastically deformed materials, which is derived based on the dislocation line energy and variable line tension. Based on the proposed model, the interaction of nonlinear plane longitudinal wave with the plastically deformed materials was simulated in this article. The simulation was validated by the experimental measurement for the satisfactory consistency. Both simulation and experimental results reveal monotonically increasing tendency of the normalized nonlinear parameter with the plastic strain, which is mainly attributed to the dislocation evolution according to microscopic study.

  13. MEMS Based Acoustic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikaza (Inventor); Humphreys, William M. (Inventor); Arnold, David P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention described and shown in the specification aid drawings include a combination responsive to an acoustic wave that can be utilized as a dynamic pressure sensor. In one embodiment of the present invention, the combination has a substrate having a first surface and an opposite second surface, a microphone positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having an input and a first output and a second output, wherein the input receives a biased voltage, and the microphone generates an output signal responsive to the acoustic wave between the first output and the second output. The combination further has an amplifier positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having a first input and a second input and an output, wherein the first input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the first output of the microphone and the second input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the second output of the microphone for receiving the output sinual from the microphone. The amplifier is spaced from the microphone with a separation smaller than 0.5 mm.

  14. Reductions in central venous pressure by lower body negative pressure or blood loss elicit similar hemodynamic responses

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Blair D.; van Helmond, Noud; Curry, Timothy B.; van Buskirk, Camille M.; Convertino, Victor A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hemodynamic and blood analyte responses to reduced central venous pressure (CVP) and pulse pressure (PP) elicited during graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to those observed during graded blood loss (BL) in conscious humans. We hypothesized that the stimulus-response relationships of CVP and PP to hemodynamic responses during LBNP would mimic those observed during BL. We assessed CVP, PP, heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and other hemodynamic markers in 12 men during LBNP and BL. Blood samples were obtained for analysis of catecholamines, hematocrit, hemoglobin, arginine vasopressin, and blood gases. LBNP consisted of 5-min stages at 0, 15, 30, and 45 mmHg of suction. BL consisted of 5 min at baseline and following three stages of 333 ml of hemorrhage (1,000 ml total). Individual r2 values and linear regression slopes were calculated to determine whether the stimulus (CVP and PP)-hemodynamic response trajectories were similar between protocols. The CVP-MAP trajectory was the only CVP-response slope that was statistically different during LBNP compared with BL (0.93 ± 0.27 vs. 0.13 ± 0.26; P = 0.037). The PP-heart rate trajectory was the only PP-response slope that was statistically different during LBNP compared with BL (−1.85 ± 0.45 vs. −0.46 ± 0.27; P = 0.024). Norepinephrine, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were all lower at termination in the BL protocol compared with LBNP (P < 0.05). Consistent with our hypothesis, LBNP mimics the hemodynamic stimulus-response trajectories observed during BL across a significant range of CVP in humans. PMID:24876357

  15. Quick-response servo amplifies small hydraulic pressure differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegard, D. E.

    1966-01-01

    Hydraulic servo, which quickly diverts fluid to either of two actuators, controls the flow rates and pressures within a hydraulic system so that the output force of the servo system is independent of the velocity of the mechanism which the system actuates. This servo is a dynamic feedback control device.

  16. Blood pressure response to patterns of weather fluctuations and effect on mortality.

    PubMed

    Aubinière-Robb, Louise; Jeemon, Panniyammakal; Hastie, Claire E; Patel, Rajan K; McCallum, Linsay; Morrison, David; Walters, Matthew; Dawson, Jesse; Sloan, William; Muir, Scott; Dominiczak, Anna F; McInnes, Gordon T; Padmanabhan, Sandosh

    2013-07-01

    Very few studies have looked at longitudinal intraindividual blood pressure responses to weather conditions. There are no data to suggest that specific response to changes in weather will have an impact on survival. We analyzed >169 000 clinic visits of 16 010 Glasgow Blood Pressure Clinic patients with hypertension. Each clinic visit was mapped to the mean West of Scotland monthly weather (temperature, sunshine, rainfall) data. Percentage change in blood pressure was calculated between pairs of consecutive clinic visits, where the weather alternated between 2 extreme quartiles (Q(1)-Q(4) or Q(4)-Q(1)) or remained in the same quartile (Q(n)-Q(n)) of each weather parameter. Subjects were also categorized into 2 groups depending on whether their blood pressure response in Q(1)-Q(4) or Q(4)-Q(1) were concordant or discordant to Q(n)-Q(n). Generalized estimating equations and Cox proportional hazards model were used to model the effect on longitudinal blood pressure and mortality, respectively. Q(n)-Q(n) showed a mean 2% drop in blood pressure consistently, whereas Q(4)-Q(1) showed a mean 2.1% and 1.6% rise in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. However, Q(1)-Q(4) did not show significant changes in blood pressure. Temperature-sensitive subjects had significantly higher mortality (1.35 [95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.71]; P=0.01) and higher follow-up systolic blood pressure (1.85 [95% confidence interval, 0.24-3.46]; P=0.02) compared with temperature-nonsensitive subjects. Blood pressure response to temperature may be one of the underlying mechanisms that determine long-term blood pressure variability. Knowing a patient's blood pressure response to weather can help reduce unnecessary antihypertensive treatment modification, which may in turn increase blood pressure variability and, thus, risk.

  17. The oceanic response of the Turkish Straits System to an extreme drop in atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, Jeffrey W.; Jarosz, Ewa; Chiggiato, Jacopo; Beşiktepe, Åükrü

    2014-06-01

    Moorings across all four entry/exit sections of the Dardanelles Strait and the Bosphorus Strait simultaneously measured the response of the Turkish Straits System to the passage of a severe cyclonic storm that included an atmospheric pressure drop of more than 30 mbar in less than 48 h. The bottom pressure response at the Aegean Sea side of the Dardanelles Strait was consistent with an inverted barometer response, but the response at the other sections did not follow an inverted barometer, leading to a large bottom pressure gradient through the Turkish Straits System. Upper-layer flow toward the Aegean Sea was reversed by the storm and flow toward the Black Sea was greatly enhanced. Bottom pressure across the Sea of Marmara peaked 6 h after the passage of the storm's minimum pressure. The response on the Dardanelles side was a combination of sea elevation and pycnocline depth rise, and the response on the Bosphorus side was an even greater sea elevation rise and a drop in pycnocline depth. The peak in bottom pressure in the Sea of Marmara was followed by another reverse in the flow through the Dardanelles Strait as flow was then directed away from the Sea of Marmara in both straits. A simple conceptual model without wind is able to explain fluctuations in bottom pressure in the Sea of Marmara to a 0.89-0.96 level of correlation. This stresses the importance of atmospheric pressure dynamics in driving the mass flux of the Turkish Strait System for extreme storms.

  18. Piston slap induced pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage of an internal combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Kazuhide; Wang, Xiaoyu; Saeki, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Liner cavitation is caused by water pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage (WCP). When the negative pressure falls below the saturated vapor pressure, the impulsive pressure following the implosion of cavitation bubbles causes cavitation erosion of the wet cylinder liner surface. The present work establishes a numerical model for structural-acoustic coupling between the crankcase and the acoustic field in the WCP considering their dynamic characteristics. The coupling effect is evaluated through mutual interaction terms that are calculated from the mode shapes of the acoustic field and of the crankcase vibration on the boundary. Water pressure fluctuations in the WCP under the action of piston slap forces are predicted and the contributions of the uncoupled mode shapes of the crankcase and the acoustic field to the pressure waveform are analyzed. The influence of sound speed variations on the water pressure response is discussed, as well as the pressure on the thrust sides of the four cylinders.

  19. Response to "Comment on 'Resonant acoustic scattering by swimbladder-bearing fish'" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 64, 571-580 (1978)].

    PubMed

    Love, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    In the 1970s a model of resonant scattering from a swimbladder-bearing fish was developed. The fish was modeled as an air bubble, representing a swimbladder, encased in a viscous spherical shell, representing the fish flesh. This model has been used successfully to correlate acoustic scattering data with fish information in a number of ocean locations. Recently, questions have arisen about viscous damping of the flesh and the thickness of the shell [K. Baik, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 5-8 (2013)]. This Letter responds to those questions and provides practical insight into the model's use.

  20. Response to "Comment on 'Resonant acoustic scattering by swimbladder-bearing fish'" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 64, 571-580 (1978)].

    PubMed

    Love, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    In the 1970s a model of resonant scattering from a swimbladder-bearing fish was developed. The fish was modeled as an air bubble, representing a swimbladder, encased in a viscous spherical shell, representing the fish flesh. This model has been used successfully to correlate acoustic scattering data with fish information in a number of ocean locations. Recently, questions have arisen about viscous damping of the flesh and the thickness of the shell [K. Baik, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 5-8 (2013)]. This Letter responds to those questions and provides practical insight into the model's use. PMID:24180749

  1. Pressure-coupled vaporization and combustion responses of liquid-fuel droplets in high-pressure environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Vigor; Shuen, J. S.; Hsiao, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic responses of liquid-fuel droplet vaporization and combustion to ambient pressure oscillations are examined. The analysis is based on the complete sets of conservation equations for both gas and liquid phases, and accommodates detailed treatments of finite-rate chemical kinetics and variable properties. With a full account of thermodynamic phase equilibrium at the droplet surface, the model enables a systematic examination of the effects of ambient flow conditions on the droplet behavior. The responses of hydrocarbon fuel droplets in both sub- and super-critical environments are investigated. Results indicate that the droplet gasification and burning mechanisms depend greatly on the ambient pressure. In particular, a rapid enlargement of the vaporization and combustion responses occurs when the droplet surface reaches its critical point, mainly due to the strong variations of latent heat of vaporization and thermophysical properties at the critical state.

  2. A membrane-type acoustic metamaterial with adjustable acoustic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfeldt, F.; Riecken, J.; Gleine, W.; von Estorff, O.

    2016-07-01

    A new realization of a membrane-type acoustic metamaterial (MAM) with adjustable sound transmission properties is presented. The proposed design distinguishes itself from other realizations by a stacked arrangement of two MAMs which is inflated using pressurized air. The static pressurization leads to large nonlinear deformations and, consequently, geometrical stiffening of the MAMs which is exploited to adjust the eigenmodes and sound transmission loss of the structure. A theoretical analysis of the proposed inflatable MAM design using numerical and analytical models is performed in order to identify two important mechanisms, namely the shifting of the eigenfrequencies and modal residuals due to the pressurization, responsible for the transmission loss adjustment. Analytical formulas are provided for predicting the eigenmode shifting and normal incidence sound transmission loss of inflated single and double MAMs using the concept of effective mass. The investigations are concluded with results from a test sample measurement inside an impedance tube, which confirm the theoretical predictions.

  3. Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustic Measurements in a Highly Back-Pressured Scramjet Isolator Model: A Research Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Troy F.; Balla, Robert J.; Baurle, Robert A.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2008-01-01

    Under the Propulsion Discipline of NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program s Hypersonics Project, a test apparatus, for testing a scramjet isolator model, is being constructed at NASA's Langley Research Center. The test apparatus will incorporate a 1-inch by 2-inch by 15-inch-long scramjet isolator model supplied with 2.1 lbm/sec of unheated dry air through a Mach 2.5 converging-diverging nozzle. The planned research will incorporate progressively more challenging measurement techniques to characterize the flow field within the isolator, concluding with the application of the Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustic (LITA) measurement technique. The primary goal of this research is to use the data acquired to validate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models employed to characterize the complex flow field of a scramjet isolator. This paper describes the test apparatus being constructed, pre-test CFD simulations, and the LITA measurement technique.

  4. Simulation of the spatial distribution of the acoustic pressure in sonochemical reactors with numerical methods: a review.

    PubMed

    Tudela, Ignacio; Sáez, Verónica; Esclapez, María Deseada; Díez-García, María Isabel; Bonete, Pedro; González-García, José

    2014-05-01

    Numerical methods for the calculation of the acoustic field inside sonoreactors have rapidly emerged in the last 15 years. This paper summarizes some of the most important works on this topic presented in the past, along with the diverse numerical works that have been published since then, reviewing the state of the art from a qualitative point of view. In this sense, we illustrate and discuss some of the models recently developed by the scientific community to deal with some of the complex events that take place in a sonochemical reactor such as the vibration of the reactor walls and the nonlinear phenomena inherent to the presence of ultrasonic cavitation. In addition, we point out some of the upcoming challenges that must be addressed in order to develop a reliable tool for the proper designing of efficient sonoreactors and the scale-up of sonochemical processes. PMID:24355287

  5. Analyses of sea surface height, bottom pressure and acoustic travel time in the Japan/East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongsheng

    A two-dimensional array of pressure-gauge-equipped inverted echo sounders (PIESs) was deployed in the southwestern Japan/East Sea (JES) from June 1999 to July 2001, designed to observe variability in the barotropic and baroclinic circulation. The findings from these studies are reported here. A nearly uniform barotropic basin-scale sea level variation exists in the JES with amplitudes about 5 cm. They are energetic at time scales of 2-70 days, which are shorter than the ERS-2 and TOPEX/Poseidon satellite altimetry Nyquist periods of 70 days and 20 days. The common mode produces a substantial alias in satellite observations; furthermore, the combined aliasing effects on multi-tracks can mimic mesoscale eddies and may qualitatively alter the synoptic mapping. Our alias can be suppressed by removing the common mode from satellite SSH. 78% of the common mode variance can be removed in the Japan/East Sea by averaging among coastal tide gauge records to estimate the common mode. High frequency oscillations with period around 7 hours are shown to be organized in a fundamental basin mode in the JES. The oscillation consists of a single amphidromic point around which the high water propagates counter-clockwise with along-coast wavelength equal to the circumference of the basin and largest amplitude at the narrow northeast region of the JES. The time series of basin oscillations is modulated in packets of time scales 2-16 days shown to coincide with synoptic scale forcing over the JES. The basin oscillations exhibit seasonal modulation and vary jointly with wind forcing. A coupled mode analysis confirms that bottom topography vertical coupling in the Japan/East Sea. In the first coupled mode, the deep response flows are largely confined on closed potential vorticity regions created by the Ulleung Basin depression or by the Korea Plateau, while the upper layer exhibits a migration of the Ulleung Warm Eddy. In the second mode, the upper and deep layer have similar spatial

  6. Cell wall extension behavior of Phycomyces sporangiophores during the pressure response.

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, J K; Smith, M E; Espinosa, M A

    1995-01-01

    The cylindrical, single-celled sporangiophore of Phycomyces blakesleeanus grows (enlarges) predominantly in the longitudinal direction during two stages of development; stage I and stage IVb. Cell enlargement (cell wall extension) occurs in a distinct region termed the "growing zone." It was previously reported that a large step-up or pulse-up in turgor pressure, greater than approximately 0.02 MPa, will elicit a transient decrease in longitudinal growth rate of the stage I and stage IVb sporangiophore. This transient decrease in longitudinal growth rate is termed the "pressure response." Both the magnitude and duration of the pressure response depend on the magnitude of the turgor pressure step-up or pulse-up. Qualitatively, the pressure response is similar to the stretch response, which is produced with the application of a longitudinal force (load) on the sporangiophore. In this investigation, the growth (extension) behavior of the cell wall in the growing zone is studied during the pressure response. It is found that both the extension rate of the cell wall in the growing zone and the length of the growing zone decrease during the pressure response, and that together they account for the observed decrease in longitudinal growth rate. PMID:7696521

  7. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  8. Hybrid optical and acoustic force based sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahoney, Paul; Brodie, Graham W.; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E. M.; Cochran, Sandy; Spalding, Gabriel C.; MacDonald, Michael P.

    2014-09-01

    We report the combined use of optical sorting and acoustic levitation to give particle sorting. Differing sizes of microparticles are sorted optically both with and without the aid of acoustic levitation, and the results compared to show that the use of acoustic trapping can increase sorting efficiency. The use of a transparent ultrasonic transducer is also shown to streamline the integration of optics and acoustics. We also demonstrate the balance of optical radiation pressure and acoustic levitation to achieve vertical sorting.

  9. Dynamic response of vaporizing droplet to pressure oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Lei; Shen, Chibing; Zhang, Xinqiao

    2016-06-01

    Combustion instability is a major challenge in the development of the liquid propellant engines, and droplet vaporization is viewed as a potential mechanism for driving instabilities. Based on the previous work, an unsteady droplet heating and vaporization model was developed. The model and numerical method are validated by experimental data available in literature, and then the oscillatory vaporization of n-Heptane droplet exposed to unsteady harmonic nitrogen atmosphere was numerically investigated over a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies. Also, temperature variations inside the droplet were demonstrated under oscillation environments. It was found that the thermal wave is attenuated with significantly reduced wave intensities as it penetrates deep into droplet from the ambient gas. Droplet surface temperature exhibits smaller fluctuation than that of the ambient gas, and it exhibits a time lag with regard to the pressure variation. Furthermore, the mechanism leading to phase lag of vaporization rate with respect to pressure oscillation was unraveled. Results show that this phase lag varies during the droplet lifetime and it is strongly influenced by oscillation frequency, indicating droplet vaporization is only capable of driving combustion instability in some certain frequency domains. Instead, the amplitude of the oscillation does not have very significant effects. It is noteworthy that thermal inertia of the droplet also plays a considerable role in determining the phase lag.

  10. Ultrafast Time Response Pressure-Sensitive Paint for Unsteady Shock-Wave Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numata, Daiju; Asai, Keisuke

    Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) is an optical pressure measurement technique widely used in aerodynamic experiments, and has been applied to unsteady shock-wave phenomena [1, 2]. However, one of the largest problems to apply PSP to high-speed and unsteady phenomena is the response time of PSP.

  11. Particle analysis in an acoustic cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for acoustically manipulating one or more particles. Acoustically manipulated particles may be separated by size. The particles may be flowed in a flow stream and acoustic radiation pressure, which may be radial, may be applied to the flow stream. This application of acoustic radiation pressure may separate the particles. In one embodiment, the particles may be separated by size, and as a further example, the larger particles may be transported to a central axis.

  12. Relationship of the Acoustic Startle Response and Its Modulation to Emotional and Behavioral Problems in Typical Development Children and Those with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Komatsu, Sahoko; Nakahachi, Takayuki; Ogino, Kazuo; Kamio, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    Auditory hyper-reactivity is a common sensory-perceptual abnormality in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which interrupts behavioral adaptation. We investigated acoustic startle response (ASR) modulations in 17 children with ASD and 27 with typical development (TD). Compared to TD, children with ASD had larger ASR magnitude to weak stimuli and…

  13. Comparison of pressure transient response in intensely and sparsely fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, R.T.

    1989-04-01

    A comprehensive analytical model is presented to study the pressure transient behavior of a naturally fractured reservoir with a continuous matrix block size distribution. Geologically realistic probability density functions of matrix block size are used to represent reservoirs of varying fracture intensity and uniformity. Transient interporosity flow is assumed and interporosity skin is incorporated. Drawdown and interference pressure transient tests are investigated. The results show distinctions in the pressure response from intensely and sparsely fractured reservoirs in the absence of interporosity skin. Also, uniformly and nonuniformly fractured reservoirs exhibit distinct responses, irrespective of the degree of fracture intensity. The pressure response in a nonuniformly fractured reservoir with large block size variability, approaches a nonfractured (homogeneous) reservoir response. Type curves are developed to estimate matrix block size variability and the degree of fracture intensity from drawdown and interference well tests.

  14. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  15. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  16. Underwater acoustic omnidirectional absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naify, Christina J.; Martin, Theodore P.; Layman, Christopher N.; Nicholas, Michael; Thangawng, Abel L.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2014-02-01

    Gradient index media, which are designed by varying local element properties in given geometry, have been utilized to manipulate acoustic waves for a variety of devices. This study presents a cylindrical, two-dimensional acoustic "black hole" design that functions as an omnidirectional absorber for underwater applications. The design features a metamaterial shell that focuses acoustic energy into the shell's core. Multiple scattering theory was used to design layers of rubber cylinders with varying filling fractions to produce a linearly graded sound speed profile through the structure. Measured pressure intensity agreed with predicted results over a range of frequencies within the homogenization limit.

  17. Peripheral chemoreception and arterial pressure responses to intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R; Peng, Ying-Jie; Kumar, Ganesh K; Nanduri, Jayasri

    2015-04-01

    Carotid bodies are the principal peripheral chemoreceptors for detecting changes in arterial blood oxygen levels, and the resulting chemoreflex is a potent regulator of blood pressure. Recurrent apnea with intermittent hypoxia (IH) is a major clinical problem in adult humans and infants born preterm. Adult patients with recurrent apnea exhibit heightened sympathetic nerve activity and hypertension. Adults born preterm are predisposed to early onset of hypertension. Available evidence suggests that carotid body chemoreflex contributes to hypertension caused by IH in both adults and neonates. Experimental models of IH provided important insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying carotid body chemoreflex-mediated hypertension. This article provides a comprehensive appraisal of how IH affects carotid body function, underlying cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms, and the contribution of chemoreflex to the hypertension.

  18. Peripheral Chemoreception and Arterial Pressure Responses to Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R.; Peng, Ying-Jie; Kumar, Ganesh K.; Nanduri, Jayasri

    2015-01-01

    Carotid bodies are the principal peripheral chemoreceptors for detecting changes in arterial blood oxygen levels, and the resulting chemoreflex is a potent regulator of blood pressure. Recurrent apnea with intermittent hypoxia (IH) is a major clinical problem in adult humans and infants born preterm. Adult patients with recurrent apnea exhibit heightened sympathetic nerve activity and hypertension. Adults born preterm are predisposed to early onset of hypertension. Available evidence suggests that carotid body chemoreflex contributes to hypertension caused by IH in both adults and neonates. Experimental models of IH provided important insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying carotid body chemoreflex-mediated hypertension. This article provides a comprehensive appraisal of how IH affects carotid body function, underlying cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms, and the contribution of chemoreflex to the hypertension. PMID:25880505

  19. Step Response Characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations have been used in this work to understand the step response characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PC-PSP). A recently developed analytical model describing the essential physics in PC-PSP quenching kinetics is used, which includes the effect of both diffusion time scale and luminescent lifetime on the net response of PC-PSP. Step response simulations using this model enables an understanding of the effects of parameters, such as the diffusion coefficient of O2 in the polymer/ceramic coating, attenuation of excitation light, ambient luminescent lifetime, sensitivity, and the magnitude and direction of pressure change on the observed response time scales of PC-PSP. It was found that higher diffusion coefficient and greater light attenuation lead to faster response, whereas longer ambient lifetime and larger sensitivity lead to slower response characteristics. Due to the inherent non-linearity of the Stern-Volmer equation, response functions also change with magnitude and direction of the pressure change. Experimental results from a shock tube are presented where the effects of varying the roughness, pressure jump magnitude and luminophore probe have been studied. Model parameters have been varied to obtain a good fit to experimental results and this optimized model is then used to obtain the response time for a step decrease in pressure, an estimate of which is currently not obtainable from experiments. PMID:26404294

  20. Step Response Characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W

    2015-09-03

    Experiments and numerical simulations have been used in this work to understand the step response characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PC-PSP). A recently developed analytical model describing the essential physics in PC-PSP quenching kinetics is used, which includes the effect of both diffusion time scale and luminescent lifetime on the net response of PC-PSP. Step response simulations using this model enables an understanding of the effects of parameters, such as the diffusion coefficient of O₂ in the polymer/ceramic coating, attenuation of excitation light, ambient luminescent lifetime, sensitivity, and the magnitude and direction of pressure change on the observed response time scales of PC-PSP. It was found that higher diffusion coefficient and greater light attenuation lead to faster response, whereas longer ambient lifetime and larger sensitivity lead to slower response characteristics. Due to the inherent non-linearity of the Stern-Volmer equation, response functions also change with magnitude and direction of the pressure change. Experimental results from a shock tube are presented where the effects of varying the roughness, pressure jump magnitude and luminophore probe have been studied. Model parameters have been varied to obtain a good fit to experimental results and this optimized model is then used to obtain the response time for a step decrease in pressure, an estimate of which is currently not obtainable from experiments.

  1. Vesuvius acoustic emissions, deformation, seismicity - an inflating and deflating system by a time varying hot fluid pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparo, G.; Coppa, U.; Gregori, G. P.; Luongo, G.; Taloni, T.

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic Emissions (AE) allow for clear assessment of the times when AE sources appear 3D distributed in space, envisaging a likely origin by hot fluid diffusion through rock pores, in contrast to times when AE sources denote some more 2D than mere 3D spatial distribution, envisaging an origin by micro-cracks, much like e.g. along a cleavage plane of a crystal. Hence, the AE recorded on a dyke of a volcano recognize the role of hot fluids (having great mobility underground) compared to the role of plutonic intrusions (producing cracks, due to the extremely low mobility of magma underground). AE provide per se with a high sensitivity and time resolution, and recognise inflation and deflation times. AE ought to be correlated with soil degassing and topographical micro-deformations. In contrast, seismic monitoring has a much lower time resolution, as it is concerned with time- and energy-integrated effects, which appear likely to be triggered by the weight of the edifice. Vesuvius is a good test case history. The state of the art is reported about correlation studies between AE, precision topography, and seismicity.

  2. Wall pressure fluctuations in rectangular partial enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliaroli, T.; Camussi, R.

    2015-04-01

    Wall pressure fluctuations generated within rectangular partial enclosures (RPEs) have been studied experimentally for a broad range of geometrical parameters. The geometry represents a simplified version of a new generation trapped vortex combustor and consisted of a rectangular cavity connected to a neck of smaller size. Wall pressure fluctuations have been measured through wall mounted microphones providing single and multi-variate pressure statistics both in the physical space and in the Fourier domain. In order to interpret the pressure signals, aerodynamic and acoustic investigations have been carried out as well for several cavity-neck ratios. The analysis of the acoustic response of the cavity has been conducted both numerically and experimentally and a simple theoretical model has been proposed to predict the frequency of the acoustic resonances. The aerodynamic study has been carried out through PIV measurements that provided characterization in terms of the geometrical parameters of both the large-scale vortex generated within the cavity and the recirculation zone formed upstream of the neck. The use of the POD decomposition permitted us to correlate the dynamics of the recirculation with the observed pressure statistics. The aerodynamic and acoustic investigations allowed us to interpret exhaustively the wall pressure cross-statistics and to separate contributions induced by hydrodynamic and purely acoustic pressure fluctuations.

  3. Low Pretreatment Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI) Values Predict Sustained Virological Response in Antiviral Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zopf, Steffen; Rösch, Lara; Konturek, Peter C.; Goertz, Ruediger S.; Neurath, Markus F.; Strobel, Deike

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-invasive procedures such as acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) shear-wave elastography are currently used for the assessment of liver fibrosis. In the course of chronic hepatitis C, significant liver fibrosis or cirrhosis develops in approximately 25% of patients, which is a negative predictor of antiviral treatment response. Cirrhosis can be prevented by successful virus elimination. In this prospective study, a pretreatment ARFI cutoff value of 1.5 m/s was evaluated in relation to sustained virological response to anti-HCV therapy. Material/Methods In 23 patients with chronic hepatitis C, liver stiffness was examined with ARFI at defined times before and under antiviral triple therapy (peginterferon, ribavirin in combination with a first-generation protease inhibitor, and telaprevir or boceprevir). Patients were stratified into 2 groups based on pretreatment ARFI values (<1.5 m/s and ≥1.5 m/s) for the assessment of virological response. Results The liver stiffness at baseline for all patients was 1.57±0.79 m/s (ARFI median ± standard deviation; margin: 0.81 m/s to 3.45 m/s). At week 4 of triple therapy, patients with low pretreatment ARFI values had higher rates of HCV-RNA negativity (69% vs. 43%), reflecting an early rapid virological response (eRVR). Sustained virological response (SVR) was found in 75% (12/16) of patients with an ARFI value <1.5 m/s and only 57% (4/7) of patients with ARFI value ≥1.5 m/s. Conclusions Patients with chronic hepatitis C and pretreatment ARFI <1.5 m/s showed earlier virus elimination and better response to treatment. PMID:27690214

  4. A method for achieving monotonic frequency-temperature response for langasite surface-acoustic-wave high-temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaoming, Bao; Yabing, Ke; Yanqing, Zheng; Lina, Cheng; Honglang, Li

    2016-02-01

    To achieve the monotonic frequency-temperature response for a high-temperature langasite (LGS) surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) sensor in a wide temperature range, a method utilizing two substrate cuts with different propagation angles on the same substrate plane was proposed. In this method, the theory of effective permittivity is adopted to calculate the temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF), electromechanical coupling coefficients (k2), and power flow angle (PFA) for different propagation angles on the same substrate plane, and then the two substrate cuts were chosen to have large k2 and small PFA, as well as the difference in their TCFs (ΔTCF) to always have the same sign of their values. The Z-cut LGS substrate plane was taken as an example, and the two suitable substrate cuts with propagation angles of 74 and 80° were chosen to derive a monotonic frequency-temperature response for LGS SAW sensors at -50 to 540 °C. Experiments on a LGS SAW sensor using the above two substrate cuts were designed, and its measured frequency-temperature response at -50 to 540 °C agreed well with the theory, demonstrating the high accuracy of the proposed method.

  5. Blood pressure response to heart rate during exercise test and risk of future hypertension.

    PubMed

    Miyai, Nobuyuki; Arita, Mikio; Miyashita, Kazuhisa; Morioka, Ikuharu; Shiraishi, Tatsuo; Nishio, Ichiro

    2002-03-01

    Previous works have shown that exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise is a valid risk marker for future hypertension, yet the use of an exercise test as a means of early prediction of hypertension still requires methodological development and confirmation. The purpose of this study was to determine abnormal ranges of blood pressure responses in relation to heart rate increase during exercise and to examine the clinical utility of exercise blood pressure measurement in evaluating individual risk for developing hypertension. We examined exercise test data from a population-based sample of 1033 nonmedicated normotensive men (mean age, 42.9+/-8.5 years; range, 20 to 59 years). Percentile curves of systolic and diastolic blood pressure responses to relative heart rate increments during submaximal exercise were constructed using a third-order polynomial model with multiple regression analysis. Of the original study sample, a cohort of 726 subjects was followed for hypertensive outcome for an average period of 4.7 years. Progression to hypertension, defined as a blood pressure of > or =140/90 mm Hg or the initiation of antihypertensive therapy, was found in 114 subjects (15.4%). Kaplan-Meier survival estimates showed that the cumulative incidence of hypertension increased progressively with higher percentiles of systolic and diastolic blood pressure response (both, P<0.01). A Cox proportional survival analysis revealed a significantly increased risk for developing hypertension associated with exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise after multivariable adjustments for traditional risk factors (relative risk, 3.8; 95% confidence interval, 2.3 to 6.1). These results suggest that an exaggerated blood pressure response to heart rate during exercise is predictive of future hypertension independent of other important risk factors and lend further support to the concept that blood pressure measurement during exercise test is a valuable means of identifying

  6. The importance of listening: juvenile allocation shifts in response to acoustic cues of the social environment.

    PubMed

    Kasumovic, M M; Hall, M D; Try, H; Brooks, R C

    2011-06-01

    The social environment has a strong effect on the strength and direction of sexual selection. Juveniles, however, often have social cues that signal the current competitive environment which may provide cues of future competitive challenges. Here we demonstrate that juvenile crickets (Teleogryllus commodus) use the calls of surrounding adult males as a cue of the quality and density of rivals/mates they are likely to encounter. We reared hatchling crickets in six acoustic environments that varied in the density and quality of calls and demonstrate that individuals modified their development rate, phenotype and behaviour at maturity. Males matured more rapidly at a smaller size and called more when reared in a low competition environment. In contrast, males delayed maturity to grow larger when faced with an increased density of high-quality males. Females matured more rapidly when reared in a high density of high-quality males and allocated proportionately more resources towards egg production. A second experiment limiting nutrient availability demonstrates sex-specific allocation shifts in the last stadium when cues are most reliable. Our results demonstrate that the social environment significantly affects allocation strategies and phenotypes, highlighting the importance of juvenile experience and competitive context when examining fitness and selection. PMID:21457172

  7. Gust Acoustic Response of a Single Airfoil Using the Space-Time CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, James (Technical Monitor); Wang, X. Y.; Chang, S. C.; Himansu, A.; Jorgenson, P. C. E.

    2003-01-01

    A 2D parallel Euler code based on the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method is validated by solving the benchmark problem I in Category 3 of the Third CAA Workshop. This problem concerns the acoustic field generated by the interaction of a convected harmonic vortical gust with a single airfoil. Three gust frequencies, two gust configurations, and three airfoil geometries are considered. Numerical results at both near and far fields are presented and compared with the analytical solutions, a frequency-domain solver GUST3D solutions, and a time-domain high-order Discontinuous Spectral Element Method (DSEM) solutions. It is shown that the CE/SE solutions agree well with the GUST3D solution for the lowest frequency, while there are discrepancies between CE/SE and GUST3D solutions for higher frequencies. However, the CE/SE solution is in good agreement with the DSEM solution for these higher frequencies. It demonstrates that the CE/SE method can produce accurate results of CAA problems involving complex geometries by using unstructured meshes.

  8. GRAAL - Griggs-type Apparatus equipped with Acoustics in the Laboratory: a new instrument to explore the rheology of rocks at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, A.; Champallier, R.; Precigout, J.; Pinquier, Y.; Ferrand, T. P.; Incel, S.; Hilairet, N.; Labrousse, L.; Renner, J.; Green, H. W., II; Stunitz, H.; Jolivet, L.

    2015-12-01

    Two new generation solid-medium Griggs-type apparatus have been set up at the Laboratoire de Géologie of ENS PARIS, and the Institut des Sciences de la Terre d'Orléans (ISTO). These new set-ups allow to perform controlled rock deformation experiments on large volume samples, up to 5 GPa and 1300°C. Careful pressure - stress calibration will be performed (using D-DIA and/or Paterson-type experiments as standards), strain-stress-pressure will be measured using modern techniques and state of the art salt assemblies. Focusing on rheology, the pressure vessel at ISTO has been designed in a goal of deforming large sample diameter (8 mm) at confining pressure of up to 3 GPa. Thanks to this large sample size, this new vessel will allow to explore the microstructures related to the deformation processes occurring at pressures of the deep lithosphere and in subduction zones. In this new apparatus, we moreover included a room below the pressure vessel in order to develop a basal load cell as close as possible to the sample. This new design, in progress, aims at significantly improving the accuracy of stress measurements in the Griggs-type apparatus. The ultimate goal is to set up a new technique able to routinely quantify the rheology of natural rocks between 0.5 and 5 GPa. Although fundamental to document the rheology of the lithosphere, such a technique is still missing in rock mechanics. Focusing on the evolution of physical and mechanical properties during mineral phase transformations, the vessel at ENS is equipped with continuous acoustic emission (AE) multi-sensor monitoring in order to "listen" to the sample during deformation. Indeed, these continuous recordings enable to detect regular AE like signals during dynamic crack propagation, as well as non-impulsive signals, which might be instrumental to identify laboratory analogs to non-volcanic tremor and low frequency earthquake signals. P and S elastic wave velocities will also be measured contemporaneously during

  9. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  10. Numerical simulation of a ramjet inlet flowfield in response to large amplitude combustor pressure oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, T.; Wardlaw, A. B., Jr.; Coakley, T.

    1984-01-01

    The unsteady flow of a two-dimensional ramjet inlet is studied numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equation with a two-equation turbulence model. Unsteadiness is introduced by prescribing the pressure disturbance at the inlet exit plane. The case with a sinusoidal exit plane pressure fluctuation of 20 percent of the steady exit pressure is considered. The resulting flow field exhibits a complicated interaction between the terminal shock, separation pockets and core flow. The exit plane properties feature a non-linear response to the imposed sinusoidal pressure variation.

  11. Toward Extreme Biophysics: Deciphering the Infrared Response of Biomolecular Solutions at High Pressures.

    PubMed

    Imoto, Sho; Kibies, Patrick; Rosin, Christopher; Winter, Roland; Kast, Stefan M; Marx, Dominik

    2016-08-01

    Biophysics under extreme conditions is the fundamental platform for scrutinizing life in unusual habitats, such as those in the deep sea or continental subsurfaces, but also for putative extraterrestrial organisms. Therefore, an important thermodynamic variable to explore is pressure. It is shown that the combination of infrared spectroscopy with simulation is an exquisite approach for unraveling the intricate pressure response of the solvation pattern of TMAO in water, which is expected to be transferable to biomolecules in their native solvent. Pressure-enhanced hydrogen bonding was found for TMAO in water. TMAO is a molecule known to stabilize proteins against pressure-induced denaturation in deep-sea organisms. PMID:27351995

  12. Response of end tidal CO2 pressure to impulse exercise.

    PubMed

    Yano, T; Afroundeh, R; Yamanak, R; Arimitsu, T; Lian, C-S; Shirkawa, K; Yunoki, T

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how end tidal CO(2) pressure (PETCO(2)) is controlled in impulse exercise. After pre-exercise at 25 watts for 5 min, impulse exercise for 10 sec with 200 watts followed by post exercise at 25 watts was performed. Ventilation (VE) significantly increased until the end of impulse exercise and significantly re-increased after a sudden decrease. Heart rate (HR) significantly increased until the end of impulse exercise and then decreased to the pre-exercise level. PETCO(2) remained constant during impulse exercise. PETCO(2) significantly increased momentarily after impulse exercise and then significantly decreased to the pre-exercise level. PETCO(2) showed oscillation. The average peak frequency of power spectral density in PETCO(2) appeared at 0.0078 Hz. Cross correlations were obtained after impulse exercise. The peak cross correlations between VE and PETCO(2), HR and PETCO(2), and VE and HR were 0.834 with a time delay of -7 sec, 0.813 with a time delay of 7 sec and 0.701 with a time delay of -15 sec, respectively. We demonstrated that PETCO(2) homeodynamics was interactively maintained by PETCO(2) itself, CO(2) transportation (product of cardiac output and mixed venous CO(2) content) into the lungs by heart pumping and CO(2) elimination by ventilation, and it oscillates as a result of their interactions.

  13. Insect hygroreceptor responses to continuous changes in humidity and air pressure.

    PubMed

    Tichy, H; Kallina, W

    2010-06-01

    The most favored model of humidity transduction views the cuticular wall of insect hygroreceptive sensilla as a hygromechanical transducer. Hygroscopic swelling or shrinking alters the geometry of the wall, deforming the dendritic membranes of the moist and dry cells. The small size the sensilla and their position surrounded by elevated structures creates technical difficulties to mechanically stimulate them by direct contact. The present study investigated hygroreceptors on the antennae of the cockroach and the stick insect. Accurately controlled, homogeneous mechanical input was delivered by modulating air pressure. Both the moist and dry cells responded not only to changes in air pressure but also in the opposite direction, as observed during changes in air humidity. The moist cell's excitatory response to increasing humidity and increasing air pressure implies that swelling of the hygroscopic cuticle compresses the dendrites, and the dry cell's excitatory response to decreasing humidity and decreasing air pressure implies that shrinking of the hygroscopic cuticle expands the dendrites. The moist and dry cells of the stick insect are more sensitive to pressure changes than those of the cockroach, but the responses to air pressure are generally weaker than to humidity. Therefore the hygroreceptive sensilla differ in their physical properties and constitutions. Furthermore, the mechanical parameters associated with homogeneous changes in air pressure on the sensillum surface can only partially account for the responses of the moist and dry cells of both species to humidity stimulation. PMID:20375249

  14. Insect hygroreceptor responses to continuous changes in humidity and air pressure

    PubMed Central

    Tichy, H.; Kallina, W.

    2011-01-01

    The most favored model of humidity transduction views the cuticular wall of insect hygroreceptive sensilla as a hygromechanical transducer. Hygroscopic swelling or shrinking alters the geometry of the wall, deforming the dendritic membranes of the moist and dry cells. The small size the sensilla and their position surrounded by elevated structures creates technical difficulties to mechanically stimulate them by direct contact. The present study investigated hygroreceptors on the antennae of the cockroach and the stick insect. Accurately controlled, homogeneous mechanical input was delivered by modulating air pressure. Both the moist and dry cells responded not only to changes in air pressure, but also in the opposite direction, as observed during changes in air humidity. The moist-cell’s excitatory response to increasing humidity and increasing air pressure implies that swelling of the hygroscopic cuticle compresses the dendrites, and the dry-cell’s excitatory response to decreasing humidity and decreasing air pressure implies that shrinking of the hygroscopic cuticle expands the dendrites. The moist and dry cells of the stick insect are more sensitive to pressure changes than those of the cockroach, but the responses to air pressure are generally weaker than to humidity. Therefore, the hygroreceptive sensilla differ in their physical properties and constitutions. Furthermore, the mechanical parameters associated with homogeneous changes in air pressure on the sensillum surface can only partially account for the responses of the moist and dry cells of both species to humidity stimulation. PMID:20375249

  15. Effects of lower body positive pressure on cardiovascular responses during walking in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Sota, T; Matsuo, S; Uchida, Y; Hagino, H; Kawai, Y

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of lower body positive pressure (LBPP) on cardiovascular responses during a 15-min walking trial in young (22.1+/-0.4 years) and elderly women (67.8+/-1.1 years). The application of 20 mm Hg LBPP reduced ground reaction forces by 31.2+/-0.5 kgw in both groups. We hypothesized that cardiovascular responses to LBPP during walking were different between the young and elderly subjects. Applying 20 mm Hg of LBPP increased diastolic and mean blood pressure but not systolic blood pressure in both groups. LBPP-induced reduction in heart rate (HR) occurred more quickly in the young group compared to the elderly group (p<0.05). Applying LBPP also decreased double product (systolic blood pressure x HR) in both groups, suggesting that LBPP reduces myocardial oxygen consumption during exercise. These results suggest that heart rate responses to LBPP during exercise vary with increasing age.

  16. Investigation of Stimulus-Response Compatibility Using a Startling Acoustic Stimulus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslovat, Dana; Carlsen, Anthony N.; Franks, Ian M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the processes underlying stimulus-response compatibility by using a lateralized auditory stimulus in a simple and choice reaction time (RT) paradigm. Participants were asked to make either a left or right key lift in response to either a control (80dB) or startling (124dB) stimulus presented to either the left ear, right ear, or…

  17. Modeling the dynamic response of pressures in a distributed helium refrigeration system

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, J.C.

    1997-12-01

    A mathematical model is created of the dynamic response of pressures caused by flow inputs to an existing distributed helium refrigeration system. The dynamic system studied consists of the suction and discharge pressure headers and compressor portions of the refrigeration system used to cool the superconducting magnets of the Tevatron accelerator at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The modeling method involves identifying the system from data recorded during a series of controlled tests, with effort made to detect locational differences in pressure response around the four mile accelerator circumference. A review of the fluid mechanics associated with the system indicates linear time invariant models are suitable for the identification, particularly since the governing equations of one dimensional fluid flow are approximated by linear differential equations. An outline of the experimental design and the data acquisition system are given, followed by a detailed description of the modeling, which utilized the Matlab programming language and associated System Identification Toolbox. Two representations of the system are presented. One, a black box model, provides a multi-input, multi-output description assembled from the results of single input step function testing. This description indicates definite variation in pressure response with distance from the flow input location, and also suggests subtle differences in response with the input location itself. A second system representation is proposed which details the relation between continuous flow changes and pressure response, and provides explanation of a previously unappreciated pressure feedback internal to the system.

  18. Development of combustion response functions in a subscale high-pressure transverse combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierman, M.; Pomeroy, B.; Anderson, W.

    2016-07-01

    Combustion response functions describe the magnitude and time lag behavior of a flame in response to unsteady pressure and velocity. By understanding the feedback between unsteady flowfields and heat release, the growth and decay of combustion instability can be better predicted. An automated data isolation and reduction method has been developed to generate meaningful graphical combustion response functions from a combination of pressure amplitude and various image analysis metrics. It was developed and tested using pressure measurements and high-speed imaging of combustion light taken from a single element at the midspan of an unstable high-pressure subscale transverse combustor. The code was used to isolate time slices of near stationary pressure amplitude and to process the corresponding images into combustion response approximated by aggregate intensity, intensity weighted spatial center, Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD), and Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD). Overall, the generated combustion response functions generally agreed with expected behavior of an element located at a first width (1W) velocity antinode and second width (2W) pressure antinode. Results from both POD and DMD successfully isolated the prominent spatial and temporal light emission behavior.

  19. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  20. Response of entrained air-void systems in cement paste to pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Scope and Method of Study: Determine the response of entrained air-void systems in fresh cement paste to applied pressures by utilizing micro-computed tomography. Compare results to those suggested by the ASTM C231 Type B pressure meter calibration equations. Findings and Conclusions: The results of this research suggest that although the Type B pressure meter assumptions are valid for the compression of individual voids, the volume of air-voids which dissolve under pressure is significant enough to register noticeable errors when using a synthetic air-entraining admixture with the Type B pressure meter test. Results currently suggest that air-void systems with a significant percentage of small voids present will have higher deviation from the Boyle's Law model used by the Type B pressure meter due to the dissolution of these air-voids.

  1. Acoustically driven programmable liquid motion using resonance cavities

    PubMed Central

    Langelier, Sean M.; Chang, Dustin S.; Zeitoun, Ramsey I.; Burns, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Performance and utility of microfluidic systems are often overshadowed by the difficulties and costs associated with operation and control. As a step toward the development of a more efficient platform for microfluidic control, we present a distributed pressure generation scheme whereby independently tunable pressure sources can be simultaneously controlled by using a single acoustic source. We demonstrate how this scheme can be used to perform precise droplet positioning as well as merging, splitting, and sorting within open microfluidic networks. We further show how this scheme can be implemented for control of continuous-flow systems, specifically for generation of acoustically tunable liquid gradients. Device operation hinges on a resonance-decoding and rectification mechanism by which the frequency content in a composite acoustic input is decomposed into multiple independently buffered output pressures. The device consists of a bank of 4 uniquely tuned resonance cavities (404, 484, 532, and 654 Hz), each being responsible for the actuation of a single droplet, 4 identical flow-rectification structures, and a single acoustic source. Cavities selectively amplify resonant tones in the input signal, resulting in highly elevated local cavity pressures. Fluidic-rectification structures then serve to convert the elevated oscillating cavity pressures into unidirectional flows. The resulting pressure gradients, which are used to manipulate fluids in a microdevice, are tunable over a range of ≈0–200 Pa with a control resolution of 10 Pa. PMID:19620719

  2. Borehole water level response to barometric pressure as an indicator of aquifer vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Mahmoud E. A.; Odling, Noelle E.; Clark, Roger A.

    2013-10-01

    The response of borehole water levels to barometric pressure changes in semiconfined aquifers can be used to determine barometric response functions from which aquifer and confining layer properties can be obtained. Following earlier work on barometric response functions and aquifer confinement, we explore the barometric response function as a tool to improve the assessment of groundwater vulnerability in semiconfined aquifers, illustrated through records from two contrasting boreholes in the semiconfined Chalk Aquifer, East Yorkshire, UK. After removal of recharge and Earth tide influences on the water level signal, barometric response functions were estimated and aquifer and confining layer properties determined through an analytical model of borehole water level response to barometric pressure. A link between the thickness and vertical diffusivity of the confining layer determined from the barometric response function, and groundwater vulnerability is proposed. The amplitude spectrum for barometric pressure and instrument resolution favor determination of the barometric response function at frequencies to which confining layer diffusivities are most sensitive. Numerical modeling indicates that while the high frequency response reflects confining layer properties in the immediate vicinity of the borehole, the low frequency response reflects vertical, high diffusivity pathways though the confining layer some hundreds of meters distant. A characteristic time scale parameter, based on vertical diffusivities and thicknesses of the saturated and unsaturated confining layer, is introduced as a measure of semiconfined aquifer vulnerability. The study demonstrates that the barometric response function has potential as a tool for quantitative aquifer vulnerability assessment in semiconfined aquifers.

  3. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  4. A Spectral Analysis Approach for Acoustic Radiation from Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Singh, Mahendra P.; Mei, Chuh

    2004-01-01

    A method is developed to predict the vibration response of a composite panel and the resulting far-field acoustic radiation due to acoustic excitation. The acoustic excitation is assumed to consist of obliquely incident plane waves. The panel is modeled by a finite element analysis and the radiated field is predicted using Rayleigh's integral. The approach can easily include other effects such as shape memory alloy (SMA) ber reinforcement, large detection thermal postbuckling, and non-symmetric SMA distribution or lamination. Transmission loss predictions for the case of an aluminum panel excited by a harmonic acoustic pressure are shown to compare very well with a classical analysis. Results for a composite panel with and without shape memory alloy reinforcement are also presented. The preliminary results demonstrate that the transmission loss can be significantly increased with shape memory alloy reinforcement. The mechanisms for further transmission loss improvement are identified and discussed.

  5. Where the ocean influences the impulse response and its effect on synchronous changes of acoustic travel time.

    PubMed

    Spiesberger, John L

    2011-12-01

    In 1983, sounds at 133 Hz, 0.06 s resolution were transmitted in the Pacific for five days at 2 min intervals over 3709 km between bottom-mounted instruments maintained with atomic clocks. In 1989, a technique was developed to measure changes in acoustic travel time with an accuracy of 135 microseconds at 2 min intervals for selected windows of travel time within the impulse response. The data have short-lived 1 to 10 ms oscillations of travel time with periods less than a few days. Excluding tidal effects, different windows exhibited significant synchronized changes in travel time for periods shorter than 10 h. In the 1980s, this phenomenon was not understood because internal waves have correlation lengths of a few kilometers which are smaller than the way sound was thought to sample the ocean along well-separated and distinct rays corresponding to different windows. The paradox's resolution comes from modern theories that replace the ray-picture with finite wavelength representations that predict sound can be influenced in the upper ocean over horizontal scales such as 20 km or more. Thus, different windows are influenced by the same short-scale fluctuations of sound speed. This conclusion is supported by the data and numerical simulations of the impulse response.

  6. Simulation of pressure and temperature responses for the 20 Inch Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motter, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    A simulation of the pressure and temperature responses of the 20 inch Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) is developed. The simulation models the tunnel system as a set of lumped parameter volumes connected by flow regulating elements such as valves and nozzles. Simulated transient responses of temperature and pressure for the five boundary points of the 20 inch SWT operating map are produced from their respective initial conditions, tunnel operating conditions, heater input power, and valve positions. Upon reaching steady state, a linearized model for each operating point is determined. Both simulated and actual tunnel responses are presented for comparison.

  7. Blood Pressure Responses and Mineral Ocorticoid Levels in the Suspended Rat Model for Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Steffen, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses and fluid/electrolyte shifts seen during space flight are attributed to cephalad redistribution of vascular fluid. The antiorthostatic (AO) rat (suspended head down tilted, 15-20 deg) is used to model these responses. Current studies show that elevated blood pressures in A0 rats are sustained for periods up to seven days. Comparisons are made with presuspension rats. Increased blood pressure in head down tilted subjects suggests a specific response to A0 positioning, potentially relatable to cephalad fluid shift. To assess a role for hormonal regulation of sodium excretion, serum aldosterone levels were measured.

  8. A computer program for the determination of the acoustic pressure signature of helicopter rotors due to blade thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, G. H.; Farassat, F.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program is presented for the determination of the thickness noise of helicopter rotors. The results were obtained in the form of an acoutic pressure time history. The parameters of the program are the rotor geometry and the helicopter motion descriptors, and the formulation employed is valid in the near and far fields. The blade planform must be rectangular, but the helicopter motion is arbitrary; the observer position is fixed with respect to the ground with a maximum elevation of 45 deg above or below the rotor plane. With these restrictions, the program can also be used for the calculation of thickness noise of propellers.

  9. Effect of a central redistribution of fluid volume on response to lower-body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomaselli, Clare M.; Frey, Mary A. B.; Kenney, Richard A.; Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe

    1990-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses to lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) were studied following 1 hour of 6-deg head-down tilt to determine whether a redistribution of blood volume toward the central circulation modifies the subsequent response to orthostatic stress. Responses of 12 men, ages 30-39 years, were evaluated by electrocardiography, impedance cardiography, sphygmomanometry, and measurement of calf circumference. During the LBNP that followed head-down tilt, as compared with control LBNP (no preceding head-down tilt) subjects, had smaller stroke volume and cardiac output, greater total peripheral resistance, and less calf enlargement. These differences reflect differences in the variables immediately preceding LBNP. Magnitudes of the responses from pre-LBNP to each pressure stage of the LBNP procedure did not differ between protocols. Mean and diastolic arterial pressures were slightly elevated after LBNP-control, but they fell slightly during LBNP post-tilt.

  10. Cardiovascular regulatory response to lower body negative pressure following blood volume loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.; Ghista, D. N.; Sandler, H.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain the cardiovascular regulatory responses to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) stress, both in the absence of and following blood or plasma volume loss, the latter being factors regularly observed with short- or long-term recumbency or weightlessness and associated with resulting cardiovascular deconditioning. Analytical expressions are derived for the responses of mean venous pressure and blood volume pooled in the lower body due to LBNP. An analysis is presented for determining the HR change due to LBNP stress following blood volume loss. It is concluded that the reduced orthostatic tolerance following long-term space flight or recumbency can be mainly attributed to blood volume loss, and that the associated cardiovascular responses characterizing this orthostatic intolerance is elicited by the associated central venous pressure response.

  11. Mobility power flow analysis of coupled plate structure subjected to mechanical and acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The mobility power flow approach that was previously applied in the derivation of expressions for the vibrational power flow between coupled plate substructures forming an L configuration and subjected to mechanical loading is generalized. Using the generalized expressions, both point and distributed mechanical loads on one or both of the plates can be considered. The generalized approach is extended to deal with acoustic excitation of one of the plate substructures. In this case, the forces (acoustic pressures) acting on the structure are dependent on the response of the structure because of the scattered pressure component. The interaction between the plate structure and the acoustic fluid leads to the derivation of a corrected mode shape for the plates' normal surface velocity and also for the structure mobility functions. The determination of the scattered pressure components in the expressions for the power flow represents an additional component in the power flow balance for the source plate and the receiver plate. This component represents the radiated acoustical power from the plate structure. For a number of coupled plate substrates, the acoustic pressure generated by one substructure will interact with the motion of another substructure. That is, in the case of the L-shaped plate, acoustic interaction exists between the two plate substructures due to the generation of the acoustic waves by each of the substructures. An approach to deal with this phenomena is described.

  12. Modeling the barotropic response of the Mediterranean sea level to atmospheric pressure forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsiopoulos, Dimitrios A.; Vergos, Georgios S.; Tziavos, Ilias N.

    2014-05-01

    An important characteristic of the Earth's atmosphere with direct impact on the marine environmental and Earth's gravity field are the variations of atmospheric pressure as it often determines wind and weather patterns across the globe. Variations in atmospheric pressure and especially low atmospheric systems affect the values of radar altimeter sea level anomalies (SLA). This response of sea level is closed to the Inverse Barometer (IB) correction given by the altimeters within their geophysical data records. In this work, altimetric data sets from the satellite remote sensing mission of Jason-2, along with their total IB corrections acquired by the on-board altimeters, have been used for a period of forty days between October and November 2013. This period was characterized by extreme low-pressure fields over the Mediterranean Sea and especially in the area of the Ionian and Adriatic Seas and over the island of Rhodes, Greece. The Jason-2 along-track records of the SLA have been used to study both the sea level response to atmospheric pressure change over short time scales (such as ten days) and examine if the barometer correction (local and global) given by the altimeter is close to the expected response (-1 cm/mbar) of sea level to atmospheric pressure change. For the latter, atmospheric pressure data for the period under study were available from the Live Access Server (LAS) of NOAA, as well, provided at four times per day intervals in a grid format. From the LAS atmospheric pressure data, the IB effect was computed and compared with the one provided by the altimeter for its external evaluation. Finally, a regional multiple regression analysis between sea level anomalies, the LAS atmospheric pressure and wind speed components is carried out to model the barotropic response of the Mediterranean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing.

  13. Bending response of an artificial muscle in high-pressure water environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakabo, Yoshihiro; Takagi, Kentaro; Mukai, Toshiharu; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Asaka, Kinji

    2005-05-01

    Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites (IPMCs) are soft actuators, generally referred to as "artificial muscles" which are made out of high polymer gel films of perfluorosulfonic acid chemically plated with gold. These composites bend by applying a low voltage between electrodes on both sides. The actuator is soft and works in water. It bends silently, responds quickly and has a long life. In our previous work, snake-like swimming robots and a 3DOF 2-D manipulator have been developed. In this research we have investigated the bending response of an IPMC artificial muscle in high-pressure water environments, with future applications in deep-sea actuators and robots. The artificial muscles have an advantage over electric motors because they do not need sealing from water, which is difficult in high-pressure water environments. Bending responses of artificial muscles were measured at three different pressure levels, 30MPa, 70MPa and 100MPa. The maximum pressure, 100MPa is the same pressure as the deepest ocean on earth, (10,000m.) From experiments, there was found to be almost no difference with that at normal water pressure of 1Pa. We present detailed results of responses of these artificial muscles including current responses and videos of bending motion with respect to combinations of several different input voltages, frequencies and wave patterns.

  14. Acoustical standards in engineering acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhard, Mahlon D.

    2001-05-01

    The Engineering Acoustics Technical Committee is concerned with the evolution and improvement of acoustical techniques and apparatus, and with the promotion of new applications of acoustics. As cited in the Membership Directory and Handbook (2002), the interest areas include transducers and arrays; underwater acoustic systems; acoustical instrumentation and monitoring; applied sonics, promotion of useful effects, information gathering and transmission; audio engineering; acoustic holography and acoustic imaging; acoustic signal processing (equipment and techniques); and ultrasound and infrasound. Evident connections between engineering and standards are needs for calibration, consistent terminology, uniform presentation of data, reference levels, or design targets for product development. Thus for the acoustical engineer standards are both a tool for practices, for communication, and for comparison of his efforts with those of others. Development of many standards depends on knowledge of the way products are put together for the market place and acoustical engineers provide important input to the development of standards. Acoustical engineers and members of the Engineering Acoustics arm of the Society both benefit from and contribute to the Acoustical Standards of the Acoustical Society.

  15. Shaping and timing gradient pulses to reduce MRI acoustic noise.

    PubMed

    Segbers, Marcel; Rizzo Sierra, Carlos V; Duifhuis, Hendrikus; Hoogduin, Johannes M

    2010-08-01

    A method to reduce the acoustic noise generated by gradient systems in MRI has been recently proposed; such a method is based on the linear response theory. Since the physical cause of MRI acoustic noise is the time derivative of the gradient current, a common trapezoid current shape produces an acoustic gradient coil response mainly during the rising and falling edge. In the falling edge, the coil acoustic response presents a 180 degrees phase difference compared to the rising edge. Therefore, by varying the width of the trapezoid and keeping the ramps constant, it is possible to suppress one selected frequency and its higher harmonics. This value is matched to one of the prominent resonance frequencies of the gradient coil system. The idea of cancelling a single frequency is extended to a second frequency, using two successive trapezoid-shaped pulses presented at a selected interval. Overall sound pressure level reduction of 6 and 10 dB is found for the two trapezoid shapes and a single pulse shape, respectively. The acoustically optimized pulse shape proposed is additionally tested in a simulated echo planar imaging readout train, obtaining a sound pressure level reduction of 12 dB for the best case.

  16. Numerical Comparison of Active Acoustic and Structural Noise Control in a Stiffened Double Wall Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1996-01-01

    The active acoustic and structural noise control characteristics of a double wall cylinder with and without ring stiffeners were numerically evaluated. An exterior monopole was assumed to acoustically excite the outside of the double wall cylinder at an acoustic cavity resonance frequency. Structural modal vibration properties of the inner and outer shells were analyzed by post-processing the results from a finite element analysis. A boundary element approach was used to calculate the acoustic cavity response and the coupled structural-acoustic interaction. In the frequency region of interest, below 500 Hz, all structural resonant modes were found to be acoustically slow and the nonresonant modal response to be dominant. Active sound transmission control was achieved by control forces applied to the inner or outer shell, or acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shell. A least mean square technique was used to minimize the interior sound pressures at the nodes of a data recovery mesh. Results showed that single acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shells resulted in better sound transmission control than six distributed point forces applied to either one of the shells. Adding stiffeners to the double wall structure constrained the modal vibrations of the shells, making the double wall stiffer with associated higher modal frequencies. Active noise control obtained for the stiffened double wall configurations was less than for the unstiffened cylinder. In all cases, the acoustic control monopoles controlled the sound transmission into the interior better than the structural control forces.

  17. Investigation of combustion chamber acoustics and its interaction with LOX/H2 spray flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oschwald, M.; Knapp, B.

    2009-09-01

    Acoustics of combustion chambers is investigated experimentally in cold flow and hot fire tests. The performance of absorber elements is analyzed in respect to their effect on combustion chamber eigenfrequencies as well as to their damping characteristics. It is shown that predictions of numerical modal analysis of chamber acoustics are in very good agreement with measurements. In hot fire tests, a burning LOX/H2 spray is acoustically excited with a siren wheel and combustion response is recorded with dynamic pressure sensors and by high-speed visualization of the spray and the flame. Although no combustion instability could be observed, analyzing the temporal and spatial distribution of flame response allowed addressing the question, whether the coupling of acoustics to combustion is via pressure or velocity sensitive processes.

  18. Measurements of acoustic responses of gaseous propellant injectors. [for rocket combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Zinn, B. T.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an investigation intended to provide experimental data that can quantitatively describe the way in which various coaxial injector designs affect the stability of gaseous propellant rocket motors. The response factors of configurations that simulate the flow conditions in a gaseous-fuel injector element and a gaseous-oxidizer injector element are measured by using a modified impedance-tube technique and under cold-flow conditions simulating those observed in rocket motors with axial instability. The measured injector response factor data are presented and discussed. It is shown that there is reasonable agreement between the measured injector response factors and those predicted by the Feiler and Heidmann model (1967), and that the orifice length can be varied to shift the resonant frequency of the injector without any change in the magnitude of the response factor at resonance. A change in the injector open-area ratio is found to have a significant effect on the characteristics of the injector response factor.

  19. Dynamic Mode Decomposition of Fast Pressure Sensitive Paint Data.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohd Y; Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W

    2016-06-11

    Fast-response pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is used in this work to measure and analyze the acoustic pressure field in a rectangular cavity. The high spatial resolution and fast frequency response of PSP effectively captures the spatial and temporal detail of surface pressure resulting in the acoustic pressure field. In this work, a high-speed camera is used to generate a continuous time record of the acoustic pressure fluctuations with PSP. Since the level of the acoustic pressure is near the resolution limit of the sensor system, advanced analysis techniques are used to extract the spatial modes of the pressure field. Both dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) are compared with phase averaging for data analysis. While all three techniques effectively extract the pressure field and reduce the impact of sensor noise, DMD and POD are more robust techniques that can be applied to aperiodic or multi-frequency signals. Furthermore, DMD is better than POD at suppressing noise in particular regions of the spectrum and at effectively separating spectral energy when multiple acoustic excitation frequencies are present.

  20. Dynamic Mode Decomposition of Fast Pressure Sensitive Paint Data.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohd Y; Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W

    2016-01-01

    Fast-response pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is used in this work to measure and analyze the acoustic pressure field in a rectangular cavity. The high spatial resolution and fast frequency response of PSP effectively captures the spatial and temporal detail of surface pressure resulting in the acoustic pressure field. In this work, a high-speed camera is used to generate a continuous time record of the acoustic pressure fluctuations with PSP. Since the level of the acoustic pressure is near the resolution limit of the sensor system, advanced analysis techniques are used to extract the spatial modes of the pressure field. Both dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) are compared with phase averaging for data analysis. While all three techniques effectively extract the pressure field and reduce the impact of sensor noise, DMD and POD are more robust techniques that can be applied to aperiodic or multi-frequency signals. Furthermore, DMD is better than POD at suppressing noise in particular regions of the spectrum and at effectively separating spectral energy when multiple acoustic excitation frequencies are present. PMID:27294939

  1. Dynamic Mode Decomposition of Fast Pressure Sensitive Paint Data

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohd Y.; Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Fast-response pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is used in this work to measure and analyze the acoustic pressure field in a rectangular cavity. The high spatial resolution and fast frequency response of PSP effectively captures the spatial and temporal detail of surface pressure resulting in the acoustic pressure field. In this work, a high-speed camera is used to generate a continuous time record of the acoustic pressure fluctuations with PSP. Since the level of the acoustic pressure is near the resolution limit of the sensor system, advanced analysis techniques are used to extract the spatial modes of the pressure field. Both dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) are compared with phase averaging for data analysis. While all three techniques effectively extract the pressure field and reduce the impact of sensor noise, DMD and POD are more robust techniques that can be applied to aperiodic or multi-frequency signals. Furthermore, DMD is better than POD at suppressing noise in particular regions of the spectrum and at effectively separating spectral energy when multiple acoustic excitation frequencies are present. PMID:27294939

  2. Pressure-coupled combustion response model for solid propellants based on Zeldovich-Novozhilov approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K. G.; Strand, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    An exact analytical solution is given to the problem of long-time propellant thermal response to a specified pressure oscillation. Coupling to the gas phase is made using the quasisteady Zeldovich-Novozhilov approximation. Explicit linear and lowest order (quadratic) nonlinear expressions for propellant response are obtained from the implicit nonlinear solutions. Using these expressions, response curves are presented for an ammonium perchlorate composite propellant and HMX monopropellant.

  3. A pilot study of phase-evoked acoustic responses from the ears of human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Anders T.; Dewey, James; Dhar, Sumitrajit; Ordoñez, Rodrigo; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2015-12-01

    Otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) evoked by pure tones lock onto the phase of the stimulus at the place of their generation in the cochlea. The effects of phase transitions in a pure tone stimulus on OAEs have not been investigated. By combining responses to pure tones with smooth phase transitions, phase-evoked residual responses (PERRs) were extracted from nine normal-hearing subjects. Five of them had PERRs in at least 18 of 36 parameter conditions expected to yield a response. PERRs do not have a straightforward dependence on stimulus parameters, but their general prevalence suggests a temporary decoupling between stimulus and OAE phase - between 5 and 10 ms. Since the stimulus is narrow in the frequency domain, the PERR may reflect the dynamic behavior of localized regions of OAE generators.

  4. Pore Water Pressure Response of a Soil Subjected to Traffic Loading under Saturated and Unsaturated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cary, Carlos

    This study presents the results of one of the first attempts to characterize the pore water pressure response of soils subjected to traffic loading under saturated and unsaturated conditions. It is widely known that pore water pressure develops within the soil pores as a response to external stimulus. Also, it has been recognized that the development of pores water pressure contributes to the degradation of the resilient modulus of unbound materials. In the last decades several efforts have been directed to model the effect of air and water pore pressures upon resilient modulus. However, none of them consider dynamic variations in pressures but rather are based on equilibrium values corresponding to initial conditions. The measurement of this response is challenging especially in soils under unsaturated conditions. Models are needed not only to overcome testing limitations but also to understand the dynamic behavior of internal pore pressures that under critical conditions may even lead to failure. A testing program was conducted to characterize the pore water pressure response of a low plasticity fine clayey sand subjected to dynamic loading. The bulk stress, initial matric suction and dwelling time parameters were controlled and their effects were analyzed. The results were used to attempt models capable of predicting the accumulated excess pore pressure at any given time during the traffic loading and unloading phases. Important findings regarding the influence of the controlled variables challenge common beliefs. The accumulated excess pore water pressure was found to be higher for unsaturated soil specimens than for saturated soil specimens. The maximum pore water pressure always increased when the high bulk stress level was applied. Higher dwelling time was found to decelerate the accumulation of pore water pressure. In addition, it was found that the higher the dwelling time, the lower the maximum pore water pressure. It was concluded that upon further

  5. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The tumor ... press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the symptoms ...

  6. Electronic dummy for acoustical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, B. B.; Di Mattia, A. L.; Rosencheck, A. J.; Stern, M.; Torick, E. L.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic Dummy /ED/ used for acoustical testing represents the average male torso from the Xiphoid process upward and includes an acoustic replica of the human head. This head simulates natural flesh, and has an artificial voice and artificial ears that measure sound pressures at the eardrum or the entrance to the ear canal.

  7. Computed Linear/Nonlinear Acoustic Response of a Cascade for Single/Multi Frequency Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Hixon, R.; Sawyer, S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines mode generation and propagation characteristics of a 2-D cascade due to incident vortical disturbances using a time domain approach. Full nonlinear Euler equations are solved employing high order accurate spatial differencing and time marching techniques. The solutions show the generation and propagation of mode orders that are expected from theory. Single frequency excitations show linear response over a wide range of amplitudes. The response for multi-frequency excitations tend to become nonlinear due to interaction between frequencies and self interaction.

  8. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio low tip speed fan with casing tip bleed (QEP Fan B scale model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Minzner, W. R.; Paas, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    A scale model of the bypass flow region of a 1.5 pressure ratio, single stage, low tip speed fan was tested with a rotor tip casing bleed slot to determine its effects on noise generation. The bleed slot was located 1/2 inch (1.3 cm) upstream of the rotor leading edge and was configured to be a continuous opening around the circumference. The bleed manifold system was operated over a range of bleed rates corresponding to as much as 6% of the fan flow at approach thrust and 4.25% of the fan flow at takeoff thrust. Acoustic results indicate that a bleed rate of 4% of the fan flow reduces the fan maximum approach 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline PNL 0.5 PNdB and the corresponding takeoff thrust noise 1.1 PNdB below the level with zero bleed. However, comparison of the standard casing (no bleed slot) and the slotted bleed casing with zero bleed shows that the bleed slot itself caused a noise increase.

  9. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance of a variable-pitch 1.83-meter-(6-ft) diameter 1.20-pressure-ratio fan stage (QF-9)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, F. W.; Woodward, R. P.; Lucas, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Far field noise data and related aerodynamic performance are presented for a variable pitch fan stage having characteristics suitable for low noise, STOL engine application. However, no acoustic suppression material was used in the flow passages. The fan was externally driven by an electric motor. Tests were made at several forward thrust rotor blade pitch angles and one for reverse thrust. Fan speed was varied from 60 to 120 percent of takeoff (design) speed, and exhaust nozzles having areas 92 to 105 percent of design were tested. The fan noise level was at a minimum at the design rotor blade pitch angles of 64 deg for takeoff thrust and at 57 deg for approach (50 percent takeoff thrust). Perceived noise along a 152.4-m sideline reached 100.1 PNdb for the takeoff (design) configuration for a stage pressure ratio of 1.17 and thrust of 57,600 N. For reverse thrust the PNL values were 4 to 5 PNdb above the takeoff values at comparable fan speeds.

  10. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio low tip speed fan with a serrated rotor (QEP fan B scale model). [reduction of engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Paas, J. E.; Minzner, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A scale model of the bypass flow region of a 1.5 pressure ratio, single stage, low tip speed fan was tested with a serrated rotor leading edge to determine its effects on noise generation. The serrated rotor was produced by cutting teeth into the leading edge of the nominal rotor blades. The effects of speed and exhaust nozzle area on the scale models noise characteristics were investigated with both the nominal rotor and serrated rotor. Acoustic results indicate the serrations reduced front quadrant PNL's at takeoff power. In particular, the 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline noise was reduced from 3 to 4 PNdb at 40 deg for nominal and large nozzle operation. However, the rear quadrant maximum sideline PNL's were increased 1.5 to 3 PNdb at approach thust and up to 2 PNdb at takeoff thust with these serrated rotor blades. The configuration with the serrated rotor produced the lowest maximum 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline PNL for any given thust when the large nozzle (116% of design area) was employed.

  11. Conformable amplified lead zirconate titanate sensors with enhanced piezoelectric response for cutaneous pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dagdeviren, Canan; Su, Yewang; Joe, Pauline; Yona, Raissa; Liu, Yuhao; Kim, Yun-Soung; Huang, YongAn; Damadoran, Anoop R; Xia, Jing; Martin, Lane W; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2014-08-05

    The ability to measure subtle changes in arterial pressure using devices mounted on the skin can be valuable for monitoring vital signs in emergency care, detecting the early onset of cardiovascular disease and continuously assessing health status. Conventional technologies are well suited for use in traditional clinical settings, but cannot be easily adapted for sustained use during daily activities. Here we introduce a conformal device that avoids these limitations. Ultrathin inorganic piezoelectric and semiconductor materials on elastomer substrates enable amplified, low hysteresis measurements of pressure on the skin, with high levels of sensitivity (~0.005 Pa) and fast response times (~0.1 ms). Experimental and theoretical studies reveal enhanced piezoelectric responses in lead zirconate titanate that follow from integration on soft supports as well as engineering behaviours of the associated devices. Calibrated measurements of pressure variations of blood flow in near-surface arteries demonstrate capabilities for measuring radial artery augmentation index and pulse pressure velocity.

  12. Conformable amplified lead zirconate titanate sensors with enhanced piezoelectric response for cutaneous pressure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdeviren, Canan; Su, Yewang; Joe, Pauline; Yona, Raissa; Liu, Yuhao; Kim, Yun-Soung; Huang, Yongan; Damadoran, Anoop R.; Xia, Jing; Martin, Lane W.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2014-08-01

    The ability to measure subtle changes in arterial pressure using devices mounted on the skin can be valuable for monitoring vital signs in emergency care, detecting the early onset of cardiovascular disease and continuously assessing health status. Conventional technologies are well suited for use in traditional clinical settings, but cannot be easily adapted for sustained use during daily activities. Here we introduce a conformal device that avoids these limitations. Ultrathin inorganic piezoelectric and semiconductor materials on elastomer substrates enable amplified, low hysteresis measurements of pressure on the skin, with high levels of sensitivity (~0.005 Pa) and fast response times (~0.1 ms). Experimental and theoretical studies reveal enhanced piezoelectric responses in lead zirconate titanate that follow from integration on soft supports as well as engineering behaviours of the associated devices. Calibrated measurements of pressure variations of blood flow in near-surface arteries demonstrate capabilities for measuring radial artery augmentation index and pulse pressure velocity.

  13. The Potential Overlapping Roles of the Ear and Lateral Line in Driving "Acoustic" Responses.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Dennis M; Radford, Craig A

    2016-01-01

    Examination of fish responses to sound stimuli has a rich and varied history but it is not always clear when responses are true measures of hearing or the lateral-line. The central innervation of auditory and lateral-line sensory afferents lie in close proximity in the brainstem and both sets of receptors are, at heart, hair cell-based particle motion detectors. While it is possible to separately measure physiological activity of these two receptor subtypes, many studies of fish "hearing" use whole brain potentials or behavioural assays in complex sound fields where it is not possible to distinguish inputs. We argue here that, as often measured, what is thought of as fish "hearing" is often a multisensory response of both auditory and lateral line receptors. We also argue that in many situations where fish use sound stimuli, the behaviour is also an integrative response of both systems, due to the often close proximity of fish during sound communication. We end with a set of recommendations for better understanding the separate and combined roles of ear and lateral-line hair cells as well as an acknowledgment of the seminal and continuing contributions of Arthur N. Popper and Richard R. Fay to this field.

  14. The Potential Overlapping Roles of the Ear and Lateral Line in Driving "Acoustic" Responses.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Dennis M; Radford, Craig A

    2016-01-01

    Examination of fish responses to sound stimuli has a rich and varied history but it is not always clear when responses are true measures of hearing or the lateral-line. The central innervation of auditory and lateral-line sensory afferents lie in close proximity in the brainstem and both sets of receptors are, at heart, hair cell-based particle motion detectors. While it is possible to separately measure physiological activity of these two receptor subtypes, many studies of fish "hearing" use whole brain potentials or behavioural assays in complex sound fields where it is not possible to distinguish inputs. We argue here that, as often measured, what is thought of as fish "hearing" is often a multisensory response of both auditory and lateral line receptors. We also argue that in many situations where fish use sound stimuli, the behaviour is also an integrative response of both systems, due to the often close proximity of fish during sound communication. We end with a set of recommendations for better understanding the separate and combined roles of ear and lateral-line hair cells as well as an acknowledgment of the seminal and continuing contributions of Arthur N. Popper and Richard R. Fay to this field. PMID:26515318

  15. Investigation of anal motor characteristics of the sensorimotor response (SMR) using 3-D anorectal pressure topography

    PubMed Central

    Cheeney, Gregory; Remes-Troche, Jose M.; Attaluri, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Desire to defecate is associated with a unique anal contractile response, the sensorimotor response (SMR). However, the precise muscle(s) involved is not known. We aimed to examine the role of external and internal anal sphincter and the puborectalis muscle in the genesis of SMR. Anorectal 3-D pressure topography was performed in 10 healthy subjects during graded rectal balloon distention using a novel high-definition manometry system consisting of a probe with 256 pressure sensors arranged circumferentially. The anal pressure changes before, during, and after the onset of SMR were measured at every millimeter along the length of anal canal and in 3-D by dividing the anal canal into 4 × 2.1-mm grids. Pressures were assessed in the longitudinal and anterior-posterior axis. Anal ultrasound was performed to assess puborectalis morphology. 3-D topography demonstrated that rectal distention produced an SMR coinciding with desire to defecate and predominantly induced by contraction of puborectalis. Anal ultrasound showed that the puborectalis was located at mean distance of 3.5 cm from anal verge, which corresponded with peak pressure difference between the anterior and posterior vectors observed at 3.4 cm with 3-D topography (r = 0.77). The highest absolute and percentage increases in pressure during SMR were seen in the superior-posterior portion of anal canal, reaffirming the role of puborectalis. The SMR anal pressure profile showed a peak pressure at 1.6 cm from anal verge in the anterior and posterior vectors and distinct increase in pressure only posteriorly at 3.2 cm corresponding to puborectalis. We concluded that SMR is primarily induced by the activation and contraction of the puborectalis muscle in response to a sensation of a desire to defecate. PMID:21109594

  16. Inhibitory effect of A10 dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area on the orienting response evoked by acoustic stimulation in the cat.

    PubMed

    Crescimanno, G; Sorbera, F; Emmi, A; Amato, G

    1998-01-01

    The effect of bilateral electric stimulation of A10 dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area (80-300 microA, 20-50 Hz, 0.1-0.5 ms, 2 s duration) on latency and duration of the orienting response, evoked by acoustic stimuli (4500-8000 Hz, 2 s), was studied in the cat. A10 neuron stimulation, simultaneous with the acoustic one, was performed with threshold parameters inducing minimal behavioral signs (head searching movement, sniffing, increase in alertness). By means of a videoanalysis system, a statistically significant increase, both of latency and duration of the response, was observed. The possible role of dopamine was studied administrating sulpiride (20 mg/kg i.p.), a dopaminergic antagonist prevalently acting on the mesolimbic-mesocortical system. In this condition, the disappearance of A10 neuron effect occurred. Sulpiride injection did not affect the parameters of the orienting response to acoustic stimulus alone, suggesting a direct effect on A10 dopaminergic neurons. Moreover, when saline administration was carried out, no significant modification of the effects, obtained following A10 neuron activation, was observed. The data suggest that A10 dopaminergic neurons, origin of the mesolimbic-mesocortical system, may be involved in the control of the response to sensory stimuli, likely by influencing sensorimotor integration processes. An involvement in the inhibitory regulation of the switching of attention is also discussed. PMID:9434203

  17. A new method for measuring the response time of the high pressure ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhentao; Shen, Yixiong; An, Jigang

    2012-08-01

    Time response is an important performance characteristic for gas-pressurized ionization chambers. To study the time response, it is especially crucial to measure the ion drift time in high pressure ionization chambers. In this paper, a new approach is proposed to study the ion drift time in high pressure ionization chambers. It is carried out with a short-pulsed X-ray source and a high-speed digitizer. The ion drift time in the chamber is then determined from the digitized data. By measuring the ion drift time of a 15 atm xenon testing chamber, the method has been proven to be effective in the time response studies of ionization chambers.

  18. Microwave measurement of the solid propellant pressure-coupled response function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Mcnamara, R. P.; Magiawala, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an investigation are presented on the applicability of a microwave Doppler shift technique for directly determining propellant response functions over the desired frequency range. The investigation consisted of three phases. In Phase 1 the validity of the technique was established by comparing measured pressure-coupled response function data to existing data from T-burners and rotating valve tests. In Phase 2 a new microwave burner-pressure modulation system capable of achieving frequencies and mean chamber pressures of at least 1500 Hz and 10.5 MPa (1500 psia), respectively, was developed. During Phase 3 test firings are being carried out to define the frequency limit, response function resolution, and precision of the new design.

  19. Dependence of the Startle Response on Temporal and Spectral Characteristics of Acoustic Modulatory Influences in Rats and Gerbils

    PubMed Central

    Steube, Natalie; Nowotny, Manuela; Pilz, Peter K. D.; Gaese, Bernhard H.

    2016-01-01

    The acoustic startle response (ASR) and its modulation by non-startling prepulses, presented shortly before the startle-eliciting stimulus, is a broadly applied test paradigm to determine changes in neural processing related to auditory or psychiatric disorders. Modulation by a gap in background noise as a prepulse is especially used for tinnitus assessment. However, the timing and frequency-related aspects of prepulses are not fully understood. The present study aims to investigate temporal and spectral characteristics of acoustic stimuli that modulate the ASR in rats and gerbils. For noise-burst prepulses, inhibition was frequency-independent in gerbils in the test range between 4 and 18 kHz. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) by noise-bursts in rats was constant in a comparable range (8–22 kHz), but lower outside this range. Purely temporal aspects of prepulse–startle-interactions were investigated for gap-prepulses focusing mainly on gap duration. While very short gaps had no (rats) or slightly facilitatory (gerbils) influence on the ASR, longer gaps always had a strong inhibitory effect. Inhibition increased with durations up to 75 ms and remained at a high level of inhibition for durations up to 1000 ms for both, rats and gerbils. Determining spectral influences on gap-prepulse inhibition (gap-PPI) revealed that gerbils were unaffected in the limited frequency range tested (4–18 kHz). The more detailed analysis in rats revealed a variety of frequency-dependent effects. Gaps in pure-tone background elicited constant and high inhibition (around 75%) over a broad frequency range (4–32 kHz). For gaps in noise-bands, on the other hand, a clear frequency-dependency was found: inhibition was around 50% at lower frequencies (6–14 kHz) and around 70% at high frequencies (16–20 kHz). This pattern of frequency-dependency in rats was specifically resulting from the inhibitory effect by the gaps, as revealed by detailed analysis of the underlying startle amplitudes. An

  20. Comparison of in vitro and in vivo acoustic response of a novel 50:50 PLGA contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Margaret A; Forsberg, Flemming; Oum, Kelleny; Ro, Raymond; El-Sherif, Dalia

    2006-11-01

    A comparison between in vitro and in vivo experiments conducted to investigate the acoustic properties of a novel, 1.2 microm diameter poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (50:50) (PLGA) ultrasound contrast agent, the development of which was described previously by us, is presented. A pulse-echo setup was used to determine enhancement in vitro. Additional in vitro studies further characterized the hollow microcapsules, including resonance frequency from attenuation measurements (from 2.25 to 15 MHz) and temperature effects (25 degrees C vs. 37 degrees C). In vivo, four rabbits received intravenous injections of the agent (dose range: 0.005-0.13 ml/kg). Quantitative in vivo dose-responses were calculated off-line using spectral power analysis of audio Doppler signals acquired from a custom-made 10 MHz cuff transducer placed around the surgically exposed distal aorta. This frequency was chosen since the very shallow scanning depths encountered in rabbits, in particular for the cuff transducer placed directly around the vessel, necessitates the use of high frequency imaging devices with sufficient spatial resolution to enable meaningful measurements. For qualitative assessments, two rabbits were imaged pre- and post-contrast administration (dose: 0.1 ml/kg) in power Doppler mode. Significant acoustic enhancements (up to 24 dB) were reported both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the rabbits did not show any adverse side effects from multiple injections (>20) of the agent. Measured in vitro resonance frequency between 3.09 and 3.49 MHz was lower than predicted for a similar sized free bubble, potentially due to capsule wall structure. Minimal loss of signal (approximately 4 dB) was observed at 25 degrees C over 20 min of insonation at 5 MHz but at 37 degrees C the signal dropped close to base line within the first 5 min. This temperature sensitivity could be due to loss of capsule integrity (and hence loss of gas). Potential causes include increased hydrolysis or polymer