Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic scattering properties

  1. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 1: spectral properties of scattering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    Bed-sediment classification using high-frequency hydro-acoustic instruments is challenging when sediments are spatially heterogeneous, which is often the case in rivers. The use of acoustic backscatter to classify sediments is an attractive alternative to analysis of topography because it is potentially sensitive to grain-scale roughness. Here, a new method is presented which uses high-frequency acoustic backscatter from multibeam sonar to classify heterogeneous riverbed sediments by type (sand, gravel,rock) continuously in space and at small spatial resolution. In this, the first of a pair of papers that examine the scattering signatures from a heterogeneous riverbed, methods are presented to construct spatially explicit maps of spectral properties from geo-referenced point clouds of geometrically and radiometrically corrected echoes. Backscatter power spectra are computed to produce scale and amplitude metrics that collectively characterize the length scales of stochastic measures of riverbed scattering, termed ‘stochastic geometries’. Backscatter aggregated over small spatial scales have spectra that obey a power-law. This apparently self-affine behavior could instead arise from morphological- and grain-scale roughnesses over multiple overlapping scales, or riverbed scattering being transitional between Rayleigh and geometric regimes. Relationships exist between stochastic geometries of backscatter and areas of rough and smooth sediments. However, no one parameter can uniquely characterize a particular substrate, nor definitively separate the relative contributions of roughness and acoustic impedance (hardness). Combinations of spectral quantities do, however, have the potential to delineate riverbed sediment patchiness, in a data-driven approach comparing backscatter with bed-sediment observations (which is the subject of part two of this manuscript).

  2. Brillouin-scattering determination of the acoustic properties and their pressure dependence for three polymeric elastomers.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Lewis L; Orler, E Bruce; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Ahart, Muhtar; Hemley, Russell J

    2007-09-14

    The acoustic properties of three polymer elastomers, a cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) (Sylgard 184), a cross-linked terpolymer poly(ethylene-vinyl acetate-vinyl alcohol), and a segmented thermoplastic poly(ester urethane) copolymer (Estane 5703), have been measured from ambient pressure to approximately 12 GPa by using Brillouin scattering in high-pressure diamond anvil cells. The Brillouin-scattering technique is a powerful tool for aiding in the determination of equations of state for a variety of materials, but to date has not been applied to polymers at pressures exceeding a few kilobars. For the three elastomers, both transverse and longitudinal acoustic modes were observed, though the transverse modes were observed only at elevated pressures (>0.7 GPa) in all cases. From the Brillouin frequency shifts, longitudinal and transverse sound speeds were calculated, as were the C(11) and C(12) elastic constants, bulk, shear, and Young's moduli, and Poisson's ratios, and their respective pressure dependencies. P-V isotherms were then constructed, and fit to several empirical/semiempirical equations of state to extract the isothermal bulk modulus and its pressure derivative for each material. Finally, the lack of shear waves observed for any polymer at ambient pressure, and the pressure dependency of their appearance is discussed with regard to instrumental and material considerations.

  3. Brillouin-scattering determination of the acoustic properties and their pressure dependence for three polymeric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Lewis L.; Orler, E. Bruce; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Ahart, Muhtar; Hemley, Russell J.

    2007-09-01

    The acoustic properties of three polymer elastomers, a cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) (Sylgard® 184), a cross-linked terpolymer poly(ethylene-vinyl acetate-vinyl alcohol), and a segmented thermoplastic poly(ester urethane) copolymer (Estane® 5703), have been measured from ambient pressure to approximately 12GPa by using Brillouin scattering in high-pressure diamond anvil cells. The Brillouin-scattering technique is a powerful tool for aiding in the determination of equations of state for a variety of materials, but to date has not been applied to polymers at pressures exceeding a few kilobars. For the three elastomers, both transverse and longitudinal acoustic modes were observed, though the transverse modes were observed only at elevated pressures (>0.7GPa) in all cases. From the Brillouin frequency shifts, longitudinal and transverse sound speeds were calculated, as were the C11 and C12 elastic constants, bulk, shear, and Young's moduli, and Poisson's ratios, and their respective pressure dependencies. P-V isotherms were then constructed, and fit to several empirical/semiempirical equations of state to extract the isothermal bulk modulus and its pressure derivative for each material. Finally, the lack of shear waves observed for any polymer at ambient pressure, and the pressure dependency of their appearance is discussed with regard to instrumental and material considerations.

  4. Acoustic asymmetric transmission based on time-dependent dynamical scattering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Yang; Ni, Xu; Xu, Ye-Long; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Chen, Ze-Guo; Feng, Liang; Liu, Xiao-ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic asymmetric transmission device exhibiting unidirectional transmission property for acoustic waves is extremely desirable in many practical scenarios. Such a unique property may be realized in various configurations utilizing acoustic Zeeman effects in moving media as well as frequency-conversion in passive nonlinear acoustic systems and in active acoustic systems. Here we demonstrate a new acoustic frequency conversion process in a time-varying system, consisting of a rotating blade and the surrounding air. The scattered acoustic waves from this time-varying system experience frequency shifts, which are linearly dependent on the blade’s rotating frequency. Such scattering mechanism can be well described theoretically by an acoustic linear time-varying perturbation theory. Combining such time-varying scattering effects with highly efficient acoustic filtering, we successfully develop a tunable acoustic unidirectional device with 20 dB power transmission contrast ratio between two counter propagation directions at audible frequencies. PMID:26038886

  5. Acoustic Scattering from Compact Bubble Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindall, Jeffrey Alan

    In this study, a simple model describing the low -frequency scattering properties of high void fraction bubble clouds in both the free field and near the ocean surface is developed. This model, which is based on an effective medium approximation and acoustically compact scatters, successfully predicts the results of the bubble cloud scattering experiment carried out at Lake Seneca in New York state for frequencies consistent with the model assumptions (Roy et al., 1992). The introduction of the surface is facilitated by the method of images and is subject to the same constraint of low-acoustic frequency imposed by the compact scatterer assumption. This model is not intended to serve as an exact replicate of oceanic bubble cloud scattering. The model herein was kept simple by design, for only then can the complex physical behavior be expressed in a simple analytical form. Simple, analytic theories facilitate the exploration of parameter space, and more importantly serve to illuminate the underlying physics.

  6. Microparticle and Cell Characterization Using Acoustic Scattering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Mark Schaefer

    A technique is presented for measuring physical properties of particles with radii from one to five microns. Tone bursts of 30 MHz center frequency are scattered by single particles as they are carried by a coaxial jet flow past three focused acoustic transducers (one sender and two receivers). The scattered pressure is measured simultaneously at two angles, which allows the compressibility and density of the particles to be calculated given the volume of the particles and the density and compressibility of the host liquid using Rayleigh's theory for long wavelength acoustic scattering. Because the particles are measured one at a time, statistical distributions of their properties may be determined. The device is calibrated using particles whose properties are known. A study was conducted on human red blood cells in hosts of different tonicity. Density and compressibility values obtained in these experiments are compared with a model accounting for changes in red cell properties due to variations in cell water content. Other studies were conducted using polystyrene and polystyrene divinylbenzene spheres. This technique is well suited to in vitro measurement of properties of biological cells. Applications are discussed, with emphasis on the study of red blood cells.

  7. Experimental Demonstration of Underwater Acoustic Scattering Cancellation

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Charles A.; Martin, Theodore P.; Guild, Matthew D.; Layman, Christopher N.; Naify, Christina J.; Nicholas, Michael; Thangawng, Abel L.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    We explore an acoustic scattering cancellation shell for buoyant hollow cylinders submersed in a water background. A thin, low-shear, elastic coating is used to cancel the monopole scattering from an air-filled, neutrally buoyant steel shell for all frequencies where the wavelength is larger than the object diameter. By design, the uncoated shell also has an effective density close to the aqueous background, independently canceling its dipole scattering. Due to the significantly reduced monopole and dipole scattering, the compliant coating results in a hollow cylindrical inclusion that is simultaneously impedance and sound speed matched to the water background. We demonstrate the proposed cancellation method with a specific case, using an array of hollow steel cylinders coated with thin silicone rubber shells. These experimental results are matched to finite element modeling predictions, confirming the scattering reduction. Additional calculations explore the optimization of the silicone coating properties. Using this approach, it is found that scattering cross-sections can be reduced by 20 dB for all wavelengths up to k0a = 0.85. PMID:26282067

  8. Cloaking of an acoustic sensor using scattering cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, Matthew D.; Alù, Andrea; Haberman, Michael R.

    2014-07-01

    In this Letter, a bilaminate acoustic cloak designed using scattering cancellation methods is applied to the case of an acoustic sensor consisting of a hollow piezoelectric shell with mechanical absorption. The bilaminate cloak provides 20-50 dB reduction in scattering strength relative to the uncloaked configuration over the typical range of operation for an acoustic sensor, retains its ability to sensing acoustic pressure signals, and remains within the physical bounds of a passive absorber. Further, the cloak is shown to increase the range of frequencies over which there is nearly perfect phase fidelity between the acoustic signal and the voltage generated by the sensor. The feasibility of achieving the necessary fluid layer properties is demonstrated using sonic crystals with the use of readily available acoustic materials.

  9. Evolution of elastic and thermal properties during TMOS-gel formation determined by ringing bottle acoustic resonance spectroscopy, impulsive stimulated scattering, photopyroelectric spectroscopy and the hot ball method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaodong; Agustin Flores Cuautle, Jose Jesus; Kouyate, Mansour; Bernardus Roozen, Nicolaas; Goossens, Jozefien; Menon, Preethy; Kuriakose Malayil, Maju; Salenbien, Robbe; Nair Rajesh, Ravindran; Glorieux, Christ; Griesmar, Pascal; Martinez, Loïc; Serfaty, Stéphane

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of the elastic and thermal properties of a tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS)-based gel that exhibits an extraordinary ringing effect when enclosed in a bottle is investigated during the sol-gel transition. The results demonstrate the feasibility of three proposed experimental methods for monitoring of gels during their formation. The shear stiffening evolution during gelation is monitored by ringing bottle, resonant acoustic spectroscopy and by an ultrasonic technique using piezo electric excitation and detection. The evolution of the longitudinal modulus and the thermal diffusivity of the gel during stiffening are simultaneously determined by a combined photoacoustic and photothermal method based on heterodyne diffraction detection of impulsive stimulated scattering by, respectively, a propagating acoustic wave grating and a decaying thermal expansion grating that were both thermo elastically generated using a pulsed laser. Also, the feasibility of an inverse photopyroelectric method and a hot ball technique to monitor the thermal transport efficiency and thermal impedance of a forming gel by tracking the thermal conductivity, the thermal diffusivity, and the thermal effusivity is demonstrated. The network polymerization and stiffening during the sol-gel transition in TMOS-gel corresponds with substantial changes in the shear acoustic velocity and in all thermal properties, while the longitudinal acoustic velocity is only weakly affected.

  10. Inverse potential scattering in duct acoustics.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Barbara J; Pike, E Roy; Sharp, David B; Aktosun, Tuncay

    2006-01-01

    The inverse problem of the noninvasive measurement of the shape of an acoustical duct in which one-dimensional wave propagation can be assumed is examined within the theoretical framework of the governing Klein-Gordon equation. Previous deterministic methods developed over the last 40 years have all required direct measurement of the reflectance or input impedance but now, by application of the methods of inverse quantum scattering to the acoustical system, it is shown that the reflectance can be algorithmically derived from the radiated wave. The potential and area functions of the duct can subsequently be reconstructed. The results are discussed with particular reference to acoustic pulse reflectometry.

  11. An invariance theorem in acoustic scattering theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha-Duong, T.

    1996-10-01

    Karp's theorem states that if the far-field pattern corresponding to the scattering of a time-harmonic acoustic plane wave by a sound-soft obstacle is invariant under the group of orthogonal transformations in 0266-5611/12/5/007/img1 (rotations in 0266-5611/12/5/007/img2), then the scatterer is a sphere (circle). The theorem is generalized to the case where the invariant group of the far field pattern is only a subgroup of the orthogonal group, and for a class of mixed boundary conditions.

  12. Acoustic scattering by benthic and planktonic shelled animals.

    PubMed

    Stanton, T K; Chu, D; Wiebe, P H; Eastwood, R L; Warren, J D

    2000-08-01

    Acoustic backscattering measurements and associated scattering modeling were recently conducted on a type of benthic shelled animal that has a spiral form of shell (Littorina littorea). Benthic and planktonic shelled animals with this shape occur on the seafloor and in the water column, respectively, and can be a significant source of acoustic scattering in the ocean. Modeling of the scattering properties allows reverberation predictions to be made for sonar performance predictions as well as for detection and classification of animals for biological and ecological applications. The studies involved measurements over the frequency range 24 kHz to 1 MHz and all angles of orientation in as small as 1 degree increments. This substantial data set is quite revealing of the physics of the acoustic scattering by these complex shelled bodies and served as a basis for the modeling. Specifically, the resonance structure of the scattering was strongly dependent upon angle of orientation and could be traced to various types of rays (e.g., subsonic Lamb waves and rays entering the opercular opening). The data are analyzed in both the frequency and time domain (compressed pulse processing) so that dominant scattering mechanisms could be identified. Given the complexity of the animal body (irregular elastic shell with discontinuities), approximate scattering models are used with only the dominant scattering properties retained. Two models are applied to the data, both approximating the body as a deformed sphere: (1) an averaged form of the exact modal-series-based solution for the spherical shell, which is used to estimate the backscattering by a deformed shell averaged over all angles of orientation, and produces reasonably accurate predictions over all k1a(esr) (k1 is the acoustic wave number of the surrounding water and a(esr) is the equivalent spherical radius of the body), and (2) a ray-based formula which is used to estimate the scattering at fixed angle of orientation, but

  13. Acoustic scattering from microfibers of Parylene C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chindam, Chandraprakash; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Awadelkarim, Osama O.; Orfali, Wasim

    2014-10-01

    The acoustic scattering characteristics of ˜10 μ m-long microfibers of Parylene C embedded in water were investigated, towards the eventual goal of designing polymeric sculptured thin films for biomedical applications. The chosen microfibers were upright circular-cylindrical, slanted circular-cylindrical, chevronic, and helical in shape. A combination of numerical and analytical techniques was adopted to examine the scattering of plane waves in a spectral regime spanning the lower few eigenfrequencies of the microfibers. Certain maximums in the spectrums of the forward and back scattering efficiencies arise from the phenomenon of creeping waves. The same phenomenon affects the total scattering efficiency in some instances. The spectrums of all efficiencies exhibit the geometric symmetry of a microfiber in relation to the direction of propagation of the incident plane wave. Similarities in the shapes of the slanted circular-cylindrical and the chevronic microfibers are reflected in the spectrums of their scattering efficiencies. A highly compliant microfiber has shorter and broader peaks than a less compliant microfiber in the spectrums of the total scattering efficiency. The proper design of polymeric sculptured thin films will benefit from the knowledge gained of the directions of maximum scattering from individual microfibers.

  14. Support minimized inversion of acoustic and elastic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Safaeinili, A.

    1994-04-24

    This report discusses the following topics on support minimized inversion of acoustic and elastic wave scattering: Minimum support inversion; forward modelling of elastodynamic wave scattering; minimum support linearized acoustic inversion; support minimized nonlinear acoustic inversion without absolute phase; and support minimized nonlinear elastic inversion.

  15. Low frequency acoustic and electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Maccamy, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with two classes of problems arising from acoustics and electromagnetics scattering in the low frequency stations. The first class of problem is solving Helmholtz equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions on an arbitrary two dimensional body while the second one is an interior-exterior interface problem with Helmholtz equation in the exterior. Low frequency analysis show that there are two intermediate problems which solve the above problems accurate to 0(k/2/ log k) where k is the frequency. These solutions greatly differ from the zero frequency approximations. For the Dirichlet problem numerical examples are shown to verify the theoretical estimates.

  16. Low frequency acoustic and electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Maccamy, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper deals with two classes of problems arising from acoustics and electromagnetics scattering in the low frequency stations. The first class of problem is solving Helmholtz equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions on an arbitrary two dimensional body while the second one is an interior-exterior interface problem with Helmholtz equation in the exterior. Low frequency analysis show that there are two intermediate problems which solve the above problems accurate to 0(k(2) log k) where k is the frequency. These solutions greatly differ from the zero frequency approximations. For the Dirichlet problem numerical examples are shown to verify the theoretical estimates.

  17. Acoustic scattering by multiple elliptical cylinders using collocation multipole method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Ming

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents the collocation multipole method for the acoustic scattering induced by multiple elliptical cylinders subjected to an incident plane sound wave. To satisfy the Helmholtz equation in the elliptical coordinate system, the scattered acoustic field is formulated in terms of angular and radial Mathieu functions which also satisfy the radiation condition at infinity. The sound-soft or sound-hard boundary condition is satisfied by uniformly collocating points on the boundaries. For the sound-hard or Neumann conditions, the normal derivative of the acoustic pressure is determined by using the appropriate directional derivative without requiring the addition theorem of Mathieu functions. By truncating the multipole expansion, a finite linear algebraic system is derived and the scattered field can then be determined according to the given incident acoustic wave. Once the total field is calculated as the sum of the incident field and the scattered field, the near field acoustic pressure along the scatterers and the far field scattering pattern can be determined. For the acoustic scattering of one elliptical cylinder, the proposed results match well with the analytical solutions. The proposed scattered fields induced by two and three elliptical-cylindrical scatterers are critically compared with those provided by the boundary element method to validate the present method. Finally, the effects of the convexity of an elliptical scatterer, the separation between scatterers and the incident wave number and angle on the acoustic scattering are investigated.

  18. Nonlinear ion acoustic waves scattered by vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Yuji; Yoshida, Zensho

    2016-09-01

    The Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy is the archetype of infinite-dimensional integrable systems, which describes nonlinear ion acoustic waves in two-dimensional space. This remarkably ordered system resides on a singular submanifold (leaf) embedded in a larger phase space of more general ion acoustic waves (low-frequency electrostatic perturbations). The KP hierarchy is characterized not only by small amplitudes but also by irrotational (zero-vorticity) velocity fields. In fact, the KP equation is derived by eliminating vorticity at every order of the reductive perturbation. Here, we modify the scaling of the velocity field so as to introduce a vortex term. The newly derived system of equations consists of a generalized three-dimensional KP equation and a two-dimensional vortex equation. The former describes 'scattering' of vortex-free waves by ambient vortexes that are determined by the latter. We say that the vortexes are 'ambient' because they do not receive reciprocal reactions from the waves (i.e., the vortex equation is independent of the wave fields). This model describes a minimal departure from the integrable KP system. By the Painlevé test, we delineate how the vorticity term violates integrability, bringing about an essential three-dimensionality to the solutions. By numerical simulation, we show how the solitons are scattered by vortexes and become chaotic.

  19. Interstellar Dust Scattering Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, K. D.

    2004-05-01

    Studies of dust scattering properties in astrophysical objects with Milky Way interstellar dust are reviewed. Such objects are reflection nebulae, dark clouds, and the Diffuse Galactic Light (DGL). To ensure their basic quality, studies had to satisfy four basic criteria to be included in this review. These four criteria significantly reduced the scatter in dust properties measurements, especially in the case of the DGL. Determinations of dust scattering properties were found to be internally consistent for each object type as well as consistent between object types. The 2175 Å bump is seen as an absorption feature. Comparisons with dust grain models find general agreement with significant disagreements at particular wavelengths (especially in the far-ultraviolet). Finally, unanswered questions and future directions are enumerated.

  20. Numerical Simulations of Radar Acoustic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boluriaan, Said; Morris, Philip J.

    1998-11-01

    Wake vortices are produced by the lifting surfaces of all aircraft. The vortex created by a large aircraft can have a catastrophic effect on a small plane following closely behind. A vortex detection system would not only increase airport productivity by allowing adaptive spacing, but would also increase the safety of all aircraft operating around the airport by alerting controllers to hazardous conditions that might exist near the runways. In the present research, one and two-dimensional models have been considered for the study of wake vortex detection using a Radar Acoustic Sounding System (RASS). The permittivity perturbation caused by the vortex is modeled as a traveling wave with a Gaussian envelope and a variable propagation speed. The model equations are solved numerically. The one-dimensional model is also solved analytically. The main problem with a time domain simulation is the number of samples required to resolve the Doppler shift. Even for a 1D model with a typical scatterer size, the CPU time required to run the code is far beyond the currently available computer resources. One way to make the time domain simulation feasible is to recast the governing differential equation in order to remove the carrier frequency and solve only for the frequency shift in the scattered wave. The numerical stability characteristics of the resulting equation with complex coefficients are discussed. In order to validate the numerical scheme, the code is run for a fictitious speed of light.

  1. Topics in electromagnetic, acoustic, and potential scattering theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuntaplook, Umaporn

    With recent renewed interest in the classical topics of both acoustic and electromagnetic aspects for nano-technology, transformation optics, fiber optics, metamaterials with negative refractive indices, cloaking and invisibility, the topic of time-independent scattering theory in quantum mechanics is becoming a useful field to re-examine in the above contexts. One of the key areas of electromagnetic theory scattering of plane electromagnetic waves --- is based on the properties of the refractive indices in the various media. It transpires that the refractive index of a medium and the potential in quantum scattering theory are intimately related. In many cases, understanding such scattering in radially symmetric media is sufficient to gain insight into scattering in more complex media. Meeting the challenge of variable refractive indices and possibly complicated boundary conditions therefore requires accurate and efficient numerical methods, and where possible, analytic solutions to the radial equations from the governing scalar and vector wave equations (in acoustics and electromagnetic theory, respectively). Until relatively recently, researchers assumed a constant refractive index throughout the medium of interest. However, the most interesting and increasingly useful cases are those with non-constant refractive index profiles. In the majority of this dissertation the focus is on media with piecewise constant refractive indices in radially symmetric media. The method discussed is based on the solution of Maxwell's equations for scattering of plane electromagnetic waves from a dielectric (or "transparent") sphere in terms of the related Helmholtz equation. The main body of the dissertation (Chapters 2 and 3) is concerned with scattering from (i) a uniform spherical inhomogeneity embedded in an external medium with different properties, and (ii) a piecewise-uniform central inhomogeneity in the external medium. The latter results contain a natural generalization of

  2. Acoustic vibrations contribute to the diffuse scatter produced by ribosome crystals.

    PubMed

    Polikanov, Yury S; Moore, Peter B

    2015-10-01

    The diffuse scattering pattern produced by frozen crystals of the 70S ribosome from Thermus thermophilus is as highly structured as it would be if it resulted entirely from domain-scale motions within these particles. However, the qualitative properties of the scattering pattern suggest that acoustic displacements of the crystal lattice make a major contribution to it.

  3. Acoustic vibrations contribute to the diffuse scatter produced by ribosome crystals

    PubMed Central

    Polikanov, Yury S.; Moore, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    The diffuse scattering pattern produced by frozen crystals of the 70S ribosome from Thermus thermophilus is as highly structured as it would be if it resulted entirely from domain-scale motions within these particles. However, the qualitative properties of the scattering pattern suggest that acoustic displacements of the crystal lattice make a major contribution to it. PMID:26457426

  4. Air bubbles in water: a strongly multiple scattering medium for acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Kafesaki, M; Penciu, R S; Economou, E N

    2000-06-26

    Using a newly developed multiple scattering scheme, we calculate band structure and transmission properties for acoustic waves propagating in bubbly water. We prove that the multiple scattering effects are responsible for the creation of wide gaps in the transmission even in the presence of strong positional and size disorder.

  5. Acoustic cloaking transformations from attainable material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urzhumov, Yaroslav; Ghezzo, Fabrizia; Hunt, John; Smith, David R.

    2010-07-01

    We propose a general methodology and a set of practical recipes for the construction of ultra-broadband acoustic cloaks—structures that can render themselves and a concealed object undetectable by means of acoustic scattering. The acoustic cloaks presented here are designed and function analogously to electromagnetic cloaks. However, acoustic cloaks in a fluid medium do not suffer the bandwidth limitations imposed on their electromagnetic counterparts by the finite speed of light in vacuum. In the absence of specific metamaterials having arbitrary combinations of quasi-static speed of sound and mass density, we explore the flexibility of continuum transformations that produce approximate cloaking solutions. We show that an imperfect, eikonal acoustic cloak (that is, one which is not impedance matched but is valid in the geometrical optics regime) with negligible dispersion can be designed using a simple layered geometry. Since a practical cloaking device will probably be composed of combinations of solid materials rather than fluids, it is necessary to consider the full elastic properties of such media, which support shear waves in addition to the compression waves associated with the acoustic regime. We perform a systematic theoretical and numerical investigation of the role of shear waves in elastic cloaking devices. We find that for elastic metamaterials with Poisson's ratio ν>0.49, shear waves do not alter the cloaking effect. Such metamaterials can be built from nearly incompressible rubbers (with ν≈0.499) and fluids. We expect this finding to have applications in other acoustic devices based on the form-invariance of the scalar acoustic wave equation.

  6. Preconditioned iterative methods for inhomogeneous acoustic scattering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sifuentes, Josef

    This thesis develops and analyzes efficient iterative methods for solving discretizations of the Lippmann--Schwinger integral equation for inhomogeneous acoustic scattering. Analysis and numerical illustrations of the spectral properties of the scattering problem demonstrate that a significant portion of the spectrum is approximated well on coarse grids. To exploit this, I develop a novel restarted GMRES method with adaptive deflation preconditioning based on spectral approximations on multiple grids. Much of the literature in this field is based on exact deflation, which is not feasible for most practical computations. This thesis provides an analytical framework for general approximate deflation methods and suggests a way to rigorously study a host of inexactly-applied preconditioners. Approximate deflation algorithms are implemented for scattering through thin inhomogeneities in photonic band gap problems. I also develop a short term recurrence for solving the one dimensional version of the problem that exploits the observation that the integral operator is a low rank perturbation of a self-adjoint operator. This method is based on strategies for solving Schur complement problems, and provides an alternative to a recent short term recurrence algorithm for matrices with such structure that we show to be numerically unstable for this application. The restarted GMRES method with adaptive deflation preconditioning over multiple grids, as well as the short term recurrence method for operators with low rank skew-adjoint parts, are very effective for reducing both the computational time and computer memory required to solve acoustic scattering problems. Furthermore, the methods are sufficiently general to be applicable to a wide class of problems.

  7. Nonlinear Raman-Type Acoustic Scattering in Three-Phase Marine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkina, N. I.

    2001-03-01

    Stimulated Raman-type acoustic scattering by bubble oscillations in three-phase marine sediments, which consist of a solid frame, the pore water, and air bubbles, is considered. A model is developed for the case of the bubbles surrounded by water. The acoustic properties of the sediments are described on the basis of the Biot theory of sound propagation in a fluid-saturated porous medium. Nonlinear wave equations are obtained for marine sediments containing air bubbles. Expressions for the nonlinear scattering coefficient and the threshold intensity of the exciting sound wave are derived. A possibility of an experimental observation of the scattering process is discussed.

  8. Resolving the Location of Acoustic Point Sources Scattered Due to the Presence of a Skull Phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, J.; Shapoori, K.; Malyarenko, E.; DiCarlo, A.; Dech, J.; Severin, F.; Maev, R. Gr.

    This paper considers resolving the location of a foreign object in the brain without the removal of the skull bone by detecting and processing the acoustic waves emitted from the foreign object modeled as point source. The variable thickness of the skull bone causes propagation acoustic waves to be scattered in such a manner that the acoustic wave undergoes a variable time delay relative to its entry point on the skull. Matched filtering can be used to detect the acoustic wave front, the time delay variations of the skull can be corrected for, and matched filtering time reversal algorithms can then detect the location of the acoustic source. This process is examined experimentally in a water tank system containing an acoustic source, custom-made skull phantom, and receiver. The apparatus is arranged in transmission mode so that the acoustic waves are emitted from the source, scattered by the phantom, and then received by a second transducer. The skull phantom has been designed so that the acoustic properties (velocity, density, and attenuation correspond approximately to those of a typical human skull. In addition, the phantom has been molded so that the surface closest to the acoustic source has smoothly oscillating ridges and valleys and a flat outer surface, approximately modeling a real-world skull bone. The data obtained from the experiment is processed to detect and extract the scattered acoustic wave front and correct for the time of flight variations in the skull. This re-creates the approximate wave front of a point source, whose location can be resolved via a matched filtering time reversal algorithm. The results of this process are examined for cases where there is no phantom present (no scattering), and with the phantom present. Comparison of these results shows a correlation between the calculated locations of the acoustic source and the expected location.

  9. Acoustical scattering cross section of gas bubbles under dual-frequency acoustic excitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuning; Li, Shengcai

    2015-09-01

    The acoustical scattering cross section is a paramount parameter determining the scattering ability of cavitation bubbles when they are excited by the incident acoustic waves. This parameter is strongly related with many important applications of acoustic cavitation including facilitating the reaction of chemical process, boosting bubble sonoluminescence, and performing non-invasive therapy and drug delivery. In present paper, both the analytical and numerical solutions of acoustical scattering cross section of gas bubbles under dual-frequency excitation are obtained. The validity of the analytical solution is shown with demonstrating examples. The nonlinear characteristics (e.g., harmonics, subharmonics and ultraharmonics) of the scattering cross section curve under dual-frequency approach are investigated. Compared with single-frequency approach, the dual-frequency approach displays more resonances termed as "combination resonances" and could promote the acoustical scattering cross section significantly within a much broader range of bubble sizes due to the generation of more resonances. The influence of several paramount parameters (e.g., acoustic pressure amplitude, power allocations between two acoustic components, and the ratio of the frequencies) in the dual-frequency system on the predictions of scattering cross section has been discussed.

  10. Multiscale analysis of the acoustic scattering by many scatterers of impedance type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challa, Durga Prasad; Sini, Mourad

    2016-06-01

    We are concerned with the acoustic scattering problem, at a frequency {κ}, by many small obstacles of arbitrary shapes with impedance boundary condition. These scatterers are assumed to be included in a bounded domain {Ω} in {{R}^3} which is embedded in an acoustic background characterized by an eventually locally varying index of refraction. The collection of the scatterers {D_m, m=1,ldots,M} is modeled by four parameters: their number M, their maximum radius a, their minimum distance d and the surface impedances {λ_m, m=1,ldots,M}. We consider the parameters M, d and {λ_m}'s having the following scaling properties: {M:=M(a)=O(a^{-s}), d:=d(a)≈ a^t} and {λ_m:=λ_m(a)=λ_{m,0}a^{-β}}, as {a→ 0}, with non negative constants s, t and {β} and complex numbers {λ_{m, 0}}'s with eventually negative imaginary parts. We derive the asymptotic expansion of the far-fields with explicit error estimate in terms of a, as {a→ 0}. The dominant term is the Foldy-Lax field corresponding to the scattering by the point-like scatterers located at the centers {z_m}'s of the scatterers {D_m}'s with {λ_m \\vert partial D_m\\vert} as the related scattering coefficients. This asymptotic expansion is justified under the following conditions a ≤ a_0, \\vert Re (λ_{m,0})\\vert ≥ λ_-,quad \\vertλ_{m,0}\\vert ≤ λ_+,quad β < 1,quad 0 ≤ s ≤2-β,quads/3 ≤ t and the error of the approximation is {C a^{3-2β-s}}, as {a → 0}, where the positive constants {a_0, λ_-,λ_+} and C depend only on the a priori uniform bounds of the Lipschitz characters of the obstacles {D_m}'s and the ones of {M(a)a^s} and {d(a)/a^t}. We do not assume the periodicity in distributing the small scatterers. In addition, the scatterers can be arbitrary close since t can be arbitrary large, i.e., we can handle the mesoscale regime. Finally, for spherical scatterers, we can also allow the limit case {β=1} with a slightly better error of the approximation.

  11. Dust properties from scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, C.; Pagani, L.; Min, M.; Poteet, C.; Whittet, D.; Cambrésy, L.

    2016-05-01

    Dust grains evolve during the life cycle of the interstellar matter. From their birth places to dense molecular clouds, they grow by coagulation and acquire ice mantles, mainly composed of water. These morphological changes affect their optical properties. However, it remains a highly degenerate issue to determine their composition, size distribution, and shape from observations. In particular, using wavelengths associated to dust emission alone is not sufficient to investigate dense cold cores. Fortunately, scattering has turned out to be a powerful tool to investigate molecular clouds from the outer regions to the core. In particular, it is possible to quantify the amount of dust aggregates needed to reproduce observations from 1.25 to 8 μm.

  12. Kinetic Enhancement of Raman Backscatter, and Electron Acoustic Thomson Scatter

    SciTech Connect

    Strozzi, D J; Williams, E A; Langdon, A B; Bers, A

    2006-09-01

    1-D Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell simulations are presented which show kinetic enhancement of stimulated Raman backscatter (SRBS) due to electron trapping in regimes of heavy linear Landau damping. The conventional Raman Langmuir wave is transformed into a set of beam acoustic modes [L. Yin et al., Phys. Rev. E 73, 025401 (2006)]. For the first time, a low phase velocity electron acoustic wave (EAW) is seen developing from the self-consistent Raman physics. Backscatter of the pump laser off the EAW fluctuations is reported and referred to as electron acoustic Thomson scatter. This light is similar in wavelength to, although much lower in amplitude than, the reflected light between the pump and SRBS wavelengths observed in single hot spot experiments, and previously interpreted as stimulated electron acoustic scatter [D. S. Montgomery et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 155001 (2001)]. The EAW observed in our simulations is strongest well below the phase-matched frequency for electron acoustic scatter, and therefore the EAW is not produced by it. The beating of different beam acoustic modes is proposed as the EAW excitation mechanism, and is called beam acoustic decay. Supporting evidence for this process, including bispectral analysis, is presented. The linear electrostatic modes, found by projecting the numerical distribution function onto a Gauss-Hermite basis, include beam acoustic modes (some of which are unstable even without parametric coupling to light waves) and a strongly-damped EAW similar to the observed one. This linear EAW results from non-Maxwellian features in the electron distribution, rather than nonlinearity due to electron trapping.

  13. Nonlinear scattering of acoustic waves by vibrating obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquette, J. C.

    1983-06-01

    The problem of the generation of sum- and difference-frequency waves produced via the scattering of an acoustic wave by an obstacle whose surface vibrates harmonically was studied both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical approach involved solving the nonlinear wave equation, subject to appropriate boundary conditions, by the use of a perturbation expansion of the fields and a Green's function method. In addition to ordinary rigid-body scattering, Censor predicted nongrowing waves at frequencies equal to the sum and to the difference of the frequencies of the primary waves. The solution to the nonlinear wave equation also yields scattered waves at the sum and difference frequencies. However, the nonlinearity of the medium causes these waves to grow with increasing distance from the scatter's surface and, after a very small distance, dominate those predicted by Censor. The simple-source formulation of the second-order nonlinear wave equation for a lossless fluid medium has been derived for arbitrary primary wave fields. This equation was used to solve the problem of nonlinear scattering of acoustic waves by a vibrating obstacle for three geometries: (1) a plane-wave scattering by a vibrating plane, (2) cylindrical-wave scattering by a vibrating cylinder, and (3) plane-wave scattering by a vibrating cylinder. Successful experimental validation of the theory was inhibited by previously unexpected levels of nonlinearity in the hydrophones used. Such high levels of hydrophone nonlinearity appeared in hydrophones that, by their geometry of construction, were expected to be fairly linear.

  14. Broadband acoustic scattering measurements of underwater unexploded ordnance (UXO).

    PubMed

    Bucaro, J A; Houston, B H; Saniga, M; Dragonette, L R; Yoder, T; Dey, S; Kraus, L; Carin, L

    2008-02-01

    In order to evaluate the potential for detection and identification of underwater unexploded ordnance (UXO) by exploiting their structural acoustic response, we carried out broadband monostatic scattering measurements over a full 360 degrees on UXO's (two mortar rounds, an artillery shell, and a rocket warhead) and false targets (a cinder block and a large rock). The measurement band, 1-140 kHz, includes a low frequency structural acoustics region in which the wavelengths are comparable to or larger than the target characteristic dimensions. In general, there are aspects that provide relatively high target strength levels ( approximately -10 to -15 dB), and from our experience the targets should be detectable in this structural acoustics band in most acoustic environments. The rigid body scattering was also calculated for one UXO in order to highlight the measured scattering features involving elastic responses. The broadband scattering data should be able to support feature-based separation of UXO versus false targets and identification of various classes of UXO as well.

  15. Inverse Scattering Problems for Acoustic Waves in AN Inhomogeneous Medium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedzierawski, Andrzej Wladyslaw

    1990-01-01

    This dissertation considers the inverse scattering problem of determining either the absorption of sound in an inhomogeneous medium or the surface impedance of an obstacle from a knowledge of the far-field patterns of the scattered fields corresponding to many incident time -harmonic plane waves. First, we consider the inverse problem in the case when the scattering object is an inhomogeneous medium with complex refraction index having compact support. Our approach to this problem is the orthogonal projection method of Colton-Monk (cf. The inverse scattering problem for time acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium, Quart. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 41 (1988), 97-125). After that, we prove the analogue of Karp's Theorem for the scattering of acoustic waves through an inhomogeneous medium with compact support. We then generalize some of these results to the case when the inhomogeneous medium is no longer of compact support. If the acoustic wave penetrates the inhomogeneous medium by only a small amount then the inverse medium problem leads to the inverse obstacle problem with an impedance boundary condition. We solve the inverse impedance problem of determining the surface impedance of an obstacle of known shape by using both the methods of Kirsch-Kress and Colton-Monk (cf. R. Kress, Linear Integral Equations, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1989).

  16. MODE CONVERSION BETWEEN DIFFERENT RADIAL ORDERS FOR SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES SCATTERED BY SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hui; Chou, Dean-Yi

    2013-11-20

    We study the mode conversion between different radial orders for solar acoustic waves interacting with sunspots. Solar acoustic waves are modified in the presence of sunspots. The modification in the wave can be viewed as that the sunspot, excited by the incident wave, generates the scattered wave, and the scattered wave is added to the incident wave to form the total wave inside and around the sunspot. The wavefunction of the acoustic wave on the solar surface is computed from the cross-correlation function. The wavefunction of the scattered wave is obtained by subtracting the wavefunction of the incident wave from that of the total wave. We use the incident waves of radial order n = 0-5 to measure the scattered wavefunctions from n to another radial order n' for NOAAs 11084 and 11092. The strength of scattered waves decreases rapidly with |Δn|, where Δn ≡ n' – n. The scattered waves of Δn = ±1 are visible for n ≤ 1, and significant for n ≥ 2. For the scattered wave of Δn = ±2, only few cases are visible. None of the scattered waves of Δn = ±3 are visible. The properties of scattered waves for Δn = 0 and Δn ≠ 0 are different. The scattered wave amplitude relative to the incident wave amplitude decreases with n for Δn = 0, while it increases with n for Δn ≠ 0. The scattered wave amplitudes of Δn = 0 are greater for the larger sunspot, while those of Δn ≠ 0 are insensitive to the sunspot size.

  17. A time domain sampling method for inverse acoustic scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yukun; Hömberg, Dietmar; Hu, Guanghui; Li, Jingzhi; Liu, Hongyu

    2016-06-01

    This work concerns the inverse scattering problems of imaging unknown/inaccessible scatterers by transient acoustic near-field measurements. Based on the analysis of the migration method, we propose efficient and effective sampling schemes for imaging small and extended scatterers from knowledge of time-dependent scattered data due to incident impulsive point sources. Though the inverse scattering problems are known to be nonlinear and ill-posed, the proposed imaging algorithms are totally "direct" involving only integral calculations on the measurement surface. Theoretical justifications are presented and numerical experiments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of our methods. In particular, the proposed static imaging functionals enhance the performance of the total focusing method (TFM) and the dynamic imaging functionals show analogous behavior to the time reversal inversion but without solving time-dependent wave equations.

  18. Acoustic Volume Scattering from the Seafloor and the Small Scale Structure of Heterogeneous Sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Anthony Patrick

    1995-11-01

    There has been little work on developing and testing seafloor volume scattering models and on the characterization of such volumes because of the complexity of the medium and the paucity of high resolution ground truth data. This dissertation addresses the different physical mechanisms responsible for backscattering from a seafloor volume and their relative importance. This was accomplished by: (1) examining and adapting theoretical and numerical techniques for predicting volume backscatter from seafloor environments in the frequency range from 5-50 kHz, (2) characterizing the physical properties of the seafloor volume that control acoustic backscatter in selected environmental regimes by using the high resolution techniques of CT scanning and p-wave logging and casting these descriptions in a form useful for scattering models, and (3) comparing model results constrained by ground truth information with acoustic data sets obtained in different seafloor environments in order to isolate physical scattering mechanisms which dominate scattering and to examine the effectiveness of the characterization and modeling components of this research. Specifically, a layered, gassy sediment and a sandy, shell hash sediment were examined. The gassy sediment was analyzed by using a continuum model for scattering from the surrounding sediment and a non-spherical bubble model for scattering from the included gas features. Simulations carried out with the bubble model showed that bubble scattering will dominate continuum scattering in soft mud containing gas bubbles. Results of calculations using the bubble scattering model compare well with data taken with the Naval Research Laboratory's Acoustic Sediment Classification System. The comparisons also show that bubbles smaller than those which could be found with CT scanning methods might be important at higher acoustic frequencies. The shell hash sediment was examined by using a single scattering model for the shell pieces instead of

  19. Numerical solution of acoustic scattering by finite perforated elastic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalieri, A. V. G.; Wolf, W. R.; Jaworski, J. W.

    2016-04-01

    We present a numerical method to compute the acoustic field scattered by finite perforated elastic plates. A boundary element method is developed to solve the Helmholtz equation subjected to boundary conditions related to the plate vibration. These boundary conditions are recast in terms of the vibration modes of the plate and its porosity, which enables a direct solution procedure. A parametric study is performed for a two-dimensional problem whereby a cantilevered perforated elastic plate scatters sound from a point quadrupole near the free edge. Both elasticity and porosity tend to diminish the scattered sound, in agreement with previous work considering semi-infinite plates. Finite elastic plates are shown to reduce acoustic scattering when excited at high Helmholtz numbers k0 based on the plate length. However, at low k0, finite elastic plates produce only modest reductions or, in cases related to structural resonance, an increase to the scattered sound level relative to the rigid case. Porosity, on the other hand, is shown to be more effective in reducing the radiated sound for low k0. The combined beneficial effects of elasticity and porosity are shown to be effective in reducing the scattered sound for a broader range of k0 for perforated elastic plates.

  20. Acoustic scattering from phononic crystals with complex geometry.

    PubMed

    Kulpe, Jason A; Sabra, Karim G; Leamy, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    This work introduces a formalism for computing external acoustic scattering from phononic crystals (PCs) with arbitrary exterior shape using a Bloch wave expansion technique coupled with the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral (HKI). Similar to a Kirchhoff approximation, a geometrically complex PC's surface is broken into a set of facets in which the scattering from each facet is calculated as if it was a semi-infinite plane interface in the short wavelength limit. When excited by incident radiation, these facets introduce wave modes into the interior of the PC. Incorporation of these modes in the HKI, summed over all facets, then determines the externally scattered acoustic field. In particular, for frequencies in a complete bandgap (the usual operating frequency regime of many PC-based devices and the requisite operating regime of the presented theory), no need exists to solve for internal reflections from oppositely facing edges and, thus, the total scattered field can be computed without the need to consider internal multiple scattering. Several numerical examples are provided to verify the presented approach. Both harmonic and transient results are considered for spherical and bean-shaped PCs, each containing over 100 000 inclusions. This facet formalism is validated by comparison to an existing self-consistent scattering technique.

  1. Novel limiting circle theory in acoustic wave scattering and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Changzheng

    Wave scattering theory is the basis for many key technologies that have important military and commercial applications. The familiar examples are radar, sonar, and various ultrasound instruments commonly used in remote sensing, target identification, non-destructive evaluation, medical diagnosis, and many other areas. Their mathematical model involves the solution of the so- called inverse scattering problem where an incident wave is used to probe a remote or inaccessible object. From the scattered field measurement, the shape and/or the material composition of the object can be determined. A new wave scattering theory, termed limiting circle theory (LCT), has been developed in this dissertation based on a novel approach of decomposing the wave scattering matrix. LCT has rigorously proved that the scattered wave field from any penetrable object (of cylinder and sphere geometries) is composed of three contributions: a rigid background, a soft background, and a pure resonance. This is a significant modification to the existing resonance scattering theory (RST) which states that the scattered field is made up of only two components: a proper background (either rigid or soft), and a pure resonance. LCT formalism led to the discovery of the limiting circle patterns associated with all normal modes or partial waves. These patterns provide a clear understanding of the resonance behavior such as the resonance period and the resonance intensity. The analytical LCT approach could also be the key to solving the background problems for shell structures that have remained unsolved for many years in acoustics.

  2. Acoustic Scattering in Flexible Waveguide Involving Step Discontinuity

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Muhammad; Nawaz, Rab; Ayub, Muhammad; Wahab, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the propagation and scattering of acoustic waves in a flexible wave-guide involving step discontinuity at an interface is considered. The emerging boundary value problem is non-Sturm-Liouville and is solved by employing a hybrid mode-matching technique. The physical scattering process and attenuation of duct modes versus frequency regime and change of height is studied. Moreover, the mode-matching solution is validated through a series of numerical experiments by testifying the power conservation identity and matching interface conditions. PMID:25084019

  3. Acoustic orbital angular momentum transfer to matter by chiral scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunenburger, Régis; Israel Vazquez Lozano, Juan; Brasselet, Etienne

    2015-10-01

    We report on orbital angular momentum exchange between sound and matter mediated by a non-dissipative chiral scattering process. An experimental demonstration is made possible by irradiating a three-dimensional printed, spiral-shaped chiral object with an incident ultrasonic beam carrying zero orbital angular momentum. Chiral refraction is shown to impart a nonzero orbital angular momentum to the scattered field and to rotate the object. This result constitutes a proof of concept of a novel kind of acoustic angular manipulation of matter.

  4. Acoustic scattering from mud volcanoes and carbonate mounds.

    PubMed

    Holland, Charles W; Weber, Thomas C; Etiope, Giuseppe

    2006-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes occur in many parts of the world's oceans and form an aperture for gas and fluidized mud emission from within the earth's crust. Their characteristics are of considerable interest to the geology, geophysics, geochemistry, and underwater acoustics communities. For the latter, mud volcanoes are of interest in part because they pose a potential source of clutter for active sonar. Close-range (single-interaction) scattering measurements from a mud volcano in the Straits of Sicily show scattering 10-15 dB above the background. Three hypotheses were examined concerning the scattering mechanism: (1) gas entrained in sediment at/near mud volcano, (2) gas bubbles and/or particulates (emitted) in the water column, (3) the carbonate bio-construction covering the mud volcano edifice. The experimental evidence, including visual, acoustic, and nonacoustic sensors, rules out the second hypothesis (at least during the observation time) and suggests that, for this particular mud volcano the dominant mechanism is associated with carbonate chimneys on the mud volcano. In terms of scattering levels, target strengths of 4-14 dB were observed from 800 to 3600 Hz for a monostatic geometry with grazing angles of 3-5 degrees. Similar target strengths were measured for vertically bistatic paths with incident and scattered grazing angles of 3-5 degrees and 33-50 degrees, respectively. PMID:17225386

  5. Acoustic scattering from mud volcanoes and carbonate mounds.

    PubMed

    Holland, Charles W; Weber, Thomas C; Etiope, Giuseppe

    2006-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes occur in many parts of the world's oceans and form an aperture for gas and fluidized mud emission from within the earth's crust. Their characteristics are of considerable interest to the geology, geophysics, geochemistry, and underwater acoustics communities. For the latter, mud volcanoes are of interest in part because they pose a potential source of clutter for active sonar. Close-range (single-interaction) scattering measurements from a mud volcano in the Straits of Sicily show scattering 10-15 dB above the background. Three hypotheses were examined concerning the scattering mechanism: (1) gas entrained in sediment at/near mud volcano, (2) gas bubbles and/or particulates (emitted) in the water column, (3) the carbonate bio-construction covering the mud volcano edifice. The experimental evidence, including visual, acoustic, and nonacoustic sensors, rules out the second hypothesis (at least during the observation time) and suggests that, for this particular mud volcano the dominant mechanism is associated with carbonate chimneys on the mud volcano. In terms of scattering levels, target strengths of 4-14 dB were observed from 800 to 3600 Hz for a monostatic geometry with grazing angles of 3-5 degrees. Similar target strengths were measured for vertically bistatic paths with incident and scattered grazing angles of 3-5 degrees and 33-50 degrees, respectively.

  6. Inverse scattering problems for acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedzierawski, Andrzej Wladyslaw

    The inverse scattering problem is considered of determining either the absorption of sound in an inhomogeneous medium or the surface impedance of an obstacle from a knowledge of the far field patterns of the scattered field corresponding to many incident time-harmonic plane waves. First, the inverse problem is studied in the case when the scattering object is an inhomogeneous medium with complex refractive index having compact support. The approach to this problem is the orthogonal projection method of Colton-Monk (1988). After that, the analogue is proven of Karp's Theorem for the scattering of acoustic waves through an inhomogeneous medium with compact support. Some of these results are then generalized to the case when the inhomogeneous medium is no longer of compact support. If the acoustic wave penetrates the inhomogeneous medium by only a small amount then the inverse medium problem leads to the inverse obstacle problem with an impedance boundary condition. The inverse impedance problem is solved of determining the surface impedance of an obstacle of known shape by using both the methods of Kirsch-Kress and Colton-Monk (1989).

  7. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  8. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  9. Characterization of Biological Cells by Inverse Acoustic Scattering and Electrozone Sensing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xucai

    A technique is presented which characterizes biological cells by their mechanical descriptors: size, compressibility and density. The experimental apparatus consists of two acoustic transducers and an electrozone sensor submerged in a bath of conducting host fluid. Diluted biological cells are convected through the apparatus by a coaxial jet. An individual cell passes through the electrozone where its volume is measured by the Coulter principle, and then through the confocal region of the two acoustic transducers. One acoustic transducer sends out tone bursts at a center frequency of 30 MHz and detects a back-scattered signal from the cell while the other transducer detects the scattered signal at 90^circ. Thus the volume, the 90^circ scattering function, and the 180^circ scattering function are recorded for each cell. The acoustic scattering functions are then inverted to provide the compressibility and density of that cell. Statistics of the mechanical properties for human red and white blood cells are generated and displayed. The size, compressibility and density of both normal and abnormal red blood cells are reported. By modeling a cell as an immiscible mixture of protein and saline solution, perfect mixture laws for compressibility and density are derived and confirmed by experimental results. With the mixture laws established, the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) is inferred from the compressibility and density data for red blood cells. Using only the data from the 180^circ back-scattered signal, different white cell subgroups are successfully distinguished by their locations in the two dimensional histograms of their mechanical descriptors.

  10. Detection of nonlinear picosecond acoustic pulses by time-resolved Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gusev, Vitalyi E.

    2014-08-14

    In time-resolved Brillouin scattering (also called picosecond ultrasonic interferometry), the time evolution of the spatial Fourier component of an optically excited acoustic strain distribution is monitored. The wave number is determined by the momentum conservation in photon-phonon interaction. For linear acoustic waves propagating in a homogeneous medium, the detected time-domain signal of the optical probe transient reflectivity shows a sinusoidal oscillation at a constant frequency known as the Brillouin frequency. This oscillation is a result of heterodyning the constant reflection from the sample surface with the Brillouin-scattered field. Here, we present an analytical theory for the nonlinear reshaping of a propagating, finite amplitude picosecond acoustic pulse, which results in a time-dependence of the observed frequency. In particular, we examine the conditions under which this information can be used to study the time-evolution of the weak-shock front speed. Depending on the initial strain pulse parameters and the time interval of its nonlinear transformation, our theory predicts the detected frequency to either be monotonically decreasing or oscillating in time. We support these theoretical predictions by comparison with available experimental data. In general, we find that picosecond ultrasonic interferometry of nonlinear acoustic pulses provides access to the nonlinear acoustic properties of a medium spanning most of the GHz frequency range.

  11. Near-specular acoustic scattering from a buried submarine mud volcano.

    PubMed

    Gerig, Anthony L; Holland, Charles W

    2007-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are objects that form on the seafloor due to the emission of gas and fluidized sediment from the Earth's interior. They vary widely in size, can be exposed or buried, and are of interest to the underwater acoustics community as potential sources of active sonar clutter. Coincident seismic reflection data and low frequency bistatic scattering data were gathered from one such buried mud volcano located in the Straits of Sicily. The bistatic data were generated using a pulsed piston source and a 64-element horizontal array, both towed over the top of the volcano. The purpose of this work was to appropriately model low frequency scattering from the volcano using the bistatic returns, seismic bathymetry, and knowledge of the general geoacoustic properties of the area's seabed to guide understanding and model development. Ray theory, with some approximations, was used to model acoustic propagation through overlying layers. Due to the volcano's size, scattering was modeled using geometric acoustics and a simple representation of volcano shape. Modeled bistatic data compared relatively well with experimental data, although some features remain unexplained. Results of an inversion for the volcano's reflection coefficient indicate that it may be acoustically softer than expected. PMID:18247739

  12. Near-specular acoustic scattering from a buried submarine mud volcano.

    PubMed

    Gerig, Anthony L; Holland, Charles W

    2007-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are objects that form on the seafloor due to the emission of gas and fluidized sediment from the Earth's interior. They vary widely in size, can be exposed or buried, and are of interest to the underwater acoustics community as potential sources of active sonar clutter. Coincident seismic reflection data and low frequency bistatic scattering data were gathered from one such buried mud volcano located in the Straits of Sicily. The bistatic data were generated using a pulsed piston source and a 64-element horizontal array, both towed over the top of the volcano. The purpose of this work was to appropriately model low frequency scattering from the volcano using the bistatic returns, seismic bathymetry, and knowledge of the general geoacoustic properties of the area's seabed to guide understanding and model development. Ray theory, with some approximations, was used to model acoustic propagation through overlying layers. Due to the volcano's size, scattering was modeled using geometric acoustics and a simple representation of volcano shape. Modeled bistatic data compared relatively well with experimental data, although some features remain unexplained. Results of an inversion for the volcano's reflection coefficient indicate that it may be acoustically softer than expected.

  13. The mechanical and acoustic properties of two-dimensional pentamode metamaterials with different structural parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xuan; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Zhigao; Zhao, Aiguo; Zhang, Xiangdong; Wu, Tao; Chen, Hong

    2016-09-01

    The effective mechanical and acoustic properties of two-dimensional pentamode metamaterials (PMs) with different structural parameters are investigated in this paper. It is found that with varying structural parameters, the effective bulk modulus and density remain constant as the same as those of water, while the figure of merit, i.e., the ratio of the bulk modulus to the shear modulus (B/G) gradually increases due to the decrease of the shear modulus. However, full wave simulations reveal that with the increase of B/G, the acoustic scattering becomes more and more intense, which indicates that the acoustic properties of pentamode metamaterials gradually deviate from those of water. These anomalous acoustic behaviors are proposed to arise from the existence of the bending modes in pentamode microstructures. Our results show that for pentamode metamaterials, the mechanical properties cannot be simply translated to their acoustic properties, and the structural parameters affect the mechanical and acoustic properties in much different ways.

  14. Effects of electric field on acoustic properties of 0.83Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3) -0.17PbTiO3 single crystals studied by Brillouin light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kojima, Seiji

    2013-03-01

    Relaxor-based ferroelectric Pb[(Mg1/3Nb2/3)1-x Tix]O3 (PMN-xPT) single crystals have attracted great attention because of their exceptionally strong piezoelectric properties. This peculiar characteristic was attributed to the rotation of polarization directions and structural complexity. In this study, the phase transition behaviors of PMN-17PT single crystals have been investigated under an electric field applied along [001] by micro-Brillouin scattering. PMN-17PT single crystals were grown by the modified Bridgeman method. The two (001) surfaces were Au-coated to apply the electric field, and the coating was thin enough to allow the incident beam to transmit without much loss. The electric field of different values was applied to the sample along the [001] direction, and the Brillouin scattering spectrum was measured under both field-heating (FH) and field-cooling (FC) conditions. The electric field of 1kV/cm induced a new longitudinal acoustic (LA) mode component along with a broad Brillouin peak evolving continuously from the paraelectric phase during both FC and FH processes. This was attributed to the remnant polar nanoregions that were not aligned under the electric field due to quenched random fields. However, the splitting of the LA mode did not appear when the electric field was over 2kV/cm indicating a clear structural phase transition. This research was supported in part by the Marubun Research Promotion Foundation and Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2010-0010497).

  15. Sound field reproduction as an equivalent acoustical scattering problem.

    PubMed

    Fazi, Filippo Maria; Nelson, Philip A

    2013-11-01

    Given a continuous distribution of acoustic sources, the determination of the source strength that ensures the synthesis of a desired sound field is shown to be identical to the solution of an equivalent acoustic scattering problem. The paper begins with the presentation of the general theory that underpins sound field reproduction with secondary sources continuously arranged on the boundary of the reproduction region. The process of reproduction by a continuous source distribution is modeled by means of an integral operator (the single layer potential). It is then shown how the solution of the sound reproduction problem corresponds to that of an equivalent scattering problem. Analytical solutions are computed for two specific instances of this problem, involving, respectively, the use of a secondary source distribution in spherical and planar geometries. The results are shown to be the same as those obtained with analyses based on High Order Ambisonics and Wave Field Synthesis, respectively, thus bringing to light a fundamental analogy between these two methods of sound reproduction. Finally, it is shown how the physical optics (Kirchhoff) approximation enables the derivation of a high-frequency simplification for the problem under consideration, this in turn being related to the secondary source selection criterion reported in the literature on Wave Field Synthesis.

  16. Acoustic and elastic multiple scattering and radiation from cylindrical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirkulova, Feruza Abdukadirovna

    Multiple scattering (MS) and radiation of waves by a system of scatterers is of great theoretical and practical importance and is required in a wide variety of physical contexts such as the implementation of "invisibility" cloaks, the effective parameter characterization, and the fabrication of dynamically tunable structures, etc. The dissertation develops fast, rapidly convergent iterative techniques to expedite the solution of MS problems. The formulation of MS problems reduces to a system of linear algebraic equations using Graf's theorem and separation of variables. The iterative techniques are developed using Neumann expansion and Block Toeplitz structure of the linear system; they are very general, and suitable for parallel computations and a large number of MS problems, i.e. acoustic, elastic, electromagnetic, etc., and used for the first time to solve MS problems. The theory is implemented in Matlab and FORTRAN, and the theoretical predictions are compared to computations obtained by COMSOL. To formulate the MS problem, the transition matrix is obtained by analyzing an acoustic and an elastic single scattering of incident waves by elastic isotropic and anisotropic solids. The mathematical model of wave scattering from multilayered cylindrical and spherical structures is developed by means of an exact solution of dynamic 3D elasticity theory. The recursive impedance matrix algorithm is derived for radially heterogeneous anisotropic solids. An explicit method for finding the impedance in piecewise uniform, transverse-isotropic material is proposed; the solution is compared to elasticity theory solutions involving Buchwald potentials. Furthermore, active exterior cloaking devices are modeled for acoustic and elastic media using multipole sources. A cloaking device can render an object invisible to some incident waves as seen by some external observer. The active cloak is generated by a discrete set of multipole sources that destructively interfere with an

  17. Acoustic anechoic layers with singly periodic array of scatterers: Computational methods, absorption mechanisms, and optimal design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hai-Bin; Li, Yue; Zhao, Hong-Gang; Wen, Ji-Hong; Wen, Xi-Sen

    2014-10-01

    The acoustic properties of anechoic layers with a singly periodic array of cylindrical scatterers are investigated. A method combined plane wave expansion and finite element analysis is extended for out-of-plane incidence. The reflection characteristics of the anechoic layers with cavities and locally resonant scatterers are discussed. The backing is a steel plate followed by an air half space. Under this approximate zero transmission backing condition, the reflection reduction is induced by the absorption enhancement. The absorption mechanism is explained by the scattering/absorption cross section of the isolated scatterer. Three types of resonant modes which can induce efficient absorption are revealed. Due to the fact that the frequencies of the resonant modes are related to the size of the scatterers, anechoic layers with scatterers of mixed size can broaden the absorption band. A genetic optimization algorithm is adopted to design the anechoic layer with scatterers of mixed size at a desired frequency band from 2 kHz to 10 kHz for normal incidence, and the influence of the incident angle is also discussed.

  18. The inverse problem of acoustic wave scattering by an air-saturated poroelastic cylinder.

    PubMed

    Ogam, Erick; Fellah, Z E A; Baki, Paul

    2013-03-01

    The efficient use of plastic foams in a diverse range of structural applications like in noise reduction, cushioning, and sleeping mattresses requires detailed characterization of their permeability and deformation (load-bearing) behavior. The elastic moduli and airflow resistance properties of foams are often measured using two separate techniques, one employing mechanical vibration methods and the other, flow rates of fluids based on fluid mechanics technology, respectively. A multi-parameter inverse acoustic scattering problem to recover airflow resistivity (AR) and mechanical properties of an air-saturated foam cylinder is solved. A wave-fluid saturated poroelastic structure interaction model based on the modified Biot theory and plane-wave decomposition using orthogonal cylindrical functions is employed to solve the inverse problem. The solutions to the inverse problem are obtained by constructing the objective functional given by the total square of the difference between predictions from the model and scattered acoustic field data acquired in an anechoic chamber. The value of the recovered AR is in good agreement with that of a slab sample cut from the cylinder and characterized using a method employing low frequency transmitted and reflected acoustic waves in a long waveguide developed by Fellah et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78(11), 114902 (2007)].

  19. The inverse problem of acoustic wave scattering by an air-saturated poroelastic cylinder.

    PubMed

    Ogam, Erick; Fellah, Z E A; Baki, Paul

    2013-03-01

    The efficient use of plastic foams in a diverse range of structural applications like in noise reduction, cushioning, and sleeping mattresses requires detailed characterization of their permeability and deformation (load-bearing) behavior. The elastic moduli and airflow resistance properties of foams are often measured using two separate techniques, one employing mechanical vibration methods and the other, flow rates of fluids based on fluid mechanics technology, respectively. A multi-parameter inverse acoustic scattering problem to recover airflow resistivity (AR) and mechanical properties of an air-saturated foam cylinder is solved. A wave-fluid saturated poroelastic structure interaction model based on the modified Biot theory and plane-wave decomposition using orthogonal cylindrical functions is employed to solve the inverse problem. The solutions to the inverse problem are obtained by constructing the objective functional given by the total square of the difference between predictions from the model and scattered acoustic field data acquired in an anechoic chamber. The value of the recovered AR is in good agreement with that of a slab sample cut from the cylinder and characterized using a method employing low frequency transmitted and reflected acoustic waves in a long waveguide developed by Fellah et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78(11), 114902 (2007)]. PMID:23464016

  20. Seismic scattering of low-grazing-angle acoustic waves incident on the seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, Robert John

    The goal of this thesis is to develop a methodology to interpret sound scattered from the seafloor in terms of seafloor structure and subseafloor geological properties. Specifically, this work has been directed towards the interpretation of matched-filtered, beamformed monostatic acoustic reverberation data acquired on the west flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge when the seafloor is insonified by a band-limited, low-grazing-angle acoustic pulse. This research is based on the hypothesis that observed backscatter signals are produced by a combination of seafloor (interface) scattering and subseafloor (volume) scattering from structure having variations at scale lengths similar to the wavelength of the insonifying acoustic field. Analysis of monostatic reverberation data acquired during the Site A experiment (Run 1) of the Acoustic Reverberation Special Research Program 1993 Acoustics Cruise suggests that the scattered signals cannot be accounted for quantitatively in terms of large- scale slope, even though a strong correspondence between high intensity backscatter and seafloor ridges is observed. In order to investigate and quantify the actual sources of seafloor scattering, a numerical modeling study of seafloor models is undertaken using a finite- difference solution to the elastic wave equation. Geological data available at Site A and published reports describing geological properties of similar deep ocean crustal regions are used to develop a realistic seafloor model for the study area with realistic constraints on elastic parameters. Wavelength-scale heterogeneity in each model, in the form of seafloor roughness and subseafloor volume heterogeneity is defined using stochastic distributions with Gaussian autocorrelations. These distributions are quantified by their correlation lengths and standard deviation in amplitude. In order to incorporate all seafloor structure in a single parameterization of seafloor scattering, large-scale slope and wavelength

  1. Neutron scattering and absorption properties

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Table in this report presents an evaluated set of values for the experimental quantities, which characterize the properties for scattering and absorption of neutrons. The neutron cross section is given for room temperature neutrons, 20.43{degree}C, corresponds to a thermal neutron energy of 0.0253 electron volts (eV) or a neutron velocity of 2200 meters/second. The neutron resonance integral is defined over the energy range from 0.5 eV to 0.1 {times} 10{sup 6} eV, or 0.1 MeV. A list of the major references used is given below. The literature cutoff data is October 1993. Uncertainties are given in parentheses. Parentheses with two or more numbers indicate values to the excited states(s) and to the ground state of the product nucleus.

  2. Negative refraction induced acoustic concentrator and the effects of scattering cancellation, imaging, and mirage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qi; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2012-07-01

    We present a three-dimensional acoustic concentrator capable of significantly enhancing the sound intensity in the compressive region with scattering cancellation, imaging, and mirage effects. The concentrator shell is built by isotropic gradient negative-index materials, which together with an exterior host medium slab constructs a pair of complementary media. The enhancement factor, which can approach infinity by tuning the geometric parameters, is always much higher than that of a traditional concentrator made by positive-index materials with the same size. The acoustic scattering theory is applied to derive the pressure field distribution of the concentrator, which is consistent with the numerical full-wave simulations. The inherent acoustic impedance match at the interfaces of the shell as well as the inverse processes of “negative refraction—progressive curvature—negative refraction” for arbitrary sound rays can exactly cancel the scattering of the concentrator. In addition, the concentrator shell can also function as an acoustic spherical magnifying superlens, which produces a perfect image with the same shape, with bigger geometric and acoustic parameters located at a shifted position. Then some acoustic mirages are observed whereby the waves radiated from (scattered by) an object located in the center region may seem to be radiated from (scattered by) its image. Based on the mirage effect, we further propose an intriguing acoustic transformer which can transform the sound scattering pattern of one object into another object at will with arbitrary geometric, acoustic, and location parameters.

  3. Acoustic Scattering by Three-Dimensional Stators and Rotors Using the SOURCE3D Code. Volume 2; Scattering Plots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    This second volume of Acoustic Scattering by Three-Dimensional Stators and Rotors Using the SOURCE3D Code provides the scattering plots referenced by Volume 1. There are 648 plots. Half are for the 8750 rpm "high speed" operating condition and the other half are for the 7031 rpm "mid speed" operating condition.

  4. Brillouin light scattering from surface acoustic waves in a subwavelength-diameter optical fibre

    PubMed Central

    Beugnot, Jean-Charles; Lebrun, Sylvie; Pauliat, Gilles; Maillotte, Hervé; Laude, Vincent; Sylvestre, Thibaut

    2014-01-01

    Brillouin scattering in optical fibres is a fundamental interaction between light and sound with important implications ranging from optical sensors to slow and fast light. In usual optical fibres, light both excites and feels shear and longitudinal bulk elastic waves, giving rise to forward-guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering and backward-stimulated Brillouin scattering. In a subwavelength-diameter optical fibre, the situation changes dramatically, as we here report with the first experimental observation of Brillouin light scattering from surface acoustic waves. These Rayleigh-type surface waves travel the wire surface at a specific velocity of 3,400 m s−1 and backscatter the light with a Doppler shift of about 6 GHz. As these acoustic resonances are sensitive to surface defects or features, surface acoustic wave Brillouin scattering opens new opportunities for various sensing applications, but also in other domains such as microwave photonics and nonlinear plasmonics. PMID:25341638

  5. Acoustic Imaging of Snowpack Physical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinar, N. J.; Pomeroy, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of snowpack depth, density, structure and temperature have often been conducted by the use of snowpits and invasive measurement devices. Previous research has shown that acoustic waves passing through snow are capable of measuring these properties. An experimental observation device (SAS2, System for the Acoustic Sounding of Snow) was used to autonomously send audible sound waves into the top of the snowpack and to receive and process the waves reflected from the interior and bottom of the snowpack. A loudspeaker and microphone array separated by an offset distance was suspended in the air above the surface of the snowpack. Sound waves produced from a loudspeaker as frequency-swept sequences and maximum length sequences were used as source signals. Up to 24 microphones measured the audible signal from the snowpack. The signal-to-noise ratio was compared between sequences in the presence of environmental noise contributed by wind and reflections from vegetation. Beamforming algorithms were used to reject spurious reflections and to compensate for movement of the sensor assembly during the time of data collection. A custom-designed circuit with digital signal processing hardware implemented an inversion algorithm to relate the reflected sound wave data to snowpack physical properties and to create a two-dimensional image of snowpack stratigraphy. The low power consumption circuit was powered by batteries and through WiFi and Bluetooth interfaces enabled the display of processed data on a mobile device. Acoustic observations were logged to an SD card after each measurement. The SAS2 system was deployed at remote field locations in the Rocky Mountains of Alberta, Canada. Acoustic snow properties data was compared with data collected from gravimetric sampling, thermocouple arrays, radiometers and snowpit observations of density, stratigraphy and crystal structure. Aspects for further research and limitations of the acoustic sensing system are also discussed.

  6. Experimental observation of surface acoustic wave Brillouin scattering in a small-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchahame, Joël. Cabrel; Sylvestre, Thibaut; Phan Huy, Kien; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Laude, Vincent; Beugnot, Jean-Charles

    2016-04-01

    Light propagation in small-core photonic crystal fibers enables tight optical confinement over long propagation lengths to enhance light-matter interactions. Not only can photonic crystal fibers compress light spatially, they also provide a tunable means to control light-hypersound interactions. By exploring Brillouin light scattering in a small-core and high air-filling fraction microstructured fiber, we report the observation of Brillouin scattering from surface acoustic waves at lower frequencies than standard Brillouin scattering from bulk acoustic waves. This effect could find potential applications for optical sensing technologies that exploit surface acoustic waves.

  7. A membrane-type acoustic metamaterial with adjustable acoustic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfeldt, F.; Riecken, J.; Gleine, W.; von Estorff, O.

    2016-07-01

    A new realization of a membrane-type acoustic metamaterial (MAM) with adjustable sound transmission properties is presented. The proposed design distinguishes itself from other realizations by a stacked arrangement of two MAMs which is inflated using pressurized air. The static pressurization leads to large nonlinear deformations and, consequently, geometrical stiffening of the MAMs which is exploited to adjust the eigenmodes and sound transmission loss of the structure. A theoretical analysis of the proposed inflatable MAM design using numerical and analytical models is performed in order to identify two important mechanisms, namely the shifting of the eigenfrequencies and modal residuals due to the pressurization, responsible for the transmission loss adjustment. Analytical formulas are provided for predicting the eigenmode shifting and normal incidence sound transmission loss of inflated single and double MAMs using the concept of effective mass. The investigations are concluded with results from a test sample measurement inside an impedance tube, which confirm the theoretical predictions.

  8. Scattering coefficients and gray-body factor for 1D BEC acoustic black holes: Exact results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Alessandro; Balbinot, Roberto; Anderson, Paul R.

    2016-03-01

    A complete set of exact analytic solutions to the mode equation is found in the region exterior to the acoustic horizon for a class of 1D Bose-Einstein condensate acoustic black holes. From these, analytic expressions for the scattering coefficients and gray-body factor are obtained. The results are used to verify previous predictions regarding the behaviors of the scattering coefficients and gray-body factor in the low-frequency limit.

  9. Acoustic and adsorption properties of submerged wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilde, Calvin Patrick

    Wood is a common material for the manufacture of many products. Submerged wood, in particular, is used in niche markets, such as the creation of musical instruments. An initial study performed on submerged wood from Ootsa Lake, British Columbia, provided results that showed that the wood was not suitable for musical instruments. This thesis re-examined the submerged wood samples. After allowing the wood to age unabated in a laboratory setting, the wood was retested under the hypothesis that the physical acoustic characteristics would improve. It was shown, however, that the acoustic properties became less adequate after being left to sit. The adsorption properties of the submerged wood were examined to show that the submerged wood had a larger accessible area of wood than that of control wood samples. This implied a lower amount of crystalline area within the submerged wood. From the combined adsorption and acoustic data for the submerged wood, relationships between the moisture content and speed of sound were created and combined with previous research to create a proposed model to describe how the speed of sound varies with temperature, moisture content and the moisture content corresponding to complete hydration of sorption sites within the wood.

  10. Acoustical properties of highly porous fibrous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Highly porous, fibrous bulk sound absorbing materials are studied with a view toward understanding their acoustical properties and performance in a wide variety of applications including liners of flow ducts. The basis and criteria for decoupling of acoustic waves in the pores of the frame and compressional waves in the frame structure are established. The equations of motion are recast in a form that elucidates the coupling mechanisms. The normal incidence surface impedance and absorption coefficient of two types of Kevlar 29 and an open celled foam material are studied. Experimental values and theoretical results are brought into agreement when the structure factor is selected to provide a fit to the experimental data. A parametric procedure for achieving that fit is established. Both a bulk material quality factor and a high frequency impedance level are required to characterize the real and imaginary part of the surface impedance and absorption coefficient. A derivation of the concepts of equivalent density and dynamic resistance is presented.

  11. Optical measurement of acoustic pressure amplitudes-at the sensitivity limits of Rayleigh scattering.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Anne; Fischer, André; Kings, Nancy; Bake, Friedrich; Roehle, Ingo

    2012-07-01

    Rayleigh scattering is a measurement technique applicable for the determination of density distributions in various technical or natural flows. The current sensitivity limits of the Rayleigh scattering technique were investigated experimentally. It is shown that it is possible to measure density oscillations caused by acoustic pressure oscillations noninvasively and directly. Acoustical standing waves in a rectangular duct were investigated using Rayleigh scattering and compared to microphone measurements. The comparison showed a sensitivity of the Rayleigh scattering technique of 75 Pa (7·10(-4) kg/m(3)) and a precision of 14 Pa (1·10(-4) kg/m(3)). Therefore, it was also shown that Rayleigh scattering is applicable for acoustic measurements. PMID:22743495

  12. Studies of acoustical properties of bulk porous flexible materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic prediction and measurement of bulk porous materials with flexible frames is investigated. The acoustic properties of Kevlar 29 are examined. Various acoustic tests are employed to determine impedance, sound wave propagation, and wave pressure equations for the highly porous fiber composites. The derivation of design equations and future research goals are included.

  13. Acoustic build-up in on-chip stimulated Brillouin scattering

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, C.; Steel, M. J.; Eggleton, B. J.; Poulton, C. G.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the role of the spatial evolution of the acoustic field in stimulated Brillouin scattering processes in short high-gain structures. When the gain is strong enough that the gain length becomes comparable to the acoustic wave decay length of order 100 microns, standard approximations treating the acoustic field as a local response no longer apply. Treating the acoustic evolution more accurately, we find that the backward SBS gain of sub-millimetre long waveguides is significantly reduced from the value obtained by the conventional treatment because the acoustic mode requires several decay lengths to build up to its nominal value. In addition, the corresponding resonance line is broadened with the development of side bands. In contrast, we argue that intra-mode forward SBS is not expected to show these effects. Our results have implications for several recent proposals and experiments on high-gain stimulated Brillouin scattering in short semiconductor waveguides. PMID:26338720

  14. Acoustic impedance and interface phonon scattering in Bi$_2$Te$_3$ and other semiconducting materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xin; Parker, David S; Singh, David J

    2013-01-01

    We present first principles calculations of the phonon dispersions of \\BiTe and discuss these in relation to the acoustic phonon interface scattering in ceramics. The phonon dispersions show agreement with what is known from neutron scattering for the optic modes. We find a difference between the generalized gradient approximation and local density results for the acoustic branches. This is a consequence of an artificial compression of the van der Waals bonded gaps in the \\BiTe structure when using the generalized gradient approximation. As a result local density approximation calculations provide a better description of the phonon dispersions in Bi$_{2}$Te$_{3}$. A key characteristic of the acoustic dispersions is the existence of a strong anisotropy in the velocities. We develop a model for interface scattering in ceramics with acoustic wave anisotropy and apply this to \\BiTe and compare with PbTe and diamond.

  15. Spectral scattering properties of turbid waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Poole, L. R.; Houghton, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    River water samples have been examined for optical scattering properties at wavelengths between 400 and 800 nm. Scattering coefficients were calculated from measurements of beam attenuation and absorption coefficients and are observed to vary with wavelength. At a fixed wavelength, the scattering coefficient is influenced by both phytoplankton concentration (as indicated by chlorophyll a) and suspended solids concentration. Measurements of small angle volume-scattering function indicate that the phase function at an angle of 1.5 deg is not constant for turbid waters and varies with both wavelength and beam attenuation coefficient. These data differ from previously published results for relatively clear oceanic and coastal waters. Caution is required when attempting to estimate scattering coefficient values from single-angle measurements of volume-scattering function.

  16. Optical Heterodyne Investigation of the Microwave Frequency Acoustic Properties of Liquids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonney, Rob

    An optical heterodyne interferometer with a state -of-the-art microwave frequency acoustic transducer was used to measure the acoustic properties of liquids and solutions at frequencies up to 1.5 GHz. Heterodyne detection with a strong optical local oscillator was used to detect a weak optical signal beam produced by Bragg deflection from an acoustic wave coupled into a liquid sample. The acoustic transducer had a frequency range of 0.2-1.5 GHz. Several liquid mixtures were measured for the first time, including aqueous dimethyl sulfoxide, and ethyl acetate in carbon disulphide. In some cases, previously unknown dispersions were characterized. A thermodynamic model (valid in the low frequency limit) involving the heat of mixing was used successfully to predict the variation of velocity with composition of liquid mixtures. With this model as a guide, an attempt was made to identify a liquid mixture which would make a superior medium for the acoustic microscope. The search produced results which supported theoretical predictions, but no superior medium was found. Solutions of biomolecules were also investigated due to interest in possible resonant acoustic modes in DNA. No dispersions or resonances were found in solutions of polyglycines, and results for DNA solutions were inconclusive. Applications of this work include general studies in liquid acoustics at very high frequencies, acoustic studies of DNA solutions, and characterization of media for such technological applications as acoustic microscopy or phase conjugation using stimulated Brillouin scattering.

  17. Negative refractive index and acoustic superlens from multiple scattering in single negative metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Kaina, Nadège; Lemoult, Fabrice; Fink, Mathias; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2015-09-01

    Metamaterials, man-made composite media structured on a scale much smaller than a wavelength, offer surprising possibilities for engineering the propagation of waves. One of the most interesting of these is the ability to achieve superlensing--that is, to focus or image beyond the diffraction limit. This originates from the left-handed behavior--the property of refracting waves negatively--that is typical of negative index metamaterials. Yet reaching this goal requires the design of 'double negative' metamaterials, which act simultaneously on the permittivity and permeability in electromagnetics, or on the density and compressibility in acoustics; this generally implies the use of two different kinds of building blocks or specific particles presenting multiple overlapping resonances. Such a requirement limits the applicability of double negative metamaterials, and has, for example, hampered any demonstration of subwavelength focusing using left-handed acoustic metamaterials. Here we show that these strict conditions can be largely relaxed by relying on media that consist of only one type of single resonant unit cell. Specifically, we show with a simple yet general semi-analytical model that judiciously breaking the symmetry of a single negative metamaterial is sufficient to turn it into a double negative one. We then demonstrate that this occurs solely because of multiple scattering of waves off the metamaterial resonant elements, a phenomenon often disregarded in these media owing to their subwavelength patterning. We apply our approach to acoustics and verify through numerical simulations that it allows the realization of negative index acoustic metamaterials based on Helmholtz resonators only. Finally, we demonstrate the operation of a negative index acoustic superlens, achieving subwavelength focusing and imaging with spot width and resolution 7 and 3.5 times better than the diffraction limit, respectively. Our findings have profound implications for the

  18. Nonlinear Transport and Noise Properties of Acoustic Phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Kamil

    We examine heat transport carried by acoustic phonons in molecular junctions composed of organic molecules coupled to two thermal baths of different temperatures. The phononic heat flux and its dynamical noise properties are analyzed within the scattering (Landauer) formalism with transmission probability function for acoustic phonons calculated within the method of atomistic Green's functions (AGF technique). The perturbative computational scheme is used to determine nonlinear corrections to phononic heat flux and its noise power spectral density with up to the second order terms with respect to temperature difference. Our results show the limited applicability of ballistic Fourier's law and fluctuation-dissipation theorem to heat transport in quantum systems. We also derive several noise-signal relations applicable to nanoscale heat flow carried by phonons, but valid for electrons as well. We also discuss the extension of the perturbative transport theory to higher order terms in order to address a huge variety of problems related to nonlinear thermal effects which may occur at nanoscale and at strongly non-equilibrium conditions with high-intensity heat fluxes. This work was supported by Pace University Start-up Grant.

  19. Simulation of Acoustic Scattering from a Trailing Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Bart A.; Brentner, Kenneth S.; Lockhard, David P.; Lilley, Geoffrey M.

    1999-01-01

    Three model problems were examined to assess the difficulties involved in using a hybrid scheme coupling flow computation with the the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation to predict noise generated by vortices passing over a sharp edge. The results indicate that the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation correctly propagates the acoustic signals when provided with accurate flow information on the integration surface. The most difficult of the model problems investigated inviscid flow over a two-dimensional thin NACA airfoil with a blunt-body vortex generator positioned at 98 percent chord. Vortices rolled up downstream of the blunt body. The shed vortices possessed similarities to large coherent eddies in boundary layers. They interacted and occasionally paired as they convected past the sharp trailing edge of the airfoil. The calculations showed acoustic waves emanating from the airfoil trailing edge. Acoustic directivity and Mach number scaling are shown.

  20. Arbitrary scattering of an acoustical Bessel beam by a rigid spheroid with large aspect-ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zhixiong; Li, Wei; Mitri, Farid G.; Chai, Yingbin; Zhao, Yao

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the T-matrix (null-field) method is applied to investigate the acoustic scattering by a large-aspect-ratio rigid spheroid immersed in a non-viscous fluid under the illumination of an unbounded zeroth-order Bessel beam with arbitrary orientation. Based on the proposed method, a MATLAB software package is constructed accordingly, and then verified and validated to compute the acoustic scattering by a rigid oblate or prolate spheroid in the Bessel beam. Several numerical examples are carried out to investigate the novel phenomenon of acoustic scattering by spheroids in Bessel beams with arbitrary incidence, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e. the ratio of the polar radius over the equatorial radius of the spheroid), the half-cone angle of Bessel beam, the dimensionless frequency, as well as the angle of incidence. The quasi-periodic oscillations are observed in the plots of the far-field backscattering form function modulus versus the dimensionless frequency, owing to the interference between the specular reflection and the Franz wave circumnavigating the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Furthermore, the 3D far-field scattering directivity patterns at end-on incidence and 2D polar plots at arbitrary angles of incidence are exhibited, which could provide new insights into the physical mechanisms of Bessel beam scattering by flat or elongated spheroid. This research work may provide an impetus for the application of acoustic Bessel beam in engineering practices.

  1. Shear-mediated contributions to the effective properties of soft acoustic metamaterials including negative index.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Derek Michael; Pinfield, Valerie J

    2015-01-01

    Here we show that, for sub-wavelength particles in a fluid, viscous losses due to shear waves and their influence on neighbouring particles significantly modify the effective acoustic properties, and thereby the conditions at which negative acoustic refraction occurs. Building upon earlier single particle scattering work, we adopt a multiple scattering approach to derive the effective properties (density, bulk modulus, wavenumber). We show,through theoretical prediction, the implications for the design of "soft" (ultrasonic) metamaterials based on locally-resonant sub-wavelength porous rubber particles, through selection of particle size and concentration, and demonstrate tunability of the negative speed zones by modifying the viscosity of the suspending medium. For these lossy materials with complex effective properties, we confirm the use of phase angles to define the backward propagation condition in preference to "single-" and "double-negative" designations. PMID:26686414

  2. Shear-mediated contributions to the effective properties of soft acoustic metamaterials including negative index

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Derek Michael; Pinfield, Valerie J.

    2015-01-01

    Here we show that, for sub-wavelength particles in a fluid, viscous losses due to shear waves and their influence on neighbouring particles significantly modify the effective acoustic properties, and thereby the conditions at which negative acoustic refraction occurs. Building upon earlier single particle scattering work, we adopt a multiple scattering approach to derive the effective properties (density, bulk modulus, wavenumber). We show,through theoretical prediction, the implications for the design of “soft” (ultrasonic) metamaterials based on locally-resonant sub-wavelength porous rubber particles, through selection of particle size and concentration, and demonstrate tunability of the negative speed zones by modifying the viscosity of the suspending medium. For these lossy materials with complex effective properties, we confirm the use of phase angles to define the backward propagation condition in preference to “single-” and “double-negative” designations. PMID:26686414

  3. Scattering reduction of an acoustically hard cylinder covered with layered pentamode metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Jeffrey E; Scandrett, Clyde L; Howarth, Thomas R

    2016-06-01

    Transformational acoustics offers the theoretical possibility of cloaking obstacles within fluids, provided metamaterials having continuously varying bulk moduli and densities can be found or constructed. Realistically, materials with the proper, continuously varying anisotropies do not presently exist. However, discretely layered cloaks having constant material parameters within each layer may be a viable alternative in practice. The present work considers a range of cloaks, from those comprised of fluid layers that are isotropic in bulk moduli with anisotropic density (inertial cloaks) to those having anisotropic bulk moduli and isotropic density (pentamode cloaks). In this paper an analytical solution is obtained for the case of plane wave scattering from a submerged rigid cylinder covered with a multilayered cylindrical cloak composed of discrete anisotropic fluid layers. An investigation of the parameter space defining such cloaks is undertaken with the goal of minimizing the far-field scattered pressure, using layer constituent anisotropic properties (density and bulk modulus) constrained to lie within reasonable ranges relative to those of water.

  4. Scattering reduction of an acoustically hard cylinder covered with layered pentamode metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Jeffrey E; Scandrett, Clyde L; Howarth, Thomas R

    2016-06-01

    Transformational acoustics offers the theoretical possibility of cloaking obstacles within fluids, provided metamaterials having continuously varying bulk moduli and densities can be found or constructed. Realistically, materials with the proper, continuously varying anisotropies do not presently exist. However, discretely layered cloaks having constant material parameters within each layer may be a viable alternative in practice. The present work considers a range of cloaks, from those comprised of fluid layers that are isotropic in bulk moduli with anisotropic density (inertial cloaks) to those having anisotropic bulk moduli and isotropic density (pentamode cloaks). In this paper an analytical solution is obtained for the case of plane wave scattering from a submerged rigid cylinder covered with a multilayered cylindrical cloak composed of discrete anisotropic fluid layers. An investigation of the parameter space defining such cloaks is undertaken with the goal of minimizing the far-field scattered pressure, using layer constituent anisotropic properties (density and bulk modulus) constrained to lie within reasonable ranges relative to those of water. PMID:27369167

  5. Scattering and Optical Properties of Water Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2003-01-01

    Light scattering by planetary ices of interest such as water, methane, clathrated species, will provide insight into the nature of the Jovian moons targeted by the JIMO mission - Europa, Callisto and Ganymede - composition, surface properties and thickness of ice mantles. Although much remote sensing data exists, theoretical models lag the data. We highlight the current state of theoretical and experimental models for water ice and highlight areas of study necessary to address the JIMO goals regarding surface and subsurface properties.

  6. Plasma characterization using ultraviolet Thomson scattering from ion-acoustic and electron plasma waves (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follett, R. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Henchen, R. J.; Katz, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    Collective Thomson scattering is a technique for measuring the plasma conditions in laser-plasma experiments. Simultaneous measurements of ion-acoustic and electron plasma-wave spectra were obtained using a 263.25-nm Thomson-scattering probe beam. A fully reflective collection system was used to record light scattered from electron plasma waves at electron densities greater than 1021 cm-3, which produced scattering peaks near 200 nm. An accurate analysis of the experimental Thomson-scattering spectra required accounting for plasma gradients, instrument sensitivity, optical effects, and background radiation. Practical techniques for including these effects when fitting Thomson-scattering spectra are presented and applied to the measured spectra to show the improvements in plasma characterization.

  7. Difference-frequency generation in nonlinear scattering of acoustic waves by a rigid sphere.

    PubMed

    Silva, Glauber T; Bandeira, Anderson

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, the partial-wave expansion method is applied to describe the difference-frequency pressure generated in a nonlinear scattering of two acoustic waves with an arbitrary wavefront by means of a rigid sphere. Particularly, the difference-frequency generation is analyzed in the nonlinear scattering with a spherical scatterer involving two intersecting plane waves in the following configurations: collinear, crossing at right angles, and counter-propagating. For the sake of simplicity, the plane waves are assumed to be spatially located in a spherical region which diameter is smaller than the difference-frequency wavelength. Such arrangements can be experimentally accomplished in vibro-acoustography and nonlinear acoustic tomography techniques. It turns out to be that when the sphere radius is of the order of the primary wavelengths, and the downshift ratio (i.e. the ratio between the fundamental frequency and the difference-frequency) is larger than five, difference-frequency generation is mostly due to a nonlinear interaction between the primary scattered waves. The exception to this is the collinear scattering for which the nonlinear interaction of the primary incident waves is also relevant. In addition, the difference-frequency scattered pressure in all scattering configurations decays as r(-1)lnr and 1/r, where r is the radial distance from the scatterer to the observation point.

  8. Secondary emission and acoustic-phonon scattering induced by strong magnetic fields in multiple quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapega, V. F.; Belitsky, V. I.; Ruf, T.; Fuchs, H. D.; Cardona, M.; Ploog, K.

    1992-12-01

    A strong increase of low-frequency Raman scattering has been observed in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs multiple quantum wells in magnetic fields up to 14 T. The spectra, consisting of background scattering, folded acoustic phonons, and additional features, show resonant behavior with respect to the laser frequency and the strength of the magnetic field. The broad background, usually related to geminate recombination, has its origin in a continuum of Raman processes with the emission of longitudinal-acoustic phonons where crystal momentum is not conserved. Such processes can become dominant when interface fluctuations allow for resonant scattering in individual quantum wells only. Thus phonons with all possible energies contribute to the background scattering efficiency. The observed folded longitudinal-acoustic phonons are in good agreement with calculated frequencies. Additional features, detected in all samples measured, are attributed to local vibrational modes tied to the gaps at the folded Brillouin-zone center and edge. Other peculiarities observed correspond to modes localized at crossings of the folded longitudinal- and transverse-acoustic branches inside the Brillouin zone. The appearance of these local modes is attributed to fluctuations in the well and barrier thicknesses of the quantum wells.

  9. Scattered acoustic field above a grating of non-parallel rectangular cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanfir, A.; Faiz, A.; Ducourneau, J.; Chatillon, J.; Lami, S. Skali

    2016-01-01

    Geometric or acoustical irregularities induces acoustic scattering. In this paper, a generalization of the model proposed by Khanfir et al. [8] (Journal of Sound and Vibration 332 (4) (2013)) to determine the scattered acoustic field above gratings of parallel rectangular cavities is developed, addressing the case of gratings of non-parallel rectangular cavities. The results provided by the model were compared both to numerical results, obtained with the finite element method, and to experimental ones. The observed agreement between the analytical predictions and the numerical and experimental results supports the validity of the proposed model. The coupling between the different cavities was investigated, in order to attain an explanation for its dependence on frequency and on the spacing between cavities.

  10. Initial Integration of Noise Prediction Tools for Acoustic Scattering Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Burley, Casey L.; Tinetti, Ana; Rawls, John W.

    2008-01-01

    This effort provides an initial glimpse at NASA capabilities available in predicting the scattering of fan noise from a non-conventional aircraft configuration. The Aircraft NOise Prediction Program, Fast Scattering Code, and the Rotorcraft Noise Model were coupled to provide increased fidelity models of scattering effects on engine fan noise sources. The integration of these codes led to the identification of several keys issues entailed in applying such multi-fidelity approaches. In particular, for prediction at noise certification points, the inclusion of distributed sources leads to complications with the source semi-sphere approach. Computational resource requirements limit the use of the higher fidelity scattering code to predict radiated sound pressure levels for full scale configurations at relevant frequencies. And, the ability to more accurately represent complex shielding surfaces in current lower fidelity models is necessary for general application to scattering predictions. This initial step in determining the potential benefits/costs of these new methods over the existing capabilities illustrates a number of the issues that must be addressed in the development of next generation aircraft system noise prediction tools.

  11. Temperature dependence of Brillouin light scattering spectra of acoustic phonons in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, Kevin S.; Klimovich, Nikita; An, Kyongmo; Sullivan, Sean; Weathers, Annie; Shi, Li E-mail: elaineli@physics.utexas.edu; Li, Xiaoqin E-mail: elaineli@physics.utexas.edu

    2015-02-02

    Electrons, optical phonons, and acoustic phonons are often driven out of local equilibrium in electronic devices or during laser-material interaction processes. The need for a better understanding of such non-equilibrium transport processes has motivated the development of Raman spectroscopy as a local temperature sensor of optical phonons and intermediate frequency acoustic phonons, whereas Brillouin light scattering (BLS) has recently been explored as a temperature sensor of low-frequency acoustic phonons. Here, we report the measured BLS spectra of silicon at different temperatures. The origins of the observed temperature dependence of the BLS peak position, linewidth, and intensity are examined in order to evaluate their potential use as temperature sensors for acoustic phonons.

  12. Experimental study of acoustic radiation force of an ultrasound beam on absorbing and scattering objects

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V. Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2015-10-28

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter.

  13. Experimental study of acoustic radiation force of an ultrasound beam on absorbing and scattering objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V.; Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter.

  14. Scattering effects induced by imperfections on an acoustic black hole placed at a structural waveguide termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, V.; Pelat, A.; Gautier, F.

    2016-02-01

    The so-called "acoustic black hole" (ABH) effect is a passive vibration control technique based on the flexural waves properties in thin structure of varying thickness. A usual implementation consists in using a plate with tapered extremity with a power-law profile, covered with a thin damping layer. The inhomogeneity of the structure leads to a decrease of flexural wave speed and an increase of their amplitude, therefore resulting in an efficient energy dissipation if damping layer is placed where the thickness is minimal. The manufacture of an efficient extremity is difficult because of the small thickness, and often generates imperfections and tearing. Moreover, previous works suggest that multiple flexural modes are propagating across the width of the ABH tip. A model of an ABH multimodal waveguide taking into account an imperfect termination is developed. It shows that an elementary imperfection can affect the reflection coefficient of the extremity and reduce it. Scattering and propagation properties of the extremity are also studied. An incident mode excites several modes that are localised in the tapered region and local resonances explain the drops in the reflection coefficient. Experimental evidence of the influence of the imperfection on the reflection coefficient is provided. A key result of the paper is that manufacturing imperfections are not detrimental to the ABH effect.

  15. Time-frequency-aspect analysis and visualization of acoustic scattering from elastic shells submerged in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Timothy J.

    2000-05-01

    The solutions for acoustic scattering from objects in separable geometries along with the associated fluid- structure interactions are well established. Closed-form solutions to these problems have either interpretations such as resonance scattering theory, or some limiting situations that provide insight into the physical processes that occur. In contrast, most acoustical scattering problems do not have closed-form solutions. Numerical solutions, like finite and boundary element methods, allow researchers to obtain solutions from scattering problems with more complicated geometries; unfortunately, these methods of solution are limited in that they lack the kind of interpretation that provides insight into the physical processes that occur. It is only through the systematic analysis of the large volume of data produced by numerical solutions that this insight is gained. One way to gain this insight is to analyze the monostatic dependence of echoes in the time-frequency domain. However, traditional three-dimensional graphical analysis of time-frequency signals that vary as a function of a third parameter (the monostatic dependence) does not display all of the signals' information content because two marginals, of this distribution (the time and frequency representations) contain information that is lost in the visual representation of the time-frequency domain. This information is lost because the uncertainty principal prevents simultaneous display of the time and frequency information via a time-frequency transform, and because humans do not possess the innate ability to perform the transforms that extract the information. The problem of how to systematically analyze monostatic scattering data in the time-frequency domain and how to visually display all of the data's information content is overcome by introducing a time-frequency-parameter graphical analysis technique. This technique is applied to farfield acoustic scattering from finite, elastic, cylindrical

  16. Identification of aero-acoustic scattering matrices from large eddy simulation: Application to whistling orifices in duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, R.; Föller, S.; Jasor, G.; Polifke, W.; Aurégan, Y.; Moussou, P.

    2013-09-01

    The identification of the aero-acoustic scattering matrix of an orifice in a duct is achieved by computational fluid dynamics. The methodology first consists in performing a large eddy simulation of a turbulent compressible flow, with superimposed broadband acoustic excitations. After extracting time series of acoustic data with a specific filter, system identification techniques are applied. They allow us to determine the components of the acoustic scattering matrix of the orifice. Following the same procedure, a previous paper determines the scattering features of a sudden area expansion. In the present paper, the focus is on whistling orifices. The whistling ability of the tested orifice is evaluated by deriving the acoustic power balance from the scattering matrix. Comparisons with experiments at two different Mach numbers show a good agreement. The potential whistling frequency range is well predicted in terms of frequency and amplitude.

  17. Scattering Properties of Lunar Dust Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S.; Marshall, J.; Richard, D.; Adler, D.; Adler, B.

    2013-01-01

    A number of space missions are planned to explore the lunar exosphere which may contain a small population of dust particles. The objective of this paper is to present preliminary results from scattering experiments on a suspension of lunar simulants to support one such mission. The intensity of the light scattered from a lunar simulant is measured with a commercial version of the spectrometer used in the forthcoming LADEE mission. Physical properties of the lunar simulant are described along with two similarly-sized reference microspheres. We confirm that micron-sized particles tend to form agglomerates rather than remaining isolated entities and that certain general characteristic of the target particles can be predicted from intensity measurements alone. These results can be used directly to assess general features of the lunar exosphere from LADEE instrument data. Further analysis of particle properties from such remote sensing data will require measurements of polarization signatures.

  18. Modeling of the Acoustic Reverberation Special Research Program deep ocean seafloor scattering experiments using a hybrid wave propagation simulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Levander, Alan; Holliger, Klaus

    1996-02-01

    Quantitative modeling of bottom-interacting ocean acoustic waves is complicated by the long propagation ranges and by the complexity of the scattering targets. We employ a two-dimensional (2-D) hybrid technique combining Gaussian beam, finite difference, and Kirchhoff integral solutions of the wave equation to simulate ocean acoustic experiments within half of a convergence zone in the SOFAR channel. The 2-D modeling approach is reasonable due to the one-dimensional (1-D) velocity distribution in the water column and the strong lineation of the seafloor morphology parallel to the mid-ocean ridges. Full-waveform modeling of ocean acoustic data requires that the topography and the material properties of the seafloor are available at scales that are several orders of magnitude smaller than typical bathymetric sampling rates. We have therefore investigated the effects on the ocean acoustic response of a stochastic interpolation scheme used to generate seafloor models. For typical grazing angles of the incident wave field (approximately 5°-20°), we found that different stochastic realizations of the same seafloor segment (sampled at 200 m) yield an intrinsic uncertainty of the order of 3-8 dB in amplitude and 0.1-0.3 s in time for individual prominent events in the reverberant acoustic field. Hybrid simulations are compared to beam-formed ocean acoustic data collected during the Acoustic Reverberation Special Research Program (ARSRP) cruises. Side lobe noise in the observed acoustic data is simulated by adding band-limited white noise at -30 dB relative to the maximum intensity in the synthetic data. Numerical simulations can be limited to the response of only one of the mirror azimuth beams provided that the experimental geometry is suitably chosen. For the 2-D approximation to be valid, the cross-range resolution of the observed data must be smaller than the characteristic scale of seafloor lineations, and the beams of interest must be approximately perpendicular to

  19. Properties of acoustic sources in the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Pawan

    1994-01-01

    The power spectrum of solar acoustic oscillations shows peaks extending out to frequencies much greater than the acoustic cutoff frequency of approximately 5.3 mHz, where waves are no longer trapped. Kumar & Lu (1991) proposed that these peaks arise from the interference of traveling waves which are generated by turbulent convection. According to this model, the frequencies of the peaks in the power spectrum depend on the static structure of the Sun as well as the radial location of the sources. Kumar & Lu used this idea to determine the depth of the acoustic sources. However, they ignored dissipative effects and found that the theoretically computed power spectrum was falling off much more rapidly than the observed spectrum. In this paper, we include the interaction of radiation with acoustic waves in the computation of the power spectrum. We find that the theoretically calculated power spectra, when radiative damping is included are in excellent agreement with the observed power spectra over the entire observed frequency range of 5.3 to 7.5 mHz above the acoustic cutoff frequency. Moreover, by matching the peak frequencies in the observed and theoretical spectra we find the mean depth of acoustic sources to be 140 +/- 60 km below the photosphere. We show that the spectrum of solar turbulence near the top of the solar convection zone is consistent with the Kolmogorov spectrum, and that the observed high frequency power spectrum provides strong evidence that the acoustic sources in the Sun are quadrupolar. The data, in fact, rules out dipole sources as significant contributors to acoustic wave generation in the Sun. The radial extent of the sources is poorly determined and is estimated to be less than about 550 km.

  20. Acoustic scattering of a cylindrical quasi-Gaussian beam with arbitrary incidence focused on a rigid elliptical cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-11-01

    Using the partial-wave series expansion method in cylindrical coordinates, a formal analytical solution for the acoustical scattering of a 2D cylindrical quasi-Gaussian beam with an arbitrary angle of incidence θi, focused on a rigid elliptical cylinder in a non-viscous fluid, is developed. The cylindrical focused beam expression is an exact solution of the Helmholtz equation. The scattering coefficients for the elliptical cylinder are determined by forcing the expression of the total (incident + scattered) field to satisfy the Neumann boundary condition for a rigid immovable surface, and performing the product of matrices involving an inversion procedure. Computations for the matrices elements require a single numerical integration procedure for each partial-wave mode. Numerical results are performed with particular emphasis on the focusing properties of the incident beam and its angle of incidence with respect to the major axis a of the ellipse as well as the aspect ratio a/b where b is the minor axis (assuming a > b). The method is validated and verified against previous results obtained via the T-matrix for plane waves. The present analysis is the first to consider an acoustical beam on an elliptic cylinder of variable cross-section as opposed to plane waves of infinite extent. Other 2D non-spherical and Chebyshev surfaces are mentioned that may be examined throughout this analytical formalism assuming a small deformation parameter ɛ.

  1. Acoustic scattering of a cylindrical quasi-Gaussian beam with arbitrary incidence focused on a rigid elliptical cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-11-14

    Using the partial-wave series expansion method in cylindrical coordinates, a formal analytical solution for the acoustical scattering of a 2D cylindrical quasi-Gaussian beam with an arbitrary angle of incidence θ{sub i}, focused on a rigid elliptical cylinder in a non-viscous fluid, is developed. The cylindrical focused beam expression is an exact solution of the Helmholtz equation. The scattering coefficients for the elliptical cylinder are determined by forcing the expression of the total (incident + scattered) field to satisfy the Neumann boundary condition for a rigid immovable surface, and performing the product of matrices involving an inversion procedure. Computations for the matrices elements require a single numerical integration procedure for each partial-wave mode. Numerical results are performed with particular emphasis on the focusing properties of the incident beam and its angle of incidence with respect to the major axis a of the ellipse as well as the aspect ratio a/b where b is the minor axis (assuming a > b). The method is validated and verified against previous results obtained via the T-matrix for plane waves. The present analysis is the first to consider an acoustical beam on an elliptic cylinder of variable cross-section as opposed to plane waves of infinite extent. Other 2D non-spherical and Chebyshev surfaces are mentioned that may be examined throughout this analytical formalism assuming a small deformation parameter ε.

  2. Photoacoustic tomography based on the Green's function retrieval with ultrasound interferometry for sample partially behind an acoustically scattering layer

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Jie; Tao, Chao Cai, Peng; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-06-08

    Acoustically inhomogeneous mediums with multiple scattering are often the nightmare of photoacoustic tomography. In order to break this limitation, a photoacoustic tomography scheme combining ultrasound interferometry and time reversal is proposed to achieve images in acoustically scattering medium. An ultrasound interferometry is developed to determine the unknown Green's function of strong scattering tissue. Using the determined Greens' function, a time-reversal process is carried out to restore images behind an acoustically inhomogeneous layer from the scattering photoacoustic signals. This method effectively decreases the false contrast, noise, and position deviation of images induced by the multiple scattering. Phantom experiment is carried out to validate the method. Therefore, the proposed method could have potential value in extending the biomedical applications of photoacoustic tomography in acoustically inhomogeneous tissue.

  3. Guided acoustic and optical waves in silicon-on-insulator for Brillouin scattering and optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabalis, Christopher J.; Hill, Jeff T.; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H.

    2016-10-01

    We numerically study silicon waveguides on silica showing that it is possible to simultaneously guide optical and acoustic waves in the technologically important silicon on insulator (SOI) material system. Thin waveguides, or fins, exhibit geometrically softened mechanical modes at gigahertz frequencies with phase velocities below the Rayleigh velocity in glass, eliminating acoustic radiation losses. We propose slot waveguides on glass with telecom optical frequencies and strong radiation pressure forces resulting in Brillouin gains on the order of 500 and 50 000 W-1m-1 for backward and forward Brillouin scattering, respectively.

  4. Material Property Measurement in Hostile Environments using Laser Acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Ken L. Telschow

    2004-08-01

    Acoustic methods are well known and have been used to measure various intrinsic material properties, such as, elastic coefficients, density, crystal axis orientation, microstructural texture, and residual stress. Extrinsic properties, such as, dimensions, motion variables or temperature are also readily determined from acoustic methods. Laser acoustics, employing optical generation and detection of elastic waves, has a unique advantage over other acoustic methods—it is noncontacting, uses the sample surface itself for transduction, requires no couplant or invasive sample surface preparation and can be utilized in any hostile environment allowing optical access to the sample surface. In addition, optical generation and detection probe beams can be focused to the micron scale and/or shaped to alter the transduction process with a degree of control not possible using contact transduction methods. Laser methods are amenable to both continuous wave and pulse-echo measurements and have been used from Hz to 100’s of GHz (time scales from sec to psec) and with amplitudes sufficient to fracture materials. This paper shall review recent applications of laser acoustic methods to determining material properties in hostile environments that preclude the use of contacting transduction techniques. Example environments include high temperature (>1000C) sintering and molten metal processing, thin film deposition by plasma techniques, materials moving at high velocity during the fabrication process and nuclear high radiation regions. Recent technological advances in solid-state lasers and telecommunications have greatly aided the development and implementation of laser acoustic methods, particularly at ultra high frequencies. Consequently, laser acoustic material property measurements exhibit high precision and reproducibility today. In addition, optical techniques provide methods of imaging acoustic motion that is both quantitative and rapid. Possible future directions for

  5. Classification of underwater targets from autonomous underwater vehicle sampled bistatic acoustic scattered fields.

    PubMed

    Fischell, Erin M; Schmidt, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    One of the long term goals of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) minehunting is to have multiple inexpensive AUVs in a harbor autonomously classify hazards. Existing acoustic methods for target classification using AUV-based sensing, such as sidescan and synthetic aperture sonar, require an expensive payload on each outfitted vehicle and post-processing and/or image interpretation. A vehicle payload and machine learning classification methodology using bistatic angle dependence of target scattering amplitudes between a fixed acoustic source and target has been developed for onboard, fully autonomous classification with lower cost-per-vehicle. To achieve the high-quality, densely sampled three-dimensional (3D) bistatic scattering data required by this research, vehicle sampling behaviors and an acoustic payload for precision timed data acquisition with a 16 element nose array were demonstrated. 3D bistatic scattered field data were collected by an AUV around spherical and cylindrical targets insonified by a 7-9 kHz fixed source. The collected data were compared to simulated scattering models. Classification and confidence estimation were shown for the sphere versus cylinder case on the resulting real and simulated bistatic amplitude data. The final models were used for classification of simulated targets in real time in the LAMSS MOOS-IvP simulation package [M. Benjamin, H. Schmidt, P. Newman, and J. Leonard, J. Field Rob. 27, 834-875 (2010)].

  6. Axisymmetric scattering of an acoustical Bessel beam by a rigid fixed spheroid.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Farid G

    2015-10-01

    Based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in spherical coordinates, a formal analytical solution for the acoustic scattering of a zeroth-order Bessel acoustic beam centered on a rigid fixed (oblate or prolate) spheroid is provided. The unknown scattering coefficients of the spheroid are determined by solving a system of linear equations derived for the Neumann boundary condition. Numerical results for the modulus of the backscattered pressure (θ = π) in the near field and the backscattering form function in the far field for both prolate and oblate spheroids are presented and discussed, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid), the half-cone angle of the Bessel beam, and the dimensionless frequency. The plots display periodic oscillations (versus the dimensionless frequency) because of the interference of specularly reflected waves in the backscattering direction with circumferential Franz' waves circumnavigating the surface of the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Moreover, the 3-D directivity patterns illustrate the near- and far-field axisymmetric scattering. Investigations in underwater acoustics, particle levitation, scattering, and the detection of submerged elongated objects and other related applications utilizing Bessel waves would benefit from the results of the present study. PMID:26470043

  7. Tunneling effects in resonant acoustic scattering of an air bubble in unbounded water.

    PubMed

    Simão, André G; Guimarães, Luiz G

    2016-01-01

    The problem of acoustic scattering of a gaseous spherical bubble immersed within unbounded liquid surrounding is considered in this work. The theory of partial wave expansion related to this problem is revisited. A physical model based on the analogy between acoustic scattering and potential scattering in quantum mechanics is proposed to describe and interpret the acoustical natural oscillation modes of the bubble, namely, the resonances. In this context, a physical model is devised in order to describe the air water interface and the implications of the high density contrast on the various regimes of the scattering resonances. The main results are presented in terms of resonance lifetime periods and quality factors. The explicit numerical calculations are undertaken through an asymptotic analysis considering typical bubble dimensions and underwater sound wavelengths. It is shown that the resonance periods are scaled according to the Minnaert's period, which is the short lived resonance mode, called breathing mode of the bubble. As expected, resonances with longer lifetimes lead to impressive cavity quality Q-factor ranging from 1010 to 105. The present theoretical findings lead to a better understanding of the energy storage mechanism in a bubbly medium. PMID:27331803

  8. Classification of underwater targets from autonomous underwater vehicle sampled bistatic acoustic scattered fields.

    PubMed

    Fischell, Erin M; Schmidt, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    One of the long term goals of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) minehunting is to have multiple inexpensive AUVs in a harbor autonomously classify hazards. Existing acoustic methods for target classification using AUV-based sensing, such as sidescan and synthetic aperture sonar, require an expensive payload on each outfitted vehicle and post-processing and/or image interpretation. A vehicle payload and machine learning classification methodology using bistatic angle dependence of target scattering amplitudes between a fixed acoustic source and target has been developed for onboard, fully autonomous classification with lower cost-per-vehicle. To achieve the high-quality, densely sampled three-dimensional (3D) bistatic scattering data required by this research, vehicle sampling behaviors and an acoustic payload for precision timed data acquisition with a 16 element nose array were demonstrated. 3D bistatic scattered field data were collected by an AUV around spherical and cylindrical targets insonified by a 7-9 kHz fixed source. The collected data were compared to simulated scattering models. Classification and confidence estimation were shown for the sphere versus cylinder case on the resulting real and simulated bistatic amplitude data. The final models were used for classification of simulated targets in real time in the LAMSS MOOS-IvP simulation package [M. Benjamin, H. Schmidt, P. Newman, and J. Leonard, J. Field Rob. 27, 834-875 (2010)]. PMID:26723332

  9. Reflection and Scattering of Acoustical Waves from a Discontinuity in Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. P.; Leeman, S.; Nolan, E.; Lee, D.

    The reflection and transmission of a plane acoustical wave from a planar boundary at the interface between two homogeneous media of different acoustical properties is a classical problem in acoustics that has served as a basis for many developments in acoustics for over 100 years. This problem, detailed in virtually every textbook on acoustics, provides us with the acoustical analogue to Snell's Law in optics and gives us correspondingly simple results. Classical acoustics predicts that a reflection from a boundary occurs only if the characteristic acoustical impedances of the two media are different. Here we show that a reflection also occurs if the media have the same impedances but different absorption coefficients. Our analysis yields some surprising results. For example, a reflection will occur at a discontinuity in absorption even if the impedance is uniform and continuous across the interface. In addition, a discontinuity in impedance at an interface between two media that have constant and equal, but non-zero absorption, results in a reflection coefficient that is dependent on absorption as well as impedance. In general, reflection coefficients now become frequency dependent. To experimentally test our results, we measured the reflection at the interface between water and castor oil, two liquids with similar impedances but very different absorption coefficients. Measurement of the reflection coefficient between 1 and 50 MHz demonstrated a frequency dependence that was in good agreement with our analysis.

  10. Representation theorems and Green's function retrieval for scattering in acoustic media.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ivan; Snieder, Roel; Douma, Huub

    2009-09-01

    Reciprocity theorems for perturbed acoustic media are provided in the form of convolution- and correlation-type theorems. These reciprocity relations are particularly useful in the general treatment of both forward and inverse-scattering problems. Using Green's functions to describe perturbed and unperturbed waves in two distinct wave states, representation theorems for scattered waves are derived from the reciprocity relations. While the convolution-type theorems can be manipulated to obtain scattering integrals that are analogous to the Lippmann-Schwinger equation, the correlation-type theorems can be used to retrieve the scattering response of the medium by cross correlations. Unlike previous formulations of Green's function retrieval, the extraction of scattered-wave responses by cross correlations does not require energy equipartitioning. Allowing for uneven energy radiation brings experimental advantages to the retrieval of fields scattered by remote lossless and/or attenuative scatterers. These concepts are illustrated with a number of examples, including analytic solutions to a one-dimensional scattering problem, and a numerical example in the context of seismic waves recorded on the ocean bottom. PMID:19905236

  11. Finite Element Prediction of Acoustic Scattering and Radiation from Submerged Elastic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, G. C.; Henderson, F. M.; Lipman, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    A finite element formulation is derived for the scattering and radiation of acoustic waves from submerged elastic structures. The formulation uses as fundamental unknowns the displacement in the structure and a velocity potential in the field. Symmetric coefficient matrices result. The outer boundary of the fluid region is terminated with an approximate local wave-absorbing boundary condition which assumes that outgoing waves are locally planar. The finite element model is capable of predicting only the near-field acoustic pressures. Far-field sound pressure levels may be determined by integrating the surface pressures and velocities over the wet boundary of the structure using the Helmholtz integral. Comparison of finite element results with analytic results show excellent agreement. The coupled fluid-structure problem may be solved with general purpose finite element codes by using an analogy between the equations of elasticity and the wave equation of linear acoustics.

  12. Vertical distribution, composition and migratory patterns of acoustic scattering layers in the Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariza, A.; Landeira, J. M.; Escánez, A.; Wienerroither, R.; Aguilar de Soto, N.; Røstad, A.; Kaartvedt, S.; Hernández-León, S.

    2016-05-01

    Diel vertical migration (DVM) facilitates biogeochemical exchanges between shallow waters and the deep ocean. An effective way of monitoring the migrant biota is by acoustic observations although the interpretation of the scattering layers poses challenges. Here we combine results from acoustic observations at 18 and 38 kHz with limited net sampling in order to unveil the origin of acoustic phenomena around the Canary Islands, subtropical northeast Atlantic Ocean. Trawling data revealed a high diversity of fishes, decapods and cephalopods (152 species), although few dominant species likely were responsible for most of the sound scattering in the region. We identified four different acoustic scattering layers in the mesopelagic realm: (1) at 400-500 m depth, a swimbladder resonance phenomenon at 18 kHz produced by gas-bearing migrant fish such as Vinciguerria spp. and Lobianchia dofleini, (2) at 500-600 m depth, a dense 38 kHz layer resulting primarily from the gas-bearing and non-migrant fish Cyclothone braueri, and to a lesser extent, from fluid-like migrant fauna also inhabiting these depths, (3) between 600 and 800 m depth, a weak signal at both 18 and 38 kHz ascribed either to migrant fish or decapods, and (4) below 800 m depth, a weak non-migrant layer at 18 kHz which was not sampled. All the dielly migrating layers reached the epipelagic zone at night, with the shorter-range migrations moving at 4.6 ± 2.6 cm s - 1 and the long-range ones at 11.5 ± 3.8 cm s - 1. This work reduces uncertainties interpreting standard frequencies in mesopelagic studies, while enhances the potential of acoustics for future research and monitoring of the deep pelagic fauna in the Canary Islands.

  13. Experimental Evidence of the Collective Brillouin Scattering of Multiple Laser Beams Sharing Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuville, C.; Tassin, V.; Pesme, D.; Monteil, M.-C.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Baccou, C.; Fremerye, P.; Philippe, F.; Seytor, P.; Teychenné, D.; Seka, W.; Katz, J.; Bahr, R.; Depierreux, S.

    2016-06-01

    The indirect-drive scheme to inertial confinement fusion uses a large number of laser beams arranged in a symmetric angular distribution. Collective laser plasma instabilities can therefore develop that couple all the incident laser waves located in a cone to the daughter wave growing along the cone symmetry axis [D. F. DuBois et al., Phys. Fluids B 4, 241 (1992)]. With complementary diagnostics of Thomson scattering and of the scattered light, we demonstrate the occurrence of collective stimulated Brillouin sidescattering driving collective acoustic waves in indirect-drive experiments.

  14. Surprises and anomalies in acoustical and optical scattering and radiation forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Philip L.

    2015-09-01

    Experiments on radiation torques and negative radiation forces by various researchers display how the underlying wave-field geometry influences radiation forces. Other situations strongly influenced by wave-field geometry include high-order caustics present in light-scattering patterns of objects as simple as oblate drops of water or oblate bubbles of air in water. Related theoretical and experimental investigations are considered. Acoustic scattering enhancements associated with various guided waves are also examined. These include guided waves having negative group velocities and guided wave radiating wavefronts having a vanishing Gaussian curvature.

  15. Experimental Evidence of the Collective Brillouin Scattering of Multiple Laser Beams Sharing Acoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Neuville, C; Tassin, V; Pesme, D; Monteil, M-C; Masson-Laborde, P-E; Baccou, C; Fremerye, P; Philippe, F; Seytor, P; Teychenné, D; Seka, W; Katz, J; Bahr, R; Depierreux, S

    2016-06-10

    The indirect-drive scheme to inertial confinement fusion uses a large number of laser beams arranged in a symmetric angular distribution. Collective laser plasma instabilities can therefore develop that couple all the incident laser waves located in a cone to the daughter wave growing along the cone symmetry axis [D. F. DuBois et al., Phys. Fluids B 4, 241 (1992)]. With complementary diagnostics of Thomson scattering and of the scattered light, we demonstrate the occurrence of collective stimulated Brillouin sidescattering driving collective acoustic waves in indirect-drive experiments. PMID:27341238

  16. Broadband acoustic properties of a murine skull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Turner, Jake; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    It has been well recognized that the presence of a skull imposes harsh restrictions on the use of ultrasound and optoacoustic techniques in the study, treatment and modulation of the brain function. We propose a rigorous modeling and experimental methodology for estimating the insertion loss and the elastic constants of the skull over a wide range of frequencies and incidence angles. A point-source-like excitation of ultrawideband acoustic radiation was induced via the absorption of nanosecond duration laser pulses by a 20 μm diameter microsphere. The acoustic waves transmitted through the skull are recorded by a broadband, spherically focused ultrasound transducer. A coregistered pulse-echo ultrasound scan is subsequently performed to provide accurate skull geometry to be fed into an acoustic transmission model represented in an angular spectrum domain. The modeling predictions were validated by measurements taken from a glass cover-slip and ex vivo adult mouse skulls. The flexible semi-analytical formulation of the model allows for seamless extension to other transducer geometries and diverse experimental scenarios involving broadband acoustic transmission through locally flat solid structures. It is anticipated that accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in a broad variety of applications employing transcranial detection or transmission of high frequency ultrasound.

  17. Broadband acoustic properties of a murine skull.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Turner, Jake; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    It has been well recognized that the presence of a skull imposes harsh restrictions on the use of ultrasound and optoacoustic techniques in the study, treatment and modulation of the brain function. We propose a rigorous modeling and experimental methodology for estimating the insertion loss and the elastic constants of the skull over a wide range of frequencies and incidence angles. A point-source-like excitation of ultrawideband acoustic radiation was induced via the absorption of nanosecond duration laser pulses by a 20 μm diameter microsphere. The acoustic waves transmitted through the skull are recorded by a broadband, spherically focused ultrasound transducer. A coregistered pulse-echo ultrasound scan is subsequently performed to provide accurate skull geometry to be fed into an acoustic transmission model represented in an angular spectrum domain. The modeling predictions were validated by measurements taken from a glass cover-slip and ex vivo adult mouse skulls. The flexible semi-analytical formulation of the model allows for seamless extension to other transducer geometries and diverse experimental scenarios involving broadband acoustic transmission through locally flat solid structures. It is anticipated that accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in a broad variety of applications employing transcranial detection or transmission of high frequency ultrasound.

  18. Angular characteristics of the stimulated-Brillouin-scattering spectrum from a laser plasma with strong acoustic-wave damping

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, P.

    1981-07-01

    The spectrum of stimulated Brillouin scattering from an inhomogeneous moving laser plasma is analyzed. The damping of acoustic waves and scattered electromagnetic waves is taken into account. Spectra are derived for various scattering angles and for various radii of the laser beam. For all observation angles the center of the spectral line is at an unshifted frequency. As the observation angle increases, the width of the red wing in the spectrum increases. The intensity of the scattered light is very anisotropic.

  19. Application of 30-MHz acoustic scattering to the study of human red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, M.S.; Apfel, R.E.; Wardlaw, S.C.

    1988-04-01

    A technique for simultaneously measuring the scattering amplitude of individual particles at two angles is applied to human red blood cells. Using a Rayleigh scattering model, the density and compressibility of the cells may be determined given a priori knowledge of their volume. A calibration method relying on measurements of the bulk properties of particle suspensions is described. Red cell properties in hypotonic and hypertonic hosts are compared with a homogeneous mixture model, and a linear relation between hemoglobin content and scattering amplitude at a 90 deg scattering angle is established.

  20. Measurements of Antarctic ice properties for acoustic neutrino detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahnhauer, R.; Ice Cube Acoustic Neutrino Detection Group

    2008-11-01

    Detection of the faint flux of neutrinos from interactions of the highest energy charged cosmic particles with microwave background photons with a reasonable number of events would contribute to answering interesting questions of particle physics as well as astro-particle physics and cosmology. This needs however detector volumes 100 times larger than the biggest optical neutrino telescopes presently under construction. The use of at least two technologies with different systematics would help to fight the large background expected to hide the small signal. A hybrid optical-radio-acoustic array suggested around the IceCube observatory at the South Pole seems to be a promising option for such an experiment. This is the reason for an extensive evaluation of the acoustic properties of the ice at the Pole with the help of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup SPATS. SPATS consists of four strings with seven acoustic stations each, deployed in the upper part of IceCube bore-holes down to 400 m to 500 m depth. Each acoustic station has an acoustic transmitter and three acoustic receivers. Data have been taken with since early 2007. During the last Austral summer in addition a movable transmitter was used in several water filled bore-holes aiming in particular for a relative calibration of the setup. Preliminary results are presented on speed of sound versus depth, noise behavior and attenuation length measurements

  1. Acoustic scattering of a Bessel vortex beam by a rigid fixed spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-12-01

    Partial-wave series representation of the acoustic scattering field of high-order Bessel vortex beams by rigid oblate and prolate spheroids using the modal matching method is developed. The method, which is applicable to slightly elongated objects at low-to-moderate frequencies, requires solving a system of linear equations which depends on the partial-wave index n and the order of the Bessel vortex beam m using truncated partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs), and satisfying the Neumann boundary condition for a rigid immovable surface in the least-squares sense. This original semi-analytical approach developed for Bessel vortex beams is demonstrated for finite oblate and prolate spheroids, where the mathematical functions describing the spheroidal geometry are written in a form involving single angular (polar) integrals that are numerically computed. The transverse (θ = π / 2) and 3D scattering directivity patterns are evaluated in the far-field for both prolate and oblate spheroids, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid) not exceeding 3:1, the half-cone angle β and order m of the Bessel vortex beam, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kr0. Periodic oscillations in the magnitude plots of the far-field scattering form function are observed, which result from the interference of the reflected waves with the circumferential (Franz') waves circumnavigating the surface of the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Moreover, the 3D directivity patterns illustrate the far-field scattering from the spheroid, that vanishes in the forward (θ = 0) and backward (θ = π) directions. Particular applications in underwater acoustics and scattering, acoustic levitation and the detection of submerged elongated objects using Bessel vortex waves to name a few, would benefit from the results of the present investigation.

  2. Acoustic properties of low growing plants.

    PubMed

    Horoshenkov, Kirill V; Khan, Amir; Benkreira, Hadj

    2013-05-01

    The plane wave normal incidence acoustic absorption coefficient of five types of low growing plants is measured in the presence and absence of soil. These plants are generally used in green living walls and flower beds. Two types of soil are considered in this work: a light-density, man-made soil and a heavy-density natural clay base soil. The absorption coefficient data are obtained in the frequency range of 50-1600 Hz using a standard impedance tube of diameter 100 mm. The equivalent fluid model for sound propagation in rigid frame porous media proposed by Miki [J. Acoust. Soc. Jpn. (E) 11, 25-28 (1990)] is used to predict the experimentally observed behavior of the absorption coefficient spectra of soils, plants, and their combinations. Optimization analysis is employed to deduce the effective flow resistivity and tortuosity of plants which are assumed to behave acoustically as an equivalent fluid in a rigid frame porous medium. It is shown that the leaf area density and dominant angle of leaf orientation are two key morphological characteristics which can be used to predict accurately the effective flow resistivity and tortuosity of plants.

  3. Directional scattering properties of a winter deciduous hardwood canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, Daniel S.; Newcomb, W. Wayne

    1987-01-01

    The unique directional scattering properties of a deciduous hardwood forest without leaves during the winter period was measured in a visible and near-infrared band. A radiative transfer model was used to explore the scattering properties of such a forest. The reflectance distributions look similar to sparse homogeneous vegetation canopies. The overall reflectance distribution is a combination of the extreme azimuthal scattering behavior of tree limbs and the more typical scattering behavior of understory litter.

  4. Acoustically-observable properties of adult gait.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Marshall; Sabatier, James M

    2012-03-01

    An approach has been developed for extracting human gait parameters from micro Doppler sonar grams. Key parameters include average speed of walking, torso velocity, walk cycle time, and peak leg velocity. The approach is a modification of a technique previously used in radar data analysis. It has been adapted because of differences between sonar and radar micro Doppler grams. The approach has been applied to an acoustic data set of 16 female and 60 male walkers. Statistics have been tabulated that illustrate the similarities and dissimilarities between female and male gait. Males tend to walk with larger walk cycle times and peak leg velocities than females.

  5. Acoustically-observable properties of adult gait.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Marshall; Sabatier, James M

    2012-03-01

    An approach has been developed for extracting human gait parameters from micro Doppler sonar grams. Key parameters include average speed of walking, torso velocity, walk cycle time, and peak leg velocity. The approach is a modification of a technique previously used in radar data analysis. It has been adapted because of differences between sonar and radar micro Doppler grams. The approach has been applied to an acoustic data set of 16 female and 60 male walkers. Statistics have been tabulated that illustrate the similarities and dissimilarities between female and male gait. Males tend to walk with larger walk cycle times and peak leg velocities than females. PMID:22423810

  6. Response to "Comment on 'Resonant acoustic scattering by swimbladder-bearing fish'" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 64, 571-580 (1978)].

    PubMed

    Love, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    In the 1970s a model of resonant scattering from a swimbladder-bearing fish was developed. The fish was modeled as an air bubble, representing a swimbladder, encased in a viscous spherical shell, representing the fish flesh. This model has been used successfully to correlate acoustic scattering data with fish information in a number of ocean locations. Recently, questions have arisen about viscous damping of the flesh and the thickness of the shell [K. Baik, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 5-8 (2013)]. This Letter responds to those questions and provides practical insight into the model's use.

  7. Response to "Comment on 'Resonant acoustic scattering by swimbladder-bearing fish'" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 64, 571-580 (1978)].

    PubMed

    Love, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    In the 1970s a model of resonant scattering from a swimbladder-bearing fish was developed. The fish was modeled as an air bubble, representing a swimbladder, encased in a viscous spherical shell, representing the fish flesh. This model has been used successfully to correlate acoustic scattering data with fish information in a number of ocean locations. Recently, questions have arisen about viscous damping of the flesh and the thickness of the shell [K. Baik, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 5-8 (2013)]. This Letter responds to those questions and provides practical insight into the model's use. PMID:24180749

  8. Perceived foreign accentedness: acoustic distances and lexical properties.

    PubMed

    Porretta, Vincent; Kyröläinen, Aki-Juhani; Tucker, Benjamin V

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we examined speaker-dependent (acoustic) and speaker-independent (lexical) linguistic influences on perceived foreign accentedness. Accentedness ratings assigned to Chinese-accented English words were analyzed, taking accentedness as a continuum. The speaker-dependent variables were included as acoustic distances, measured in relation to typical native-speaker values. The speaker-independent variable measures were related to the properties of individual words, not influenced by the speech signal. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this represents the first attempt to examine speaker-dependent and speaker-independent variables simultaneously. The model indicated that the perception of accentedness is affected by both acoustic goodness of fit and lexical properties. The results are discussed in terms of matching variability in the input to multidimensional representations.

  9. Self-Characterization of Commercial Ultrasound Probes in Transmission Acoustic Inverse Scattering: Transducer Model and Volume Integral Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Mark; Verweij, Sacha A. M.; Moghaddam, Mahta; Carson, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    A self-contained source characterization method for commercial ultrasound probes in transmission acoustic inverse scattering is derived and experimentally tested. The method is based on modified scattered field volume integral equations that are linked to the source-scattering transducer model. The source-scattering parameters are estimated via pair-wise transducer measurements and the nonlinear inversion of an acoustic propagation model that is derived. This combination creates a formal link between the transducer characterization and the inverse scattering algorithm. The method is tested with two commercial ultrasound probes in a transmission geometry including provisions for estimating the probe locations and aligning a robotic rotator. The transducer characterization results show that the nonlinear inversion fit the measured data well. The transducer calibration and inverse scattering algorithm are tested on simple targets. Initial images show that the recovered contrasts are physically consistent with expected values. PMID:24569251

  10. Control of acoustic absorption in one-dimensional scattering by resonant scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, A.; Theocharis, G.; Richoux, O.; Romero-García, V.; Pagneux, V.

    2015-12-01

    We experimentally report perfect acoustic absorption through the interplay of the inherent losses and transparent modes with high Q factor. These modes are generated in a two-port, one-dimensional waveguide, which is side-loaded by isolated resonators of moderate Q factor. In symmetric structures, we show that in the presence of small inherent losses, these modes lead to coherent perfect absorption associated with one-sided absorption slightly larger than 0.5. In asymmetric structures, near perfect one-sided absorption is possible (96%) with a deep sub-wavelength sample ( λ / 28 , where λ is the wavelength of the sound wave in the air). The control of strong absorption by the proper tuning of the radiation leakage of few resonators with weak losses will open possibilities in various wave-control devices.

  11. Nonlinear acoustic propagation in bubbly liquids: Multiple scattering, softening and hardening phenomena.

    PubMed

    Doc, Jean-Baptiste; Conoir, Jean-Marc; Marchiano, Régis; Fuster, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The weakly nonlinear propagation of acoustic waves in monodisperse bubbly liquids is investigated numerically. A hydrodynamic model based on the averaged two-phase fluid equations is coupled with the Rayleigh-Plesset equation to model the dynamics of bubbles at the local scale. The present model is validated in the linear regime by comparing with the Foldy approximation. The analysis of the pressure signals in the linear regime highlights two resonance frequencies: the Minnaert frequency and a multiple scattering resonance that strongly depends on the bubble concentration. For weakly nonlinear regimes, the generation of higher harmonics is observed only for the Minnaert frequency. Linear combinations between the Minnaert harmonics and the multiple scattering resonance are also observed. However, the most significant effect observed is the appearance of softening-hardening effects that share some similarities with those observed for sandstones or cracked materials. These effects are related to the multiple scattering resonance. Downward or upward resonance frequency shifts can be observed depending on the characteristic of the incident wave when increasing the excitation amplitude. It is shown that the frequency shift can be explained assuming that the acoustic wave velocity depends on a law different from those usually encountered for sandstones or cracked materials.

  12. Nonlinear acoustic propagation in bubbly liquids: Multiple scattering, softening and hardening phenomena.

    PubMed

    Doc, Jean-Baptiste; Conoir, Jean-Marc; Marchiano, Régis; Fuster, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The weakly nonlinear propagation of acoustic waves in monodisperse bubbly liquids is investigated numerically. A hydrodynamic model based on the averaged two-phase fluid equations is coupled with the Rayleigh-Plesset equation to model the dynamics of bubbles at the local scale. The present model is validated in the linear regime by comparing with the Foldy approximation. The analysis of the pressure signals in the linear regime highlights two resonance frequencies: the Minnaert frequency and a multiple scattering resonance that strongly depends on the bubble concentration. For weakly nonlinear regimes, the generation of higher harmonics is observed only for the Minnaert frequency. Linear combinations between the Minnaert harmonics and the multiple scattering resonance are also observed. However, the most significant effect observed is the appearance of softening-hardening effects that share some similarities with those observed for sandstones or cracked materials. These effects are related to the multiple scattering resonance. Downward or upward resonance frequency shifts can be observed depending on the characteristic of the incident wave when increasing the excitation amplitude. It is shown that the frequency shift can be explained assuming that the acoustic wave velocity depends on a law different from those usually encountered for sandstones or cracked materials. PMID:27106317

  13. Near resonance acoustic scattering from organized schools of juvenile Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus).

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas C; Lutcavage, Molly E; Schroth-Miller, Madeline L

    2013-06-01

    Schools of Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) can exhibit highly organized spatial structure within the school. This structure was quantified for dome shaped schools using both aerial imagery collected from a commercial spotter plane and 400 kHz multibeam echo sounder data collected on a fishing vessel in 2009 in Cape Cod Bay, MA. Observations from one school, containing an estimated 263 fish within an approximately ellipsoidal volume of 1900 m(3), were used to seed an acoustic model that estimated the school target strength at frequencies between 10 and 2000 Hz. The fish's swimbladder resonance was estimated to occur at approximately 50 Hz. The acoustic model examined single and multiple scattering solutions and also a completely incoherent summation of scattering responses from the fish. Three levels of structure within the school were examined, starting with fish locations that were constrained by the school boundaries but placed according to a Poisson process, then incorporating a constraint on the distance to the nearest neighbor, and finally adding a constraint on the bearing to the nearest neighbor. Results suggest that both multiple scattering and spatial organization within the school should be considered when estimating the target strength of schools similar to the ones considered here. PMID:23742334

  14. A fast and stable solver for acoustic scattering problems based on the nonuniform grid approach.

    PubMed

    Chernokozhin, Evgeny; Brick, Yaniv; Boag, Amir

    2016-01-01

    A fast and stable boundary element method (BEM) algorithm for solving external problems of acoustic scattering by impenetrable bodies is developed. The method employs the Burton-Miller integral equation, which provides stable convergence of iterative solvers, and a generalized multilevel nonuniform grid (MLNG) algorithm for fast evaluation of field integrals. The MLNG approach is used here for the removal of computational bottlenecks involved with repeated matrix-vector multiplications as well as for the low-order basis function regularization of the hyper-singular integral kernel. The method is used for calculating the fields scattered by large acoustic scatterers, including nonconvex bodies with piece-wise smooth surfaces. As a result, the algorithm is capable of accurately incorporating high-frequency effects such as creeping waves and multiple-edges diffractions. In all cases, stable convergence of the method is observed. High accuracy of the method is demonstrated by comparison with the traditional BEM solution. The computational complexity of the method in terms of both the computation time and storage is estimated in practical computations and shown to be close to the asymptotic O(N log N) dependence. PMID:26827041

  15. A boundary integral approach to the scattering of nonplanar acoustic waves by rigid bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallman, Judith M.; Myers, M. K.; Farassat, F.

    1990-01-01

    The acoustic scattering of an incident wave by a rigid body can be described by a singular Fredholm integral equation of the second kind. This equation is derived by solving the wave equation using generalized function theory, Green's function for the wave equation in unbounded space, and the acoustic boundary condition for a perfectly rigid body. This paper will discuss the derivation of the wave equation, its reformulation as a boundary integral equation, and the solution of the integral equation by the Galerkin method. The accuracy of the Galerkin method can be assessed by applying the technique outlined in the paper to reproduce the known pressure fields that are due to various point sources. From the analysis of these simpler cases, the accuracy of the Galerkin solution can be inferred for the scattered pressure field caused by the incidence of a dipole field on a rigid sphere. The solution by the Galerkin technique can then be applied to such problems as a dipole model of a propeller whose pressure field is incident on a rigid cylinder. This is the groundwork for modeling the scattering of rotating blade noise by airplane fuselages.

  16. Numerical method to compute acoustic scattering effect of a moving source.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Yi, Mingxu; Huang, Jun; Pan, Yalin; Liu, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the aerodynamic characteristic of a ducted tail rotor in hover has been numerically studied using CFD method. An analytical time domain formulation based on Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation is derived for the prediction of the acoustic velocity field and used as Neumann boundary condition on a rigid scattering surface. In order to predict the aerodynamic noise, a hybrid method combing computational aeroacoustics with an acoustic thin-body boundary element method has been proposed. The aerodynamic results and the calculated sound pressure levels (SPLs) are compared with the known method for validation. Simulation results show that the duct can change the value of SPLs and the sound directivity. Compared with the isolate tail rotor, the SPLs of the ducted tail rotor are smaller at certain azimuth. PMID:27610323

  17. Numerical method to compute acoustic scattering effect of a moving source.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Yi, Mingxu; Huang, Jun; Pan, Yalin; Liu, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the aerodynamic characteristic of a ducted tail rotor in hover has been numerically studied using CFD method. An analytical time domain formulation based on Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation is derived for the prediction of the acoustic velocity field and used as Neumann boundary condition on a rigid scattering surface. In order to predict the aerodynamic noise, a hybrid method combing computational aeroacoustics with an acoustic thin-body boundary element method has been proposed. The aerodynamic results and the calculated sound pressure levels (SPLs) are compared with the known method for validation. Simulation results show that the duct can change the value of SPLs and the sound directivity. Compared with the isolate tail rotor, the SPLs of the ducted tail rotor are smaller at certain azimuth.

  18. Calculating the acoustical properties of fabric constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, K. P.

    1988-06-01

    Architects are using fabric structures more frequently, not only because of the aesthetic appeal of such structures, but also because of their low initial and operational costs. A common application of fabric structures is in community buildings such as shopping malls and recreation centres. Fabric structures are also now used in industrial noise control applications. The constructions used in fabric structures incorporate one or more porous or impervious fabric sheets which may carry high in-plane tensions. Sometimes layers of porous materials may also be included. The acoustical performance of a fabric construction is usually adequately described by the diffuse field sound absorption cofficient, α (Δf), and the diffuse field sound reduction index, R(Δf), in frequency bands. A procedure for calculating these quantities is described. For this procedure, a fabric sheet is characterized by its mass per unit area, flexural stiffness, flexural loss factor, specific flow resistance, and the magnitudes and directions of the principal biaxial in-plane tensions. A porous layer is characterized by its thickness, flow resistivity, and position relative to the fabric sheets. The first part of the calculation procedure is concerned with finding the sound reflection and transmission coefficients for a plane wave of given frequency and direction. These calculations are based on the successive application of two types of formulae. The first type of formulae relate the surface or wave impedances across the fabric sheets and the porous layers or air spaces between them, and the second type relate the acoustic pressures across these elements. The second part of the calculation procedure involves integrating the frequency and direction dependent plane wave coefficients to give the diffuse field coefficients. The results of the application of the procedure to some representative situations are given and are compared with experimental results.

  19. The Acoustic Properties of Gassy Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Trevor Noel

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Compression wave sound speed and attenuation measurements are made in the laboratory over frequencies in the range from 10 kHz to 1 MHz on samples of estuarine silty clay that have been provided with varying amounts of uniformly distributed gas bubbles. The soil can be idealised as a two phase material of spherical gas pockets within a matrix of saturated soil, where the pocket sizes are in the range from 100 to 2000 μm diameter. It is shown that the acoustic response of this soil is dominated by the gas fraction and bubble size of the gas phase, and by the elastic moduli of the matrix phase, within the frequency range that causes bubbles to pulsate radially (resonate). Below this range, it is shown that the sound speed response is not significantly affected by bubble size, except close to the saturated soil condition. The gas fraction and bubble size distribution of each sample is measured and used, with values of the appropriate elastic moduli from the literature, to provide curves from current theory. The theory is evaluated in comparison to the experiment results, and proposals are made, which may provide the basis for the prediction of the gas fraction and bubble sizes of sea-bed sediments that are suspected of containing gas. Such a process would involve the use of an acoustic probe to obtain in situ sound speed and attenuation measurements using the signal analysis techniques developed in this study.

  20. Acoustic Reflection and Transmission of 2-Dimensional Rotors and Stators, Including Mode and Frequency Scattering Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Donald B.

    1999-01-01

    A reduced order modeling scheme has been developed for the unsteady acoustic and vortical coupling between blade rows of a turbomachine. The essential behavior of the system is governed by modal scattering coefficients (i.e., reflection and transmission coefficients) of the rotor, stator, inlet and nozzle, which are calculated as if they were connected to non-reflecting ducts. The objective of this report is to identify fundamental behavior of these scattering coefficients for a better understanding of the role of blade row reflection and transmission in noise generation. A 2D flat plate unsteady cascade model is used for the analysis with the expectation that the general behavior presented herein will carry over to models that include more realistic flow and geometry. It is shown that stators scatter input waves into many modes at the same frequency whereas rotors scatter on frequency, or harmonic order. Important cases are shown here the rotor reflection coefficient is greater than unity; a mode at blade passing frequency (BPF) traveling from the stator with unit sound power is reflected by the rotor with more than unit power at 2xBPF and 3xBPE Analysis is presented to explain this unexpected phenomenon. Scattering curves are presented in a format chosen for design use and for physical interpretation. To aid in interpretation of the curves, formulas are derived for special condition where waveforms are parallel to perpendicular to the rotor.

  1. Acoustic scattering from an infinitely long cylindrical shell with an internal mass attached by multiple axisymmetrically distributed stiffeners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titovich, Alexey S.; Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-03-01

    A thin infinitely long elastic shell is stiffened by J in number identical lengthwise ribs distributed uniformly around the circumference and joined to a rod in the center. The 2D model of the substructure is a rigid central mass supported by J axisymmetrically placed linear springs. The response of the shell-spring-mass system is quite different from a fluid filled shell or that of a solid cylinder due to the discrete number of contact points which couple the displacement of the shell at different locations. Exterior acoustic scattering due to normal plane wave incidence is solved in closed form for arbitrary J. The scattering matrix associated with the normal mode solution displays a simple structure, composed of distinct sub-matrices which decouple the incident and scattered fields into J families. The presence of a spring-mass substructure causes resonances which are shown to be related to the subsonic shell flexural waves, and an approximate analytic expression is derived for the quasi-flexural resonance frequencies. Numerical simulations indicate that the new solution for J ≥ 3 springs results in a complicated scattering response for plane wave incidence. As the number of springs becomes large enough, the total scattering cross-section is asymptotically zero at low frequencies and slightly increased compared to the empty shell at moderate frequencies due to the added stiffness and mass. It is also observed that the sensitivity to the angle of incidence diminishes as the number of springs is increased. This system can be tuned by selecting the shell thickness, spring stiffness and added mass to yield desired quasi-static effective properties making it a candidate element for graded index sonic crystals.

  2. Efficient Solution of Three-Dimensional Problems of Acoustic and Electromagnetic Scattering by Open Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turc, Catalin; Anand, Akash; Bruno, Oscar; Chaubell, Julian

    2011-01-01

    We present a computational methodology (a novel Nystrom approach based on use of a non-overlapping patch technique and Chebyshev discretizations) for efficient solution of problems of acoustic and electromagnetic scattering by open surfaces. Our integral equation formulations (1) Incorporate, as ansatz, the singular nature of open-surface integral-equation solutions, and (2) For the Electric Field Integral Equation (EFIE), use analytical regularizes that effectively reduce the number of iterations required by iterative linear-algebra solution based on Krylov-subspace iterative solvers.

  3. An Estimate of Biofilm Properties using an Acoustic Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Good, Morris S.; Wend, Christopher F.; Bond, Leonard J.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Panetta, Paul D.; Ahmed, Salahuddin; Crawford, Susan L.; Daly, Don S.

    2006-09-01

    Noninvasive measurements over a biofilm, a three-dimensional community of microorganisms immobilized at a substratum, were made using an acoustic microscope operating at frequencies up to 70 MHz. Spatial variation of surface heterogeneity, thickness, interior structure, and biomass of a living biofilm was estimated over a 2.5-mm by 2.5-mm region. Ultrasound based estimates of thickness were corroborated using optical microscopy and the nominal biofilm thickness was 100 microns. Experimental data showed that the acoustic microscope combined with signal processing was capable of imaging and making quantitative estimates of the spatial distribution of biomass within the biofilm. The revealed surface topology and interior structure of the biofilm provide data for use in advanced biofilm mass transport models. The experimental acoustic and optical systems, methods to estimate of biofilm properties and potential applications for the resulting data are discussed.

  4. Measurements of high-frequency acoustic scattering from glacially eroded rock outcrops.

    PubMed

    Olson, Derek R; Lyons, Anthony P; Sæbø, Torstein O

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of acoustic backscattering from glacially eroded rock outcrops were made off the coast of Sandefjord, Norway using a high-frequency synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) system. A method by which scattering strength can be estimated from data collected by a SAS system is detailed, as well as a method to estimate an effective calibration parameter for the system. Scattering strength measurements from very smooth areas of the rock outcrops agree with predictions from both the small-slope approximation and perturbation theory, and range between -33 and -26 dB at 20° grazing angle. Scattering strength measurements from very rough areas of the rock outcrops agree with the sine-squared shape of the empirical Lambertian model and fall between -30 and -20 dB at 20° grazing angle. Both perturbation theory and the small-slope approximation are expected to be inaccurate for the very rough area, and overestimate scattering strength by 8 dB or more for all measurements of very rough surfaces. Supporting characterization of the environment was performed in the form of geoacoustic and roughness parameter estimates. PMID:27106331

  5. Measurements of high-frequency acoustic scattering from glacially eroded rock outcrops.

    PubMed

    Olson, Derek R; Lyons, Anthony P; Sæbø, Torstein O

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of acoustic backscattering from glacially eroded rock outcrops were made off the coast of Sandefjord, Norway using a high-frequency synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) system. A method by which scattering strength can be estimated from data collected by a SAS system is detailed, as well as a method to estimate an effective calibration parameter for the system. Scattering strength measurements from very smooth areas of the rock outcrops agree with predictions from both the small-slope approximation and perturbation theory, and range between -33 and -26 dB at 20° grazing angle. Scattering strength measurements from very rough areas of the rock outcrops agree with the sine-squared shape of the empirical Lambertian model and fall between -30 and -20 dB at 20° grazing angle. Both perturbation theory and the small-slope approximation are expected to be inaccurate for the very rough area, and overestimate scattering strength by 8 dB or more for all measurements of very rough surfaces. Supporting characterization of the environment was performed in the form of geoacoustic and roughness parameter estimates.

  6. Acoustic behaviour and equation of state of amorphous ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer studied by means of high-pressure Brillouin scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kwang Joo

    2014-06-01

    The determination of the equation of state (EOS) of amorphous materials is very important for fundamental understanding of the glass transition and applications as well. Simultaneous observation of both longitudinal and transverse acoustic modes by Brillouin scattering spectroscopy has been one of the major methods to obtain EOS of amorphous materials. However, the transverse acoustic mode is hardly seen from some of the amorphous polymers, which makes it difficult to derive EOS. The temperature and pressure dependences of the acoustic properties of amorphous ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) copolymer were measured by using high-pressure Brillouin scattering spectroscopy. The temperature variation induced large changes in the frequency shift and linewidth of the longitudinal acoustic mode due to strong coupling between the structural relaxation process and the propagating density fluctuations. The residual linewidth in the glassy state was attributed to the remnant intramolecular motions of EVA, the activation energy of which was estimated to be ∼3.30 ± 0.27 kcal/mol. The pressure-density relationship of EVA could be obtained for the first time by measuring the refractive index and using the Lorentz-Lorenz equation. The density and the refractive index exhibited monotonic increase up to approximately 12 GPa. The strong reduction of the acoustic damping at low pressures below ∼3 GPa was attributed to the collapsing free volume in EVA. The present study clearly shows that measuring the refractive index by high-pressure Brillouin spectroscopy may be an alternative method to get the EOS of polymeric materials whose transverse acoustic mode is too weak to be observed.

  7. Experimental source characterization techniques for studying the acoustic properties of perforates under high level acoustic excitation.

    PubMed

    Bodén, Hans

    2011-11-01

    This paper discusses experimental techniques for obtaining the acoustic properties of in-duct samples with non-linear acoustic characteristic. The methods developed are intended both for studies of non-linear energy transfer to higher harmonics for samples only accessible from one side such as wall treatment in aircraft engine ducts or automotive exhaust systems and for samples accessible from both sides such as perforates or other top sheets. When harmonic sound waves are incident on the sample nonlinear energy transfer results in sound generation at higher harmonics at the sample (perforate) surface. The idea is that these sources can be characterized using linear system identification techniques similar to one-port or two-port techniques which are traditionally used for obtaining source data for in-duct sources such as IC-engines or fans. The starting point will be so called polyharmonic distortion modeling which is used for characterization of nonlinear properties of microwave systems. It will be shown how acoustic source data models can be expressed using this theory. Source models of different complexity are developed and experimentally tested. The results of the experimental tests show that these techniques can give results which are useful for understanding non-linear energy transfer to higher harmonics.

  8. A Advanced Boundary Element Formulation for Acoustic Radiation and Scattering in Three Dimensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soenarko, Benjamin

    A computational method is presented for determining acoustic fields produced by arbitrary shaped three-dimensional bodies. The formulation includes both radiation and scattering problems. In particular an isoparametric element formulation is introduced in which both the surface geometry and the acoustic variables on the surface of the body are represented by second order shape functions within the local coordinate system. A general result for the surface velocity potential and the exterior field is derived. This result is applicable to non-smooth bodies, i.e. it includes the case where the surface may have a non-unique normal (e.g. at the edge of a cube). Test cases are shown involving spherical, cylindrical and cubical geometry for both radiation and scattering problems. The present formulation is also extended to include half-space problems in which the effect of the reflected wave from an infinite plane is taken into account. By selecting an appropriate Green's function, the surface integral over the plane is nullified; thus all the computational efforts can be performed only on the radiating or scattering body at issue and thereby greatly simplify the solution. A special formulation involving axisymmetric bodies and boundary conditions is also presented. For this special case, the surface integrals are reduced to line integrals and an integral over the angle of revolution. The integration over the angle is performed partly analytically in terms of elliptic integrals and partly numerically using simple Gaussian quadrature formula. Since the rest of the integrals involve only line integrals along the generator of the body, any discretization scheme can be easily obtained to achieve a desired degree of accuracy in evaluating these integrals.

  9. Biologically relevant photoacoustic imaging phantoms with tunable optical and acoustic properties.

    PubMed

    Vogt, William C; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A; Garra, Brian S; Joshua Pfefer, T

    2016-10-01

    Established medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography rely on well-validated tissue-simulating phantoms for standardized testing of device image quality. The availability of high-quality phantoms for optical-acoustic diagnostics such as photoacoustic tomography (PAT) will facilitate standardization and clinical translation of these emerging approaches. Materials used in prior PAT phantoms do not provide a suitable combination of long-term stability and realistic acoustic and optical properties. Therefore, we have investigated the use of custom polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) formulations for imaging phantoms and identified a dual-plasticizer approach that provides biologically relevant ranges of relevant properties. Speed of sound and acoustic attenuation were determined over a frequency range of 4 to 9 MHz and optical absorption and scattering over a wavelength range of 400 to 1100 nm. We present characterization of several PVCP formulations, including one designed to mimic breast tissue. This material is used to construct a phantom comprised of an array of cylindrical, hemoglobin-filled inclusions for evaluation of penetration depth. Measurements with a custom near-infrared PAT imager provide quantitative and qualitative comparisons of phantom and tissue images. Results indicate that our PVCP material is uniquely suitable for PAT system image quality evaluation and may provide a practical tool for device validation and intercomparison.

  10. Biologically relevant photoacoustic imaging phantoms with tunable optical and acoustic properties.

    PubMed

    Vogt, William C; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A; Garra, Brian S; Joshua Pfefer, T

    2016-10-01

    Established medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography rely on well-validated tissue-simulating phantoms for standardized testing of device image quality. The availability of high-quality phantoms for optical-acoustic diagnostics such as photoacoustic tomography (PAT) will facilitate standardization and clinical translation of these emerging approaches. Materials used in prior PAT phantoms do not provide a suitable combination of long-term stability and realistic acoustic and optical properties. Therefore, we have investigated the use of custom polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) formulations for imaging phantoms and identified a dual-plasticizer approach that provides biologically relevant ranges of relevant properties. Speed of sound and acoustic attenuation were determined over a frequency range of 4 to 9 MHz and optical absorption and scattering over a wavelength range of 400 to 1100 nm. We present characterization of several PVCP formulations, including one designed to mimic breast tissue. This material is used to construct a phantom comprised of an array of cylindrical, hemoglobin-filled inclusions for evaluation of penetration depth. Measurements with a custom near-infrared PAT imager provide quantitative and qualitative comparisons of phantom and tissue images. Results indicate that our PVCP material is uniquely suitable for PAT system image quality evaluation and may provide a practical tool for device validation and intercomparison. PMID:26886681

  11. Symmetry properties of periodic orbits extracted from scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, O.; Jung, C.; Seligman, T. H.

    2004-12-01

    Discrete symmetries of a system are reflected in the properties of the shortest periodic orbits. By applying a recent method to extract these from the scaling of the fractal structure in scattering functions, we show how the symmetries can be extracted from scattering data simultaneously with the periods and the Lyapunov exponents. We pay particular attention to the change of scattering data under a small symmetry breaking.

  12. Universal and nonuniversal properties of wave-chaotic scattering systems.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Jen-Hao; Hart, James A; Bradshaw, Elliott; Antonsen, Thomas M; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven M

    2010-02-01

    Prediction of the statistics of scattering in typical wave-chaotic systems requires combining system-specific information with universal aspects of chaotic scattering as described by random matrix theory. This Rapid Communication shows that the average impedance matrix, which characterizes such system-specific properties, can be semiclassically calculated in terms of ray trajectories between ports. Theoretical predictions are compared with experimental results for a microwave billiard, demonstrating that the theory successfully uncovered universal statistics of wave-chaotic scattering systems.

  13. Correlation of mechanical properties with the acoustic properties in case of an experimental white cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gȋrneţ, A.; Stanciu, S.; Chicet, D.; Axinte, M.; Goanţă, V.

    2016-08-01

    The general and traditional opinion regarding the materials used to build bells, musical instruments or sound transmitters is that those materials must be only from the bronze alloyed with tin category. In order to approach this idea from a scientific point of view, the materials with acoustic properties must be analyzed starting from the physical theory and experimental determination that sound travels only through bodies with elastic properties. It has been developed an experimental white cast iron, medium alloyed with Cr and Ni, in order to obtain a material with special acoustic properties. There were determined on specific samples: the vibration damping capacity, the unit energy, the tensile strength and elasticity modulus. These properties were correlated with the properties of other known acoustic materials.

  14. Acoustic backscatter properties of the particle/bubble ultrasound contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D; Chen, X; Baggs, R; Rubens, D; Violante, M; Parker, K J

    1998-07-01

    Bubble-based suspensions with diameters in the 1-5 microns range have been developed for use as ultrasound contrast agents. Bubbles of these dimensions have resonance frequencies in the diagnostic ultrasonic range, thus improving their backscatter enhancement capabilities. The durability of these bubbles in the blood stream has been found to be limited, providing impetus for a number of approaches to further stabilize them. One of the approaches has been the development of micrometer-size porous particles or 'nano-sponges' with properties suitable for the entrapment and stabilization of gas bubbles. However, the complex morphology and surface chemistry involved in the production of this type of agent makes it unfeasible to directly measure the volume of the entrained gas. A model based on acoustic scattering principles is proposed which indicates that only a small volume fraction of gas should be necessary to significantly enhance the echogenicity of this type of particle-based contrast agent. In the model, the effective scattering cross-section is evaluated as a function of the volume fraction of gas contained in the overall scatterer and the overall scatterer diameter. Initially, the volume fraction of gas is considered as a discrete entity of single bubble. Using common mixture rules, it is then shown that the gas can be considered to be distributed throughout the particle and still arrive at a result that is similar to that for a single, discrete volume of gas. The main contribution to the increased scattering cross-section is due to the compressibility difference between gas and water. The backscatter coefficient is computed as the product of the resulting differential scattering cross-section and the scatterer number density. This approach facilitates comparison with known backscatter coefficients of biological targets such as liver and blood. Simple experimental results are presented for comparison with the model, and the implications relevant to clinical

  15. Acoustics of fish shelters: frequency response and gain properties.

    PubMed

    Lugli, Marco

    2012-11-01

    Many teleosts emit sounds from cavities beneath stones and other types of submerged objects, yet the acoustical properties of fish shelters are virtually unexplored. This study examines the gain properties of shelters commonly used by Mediterranean gobies as hiding places and/or nest sites in the field (flat stones, shells belonging to five bivalve species), or within aquarium tanks (tunnel-shaped plastic covers, concrete blocks, concrete cylinder pipe, halves of terracotta flower pots). All shelters were acoustically stimulated using a small underwater buzzer, placed inside or around the shelter to mimic a fish calling from the nest site, and different types of driving stimuli (white noise, pure tones, and artificial pulse trains). Results showed the presence of significant amplitude gain (3-18 dB) at frequencies in the range 100-150 Hz in all types of natural shelters but one (Mytilus), terracotta flower pots, and concrete blocks. Gain was higher for stones and artificial shelters than for shells. Gain peak amplitude increased with the weight of stones and shells. Conclusions were verified by performing analogous acoustical tests on flat stones in the stream. Results draw attention to the use of suitable shelters for proper recording of sounds produced by fishes kept within laboratory aquaria.

  16. Mechanical property quantification of endothelial cells using scanning acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelke, A.; Brand, S.; Kundu, T.; Bereiter-Hahn, J.; Blase, C.

    2012-04-01

    The mechanical properties of cells reflect dynamic changes of cellular organization which occur during physiologic activities like cell movement, cell volume regulation or cell division. Thus the study of cell mechanical properties can yield important information for understanding these physiologic activities. Endothelial cells form the thin inner lining of blood vessels in the cardiovascular system and are thus exposed to shear stress as well as tensile stress caused by the pulsatile blood flow. Endothelial dysfunction might occur due to reduced resistance to mechanical stress and is an initial step in the development of cardiovascular disease like, e.g., atherosclerosis. Therefore we investigated the mechanical properties of primary human endothelial cells (HUVEC) of different age using scanning acoustic microscopy at 1.2 GHz. The HUVECs are classified as young (tD < 90 h) and old (tD > 90 h) cells depending upon the generation time for the population doubling of the culture (tD). Longitudinal sound velocity and geometrical properties of cells (thickness) were determined using the material signature curve V(z) method for variable culture condition along spatial coordinates. The plane wave technique with normal incidence is assumed to solve two-dimensional wave equation. The size of the cells is modeled using multilayered (solid-fluid) system. The propagation of transversal wave and surface acoustic wave are neglected in soft matter analysis. The biomechanical properties of HUVEC cells are quantified in an age dependent manner.

  17. Mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

    2001-05-09

    This paper presents the results of laboratory measurements on the mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rock. Artificial rock samples were fabricated by cementing sand and glass beads with sodium silicate binder. During uniaxial compression tests, the rock samples showed stress-strain behavior which was more similar to that of soils than competent rocks, exhibiting large permanent deformations with frictional slip. The mechanical behavior of the samples approached that of competent rocks as the amount of binder was increased. For very weak samples, acoustic waves propagating in these rocks showed very low velocities of less than 1000 m/sec for compressional waves. A borehole made within this weakly cemented rock exhibited a unique mode of failure that is called ''anti-KI mode fracture'' in this paper. The effect of cementation, grain type, and boundary conditions on this mode of failure was also examined experimentally.

  18. Acoustic phonons in chrysotile asbestos probed by high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Vakhrushev, S. B.; Kumzerov, Yu. A,; Alatas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic phonons in an individual, oriented fiber of chrysotile asbestos (chemical formula Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}) were observed at room temperature in the inelastic x-ray measurement with a very high (meV) resolution. The x-ray scattering vector was aligned along [1 0 0] direction of the reciprocal lattice, nearly parallel to the long axis of the fiber. The latter coincides with [1 0 0] direction of the direct lattice and the axes of the nano-channels. The data were analyzed using a damped harmonic oscillator model. Analysis of the phonon dispersion in the first Brillouin zone yielded the longitudinal sound velocity of (9200 {+-} 600) m/s.

  19. Stimulated scattering of a whistler wave off ion-cyclotron and ion-acoustic modes in a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Annou, R.; Tripathi, V.K.

    1998-01-01

    A whistler wave propagating through a magnetized dusty plasma undergoes stimulated Brillioun scattering off ion-cyclotron and ion-acoustic modes. The dust has little effect on nonlinear coupling. However, it reduces the growth rate by introducing linear damping on the low-frequency modes. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Resonant raman scattering and dispersion of polar optical and acoustic phonons in hexagonal inn

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, V. Yu. Klochikhin, A. A.; Smirnov, A. N.; Strashkova, I. Yu.; Krylov, A. S.; Lu Hai; Schaff, William J.; Lee, H.-M.; Hong, Y.-L.; Gwo, S.

    2010-02-15

    It is shown that a study of the dependence of impurity-related resonant first-order Raman scattering on the frequency of excitation light makes it possible to observe the dispersion of polar optical and acoustic branches of vibrational spectrum in hexagonal InN within a wide range of wave vectors. It is established that the wave vectors of excited phonons are uniquely related to the energy of excitation photon. Frequencies of longitudinal optical phonons E{sub 1}(LO) and A{sub 1}(LO) in hexagonal InN were measured in the range of excitation-photon energies from 2.81 to 1.17 eV and the frequencies of longitudinal acoustic phonons were measured in the range 2.81-1.83 eV of excitation-photon energies. The obtained dependences made it possible to extrapolate the dispersion of phonons A{sub 1}(LO) and E{sub 1}(LO) to as far as the point {Gamma} in the Brillouin zone and estimate the center-band energies of these phonons (these energies have not been uniquely determined so far).

  1. Soliton generation via continuous stokes acoustic self-scattering of hypersonic waves in a paramagnetic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Bugay, A. N.; Sazonov, S. V.

    2008-08-15

    A new mechanism is proposed for continuous frequency down-conversion of acoustic waves propagating in a paramagnetic crystal at a low temperature in an applied magnetic field. A transverse hypersonic pulse generating a carrier-free longitudinal strain pulse via nonlinear effects is scattered by the generated pulse. This leads to a Stokes shift in the transverse hypersonic wave proportional to its intensity, and both pulses continue to propagate in the form of a mode-locked soliton. As the transverse-pulse frequency is Stokes shifted, its spectrum becomes narrower. This process can be effectively implemented only if the linear group velocity of the transverse hypersonic pulse equals the phase velocity of the longitudinal strain wave. These velocities are renormalized by spin-phonon coupling and can be made equal by adjusting the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. The transverse structure of the soliton depends on the sign of the group velocity dispersion of the transverse component. When the dispersion is positive, planar solitons can develop whose transverse component has a topological defect of dark vortex type and longitudinal component has a hole. In the opposite case, the formation of two-component acoustic 'bullets' or vortices localized in all directions is possible.

  2. Simultaneous stimulated Raman, Brillouin, and electron-acoustic scattering reveals a potential saturation mechanism in Raman plasma amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbull, D.; Li, S.; Morozov, A.; Suckewer, S.

    2012-08-15

    In a Raman plasma amplifier, the aim is to create plasma conditions in which Raman backscattering is the fastest growing instability, outrunning all competing effects so that it is possible to amplify and compress a laser beam to unprecedented unfocused intensities by utilizing that instability. However, achieving high efficiencies via this scheme has proven very difficult experimentally. Recent data show the simultaneous occurrence of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), and stimulated electron-acoustic scattering (SEAS). The appearance of SEAS is indicative of strong particle trapping, the existence of which is hard to justify without highlighting the interplay between SRS and SBS.

  3. Moving to the Speed of Sound: Context Modulation of the Effect of Acoustic Properties of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shintel, Hadas; Nusbaum, Howard C.

    2008-01-01

    Suprasegmental acoustic patterns in speech can convey meaningful information and affect listeners' interpretation in various ways, including through systematic analog mapping of message-relevant information onto prosody. We examined whether the effect of analog acoustic variation is governed by the acoustic properties themselves. For example, fast…

  4. Acoustic scattering by circular cylinders of various aspect ratios. [pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maciulaitis, A.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of acoustic scattering on the useful frequency range of pressure gradient microphones were investigated experimentally between ka values of 0.407 and 4.232 using two circular cylindrical models (L/D = 0.5 and 0.25) having a 25 cm outside diameter. Small condenser microphones, attached to preamplifiers by flexible connectors, were installed from inside the cylindrical bodies, and flush mounted on the exterior surface of the cylinders. A 38 cm diameter woofer in a large speaker enclosure was used as the sound source. Surface pressure augmentation and phase differences were computed from measured data for various sound wave incidence angles. Results are graphically compared with theoretical predictions supplied by NASA for ka = 0.407, 2.288, and 4.232. All other results are tabulated in the appendices. With minor exceptions, the experimentally determined pressure augmentations agreed within 0.75 dB with theoretical predictions. The agreement for relative phase angles was within 5 percent without any exceptions. Scattering parameter variations with ka and L/D ratio, as computed from experimental data, are also presented.

  5. On the scattering properties of polyelectrolyte gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrat, Jean-Louis; Joanny, Jean-François; Pincus, Phil

    1992-08-01

    We present a simple model for scattering properties of polyelectrolyte gels at swelling equilibrium. In the weak screening limit where the Debye-Hückel screening length is larger than the mesh size of the gel, the direct electrostatic interactions are negligible and the swelling is driven by the osmotic pressure of the counterions. The tension created by this pressure is transmitted through the crosslinks to the elastic chains which behave as isolated chains with an applied force at their end points. The structure factor of the gel can be split into a frozen component due to the average concentration heterogeneities and a thermodynamic component due to concentration fluctuations. The frozen component has a peak at a wavevector of the order of the mesh size of the gel, the thermodynamic component has a peak at a higher wavevector of the order of the inverse transverse radius of the chains. At infinite times the dynamic structure factor relaxes towards the frozen component of the static structure factor. In the limit of small wavevectors the relaxation is diffusive with a diffusion constant equal to the Stokes diffusion constant of the Pincus blobs of the stretched chains. The diffusion constant shows a minimum at a wavevector of the order of the inverse transverse radius of the chains. Nous présentons un modèle simple pour étudier la diffusion de rayonnement par des gels polylectrolytes à l'équilibre de gonflement. Dans la limite d'écrantage faible où la longueur d'écran de Debye-Hückel est plus grande que la maille du gel, les interactions électrostatiques directes sont négligeables et le gonflement est dû à la pression osmotique des contreions. La tension créée par cette pression est transmise par les noeuds du gel aux chaines élastiques qui se comportent comme des chaines isolées avec une force extérieure appliquée aux extrémités. Le facteur de structure du gel est la somme d'une composante gelée due aux hétérogénéités de concentration

  6. Methane gas hydrate effect on sediment acoustic and strength properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winters, W.J.; Waite, W.F.; Mason, D.H.; Gilbert, L.Y.; Pecher, I.A.

    2007-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the interaction of methane gas hydrate with host sediment, we studied: (1) the effects of gas hydrate and ice on acoustic velocity in different sediment types, (2) effect of different hydrate formation mechanisms on measured acoustic properties (3) dependence of shear strength on pore space contents, and (4) pore pressure effects during undrained shear. A wide range in acoustic p-wave velocities (Vp) were measured in coarse-grained sediment for different pore space occupants. Vp ranged from less than 1 km/s for gas-charged sediment to 1.77–1.94 km/s for water-saturated sediment, 2.91–4.00 km/s for sediment with varying degrees of hydrate saturation, and 3.88–4.33 km/s for frozen sediment. Vp measured in fine-grained sediment containing gas hydrate was substantially lower (1.97 km/s). Acoustic models based on measured Vp indicate that hydrate which formed in high gas flux environments can cement coarse-grained sediment, whereas hydrate formed from methane dissolved in the pore fluid may not. The presence of gas hydrate and other solid pore-filling material, such as ice, increased the sediment shear strength. The magnitude of that increase is related to the amount of hydrate in the pore space and cementation characteristics between the hydrate and sediment grains. We have found, that for consolidation stresses associated with the upper several hundred meters of sub-bottom depth, pore pressures decreased during shear in coarse-grained sediment containing gas hydrate, whereas pore pressure in fine-grained sediment typically increased during shear. The presence of free gas in pore spaces damped pore pressure response during shear and reduced the strengthening effect of gas hydrate in sands.

  7. The Voice of Emotion: Acoustic Properties of Six Emotional Expressions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Carol May

    Studies in the perceptual identification of emotional states suggested that listeners seemed to depend on a limited set of vocal cues to distinguish among emotions. Linguistics and speech science literatures have indicated that this small set of cues included intensity, fundamental frequency, and temporal properties such as speech rate and duration. Little research has been done, however, to validate these cues in the production of emotional speech, or to determine if specific dimensions of each cue are associated with the production of a particular emotion for a variety of speakers. This study addressed deficiencies in understanding of the acoustical properties of duration and intensity as components of emotional speech by means of speech science instrumentation. Acoustic data were conveyed in a brief sentence spoken by twelve English speaking adult male and female subjects, half with dramatic training, and half without such training. Simulated expressions included: happiness, surprise, sadness, fear, anger, and disgust. The study demonstrated that the acoustic property of mean intensity served as an important cue for a vocal taxonomy. Overall duration was rejected as an element for a general taxonomy due to interactions involving gender and role. Findings suggested a gender-related taxonomy, however, based on differences in the ways in which men and women use the duration cue in their emotional expressions. Results also indicated that speaker training may influence greater use of the duration cue in expressions of emotion, particularly for male actors. Discussion of these results provided linkages to (1) practical management of emotional interactions in clinical and interpersonal environments, (2) implications for differences in the ways in which males and females may be socialized to express emotions, and (3) guidelines for future perceptual studies of emotional sensitivity.

  8. Acoustical, morphological and optical properties of oral rehydration salts (ORS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Preetha Mary; Jayakumar, S.; Divya, P.; Subhashree, N. S.; Ahmed, M. Anees

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasonic velocity, density and viscosity were measured in different concentrations of oral rehydration salts (ORS) at room temperature 303 k. From the experimental data other related thermodynamic parameters, viz adiabatic compressibility, intermolecular free length, acoustic impedence, relaxation time are calculated. The experimental data were discussed in the light of molecular interaction existing in the liquid mixtures. The results have been discussed in terms of solute-solvent interaction between the components. Structural characterization is important for development of new material. The morphology, structure and grain size of the samples are investigated by SEM. The optical properties of the sample have been studied using UV Visible spectroscopy.

  9. Acoustical, morphological and optical properties of oral rehydration salts (ORS)

    SciTech Connect

    George, Preetha Mary E-mail: jayakumars030@gmail.com; Divya, P.; Jayakumar, S. E-mail: jayakumars030@gmail.com; Subhashree, N. S.; Ahmed, M. Anees

    2015-06-24

    Ultrasonic velocity, density and viscosity were measured in different concentrations of oral rehydration salts (ORS) at room temperature 303 k. From the experimental data other related thermodynamic parameters, viz adiabatic compressibility, intermolecular free length, acoustic impedence, relaxation time are calculated. The experimental data were discussed in the light of molecular interaction existing in the liquid mixtures. The results have been discussed in terms of solute-solvent interaction between the components. Structural characterization is important for development of new material. The morphology, structure and grain size of the samples are investigated by SEM. The optical properties of the sample have been studied using UV Visible spectroscopy.

  10. Microwave scattering properties of snow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelakos, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental results were presented showing backscatter dependence on frequency, angle of incidence, snow wetness, and frequency modulation. Theoretical studies were made of the inverse scattering problem yielding some preliminary results concerning the determination of the dielectric constant of the snow layer. The experimental results lead to the following conclusions: (1) snow layering affects backscatter; (2) layer response was significant up to 45 degrees of incidence; (3) wetness modifies snow layer effects; and (4) frequency modulation masks the layer response.

  11. Picosecond Acoustic Measurement of Anisotropic Properties of Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Perton, M.; Rossignol, C.; Chigarev, N.; Audoin, B.

    2007-03-21

    Properties of thin metallic films have been studied extensively by means of laser-picosecond ultrasonics. Generation of longitudinal and shear waves via thermoelastic mechanism and large source has been only demonstrated for waves vectors along the normal to the interface. However, such measurements cannot provide complete information about elastic properties of films. As it has been already shown for nanosecond ultrasonics, the knowledge of group or phase velocities in several directions for sources with small lateral size allows determining the stiffness tensor coefficients of a sample. The experimental set-up was prepared to obtain the thinnest size for the source to achieve acoustic diffraction. The identification of the stiffness tensor components, based on the inversion of the bulk waves phase velocities, is applied to signals simulated and experimentally recorded for a material with hexagonal properties. First estimation of stiffness tensor coefficients for thin metallic film 2.1 {mu}m has been performed.

  12. Transport Properties of Graphene and Suspended Graphene with EMC: The Role of Various Scattering Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, M. D.; Atasever, Ö. S.; Özdemir, B.; Yarar, Z.; Özdemir, M.

    2016-08-01

    The electronic transport properties of graphene and suspended (intrinsic) graphene sheets are studied using an ensemble Monte Carlo (EMC) technique. The combined scattering mechanisms that are taken into account for both cases are nonpolar optic and acoustic phonons, ionized impurity, interface roughness, and surface polar phonon scatterings. The effect of screening is also considered in the ionized impurity and surface polar phonon scatterings of electrons. A rejection technique is used in EMC simulations to account for the occupancy of the final states. Velocity-field characteristics of graphene and suspended graphene sheets are obtained using various values of acoustic deformation potential constants. The variation of electron mobility of graphene is studied as a function of electron concentration and its variation as a function of temperature are investigated for the case of suspended graphene. For the former case, the mobility increases with electron concentration first and after a certain value of electron concentration it begins to decrease, while for the latter case the mobility decreases almost linearly with temperature. The mobility results from EMC simulations are compatible with the existing experimental studies for the unsuspended graphene case.

  13. Scattering and Absorption Properties of Biomaterials for Dental Restorative Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Oliveras, A.; Rubiño, M.; Pérez, M. M.

    2013-08-01

    The physical understanding of the optical properties of dental biomaterials is mandatory for their final success in restorative applications.Light propagation in biological media is characterized by the absorption coefficient, the scattering coefficient, the scattering phase function,the refractive index, and the surface conditions (roughness). We have employed the inverse adding-doubling (IAD) method to combine transmittance and reflectance measurements performed using an integrating-sphere setup with the results of the previous scattering-anisotropygoniometric measurements. This has led to the determination of the absorption and the scattering coefficients. The aim was to optically characterize two different dental-resin composites (nanocomposite and hybrid) and one type of zirconia ceramic, and comparatively study them. The experimental procedure was conducted under repeatability conditions of measurement in order to determine the uncertainty associated to the optical properties of the biomaterials. Spectral variations of the refraction index and the scattering anisotropy factor were also considered. The whole experimental procedure fulfilled all the necessary requirements to provide optical-property values with lower associated uncertainties. The effective transport coefficient presented a similar spectral behavior for the two composites but completely different for the zirconia ceramic. The results demonstrated that the scattering anisotropy exerted a clearly distinct impact on the optical properties of the zirconia ceramic compared with those of the dental-resin composites.

  14. Development of hydroacoustical techniques for the monitoring and classification of benthic habitats in Puck Bay: Modeling of acoustic waves scattering by seagrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raczkowska, A.; Gorska, N.

    2012-12-01

    seagrass leaf and the strength of surface scattering from the orientation of the leaves relative to the direction of incidence of the acoustic wave. The influences of the acoustic properties of the biological plant tissue and acoustic frequency were also examined in regards to these dependencies. It was found that the target strength of the seagrass leaf depends on the angle of inclination relative to the direction of incidence of the acoustic wave; furthermore, target strength was found to be sensitive to the frequency of the wave and the value of density and speed sound contrasts. These parameters also affect the nature of the oscillations depending on the target strenght to the angle of inclination of sea grass leaves. We have also performed a prognosis of surface scattering strength variability for sea grass meadows of Zostera marina in Puck Bay. The results obtained in this study are important for interpretation of acoustic measurements carried out in the underwater meadows of Puck Bay. Thus, they contribute to the development of non-invasive and fast acoustic monitoring methods.

  15. Risk of a second cancer from scattered radiation in acoustic neuroma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Hyunho; Sung, Jiwon; Shin, Dongoh; Park, Sungho; Chung, Weon Kuu; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Kim, Dong Wook

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to compare the risk of a secondary cancer from scattered and leakage doses in patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of a secondary cancer were estimated using the corresponding secondary doses measured at various organs by using radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, liver, bowel, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were 14.6, 1.7, 0.9, 0.8, 0.6, 0.6, and 0.6 cGy, respectively, for IMRT whereas they were 19.1, 1.8, 2.0, 0.6, 0.4, 0.4, and 0.4 cGy, respectively, for VMAT, and 22.8, 4.6, 1.4, 0.7, 0.5, 0.5, and 0.5 cGy, respectively, for SRS. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A lifetime attributable risk evaluation estimated that more than 0.03% of acoustic neuroma (AN) patients would get radiation-induced cancer within 20 years of receiving radiation therapy. The organ with the highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN was the thyroid. We found that the LAR could be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  16. Controlling the scattering properties of thin, particle-doped coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, William; Corbett, Madeleine; Manoharan, Vinothan

    2013-03-01

    Coatings and thin films of small particles suspended in a matrix possess optical properties that are important in several industries from cosmetics and paints to polymer composites. Many of the most interesting applications require coatings that produce several bulk effects simultaneously, but it is often difficult to rationally formulate materials with these desired optical properties. Here, we focus on the specific challenge of designing a thin colloidal film that maximizes both diffuse and total hemispherical transmission. We demonstrate that these bulk optical properties follow a simple scaling with two microscopic length scales: the scattering and transport mean free paths. Using these length scales and Mie scattering calculations, we generate basic design rules that relate scattering at the single particle level to the film's bulk optical properties. These ideas will be useful in the rational design of future optically active coatings.

  17. Correlating the morphological and light scattering properties of biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Marina

    The scattered light pattern from a biological cell is greatly influenced by the internal structure and optical properties of the cell. This research project examines the relationships between the morphological and scattering properties of biological cells through numerical simulations. The mains goals are: (1) to develop a procedure to analytically model biological cells, (2) to quantitatively study the effects of a range of cell characteristics on the features of the light scattering patterns, and (3) to classify cells based on the features of their light scattering patterns. A procedure to create an analytical cell model was developed which extracted structural information from the confocal microscopic images of cells and allowed for the alteration of the cell structure in a controlled and systematic way. The influence of cell surface roughness, nuclear size, and mitochondrial volume density, spatial distribution, size and shape on the light scattering patterns was studied through numerical simulations of light scattering using the Discrete Dipole Approximation. It was found that the light scattering intensity in the scattering angle range of 25° to 45° responded to changes in the surface fluctuation of the cell and the range of 90° to 110° was well suited for characterization of mitochondrial density and nuclear size. A comparison of light scattering pattern analysis methods revealed that the angular distribution of the scattered light and Gabor filters were most helpful in differentiating between the cell characteristics. In addition, a measured increase in the Gabor energy of the light scattering patterns in response to an increase in the complexity of the cell models suggested that a complex nuclear structure and mitochondria should be included when modeling biological cells for light scattering simulations. Analysis of the scattering pattern features with Gabor filters resulted in discrimination of the cell models according to cell surface roughness

  18. Radar Scattering Properties of Terra Meridiani, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, K. W.; Haldemann, A. F.; Jurgens, R. F.; Slade, M. A.; Arvidson, R. E.

    2002-12-01

    A series of fourteen radar observations of Mars were made during the 2001 opposition. Four of these observation tracks passed over Terra Meridiani, a prime candidate landing site for one of the 2003 Mars Exploration Rover missions. Observations were conducted using X-band (3.5 centimeter wavelength) radar transmitted with a pseudo-random binary phase encoding which, combined with the frequency resolution of the processing FFT, yields a maximum spatial resolution of approximately five kilometers. Actual spatial resolution is coarser than this (between five and twenty kilometers) due to signal-to-noise considerations that predicated longer integration times as well as greater planetary ranges for the off-opposition observations. We have processed the Terra Meridiani data in stages, beginning with one-dimensional sub-radar track profiles and culminating with four-station interferometry. Not all observations were amendable to the full four-station interferometry, due to technical issues, but were processed with a minimum of two stations to remove the spatial ambiguities inherent to radar observations. Our processing yields one- and two-dimensional maps of the surface reflectivity along the radar track. We extract scattering data for points along the sub-radar track, where the angle in incidence varies most, and model the scattering function. The multi-station reflectivity data is also modeled according to the Hagfors scattering model to extract two-dimensional maps of RMS roughness and dielectric constant. The RMS roughness data for the Terra Meridiani landing sites shows the local surface slopes to be less than 3 degrees, on the scale of tens of wavelengths. An enhanced dielectric constant is apparent over Terra Meridiani that is spatially correlated with the MGS detected hematite deposits. The level of the enhancement is consistent with the inclusion of 10-15 percent hematite, according to a weighted dielectric or PVL model. Integral to our processing, and new to

  19. Wave propagation characteristics of helically orthotropic cylindrical shells and resonance emergence in scattered acoustic field. Part 1. Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Majid

    2016-05-01

    The method of wave function expansion is adopted to study the three dimensional scattering of a plane progressive harmonic acoustic wave incident upon an arbitrarily thick-walled helically filament-wound composite cylindrical shell submerged in and filled with compressible ideal fluids. An approximate laminate model in the context of the so-called state-space formulation is employed for the construction of T-matrix solution to solve for the unknown modal scattering coefficients. Considering the nonaxisymmetric wave propagation phenomenon in anisotropic cylindrical components and following the resonance scattering theory which determines the resonance and background scattering fields, the stimulated resonance frequencies of the shell are isolated and classified due to their fundamental mode of excitation, overtone and style of propagation along the cylindrical axis (i.e., clockwise or anticlockwise propagation around the shell) and are identified as the helically circumnavigating waves.

  20. Acoustic Properties of Carbonate Rocks and Their Relation with Porosity and Mineral Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotellaro, C.; Vanorio, T.; Mavko, G.

    2007-12-01

    Carbonates are complex rocks characterized by a wide range of facies, texture, micro-structure, and rock fabrics. Understanding how this complexity affects the acoustic properties of carbonates is a key issue for interpreting and predicting changes in seismic images and acoustic log. Questions arise from the study of the porosity versus velocity relation for carbonate rocks which often consider the large scatter around the main velocity-porosity trend predominantly related to the porosity. We started a comprehensive laboratory study on carbonate rocks to understand how mineral composition, together with porosity, controls seismic wave propagation. The samples were collected capturing a wide range of porosities (from 1-52 percent) and different depositional environments in order to represent at best pore fabric and mineralogical heterogeneity in carbonates. Results of the hydraulic, transport, and acoustic properties of the collected samples were compared with those reported in the literature. The main results of this research show that a quite heterogeneous mineral composition of the samples (calcite, dolomite, and anhydrite), other than the pore type, controls the elastic behavior of carbonate rocks, and thus, the velocity-porosity trend. In particular, the samples showing the biggest departure from the general velocity-porosity trend show a non-negligible amount of anhydrite. Compared to calcite, anhydrite 1) causes rock softening and in turn, a decrease of P-wave velocity, because of the lower bulk modulus (k =56 GPa); 2) is characterized by a finer grain size (silt-size) which may create two elastic domains separated by a critical porosity approximately 30 percent.

  1. Iterative solution of multiple radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics using the BL-QMR algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, M.

    1996-12-31

    Finite-element discretizations of time-harmonic acoustic wave problems in exterior domains result in large sparse systems of linear equations with complex symmetric coefficient matrices. In many situations, these matrix problems need to be solved repeatedly for different right-hand sides, but with the same coefficient matrix. For instance, multiple right-hand sides arise in radiation problems due to multiple load cases, and also in scattering problems when multiple angles of incidence of an incoming plane wave need to be considered. In this talk, we discuss the iterative solution of multiple linear systems arising in radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics by means of a complex symmetric variant of the BL-QMR method. First, we summarize the governing partial differential equations for time-harmonic structural acoustics, the finite-element discretization of these equations, and the resulting complex symmetric matrix problem. Next, we sketch the special version of BL-QMR method that exploits complex symmetry, and we describe the preconditioners we have used in conjunction with BL-QMR. Finally, we report some typical results of our extensive numerical tests to illustrate the typical convergence behavior of BL-QMR method for multiple radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics, to identify appropriate preconditioners for these problems, and to demonstrate the importance of deflation in block Krylov-subspace methods. Our numerical results show that the multiple systems arising in structural acoustics can be solved very efficiently with the preconditioned BL-QMR method. In fact, for multiple systems with up to 40 and more different right-hand sides we get consistent and significant speed-ups over solving the systems individually.

  2. Acoustic and elastic properties of Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals.

    PubMed

    Mys, O; Martynyuk-Lototska, I; Grabar, A; Vlokh, R

    2009-07-01

    We present the results concerned with acoustic and elastic properties of Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals. The complete matrices of elastic stiffness and compliance coefficients are determined in both the crystallographic coordinate system and the system associated with eigenvectors of the elastic stiffness tensor. The acoustic slowness surfaces are constructed and the propagation and polarization directions of the slowest acoustic waves promising for acousto-optic interactions are determined on this basis. The acoustic obliquity angle and the deviation of polarization of the acoustic waves from purely transverse or longitudinal states are quantitatively analysed.

  3. Estimation of biological parameters of marine organisms using linear and nonlinear acoustic scattering model-based inversion methods.

    PubMed

    Chu, Dezhang; Lawson, Gareth L; Wiebe, Peter H

    2016-05-01

    The linear inversion commonly used in fisheries and zooplankton acoustics assumes a constant inversion kernel and ignores the uncertainties associated with the shape and behavior of the scattering targets, as well as other relevant animal parameters. Here, errors of the linear inversion due to uncertainty associated with the inversion kernel are quantified. A scattering model-based nonlinear inversion method is presented that takes into account the nonlinearity of the inverse problem and is able to estimate simultaneously animal abundance and the parameters associated with the scattering model inherent to the kernel. It uses sophisticated scattering models to estimate first, the abundance, and second, the relevant shape and behavioral parameters of the target organisms. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the abundance, size, and behavior (tilt angle) parameters of marine animals (fish or zooplankton) can be accurately inferred from the inversion by using multi-frequency acoustic data. The influence of the singularity and uncertainty in the inversion kernel on the inversion results can be mitigated by examining the singular values for linear inverse problems and employing a non-linear inversion involving a scattering model-based kernel. PMID:27250181

  4. Collective Thomson scattering measurements of the Ion Acoustic Decay Instability. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.

    1993-12-31

    We have developed an uv collective Thomson scattering system for plasma produced by a short wavelength laser. The Ion Acoustic Decay Instabilities are studied in a large ({approximately}mm) scale, hot ({approximately}keV) plasma, which is relevant to a direct-driven laser fusion plasma. The IADI primary decay process is measured by the CTS. We used a random phase plate to minimize the non uniform irradiation of the interaction laser. Nevertheless, the threshold of the most unstable mode driven by the IADI is quite low. The measured threshold value agrees favorably with the theoretical value of the large scale plasma. We have also shown that the CTS from the IADI can be a good tool for measuring a local electron temperature. The measured results agree reasonably with the SAGE computer calculations. We used the real part of the wave (frequency) to estimate T{sub e}. The real part is, in general, reliable compared to the imaginary part such as the damping, and the growth rates. We have shown that the IADI can be easily excited in a large scale, hot plasma. The IADI has potentially important applications to direct drive laser fusion, and also critical surface diagnostic.

  5. On the Assessment of Acoustic Scattering and Shielding by Time Domain Boundary Integral Equation Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Fang Q.; Pizzo, Michelle E.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the time domain boundary integral equation formulation of the linear convective wave equation, a computational tool dubbed Time Domain Fast Acoustic Scattering Toolkit (TD-FAST) has recently been under development. The time domain approach has a distinct advantage that the solutions at all frequencies are obtained in a single computation. In this paper, the formulation of the integral equation, as well as its stabilization by the Burton-Miller type reformulation, is extended to cases of a constant mean flow in an arbitrary direction. In addition, a "Source Surface" is also introduced in the formulation that can be employed to encapsulate regions of noise sources and to facilitate coupling with CFD simulations. This is particularly useful for applications where the noise sources are not easily described by analytical source terms. Numerical examples are presented to assess the accuracy of the formulation, including a computation of noise shielding by a thin barrier motivated by recent Historical Baseline F31A31 open rotor noise shielding experiments. Furthermore, spatial resolution requirements of the time domain boundary element method are also assessed using point per wavelength metrics. It is found that, using only constant basis functions and high-order quadrature for surface integration, relative errors of less than 2% may be obtained when the surface spatial resolution is 5 points-per-wavelength (PPW) or 25 points-per-wavelength squared (PPW2).

  6. Time-frequency analysis of the bistatic acoustic scattering from a spherical elastic shell.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Shaun D; Sabra, Karim G; Zakharia, Manell E; Sessarego, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The development of low-frequency sonar systems, using, for instance, a network of autonomous systems in unmanned vehicles, provides a practical means for bistatic measurements (i.e., when the source and receiver are widely separated) allowing for multiple viewpoints of the target of interest. Time-frequency analysis, in particular, Wigner-Ville analysis, takes advantage of the evolution time dependent aspect of the echo spectrum to differentiate a man-made target, such as an elastic spherical shell, from a natural object of the similar shape. A key energetic feature of fluid-loaded and thin spherical shell is the coincidence pattern, also referred to as the mid-frequency enhancement (MFE), that results from antisymmetric Lamb-waves propagating around the circumference of the shell. This article investigates numerically the bistatic variations of the MFE with respect to the monostatic configuration using the Wigner-Ville analysis. The observed time-frequency shifts of the MFE are modeled using a previously derived quantitative ray theory by Zhang et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 91, 1862-1874 (1993)] for spherical shell's scattering. Additionally, the advantage of an optimal array beamformer, based on joint time delays and frequency shifts is illustrated for enhancing the detection of the MFE recorded across a bistatic receiver array when compared to a conventional time-delay beamformer.

  7. Burton-Miller-type singular boundary method for acoustic radiation and scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhuo-Jia; Chen, Wen; Gu, Yan

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes the singular boundary method (SBM) in conjunction with Burton and Miller's formulation for acoustic radiation and scattering. The SBM is a strong-form collocation boundary discretization technique using the singular fundamental solutions, which is mathematically simple, easy-to-program, meshless and introduces the concept of source intensity factors (SIFs) to eliminate the singularities of the fundamental solutions. Therefore, it avoids singular numerical integrals in the boundary element method (BEM) and circumvents the troublesome placement of the fictitious boundary in the method of fundamental solutions (MFS). In the present method, we derive the SIFs of exterior Helmholtz equation by means of the SIFs of exterior Laplace equation owing to the same order of singularities between the Laplace and Helmholtz fundamental solutions. In conjunction with the Burton-Miller formulation, the SBM enhances the quality of the solution, particularly in the vicinity of the corresponding interior eigenfrequencies. Numerical illustrations demonstrate efficiency and accuracy of the present scheme on some benchmark examples under 2D and 3D unbounded domains in comparison with the analytical solutions, the boundary element solutions and Dirichlet-to-Neumann finite element solutions.

  8. An immersed boundary computational model for acoustic scattering problems with complex geometries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Yongsong; Liang, An; Jing, Xiaodong

    2012-11-01

    An immersed boundary computational model is presented in order to deal with the acoustic scattering problem by complex geometries, in which the wall boundary condition is treated as a direct body force determined by satisfying the non-penetrating boundary condition. Two distinct discretized grids are used to discrete the fluid domain and immersed boundary, respectively. The immersed boundaries are represented by Lagrangian points and the direct body force determined on these points is applied on the neighboring Eulerian points. The coupling between the Lagrangian points and Euler points is linked by a discrete delta function. The linearized Euler equations are spatially discretized with a fourth-order dispersion-relation-preserving scheme and temporal integrated with a low-dissipation and low-dispersion Runge-Kutta scheme. A perfectly matched layer technique is applied to absorb out-going waves and in-going waves in the immersed bodies. Several benchmark problems for computational aeroacoustic solvers are performed to validate the present method.

  9. Acoustic quasi-holographic images of scattering by vertical cylinders from one-dimensional bistatic scans.

    PubMed

    Baik, Kyungmin; Dudley, Christopher; Marston, Philip L

    2011-12-01

    When synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) is used to image elastic targets in water, subtle features can be present in the images associated with the dynamical response of the target being viewed. In an effort to improve the understanding of such responses, as well as to explore alternative image processing methods, a laboratory-based system was developed in which targets were illuminated by a transient acoustic source, and bistatic responses were recorded by scanning a hydrophone along a rail system. Images were constructed using a relatively conventional bistatic SAS algorithm and were compared with images based on supersonic holography. The holographic method is a simplification of one previously used to view the time evolution of a target's response [Hefner and Marston, ARLO 2, 55-60 (2001)]. In the holographic method, the space-time evolution of the scattering was used to construct a two-dimensional image with cross range and time as coordinates. Various features for vertically hung cylindrical targets were interpreted using high frequency ray theory. This includes contributions from guided surface elastic waves, as well as transmitted-wave features and specular reflection.

  10. Acoustic scattering by elastic cylinders of elliptical cross-section and splitting up of resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Ancey, S. Bazzali, E. Gabrielli, P. Mercier, M.

    2014-05-21

    The scattering of a plane acoustic wave by an infinite elastic cylinder of elliptical cross section is studied from a modal formalism by emphasizing the role of the symmetries. More precisely, as the symmetry is broken in the transition from the infinite circular cylinder to the elliptical one, the splitting up of resonances is observed both theoretically and experimentally. This phenomenon can be interpreted using group theory. The main difficulty stands in the application of this theory within the framework of the vectorial formalism in elastodynamics. This method significantly simplifies the numerical treatment of the problem, provides a full classification of the resonances, and gives a physical interpretation of the splitting up in terms of symmetry breaking. An experimental part based on ultrasonic spectroscopy complements the theoretical study. A series of tank experiments is carried out in the case of aluminium elliptical cylinders immersed in water, in the frequency range 0 ≤ kr ≤ 50, where kr is the reduced wave number in the fluid. The symmetry is broken by selecting various cylinders of increasing eccentricity. More precisely, the greater the eccentricity, the higher the splitting up of resonances is accentuated. The experimental results provide a very good agreement with the theoretical ones, the splitting up is observed on experimental form functions, and the split resonant modes are identified on angular diagrams.

  11. Inelastic light scattering spectroscopy in Si/SiGe nanostructures: Strain, chemical composition and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsybeskov, L.; Mala, S. A.; Wang, X.; Baribeau, J.-M.; Wu, X.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    We present a review of recent studies of inelastic light scattering spectroscopy in two types of Si/SiGe nanostructures: planar superlattices and cluster (dot) multilayers including first- and second-order Raman scattering, polarized Raman scattering and low-frequency inelastic light scattering associated with folded acoustic phonons. The results are used in semi-quantitative analysis of chemical composition, strain and thermal conductivity in these technologically important materials for electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  12. Concurrent identification of aero-acoustic scattering and noise sources at a flow duct singularity in low Mach number flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovardi, Carlo; Jaensch, Stefan; Polifke, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    A numerical method to concurrently characterize both aeroacoustic scattering and noise sources at a duct singularity is presented. This approach combines Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with techniques of System Identification (SI): In a first step, a highly resolved LES with external broadband acoustic excitation is carried out. Subsequently, time series data extracted from the LES are post-processed by means of SI to model both acoustic propagation and noise generation. The present work studies the aero-acoustic characteristics of an orifice placed in a duct at low flow Mach numbers with the "LES-SI" method. Parametric SI based on the Box-Jenkins mathematical structure is employed, with a prediction error approach that utilizes correlation analysis of the output residuals to avoid overfitting. Uncertainties of model parameters due to the finite length of times series are quantified in terms of confidence intervals. Numerical results for acoustic scattering matrices and power spectral densities of broad-band noise are validated against experimental measurements over a wide range of frequencies below the cut-off frequency of the duct.

  13. Changes in zooplankton habitat, behavior, and acoustic scattering characteristics across glider-resolved fronts in the Southern California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Jesse R.; Ohman, Mark D.

    2015-05-01

    We report cross-frontal changes in the characteristics of plankton proxy variables measured by autonomous Spray ocean gliders operating within the Southern California Current System (SCCS). A comparison of conditions across the 154 positive frontal gradients (i.e., where density of the surface layer decreased in the offshore direction) identified from six years of continuous measurements showed that waters on the denser side of the fronts typically showed higher Chl-a fluorescence, shallower euphotic zones, and higher acoustic backscatter than waters on the less dense side. Transitions between these regions were relatively abrupt. For positive fronts the amplitude of Diel Vertical Migration (DVM), inferred from a 3-beam 750 kHz acoustic Doppler profiler, increased offshore of fronts and covaried with optical transparency of the water column. Average interbeam variability in acoustic backscatter also changed across many positive fronts within 3 depth strata (0-150 m, 150-400 m, and 400-500 m), revealing a front-related change in the acoustic scattering characteristics of the assemblages. The extent of vertical stratification of distinct scattering assemblages was also more pronounced offshore of positive fronts. Depth-stratified zooplankton samples collected by Mocness nets corroborated the autonomous measurements, showing copepod-dominated assemblages and decreased zooplankton body sizes offshore and euphausiid-dominated assemblages with larger median body sizes inshore of major frontal features.

  14. Reconstruction of scattering properties of rough air-dielectric boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V. G.; Zhdanov, D. D.; Potemin, I. S.; Garbul, A. A.; Voloboy, A. G.; Galaktionov, V. A.; Kirilov, N.

    2016-10-01

    The article is devoted to elaboration of the method of reconstruction of rough surface scattering properties. The object with rough surface is made of transparent dielectric material. Typically these properties are described with bi-directional scattering distribution function (BSDF). Direct measurement of such function is either impossible or very expensive. The suggested solution provides physically reasonable method for the rough surface BSDF reconstruction. The method is based on Monte-Carlo ray tracing simulation for BSDF calculation. Optimization technique is further applied to correctly reconstruct the BSDF. The results of the BSDF reconstruction together with measurement results are presented in the article as well.

  15. Reconstruction of scattering properties of rough air-dielectric boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V. G.; Zhdanov, D. D.; Potemin, I. S.; Garbul, A. A.; Voloboy, A. G.; Galaktionov, V. A.; Kirilov, N.

    2016-08-01

    The article is devoted to elaboration of the method of reconstruction of rough surface scattering properties. The object with rough surface is made of transparent dielectric material. Typically these properties are described with bi-directional scattering distribution function (BSDF). Direct measurement of such function is either impossible or very expensive. The suggested solution provides physically reasonable method for the rough surface BSDF reconstruction. The method is based on Monte-Carlo ray tracing simulation for BSDF calculation. Optimization technique is further applied to correctly reconstruct the BSDF. The results of the BSDF reconstruction together with measurement results are presented in the article as well.

  16. On multiple scattering in acoustic media: a deterministic Ray Tracing method for random structures.

    PubMed

    Brigante, M

    2013-03-01

    The paper is devoted to computer and experimental simulation of US (ultrasonic) signal propagation in acoustic solids with micro-structure. Any change in the percentage of flaws or pores influences considerably the value of the ultrasonic wave speed. The theoretical analysis is based upon the Ray Tracing algorithm. We calculate numerically the full path of each ray from the transmitter to the receiver, in its multiple reflections between the surfaces of the internal obstacles. The natural experiments are performed in a water basin with some arrays of equal metallic round rods. This simulates the US evaluation of the mechanical properties of concrete. The computer modeling allows us to construct the envelope of the US signal registered at the receiving transducer. Then we simulate the dependence of the wave speed versus porosity. There is a sufficiently good accordance between numerical and experimental results.

  17. Variations in the optical scattering properties of phytoplankton cultures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen; Wang, Guifen; Sun, Zhaohua; Cao, Wenxi; Xu, Zhantang; Hu, Shuibo; Zhao, Jun

    2012-05-01

    The scattering and backscattering coefficients of 15 phytoplankton species were determined in the laboratory using the acs and BB9 instruments. The spectral variability of scattering properties was investigated and the homogenous sphere model based on Mie theory was also evaluated. The scattering efficiencies at 510 nm varied from 1.42 to 2.26, and the backscattering efficiencies varied from 0.003 to 0.020. The backscattering ratios at 510 nm varied from 0.17% to 0.97%, with a mean value of 0.58%. The scattering properties were influenced by algal cell size and cellular particulate organic carbon content rather than the chlorophyll a concentration. Comparison of the measured results to the values estimated using the homogenous sphere model showed that: (1) The model could well reproduce the spectral scattering coefficient with relative deviations of 5-39%, which indicates that cell shape and internal structure have no significant effects on predicting the scattering spectra; (2) Although the homogenous sphere model generally reflected the spectral trend of backscattering spectra for most species, it severely underestimated the backscattering coefficients by 1.4-48.6 folds at 510 nm. The deviations for Chaetoceros sp. and Microcystis aeruginosa were large and might be due to algal cell chain links and intracellular gas vacuoles, respectively.

  18. Raman scattering and in-water ocean optical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Bruce R.; Smith, Raymond C.

    1990-01-01

    Inelastic (transpectral) scattering may contribute significantly to the in-water light field. Major mechanisms for inelastic scattering include Raman scattering, which is important in clear ocean waters, and fluorescence from a variety of sources, which may be important in more turbid waters. The Raman cross section for liquid water is found to be 8.2 x 10 to the -30th sq cm/sr molecule, which is in agreement with the lower range of published values. Inelastic scattering has important ramifications for several aspects of marine biooptics, including the determination of in-water spectral absorption, the estimation of clear-water ocean optical properties, and possibly various aspects of algal photobiology.

  19. Thermodynamic properties of liquid gallium from picosecond acoustic velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Ayrinhac, S; Gauthier, M; Le Marchand, G; Morand, M; Bergame, F; Decremps, F

    2015-07-15

    Due to discrepancies in the literature data the thermodynamic properties of liquid gallium are still in debate. Accurate measurements of adiabatic sound velocities as a function of pressure and temperature have been obtained by the combination of laser picosecond acoustics and surface imaging on sample loaded in diamond anvil cell. From these results the thermodynamic parameters of gallium have been extracted by a numerical procedure up to 10 GPa and 570 K. It is demonstrated that a Murnaghan equation of state accounts well for the whole data set since the isothermal bulk modulus BT has been shown to vary linearly with pressure in the whole temperature range. No evidence for a previously reported liquid-liquid transition has been found in the whole pressure and temperature range explored.

  20. GNSS-Reflectometry: Forest canopies polarization scattering properties and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuerui; Jin, Shuanggen

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays, GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) can be a new promising remote sensing tool in the ocean, snow/ice and land surfaces, e.g., vegetation biomass monitoring. Although GNSS-R provides a potentially special L-band multi-angular and multi-polarization measurement, the theoretical vegetation scattering properties and mechanisms for GNSS-R are not understood clearly. In this paper, the GNSS-R vegetation polarization scattering properties are studied and modeled at different incidence angles (specular direction). The bistatic scattering model Bi-mimics is employed, which is the first-order radiative transfer equation. As a kind of forest stand, the Aspen’s crown layer is composed of entire leaves, and its parameters in Mimics handbook are used as model input. The specular circular polarizations (co-polarization RR and cross-polarization LR) are simulated. For cross-polarization, the received polarization is assumed as a linear (horizontal and vertical) polarizations and ±45° linear polarizations. Therefore, the HR VR, +45R and -45R polarizations are simulated here. Contributions from different scattering components at RR, LR and VR polarization are also presented. For co-polarization, it is large in the whole specular angles (10-80°). The scattering trends of the other cross polarization (HR, LR, +45R and -45R) are a little similar when compared to the RR and RV. Therefore, the RHCP and V polarizations are more favorable to collect the reflected signals. The trunk heights and crown depths do not affect the scattering trends of RR, RV and RL, while the trunk height has some effect on the scattering amplitude of different polarizations. The azimuth angle has more effects on RR, RL and RV scattering, especially in lower than 50°. The observation angles and polarization combinations are extremely important for GNSS-R remote sensing.

  1. Blind source separation based on time-frequency morphological characteristics for rigid acoustic scattering by underwater objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Li, Xiukun

    2016-06-01

    Separation of the components of rigid acoustic scattering by underwater objects is essential in obtaining the structural characteristics of such objects. To overcome the problem of rigid structures appearing to have the same spectral structure in the time domain, time-frequency Blind Source Separation (BSS) can be used in combination with image morphology to separate the rigid scattering components of different objects. Based on a highlight model, the separation of the rigid scattering structure of objects with time-frequency distribution is deduced. Using a morphological filter, different characteristics in a Wigner-Ville Distribution (WVD) observed for single auto term and cross terms can be simplified to remove any cross-term interference. By selecting time and frequency points of the auto terms signal, the accuracy of BSS can be improved. An experimental simulation has been used, with changes in the pulse width of the transmitted signal, the relative amplitude and the time delay parameter, in order to analyzing the feasibility of this new method. Simulation results show that the new method is not only able to separate rigid scattering components, but can also separate the components when elastic scattering and rigid scattering exist at the same time. Experimental results confirm that the new method can be used in separating the rigid scattering structure of underwater objects.

  2. Spectral properties of a mixed system using an acoustical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neicu, T.; Schaadt, K.; Kudrolli, A.

    2001-02-01

    We experimentally study the spectral properties of a mixed system using the flexural modes of a clover shaped plate. The system is called mixed because the corresponding ray dynamics has both chaotic and integrable regions in its phase space. The eigenvalue statistics show intermediate properties between the universal statistics corresponding to chaotic geometries which show Gaussian orthogonal ensemble statistics and integrable geometries that show Poisson statistics. We further investigate the Fourier transform of the peaks to study the influence of the length scales of the plate on the properties of the acoustic resonances. We observe a weak signal of the periodic orbits in the experimental data. Although some of the peaks in the Fourier transform of the eigenvalue spectrum correspond to the shortest stable periodic orbits, other strong peaks are also observed. To understand the role of symmetries, we start with a clover shaped plate belonging to the C4v point symmetry group, and progressively reduce the symmetry by sanding one of the edges. A Shnirelman peak in P(s) is observed for the highly symmetric situation due to level clustering.

  3. Acoustic scattering from a solid aluminum cylinder in contact with a sand sediment: measurements, modeling, and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kevin L; Kargl, Steven G; Thorsos, Eric I; Burnett, David S; Lopes, Joseph L; Zampolli, Mario; Marston, Philip L

    2010-06-01

    Understanding acoustic scattering from objects placed on the interface between two media requires incorporation of scattering off the interface. Here, this class of problems is studied in the particular context of a 61 cm long, 30.5 cm diameter solid aluminum cylinder placed on a flattened sand interface. Experimental results are presented for the monostatic scattering from this cylinder for azimuthal scattering angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees and frequencies from 1 to 30 kHz. In addition, synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) processing is carried out. Next, details seen within these experimental results are explained using insight derived from physical acoustics. Subsequently, target strength results are compared to finite-element (FE) calculations. The simplest calculation assumes that the source and receiver are at infinity and uses the FE result for the cylinder in free space along with image cylinders for approximating the target/interface interaction. Then the effect of finite geometries and inclusion of a more complete Green's function for the target/interface interaction is examined. These first two calculations use the axial symmetry of the cylinder in carrying out the analysis. Finally, the results from a three dimensional FE analysis are presented and compared to both the experiment and the axially symmetric calculations.

  4. Influence of acoustic anisotropy of paratellurite crystal on the double acousto-optic Bragg light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, A. V.; Voloshinov, V. B.

    2016-09-01

    Influence of acoustic anisotropy on acousto-optic interaction in optically and acoustically anisotropic media is theoretically and experimentally studied. A specific type of acousto-optic diffraction is analyzed with allowance for the phase-matching conditions for two diffraction maxima. Analytical expressions for the phase-mismatch parameters versus the angle between the phase and group velocities of acoustic wave are derived. Light intensity in the diffraction peaks is numerically calculated, and experimental data on the diffraction in the paratellurite crystal at an acoustic walk-off angle of 54° are presented.

  5. Acoustic Scattering by Three-Dimensional Stators and Rotors Using the SOURCE3D Code. Volume 1; Analysis and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides a study of rotor and stator scattering using the SOURCE3D Rotor Wake/Stator Interaction Code. SOURCE3D is a quasi-three-dimensional computer program that uses three-dimensional acoustics and two-dimensional cascade load response theory to calculate rotor and stator modal reflection and transmission (scattering) coefficients. SOURCE3D is at the core of the TFaNS (Theoretical Fan Noise Design/Prediction System), developed for NASA, which provides complete fully coupled (inlet, rotor, stator, exit) noise solutions for turbofan engines. The reason for studying scattering is that we must first understand the behavior of the individual scattering coefficients provided by SOURCE3D, before eventually understanding the more complicated predictions from TFaNS. To study scattering, we have derived a large number of scattering curves for vane and blade rows. The curves are plots of output wave power divided by input wave power (in dB units) versus vane/blade ratio. Some of these plots are shown in this report. All of the plots are provided in a separate volume. To assist in understanding the plots, formulas have been derived for special vane/blade ratios for which wavefronts are either parallel or normal to rotor or stator chords. From the plots, we have found that, for the most part, there was strong transmission and weak reflection over most of the vane/blade ratio range for the stator. For the rotor, there was little transmission loss.

  6. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  7. Mechanical properties of low- and high-k dielectric thin films: A surface Brillouin light scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zizka, J.; King, S.; Every, A. G.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2016-04-01

    Surface Brillouin light scattering measurements are used to determine the elastic constants of nano-porous low-k SiOC:H (165 nm) and high-k HfO2 (25 nm) as well as BN:H (100 nm) films grown on Si substrates. In addition, the study investigates the mechanical properties of ultra-thin (25 nm) blanket TiN cap layers often used as hard masks for patterning, and their effects on the underlying low-k dielectrics that support a high level of interconnected porosity. Depending on the relative material properties of individual component layers, the acoustic modes manifest as confined, propagating, or damped resonances in the light scattering spectra, thereby enabling the mechanical properties of the ultra-thin films to be determined.

  8. Teaching Acoustic Properties of Materials in Secondary School: Testing Sound Insulators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, M. I.; Couso, D.; Pinto, R.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching the acoustic properties of materials is a good way to teach physics concepts, extending them into the technological arena related to materials science. This article describes an innovative approach for teaching sound and acoustics in combination with sound insulating materials in secondary school (15-16-year-old students). Concerning the…

  9. Seismic scattering and absorption parameters in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region from elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Peter J.; Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    In this study, frequency-dependent seismic scattering and intrinsic attenuation parameters for the crustal structure beneath the W-Bohemia/Vogtland swarm earthquake region close to the border of Czech Republic and Germany are estimated. Synthetic seismogram envelopes are modelled using elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory. Scattering and absorption parameters are determined by fitting these synthetic envelopes to observed seismogram envelopes from 14 shallow local events from the October 2008 W-Bohemia/Vogtland earthquake swarm. The two different simulation approaches yield similar results for the estimated crustal parameters and show a comparable frequency dependence of both transport mean free path and intrinsic absorption path length. Both methods suggest that intrinsic attenuation is dominant over scattering attenuation in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region for the investigated epicentral distance range and frequency bands from 3 to 24 Hz. Elastic simulations of seismogram envelopes suggest that forward scattering is required to explain the data, however, the degree of forward scattering is not resolvable. Errors in the parameter estimation are smaller in the elastic case compared to results from the acoustic simulations. The frequency decay of the transport mean free path suggests a random medium described by a nearly exponential autocorrelation function. The fluctuation strength and correlation length of the random medium cannot be estimated independently, but only a combination of the parameters related to the transport mean free path of the medium can be computed. Furthermore, our elastic simulations show, that using our numerical method, it is not possible to resolve the value of the mean free path of the random medium.

  10. Operational properties of fluctuation X-ray scattering data

    DOE PAGES

    Malmerberg, Erik; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Zwart, Petrus H.

    2015-03-20

    X-ray scattering images collected on timescales shorter than rotation diffusion times using a (partially) coherent beam result in a significant increase in information content in the scattered data. These measurements, named fluctuation X-ray scattering (FXS), are typically performed on an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) and can provide fundamental insights into the structure of biological molecules, engineered nanoparticles or energy-related mesoscopic materials beyond what can be obtained with standard X-ray scattering techniques. In order to understand, use and validate experimental FXS data, the availability of basic data characteristics and operational properties is essential, but has been absent up to this point.more » In this communication, an intuitive view of the nature of FXS data and their properties is provided, the effect of FXS data on the derived structural models is highlighted, and generalizations of the Guinier and Porod laws that can ultimately be used to plan experiments and assess the quality of experimental data are presented.« less

  11. Operational properties of fluctuation X-ray scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Malmerberg, Erik; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Zwart, Petrus H.

    2015-03-20

    X-ray scattering images collected on timescales shorter than rotation diffusion times using a (partially) coherent beam result in a significant increase in information content in the scattered data. These measurements, named fluctuation X-ray scattering (FXS), are typically performed on an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) and can provide fundamental insights into the structure of biological molecules, engineered nanoparticles or energy-related mesoscopic materials beyond what can be obtained with standard X-ray scattering techniques. In order to understand, use and validate experimental FXS data, the availability of basic data characteristics and operational properties is essential, but has been absent up to this point. In this communication, an intuitive view of the nature of FXS data and their properties is provided, the effect of FXS data on the derived structural models is highlighted, and generalizations of the Guinier and Porod laws that can ultimately be used to plan experiments and assess the quality of experimental data are presented.

  12. Scattering Properties and Brightness Temperatures Associated with Solid Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail M.; Kim, Min-Jeong

    2005-01-01

    In the past few years, early solid precipitation detection and retrieval algorithms have been developed and shown to be applicable for snowing clouds and blizzards. NOAA has an operational snow versus rain classifier based on AMSU-B observations. Solid precipitation retrieval algorithms reported in the literature over the past two years include those that rely on neural nets, statistics, or physical relationships. All of the algorithms require the use of millimeter-wave radiometer observations. The millimeter-wave frequencies are especially sensitive to the scattering and emission properties of frozen particles due to the ice particle refractive index. Passive radiometric channels respond to both the integrated particle mass throughout the volume and field of view, and to the amount, location, and size distribution of the frozen (and liquid) particles with the sensitivity varying for different frequencies and hydrometeor types. This investigation probes the sensitivity of scattering and absorption coefficients, and hence computed brightness temperatures, resulting from variations in solid precipitation cloud profiles. The first study compares the single scattering, absorption, and asymmetry parameters associated with snow particles in clouds. Several methodologies are used to convert the physical characteristics (e.g., shape, size distributions, ice-air-water ratios) of ice particles to electromagnetic properties (e.g., absorption, scattering, and asymmetry factors). These methodologies include: conversion to solid ice particles, homogeneous dielectric mixing, or discrete dipole approximation. Changes in the conversion methodology can produce computed brightness temperature differences greater than 50 Kelvin.

  13. Acoustic Properties of Lens Materials for Ultrasonic Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hideji; Nakaya, Chitose; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Kondo, Toshio; Ishikawa, Yasuo

    1995-01-01

    The acoustic velocities and densities of 20 types of commercial rubber have been measured at a frequency of 2 MHz at room temperature, and they are evaluated in terms of their application to an acoustic lens or an acoustic window of probes of an ultrasonic diagnostic instrument. Fluorosilicone rubber and phoshazene rubber have lower acoustic velocities than the human body, and they have excellent impedance matching with the human body. Both the acoustic velocities and densities of butadiene rubber, polybutadiene rubber, acrylic rubber and polyurethane match those of the human body. It is also described that rubber having good impedance matching with the human body can be fabricated by adjusting the volume fraction of the added filler.

  14. The effect of microstructural variation on the mechanical and acoustic properties of silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusark, Douglas Michael

    Silicon carbide ceramic materials have many beneficial properties which have led to their adoption in various industrial uses, including its application as an armor material. This is due to the high hardness and stiffness of these materials, as well as a low relative density. The homogeneity of the final properties depends upon the processing history of the material. Factors which affect this include the need for high temperatures and sintering additives to achieve densification, as well as the presence of additive agglomerates and pressing artifacts within the green compact. This dissertation seeks to determine the effect which microstructural variability has on the acoustic and mechanical properties of sintered silicon carbide materials. Sample sets examined included commercially produced, pressurelessly sintered tiles, as well as additional, targeted tiles which were specifically produced for evaluation in this study. Production of these targeted samples was carried out such that particular aspects of the microstructure were emphasized. These included tiles which were fired with an excess of boron sintering aid as well as tiles which had been pressed to a reduced green body density and then fired. The sample evaluation procedure which was developed incorporated non destructive evaluation methods, mechanical testing, and both fractographic and image analysis of fractured and polished sections. Non destructive evaluation of the tiles was carried out by Archimedes density and ultrasound scanning at 20 MHz to determine the acoustic attenuation coefficient. Selected samples were chosen for machining into ASTM B-type bend bars on which 4-pt flexure testing was performed. Strength limiting features were designated for each sample set. The correlation between acoustic attenuation coefficient and quasi-static strength was examined both qualitatively and quantitatively. This was done by comparing the primary fracture location of flexure bars to features within the

  15. Underwater acoustic omnidirectional absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naify, Christina J.; Martin, Theodore P.; Layman, Christopher N.; Nicholas, Michael; Thangawng, Abel L.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2014-02-01

    Gradient index media, which are designed by varying local element properties in given geometry, have been utilized to manipulate acoustic waves for a variety of devices. This study presents a cylindrical, two-dimensional acoustic "black hole" design that functions as an omnidirectional absorber for underwater applications. The design features a metamaterial shell that focuses acoustic energy into the shell's core. Multiple scattering theory was used to design layers of rubber cylinders with varying filling fractions to produce a linearly graded sound speed profile through the structure. Measured pressure intensity agreed with predicted results over a range of frequencies within the homogenization limit.

  16. Scatterer size and concentration estimation technique based on a 3D acoustic impedance map from histologic sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Oelze, Michael L.; O'Brien, William D.; Zachary, James F.

    2001-05-01

    Accurate estimates of scatterer parameters (size and acoustic concentration) are beneficial adjuncts to characterize disease from ultrasonic backscatterer measurements. An estimation technique was developed to obtain parameter estimates from the Fourier transform of the spatial autocorrelation function (SAF). A 3D impedance map (3DZM) is used to obtain the SAF of tissue. 3DZMs are obtained by aligning digitized light microscope images from histologic preparations of tissue. Estimates were obtained for simulated 3DZMs containing spherical scatterers randomly located: relative errors were less than 3%. Estimates were also obtained from a rat fibroadenoma and a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor (MMT). Tissues were fixed (10% neutral-buffered formalin), embedded in paraffin, serially sectioned and stained with H&E. 3DZM results were compared to estimates obtained independently against ultrasonic backscatter measurements. For the fibroadenoma and MMT, average scatterer diameters were 91 and 31.5 μm, respectively. Ultrasonic measurements yielded average scatterer diameters of 105 and 30 μm, respectively. The 3DZM estimation scheme showed results similar to those obtained by the independent ultrasonic measurements. The 3D impedance maps show promise as a powerful tool to characterize ultrasonic scattering sites of tissue. [Work supported by the University of Illinois Research Board.

  17. NOTE: Acoustical properties of selected tissue phantom materials for ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zell, K.; Sperl, J. I.; Vogel, M. W.; Niessner, R.; Haisch, C.

    2007-10-01

    This note summarizes the characterization of the acoustic properties of four materials intended for the development of tissue, and especially breast tissue, phantoms for the use in photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging. The materials are agar, silicone, polyvinyl alcohol gel (PVA) and polyacrylamide gel (PAA). The acoustical properties, i.e., the speed of sound, impedance and acoustic attenuation, are determined by transmission measurements of sound waves at room temperature under controlled conditions. Although the materials are tested for application such as photoacoustic phantoms, we focus here on the acoustic properties, while the optical properties will be discussed elsewhere. To obtain the acoustic attenuation in a frequency range from 4 MHz to 14 MHz, two ultrasound sources of 5 MHz and 10 MHz core frequencies are used. For preparation, each sample is cast into blocks of three different thicknesses. Agar, PVA and PAA show similar acoustic properties as water. Within silicone polymer, a significantly lower speed of sound and higher acoustical attenuation than in water and human tissue were found. All materials can be cast into arbitrary shapes and are suitable for tissue-mimicking phantoms. Due to its lower speed of sound, silicone is generally less suitable than the other presented materials.

  18. Viscoelastic properties and efficient acoustic damping in confined polymer nano-layers at GHz frequencies.

    PubMed

    Hettich, Mike; Jacob, Karl; Ristow, Oliver; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Gusev, Vitalyi; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2016-09-16

    We investigate the viscoelastic properties of confined molecular nano-layers by time resolved optical pump-probe measurements. Access to the elastic properties is provided by the damping time of acoustic eigenmodes of thin metal films deposited on the molecular nano-layers which show a strong dependence on the molecular layer thickness and on the acoustic eigen-mode frequencies. An analytical model including the viscoelastic properties of the molecular layer allows us to obtain the longitudinal sound velocity as well as the acoustic absorption coefficient of the layer. Our experiments and theoretical analysis indicate for the first time that the molecular nano-layers are much more viscous than elastic in the investigated frequency range from 50 to 120 GHz and thus show pronounced acoustic absorption. The longitudinal acoustic wavenumber has nearly equal real and imaginary parts, both increasing proportional to the square root of the frequency. Thus, both acoustic velocity and acoustic absorption are proportional to the square root of frequency and the propagation of compressional/dilatational acoustic waves in the investigated nano-layers is of the diffusional type, similar to the propagation of shear waves in viscous liquids and thermal waves in solids.

  19. Viscoelastic properties and efficient acoustic damping in confined polymer nano-layers at GHz frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Hettich, Mike; Jacob, Karl; Ristow, Oliver; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Gusev, Vitalyi; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the viscoelastic properties of confined molecular nano-layers by time resolved optical pump-probe measurements. Access to the elastic properties is provided by the damping time of acoustic eigenmodes of thin metal films deposited on the molecular nano-layers which show a strong dependence on the molecular layer thickness and on the acoustic eigen-mode frequencies. An analytical model including the viscoelastic properties of the molecular layer allows us to obtain the longitudinal sound velocity as well as the acoustic absorption coefficient of the layer. Our experiments and theoretical analysis indicate for the first time that the molecular nano-layers are much more viscous than elastic in the investigated frequency range from 50 to 120 GHz and thus show pronounced acoustic absorption. The longitudinal acoustic wavenumber has nearly equal real and imaginary parts, both increasing proportional to the square root of the frequency. Thus, both acoustic velocity and acoustic absorption are proportional to the square root of frequency and the propagation of compressional/dilatational acoustic waves in the investigated nano-layers is of the diffusional type, similar to the propagation of shear waves in viscous liquids and thermal waves in solids. PMID:27633351

  20. Viscoelastic properties and efficient acoustic damping in confined polymer nano-layers at GHz frequencies.

    PubMed

    Hettich, Mike; Jacob, Karl; Ristow, Oliver; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Gusev, Vitalyi; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the viscoelastic properties of confined molecular nano-layers by time resolved optical pump-probe measurements. Access to the elastic properties is provided by the damping time of acoustic eigenmodes of thin metal films deposited on the molecular nano-layers which show a strong dependence on the molecular layer thickness and on the acoustic eigen-mode frequencies. An analytical model including the viscoelastic properties of the molecular layer allows us to obtain the longitudinal sound velocity as well as the acoustic absorption coefficient of the layer. Our experiments and theoretical analysis indicate for the first time that the molecular nano-layers are much more viscous than elastic in the investigated frequency range from 50 to 120 GHz and thus show pronounced acoustic absorption. The longitudinal acoustic wavenumber has nearly equal real and imaginary parts, both increasing proportional to the square root of the frequency. Thus, both acoustic velocity and acoustic absorption are proportional to the square root of frequency and the propagation of compressional/dilatational acoustic waves in the investigated nano-layers is of the diffusional type, similar to the propagation of shear waves in viscous liquids and thermal waves in solids. PMID:27633351

  1. Viscoelastic properties and efficient acoustic damping in confined polymer nano-layers at GHz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettich, Mike; Jacob, Karl; Ristow, Oliver; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Gusev, Vitalyi; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the viscoelastic properties of confined molecular nano-layers by time resolved optical pump-probe measurements. Access to the elastic properties is provided by the damping time of acoustic eigenmodes of thin metal films deposited on the molecular nano-layers which show a strong dependence on the molecular layer thickness and on the acoustic eigen-mode frequencies. An analytical model including the viscoelastic properties of the molecular layer allows us to obtain the longitudinal sound velocity as well as the acoustic absorption coefficient of the layer. Our experiments and theoretical analysis indicate for the first time that the molecular nano-layers are much more viscous than elastic in the investigated frequency range from 50 to 120 GHz and thus show pronounced acoustic absorption. The longitudinal acoustic wavenumber has nearly equal real and imaginary parts, both increasing proportional to the square root of the frequency. Thus, both acoustic velocity and acoustic absorption are proportional to the square root of frequency and the propagation of compressional/dilatational acoustic waves in the investigated nano-layers is of the diffusional type, similar to the propagation of shear waves in viscous liquids and thermal waves in solids.

  2. Invariant properties and rotation transformations of the GPR scattering matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villela, Almendra; Romo, José M.

    2013-03-01

    We analyze the properties of the scattering matrix associated with the incident and scattered electric fields used in GPR. The elements of the scattering matrix provide information produced by different polarizations of the incident wave field. Rotationally invariant quantities such as trace, determinant and Frobenius norm lead to images that combine the information contained in the four elements of the scattering matrix in a mathematically simple and sound manner. The invariant quantities remove the directional properties implicit in the dipolar field used in GPR allowing the application of standard processing techniques designed for scalar fields, such as those used in seismic data processing. We illustrate the non-directional properties of the invariants using a 3D simulation of the wavefield produced by a point scatterer. The estimation of the azimuth angle of elongated targets is also explored using rotation transformations that maximize alternatively the co-polarized or the cross-polarized responses. The angle estimation is essentially an unstable process, particularly if low amplitudes or noisy data are involved. We apply the Frobenius norm ‖S‖F as a criterion for selection of the best amplitudes to use for a more stable and significant angle estimation. The performance of our formulation was tested with synthetic data produced by a 3D model of an air-filled metal pipe buried in a homogeneous halfspace. The images resulting from the invariants show a clear diffraction hyperbola suitable for a scalar wavefield migration, while the azimuth of the pipe is neatly resolved for amplitudes selected with ‖S‖F ≥ 0.4. A field experiment conducted above an aqueduct pipe illustrates the proposed methods with real data. The images obtained from the invariants are better than those from the individual elements of the scattering matrix. The azimuth estimated using our formulation is in agreement with the probable orientation of the aqueduct. Finally, a field

  3. Acoustic properties of a crack containing magmatic or hydrothermal fluids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kumagai, H.; Chouet, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    We estimate the acoustic properties of a crack containing maginatic or hydrothermal fluids to quantify the source properties of long-period (LP) events observed in volcanic areas assuming that a crack-like structure is the source of LP events. The tails of synthetic waveforms obtained from a model of a fluid-driven crack are analyzed by the Sompi method to determine the complex frequencies of one of the modes of crack resonance over a wide range of the model parameters ??/a and ??f/??s, where ?? is the P wave velocity of the rock matrix, a is the sound speed of the fluid, and ??f and ??s are the densities of the fluid and rock matrix, respectively. The quality factor due to radiation loss (Qr) for the selected mode almost monotonically increases with increasing ??/a, while the dimensionless frequency (??) of the mode decreases with increasing ??/a and ??f/??s. These results are used to estimate Q and ?? for a crack containing various types of fluids (gas-gas mixtures, liquid-gas mixtures, and dusty and misty gases) for values of a, ??f, and quality factor due to intrinsic losses (Qi) appropriate for these types of fluids, in which Q is given by Q-1 = Qr-1 + Qi-1. For a crack containing such fluids, we obtain Q ranging from almost unity to several hundred, which consistently explains the wide variety of quality factors measured in LP events observed at various volcanoes. We underscore the importance of dusty and misty gases containing small-size particles with radii around 1 ??m to explain long-lasting oscillations with Q significantly larger than 100. Our results may provide a basis for the interpretation of spatial and temporal variations in the observed complex frequencies of LP events in terms of fluid compositions beneath volcanoes. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. The acoustic properties of bilingual infant-directed speech.

    PubMed

    Danielson, D Kyle; Seidl, Amanda; Onishi, Kristine H; Alamian, Golnoush; Cristia, Alejandrina

    2014-02-01

    Does the acoustic input for bilingual infants equal the conjunction of the input heard by monolinguals of each separate language? The present letter tackles this question, focusing on maternal speech addressed to 11-month-old infants, on the cusp of perceptual attunement. The acoustic characteristics of the point vowels /a,i,u/ were measured in the spontaneous infant-directed speech of French-English bilingual mothers, as well as in the speech of French and English monolingual mothers. Bilingual caregivers produced their two languages with acoustic prosodic separation equal to that of the monolinguals, while also conveying distinct spectral characteristics of the point vowels in their two languages.

  5. Scattering of the Transverse Waveguide Modes of Surface Acoustic Waves by the Finite-Aperture Electrode Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sveshnikov, B. V.; Bagdasaryan, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a physical model allowing one to analyze reflection of the inhomogeneous beams of surface acoustic waves from metal strips in a planar waveguide on the piezoelectric substrate. Analytical relationships for determining the coefficients of scattering and mutual conversion of the transverse waveguide modes during their interaction with the spatially limited Bragg reflectors are obtained. The waveguide-reflector characteristics are shown to depend on the ratio of the waveguide aperture to its maximum value for which only the fundamental transverse mode is excited. It is established that the developed model strictly corresponds to the energy conservation law, i.e., in the absence of dissipation, the power of the inhomogeneous beam, which is incident on the finite reflector, is equal to the total power of all the scattered fields of the discrete and continuous waveguide spectra.

  6. Assessing the integrity of structural adhesive bonds by the measurement of acoustic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagasivamani, V.; Smith, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Results are reported of an experimental study tracing the influence of externally applied shear stresses on the acoustic properties in the bondline region. The changes in the acoustic properties with a change in the temperature of the test samples are measured. The results of these tests are employed to evaluate the quality of the adhesive bonds. The dependence of time-of-flight on the temperature of plain steel and of steel adhesively bonded to rubber is illustrated in graphic form.

  7. Linkage between acoustic parameters and seabed sediment properties in the south-western Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endler, Michael; Endler, Rudolf; Bobertz, Bernd; Leipe, Thomas; Arz, Helge W.

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic profiling methods are widely used to provide a rapid view into geological structures. For the interpretation of acoustic profiling results (single- and multi-beam), reliable geo-acoustic models are needed. Suitable geo-acoustic models covering a wide range of sediment types do not exist to date for the Baltic Sea. Based on surface sediment datasets, geo-acoustic models have been set up for the prediction of acoustical parameters derived from sedimentological data for south-western Baltic Sea surface sediments. Empirical relationships were created to predict key in situ parameters (p-wave velocity, wet bulk density) from sedimentological core data, notably grain density and water content. The Gassmann-Hamilton equations were used to set up a more generic physically based model. For the first time semi-empirical equations for the calculation of the elastic frame modulus and the solid sediment particle modulus were established by an iterative Gassmann-Hamilton fitting procedure. The resulting models have a remarkably good performance with, for example, a calculated sound velocity accuracy of about 17-32 m s-1 depending on model input data. The acoustic impedance of seafloor sediments can be estimated from single-beam echosounding if the contribution of seafloor reflectivity is extracted from the total acoustic signal. The data reveal a strong linkage between acoustic impedance and selected sediment properties (e.g. grain size, water content). This underlines the potential for effective mapping of seafloor sediment properties (e.g. habitat mapping). Furthermore, these geo-acoustic models can be used by marine geologists for a precise linkage between sediment facies identified in longer cores and corresponding acoustic facies recorded by high-resolution seismic profiling in future work.

  8. Study the polarization and depolarization properties of atmospheric aerosol multiple scattering based on the successive order of scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weizhen; Sun, Bin; Li, Zhengqiang; Sun, Xiaobing; Hong, Jin; Qie, Lili; Wang, Han

    2015-10-01

    With the polynomial fitting of source function in each order of scattering calculation and the effective process of aerosol forward scattering peak, a polarized radiative transfer (RT) model based on the improved successive order of scattering (SOS) method has been developed to solve the vector radiative transfer equation. By our RT model, not only the total Stokes parameters [I, Q, U] measured by the satellite (aircraft) and ground-based sensors with linear polarization could be approximately simulated, but also the results of parameters for each scattering order event could conveniently calculated, which are very helpful to study the polarization properties for the atmospheric aerosol multiple scattering. In this study, the synchronous measured aerosol results including aerosol optical depth, complex refractive index and particle size distribution from AERONET under different air conditions, are considered as the input parameters for the successive scattering simulations. With our polarized RT model and the Mie code combined, the Stokes parameters as well as the degree of polarization for each scattering order are simulated and presented; meanwhile, the polarization (depolarization) properties of multiply scattering are preliminary analyzed and compared with different air quality (clear and pollution). Those results could provide a significant support for the further research of polarized aerosol remote sensing and inversion. Polarization properties of aerosol, successive order of scattering, vector radiative transfer equation, polynomial fitting of source function , multiply scattering

  9. Reconstruction of the fine structure of an acoustic scatterer against the distorting influence of its large-scale inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, V. A.; Grishina, I. M.; Lapshenkina, O. I.; Morozov, S. A.; Rumyantseva, O. D.; Sukhov, E. G.

    2003-11-01

    In the ultrasonic diagnostics of small-size neoplasms of biological tissues at the earliest stage of their development, an efficient way to eliminate the distorting influence of high-contrast or large inhomogeneities of the biological medium is to apply the iterative technique. A simple approach is proposed, which makes it possible with only two iteration steps to achieve an efficient focusing of the tomograph array. At the first step, the unknown distribution of the large-scale inhomogeneities of sound velocity and absorption over the scatterer is reconstructed, where the large-scale inhomogeneities are those whose size exceeds several wavelengths. At the second step, the fine structure of the scatterer is reconstructed against the large-scale background, which can be performed with a high accuracy owing to the evaluation of the background at the first step. The possibility of simultaneous reconstruction of the large-scale and fine structures by the noniterative Grinevich-Novikov algorithm is considered as an alternative. This algorithm reconstructs in an explicit form two-dimensional refractive-absorbing acoustic scatterers of almost arbitrary shape and strength. Taking into account the effects of multiple scattering, this algorithm provides resolution of the fine structure almost as good as that achieved in reconstructing the same structure against an undistorting homogeneous background. The results of numerical simulations of both algorithms are presented.

  10. Acoustic assessment of sound scattering zooplankton in warm- and cold-core eddies in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Robert Allen

    Zooplankton and micronekton which cause a density discontinuity with the surrounding seawater reflect acoustic energy. This acoustic backscatter intensity (ABI) was measured using a vessel mounted 153 kHz acoustic Doppler current profiler. The ABI was used to describe vertical migration and distribution of sound scatterers in several mesoscale hydrographic features commonly found in the Gulf of Mexico: cold-core rings (CCRs), warm-core Loop Current eddies (LCEs) and the Loop Current (LC). The present paradigm contends that cold- core (cyclonic) features are mesoscale areas of enhanced production due to an influx of new nitrogen to surface waters as a result of divergent flow. The null hypothesis which was tested in this study was that the acoustic signatures of these features were not significantly different from one another. Clear diel differences in all of the features and a robust, positive correlation between ABI and plankton and micronekton wet displacement volume collected in MOCNESS tows in the upper 100 m of the water column were observed. During the day, ABI in CCRs was significantly greater than in LCEs and in the LC with regards to the upper 200 m. However, ABI in the LCEs and LC were not significantly different from each other. During the night, the ABI in the upper 50 m of the CCRs was significantly greater than that in the LCEs and the LC. However, there were no differences between features when ABI at night was summed for the entire upper 200 m, due to substantial vertical migrations of organisms into the upper 200 m of the water column at night. Two LCEs were revisited at an age of 8-9 months after their initial acoustic transects. The null hypothesis that there would be no significant difference in integrated ABI when the LCEs were resampled was rejected: both LCEs showed a reduction in integrated ABI over the upper 200 m. Further investigations into the faunal changes of these features are warranted, but the ADCP should continue to be a useful

  11. Research of microwave scattering properties of snow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelakos, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The results obtained in the research program of microwave scattering properties of snow fields are presented. Experimental results are presented showing backscatter dependence on frequency (5.8-8.0 GHz), angle of incidence (0-60 degrees), snow wetness (time of day), and frequency modulation (0-500 MHz). Theoretical studies are being made of the inverse scattering problem yielding some preliminary results concerning the determination of the dielectric constant of the snow layer. The experimental results lead to the following conclusions: snow layering affects backscatter, layer response is significant up to 45 degrees of incidence, wetness modifies snow layer effects, frequency modulation masks the layer response, and for the proper choice of probing frequency and for nominal snow depths, it appears to be possible to measure the effective dielectric constant and the corresponding water content of a snow pack.

  12. Invariance property of wave scattering through disordered media.

    PubMed

    Pierrat, Romain; Ambichl, Philipp; Gigan, Sylvain; Haber, Alexander; Carminati, Rémi; Rotter, Stefan

    2014-12-16

    A fundamental insight in the theory of diffusive random walks is that the mean length of trajectories traversing a finite open system is independent of the details of the diffusion process. Instead, the mean trajectory length depends only on the system's boundary geometry and is thus unaffected by the value of the mean free path. Here we show that this result is rooted on a much deeper level than that of a random walk, which allows us to extend the reach of this universal invariance property beyond the diffusion approximation. Specifically, we demonstrate that an equivalent invariance relation also holds for the scattering of waves in resonant structures as well as in ballistic, chaotic or in Anderson localized systems. Our work unifies a number of specific observations made in quite diverse fields of science ranging from the movement of ants to nuclear scattering theory. Potential experimental realizations using light fields in disordered media are discussed.

  13. Invariance property of wave scattering through disordered media

    PubMed Central

    Pierrat, Romain; Ambichl, Philipp; Gigan, Sylvain; Haber, Alexander; Carminati, Rémi; Rotter, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental insight in the theory of diffusive random walks is that the mean length of trajectories traversing a finite open system is independent of the details of the diffusion process. Instead, the mean trajectory length depends only on the system's boundary geometry and is thus unaffected by the value of the mean free path. Here we show that this result is rooted on a much deeper level than that of a random walk, which allows us to extend the reach of this universal invariance property beyond the diffusion approximation. Specifically, we demonstrate that an equivalent invariance relation also holds for the scattering of waves in resonant structures as well as in ballistic, chaotic or in Anderson localized systems. Our work unifies a number of specific observations made in quite diverse fields of science ranging from the movement of ants to nuclear scattering theory. Potential experimental realizations using light fields in disordered media are discussed. PMID:25425671

  14. Scattering Properties of Heterogeneous Mineral Particles with Absorbing Inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dlugach, Janna M.; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the results of numerically exact computer modeling of scattering and absorption properties of randomly oriented poly-disperse heterogeneous particles obtained by placing microscopic absorbing grains randomly on the surfaces of much larger spherical mineral hosts or by imbedding them randomly inside the hosts. These computations are paralleled by those for heterogeneous particles obtained by fully encapsulating fractal-like absorbing clusters in the mineral hosts. All computations are performed using the superposition T-matrix method. In the case of randomly distributed inclusions, the results are compared with the outcome of Lorenz-Mie computations for an external mixture of the mineral hosts and absorbing grains. We conclude that internal aggregation can affect strongly both the integral radiometric and differential scattering characteristics of the heterogeneous particle mixtures.

  15. Invariance property of wave scattering through disordered media.

    PubMed

    Pierrat, Romain; Ambichl, Philipp; Gigan, Sylvain; Haber, Alexander; Carminati, Rémi; Rotter, Stefan

    2014-12-16

    A fundamental insight in the theory of diffusive random walks is that the mean length of trajectories traversing a finite open system is independent of the details of the diffusion process. Instead, the mean trajectory length depends only on the system's boundary geometry and is thus unaffected by the value of the mean free path. Here we show that this result is rooted on a much deeper level than that of a random walk, which allows us to extend the reach of this universal invariance property beyond the diffusion approximation. Specifically, we demonstrate that an equivalent invariance relation also holds for the scattering of waves in resonant structures as well as in ballistic, chaotic or in Anderson localized systems. Our work unifies a number of specific observations made in quite diverse fields of science ranging from the movement of ants to nuclear scattering theory. Potential experimental realizations using light fields in disordered media are discussed. PMID:25425671

  16. Acoustic properties and durability of liner materials at non-standard atmospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.; Hsu, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the results of an experimental study on how acoustic properties of certain absorbing liner materials are affected by nonstandard atmospheric conditions. This study was motivated by the need to assess risks associated with incorporating acoustic testing capability in wind tunnels with semicryogenic high Reynolds number aerodynamic and/or low pressure capabilities. The study consisted of three phases: 1) measurement of acoustic properties of selected liner materials at subatmospheric pressure conditions, 2) periodic cold soak and high pressure exposure of liner materials for 250 cycles, and 3) determination of the effect of periodic cold soak on the acoustic properties of the liner materials at subatmospheric conditions and the effect on mechanical resiliency. The selected liner materials were Pyrell foam, Fiberglass, and Kevlar. A vacuum facility was used to create the subatmospheric environment in which an impedance tube was placed to measure acoustic properties of the test materials. An automated cryogenic cooling system was used to simulate periodic cold soak and high pressure exposure. It was found that lower ambient pressure reduced the absorption effectiveness of the liner materials to varying degrees. Also no significant change in the acoustic properties occurred after the periodic cold soak. Furthermore, mechanical resiliency tests indicated no noticeable change.

  17. Modelling acoustic scattering, sound speed, and attenuation in gassy soft marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Mantouka, A; Dogan, H; White, P R; Leighton, T G

    2016-07-01

    A model for nonlinear gas bubble pulsation in marine sediments is presented. This model is then linearized to determine the resonance frequency and the damping terms for linear radial oscillations. The linear model is then used to predict the effects that such bubble pulsations will have on the sound speed and attenuation of acoustic waves propagating in gassy marine sediment. The results are compared for monodisperse populations against the predictions of a model of Anderson and Hampton and, furthermore, the additional abilities of the model introduced in this paper are discussed. These features include the removal of the sign ambiguities in the expressions, the straightforward implementation for acoustic propagation through polydisperse bubble populations, the capability to estimate bubble size distributions through a full acoustic inversion, and the capability to predict nonlinear effects. PMID:27475152

  18. Acoustic Scattering by an Heterogeneous River Bed: Relationship to Bathymetry and Implications for Sediment Classification using Multibeam Echosounder Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscombe, D.; Grams, P. E.; Kaplinski, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Bed sediment classification using backscatter intensities from multibeam echosounder (MBES) systems in rivers is attractive due to its high coverage and resolution, limited costs compared to conventional sampling, and the potential combination of bathymetric and bottom sediment mapping in one instrument. Sediment classification by means of hydro-acoustic remote sensing is becoming an established discipline in oceanography. A number of techniques have been proposed, none of which has become the preferred method. In rivers, however, the field is relatively new and faces challenges not typically encountered in deep ocean settings. For example, river beds tend to have larger mean and maximum slopes than typical seabeds. Shallow water depths not only make MBES deployments more difficult, but also make the size of the beam footprint on the bed small which can lead to relatively noisy backscatter data. In particular, sediments can more heterogeneous in terms of: 1) range of particle sizes (both in a given area and over an entire mapped reach); 2) range of grain size over proximal bedform fields; 3) superimposed bedforms; and 4) abrupt sedimentological transitions over small scales. This sediment heterogeneity means grain-size usually changes along swath, which has a number of implications for existing sediment classification methods which use the distribution of backscatter intensities over all acoustic beams. We discuss these implications with reference to MBES data collected from the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona. We analyze the scale-dependence of probability density functions (PDF) of measured elevations in different sedimentological settings, which reveals the appropriate spatial scale at which to apply acoustic scattering theories. We also discuss the joint PDF of elevation and backscatter over different scales as a means by which to create an adaptive gridding scheme in which each grid is scaled appropriately, in situations with rapidly changing

  19. Numerical Studies of Scattering Properties of Leaves and Leaf Moisture Influences on the Scattering at Microwave Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Hu, Yongxiang; Sun, Wenbo; Min, Qilong

    2008-01-01

    This study uses 3-dimensional finite difference time domain method to accurately calculate single-scattering properties of randomly orientated leaves and evaluate the influences of vegetation water content (VWC) on these properties at 19 and 37 GHz frequencies. The studied leaves are assumed to be thin elliptic disks with two different sizes and have various VWC values. Although the leaf moisture produces considerable absorption during scattering processes, the effective efficiencies of extinction and scattering of leaves still near-linearly increase with VWC. Calculated asymmetry factors and phase functions indicate that there are significant amounts of scattering at large scattering angles in microwave wavelengths, which provides good opportunities for off-nadir microwave remote sensing of forests. This study lays a basic foundation in future quantifications of the relations between satellite measurements and physical properties of vegetation canopies.

  20. Numerical simulation of scattering of acoustic waves by inelastic bodies using hypersingular boundary integral equation

    SciTech Connect

    Daeva, S.G.; Setukha, A.V.

    2015-03-10

    A numerical method for solving a problem of diffraction of acoustic waves by system of solid and thin objects based on the reduction the problem to a boundary integral equation in which the integral is understood in the sense of finite Hadamard value is proposed. To solve this equation we applied piecewise constant approximations and collocation methods numerical scheme. The difference between the constructed scheme and earlier known is in obtaining approximate analytical expressions to appearing system of linear equations coefficients by separating the main part of the kernel integral operator. The proposed numerical scheme is tested on the solution of the model problem of diffraction of an acoustic wave by inelastic sphere.

  1. Comparison of acoustic and seismic excitation, propagation, and scattering at an air-ground interface containing a mine-like inclusion.

    PubMed

    Muir, Thomas G; Costley, R Daniel; Sabatier, James M

    2014-01-01

    Finite element methods are utilized to model and compare the use of both a remote loudspeaker and a vertical shaker in the generation of sound and shear and interface waves in an elastic solid containing an imbedded elastic scatterer, which is resonant. Results for steady state and transient insonification are presented to illustrate excitation, propagation, and scattering mechanisms and effects. Comparisons of acoustic and vibratory excitation of the solid interface are made, with a view towards remote sensing of induced vibratory motion through optical measurement of the ground interface motion above the imbedded inclusion. Some advantages of the acoustic excitation method for exciting plate mode resonances in the target are observed. PMID:24437744

  2. Comparison of acoustic and seismic excitation, propagation, and scattering at an air-ground interface containing a mine-like inclusion.

    PubMed

    Muir, Thomas G; Costley, R Daniel; Sabatier, James M

    2014-01-01

    Finite element methods are utilized to model and compare the use of both a remote loudspeaker and a vertical shaker in the generation of sound and shear and interface waves in an elastic solid containing an imbedded elastic scatterer, which is resonant. Results for steady state and transient insonification are presented to illustrate excitation, propagation, and scattering mechanisms and effects. Comparisons of acoustic and vibratory excitation of the solid interface are made, with a view towards remote sensing of induced vibratory motion through optical measurement of the ground interface motion above the imbedded inclusion. Some advantages of the acoustic excitation method for exciting plate mode resonances in the target are observed.

  3. Theory for a gas composition sensor based on acoustic properties.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Scott; Dain, Yefim; Lueptow, Richard M

    2003-01-01

    Sound travelling through a gas propagates at different speeds and its intensity attenuates to different degrees depending upon the composition of the gas. Theoretically, a real-time gaseous composition sensor could be based on measuring the sound speed and the acoustic attenuation. To this end, the speed of sound was modelled using standard relations, and the acoustic attenuation was modelled using the theory for vibrational relaxation of gas molecules. The concept for a gas composition sensor is demonstrated theoretically for nitrogen-methane-water and hydrogen-oxygen-water mixtures. For a three-component gas mixture, the measured sound speed and acoustic attenuation each define separate lines in the composition plane of two of the gases. The intersection of the two lines defines the gas composition. It should also be possible to use the concept for mixtures of more than three components, if the nature of the gas composition is known to some extent. PMID:14552356

  4. Density-dependent acoustic properties of PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey W; Thompson, Darla G; Deluca, Racci; Hartline, Ernest L; Hagelberg, Stephanie I

    2009-07-31

    We have measured the longitudinal and shear acoustic velocities of PBX 9502 as a function of density for die-pressed samples over the range 1.795 g/cc to 1.888 g/cc. The density dependence of the velocities is linear. Thermal cycling of PBX 9502 is known to induce irreversible volume growth. We have measured this volume growth dependence on density for a subset of the pressed parts and find that the most growth occurs for the samples with lowest initial density. The acoustic velocity changes due to the volume growth are significant and reflect damage in the samples.

  5. Influence of viscoelastic property on laser-generated surface acoustic waves in coating-substrate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Hongxiang; Zhang Shuyi; Xu Baiqiang

    2011-04-01

    Taking account of the viscoelasticity of materials, the pulsed laser generation of surface acoustic waves in coating-substrate systems has been investigated quantitatively by using the finite element method. The displacement spectra of the surface acoustic waves have been calculated in frequency domain for different coating-substrate systems, in which the viscoelastic properties of the coatings and substrates are considered separately. Meanwhile, the temporal displacement waveforms have been obtained by applying inverse fast Fourier transforms. The numerical results of the normal surface displacements are presented for different configurations: a single plate, a slow coating on a fast substrate, and a fast coating on a slow substrate. The influences of the viscoelastic properties of the coating and the substrate on the attenuation of the surface acoustic waves have been studied. In addition, the influence of the coating thickness on the attenuation of the surface acoustic waves has been also investigated in detail.

  6. Calculating the Scattering Properties of Fine Particulates on Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, G.; Glotch, T. D.; Arnold, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Infrared radiation is used to remotely determine the mineralogical composition of planetary surfaces. However, determining the compositions of fine particulates has been a problematic task. This is due to an increased difficulty in determining the scattering properties for multiple scattering of light that occurs when regolith particles have diameters on the order of the wavelength of incident light. Radiative transfer models have been used to calculate the emissivity of closely-packed, fine particles with some success, but these models are not accurate enough. In particular, Mie theory has been used to obtain the necessary parameters for radiative transfer models in hope of capturing the diffraction effects. Although these methods have been adjusted to account for closely-packed particles, the physics of radiative transfer and Mie theory only holds for truly well-separated particles. Considering this, our study takes a different approach, Multiple Sphere T-Matrix (MSTM) method, to capture the multiple scattering process. For a cluster composed of many particles, MSTM solves Maxwell's equations at every light and particle interface. Then, the cluster-averaged scattering properties of a single volume are input into equations of emissivity in Hapke [1996]. We generated a cluster of closely-packed spheres of forsterite composition with different diameters. Emissivities were calculated using MSTM/Hapke approach, then its quality was compared to that of Mie method. Furthermore, emissivity measurements were taken in a laboratory. Emission spectra derived from MSTM method resembled those from laboratory measurements closer than Mie method. This is an indication that MSTM method is capturing the multiple scattering process that increasingly becomes complex for particles with diameters on the order of the wavelength of incident radiation. MSTM method was shown to be more effective than Mie method, but not perfect; our next steps are to explore the effects of particle

  7. An efficient high-order Nyström scheme for acoustic scattering by inhomogeneous penetrable media with discontinuous material interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Akash; Pandey, Ambuj; Rathish Kumar, B. V.; Paul, Jagabandhu

    2016-04-01

    This text proposes a fast, rapidly convergent Nyström method for the solution of the Lippmann-Schwinger integral equation that mathematically models the scattering of time-harmonic acoustic waves by inhomogeneous obstacles, while allowing the material properties to jump across the interface. The method works with overlapping coordinate charts as a description of the given scatterer. In particular, it employs "partitions of unity" to simplify the implementation of high-order quadratures along with suitable changes of parametric variables to analytically resolve the singularities present in the integral operator to achieve desired accuracies in approximations. To deal with the discontinuous material interface in a high-order manner, a specialized quadrature is used in the boundary region. The approach further utilizes an FFT based strategy that uses equivalent source approximations to accelerate the evaluation of large number of interactions that arise in the approximation of the volumetric integral operator and thus achieves a reduced computational complexity of O (Nlog ⁡ N) for an N-point discretization. A detailed discussion on the solution methodology along with a variety of numerical experiments to exemplify its performance are presented in this paper.

  8. Finescale biological patchiness of 70 kHz acoustic scattering at the edge of the Gulf Stream—EchoFront 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nero, R. W.; Magnuson, J. J.; Brandt, S. B.; Stanton, T. K.; Jech, J. M.

    1990-06-01

    The spatial distribution of biological scatterers within the Gulf Stream front is inferred from an analysis of patch statistics obtained from digitally recorded backscattering data. Acoustic data were collected along 10 transects perpendicular to the front using a downward-looking 70 kHz echosounder. Patches were defined using an algorithm selected to search for finescale patches from within 200 × 900 element (approx. 200 m depth × 24 km length) integrated echo data. Based on principal component analyses of 17 patch parameters, we identified the third most important component as a measure of "acoustic roughness" (containing the coefficient of variance and coefficient of roughness of the integrated echo independent of echo intensity). This third component was a good descriptor of differences among patches within scattering layers and between water masses. It is independent of echo strength and patch size which constitute the first two components. We interpret higher acoustic roughness within patches to indicate a more contagious (clumped) distribution of animals within those patches. Classification of patches on acoustic roughness showed that patches were often acoustically different from distant neighbors but more similar to neighbors within the same scattering layer or region. We infer that finescale layers are made up of small patches of like animals exhibiting a similar spatial arrangement throughout the layer. Cross-stream differences in acoustic roughness indicate a greater number of solitary scatterers occur within the slope water than within the Gulf Stream. Acoustic roughness is also reduced at night when compared with day, indicating that the ascent of vertical migrators into the near-surface waters (<200 m) results in a more dispersed spatial pattern.

  9. Extraction of Target Scatterings from Received Transients on Target Detection Trial of Ambient Noise Imaging with Acoustic Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Nakamura, Toshiaki; Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2012-07-01

    We have already designed and fabricated an aspherical lens with an aperture diameter of 1.0 m to develop a prototype system for ambient noise imaging (ANI). It has also been verified that this acoustic lens realizes a directional resolution, which is a beam width of 1° at the center frequency of 120 kHz over the field of view from -7 to +7°. In this study, a sea trial of silent target detection using the prototype ANI system was conducted under only natural ocean ambient noise at Uchiura Bay, in November of 2010. There were many transients in the received sound. These transients were classified roughly into directly received noises and target scatterings. We proposed a classification method to extract transients of only target scatterings. By analyzing transients extracted as target scatterings, it was verified that the power spectrum density levels of the on-target directions were greater than those of the off-target directions in the higher frequency band over 60 kHz. These results showed that the targets are successfully detected under natural ocean ambient noise, mainly generated by snapping shrimps.

  10. The inverse problem of an impenetrable sound-hard body in acoustic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olshansky, Yaakov; Turkel, Eli

    2008-11-01

    We study the inverse problem of recovering the scatterer shape from the far-field pattern(FFP) of the scattered wave in presence of noise. This problem is ill-posed and is usually addressed via regularization. Instead, a direct approach to denoise the FFP using wavelet technique is proposed by us. We are interested in methods that deal with the scatterer of the general shape which may be described by a finite number of parameters. To study the effectiveness of the technique we concentrate on simple bodies such as ellipses, where the analytic solution to the forward scattering problem is known. The shape parameters are found based on a least-square error estimator. Two cases with the FFP corrupted by Gaussian noise and/or computational error from a finite element method are considered. We also consider the case where only partial data is known in the far field.

  11. Sound scattering from rough bubbly ocean surface based on modified sea surface acoustic simulator and consideration of various incident angles and sub-surface bubbles' radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolghasi, Alireza; Ghadimi, Parviz; Chekab, Mohammad A. Feizi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve the capabilities and precision of a recently introduced Sea Surface Acoustic Simulator (SSAS) developed based on optimization of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff-Fresnel (HKF) method. The improved acoustic simulator, hereby known as the Modified SSAS (MSSAS), is capable of determining sound scattering from the sea surface and includes an extended Hall-Novarini model and optimized HKF method. The extended Hall-Novarini model is used for considering the effects of sub-surface bubbles over a wider range of radii of sub-surface bubbles compared to the previous SSAS version. Furthermore, MSSAS has the capability of making a three-dimensional simulation of scattered sound from the rough bubbly sea surface with less error than that of the Critical Sea Tests (CST) experiments. Also, it presents scattered pressure levels from the rough bubbly sea surface based on various incident angles of sound. Wind speed, frequency, incident angle, and pressure level of the sound source are considered as input data, and scattered pressure levels and scattering coefficients are provided. Finally, different parametric studies were conducted on wind speeds, frequencies, and incident angles to indicate that MSSAS is quite capable of simulating sound scattering from the rough bubbly sea surface, according to the scattering mechanisms determined by Ogden and Erskine. Therefore, it is concluded that MSSAS is valid for both scattering mechanisms and the transition region between them that are defined by Ogden and Erskine.

  12. Sound scattering from rough bubbly ocean surface based on modified sea surface acoustic simulator and consideration of various incident angles and sub-surface bubbles' radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolghasi, Alireza; Ghadimi, Parviz; Chekab, Mohammad A. Feizi

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve the capabilities and precision of a recently introduced Sea Surface Acoustic Simulator (SSAS) developed based on optimization of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff-Fresnel (HKF) method. The improved acoustic simulator, hereby known as the Modified SSAS (MSSAS), is capable of determining sound scattering from the sea surface and includes an extended Hall-Novarini model and optimized HKF method. The extended Hall-Novarini model is used for considering the effects of sub-surface bubbles over a wider range of radii of sub-surface bubbles compared to the previous SSAS version. Furthermore, MSSAS has the capability of making a three-dimensional simulation of scattered sound from the rough bubbly sea surface with less error than that of the Critical Sea Tests (CST) experiments. Also, it presents scattered pressure levels from the rough bubbly sea surface based on various incident angles of sound. Wind speed, frequency, incident angle, and pressure level of the sound source are considered as input data, and scattered pressure levels and scattering coefficients are provided. Finally, different parametric studies were conducted on wind speeds, frequencies, and incident angles to indicate that MSSAS is quite capable of simulating sound scattering from the rough bubbly sea surface, according to the scattering mechanisms determined by Ogden and Erskine. Therefore, it is concluded that MSSAS is valid for both scattering mechanisms and the transition region between them that are defined by Ogden and Erskine.

  13. Measurement of inherent particle properties by dynamic light scattering: introducing electrorotational light scattering.

    PubMed Central

    Prüger, B; Eppmann, P; Donath, E; Gimsa, J

    1997-01-01

    Common dynamic light scattering (DLS) methods determine the size and zeta-potential of particles by analyzing the motion resulting from thermal noise or electrophoretic force. Dielectric particle spectroscopy by common microscopic electrorotation (ER) measures the frequency dependence of field-induced rotation of single particles to analyze their inherent dielectric structure. We propose a new technique, electrorotational light scattering (ERLS). It measures ER in a particle ensemble by a homodyne DLS setup. ER-induced particle rotation is extracted from the initial decorrelation of the intensity autocorrelation function (ACF) by a simple optical particle model. Human red blood cells were used as test particles, and changes of the characteristic frequency of membrane dispersion induced by the ionophore nystatin were monitored by ERLS. For untreated control cells, a rotation frequency of 2 s-1 was induced at the membrane peak frequency of 150 kHz and a field strength of 12 kV/m. This rotation led to a decorrelation of the ACF about 10 times steeper than that of the field free control. For deduction of ERLS frequency spectra, different criteria are discussed. Particle shape and additional field-induced motions like dielectrophoresis and particle-particle attraction do not significantly influence the criteria. For nystatin-treated cells, recalculation of dielectric cell properties revealed an ionophore-induced decrease in the internal conductivity. Although the absolute rotation speed and the rotation sense are not yet directly accessible, ERLS eliminates the tedious microscopic measurements. It offers computerized, statistically significant measurements of dielectric particle properties that are especially suitable for nonbiological applications, e.g., the study of colloidal particles. PMID:9138587

  14. Acoustical properties of individual liposome-loaded microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Luan, Ying; Faez, Telli; Gelderblom, Erik; Skachkov, Ilya; Geers, Bart; Lentacker, Ine; van der Steen, Ton; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico

    2012-12-01

    A comparison between phospholipid-coated microbubbles with and without liposomes attached to the microbubble surface was performed using the ultra-high-speed imaging camera (Brandaris 128). We investigated 73 liposome-loaded microbubbles (loaded microbubbles) and 41 microbubbles without liposome loading (unloaded microbubbles) with a diameter ranging from 3-10 μm at frequencies ranging from 0.6-3.8 MHz and acoustic pressures ranging from 5-100 kPa. The experimental data showed nearly the same shell elasticity for the loaded and unloaded bubbles, but the shell viscosity was higher for loaded bubbles compared with unloaded bubbles. For loaded bubbles, a higher pressure threshold for the bubble vibrations was noticed. In addition, an "expansion-only" behavior was observed for up to 69% of the investigated loaded bubbles, which mostly occurred at low acoustic pressures (≤30 kPa). Finally, fluorescence imaging showed heterogeneity of liposome distributions of the loaded bubbles.

  15. Development of a new plasma diagnostic of the critical surface and studies of the ion acoustic decay instability using collective Thomson scattering. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Seka, W.; Drake, R.P.

    1992-08-01

    We have developed 5-channel collective Thomson scattering system to measure the ion acoustic wave excited by the ion acoustic wave decay instabilities. The multichannel collective Thomson scattering technique was established with 4{omega} probe laser beam using GDL laser system at LLE, Univ. of Rochester. We have obtained the ionic charge state Z by measuring the second harmonic emission from the ion acoustic decay instability. The LASNEX computer simulation calculations have been carried out. The experimental results agree very well with the LASNEX computer simulation results with the flux number f=0.l. In high power laser regime, the spectrum become broad, and the {Delta}{gamma} decreases indicating that the turbulent like spectrum is observed. In order to understand the experimental results, we have developed a theory to study absorption of laser and heat transport. This new theory includes the temporal evolution of the heat conduction region. The results agree with flux-limited hydrodynamic simulations.

  16. Development of a new plasma diagnostic of the critical surface and studies of the ion acoustic decay instability using collective Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S. ); Seka, W. . Lab. of Laser Energetics); Drake, R.P. )

    1992-01-01

    We have developed 5-channel collective Thomson scattering system to measure the ion acoustic wave excited by the ion acoustic wave decay instabilities. The multichannel collective Thomson scattering technique was established with 4{omega} probe laser beam using GDL laser system at LLE, Univ. of Rochester. We have obtained the ionic charge state Z by measuring the second harmonic emission from the ion acoustic decay instability. The LASNEX computer simulation calculations have been carried out. The experimental results agree very well with the LASNEX computer simulation results with the flux number f=0.l. In high power laser regime, the spectrum become broad, and the {Delta}{gamma} decreases indicating that the turbulent like spectrum is observed. In order to understand the experimental results, we have developed a theory to study absorption of laser and heat transport. This new theory includes the temporal evolution of the heat conduction region. The results agree with flux-limited hydrodynamic simulations.

  17. Collective acoustic modes as renormalized damped oscillators: Unified description of neutron and x-ray scattering data from classical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Guarini, Eleonora

    2006-06-15

    In the Q range where inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering are applied to the study of acoustic collective excitations in fluids, various models of the dynamic structure factor S(Q,{omega}) generalize in different ways the results obtained from linearized-hydrodynamics theory in the Q{yields}0 limit. Here we show that the models most commonly fitted to experimental S(Q,{omega}) spectra can be given a unified formulation. In this way, direct comparisons among the results obtained by fitting different models become now possible to a much larger extent than ever. We also show that a consistent determination of the dispersion curve and of the propagation Q range of the excitations is possible, whichever model is used. We derive an exact formula which describes in all cases the dispersion curve and allows for the first quantitative understanding of its shape, by assigning specific and distinct roles to the various structural, thermal, and damping effects that determine the Q dependence of the mode frequencies. The emerging picture describes the acoustic modes as Q-dependent harmonic oscillators whose characteristic frequency is explicitly renormalized in an exact way by the relaxation processes, which also determine, through the widths of both the inelastic and the elastic lines, the whole shape of collective-excitation spectra.

  18. Acoustic scattering by a two-layer cylindrical tube immersed in a fluid medium: Existence of a pseudo wave.

    PubMed

    Elhanaoui, Abdelkader; Aassif, Elhoucein; Maze, Gérard; Décultot, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    The present paper studies the acoustic signal backscattered by an air-filled copper–solid polymer two-layer cylindrical tube immersed in water. The work is done from the calculation of the backscattered pressure, an inverse Fourier Transform, which allows us to obtain an impulse signal. Smoothed pseudo Wigner–Ville and Concentrated spectrogram representations have been chosen to analyze the scattering phenomenon. For reduced frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 200, the resonance trajectories and time–frequency images have shown the presence of the guided waves. The bifurcation of the A0 wave into the A0(-) and the A0(+) waves has also been observed. The authors provide the phase and the group velocities of guided waves and investigate the differences between curves. The findings are then compared with those obtained for the copper and the solid polymer one-layer cylindrical tubes. Group velocity values have also been extracted from smoothed pseudo Wigner–Ville and Concentrated spectrogram time–frequency images. A good agreement with the theory has, therefore, been observed. The study of acoustic backscattering by a copper–solid polymer two-layer tube has revealed the interaction and the coupling of guided waves, specially the presence of a pseudo A1 wave; which is a very interesting, remarkable phenomenon. PMID:26601563

  19. Collective acoustic modes as renormalized damped oscillators: Unified description of neutron and x-ray scattering data from classical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Guarini, Eleonora; Barocchi, Fabrizio

    2006-06-01

    In the Q range where inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering are applied to the study of acoustic collective excitations in fluids, various models of the dynamic structure factor S(Q,ω) generalize in different ways the results obtained from linearized-hydrodynamics theory in the Q→0 limit. Here we show that the models most commonly fitted to experimental S(Q,ω) spectra can be given a unified formulation. In this way, direct comparisons among the results obtained by fitting different models become now possible to a much larger extent than ever. We also show that a consistent determination of the dispersion curve and of the propagation Q range of the excitations is possible, whichever model is used. We derive an exact formula which describes in all cases the dispersion curve and allows for the first quantitative understanding of its shape, by assigning specific and distinct roles to the various structural, thermal, and damping effects that determine the Q dependence of the mode frequencies. The emerging picture describes the acoustic modes as Q -dependent harmonic oscillators whose characteristic frequency is explicitly renormalized in an exact way by the relaxation processes, which also determine, through the widths of both the inelastic and the elastic lines, the whole shape of collective-excitation spectra.

  20. Collective acoustic modes as renormalized damped oscillators: unified description of neutron and x-ray scattering data from classical fluids.

    PubMed

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Guarini, Eleonora; Barocchi, Fabrizio

    2006-06-01

    In the Q range where inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering are applied to the study of acoustic collective excitations in fluids, various models of the dynamic structure factor S(Q, omega) generalize in different ways the results obtained from linearized-hydrodynamics theory in the Q-->0 limit. Here we show that the models most commonly fitted to experimental S(Q, omega) spectra can be given a unified formulation. In this way, direct comparisons among the results obtained by fitting different models become now possible to a much larger extent than ever. We also show that a consistent determination of the dispersion curve and of the propagation Q range of the excitations is possible, whichever model is used. We derive an exact formula which describes in all cases the dispersion curve and allows for the first quantitative understanding of its shape, by assigning specific and distinct roles to the various structural, thermal, and damping effects that determine the Q dependence of the mode frequencies. The emerging picture describes the acoustic modes as Q-dependent harmonic oscillators whose characteristic frequency is explicitly renormalized in an exact way by the relaxation processes, which also determine, through the widths of both the inelastic and the elastic lines, the whole shape of collective-excitation spectra. PMID:16906814

  1. Numerical investigation on buffer performance based on acoustic excitation by stimulated Brillouin scattering in an As 2Se 3 fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyao; Zhou, Xiaojun; Liang, Rui; Qin, Zujun; Liu, Yong

    2009-07-01

    Buffer performance of a 2.5 Gb/s bit stream with non-return-to-zero format is investigated based on acoustic excitation by stimulated Brillouin scattering in an As 2Se 3 fiber. The storage process and the retrieval process of the bit stream are separately controlled by a "Write" pulse and a "Read" pulse. The research results show that the output signal-to-noise ratio and the readout efficiency of the buffer are agreeable, and the pulse distortion is low, if both the "Write" and the "Read" pulses are with high enough peak power and spectrum wider than that of the signal pulse. Buffering of a consecutive 10-bit-long 2.5 Gb/s NRZ bit stream has also been demonstrated in the As 2Se 3 fiber with length of only 0.5 m. The storage of a long bit stream, such as the data packet containing about 1000 bits in the telecommunications, is limited by the high loss in the As 2Se 3 fiber. However, the development of the special optical fiber with high Brillouin gain coefficient, long acoustic lifetime and low loss can make this technology applicable for all-optical buffering in high speed optical networks.

  2. Comparison of temporal and spectral scattering methods using acoustically large breast models derived from magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Hesford, Andrew J.; Tillett, Jason C.; Astheimer, Jeffrey P.; Waag, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and efficient modeling of ultrasound propagation through realistic tissue models is important to many aspects of clinical ultrasound imaging. Simplified problems with known solutions are often used to study and validate numerical methods. Greater confidence in a time-domain k-space method and a frequency-domain fast multipole method is established in this paper by analyzing results for realistic models of the human breast. Models of breast tissue were produced by segmenting magnetic resonance images of ex vivo specimens into seven distinct tissue types. After confirming with histologic analysis by pathologists that the model structures mimicked in vivo breast, the tissue types were mapped to variations in sound speed and acoustic absorption. Calculations of acoustic scattering by the resulting model were performed on massively parallel supercomputer clusters using parallel implementations of the k-space method and the fast multipole method. The efficient use of these resources was confirmed by parallel efficiency and scalability studies using large-scale, realistic tissue models. Comparisons between the temporal and spectral results were performed in representative planes by Fourier transforming the temporal results. An RMS field error less than 3% throughout the model volume confirms the accuracy of the methods for modeling ultrasound propagation through human breast. PMID:25096103

  3. Thermal properties of nanotubes and nanowires with acoustically stiffened surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bifano, Michael F. P.; Prakash, Vikas

    2012-02-01

    A multilayer elasticity model is developed to investigate the effects of acoustically stiffened surfaces (increased surface moduli) on the specific heat and thermal conductivity of typical nanowire and nanotubes as a function of temperature. Changes in phonon dispersion are analyzed using approximated phonon dispersion relations that result from the solutions to the frequency equation of a vibrating elastic tube or rod. The results of the investigation indicate a 10% reduction in specific heat and a 2% decrease in lattice thermal conductivity at 50 K for a 10 nm outer diameter crystalline nanotube with an inner diameter of 5 nm when the average Young's modulus of the first three atomic layers on both the inner and outer free surfaces are increased by a factor of 1.87. In contrast, a 10 nm outer diameter nanowire composed of the same material and with an acoustically stiffened outer shell shows an approximate 30% increase in thermal conductivity and specific heat near 50 K. Our simplified model can potentially be extended to investigate the acoustic tuning of nanowires and nanotubes by inducing surface stiffening or softening via appropriate surface chemical functionalization protocols or coatings.

  4. Experimental evidence of the effect of heat flux on thomson scattering off ion acoustic waves

    PubMed

    Amiranoff; Baton; Huller; Malka; Modena; Mounaix; Galloudec; Rousseaux; Salvati

    2000-02-01

    Thomson self-scattering measurements are performed in a preionized helium gas jet plasma at different locations along the laser propagation direction. A systematic and important variation of the intensity ratio between the blue and the red ion spectral components is observed, depending on whether the location of the probed region is in front of or behind the focal plane. A simple theoretical calculation of Thomson scattering shows that this behavior can be qualitatively understood in terms of a deformation of the electron distribution function due to the return current correlated with the classical thermal heat flux. PMID:11046481

  5. Radar scattering properties of steep-sided domes on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Peter G.

    1994-01-01

    More than 100 quasi-circular steep-sided volcanic domes, with diameters ranging from 6 to 60 km, have been observed on the surface of Venus by the Magellan radar mapper. Assuming that they have the shape of a solidified high-viscosity Newtonian fluid, their radar scattering properties can be studied in detail from Magellan images, since a typical radar swath resolves each dome into several tens of thousands of measurements of radar cross section at incidence angles varying fom 15 deg to 55 deg. Through examination of 20 domes in detail, it appears that many of those situated on lava plains scatter radar in a manner that is indistinguishable from that of the surrounding material, suggesting that either (1) they were formed of a relatively high-density high-viscosity material, e.g., andesite, rather than a lower-density one, e.g., rhyolite or dacite; or (2) that their surfaces share a common origin with those of their surroundings, e.g., through in situ weathering or aeolian deposition.

  6. Studies of horizontal refraction and scattering of low-frequency acoustic signals using a modal approach in signal processing of NPAL data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronovich, Alexander G.; Ostashev, Vladimir E.

    2003-04-01

    In our previous paper [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112, 2232], we obtained a time dependence of the horizontal refraction angle (HRA) of acoustic signals propagating over a range of about 4000 km in the ocean. This dependence was computed by processing of acoustic signals recorded during the North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory (NPAL) experiment using a ray-type approach. In the present paper, we consider the results obtained in signal processing of the same data using a modal approach. In this approach, the acoustic field is represented as a sum of local acoustic modes with amplitudes depending on a frequency and arrival angle. We obtained a time dependence of HRA for a time interval of about a year. Time evolution of HRA exhibits long-period variations which could be associated with seasonal trends in the sound speed profiles. The results are consistent with those obtained by the ray approach. Different horizontal angles within arrivals were impossible to resolve due to sound scattering by internal waves. A theoretical estimate of the angular width of the acoustic signals in a horizontal plane was obtained. It appears to be consistent with the observed variance of HRA data. [Work supported by ONR.] a)J. A. Colosi, B. D. Cornuelle, B. D. Dushaw, M. A. Dzieciuch, B. M. Howe, J. A. Mercer, R. C. Spindel, and P. F. Worcester.

  7. Scattering properties of a composite resin: Influence on color perception

    PubMed Central

    Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco; Bianchi, Stefano; Poggio, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Background: The properties of the composite materials and the clinical expertise while layering them carry many esthetic implications in restorative dentistry. Aims: The aim of the present study is to assess the influence of scattering properties of G-aenial A2 shade on color perception when used in esthetic restorations. Materials and Methods: Two composite resins were evaluated in this study: Gradia Direct (shade A3) and G-aenial (shade A2). A colorimetric evaluation according to the CIE L*a*b* system, relative to standard illuminant A against a white background, was performed to assess the referred chameleonic properties of G-aenial when used in simulated clinical situations. Statistical Analysis Used: The differences in color change between the test group G-aenial and the test Group Gradia Direct were considered clinically not perceptible (ΔE* <3.3). Differently, the differences in color change were considered clinically perceptible (ΔE* >3.3) between the control group G-aenial and the control group Gradia Direct and between the test group G-aenial and the control specimens obtained with G-aenial. The CIE Lab parameters which brought to ΔE were investigated using t-test (P < 0.05). Results and Conclusions: Color harmonization in simulated clinical conditions depends on different factors related to dentine and to composite resins. In this study dentine variables were dropped in order to analyze the influence of thickness and of the composition of the composite resin. PMID:25395767

  8. A method to determine the acoustical properties of locally and nonlocally reacting duct liners in grazing flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Succi, G.

    1982-01-01

    The acoustical properties of locally and nonlocally reacting acoustical liners in grazing flow are described. The effect of mean flow and shear flow are considered as well as the application to rigid and limp bulk reacting materials. The axial wavenumber of the least attenuated mode in a flow duct is measured. The acoustical properties of duct liners is then deduced from the measured axial wavenumber and known flow profile and boundary conditions. This method is a natural extension of impedance-like measurements.

  9. A numerical method for time dependent acoustic scattering problems involving smart obstacles and incoming waves of small wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatone, Lorella; Recchioni, Maria Cristina; Zirilli, Francesco

    2006-05-01

    In this paper we propose a highly parallelizable numerical method for time dependent acoustic scattering problems involving realistic smart obstacles hit by incoming waves having wavelengths small compared with the characteristic dimension of the obstacles. A smart obstacle is an obstacle that when hit by an incoming wave tries to pursue a goal circulating on its boundary a pressure current. In particular we consider obstacles whose goal is to be undetectable and we refer to them as furtive obstacles. These scattering problems are modelled as optimal control problems for the wave equation. We validate the method proposed to solve the optimal control problem considered on some test problems where a "smart" simplified version of the NASA space shuttle is hit by incoming waves with small wavelengths compared to its characteristic dimension. That is we consider test problems with ratio between the characteristic dimension of the obstacle and wavelength of the time harmonic component of the incoming wave up to approximately one hundred. The website: http://www.econ.univpm.it/recchioni/w14 contains animations and virtual reality applications showing some numerical experiments relative to the problems studied in this paper.

  10. Measurements and empirical model of the acoustic properties of reticulated vitreous carbon.

    PubMed

    Muehleisena, Ralph T; Beamer, C Walter; Tinianov, Brandon D

    2005-02-01

    Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) is a highly porous, rigid, open cell carbon foam structure with a high melting point, good chemical inertness, and low bulk thermal conductivity. For the proper design of acoustic devices such as acoustic absorbers and thermoacoustic stacks and regenerators utilizing RVC, the acoustic properties of RVC must be known. From knowledge of the complex characteristic impedance and wave number most other acoustic properties can be computed. In this investigation, the four-microphone transfer matrix measurement method is used to measure the complex characteristic impedance and wave number for 60 to 300 pore-per-inch RVC foams with flow resistivities from 1759 to 10,782 Pa s m(-2) in the frequency range of 330 Hz-2 kHz. The data are found to be poorly predicted by the fibrous material empirical model developed by Delany and Bazley, the open cell plastic foam empirical model developed by Qunli, or the Johnson-Allard microstructural model. A new empirical power law model is developed and is shown to provide good predictions of the acoustic properties over the frequency range of measurement. Uncertainty estimates for the constants of the model are also computed.

  11. Acoustic and optical properties of thallium ion-exchanged KTiOPO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, David K. T.

    1994-10-01

    Both acoustic and optical properties of thallium ion-exchanged KTiOPO4 (Tl:KTP) plates were examined. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity of the thallium-exchanged z-cut KTP possesses a reduction of 13% from the unchanged KTP. Temperature stability of SAW resonance (1/f0 df/dT) changed from ≊-81 ppm of an untreated z-cut KTP substrate to ≊-121 ppm of a z-cut Tl:KTP substrate. Large optical refractive indices changes at the Tl ion-exchanged surface were observed [Δneff(TE)≊0.3, Δneff(TM)≊0.22]. Tl ion concentration profile from the crystal surface into substrate was also studied using electron beam microscopy and the optical index m-line measurement. Tl-exchanged KTP, therefore, possesses both acoustic and optical waveguiding properties.

  12. In-situ physical properties measurements using crosswell acoustic data

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.A.; Albright, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    Crosswell acoustic surveys enable the in-situ measurements of elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio, porosity, and apparent seismic Q of gas-bearing low-permeability formations represented at the Department of Energy Multi-Well Experiment (MWX) site near Rifle, Colorado. These measurements, except for Q, are compared with laboratory measurements on core taken from the same depths at which the crosswell measurements are made. Seismic Q determined in situ is compared to average values for sandstone. Porosity was determined from crosswell data using the empirical relationship between acoustic velocity, porosity, and effective pressure developed by Domenico. Domenico, S.N., ''Rock Lithology and Porosity Determination from Shear and compressional Wave Velocity,'' Geophysics, Vol. 49, No. 9, Aug. 1984, pp. 1188-1195. In-situ porosities are significantly greater than the core-derived values. Sources of the discrepancy may arise from (i) the underestimation of porosity that can result when Boyle's Law measurements are made on low-permeability core and (ii) the application of Dominico's relationship, which is developed for clean sands, to the mixed sandstone and shale lithologies represented at the MWX site. Values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio derived from crosswell measurements are comparable to values obtained from core. Apparent seismic Q measured in situ between wells is lower than Q measured on core and clearly shows the heterogeneity of sandstone deposited in a fluvial environment. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Structure and acoustic properties of hydrated nafion membranes.

    PubMed

    Plazanet, M; Bartolini, P; Torre, R; Petrillo, C; Sacchetti, F

    2009-07-30

    The propagation of acoustic waves in water-hydrated Nafion membrane has been monitored using heterodyne-detected transient grating spectroscopy. At room temperature, upon increasing the water content, the speed of sound drops to a value lower than the respective velocities of sound in pure Nafion and pure water. This counterintuitive effect can be explained by a simple calculation of the sound velocity in an effective medium made of water and Nafion polymer. Upon cooling, a phase separation occurs in the sample, and the formation of ice is observed (M. Pineri et al. J. Power Sources 2007, 172, 587-596). This phase transition is characterized via a second acoustic wave observed in the signal. Sound propagation and X-ray diffraction confirm the formation of crystalline ice on the membrane surface, that reversibly melts upon heating. The amount of ice that forms in the sample is monitored as a function of temperature and represents an order parameter for the transition. This parameter follows a power law with an exponent of 0.5, indicating the critical nature of the observed process. PMID:19719280

  14. Modelling of the acoustic field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gélat, Pierre; ter Haar, Gail; Saffari, Nader

    2011-09-01

    The efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the treatment of a range of different cancers, including those of the liver, prostate and breast, has been demonstrated. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection in terms of reduced risk of harmful side effects. Despite this, there are a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the rib cage to induce tissue necrosis in the required volume whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes. Multi-element random-phased arrays are currently showing great promise in overcoming the limitations of single-element transducers. Nevertheless, successful treatment of a patient with liver tumours requires a thorough understanding of the way in which the ultrasonic pressure field from a HIFU array is scattered by the rib cage. In order to address this, a boundary element approach based on a generalized minimal residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was used in conjunction with phase conjugation techniques to focus the field of a 256-element random HIFU array behind human ribs at locations requiring intercostal and transcostal treatment. Simulations were carried out on a 3D mesh of quadratic pressure patches generated using CT scan anatomical data for adult ribs 9-12 on the right side. The methodology was validated on spherical and cylindrical scatterers. Field calculations were also carried out for idealized ribs, consisting of arrays of strip-like scatterers, demonstrating effects of splitting at the focus. This method has the advantage of fully accounting for the effect of scattering and diffraction in 3D under continuous wave excitation.

  15. Modelling of the acoustic field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs.

    PubMed

    Gélat, Pierre; Ter Haar, Gail; Saffari, Nader

    2011-09-01

    The efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the treatment of a range of different cancers, including those of the liver, prostate and breast, has been demonstrated. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection in terms of reduced risk of harmful side effects. Despite this, there are a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the rib cage to induce tissue necrosis in the required volume whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes. Multi-element random-phased arrays are currently showing great promise in overcoming the limitations of single-element transducers. Nevertheless, successful treatment of a patient with liver tumours requires a thorough understanding of the way in which the ultrasonic pressure field from a HIFU array is scattered by the rib cage. In order to address this, a boundary element approach based on a generalized minimal residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was used in conjunction with phase conjugation techniques to focus the field of a 256-element random HIFU array behind human ribs at locations requiring intercostal and transcostal treatment. Simulations were carried out on a 3D mesh of quadratic pressure patches generated using CT scan anatomical data for adult ribs 9-12 on the right side. The methodology was validated on spherical and cylindrical scatterers. Field calculations were also carried out for idealized ribs, consisting of arrays of strip-like scatterers, demonstrating effects of splitting at the focus. This method has the advantage of fully accounting for the effect of scattering and diffraction in 3D under continuous wave excitation.

  16. THz Acoustic Spectroscopy by using Double Quantum Wells and Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fan Jun; Yeh, Yu-Hsiang; Sheu, Jinn-Kong; Lin, Kung-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    GaN is a pivotal material for acoustic transducers and acoustic spectroscopy in the THz regime, but its THz phonon properties have not been experimentally and comprehensively studied. In this report, we demonstrate how to use double quantum wells as a THz acoustic transducer for measuring generated acoustic phonons and deriving a broadband acoustic spectrum with continuous frequencies. We experimentally investigated the sub-THz frequency dependence of acoustic attenuation (i.e., phonon mean-free paths) in GaN, in addition to its physical origins such as anharmonic scattering, defect scattering, and boundary scattering. A new upper limit of attenuation caused by anharmonic scattering, which is lower than previously reported values, was obtained. Our results should be noteworthy for THz acoustic spectroscopy and for gaining a fundamental understanding of heat conduction. PMID:27346494

  17. THz Acoustic Spectroscopy by using Double Quantum Wells and Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Fan Jun; Yeh, Yu-Hsiang; Sheu, Jinn-Kong; Lin, Kung-Hsuan

    2016-06-01

    GaN is a pivotal material for acoustic transducers and acoustic spectroscopy in the THz regime, but its THz phonon properties have not been experimentally and comprehensively studied. In this report, we demonstrate how to use double quantum wells as a THz acoustic transducer for measuring generated acoustic phonons and deriving a broadband acoustic spectrum with continuous frequencies. We experimentally investigated the sub-THz frequency dependence of acoustic attenuation (i.e., phonon mean-free paths) in GaN, in addition to its physical origins such as anharmonic scattering, defect scattering, and boundary scattering. A new upper limit of attenuation caused by anharmonic scattering, which is lower than previously reported values, was obtained. Our results should be noteworthy for THz acoustic spectroscopy and for gaining a fundamental understanding of heat conduction.

  18. THz Acoustic Spectroscopy by using Double Quantum Wells and Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fan Jun; Yeh, Yu-Hsiang; Sheu, Jinn-Kong; Lin, Kung-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    GaN is a pivotal material for acoustic transducers and acoustic spectroscopy in the THz regime, but its THz phonon properties have not been experimentally and comprehensively studied. In this report, we demonstrate how to use double quantum wells as a THz acoustic transducer for measuring generated acoustic phonons and deriving a broadband acoustic spectrum with continuous frequencies. We experimentally investigated the sub-THz frequency dependence of acoustic attenuation (i.e., phonon mean-free paths) in GaN, in addition to its physical origins such as anharmonic scattering, defect scattering, and boundary scattering. A new upper limit of attenuation caused by anharmonic scattering, which is lower than previously reported values, was obtained. Our results should be noteworthy for THz acoustic spectroscopy and for gaining a fundamental understanding of heat conduction. PMID:27346494

  19. Simplifying the calculation of light scattering properties for black carbon fractal aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. J. A.; Grainger, R. G.

    2014-08-01

    Black carbon fractal aggregates have complicated shapes that make the calculation of their optical properties particularly computationally expensive. Here, a method is presented to estimate fractal aggregate light scattering properties by optimising simplified models to full light scattering calculations. It is found that there are no possible spherical models (at any size or refractive index) that well represent the light scattering in the visible or near-thermal infrared. As such, parameterisations of the light scattering as a function of the number of aggregate particles is presented as the most pragmatic choice for modelling distributions of black carbon when the large computational overheads of rigorous scattering calculations cannot be justified. This parameterisation can be analytically integrated to provide light scattering properties for lognormal distributions of black carbon fractal aggregates and return extinction cross sections with 0.1% accuracy for typical black carbon size distributions. Scattering cross sections and the asymmetry parameter can be obtained to within 3%.

  20. Simplifying the calculation of light scattering properties for black carbon fractal aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. J. A.; Grainger, R. G.

    2014-02-01

    Black carbon fractal aggregates have complicated shapes that make the calculation of their optical properties particularly computationally expensive. Here, a method is presented to estimate fractal aggregate light scattering properties by optimising simplified models to full light scattering calculations. It is found that there are no possible spherical models (at any size or refractive index) that well represent the light scattering in the visible, or near-thermal infrared. As such, parameterisations of the light scattering as a function of the number of aggregate particles is presented as the most pragmatic choice for modelling distributions of black carbon when the large computational overheads of rigorous scattering calculations cannot be justified. This parameterisation can be analytically integrated to provide light scattering properties for log-normal distributions of black carbon fractal aggregates and return extinction cross-sections with 0.1% accuracy for typical black carbon size distributions. Scattering cross-sections and the asymmetry parameter can be obtained to within 3%.

  1. Alarming features: birds use specific acoustic properties to identify heterospecific alarm calls

    PubMed Central

    Fallow, Pamela M.; Pitcher, Benjamin J.; Magrath, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Vertebrates that eavesdrop on heterospecific alarm calls must distinguish alarms from sounds that can safely be ignored, but the mechanisms for identifying heterospecific alarm calls are poorly understood. While vertebrates learn to identify heterospecific alarms through experience, some can also respond to unfamiliar alarm calls that are acoustically similar to conspecific alarm calls. We used synthetic calls to test the role of specific acoustic properties in alarm call identification by superb fairy-wrens, Malurus cyaneus. Individuals fled more often in response to synthetic calls with peak frequencies closer to those of conspecific calls, even if other acoustic features were dissimilar to that of fairy-wren calls. Further, they then spent more time in cover following calls that had both peak frequencies and frequency modulation rates closer to natural fairy-wren means. Thus, fairy-wrens use similarity in specific acoustic properties to identify alarms and adjust a two-stage antipredator response. Our study reveals how birds respond to heterospecific alarm calls without experience, and, together with previous work using playback of natural calls, shows that both acoustic similarity and learning are important for interspecific eavesdropping. More generally, this study reconciles contrasting views on the importance of alarm signal structure and learning in recognition of heterospecific alarms. PMID:23303539

  2. The Acoustic Properties of Vowels: A Tool for Improving Articulation and Comprehension of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCombs, Candalene J.

    2006-01-01

    Correct pronunciation is often a later step in the process of teaching English as a second language. However, a focus on the correct articulation of vowels can significantly improve listening and comprehension skills as well as articulatory skills. Vowels and consonants differ in their acoustic properties. Unlike consonants, vowel sounds are…

  3. Light comfort zones of mesopelagic acoustic scattering layers in two contrasting optical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Røstad, Anders; Kaartvedt, Stein; Aksnes, Dag L.

    2016-07-01

    We make a comparison of the mesopelagic sound scattering layers (SLs) in two contrasting optical environments; the clear Red Sea and in murkier coastal waters of Norway (Masfjorden). The depth distributions of the SL in Masfjorden are shallower and narrower than those of the Red Sea. This difference in depth distribution is consistent with the hypothesis that the organisms of the SL distribute according to similar light comfort zones (LCZ) in the two environments. Our study suggest that surface and underwater light measurements ranging more than 10 orders of magnitude is required to assess the controlling effects of light on SL structure and dynamics.

  4. Development and validation of a MRgHIFU non-invasive tissue acoustic property estimation technique.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sara L; Dillon, Christopher; Odéen, Henrik; Parker, Dennis; Christensen, Douglas; Payne, Allison

    2016-11-01

    MR-guided high-intensity focussed ultrasound (MRgHIFU) non-invasive ablative surgeries have advanced into clinical trials for treating many pathologies and cancers. A remaining challenge of these surgeries is accurately planning and monitoring tissue heating in the face of patient-specific and dynamic acoustic properties of tissues. Currently, non-invasive measurements of acoustic properties have not been implemented in MRgHIFU treatment planning and monitoring procedures. This methods-driven study presents a technique using MR temperature imaging (MRTI) during low-temperature HIFU sonications to non-invasively estimate sample-specific acoustic absorption and speed of sound values in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Using measured thermal properties, specific absorption rate (SAR) patterns are calculated from the MRTI data and compared to simulated SAR patterns iteratively generated via the Hybrid Angular Spectrum (HAS) method. Once the error between the simulated and measured patterns is minimised, the estimated acoustic property values are compared to the true phantom values obtained via an independent technique. The estimated values are then used to simulate temperature profiles in the phantoms, and compared to experimental temperature profiles. This study demonstrates that trends in acoustic absorption and speed of sound can be non-invasively estimated with average errors of 21% and 1%, respectively. Additionally, temperature predictions using the estimated properties on average match within 1.2 °C of the experimental peak temperature rises in the phantoms. The positive results achieved in tissue-mimicking phantoms presented in this study indicate that this technique may be extended to in vivo applications, improving HIFU sonication temperature rise predictions and treatment assessment.

  5. Development and validation of a MRgHIFU non-invasive tissue acoustic property estimation technique.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sara L; Dillon, Christopher; Odéen, Henrik; Parker, Dennis; Christensen, Douglas; Payne, Allison

    2016-11-01

    MR-guided high-intensity focussed ultrasound (MRgHIFU) non-invasive ablative surgeries have advanced into clinical trials for treating many pathologies and cancers. A remaining challenge of these surgeries is accurately planning and monitoring tissue heating in the face of patient-specific and dynamic acoustic properties of tissues. Currently, non-invasive measurements of acoustic properties have not been implemented in MRgHIFU treatment planning and monitoring procedures. This methods-driven study presents a technique using MR temperature imaging (MRTI) during low-temperature HIFU sonications to non-invasively estimate sample-specific acoustic absorption and speed of sound values in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Using measured thermal properties, specific absorption rate (SAR) patterns are calculated from the MRTI data and compared to simulated SAR patterns iteratively generated via the Hybrid Angular Spectrum (HAS) method. Once the error between the simulated and measured patterns is minimised, the estimated acoustic property values are compared to the true phantom values obtained via an independent technique. The estimated values are then used to simulate temperature profiles in the phantoms, and compared to experimental temperature profiles. This study demonstrates that trends in acoustic absorption and speed of sound can be non-invasively estimated with average errors of 21% and 1%, respectively. Additionally, temperature predictions using the estimated properties on average match within 1.2 °C of the experimental peak temperature rises in the phantoms. The positive results achieved in tissue-mimicking phantoms presented in this study indicate that this technique may be extended to in vivo applications, improving HIFU sonication temperature rise predictions and treatment assessment. PMID:27441427

  6. Distinct effects of moisture and air contents on acoustic properties of sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Takuya; Hiraguri, Yasuhiro; Okuzono, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge of distinct effects of moisture content and air volume on acoustic properties of soil is sought to predict the influence of human activities such as cultivation on acoustic propagation outdoors. This work used an impedance tube with the two-thickness method to investigate such effects. For a constant moisture weight percentage, the magnitude of the characteristic impedance became smaller and the absorption coefficient became higher with increase of the air space ratio. For a constant air space ratio, the absorption coefficient became larger and the magnitude of the propagation constant became smaller with increasing moisture weight percentage. PMID:26428823

  7. Efficient numerical solution of acoustic scattering from doubly-periodic arrays of axisymmetric objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuxiang; Barnett, Alex H.

    2016-11-01

    We present a high-order accurate boundary-based solver for three-dimensional (3D) frequency-domain scattering from a doubly-periodic grating of smooth axisymmetric sound-hard or transmission obstacles. We build the one-obstacle solution operator using separation into P azimuthal modes via the FFT, the method of fundamental solutions (with N proxy points lying on a curve), and dense direct least-squares solves; the effort is O (N3 P) with a small constant. Periodizing then combines fast multipole summation of nearest neighbors with an auxiliary global Helmholtz basis expansion to represent the distant contributions, and enforcing quasiperiodicity and radiation conditions on the unit cell walls. Eliminating the auxiliary coefficients, and preconditioning with the one-obstacle solution operator, leaves a well-conditioned square linear system that is solved iteratively. The solution time per incident wave is then O (NP) at fixed frequency. Our scheme avoids singular quadratures, periodic Green's functions, and lattice sums, and its convergence rate is unaffected by resonances within obstacles. We include numerical examples such as scattering from a grating of period 13 λ × 13 λ comprising highly-resonant sound-hard "cups" each needing NP = 64800 surface unknowns, to 10-digit accuracy, in half an hour on a desktop.

  8. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 2: scattering signatures of Colorado River bed sediment in Marble and Grand Canyons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    In this, the second of a pair of papers on the statistical signatures of riverbed sediment in high-frequency acoustic backscatter, spatially explicit maps of the stochastic geometries (length- and amplitude-scales) of backscatter are related to patches of riverbed surfaces composed of known sediment types, as determined by geo-referenced underwater video observations. Statistics of backscatter magnitudes alone are found to be poor discriminators between sediment types. However, the variance of the power spectrum, and the intercept and slope from a power-law spectral form (termed the spectral strength and exponent, respectively) successfully discriminate between sediment types. A decision-tree approach was able to classify spatially heterogeneous patches of homogeneous sands, gravels (and sand-gravel mixtures), and cobbles/boulders with 95, 88, and 91% accuracy, respectively. Application to sites outside the calibration, and surveys made at calibration sites at different times, were plausible based on observations from underwater video. Analysis of decision trees built with different training data sets suggested that the spectral exponent was consistently the most important variable in the classification. In the absence of theory concerning how spatially variable sediment surfaces scatter high-frequency sound, the primary advantage of this data-driven approach to classify bed sediment over alternatives is that spectral methods have well understood properties and make no assumptions about the distributional form of the fluctuating component of backscatter over small spatial scales.

  9. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics: 2. Scattering signatures of Colorado River bed sediment in Marble and Grand Canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscombe, D.; Grams, P. E.; Kaplinski, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    In this, the second of a pair of papers on the statistical signatures of riverbed sediment in high-frequency acoustic backscatter, spatially explicit maps of the stochastic geometries (length and amplitude scales) of backscatter are related to patches of riverbed surfaces composed of known sediment types, as determined by georeferenced underwater video observations. Statistics of backscatter magnitudes alone are found to be poor discriminators between sediment types. However, the variance of the power spectrum and the intercept and slope from a power law spectral form (termed the spectral strength and exponent, respectively) successfully discriminate between sediment types. A decision tree approach was able to classify spatially heterogeneous patches of homogeneous sands, gravels (and sand-gravel mixtures), and cobbles/boulders with 95, 88, and 91% accuracy, respectively. Application to sites outside the calibration and surveys made at calibration sites at different times were plausible based on observations from underwater video. Analysis of decision trees built with different training data sets suggested that the spectral exponent was consistently the most important variable in the classification. In the absence of theory concerning how spatially variable sediment surfaces scatter high-frequency sound, the primary advantage of this data-driven approach to classify bed sediment over alternatives is that spectral methods have well-understood properties and make no assumptions about the distributional form of the fluctuating component of backscatter over small spatial scales.

  10. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Precipitate Contribution to the Acoustic Nonlinearity in Nickel-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung-seok, Kim; Cliff, Lissenden J.

    2009-08-01

    The influence of γ' precipitate on the acoustic nonlinearity is investigated for a nickel-based superalloy, which is subjected to creep deformation. During creep deformation, the cuboidal γ' precipitate is preferentially coarsened in a direction perpendicular to the applied stress axis. The length and shape factor of the γ' precipitate increase with creep time. The increase of relative acoustic nonlinearity with increasing fraction of creep life is discussed in relation to the rafting of γ' precipitate, which is closely related to the scattering and distortion of the acoustic wave.

  11. Bulk microstructure and local elastic properties of carbon nanocomposites studied by impulse acoustic microscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, V.; Petronyuk, Yu.; Morokov, E.; Chernozatonskii, L.; Kuzhir, P.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.; Bellucci, S.; Bistarelli, S.; Mastrucci, M.; Tabacchioni, I.

    2016-05-01

    Bulk microstructure and elastic properties of epoxy-nanocarbon nanocomposites for diverse types and different content of carbon nanofiller has been studied by using impulse acoustic microscopy technique. It has been shown occurrence of various types of mesoscopic structure formed by nanoparticles inside the bulk of nanocomposite materials, including nanoparticle conglomerates and nanoparticle aerogel systems. In spite of the bulk microstructure, nanocarbon composites demonstrate elastic uniformity and negligible influence of nanofiller on elastic properties of carbon nanocomposite materials.

  12. "Diffuse Scattering and the Fundamental Properties of materials"

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Ice, Gene E; Turchi, Dr. Patrice E.A.

    2009-01-01

    This book highlights emerging research areas that exploit the ability of diffuse scattering to characterize local structures in materials. An emphasis is placed on the coming renaissance in diffuse scattering driven by new sources, better instrumentation, novel new materials, and advanced theories and methods. This book will provide an overview of some of the most exciting recent advances in diffuse scattering and provides guidance for students and researchers interested in new methods to characterize their samples.

  13. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr.; Younane Abousleiman

    2004-04-01

    The research during this project has concentrated on developing a correlation between rock deformation mechanisms and their acoustic velocity signature. This has included investigating: (1) the acoustic signature of drained and undrained unconsolidated sands, (2) the acoustic emission signature of deforming high porosity rocks (in comparison to their low porosity high strength counterparts), (3) the effects of deformation on anisotropic elastic and poroelastic moduli, and (4) the acoustic tomographic imaging of damage development in rocks. Each of these four areas involve triaxial experimental testing of weak porous rocks or unconsolidated sand and involves measuring acoustic properties. The research is directed at determining the seismic velocity signature of damaged rocks so that 3-D or 4-D seismic imaging can be utilized to image rock damage. These four areas of study are described in the report: (1) Triaxial compression experiments have been conducted on unconsolidated Oil Creek sand at high confining pressures. (2) Initial experiments on measuring the acoustic emission activity from deforming high porosity Danian chalk were accomplished and these indicate that the AE activity was of a very low amplitude. (3) A series of triaxial compression experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of induced stress on the anisotropy developed in dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters in rocks. (4) Tomographic acoustic imaging was utilized to image the internal damage in a deforming porous limestone sample. Results indicate that the deformation damage in rocks induced during laboratory experimentation can be imaged tomographically in the laboratory. By extension the results also indicate that 4-D seismic imaging of a reservoir may become a powerful tool for imaging reservoir deformation (including imaging compaction and subsidence) and for imaging zones where drilling operation may encounter hazardous shallow water flows.

  14. Acoustic property reconstruction of a pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) forehead based on computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhongchang; Xu, Xiao; Dong, Jianchen; Xing, Luru; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Xuecheng; Zhang, Yu; Li, Songhai; Berggren, Per

    2015-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging and sound experimental measurements were used to reconstruct the acoustic properties (density, velocity, and impedance) of the forehead tissues of a deceased pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps). The forehead was segmented along the body axis and sectioned into cross section slices, which were further cut into sample pieces for measurements. Hounsfield units (HUs) of the corresponding measured pieces were obtained from CT scans, and regression analyses were conducted to investigate the linear relationships between the tissues' HUs and velocity, and HUs and density. The distributions of the acoustic properties of the head at axial, coronal, and sagittal cross sections were reconstructed, revealing that the nasal passage system was asymmetric and the cornucopia-shaped spermaceti organ was in the right nasal passage, surrounded by tissues and airsacs. A distinct dense theca was discovered in the posterior-dorsal area of the melon, which was characterized by low velocity in the inner core and high velocity in the outer region. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences in density, velocity, and acoustic impedance between all four structures, melon, spermaceti organ, muscle, and connective tissue (p < 0.001). The obtained acoustic properties of the forehead tissues provide important information for understanding the species' bioacoustic characteristics.

  15. Acoustic property reconstruction of a pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) forehead based on computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhongchang; Xu, Xiao; Dong, Jianchen; Xing, Luru; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Xuecheng; Zhang, Yu; Li, Songhai; Berggren, Per

    2015-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging and sound experimental measurements were used to reconstruct the acoustic properties (density, velocity, and impedance) of the forehead tissues of a deceased pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps). The forehead was segmented along the body axis and sectioned into cross section slices, which were further cut into sample pieces for measurements. Hounsfield units (HUs) of the corresponding measured pieces were obtained from CT scans, and regression analyses were conducted to investigate the linear relationships between the tissues' HUs and velocity, and HUs and density. The distributions of the acoustic properties of the head at axial, coronal, and sagittal cross sections were reconstructed, revealing that the nasal passage system was asymmetric and the cornucopia-shaped spermaceti organ was in the right nasal passage, surrounded by tissues and airsacs. A distinct dense theca was discovered in the posterior-dorsal area of the melon, which was characterized by low velocity in the inner core and high velocity in the outer region. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences in density, velocity, and acoustic impedance between all four structures, melon, spermaceti organ, muscle, and connective tissue (p < 0.001). The obtained acoustic properties of the forehead tissues provide important information for understanding the species' bioacoustic characteristics. PMID:26627786

  16. Acoustic characterization of monodisperse lipid-coated microbubbles: relationship between size and shell viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Parrales, Miguel A; Fernandez, Juan M; Perez-Saborid, Miguel; Kopechek, Jonathan A; Porter, Tyrone M

    2014-09-01

    The acoustic attenuation spectrum of lipid-coated microbubble suspensions was measured in order to characterize the linear acoustic behavior of ultrasound contrast agents. For that purpose, microbubbles samples were generated with a very narrow size distribution by using microfluidics techniques. A performance as good as optical characterization techniques of single microbubbles was achieved using this method. Compared to polydispersions (i.e., contrast agents used clinically), monodisperse contrast agents have a narrower attenuation spectrum, which presents a maximum peak at a frequency value corresponding to the average single bubble resonance frequency. The low polydispersity index of the samples made the estimation of the lipid viscoelastic properties more accurate since, as previously reported, the shell linear parameters may change with the equilibrium bubble radius. The results showed the great advantage of dealing with monodisperse populations rather than polydisperse populations for the acoustic characterization of ultrasound contrast agents. PMID:25190383

  17. Application of finite element techniques in predicting the acoustic properties of turbofan inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majjigi, R. K.; Sigman, R. K.; Zinn, B. T.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical technique was developed for predicting the acoustic performance of turbofan inlets carrying a subsonic axisymmetric steady flow. The finite element method combined with the method of weighted residuals is used in predicting the acoustic properties of variable area, annular ducts with or without acoustic treatments along their walls. An approximate solution for the steady inviscid flow field is obtained using an integral method for calculating the incompressible potential flow field in the inlet with a correction to account for compressibility effects. The accuracy of the finite element technique was assessed by comparison with available analytical solutions for the problems of plane and spinning wave propagation through a hard walled annular cylinder with a constant mean flow.

  18. Acoustic tests of elastic and microplastic properties of VTiCr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. M.; Rezvoushkin, A. V.; Kardashev, B. K.

    1996-10-01

    The non-linear acoustic properties of V10Ti5Cr alloy before and after proton irradiation (dose 2.2 × 10 14 p/cm 2) were investigated using a composite oscillator technique at longitudinal vibration frequencies of about 100 kHz. Acoustic parameters (decrement and resonance frequency) of the samples demonstrated noticeable amplitude dependencies of hysteretic type both in undeformed and deformed states. An unusual influence of plastical pre-staining on irradiated sample was found which resulted in small decreases in damping and increases in resonance frequency, and hence, of the elastic modulus. Damping in an irradiated sample was higher and its resonant frequency was lower as compared with a non-irradiated sample. This acoustic effect correlated with the results of microhardness and yield strength measurements. The experimental results are discussed in the framework of a model which predicts the creation by proton irradiation of defects which aid the motion of dislocations in V-alloys.

  19. Optical scattering methods applicable to drops and bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Philip L.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of optical scattering properties of drops and bubbles is presented. The properties lead to unconventional methods for optically monitoring the size or shape of a scatterer and are applicable to acoustically levitated objects. Several of the methods are applicable to the detection and measurement of small amplitude oscillations. Relevant optical phenomena include: (1) rainbows; (2) diffraction catastrophes from spheroids; (3) critical angle scattering; (4) effects of coatings; (5) glory scattering; and (6) optical levitation.

  20. Acoustic properties of organic powders as ultrasonic contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, V. A.; Loginov, S. V.; Dmitriev, K. V.

    2011-11-01

    The results of experiments on measuring attenuation and the effective acoustic nonlinear parameter of the second order are given for a suspension of cocoa-powder in water at different concentrations of the suspension. In the process of evaluating the value of the nonlinear parameter the attenuation in the suspension and generation of the second harmonic not only in the suspension but also in water are taken into account. The obtained results are evidence of the possibility of using a suspension of cocoa-powder in water as a technical substitute for ultrasonic contrast agents. The values of attenuation (up to 60 m-1 at the concentration of 1 g of the powder per 1 l of water) and the nonlinear parameter (up to 120 m-1 at the same concentration) mean that the suspension of cocoa-powder in water has smaller attenuation and the nonlinear parameter than ultrasonic contrast agents at the same concentration. However, these values for the suspension differ considerably from corresponding values for water or blood and, therefore, a suspension of cocoa-powder in water is a promising "substitute" for ultrasonic contrast agents in the case of technical testing of systems for nonlinear tomography of a blood flow, but cannot replace them in medical studies.

  1. Acoustic properties of naturally produced clear speech at normal speaking rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Jean C.; Braida, Louis D.

    2004-01-01

    Sentences spoken ``clearly'' are significantly more intelligible than those spoken ``conversationally'' for hearing-impaired listeners in a variety of backgrounds [Picheny et al., J. Speech Hear. Res. 28, 96-103 (1985); Uchanski et al., ibid. 39, 494-509 (1996); Payton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 95, 1581-1592 (1994)]. While producing clear speech, however, talkers often reduce their speaking rate significantly [Picheny et al., J. Speech Hear. Res. 29, 434-446 (1986); Uchanski et al., ibid. 39, 494-509 (1996)]. Yet speaking slowly is not solely responsible for the intelligibility benefit of clear speech (over conversational speech), since a recent study [Krause and Braida, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112, 2165-2172 (2002)] showed that talkers can produce clear speech at normal rates with training. This finding suggests that clear speech has inherent acoustic properties, independent of rate, that contribute to improved intelligibility. Identifying these acoustic properties could lead to improved signal processing schemes for hearing aids. To gain insight into these acoustical properties, conversational and clear speech produced at normal speaking rates were analyzed at three levels of detail (global, phonological, and phonetic). Although results suggest that talkers may have employed different strategies to achieve clear speech at normal rates, two global-level properties were identified that appear likely to be linked to the improvements in intelligibility provided by clear/normal speech: increased energy in the 1000-3000-Hz range of long-term spectra and increased modulation depth of low frequency modulations of the intensity envelope. Other phonological and phonetic differences associated with clear/normal speech include changes in (1) frequency of stop burst releases, (2) VOT of word-initial voiceless stop consonants, and (3) short-term vowel spectra.

  2. Probing the mechanical properties of high-k dielectric nano-films by Brillouin light scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zizka, Jonathan; Bielefeld, Jeffrey; King, Sean; Sooryakumar, R.

    2014-03-01

    As microelectronic transistors scale to smaller dimensions, device functionality suffers from current leakage. This problem can be overcome by using thicker gate materials with a high dielectric constant. SiO2 has been the material of choice, but becomes unsuitable due to its relatively low dielectric constant (k = 3.9). Alternate materials, such as BN:H (k = 5.7) and HfO2 (k = 25) are promising choices to replace SiO2 to achieve the desired performance while preserving ultra-thin thickness (<10 nm). Despite these promising features, one concern of including these materials, are their mechanical and thermal properties that could degrade device functionality. There is thus a growing need for non-destructive techniques to evaluate the mechanical properties of such laminar structures since traditional methods like nano-indentation are not effective at these dimensions. We report on Brillioun light scattering studies to determine the individual elastic constants and, thus the mechanical properties of BN:H and HfO2 high-k films with thicknesses as low as 24 nm. Young's modulus (E) and Poisson's ratio (ν) were determined by measuring the frequency dispersion of confined and traveling transverse and longitudinal acoustic waves as well as their associated light scattering intensities.

  3. Acoustic and reservoir properties of microporous carbonate rocks: Implication of micrite particle size and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnet, J. B.; Robion, P.; David, C.; Fortin, J.; Brigaud, B.; Yven, B.

    2015-02-01

    This integrated study provides significant insight into parameters controlling the acoustic and reservoir properties of microporous limestones, improving the knowledge of the relationships among petrophysic and microstructural content. Petrophysical properties measured from laboratory and logging tools (porosity, permeability, electrical conductivity, and acoustic properties) have been coupled with thin section and scanning electron microscope observations on the EST205 borehole from the Oxfordian limestone aquifer of the eastern part of the Paris Basin. A major achievement is the establishment of the link between micrite microtexture types (particle morphology and nature of intercrystal contacts) and the physical response, introducing a new effective and interesting rock-typing approach for microporous reservoirs. Fluid-flow properties are enhanced by the progressive augmentation of intercrystalline microporosity and associated pore throat diameter, as the coalescence of micrite particles decreases. Concerning acoustic properties, the slow increase of P wave velocity can be seen as a reflection of crystal size and growing contact cementation leading to a more cohesive and stiffer micrite microtexture. By applying poroelasticity theory on our samples, we show that velocity dispersion can be a very useful tool for data discrimination in carbonates. This dispersion analysis highlights the presence of microcracks in the rocks, and their overall effect on acoustic and transport properties. The presence of microcracks is also confirmed with observations and permeability measurements under high confining pressure. Finally, a possible origin of high porous levels in neritic limestones is a mineralogical transformation of carbonates through freshwater-related diagenesis during subaerial exposure time. Finally, by applying poroelasticity theory on our samples, we show that velocity dispersion can be a very useful tool for data discrimination in carbonates.

  4. Acoustic backscatter measurements with a 153 kHz ADCP in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico: determination of dominant zooplankton and micronekton scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressler, Patrick H.

    2002-11-01

    A 153 kHz narrowband acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was used to measure volume backscattering strength ( Sv) during a deepwater oceanographic survey of cetacean and seabird habitat in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Sv was positively related to zooplankton and micronekton biomass (wet displacement volume) in 'sea-truth' net hauls made with a 1 m 2 Multiple Opening-Closing Net Environmental Sensing System (MOCNESS). A subset of these MOCNESS tows was used to explore the relationship between the numerical densities of various taxonomic categories of zooplankton and the ADCP backscatter signal. Crustaceans, small fish, and fragments of non-gas-bearing siphonophores in the net samples all showed significant, positive correlations with the acoustic signal, while other types of gelatinous zooplankton, pteropod and atlantid molluscs, and gas-filled siphonophore floats showed no significant correlation with Sv. Previously published acoustic scattering models for zooplankton were used to calculate expected scattering for several general zooplankton types and sizes for comparison with the field data. Even though gelatinous material often made up a large fraction of the total biomass, crustaceans, small fish, and pteropods were most likely the important scatterers. Since only crustacean and small fish densities were significantly correlated with Sv, it is suggested that Sv at 153 kHz can be used as a relative proxy for the abundance of these organisms in the Gulf of Mexico.

  5. The single scattering properties of the aerosol particles as aggregated spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Gu, X.; Cheng, T.; Xie, D.; Yu, T.; Chen, H.; Guo, J.

    2012-08-01

    The light scattering and absorption properties of anthropogenic aerosol particles such as soot aggregates are complicated in the temporal and spatial distribution, which introduce uncertainty of radiative forcing on global climate change. In order to study the single scattering properties of anthorpogenic aerosol particles, the structures of these aerosols such as soot paticles and soot-containing mixtures with the sulfate or organic matter, are simulated using the parallel diffusion limited aggregation algorithm (DLA) based on the transmission electron microscope images (TEM). Then, the single scattering properties of randomly oriented aerosols, such as scattering matrix, single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP), are computed using the superposition T-matrix method. The comparisons of the single scattering properties of these specific types of clusters with different morphological and chemical factors such as fractal parameters, aspect ratio, monomer radius, mixture mode and refractive index, indicate that these different impact factors can respectively generate the significant influences on the single scattering properties of these aerosols. The results show that aspect ratio of circumscribed shape has relatively small effect on single scattering properties, for both differences of SSA and AP are less than 0.1. However, mixture modes of soot clusters with larger sulfate particles have remarkably important effects on the scattering and absorption properties of aggregated spheres, and SSA of those soot-containing mixtures are increased in proportion to the ratio of larger weakly absorbing attachments. Therefore, these complex aerosols come from man made pollution cannot be neglected in the aerosol retrievals. The study of the single scattering properties on these kinds of aggregated spheres is important and helpful in remote sensing observations and atmospheric radiation balance computations.

  6. Monitoring muscle optical scattering properties during rigor mortis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, J.; Ranasinghesagara, J.; Ku, C. W.; Yao, G.

    2007-09-01

    Sarcomere is the fundamental functional unit in skeletal muscle for force generation. In addition, sarcomere structure is also an important factor that affects the eating quality of muscle food, the meat. The sarcomere structure is altered significantly during rigor mortis, which is the critical stage involved in transforming muscle to meat. In this paper, we investigated optical scattering changes during the rigor process in Sternomandibularis muscles. The measured optical scattering parameters were analyzed along with the simultaneously measured passive tension, pH value, and histology analysis. We found that the temporal changes of optical scattering, passive tension, pH value and fiber microstructures were closely correlated during the rigor process. These results suggested that sarcomere structure changes during rigor mortis can be monitored and characterized by optical scattering, which may find practical applications in predicting meat quality.

  7. Periodicity property of relativistic Thomson scattering with application to exact calculations of angular and spectral distributions of the scattered field

    SciTech Connect

    Popa, Alexandru

    2011-08-15

    We prove that the analytical expression of the intensity of the relativistic Thomson scattered field for a system composed of an electron interacting with a plane electromagnetic field can be written in the form of a composite periodic function of only one variable, that is, the phase of the incident field. This property is proved without using any approximation in the most general case in which the field is elliptically polarized, the initial phase of the incident field and the initial velocity of the electron are taken into consideration, and the direction in which the radiation is scattered is arbitrary. This property leads to an exact method for calculating the angular and spectral distributions of the scattered field, which reveals a series of physical details of these distributions, such as their dependence on the components of the initial electron velocity. Since the phase of the field is a relativistic invariant, it follows that the periodicity property is also valid when the analysis is made in the inertial system in which the initial velocity of the electron is zero in the case of interactions between very intense electromagnetic fields and relativistic electrons. Consequently, the calculation method can be used for the evaluation of properties of backscattered hard radiations generated by this type of interaction. The theoretical evaluations presented in this paper are in good agreement with the experimental data from literature.

  8. A wall-less poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel flow phantom with accurate scattering properties for transcranial Doppler ultrasound propagation channels analysis.

    PubMed

    Weir, Alexander J; Sayer, Robin; Cheng-Xiang Wang; Parks, Stuart

    2015-08-01

    Medical phantoms are frequently required to verify image and signal processing systems, and are often used to support algorithm development for a wide range of imaging and blood flow assessments. A phantom with accurate scattering properties is a crucial requirement when assessing the effects of multi-path propagation channels during the development of complex signal processing techniques for Transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound. The simulation of physiological blood flow in a phantom with tissue and blood equivalence can be achieved using a variety of techniques. In this paper, poly (vinyl alcohol) cryogel (PVA-C) tissue mimicking material (TMM) is evaluated in conjunction with a number of potential scattering agents. The acoustic properties of the TMMs are assessed and an acoustic velocity of 1524ms(-1), an attenuation coefficient of (0:49) × 10(-4)fdBm(1)Hz(-1), a characteristic impedance of (1.72) × 10(6)Kgm(-2)s(-1) and a backscatter coefficient of (1.12) × 10(-28)f(4)m(-1)Hz(-4)sr(-1) were achieved using 4 freeze-thaw cycles and an aluminium oxide (Al(2)O(3)) scattering agent. This TMM was used to make an anatomically realistic wall-less flow phantom for studying the effects of multipath propagation in TCD ultrasound.

  9. Analysis of underwater decoupling properties of a locally resonant acoustic metamaterial coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling-Zhi, Huang; Yong, Xiao; Ji-Hong, Wen; Hai-Bin, Yang; Xi-Sen, Wen

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical solution for the vibration and sound radiation of a semi-infinite plate covered by a decoupling layer consisting of locally resonant acoustic metamaterial. Formulations are derived based on a combination use of effective medium theory and the theory of elasticity for the decoupling material. Theoretical results show good agreements between the method developed in this paper and the conventional finite element method (FEM), but the method of this paper is more efficient than FEM. Numerical results also show that system with acoustic metamaterial decoupling layer exhibits significant noise reduction performance at the local resonance frequency of the acoustic metamaterial, and such performance can be ascribed to the vibration suppression of the base plate. It is demonstrated that the effective density of acoustic metamaterial decoupling layer has a great influence on the mechanical impedance of the system. Furthermore, the resonance frequency of locally resonant structure can be effectively predicted by a simple model, and it can be significantly affected by the material properties of the locally resonant structure. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51305448 and 51275519).

  10. Low-cost tissue simulating phantoms with tunable, wavelength-dependent scattering properties (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saager, Rolf B.; Quach, Alan; Rowland, Rebecca A.; Baldado, Melissa L.; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2016-03-01

    Tissue-simulating phantoms provide the opportunity to evaluate the performance of optical and spectroscopic instruments under controlled experimental conditions. Recent efforts have advanced phantom fabrication methods to provide more tissue realistic phantoms, both in terms of a) incorporating absorbing agents that more faithfully mimic in vivo tissue chromophores spanning visible and near infrared regimes and b) accounting for multi-layer tissue structures with distinct optical properties. The spectral scattering properties in these phantoms, however, are typically based only on a single scattering agent, thereby locking the spectral scattering properties to a single particle size distribution. However, in both healthy tissue as well as pathologic tissue, regions of distinct and differentiated scattering may be present. With differing mean size and distribution of scattering objects in these tissue regions, the relative wavelength-dependent scattering spectra may vary. For example, partial thickness burns exhibit significant cellular damage and collagen denaturation that will significantly alter the wavelength-dependent scattering properties resembling large Mie-like scatterer distributions in both visible and near infrared regimes. We present a low-cost method to fabricate silicone tissue-simulating phantoms with tunable scattering spectra properties that span visible and near infrared wavelengths. We use optical polishing agents (white aluminum oxides powders) at various grit sizes to approximate Mie scattering across multiple mean particle sizes. Mean particle sizes used in this study range from 17-3 micron. The optical properties of these phantoms are verified using an integrating sphere in combination with inverse adding-doubling methods. The tolerances of this fabrication method will be discussed.

  11. Ripeness of 'Sun Bright' tomato using the optical absorption and scattering properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maturity is one of the most important factors in determining the processing and eating quality of tomato. The objective of this research was to test the suitability of optical absorption and scattering properties for evaluating the maturity of tomatoes. Optical absorption and reduced scattering coef...

  12. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  13. Dynamic Properties of Langmuir Films by Laser Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, John Newell

    A technique and instrumentation for measuring visco-elastic properties of Langmuir film organic monolayers has been developed. This technique is used to characterize certain films used in the manufacture of Langmuir-Blodgett solid films. Furthermore a comparison of the dynamic viscous and elastic moduli determined by this technique is made with static values determined from the Pressure versus Area Isotherm. Briefly, a Langmuir film consists of amphiphilic organic molecules spread in a trough filled with pure water. The hydrophobic ends of the molecules trap them on the water surface. When spread at a dilute concentration the molecules exhibit two dimensional ideal gas behavior. By increasing the surface concentration one obtains two dimensional liquid and finally two dimensional solid behavior. The measurement is performed by electrodynamically driving the liquid surface with the electric field from a razor blade brought to within less than 1 mm of the surface. A sinusoidally varying electric field induces dipoles in the water subphase and generates waves at twice the driving frequency (Attractive dipoles are generated whether the field is positive or negative). The space propagation and damping of these waves is measured by laser light scattering. A focused laser beam incident on the surface is reflected at an angle due to the slope of the waves on the surface. By observing the movement of the beam the amplitude and phase of the oscillation with respect to the driving function may be determined (via a Lock-In amplifier) at various distances from the razor blade. One may directly profile the waves by translating the profiler, or one may observe the variation in amplitude and phase while scanning the frequency or surface pressure. In the latter cases one uses a known reference state to determine the wavelength and damping from the amplitude and phase change. This data is fit by a non-linear least squares curve fitting program to determine the wavelength and space

  14. Determination of elastic properties of a MnO{sub 2} coating by surface acoustic wave velocity dispersion analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sermeus, J.; Glorieux, C.; Sinha, R.; Vereecken, P. M.; Vanstreels, K.

    2014-07-14

    MnO{sub 2} is a material of interest in the development of high energy-density batteries, specifically as a coating material for internal 3D structures, thus ensuring rapid energy deployment. Its electrochemical properties have been mapped extensively, but there are, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no records of the elastic properties of thin film MnO{sub 2}. Impulsive stimulated thermal scattering (ISTS), also known as the heterodyne diffraction or transient grating technique, was used to determine the Young's modulus (E) and porosity (ψ) of a 500 nm thick MnO{sub 2} coating on a Si(001) substrate. ISTS is an all optical method that is able to excite and detect surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on opaque samples. From the measured SAW velocity dispersion, the Young's modulus and porosity were determined to be E = 25 ± 1 GPa and ψ=42±1%, respectively. These values were confirmed by independent techniques and determined by a most-squares analysis of the carefully fitted SAW velocity dispersion. This study demonstrates the ability of the presented technique to determine the elastic parameters of a thin, porous film on an anisotropic substrate.

  15. Correlations between the in situ acoustic properties and geotechnical parameters of sediments in the Yellow Sea, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baohua; Han, Tongcheng; Kan, Guangming; Li, Guanbao

    2013-11-01

    Knowledge about the marine sediment acoustic properties is a key to understanding wave propagation in sediments and is very important for military oceanography and ocean engineering. We developed a hydraulic-drived self-contained in situ sediment acoustic measurement system, and measured for the first time the in situ acoustic properties of sediments on 78 stations in the Yellow Sea, China, by employing this system. The relationships between the in situ measured acoustic properties and the onboard or laboratory determined geotechnical parameters were analyzed. Porosity was found to be the dominant factor in reducing velocity in a quadratic fashion; velocity showed an increment with bulk density and a decrement with mean grain size and clay content both with a nonlinear dependence; acoustic attenuation showed a bell-shaped correlation with porosity and mean grain size but reduced with clay content of the sediments. The attenuation results indicate that intergrain friction rather than viscous interactions between pore fluid and solid grains is the dominant loss mechanism in our marine sediments. The relationships established would be used to predict the geotechnical parameters from in situ measured acoustic properties and vice versa, as well as being an indicator of the seafloor processes, potential gas bubbles hazard and gas hydrates resources or other suitable targets of acoustic surveys.

  16. Estimation of X-band scattering properties of tree components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, D. E.; Badhwar, G. D.; Reyna, E.; Zoughi, R.; Wu, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    An X-band FM-CW very fine range resolution scatterometer was used to acquire backscattering data for a number of tree species. Using a model to describe the scattering source function and an experimental procedure for selected removal of plant parts allows the estimation of the volume backscatter coefficient and the volume extinction coefficient. It is found that: (1) leaves are strong attenuators as well as scatterers; (2) the albedo at a given angle of incidence is nearly independent of the tree type; (3) the tree limbs are good attenuators but rather poor scatterers; and (4) the albedo changes as a function of the angle of incidence and for deciduous trees is also a function of the season.

  17. Natural Variability during Snowfall: Observations of Snowflake Microstructure and Calculations of Corresponding Snowfall Scattering Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gergely, M.; Garrett, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Significant progress has been achieved in approximating snowflakes and ice-cloud particles by increasingly more realistic and detailed shape models and in calculating associated scattering properties crucial to snowfall remote sensing. The applied approximations of the snowflake microstructure applied for the scattering calculations, however, are still based on few available field measurement data, often integrated over many individual snow storms, and only include several microstructural properties that cannot fully capture the natural variability during snowfall, e.g. different degrees of riming or aggregate snowflakes formed from more than one distinct ice crystal habit. In this study, (i) the natural variability of key microstructural properties during snowfall is quantified for individual snow storms based on high-resolution multi-view snowflake imaging data collected with the Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) at Alta ski area (Alta, UT), and (ii) the corresponding variability in snowflake scattering properties is calculated. In addition to snowflake size, orientation and aspect ratio, 'particle complexity' (specifying snowflake perimeter and brightness variations in the MASC snowflake images) is included in the presented approach, yielding a quantitative and objective measure of characteristic snowflake microstructure, including crystal habit and degree of riming, important for realistically modelling snowfall scattering properties. The aim is to present an analysis of the impact of the observed natural microstructural variability on the derived snowflake scattering properties and ultimately on the snowfall radar reflectivity integrated over the obtained variability of snowflake microstructure and scattering properties.

  18. Acoustic properties of pistonphones at low frequencies in the presence of pressure leakage and heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; He, Wen; He, Longbiao; Rong, Zuochao

    2015-12-01

    The wide concern on absolute pressure calibration of acoustic transducers at low frequencies prompts the development of the pistonphone method. At low frequencies, the acoustic properties of pistonphones are governed by the pressure leakage and the heat conduction effects. However, the traditional theory for these two effects applies a linear superposition of two independent correction models, which differs somewhat from their coupled effect at low frequencies. In this paper, acoustic properties of pistonphones at low frequencies in full consideration of the pressure leakage and heat conduction effects have been quantitatively studied, and the explicit expression for the generated sound pressure has been derived. With more practical significance, a coupled correction expression for these two effects of pistonphones has been derived. In allusion to two typical pistonphones, the NPL pistonphone and our developed infrasonic pistonphone, comparisons were done for the coupled correction expression and the traditional one, whose results reveal that the traditional one produces maximum insufficient errors of about 0.1 dB above the lower limiting frequencies of two pistonphones, while at lower frequencies, excessive correction errors with an explicit limit of about 3 dB are produced by the traditional expression. The coupled correction expression should be adopted in the absolute pressure calibration of acoustic transducers at low frequencies. Furthermore, it is found that the heat conduction effect takes a limiting deviation of about 3 dB for the pressure amplitude and a small phase difference as frequency decreases, while the pressure leakage effect remarkably drives the pressure amplitude to attenuate and the phase difference tends to be 90° as the frequency decreases. The pressure leakage effect plays a more important role on the low frequency property of pistonphones.

  19. Calculating acoustical properties of cells: influence of surface topography and liquid layer between cell and substrate.

    PubMed

    Kundu, T; Bereiter-Hahn, J; Hillmann, K

    1992-05-01

    In this paper, a mathematical formulation is presented to compute the V(z) of a tapering layered solid and applying this formulation to the determination of acoustic properties of biological cells and tissues. The formulation is adopted in the simplex inversion algorithm to obtain the acoustic properties of a tapering cell from its V(z) values. The influence of two parameters had been considered: The tapering angle and the presence of a thin liquid layer present between cells and the substratum to which they adhere. Up to a tapering angle less than 10 degrees, it can be safely neglected. However, if a larger angle is neglected, then the acoustic wave velocity in the cell is overestimated. Cell thickness estimation is not affected significantly when the tapering angle is ignored. The calculations of acoustic properties of cells are considerably influenced by the introduction of a thin fluid layer between the solid substratum and the overlying cell, neglecting the presence of at least a very thin layer (20-30 nm), in general, results in a considerable overestimation of sound velocity. The reliability of the data calculated from V(z) values was ascertained using an independent method to determine cell thickness by calculating it from the interference fringe pattern obtained with the reflection-interference light microscope. The shape of the glutaraldehyde-fixed cells was similar to fried eggs. The highest sound velocities were found close to the periphery of the dome-shaped cell center. In the very center and over most of the area of the thin periphery, sound velocity was close to that in saline.

  20. Scattering properties of horizontally oriented ice crystal columns in cirrus clouds. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Rockwitz, K D

    1989-10-01

    A ray tracing technique is presented based on the fundamental laws of ray and wave optics; it has been used to calculate the scattering properties of hexagonal ice crystals. These crystals were assumed to be oriented preferably horizontal, and, therefore, the resulting phase functions have been plotted vs direction in 3-D space contrary to earlier calculations of other authors. The anisotropy of the scattered radiation is clearly shown; on the average the phase function varies over ~2 orders of magnitude. From these single scattering results the multiple scattering between various ice crystals has also been calculated.

  1. Influence of magnetic and acoustic treatment of superplasticizer solutions on the properties of portland cement concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belous, N. Kh.; Azharonok, V. V.; Rodtsevich, S. P.; Koshevar, V. D.; Goncharik, S. V.; Chubrik, N. I.; Orlovich, A. I.; Rubannik, V. V.

    2012-05-01

    We have investigated the influence of the regimes of high-frequency magnetic-impulse and acoustic action on the physicochemical properties of water solutions of polycarboxylate superplasticizers and technological indices of fine concretes plasticized by them. The dependences of technological properties of concretes on the concentration of water solutions of the superplasticizers, the content of impurity ions in the water used for dilution, and the conditions of acousto-radiowave treatment have been determined. The regimes of activation of superplasticizer solutions, which permit increasing the mobility and keeping quality of concrete and solution mixes tempered with water and the density and strength of fine concretes formed from them, have been established.

  2. Laboratory experiments for inter-comparison of three volume scattering meters to measure angular scattering properties of hydrosols.

    PubMed

    Harmel, T; Hieronymi, M; Slade, W; Röttgers, R; Roullier, F; Chami, M

    2016-01-25

    Measurements of the volume scattering function (VSF) of hydrosols is of primary importance to investigate the interaction of light with hydrosols and to further interpret in situ and remote sensing data of ocean color. In this paper, a laboratory inter-comparison experiment of three recently developed VSF meters that are able to measure the scattered light for a wide range of scattering angle at 515 nm wavelength is performed using phytoplankton cultures and mineral-like hydrosols. A rigorous measurement protocol was employed to ensure good quality data. In particular, the protocol enabled removing the influence of bacteria on the hydrosols within the sample. The differences in the VSF measurements between the instruments vary from 10 to 25% depending on the composition of the hydrosols. The analysis of the angular features of the VSF revealed a sharp increase of the VSF beyond the scattering angle of 150° for some phytoplankton species. Such behavior is observed for two of the three VSF meters, thus suggesting that it is not due to instrumental artifacts but more likely to phytoplankton optical properties themselves. Moreover, comparisons with currently used theoretical phase functions show that the models are not able to reproduce satisfactorily the directional patterns in the backscattering region. This study suggests that a better modelling of the VSF shape of phytoplankton at high scattering angles is required to correctly represent the angular shape of the VSF in the backscattering hemisphere. Tabulated values of the measured phase functions are provided for scattering angles from 0.1 to 175°.

  3. Quantitative ultrasound characterization of locally advanced breast cancer by estimation of its scatterer properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tadayyon, Hadi; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory; Wirtzfeld, Lauren; Wright, Frances C.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Tumor grading is an important part of breast cancer diagnosis and currently requires biopsy as its standard. Here, the authors investigate quantitative ultrasound parameters in locally advanced breast cancers that can potentially separate tumors from normal breast tissue and differentiate tumor grades. Methods: Ultrasound images and radiofrequency data from 42 locally advanced breast cancer patients were acquired and analyzed. Parameters related to the linear regression of the power spectrum—midband fit, slope, and 0-MHz-intercept—were determined from breast tumors and normal breast tissues. Mean scatterer spacing was estimated from the spectral autocorrelation, and the effective scatterer diameter and effective acoustic concentration were estimated from the Gaussian form factor. Parametric maps of each quantitative ultrasound parameter were constructed from the gated radiofrequency segments in tumor and normal tissue regions of interest. In addition to the mean values of the parametric maps, higher order statistical features, computed from gray-level co-occurrence matrices were also determined and used for characterization. Finally, linear and quadratic discriminant analyses were performed using combinations of quantitative ultrasound parameters to classify breast tissues. Results: Quantitative ultrasound parameters were found to be statistically different between tumor and normal tissue (p < 0.05). The combination of effective acoustic concentration and mean scatterer spacing could separate tumor from normal tissue with 82% accuracy, while the addition of effective scatterer diameter to the combination did not provide significant improvement (83% accuracy). Furthermore, the two advanced parameters, including effective scatterer diameter and mean scatterer spacing, were found to be statistically differentiating among grade I, II, and III tumors (p = 0.014 for scatterer spacing, p = 0.035 for effective scatterer diameter). The separation of the tumor

  4. Mechanical Properties of Silicone Rubber Acoustic Lens Material Doped with Fine Zinc Oxide Powders for Ultrasonic Medical Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Noriko; Yohachi; Yamashita; Itsumi, Kazuhiro

    2009-07-01

    The mechanical properties of high-temperature-vulcanization silicone (Q) rubber doped with zinc oxide (ZnO) fine powders have been investigated to develop an acoustic lens material with high reliability. The ZnO-doped Q rubber with an acoustic impedance (Z) of 1.46×106 kg·m-2·s-1 showed a tear strength of 43 N/mm and an elongation of 560%. These mechanical property values were about 3 times higher than those of conventional acoustic Q lens materials. The ZnO-doped Q rubbers also showed a lower abrasion loss. These superior characteristics are attributable to the microstructure with fewer origins of breaks; few pores and spherical fine ZnO powder. The high mechanical properties of ZnO-doped Q rubber acoustic lenses enable higher performance during long-life and safe operation during diagnosis using medical array probe applications.

  5. Distribution, abundance and acoustic properties of Antarctic silverfish ( Pleuragramma antarcticum) in the Ross Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Driscoll, Richard L.; Macaulay, Gavin J.; Gauthier, Stéphane; Pinkerton, Matt; Hanchet, Stuart

    2011-03-01

    Antarctic silverfish ( Pleuragramma antarcticum) is a key link between plankton and the community of top predators in the shelf waters of the Ross Sea. In spite of their abundance and important role in Antarctic food chains, very little is known of many ecological and biological aspects of this species. A combined trawl and acoustic survey of silverfish was carried out on the western Ross Sea shelf during the New Zealand International Polar Year Census of Antarctic Marine Life research voyage on R.V. Tangaroa in February-March 2008. Multi-frequency acoustic data (12, 38, 70, and 120 kHz) allowed discrimination of silverfish marks from those of krill and other associated species. Mark identification was achieved using targeted midwater trawls. Additional midwater and demersal trawls were carried out at randomly selected locations over the shelf as part of the core biodiversity survey. Silverfish were widely distributed over the Ross Sea shelf. Adult silverfish tended to form layers at 100-400 m depth and were sometimes present close to the bottom, where they were frequently caught in demersal trawls shallower than 500 m. A weak layer at about 80 m depth was associated with juvenile silverfish of 50-80 mm standard length. Acoustic backscatter strength from both silverfish and krill marks increased with increasing frequency (i.e., was highest at 120 kHz), which is characteristic of species without an air-filled swimbladder. Acoustic target strengths (TS) for silverfish at 12, 18, 38, 70, and 120 kHz were estimated from anatomically detailed scattering models based on computed tomography (CT) scans of frozen specimens. The relationship between TS and fish length at 38 kHz was sensitive to estimates of density and sound speed contrast within the fish, especially for small specimens (less than 110 mm SL). Our best estimate of the acoustic biomass of silverfish in the study area was 592 000 t (95% confidence interval 326 000-866 000 t). However, the biomass of juvenile

  6. The electrical properties of a planar coil electromagnetic acoustic transducer and their implications for noise performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seher, Matthias; Challis, Richard

    2016-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the electrical properties of an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) formed of a flat spiral coil coupled to steel sheet components and operating over a narrow band of frequencies around 50 kHz, well below significant resonances. The electromagnetic skin effect is a significant contributor to the terminal impedance of the EMAT and hence to signal sensitivity, Johnson noise generation and the achievable signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). A transformer model is developed to simulate these effects and to assist in the optimization of the SNR. In this analysis Johnson noise in the system is compared to the unknown emf generated in the eddy current path by an incident acoustic wave to yield a fundamental SNR. The attainable SNR of the whole system is normalized to this in the form of a noise figure.

  7. Measurements of Acoustic Properties of Porous and Granular Materials and Application to Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Junhong; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2004-01-01

    For application of porous and granular materials to vibro-acoustic controls, a finite dynamic strength of the solid component (frame) is an important design factor. The primary goal of this study was to investigate structural vibration damping through this frame wave propagation for various poroelastic materials. A measurement method to investigate the vibration characteristics of the frame was proposed. The measured properties were found to follow closely the characteristics of the viscoelastic materials - the dynamic modulus increased with frequency and the degree of the frequency dependence was determined by its loss factor. The dynamic stiffness of hollow cylindrical beams containing porous and granular materials as damping treatment was measured also. The data were used to extract the damping materials characteristics using the Rayleigh-Ritz method. The results suggested that the acoustic structure interaction between the frame and the structure enhances the dissipation of the vibration energy significantly.

  8. Flow and acoustic properties of low Reynolds number underexpanded supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Tieh-Feng; Mclaughlin, D. K.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental program to investigate the flow and acoustic properties of model underexpanded supersonic jets was conducted. In particular, the role played by large-scale organized fluctuations in the flow evolution and acoustic production processes was examined in detail. The experimental conditions were chosen as low-Reynolds-number (Re = 8000) Mach 1.4 and 2.1 underexpanded jets exhausting from convergent nozzles. A consequence of performing the experiments at low Reynolds number is that the broadband shock-associated noise is suppressed. The focus of the present study is on the generation of noise by large-scale instabilities in the presence of strong shock cell structures. It is demonstrated that the production of screech is related to the modulation and decay of large-scale turbulence structures.

  9. Influence of glucose solution on the erythrocyte scattering properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, Elena K.

    2007-02-01

    The scattering characteristics of erythrocytes (the coefficients of extinction, scattering, absorption and indicatrixes) were calculated with using the theory Mie for spherical homogeneous spherical particles and the theory for two-layered spherical concentric particles. Transmission spectrums were measured with the spectrophotometer Cary500 in the wavelength range 460-860 n m. Specimens of liquid for imbedding of erythrocytes were preparing by mixing blood plasma a nd 50-% glucose solution with the different concentrations. The volume concentrations (hematocrit) of red blood cells (RBC) were maintained to have the same values in all specimens by adding equal volume of whole blood to immersion liquid of equal volumes. It has been shown that, contrary to theretical prediction, transmission is decreasing for all wavelengths with the addition of glucose solution in interval glucose volume concentrations 0.05 - 0.35-0.4. The subsequent increase of the glucose concentration leads to increasing of spectral transmission as a result of erythrocyte hemolysis.

  10. Magnetic properties of Ga doped cobalt ferrite: Compton scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Arvind; Sahariya, Jagrati; Mund, H. S.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.; Ahuja, B. L.

    2014-04-01

    We present the spin momentum density of Ga doped CoFe2O4 at 100 K using magnetic Compton scattering. The measurement has been performed using circularly polarized synchrotron radiations of 182.65 keV at SPring8, Japan. The experimental profile is decomposed into its constituent profile to determine the spin moment at individual sites. Co atom has the maximum contribution (about 58%) in the total spin moment of the doped CoFe2O4.

  11. A comparison between acoustic properties and heat effects in biogenic (magnetosomes) and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Józefczak, A.; Leszczyński, B.; Skumiel, A.; Hornowski, T.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles show unique properties and find many applications because of the possibility to control their properties using magnetic field. Magnetic nanoparticles are usually synthesized chemically and modification of the particle surface is necessary. Another source of magnetic nanoparticles are various magnetotactic bacteria. These biogenic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) represent an attractive alternative to chemically synthesized iron oxide particles because of their unique characteristics and a high potential for biotechnological and biomedical applications. This work presents a comparison between acoustic properties of biogenic and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions. Experimental studies have shown the influence of a biological membrane on the ultrasound properties of magnetosomes suspension. Finally the heat effect in synthetic and biogenic magnetite nanoparticles is also discussed. The experimental study shows that magnetosomes present good heating efficiency.

  12. Estimating aerosol light-scattering enhancement from dry aerosol optical properties at different sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, Gloria; Jefferson, Anne; Sheridan, Patrick; Andrews, Elisabeth; Lyamani, Hassan; Ogren, John; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2014-05-01

    Microphysical and optical properties of aerosol particles are strongly dependent on the relative humidity (RH). Knowledge of the effect of RH on aerosol optical properties is of great importance for climate forcing calculations and for comparison of in-situ measurements with satellite and remote sensing retrievals. The scattering enhancement factor, f(RH), is defined as the ratio of the scattering coefficient at a high and reference RH. Predictive capability of f(RH) for use in climate models would be enhanced if other aerosol parameters could be used as proxies to estimate hygroscopic growth. Toward this goal, we explore the relationship between aerosol light-scattering enhancement and dry aerosol optical properties such as the single scattering albedo (SSA) and the scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) at multiple sites around the world. The measurements used in this study were conducted by the US Department of Energy at sites where different aerosol types predominate (pristine marine, polluted marine, dust dominated, agricultural and forest environments, among others). In all cases, the scattering enhancement decreases as the SSA decreases, that is, as the contribution of absorbing particles increases. On the other hand, for marine influenced environments the scattering enhancement clearly increases as the contribution of coarse particles increases (SAE decreases), evidence of the influence of hygroscopic coarse sea salt particles. For other aerosol types the relationship between f(RH) and SAE is not so straightforward. Combining all datasets, f(RH) was found to exponentially increase with SSA with a high correlation coefficient.

  13. Acoustic phonon-limited resistivity of spin-orbit coupled two-dimensional electron gas: the deformation potential and piezoelectric scattering.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Tutul; Ghosh, Tarun Kanti

    2013-01-23

    We study the interaction between electron and acoustic phonons in a Rashba spin-orbit coupled two-dimensional electron gas using Boltzmann transport theory. Both the deformation potential and piezoelectric scattering mechanisms are considered in the Bloch-Grüneisen (BG) regime as well as in the equipartition (EP) regime. The effect of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction on the temperature dependence of the resistivity in the BG and EP regimes is discussed. We find that the effective exponent of the temperature dependence of the resistivity in the BG regime decreases due to spin-orbit coupling.

  14. POLVSM (Polarized Volume Scattering Meter) instrument: an innovative device to measure the directional and polarized scattering properties of hydrosols.

    PubMed

    Chami, Malik; Thirouard, Alexandre; Harmel, Tristan

    2014-10-20

    An innovative instrument dedicated to the multispectral measurements of the directional and polarized scattering properties of the hydrosols, so-called POLVSM, is described. The instrument could be used onboard a ship, as a benchtop instrument, or at laboratory. The originality of the POLVSM concept relies on the use of a double periscopic optical system whose role is (i) to separate the plane containing the light source from the scattering plane containing the sample and the receiver and (ii) to prevent from any specularly reflected light within the sample chamber. As a result, a wide range of scattering angle, namely from 1° to 179°, is covered by the detector. Another originality of the instrument is to measure the Mueller scattering matrix elements, including the degree of polarization. A relevant calibration procedure, which could be of great interest as well for other instruments, is proposed to convert the raw data into physical units. The relative uncertainty in POLVSM data was determined at ± 4.3%. The analysis of measurements of the volume scattering function and degree of polarization performed under controlled conditions for samples dominated either by inorganic hydrosols or phytoplankton monospecific species showed a good consistency with literature, thus confirming the good performance of the POLVSM device. Comparisons of POLVSM data with theoretical calculations showed that Mie theory could reproduce efficiently the measurements of the VSF and degree of polarization for the case of inorganic hydrosols sample, despite the likely non sphericity of these particles as revealed by one of the element of the Mueller matrix. Our results suggested as well that a sophisticated modeling of the heterogeneous internal structure of living cells, or at least, the use of layered sphere models, is needed to correctly predict the directional and polarized effects of phytoplankton on the oceanic radiation. The relevance of performing angularly resolved measurements

  15. POLVSM (Polarized Volume Scattering Meter) instrument: an innovative device to measure the directional and polarized scattering properties of hydrosols.

    PubMed

    Chami, Malik; Thirouard, Alexandre; Harmel, Tristan

    2014-10-20

    An innovative instrument dedicated to the multispectral measurements of the directional and polarized scattering properties of the hydrosols, so-called POLVSM, is described. The instrument could be used onboard a ship, as a benchtop instrument, or at laboratory. The originality of the POLVSM concept relies on the use of a double periscopic optical system whose role is (i) to separate the plane containing the light source from the scattering plane containing the sample and the receiver and (ii) to prevent from any specularly reflected light within the sample chamber. As a result, a wide range of scattering angle, namely from 1° to 179°, is covered by the detector. Another originality of the instrument is to measure the Mueller scattering matrix elements, including the degree of polarization. A relevant calibration procedure, which could be of great interest as well for other instruments, is proposed to convert the raw data into physical units. The relative uncertainty in POLVSM data was determined at ± 4.3%. The analysis of measurements of the volume scattering function and degree of polarization performed under controlled conditions for samples dominated either by inorganic hydrosols or phytoplankton monospecific species showed a good consistency with literature, thus confirming the good performance of the POLVSM device. Comparisons of POLVSM data with theoretical calculations showed that Mie theory could reproduce efficiently the measurements of the VSF and degree of polarization for the case of inorganic hydrosols sample, despite the likely non sphericity of these particles as revealed by one of the element of the Mueller matrix. Our results suggested as well that a sophisticated modeling of the heterogeneous internal structure of living cells, or at least, the use of layered sphere models, is needed to correctly predict the directional and polarized effects of phytoplankton on the oceanic radiation. The relevance of performing angularly resolved measurements

  16. Magma acoustics and time-varying melt properties at Arenal Volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcés, Milton A.; Hagerty, Michael T.; Schwartz, Susan Y.

    The similarity of acoustic and seismic spectra recorded during Strombolian activity of Arenal Volcano provides conclusive evidence that pressure waves are generated and propagated within the magma-gas mixture inside volcanic conduits. These pressure waves are sensitive to the flow velocity and to small changes in the gas content of the magma-gas mixture, and thus can provide useful indicators of the time-varying properties of the unsteady flow regime and the chemical composition of the melt. The dominant features of the observed explosion and tremor signals are attributed to the source excitation functions and the acoustic resonance of a magma-gas mixture inside the volcanic conduit. We postulate that explosions are triggered in the shallow parts of the magma conduit, where a drastic pressure drop with depth creates a region where violent degassing can occur. Tremor may be sustained by unsteady flow fluctuations at depth. Equilibrium degassing of the melt creates a stable, stratified magma column where the void fraction increases with decreasing depth. Disruption of this equilibrium stratification is thought to be responsible for observed variations in the seismic efficiency of explosions and enhanced acoustic transmission from the interior of the conduit to the atmosphere.

  17. Acoustic properties of vowels in clear and conversational speech by female non-native English speakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chi-Nin; So, Connie K.

    2005-04-01

    Studies have shown that talkers can improve the intelligibility of their speech when instructed to speak as if talking to a hearing-impaired person. The improvement of speech intelligibility is associated with specific acoustic-phonetic changes: increases in vowel duration and fundamental frequency (F0), a wider pitch range, and a shift in formant frequencies for F1 and F2. Most previous studies of clear speech production have been conducted with native speakers; research with second language speakers is much less common. The present study examined the acoustic properties of non-native English vowels produced in a clear speaking style. Five female Cantonese speakers and a comparison group of English speakers were recorded producing four vowels (/i u ae a/) in /bVt/ context in conversational and clear speech. Vowel durations, F0, pitch range, and the first two formants for each of the four vowels were measured. Analyses revealed that for both groups of speakers, vowel durations, F0, pitch range, and F1 spoken clearly were greater than those produced conversationally. However, F2 was higher in conversational speech than in clear speech. The findings suggest that female non-native English speakers exhibit acoustic-phonetic patterns similar to those of native speakers when asked to produce English vowels clearly.

  18. Acoustic Property Reconstruction of a Neonate Yangtze Finless Porpoise's (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis) Head Based on CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chong; Wang, Zhitao; Song, Zhongchang; Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding; Au, Whitlow W. L.; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of the acoustic properties of a neonate finless porpoise’s head was performed using X-ray computed tomography (CT). The head of the deceased neonate porpoise was also segmented across the body axis and cut into slices. The averaged sound velocity and density were measured, and the Hounsfield units (HU) of the corresponding slices were obtained from computed tomography scanning. A regression analysis was employed to show the linear relationships between the Hounsfield unit and both sound velocity and density of samples. Furthermore, the CT imaging data were used to compare the HU value, sound velocity, density and acoustic characteristic impedance of the main tissues in the porpoise’s head. The results showed that the linear relationships between HU and both sound velocity and density were qualitatively consistent with previous studies on Indo-pacific humpback dolphins and Cuvier’s beaked whales. However, there was no significant increase of the sound velocity and acoustic impedance from the inner core to the outer layer in this neonate finless porpoise’s melon. PMID:25856588

  19. Acoustic property reconstruction of a neonate Yangtze finless porpoise's (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis) head based on CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chong; Wang, Zhitao; Song, Zhongchang; Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding; Au, Whitlow W L; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of the acoustic properties of a neonate finless porpoise's head was performed using X-ray computed tomography (CT). The head of the deceased neonate porpoise was also segmented across the body axis and cut into slices. The averaged sound velocity and density were measured, and the Hounsfield units (HU) of the corresponding slices were obtained from computed tomography scanning. A regression analysis was employed to show the linear relationships between the Hounsfield unit and both sound velocity and density of samples. Furthermore, the CT imaging data were used to compare the HU value, sound velocity, density and acoustic characteristic impedance of the main tissues in the porpoise's head. The results showed that the linear relationships between HU and both sound velocity and density were qualitatively consistent with previous studies on Indo-pacific humpback dolphins and Cuvier's beaked whales. However, there was no significant increase of the sound velocity and acoustic impedance from the inner core to the outer layer in this neonate finless porpoise's melon.

  20. Picosecond acoustics method for measuring the thermodynamical properties of solids and liquids at high pressure and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Decremps, F; Gauthier, M; Ayrinhac, S; Bove, L; Belliard, L; Perrin, B; Morand, M; Le Marchand, G; Bergame, F; Philippe, J

    2015-02-01

    Based on the original combination of picosecond acoustics and diamond anvils cell, recent improvements to accurately measure hypersonic sound velocities of liquids and solids under extreme conditions are described. To illustrate the capability of this technique, results are given on the pressure and temperature dependence of acoustic properties for three prototypical cases: polycrystal (iron), single-crystal (silicon) and liquid (mercury) samples. It is shown that such technique also enables the determination of the density as a function of pressure for liquids, of the complete set of elastic constants for single crystals, and of the melting curve for any kind of material. High pressure ultrafast acoustic spectroscopy technique clearly opens opportunities to measure thermodynamical properties under previously unattainable extreme conditions. Beyond physics, this state-of-the-art experiment would thus be useful in many other fields such as nonlinear acoustics, oceanography, petrology, in of view. A brief description of new developments and future directions of works conclude the article.

  1. Picosecond acoustics method for measuring the thermodynamical properties of solids and liquids at high pressure and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Decremps, F; Gauthier, M; Ayrinhac, S; Bove, L; Belliard, L; Perrin, B; Morand, M; Le Marchand, G; Bergame, F; Philippe, J

    2015-02-01

    Based on the original combination of picosecond acoustics and diamond anvils cell, recent improvements to accurately measure hypersonic sound velocities of liquids and solids under extreme conditions are described. To illustrate the capability of this technique, results are given on the pressure and temperature dependence of acoustic properties for three prototypical cases: polycrystal (iron), single-crystal (silicon) and liquid (mercury) samples. It is shown that such technique also enables the determination of the density as a function of pressure for liquids, of the complete set of elastic constants for single crystals, and of the melting curve for any kind of material. High pressure ultrafast acoustic spectroscopy technique clearly opens opportunities to measure thermodynamical properties under previously unattainable extreme conditions. Beyond physics, this state-of-the-art experiment would thus be useful in many other fields such as nonlinear acoustics, oceanography, petrology, in of view. A brief description of new developments and future directions of works conclude the article. PMID:24852260

  2. Determination of thermoelastic material properties by differential heterodyne detection of impulsive stimulated thermal scattering

    PubMed Central

    Verstraeten, B.; Sermeus, J.; Salenbien, R.; Fivez, J.; Shkerdin, G.; Glorieux, C.

    2015-01-01

    The underlying working principle of detecting impulsive stimulated scattering signals in a differential configuration of heterodyne diffraction detection is unraveled by involving optical scattering theory. The feasibility of the method for the thermoelastic characterization of coating-substrate systems is demonstrated on the basis of simulated data containing typical levels of noise. Besides the classical analysis of the photoacoustic part of the signals, which involves fitting surface acoustic wave dispersion curves, the photothermal part of the signals is analyzed by introducing thermal wave dispersion curves to represent and interpret their grating wavelength dependence. The intrinsic possibilities and limitations of both inverse problems are quantified by making use of least and most squares analysis. PMID:26236643

  3. Hydration properties of small hydrophobic molecules by Brillouin light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comez, L.; Lupi, L.; Paolantoni, M.; Picchiò, F.; Fioretto, D.

    2012-09-01

    We study the relaxation of water molecules next to hydrophobic solutes with different functional groups by Brillouin light scattering. Evidence is given for (i) water activation energy in trimethylamine-N-oxide, proline and t-butyl alcohol diluted solutions which is comparable to that of neat water, almost independent from solute mole fraction and (ii) moderate slowdown of relaxation time of proximal water compared to the bulk, which is consistent with excluded volume models. Assuming that the main contribution to viscosity comes from bulk and hydration water, a rationale is given of the phenomenological Arrhenius' laws for the viscosity of diluted aqueous solutions.

  4. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-11-18

    During the seven quarter of the project the research team analyzed some of the acoustic velocity data and rock deformation data. The goal is to create a series of ''deformation-velocity maps'' which can outline the types of rock deformational mechanisms which can occur at high pressures and then associate those with specific compressional or shear wave velocity signatures. During this quarter, we began to analyze both the acoustical and deformational properties of the various rock types. Some of the preliminary velocity data from the Danian chalk will be presented in this report. This rock type was selected for the initial efforts as it will be used in the tomographic imaging study outlined in Task 10. This is one of the more important rock types in the study as the Danian chalk is thought to represent an excellent analog to the Ekofisk chalk that has caused so many problems in the North Sea. Some of the preliminary acoustic velocity data obtained during this phase of the project indicates that during pore collapse and compaction of this chalk, the acoustic velocities can change by as much as 200 m/s. Theoretically, this significant velocity change should be detectable during repeated successive 3-D seismic images. In addition, research continues with an analysis of the unconsolidated sand samples at high confining pressures obtained in Task 9. The analysis of the results indicate that sands with 10% volume of fines can undergo liquefaction at lower stress conditions than sand samples which do not have fines added. This liquefaction and/or sand flow is similar to ''shallow water'' flows observed during drilling in the offshore Gulf of Mexico.

  5. Estimation of mechanical properties of gelatin using a microbubble under acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Eriko; Ando, Keita

    2015-12-01

    This paper is concerned with observations of the translation of a microbubble (80 μm or 137 μm in radius) in a viscoelastic medium (3 w% gelatin), which is induced by acoustic radiation force originating from 1 MHz focused ultrasound. An optical system using a high-speed camera was designed to visualize the bubble translation and deformation. If the bubble remains its spherical shape under the sonication, the bubble translation we observed can be described by theory based on the Voigt model for linear viscoelastic solids; mechanical properties of the gelatin are calculated from measurements of the terminal displacement under the sonication.

  6. LED lamp or bulb with remote phosphor and diffuser configuration with enhanced scattering properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Tao; Le Toquin, Ronan; Keller, Bernd; Tarsa, Eric; Youmans, Mark; Lowes, Theodore; Medendorp, Jr., Nicholas W; Van De Ven, Antony; Negley, Gerald

    2014-11-11

    An LED lamp or bulb is disclosed that comprises a light source, a heat sink structure and an optical cavity. The optical cavity comprises a phosphor carrier having a conversions material and arranged over an opening to the cavity. The phosphor carrier comprises a thermally conductive transparent material and is thermally coupled to the heat sink structure. An LED based light source is mounted in the optical cavity remote to the phosphor carrier with light from the light source passing through the phosphor carrier. A diffuser dome is included that is mounted over the optical cavity, with light from the optical cavity passing through the diffuser dome. The properties of the diffuser, such as geometry, scattering properties of the scattering layer, surface roughness or smoothness, and spatial distribution of the scattering layer properties may be used to control various lamp properties such as color uniformity and light intensity distribution as a function of viewing angle.

  7. Predict compositions and mechanical properties of sugar beet using hyperspectral scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose, soluble solids, and moisture content and mechanical properties are important quality/property attributes of sugar beet. In this study, hyperspectral scattering images for the spectral region of 500-1,000 nm were acquired from 398 beet slices, from which relative mean spectra were calculated...

  8. Vibrational Properties of Nanocrystals from the Debye Scattering Equation

    PubMed Central

    Scardi, P.; Gelisio, L.

    2016-01-01

    One hundred years after the original formulation by Petrus J.W. Debije (aka Peter Debye), the Debye Scattering Equation (DSE) is still the most accurate expression to model the diffraction pattern from nanoparticle systems. A major limitation in the original form of the DSE is that it refers to a static domain, so that including thermal disorder usually requires rescaling the equation by a Debye-Waller thermal factor. The last is taken from the traditional diffraction theory developed in Reciprocal Space (RS), which is opposed to the atomistic paradigm of the DSE, usually referred to as Direct Space (DS) approach. Besides being a hybrid of DS and RS expressions, rescaling the DSE by the Debye-Waller factor is an approximation which completely misses the contribution of Temperature Diffuse Scattering (TDS). The present work proposes a solution to include thermal effects coherently with the atomistic approach of the DSE. A deeper insight into the vibrational dynamics of nanostructured materials can be obtained with few changes with respect to the standard formulation of the DSE, providing information on the correlated displacement of vibrating atoms. PMID:26916341

  9. Vibrational properties of nanocrystals from the Debye Scattering Equation

    DOE PAGES

    Scardi, P.; Gelisio, L.

    2016-02-26

    One hundred years after the original formulation by Petrus J.W. Debije (aka Peter Debye), the Debye Scattering Equation (DSE) is still the most accurate expression to model the diffraction pattern from nanoparticle systems. A major limitation in the original form of the DSE is that it refers to a static domain, so that including thermal disorder usually requires rescaling the equation by a Debye-Waller thermal factor. The last is taken from the traditional diffraction theory developed in Reciprocal Space (RS), which is opposed to the atomistic paradigm of the DSE, usually referred to as Direct Space (DS) approach. Besides beingmore » a hybrid of DS and RS expressions, rescaling the DSE by the Debye-Waller factor is an approximation which completely misses the contribution of Temperature Diffuse Scattering (TDS). The present work proposes a solution to include thermal effects coherently with the atomistic approach of the DSE. Here, a deeper insight into the vibrational dynamics of nanostructured materials can be obtained with few changes with respect to the standard formulation of the DSE, providing information on the correlated displacement of vibrating atoms.« less

  10. Development of fly ash boards with thermal, acoustic and fire insulation properties.

    PubMed

    Leiva, C; Arenas, C; Vilches, L F; Alonso-Fariñas, B; Rodriguez-Galán, M

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental analysis on a new board composed of gypsum and fly ashes from coal combustion, which are mutually compatible. Physical and mechanical properties, sound absorption coefficient, thermal properties and leaching test have been obtained. The mechanical properties showed similar values to other commercial products. As far as the acoustic insulation characteristics are concerned, sound absorption coefficients of 0.3 and 0.8 were found. The board presents a low thermal conductivity and a fire resistance higher than 50 min (for 4 cm of thickness). The leaching of trace elements was below the leaching limit values. These boards can be considered as suitable to be used in building applications as partitions. PMID:26337964

  11. Development of fly ash boards with thermal, acoustic and fire insulation properties.

    PubMed

    Leiva, C; Arenas, C; Vilches, L F; Alonso-Fariñas, B; Rodriguez-Galán, M

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental analysis on a new board composed of gypsum and fly ashes from coal combustion, which are mutually compatible. Physical and mechanical properties, sound absorption coefficient, thermal properties and leaching test have been obtained. The mechanical properties showed similar values to other commercial products. As far as the acoustic insulation characteristics are concerned, sound absorption coefficients of 0.3 and 0.8 were found. The board presents a low thermal conductivity and a fire resistance higher than 50 min (for 4 cm of thickness). The leaching of trace elements was below the leaching limit values. These boards can be considered as suitable to be used in building applications as partitions.

  12. Accuracy of RGD approximation for computing light scattering properties of diffusing and motile bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kotlarchyk, M; Chen, S H; Asano, S

    1979-07-15

    The quasi-elastic light scattering has become an established technique for a rapid and quantitative characterization of an average motility pattern of motile bacteria in suspensions. Essentially all interpretations of the measured light scattering intensities and spectra so far are based on the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye (RGD) approximation. Since the range of sizes of bacteria of interest is generally larger than the wavelength of light used in the measurement, one is not certain of the justification for the use of the RGD approximation. In this paper we formulate a method by which both the scattering intensity and the quasi-elastic light scattering spectra can be calculated from a rigorous scattering theory. For a specific application we study the case of bacteria Escherichia coli (about 1 microm in size) by using numerical solutions of the scattering field amplitudes from a prolate spheroid, which is known to simulate optical properties of the bacteria well. We have computed (1) polarized scattered light intensity vs scattering angle for a randomly oriented bacteria population; (2) polarized scattered field correlation functions for both a freely diffusing bacterium and for a bacterium undergoing a straight line motion in random directions and with a Maxwellian speed distribution; and (3) the corresponding depolarized scattered intensity and field correlation functions. In each case sensitivity of the result to variations of the index of refraction and size of the bacterium is investigated. The conclusion is that within a reasonable range of parameters applicable to E. coli, the accuracy of the RGD is good to within 10% at all angles for the properties (1) and (2), and the depolarized contributions in (3) are generally very small. PMID:20212685

  13. The Influence of Structural Features of Particles on their Light Scattering Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theilheim, K. O.

    The theory of the scattering of light by ensembles of particles with ir regular shape is of interest in the context of interstellar and interplanetary dust grains and particles associated with comets or observed in aerosols and hydrosols. The scattering properties of homogeneous particles are determined by both geometrical features and chemical composition as represented by the complex frequency dependent index of refraction. We have performed a systematic investigation on the former aspect, namely the influence of structural features of the surface of large dielectric particles on their light scattering properties. The geometrical surface structure will be discussed in terms of macro roughness and micro roughness as two limiting cases of a more general type of roughness. Some results will also be presented for composite roughness models. Finally I will discuss preliminary results of a scattering theory applicable to ensembles of particles with irregular shape and arbitrary size based on the method of perturbed boundary conditions.

  14. Light-scattering properties of plate and column ice crystals generated in a laboratory cold chamber.

    PubMed

    Barkey, Brian; Bailey, Matt; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Hallett, John

    2002-09-20

    Angular scattering properties of ice crystal particles generated in a laboratory cloud chamber are measured with a lightweight polar nephelometer with a diode laser beam. This cloud chamber produces distinct plate and hollow column ice crystal types for light-scattering experiments and provides a controlled test bed for comparison with results computed from theory. Ice clouds composed predominantly of plates and hollow columns generated noticeable 22 degrees and 46 degrees halo patterns, which are predicted from geometric ray-tracing calculations. With the measured ice crystal shape and size distribution, the angular scattering patterns computed from geometrical optics with a significant contribution by rough surfaces closely match those observed from the nephelometer.

  15. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  16. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  17. Mechanical spectra of glass-forming liquids. II. Gigahertz-frequency longitudinal and shear acoustic dynamics in glycerol and DC704 studied by time-domain Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Klieber, Christoph; Hecksher, Tina; Pezeril, Thomas; Torchinsky, Darius H; Dyre, Jeppe C; Nelson, Keith A

    2013-03-28

    This paper presents and discusses the temperature and frequency dependence of the longitudinal and shear viscoelastic response at MHz and GHz frequencies of the intermediate glass former glycerol and the fragile glass former tetramethyl-tetraphenyl-trisiloxane (DC704). Measurements were performed using the recently developed time-domain Brillouin scattering technique, in which acoustic waves are generated optically, propagated through nm thin liquid layers of different thicknesses, and detected optically after transmission into a transparent detection substrate. This allows for a determination of the frequency dependence of the speed of sound and the sound-wave attenuation. When the data are converted into mechanical moduli, a linear relationship between longitudinal and shear acoustic moduli is revealed, which is consistent with the generalized Cauchy relation. In glycerol, the temperature dependence of the shear acoustic relaxation time agrees well with literature data for dielectric measurements. In DC704, combining the new data with data from measurements obtained previously by piezo-ceramic transducers yields figures showing the longitudinal and shear sound velocities at frequencies from mHz to GHz over an extended range of temperatures. The shoving model's prediction for the relaxation time's temperature dependence is fairly well obeyed for both liquids as demonstrated from a plot with no adjustable parameters. Finally, we show that for both liquids the instantaneous shear modulus follows an exponential temperature dependence to a good approximation, as predicted by Granato's interstitialcy model. PMID:23556795

  18. Effect of stent surface-scattering properties on IV-OCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elahi, Sahar; Mancuso, J. Jacob; Feldman, Marc D.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Milner, Thomas E.

    2012-02-01

    Effect of stent surface-scattering properties on the appearance of stent struts in IV-OCT images was examined by simulation of light-stent interaction by an optical design software package. A phantom blood vessel was constructed from a mix of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and titanium dioxide to simulate the elastic and optical scattering properties of the arterial wall. A Cordis CYPHER® sirolimus-eluting stent was deployed within the phantom vessel and high resolution Micro-CT images of the stent strut were recorded to create a three-dimensional representation that was imported into software. A Gaussian surface-scattering model (bi-directional scattering distribution function) was assumed for the strut. Simulation of IV-OCT catheter and reflection of light from the stent strut was implemented for different surface scattering properties. A model of IV-OCT catheter was defined in the optical model and the rotation of the light beam over the stent strut was simulated. The measured parameters included: fraction of the reflected rays returning to the catheter and coordinate locations on the stent struts of returned rays. The results indicate that when the surface scattering of the strut increases, reflectivity is higher, while the angular spread of the light beam that is reflected back to the catheter is wider.

  19. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.

    2001-04-01

    The oil and gas industry has encountered significant problems in the production of oil and gas from weak rocks (such as chalks and limestones) and from unconsolidated sand formations. Problems include subsidence, compaction, sand production, and catastrophic shallow water sand flows during deep water drilling. Together these cost the petroleum industry hundreds of millions of dollars annually. The goals of this first quarterly report is to document the progress on the project to provide data on the acoustic imaging and mechanical properties of soft rock and marine sediments. The project is intended to determine the geophysical (acoustic velocities) rock properties of weak, poorly cemented rocks and unconsolidated sands. In some cases these weak formations can create problems for reservoir engineers. For example, it cost Phillips Petroleum 1 billion dollars to repair of offshore production facilities damaged during the unexpected subsidence and compaction of the Ekofisk Field in the North Sea (Sulak 1991). Another example is the problem of shallow water flows (SWF) occurring in sands just below the seafloor encountered during deep water drilling operations. In these cases the unconsolidated sands uncontrollably flow up around the annulus of the borehole resulting in loss of the drill casing. The $150 million dollar loss of the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast resulted from an uncontrolled SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The first three tasks outlined in the work plan are: (1) obtain rock samples, (2) construct new acoustic platens, (3) calibrate and test the equipment. These have been completed as scheduled. Rock Mechanics Institute researchers at the University of Oklahoma have obtained eight different types of samples for the experimental program. These include: (a) Danian Chalk, (b) Cordoba Cream Limestone, (c) Indiana Limestone, (d) Ekofisk Chalk, (e) Oil Creek Sandstone, (f) unconsolidated Oil Creek sand, and (g) unconsolidated Brazos river sand

  20. Extinction and Scattering Properties of Dust Around Red Supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Stacey; Clayton, G.; Massey, P.; Gordon, K.; Levesque, E.; Plez, B.

    2007-12-01

    We have been amassing a unique dataset which can be used to investigate the amount and nature of dust produced by red supergiants (RSGs) in very different environments. To this end, optical spectra are being obtained for RSGs in various galaxies in the Local Group. Moderate-resolution, high S/N, spectrophotometry, covering 3500-9000A, has been obtained for a sample of RSGs in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. Using the the MARCS stellar atmosphere models to fit the SEDs, we are deriving extinction curves from 3500A to the K-band for the Local Group RSGs. In particular, for the LMC and SMC stars, the problem is more tractable than for the Milky Way RSGs, given the small and relatively uniform foreground extinction of the Clouds. We will construct extinction curves using the classic "pair method". The feasibility of using the model SEDs as "unreddened" standards will be examined, as well as the more conventional pairing of stars that are closely matched in spectral type but have different reddenings. These extinction curves are actually attenuation curves since the RSG circumstellar dust shells are not resolved and light can be scattered back into the beam. In particular, we plan to examine the apparent NUV excess seen in the Galactic RSG extinction curves. The NUV excess is possibly due to scattering of the star's light by circumstellar dust and/or a larger average size than that typical of grains found in the diffuse interstellar medium. This project is being supported by NSF grant AST-0707691 and a LaSPACE Undergraduate Research Assistantship (NASA grant NNG05GH22H).

  1. Properties of cells through life and death – an acoustic microscopy investigation

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Maurice M; Strohm, Eric M; Berndl, Elizabeth SL; Kolios, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Current methods to evaluate the status of a cell are largely focused on fluorescent identification of molecular biomarkers. The invasive nature of these methods – requiring either fixation, chemical dyes, genetic alteration, or a combination of these – prevents subsequent analysis of samples. In light of this limitation, studies have considered the use of physical markers to differentiate cell stages. Acoustic microscopy is an ultrahigh frequency (>100 MHz) ultrasound technology that can be used to calculate the mechanical and physical properties of biological cells in real-time, thereby evaluating cell stage in live cells without invasive biomarker evaluation. Using acoustic microscopy, MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells within the G1, G2, and metaphase phases of the proliferative cell cycle, in addition to early and late programmed cell death, were examined. Physical properties calculated include the cell height, sound speed, acoustic impedance, cell density, adiabatic bulk modulus, and the ultrasonic attenuation. A total of 290 cells were measured, 58 from each cell phase, assessed using fluorescent and phase contrast microscopy. Cells actively progressing from G1 to metaphase were marked by a 28% decrease in attenuation, in contrast to the induction of apoptosis from G1, which was marked by a significant 81% increase in attenuation. Furthermore late apoptotic cells separated into 2 distinct groups based on ultrasound attenuation, suggesting that presently-unidentified sub-stages may exist within late apoptosis. A methodology has been implemented for the identification of cell stages without the use of chemical dyes, fixation, or genetic manipulation. PMID:26178635

  2. A reliable acoustic path: Physical properties and a source localization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Rui; Yang, Kun-De; Ma, Yuan-Liang; Lei, Bo

    2012-12-01

    The physical properties of a reliable acoustic path (RAP) are analysed and subsequently a weighted-subspace-fitting matched field (WSF-MF) method for passive localization is presented by exploiting the properties of the RAP environment. The RAP is an important acoustic duct in the deep ocean, which occurs when the receiver is placed near the bottom where the sound velocity exceeds the maximum sound velocity in the vicinity of the surface. It is found that in the RAP environment the transmission loss is rather low and no blind zone of surveillance exists in a medium range. The ray theory is used to explain these phenomena. Furthermore, the analysis of the arrival structures shows that the source localization method based on arrival angle is feasible in this environment. However, the conventional methods suffer from the complicated and inaccurate estimation of the arrival angle. In this paper, a straightforward WSF-MF method is derived to exploit the information about the arrival angles indirectly. The method is to minimize the distance between the signal subspace and the spanned space by the array manifold in a finite range-depth space rather than the arrival-angle space. Simulations are performed to demonstrate the features of the method, and the results are explained by the arrival structures in the RAP environment.

  3. Inherent and Apparent Scattering Properties of Coated or Uncoated Spheres Embedded in an Absorbing Host Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, P.; Gao, B.-C.; Wiscombe, W. J.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Platnick, S.; Huang, H.-L.; Baum, B. A.; Hu, Y. X.; Winkler, D,; Tsay, S.-C.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The conventional Lorenz-Mie formalism is extended to the scattering process associated with a coated sphere embedded in an absorbing medium. It is shown that apparent and inherent scattering cross sections of a scattering particle, which are identical in the case of transparent host medium, are different if the host medium is absorptive. Here the inherent single-scattering properties are derived from the near-field information whereas the corresponding apparent counterparts are derived from the far-field asymptotic form of the scattered wave with scaling of host absorption that is assumed to be in an exponential form. The formality extinction and scattering efficiencies defined in the same manner as in the conventional sense can be unbounded. For a nonabsorptive particle embedded in an absorbing medium, the effect of host absorption on the phase matrix elements associated with polarization is significant. This effect, however, is largely reduced for strongly absorptive particles such as soot. For soot particles coated with water, the impurity can substantially reduce the single-scattering albedo of the particle if the size parameter is small. For water-coating soot and hollow ice spheres, it is shown that the phase matrix elements -P(sub 12)/P(sub 11) and P(sub 33)/P(sub 11) are unique if the shell is thin, as compared with the case for thick shell. Furthermore, the radiative transfer equation regarding a multidisperse particle system in an absorbing medium is discussed. It is illustrated that the conventional computation algorithms can be applied to solve the multiple scattering process if the scaled apparent single-scattering properties are applied.

  4. Measurement and Modeling of the Optical Scattering Properties of Crop Canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Grant, L.

    1984-01-01

    Efforts in measuring, analyzing, and mathematically modeling the specular, polarized, and diffuse light scattering properties of several plant canopies and their component parts (leaves, stems, fruit, soil) as a function of view angle and illumination angle are reported. Specific objectives were: (1) to demonstrate a technique for determining the specular and diffuse components of the reflectance factor of plant canopies; (2) to acquire the measurements and begin assembling a data set for developing and testing canopy reflectance models; (3) to design and build a new optical instrument to measure the light scattering properties of individual leaves; and (4) to use this instrument to survey and investigate the information in the light scattering properties of individual leaves of crops, forests, weeds, and horticulture.

  5. Acoustic metafluids.

    PubMed

    Norris, Andrew N

    2009-02-01

    Acoustic metafluids are defined as the class of fluids that allow one domain of fluid to acoustically mimic another, as exemplified by acoustic cloaks. It is shown that the most general class of acoustic metafluids are materials with anisotropic inertia and the elastic properties of what are known as pentamode materials. The derivation uses the notion of finite deformation to define the transformation of one region to another. The main result is found by considering energy density in the original and transformed regions. Properties of acoustic metafluids are discussed, and general conditions are found which ensure that the mapped fluid has isotropic inertia, which potentially opens up the possibility of achieving broadband cloaking. PMID:19206861

  6. Extinction and Scattering Properties of Soot Emitted from Buoyant Turbulent Diffusion Flames. Appendix D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, S. S.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extinction and scattering properties at wavelengths of 250-5200 nm were studied for soot emitted from buoyant turbulent diffusion flames in the long residence time regime where soot properties are independent of position in the overfire region and characteristic flame residence times. Flames burning in still air and fueled with gas (acetylene, ethylene, propane, and propylene) and liquid (benzene, toluene, cyclohexane, and n-heptane) hydrocarbon fuels were considered Measured scattering patterns and ratios of total scattering/absorption cross sections were in good agreement with predictions based on the Rayleigh-Debye-Gans (RDG) scattering approximation in the visible. Measured depolarization ratios were roughly correlated by primary particle size parameter, suggesting potential for completing RDG methodology needed to make soot scattering predictions as well as providing a nonintrusive way to measure primary soot particle diameters. Measurements of dimensionless extinction coefficients were in good agreement with earlier measurements for similar soot populations and were independent of fuel type and wavelength except for reduced values as the near ultraviolet was approached. The ratios of the scattering/absorption refractive index functions were independent of fuel type within experimental uncertainties and were in good agreement with earlier measurements. The refractive index function for absorption was similarly independent of fuel type but was larger than earlier reflectometry measurements in the infrared. Ratios of total scattering/absorption cross sections were relatively large in the visible and near infrared, with maximum values as large as 0.9 and with values as large as 0.2 at 2000 nm, suggesting greater potential for scattering from soot particles to affect flame radiation properties than previously thought.

  7. Extinction and Scattering Properties of Soot Emitted from Buoyant Turbulent Diffusion Flames. Appendix F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, S. S.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extinction and scattering properties at wavelengths of 250-5200 nm were studied for soot emitted from buoyant turbulent diffusion flames in the long residence time regime where soot properties are independent of position in the overfire region and characteristic flame residence times. Flames burning in still air and fueled with gas (acetylene, ethylene, propane, and propylene) and liquid (benzene, toluene, cyclohexane, and n-heptane) hydrocarbon fuels were considered. Measured scattering patterns and ratios of total scattering/absorption cross sections were in good agreement with predictions based on the Rayleigh-Debye-Gans (RDG) scattering approximation in the visible. Measured depolarization ratios were roughly correlated by primary particle size parameter, suggesting potential for completing RDG methodology needed to make soot scattering predictions as well as providing a nonintrusive way to measure primary soot particle diameters. Measurements of dimensionless extinction coefficients were in good agreement with earlier measurements for similar soot populations and were independent of fuel type and wavelength except for reduced values as the near ultraviolet was approached. The ratios of the scattering/absorption refractive index functions were independent of fuel type within experimental uncertainties and were in good agreement with earlier measurements. The refractive index junction for absorption was similarly independent of fuel type but was larger than earlier reflectometry measurements in the infrared. Ratios of total scattering/absorption cross sections were relatively large in the visible and near infrared, with maximum values as large as 0.9 and with values as large as 0.2 at 2000 nm, suggesting greater potential for scattering from soot particles to affect flame radiation properties than previously thought.

  8. Effects of fine metal oxide particle dopant on the acoustic properties of silicone rubber lens for medical array probe.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Yasuharu; Yamashita, Yohachi; Itsumi, Kazuhiro

    2007-08-01

    The effects of fine metal oxide particles, particularly those of high-density elements (7.7 to 9.7 x 10(3) kg/m3), on the acoustic properties of silicone rubber have been investigated in order to develop an acoustic lens with a low acoustic attenuation. Silicone rubber doped with Yb2O3 powder having nanoparticle size of 16 nm showed a lower acoustic attenuation than silicone rubber doped with powders of CeO2, Bi2O3, Lu2O3 and HfO2. The silicone rubber doped with Yb2O3 powder showed a sound speed of 0.88 km/s, an acoustic impedance of 1.35 x 10(6) kg/m2s, an acoustic attenuation of 0.93 dB/mmMHz, and a Shore A hardness of 55 at 37 degrees C. Although typical silicone rubber doped with SiO2 (2.6 x 10(3) kg/m3) shows a sound speed of about 1.00 km/s, heavy metal oxide particles decreased the sound velocities to lower than 0.93 km/s. Therefore, an acoustic lens of silicone rubber doped with Yb2O3 powder provides increased sensitivity because it realizes a thinner acoustic lens than is conventionally used due to its low sound speed. Moreover, it has an advantage in that a focus point is not changed when the acoustic lens is pressed to a human body due to its reasonable hardness.

  9. Dynamic Properties of Tympanic Membrane in a Chinchilla Otitis Media Model Measured With Acoustic Loading.

    PubMed

    Yokell, Zachary; Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z

    2015-08-01

    Otitis media is the most common infectious disease in young children, which results in changes in the thickness and mechanical properties of the tympanic membrane (TM) and induces hearing loss. However, there are no published data for the dynamic properties of the TM in otitis media ears, and it is unclear how the mechanical property changes are related to TM thickness variation. This paper reports a study of the measurement of the dynamic properties of the TM in a chinchilla acute otitis media (AOM) model using acoustic loading and laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). AOM was created through transbullar injection of Haemophilus influenzae into the middle ear, and AOM samples were prepared 4 days after inoculation. Vibration of the TM specimen induced by acoustic loading was measured via LDV over a frequency range of 0.1-8 kHz. The experiment was then simulated in a finite element (FE) model, and the inverse-problem solving method was used to determine the complex modulus in the frequency domain. Results from 12 ears (six control and six AOM) show that the storage modulus of the TM from AOM ears was on average 53% higher than that of control ears, while the loss factor was 17.3% higher in control ears than in AOM ears at low-frequency (f < 1 kHz). At high-frequency (e.g., 8000 Hz), there was a mean 40% increase in storage modulus of the TM from AOM compared to control samples. At peak frequency (e.g., 3 kHz), there was a 19.5% increase in loss factor in control samples compared to AOM samples. These findings quantify the changes induced by AOM in the chinchilla TM, namely, a significant increase in both the storage and loss moduli.

  10. Dynamic Properties of Tympanic Membrane in a Chinchilla Otitis Media Model Measured With Acoustic Loading.

    PubMed

    Yokell, Zachary; Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z

    2015-08-01

    Otitis media is the most common infectious disease in young children, which results in changes in the thickness and mechanical properties of the tympanic membrane (TM) and induces hearing loss. However, there are no published data for the dynamic properties of the TM in otitis media ears, and it is unclear how the mechanical property changes are related to TM thickness variation. This paper reports a study of the measurement of the dynamic properties of the TM in a chinchilla acute otitis media (AOM) model using acoustic loading and laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). AOM was created through transbullar injection of Haemophilus influenzae into the middle ear, and AOM samples were prepared 4 days after inoculation. Vibration of the TM specimen induced by acoustic loading was measured via LDV over a frequency range of 0.1-8 kHz. The experiment was then simulated in a finite element (FE) model, and the inverse-problem solving method was used to determine the complex modulus in the frequency domain. Results from 12 ears (six control and six AOM) show that the storage modulus of the TM from AOM ears was on average 53% higher than that of control ears, while the loss factor was 17.3% higher in control ears than in AOM ears at low-frequency (f < 1 kHz). At high-frequency (e.g., 8000 Hz), there was a mean 40% increase in storage modulus of the TM from AOM compared to control samples. At peak frequency (e.g., 3 kHz), there was a 19.5% increase in loss factor in control samples compared to AOM samples. These findings quantify the changes induced by AOM in the chinchilla TM, namely, a significant increase in both the storage and loss moduli. PMID:25902287

  11. Seismic inversion with generalized Radon transform based on local second-order approximation of scattered field in acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Mao, Weijian; Li, Xuelei; Li, Wuqun

    2014-08-01

    Sound velocity inversion problem based on scattering theory is formulated in terms of a nonlinear integral equation associated with scattered field. Because of its nonlinearity, in practice, linearization algorisms (Born/single scattering approximation) are widely used to obtain an approximate inversion solution. However, the linearized strategy is not congruent with seismic wave propagation mechanics in strong perturbation (heterogeneous) medium. In order to partially dispense with the weak perturbation assumption of the Born approximation, we present a new approach from the following two steps: firstly, to handle the forward scattering by taking into account the second-order Born approximation, which is related to generalized Radon transform (GRT) about quadratic scattering potential; then to derive a nonlinear quadratic inversion formula by resorting to inverse GRT. In our formulation, there is a significant quadratic term regarding scattering potential, and it can provide an amplitude correction for inversion results beyond standard linear inversion. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the linear single scattering inversion is only good in amplitude for relative velocity perturbation () of background media up to 10 %, and its inversion errors are unacceptable for the perturbation beyond 10 %. In contrast, the quadratic inversion can give more accurate amplitude-preserved recovery for the perturbation up to 40 %. Our inversion scheme is able to manage double scattering effects by estimating a transmission factor from an integral over a small area, and therefore, only a small portion of computational time is added to the original linear migration/inversion process.

  12. Analysis on the electromagnetic scattering properties of crops at multi-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Wu, Zhensen; Liu, Xiaoyi

    2014-12-01

    The vector radiative transfer (VRT) theory for active microwave remote sensing and Rayleigh-Gans approximation (GRG) are applied in the study, and an iterative algorithm is used to solve the RT equations, thus we obtain the zeroorder and first-order equation for numerical results. The Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering (MIMICS) model is simplified to adapt to the crop model, by analyzing body-surface bistatic scattering and backscattering properties between a layer of soybean or wheat consisting of stems and leaves and different underlying soil surface at multi-band (i.e. P, L, S, X, Ku-band), we obtain microwave scattering mechanisms of crop components and the effect of underlying ground on total crop scattering. Stem and leaf are regard as a needle and a circular disk, respectively. The final results are compared with some literature data to verify our calculating method, numerical results show multi-band crop microwave scattering properties differ from scattering angle, azimuth angle and moisture of vegetation and soil, which offer the part needed information for the design of future bistatic radar systems for crop sensing applications.

  13. Scattering properties of woven fibrous insulations - Effects of interference for normal incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Sunil; White, Susan M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the scattering properties of woven fibrous materials in order to model the interactions between the scattered radiation from individual fibers. A normally incident plane electromagnetic wave is considered and different representative geometries are analyzed theoretically. Experimental results are presented for specific woven thermal insulation fabrics. Previous studies in the literature have mostly ignored the effect of constructive or destructive addition of scattered waves from individual fibers with the exception of the case of parallel fibers. Whereas the light-scattering characteristics of a single long fiber depend only on the size parameter and on the material optical constants, the additional mechanism of interference between the scattered waves from fibers of parallel or perpendicular orientation introduces an additional dependence on fiber locations. In this study, analytical models are developed for obtaining the radiative scattering characteristics of woven fibrous media taking into account the mechanism of interference. Experimental measurements of forward- and backward-scattered light from a woven silica cloth over a broad range of wavelengths in the infrared are obtained and compared with the predicted results for a system of two orthogonal families of infinite parallel fibers.

  14. Non-destructive electromagnetic-acoustic evaluation methods of anisotropy and elastic properties in structural alloy steel rolled products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraviev, V. V.; Muravieva, O. V.; Gabbasova, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Application opportunities of acoustic structural analysis methods for evaluation of elastic properties and anisotropy by the example of cold-rolled sheets and spring steel rods are presented. Methods are based on application of non-contact electromagnetic-acoustic transducers of encircling and laid-on types developed by the authors and measurements of volume, Rayleigh and Lamb waves parameters. The methods developed can be used as a research tool of material structural analysis, anisotropy of properties when choosing heat treatment techniques and conditions, under intensive plastic deformation and other external energy deposition, including non-conventional material production with hierarchy structure and development of new technologies and safe constructions.

  15. Scattering Properties of Needle-Like and plate-like Ice Spheroids with Moderate Size Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakharova, Nadia T.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We use the current advanced version of the T-matrix method to compute the optical cross sections, the asymmetry parameter of the phase function, and the scattering matrix elements of ice spheroids with aspect ratios up to 20 and surface-equivalent-sphere size parameters up to 12. We demonstrate that plate-like and needle-like particles with moderate size parameters possess unique scattering properties: their asymmetry parameters and phase functions are similar to those of surface-equivalent spheres, whereas all other elements of the scattering matrix are typical of particles much smaller than the wavelength (Rayleigh scatterers). This result may have important implications for optical particle sizing and remote sensing of the terrestrial and planetary atmospheres.

  16. Universal properties of two-port scattering, impedance, and admittance matrices of wave-chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmady, Sameer; Zheng, Xing; Hart, James; Antonsen, Thomas M. Jr.; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven M.

    2006-09-15

    Statistical fluctuations in the eigenvalues of the scattering, impedance, and admittance matrices of two-port wave-chaotic systems are studied experimentally using a chaotic microwave cavity. These fluctuations are universal in that their properties are dependent only upon the degree of loss in the cavity. We remove the direct processes introduced by the nonideally coupled driving ports through a matrix normalization process that involves the radiation-impedance matrix of the two driving ports. We find good agreement between the experimentally obtained marginal probability density functions (PDFs) of the eigenvalues of the normalized impedance, admittance, and scattering matrix and those from random matrix theory (RMT). We also experimentally study the evolution of the joint PDF of the eigenphases of the normalized scattering matrix as a function of loss. Experimental agreement with the theory by Brouwer and Beenakker for the joint PDF of the magnitude of the eigenvalues of the normalized scattering matrix is also shown.

  17. Universal properties of two-port scattering, impedance, and admittance matrices of wave-chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Hemmady, Sameer; Zheng, Xing; Hart, James; Antonsen, Thomas M; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven M

    2006-09-01

    Statistical fluctuations in the eigenvalues of the scattering, impedance, and admittance matrices of two-port wave-chaotic systems are studied experimentally using a chaotic microwave cavity. These fluctuations are universal in that their properties are dependent only upon the degree of loss in the cavity. We remove the direct processes introduced by the nonideally coupled driving ports through a matrix normalization process that involves the radiation-impedance matrix of the two driving ports. We find good agreement between the experimentally obtained marginal probability density functions (PDFs) of the eigenvalues of the normalized impedance, admittance, and scattering matrix and those from random matrix theory (RMT). We also experimentally study the evolution of the joint PDF of the eigenphases of the normalized scattering matrix as a function of loss. Experimental agreement with the theory by Brouwer and Beenakker for the joint PDF of the magnitude of the eigenvalues of the normalized scattering matrix is also shown.

  18. Scattering Properties of Jovian Tropospheric Cloud Particles from Cassini/ISS: Mie Scattering Phase Function and Particle Size in the South Tropical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takao M.; Satoh, T.; Kasaba, Y.

    2010-10-01

    It is essential to know scattering properties (e.g., scattering phase function) of clouds for determination of vertical cloud structure. However, we cannot derive those from ground-based and Earth-orbit observations because of the limitation of solar phase angle as viewed from the Earth. Then, most previous studies have used the scattering phase function deduced from the Pioneer 10/IPP data (blue: 440 nm, red: 640nm) [Tomasko et al., 1978]. There are two shortcomings in the Pioneer scattering phase function. One is that we have to use this scattering phase function at red as a substitute for analyses of imaging photometry using CH4 bands (center: 727 and 890 nm), although clouds should have wavelength dependency. The other is that the red pass band of IPP was so broad (595-720 nm) that this scattering phase function in red just show wavelength-averaged scattering properties of clouds. To provide a new reference scattering phase function with wavelength dependency, we have analyzed the Cassini/ISS data in BL1 (451 nm), CB1 (619 nm), CB2 (750 nm), and CB3 (938 nm) over wide solar phase angles (3-141 degrees) during its Jovian flyby in 2000-2001. A simple cloud model which consists of a thin stratospheric haze, a semi-infinite cloud, and an intervening Rayleigh gas layers is adopted. Applying Mie theory to scattering by clouds, we deduce the scattering phase function of cloud and effective particle size in the South Tropical Zone. When we use the nominal value of reflective index for ammonia ice (Martonchik et al., 1984), we cannot obtain reasonable fit to the observed limb-darkening profiles. This would imply that we should consider possible effects on the impurity and/or the nonsphericiy of clouds. In this presentation, we will show detail model description and these results. Finally, we discuss scattering properties of clouds through comparison with previous works.

  19. Effects of core position of locally resonant scatterers on low-frequency acoustic absorption in viscoelastic panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jie; Wen, Ji-Hong; Zhao, Hong-Gang; Yin, Jian-Fei; Yang, Hai-Bin

    2015-08-01

    Locally resonant sonic materials, due to their ability to control the propagation of low-frequency elastic waves, have become a promising option for underwater sound absorption materials. In this paper, the finite element method is used to investigate the absorption characteristics of a viscoelastic panel periodically embedded with a type of infinite-long non-coaxially cylindrical locally resonant scatterers (LRSs). The effect of the core position in the coating layer of the LRS on the low-frequency (500 Hz-3000 Hz) sound absorption property is investigated. With increasing the longitudinal core eccentricity e, there occur few changes in the absorptance at the frequencies below 1500 Hz, however, the absorptance above 1500 Hz becomes gradually better and the valid absorption (with absorptance above 0.8) frequency band (VAFB) of the viscoelastic panel becomes accordingly broader. The absorption mechanism is revealed by using the displacement field maps of the viscoelastic panel and the steel slab. The results show two typical resonance modes. One is the overall resonance mode (ORM) caused by steel backing, and the other is the core resonance mode (CRM) caused by LRS. The absorptance of the viscoelastic panel by ORM is induced mainly by the vibration of the steel slab and affected little by core position. On the contrary, with increasing the core eccentricity, the CRM shifts toward high frequency band and decouples with the ORM, leading to two separate absorption peaks and the broadened VAFB of the panel. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51275519).

  20. Acoustic Droplet Vaporization, Cavitation, and Therapeutic Properties of Copolymer-Stabilized Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Christensen, Douglas A.; Rapoport, Natalya; Kennedy, Anne M.

    2009-04-14

    Acoustic and therapeutic properties of Doxorubicin (DOX) and paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions have been investigated in a mouse model of ovarian cancer. The nanoemulsions were stabilized by two biodegradable amphiphilic block copolymers that differed in the structure of the hydrophobic block. Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) and cavitation parameters were measured as a function of ultrasound frequency, pressure, duty cycles, and temperature. The optimal parameters that induced ADV and inertial cavitation of the formed microbubbles were used in vivo in the experiments on the ultrasound-mediated chemotherapy of ovarian cancer. A combination tumor treatment by intravenous injections of drug-loaded perfluoropentane nanoemulsions and tumor-directed 1-MHz ultrasound resulted in a dramatic decrease of ovarian or breast carcinoma tumor volume and sometimes complete tumor resolution. However, tumors often recurred three to six weeks after the treatment indicating that some cancer cells survived the treatment. The recurrent tumors proved more aggressive and resistant to the repeated therapy than initial tumors suggesting selection for the resistant cells during the first treatment.

  1. Effects of nasalance on the acoustical properties of the tenor passaggio and the head voice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perna, Nicholas Kevin

    This study aims to measure the effect that nasality has on the acoustical properties of the tenor passaggio and head voice. Not to be confused with forward resonance, nasality here will be defined as nasalance, the reading of a Nasometer, or the percentage of nasal and oral airflow during phonation. A previous study by Peer Birch et al. has shown that professional tenors used higher percentages of nasalance through their passaggio. They hypothesized that tenors used nasalance to make slight timbral adjustments as they ascended through passaggio. Other well respected authors including Richard Miller and William McIver have claimed that teaching registration issues is the most important component of training young tenors. It seemed logical to measure the acoustic effects of nasalance on the tenor passaggio and head voice. Eight professional operatic tenors participated as subjects performing numerous vocal exercises that demonstrated various registration events. These examples were recorded and analyzed using a Nasometer and Voce Vista Pro Software. Tenors did generally show an increase of nasalance during an ascending B-flat major scale on the vowels [i] and [u]. Perhaps the most revealing result was that six of seven tenors showed at least a 5-10% increase in nasalance on the note after their primary register transition on the vowel of [a]. It is suggested that this phenomenon receive further empirical scrutiny, because, if true, pedagogues could use nasalance as a tool for helping a young tenor ascend through his passaggio.

  2. Nonlinear acoustic properties of ex vivo bovine liver and the effects of temperature and denaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, E. J.; Coussios, C.-C.; Cleveland, R. O.

    2014-06-01

    Thermal ablation by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has a great potential for the non-invasive treatment of solid tumours. Due to the high pressure amplitudes involved, nonlinear acoustic effects must be understood and the relevant medium property is the parameter of nonlinearity B/A. Here, B/A was measured in ex vivo bovine liver, over a heating/cooling cycle replicating temperatures reached during HIFU ablation, adapting a finite amplitude insertion technique, which also allowed for measurement of sound-speed and attenuation. The method measures the nonlinear progression of a plane wave through liver and B/A was chosen so that numerical simulations matched the measured waveforms. To create plane-wave conditions, sinusoidal bursts were transmitted by a 100 mm diameter 1.125 MHz unfocused transducer and measured using a 15 mm diameter 2.25 MHz broadband transducer in the near field. Attenuation and sound-speed were calculated using a reflected pulse from the smaller transducer using the larger transducer as the reflecting interface. Results showed that attenuation initially decreased with heating then increased after denaturation, the sound-speed initially increased with temperature and then decreased, and B/A showed an increase with temperature but no significant post-heating change. The B/A data disagree with other reports that show a significant change and we suggest that any nonlinear enhancement in the received ultrasound signal post-treatment is likely due to acoustic cavitation rather than changes in tissue nonlinearity.

  3. Pentamodal property and acoustic band gaps of pentamode metamaterials with different cross-section shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Lu, Xuegang; Liang, Gongying; Xu, Zhuo

    2016-03-01

    Pentamodal property and acoustic band gaps of pentamode metamaterials with different cross-section shapes, including regular triangle, square, pentagon, hexagon and circle, have been comparatively studied by finite-element method. Results show that for the varying diameters of circumcircles in thick and thin ends of unit (D and d), the ratio of bulk modulus to shear modulus (B / G) and bandgaps of these five structures perform similar changing tendency. With the increasing d, B / G decreases and the single-mode bandgap moves toward high-frequency direction with the decreasing normalized bandwidth (Δω /ωg). With the increasing D, B / G keeps around the respective average value, and the single-mode bandgap firstly moves to high-frequency then to low-frequency direction with the firstly increasing and then decreasing Δω /ωg. Complete bandgap appears as D reaching to critical value for each given d, then moves to high-frequency direction. For same parameters the triangle case has highest B / G and acoustic band gaps with lower frequency and broader bandwidth.

  4. Local scattering property scales flow speed estimation in laser speckle contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Peng; Chao, Zhen; Feng, Shihan; Yu, Hang; Ji, Yuanyuan; Li, Nan; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2015-07-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) has been widely used in in vivo blood flow imaging. However, the effect of local scattering property (scattering coefficient µ s ) on blood flow speed estimation has not been well investigated. In this study, such an effect was quantified and involved in relation between speckle autocorrelation time τ c and flow speed v based on simulation flow experiments. For in vivo blood flow imaging, an improved estimation strategy was developed to eliminate the estimation bias due to the inhomogeneous distribution of the scattering property. Compared to traditional LSCI, a new estimation method significantly suppressed the imaging noise and improves the imaging contrast of vasculatures. Furthermore, the new method successfully captured the blood flow changes and vascular constriction patterns in rats’ cerebral cortex from normothermia to mild and moderate hypothermia.

  5. On physical properties of planetary surfaces studied by modeling radar scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virkki, Anne; Muinonen, Karri

    2015-11-01

    After decades of post-discovery characterization and orbital refinement of near-Earth objects using planetary radars, extensive literature describing the radar scattering properties of various objects of the Solar System has become available. At the same time, there is a shortage of work on what the observed values imply about the physical properties of the planetary surfaces. Our goal is to fill part of this gap.We investigate, which physical properties of a planetary surface or small body affect the radar echo and how. All of the work will be carried out by modeling electromagnetic scattering with the primary focus in the backscattering direction. As all models are only simplifications of the real world, it is necessary to study, which models are the best analogies to observations. Moreover, the number of scattering scenarios is near infinite, but numerical resources are limited. Due to the limitations of specific codes, several different codes are used.The simulations reveal, in the backscattering direction, polarization enhancement at certain bands of sizes and refractive indices. By studying spherical inhomogeneous particles, we found that the electric permittivity defines the phase shift caused by the scatterer, and hence, the depolarizing capability of the scatterer. By using large, irregular particles as the scatterers, a systematic effect of the absorption on the radar observables can be seen, which leads to a semi-analytic, novel form of the radar scattering laws. By using small (wavelength-scale) irregular particles as internal or external diffuse medium inside or on the surface of a very large particle, radar scattering can be simulated very realistically. The results mainly support the current understanding of the effects of the surface geometry, the electric permittivity, and multiple scattering. We also explain how the electric permittivity can affect the radar albedo and circular-polarization ratio by phase shift and absorption. In addition, we show

  6. Determination of acoustic properties of thin polymer films utilizing the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient of ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohmyoh, Hironori; Sakamoto, Yuhei

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports on a technique to measure the acoustic properties of a thin polymer film utilizing the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient of ultrasound reflected back from a system comprising a reflection plate, the film, and a material that covers the film. The frequency components of the echo reflected from the back of the plate, where the film is attached, take their minimum values at the resonant frequency, and from these frequency characteristics, the acoustic impedance, sound velocity, and the density of the film can be determined. We applied this technique to characterize an ion exchange membrane, which has high water absorbability, and successfully determined the acoustic properties of the membrane without getting it wet.

  7. Scattering properties of PT- symmetric layered periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shramkova, O. V.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2016-10-01

    The optical properties of PT-symmetric periodic stacks of the layers with balanced loss and gain are examined. We demonstrate that the tunnelling phenomenon in periodic structures is connected with excitation of surface waves at the boundaries separating gain and loss regions within each unit cell and tunnelling conditions for periodic stacks can be reduced to the conditions for one period. Alternatively, it is shown that coherent perfect absorber laser states are mediated by excitation of surface modes localised at all internal boundaries of the structure. The effects of structure parameters, angles, direction of incidence on the resonant phenomena and spontaneous symmetry breaking transition are determined. It is shown that structural periodicity significantly increases the number of resonant phenomena, especially in stacks with high real and imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity of the layers.

  8. Influence of surface scattering on the thermal properties of spatially confined GaN nanofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yang; Zhu, Lin-Li

    2016-08-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN), the notable representative of third generation semiconductors, has been widely applied to optoelectronic and microelectronic devices due to its excellent physical and chemical properties. In this paper, we investigate the surface scattering effect on the thermal properties of GaN nanofilms. The contribution of surface scattering to phonon transport is involved in solving a Boltzmann transport equation (BTE). The confined phonon properties of GaN nanofilms are calculated based on the elastic model. The theoretical results show that the surface scattering effect can modify the cross-plane phonon thermal conductivity of GaN nanostructures completely, resulting in the significant change of size effect on the conductivity in GaN nanofilm. Compared with the quantum confinement effect, the surface scattering leads to the order-of-magnitude reduction of the cross-plane thermal conductivity in GaN nanofilm. This work could be helpful for controlling the thermal properties of GaN nanostructures in nanoelectronic devices through surface engineering. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11302189 and 11321202) and the Doctoral Fund of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 20130101120175).

  9. Influence of surface scattering on the thermal properties of spatially confined GaN nanofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yang; Zhu, Lin-Li

    2016-08-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN), the notable representative of third generation semiconductors, has been widely applied to optoelectronic and microelectronic devices due to its excellent physical and chemical properties. In this paper, we investigate the surface scattering effect on the thermal properties of GaN nanofilms. The contribution of surface scattering to phonon transport is involved in solving a Boltzmann transport equation (BTE). The confined phonon properties of GaN nanofilms are calculated based on the elastic model. The theoretical results show that the surface scattering effect can modify the cross-plane phonon thermal conductivity of GaN nanostructures completely, resulting in the significant change of size effect on the conductivity in GaN nanofilm. Compared with the quantum confinement effect, the surface scattering leads to the order-of-magnitude reduction of the cross-plane thermal conductivity in GaN nanofilm. This work could be helpful for controlling the thermal properties of GaN nanostructures in nanoelectronic devices through surface engineering. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11302189 and 11321202) and the Doctoral Fund of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 20130101120175).

  10. Elastic properties of a polyimide film determined by Brillouin scattering and mechanical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.S.; Schuller, I.K.; Kumar, S.S.; Fartash, A.; Grimsditch, M.

    1993-06-01

    We discuss here the complete determination of the elastic properties of a polyimide film using two experimental techniques. One technique employs the polymer film as a vibrating membrane and allows a direct determination of the ``macroscopic`` biaxial modulus. Brillouin scattering, which measures the elastic properties on a {approximately} 100{mu} scale, allows for a complete characterization of the elastic behavior. Results obtained by the two techniques are in agreement within reported error bars.

  11. Development of a New Apparatus for Investigating Acoustic Effects on Hydraulic Properties of Low-Permeability Geo-Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, H.; Sawada, A.; Sugita, H.; Takeda, M.; Komai, T.; Zhang, M.

    2006-12-01

    feasibility of the EASD method and to obtain the fundamental but important knowledge for the design of this method, it is first necessary to understand the effects of acoustic wave application on pore water flow behavior. A new apparatus is developed to investigate the effects of acoustic wave on hydraulic properties of soil sample. This test apparatus enables to confine a cylindrical specimen under hydrostatic pressure conditions and to apply acoustic wave simultaneously. Preliminary results associated with the effects of acoustic wave frequency on changes of permeability of kaolin clay samples are illustrated in this report. A program investigating the effects of electricity and pore water chemistry on efficiency of decontamination using the same samples is also ongoing and briefly presented. The two strategies for enhancing the efficiency of remediation for low permeable soils will be combined in the near future

  12. Subsurface damage of optical components and the influence on scattering properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draheim, Falk; Harnisch, Bernd; Weigel, Thomas

    1994-09-01

    The influence ofsurface damage under smooth optical surfaces on the scattering properties was investigated. Usually thissurface damage is filled and covered by a polishing layer. Thereforesurface damage does not contribute to the micro roughness of the surface. Three glasses, SF3, BK7, and SUPRASIL, with different Knoop hardness and related differentsurface damage density were chosen for the measurements. Three samples of each glass were polished with increasing polishing time in order to reduce the layer which contains thesurface damage. Beside the extensive measurements of the scatter behavior the samples were also investigated by means of microscopy (Nomarski, darkfield, cross polarization) and optical profilometry. The stray light was detected in the case of reflection (back scatter), transmission (forward scatter) and total reflection. In the case of totalreflection the scattered light behind the reflection surface was investigated. The detected scatter light was integrated over the measurement range and the resulting value was compared with the polishing time. Additional investigations were carried out to determine the influence on the light polarization.

  13. Acoustic Properties of Polyurethane Composition Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes and Silicon Oxide Nano-powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orfali, Wasim A.

    This article demonstrates the acoustic properties of added small amount of carbon-nanotube and siliconoxide nano powder (S-type, P-Type) to the host material polyurethane composition. By adding CNT and/or nano-silica in the form of powder at different concentrations up to 2% within the PU composition to improve the sound absorption were investigated in the frequency range up to 1600 Hz. Sound transmission loss measurement of the samples were determined using large impedance tube. The tests showed that addition of 0.2 wt.% Silicon Oxide Nano-powder and 0.35 wt.% carbon nanotube to polyurethane composition improved sound transmissions loss (Sound Absorption) up to 80 dB than that of pure polyurethane foam sample.

  14. An experimental study of the effects of water repellant treatment on the acoustic properties of Kevlar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. D.; Parrott, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    The treatment consisted of immersing samples of Kevlar in a solution of distilled water and Zepel. The samples were then drained, dried in a circulating over, and cured. Flow resistance tests showed approximately one percent decrease in flow resistance of the samples. Also there was a density increase of about three percent. It was found that the treatment caused a change in the texture of the samples. There were significant changes in the acoustic properties of the treated Kevlar over the frequency range 0.5 to 3.5 kHz. In general it was found that the propagation constant and characteristic impedance increased with increasing frequency. The real and imaginary components of the propagation constant for the treated Kevlar exhibited a decrease of 8 to 12 percent relative to that for the untreated Kevlar at the higher frequencies. The magnitude of the reactance component of the characteristic impedance decreased by about 40 percent at the higher frequencies.

  15. Acoustic properties of multiple cavity resonance liner for absorbing higher-order duct modes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Di; Wang, Xiaoyu; Jing, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes analytical and experimental studies conducted to investigate the acoustic properties of axially non-uniform multiple cavity resonance liner for absorbing higher-order duct modes. A three-dimensional analytical model is proposed based upon transfer element method. The model is assessed by making a comparison with results of a liner performance experiment concerning higher-order modes propagation, and the agreement is good. According to the present results, it is found that the performance of multiple cavity resonance liner is related to the incident sound waves. Moreover, an analysis of the corresponding response of liner perforated panel-cavity system is performed, in which the features of resonance frequency and dissipation of the system under grazing or oblique incidence condition are revealed. The conclusions can be extended to typical non-locally reacting liners with single large back-cavity, and it would be beneficial for future non-locally reacting liner design to some extent. PMID:27586753

  16. Method for noninvasive determination of acoustic properties of fluids inside pipes

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-08-02

    A method for determining the composition of fluids flowing through pipes from noninvasive measurements of acoustic properties of the fluid is described. The method includes exciting a first transducer located on the external surface of the pipe through which the fluid under investigation is flowing, to generate an ultrasound chirp signal, as opposed to conventional pulses. The chirp signal is received by a second transducer disposed on the external surface of the pipe opposing the location of the first transducer, from which the transit time through the fluid is determined and the sound speed of the ultrasound in the fluid is calculated. The composition of a fluid is calculated from the sound speed therein. The fluid density may also be derived from measurements of sound attenuation. Several signal processing approaches are described for extracting the transit time information from the data with the effects of the pipe wall having been subtracted.

  17. Local and global scattering properties of the interplanetary medium obtained from Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wibberenz, G.; Hatzky, R.; Bieber, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    Solar energetic particles can be used as probes for the turbulence level in the interplanetary medium. It is of general interest to compare the LOCAL scattering properties near an observer with GLOBAL properties which characterize the average scattering along the magnetic field. We discuss various methods by which the scattering conditions can be determined: (1) overall fits of observed particle intensities and anisotropies to a transport model; (2) evaluation of the steady-state pitch angle distribution; and (3) suitably normalized angular distributions during the intensity maximum of a particle event. Energetic particle data from HELIOS 1/2 are analyzed, and the mean free paths obtained with the different methods are compared with each other. As a result one can state: (1) for a number of solar particle events the radial mean free path is essentially constant between the Sun and Helios; and (2) large variations in the degree of scattering exist from one event to the other. These results indicate the existence of 'regimes' where the amount of particle scattering is relatively constant over extended regions in radius and azimuth, but with marked differences from one regime to the other.

  18. Influence of Acoustic and Electromagnetic Actions on the Properties of Aqueous Nanoparticle Dispersions Used as Tempering Liquids for Dental Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azharonok, V. V.; Belous, N. Kh.; Rodtsevich, S. P.; Goncharik, S. V.; Chubrik, N. N.; Koshevar, V. D.; Lopat‧ko, K. G.; Aftandilyants, E. G.; Veklich, A. N.; Boretskii, V. F.; Orlovich, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    The authors have studied the physicochemical properties of aqueous dispersions containing carbon, silver, and iron nanoparticles which were produced by elastic-spark synthesis under the conditions of subaqueous spark discharge, and also the influence of preliminary acoustic and high-frequency electromagnetic action on them and the change in the functional indices of the glass-ionomer cement tempered by these dispersions.

  19. Analyzing Students' Learning Progressions throughout a Teaching Sequence on Acoustic Properties of Materials with a Model-Based Inquiry Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernández, María Isabel; Couso, Digna; Pintó, Roser

    2015-01-01

    The study we have carried out aims to characterize 15-to 16-year-old students' learning progressions throughout the implementation of a teaching-learning sequence on the acoustic properties of materials. Our purpose is to better understand students' modeling processes about this topic and to identify how the instructional design and actual…

  20. Imaging an object buried in the sediment bottom of a deep sea by linearized inversion of synthetic and experimental scattered acoustic wavefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillermin, R.; Lasaygues, P.; Sessarego, J. P.; Wirgin, A.

    2000-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the reconstruction, from measured (synthetic and experimental) data, of a 2D penetrable fluid-like cylindrical object of arbitrary cross-section imbedded in a fluid-like (sediment) half-space separated by a plane interface from another fluid half-space (deep water) wherein propagates a plane acoustic interrogating wave. The Green theorem is used to provide (1) a domain integral representation (DIR) of the scattered field and (2) a domain integral equation (DIE) for the pressure field in a test region containing the object. Both the DIE and DIR are discretized by collocation, thereby leading to a linear system of equations for the discretized pressure in the test region and a linear transform for the discretized pressure outside the test region. This is the means adopted herein for generating synthetic scattered field data. The inverse problem is linearized by replacing the (unknown) field in the test region by the (known) field which is established in the water/sediment system in the absence of the object. Using this Born approximation and minimizing the discrepancy between the measured and model scattered fields gives rise to a linear system of equations for the (unknown) discretized index-of-refraction contrast function in the test region. Due to its ill conditioned nature, the linear system is solved by a singular value decomposition technique. Images of the index-of-refraction contrast representation of the object obtained by inversion of both simulated and experimentally measured scattered field data are presented and compared.

  1. Systematic investigation of effects of exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering on photoluminescence rise times of free excitons in GaAs/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As single quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Masaaki Ohno, Tatsuya; Furukawa, Yoshiaki

    2015-04-07

    We have systematically investigated the photoluminescence (PL) dynamics of free excitons in GaAs/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As single quantum wells, focusing on the energy relaxation process due to exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering under non-resonant and weak excitation conditions as a function of GaAs-layer thickness from 3.6 to 12.0 nm and temperature from 30 to 50 K. The free exciton characteristics were confirmed by observation that the PL decay time has a linear dependence with temperature. We found that the free exciton PL rise rate, which is the reciprocal of the rise time, is inversely linear with the GaAs-layer thickness and linear with temperature. This is consistent with a reported theoretical study of the exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering rate in the energy relaxation process in quantum wells. Consequently, it is conclusively verified that the PL rise rate is dominated by the exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering rate. In addition, from quantitative analysis of the GaAs-layer thickness and temperature dependences, we suggest that the PL rise rate reflects the number of exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering events.

  2. A High-Order Immersed Boundary Method for Acoustic Wave Scattering and Low-Mach Number Flow-Induced Sound in Complex Geometries

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jung Hee; Mittal, Rajat

    2010-01-01

    A new sharp-interface immersed boundary method based approach for the computation of low-Mach number flow-induced sound around complex geometries is described. The underlying approach is based on a hydrodynamic/acoustic splitting technique where the incompressible flow is first computed using a second-order accurate immersed boundary solver. This is followed by the computation of sound using the linearized perturbed compressible equations (LPCE). The primary contribution of the current work is the development of a versatile, high-order accurate immersed boundary method for solving the LPCE in complex domains. This new method applies the boundary condition on the immersed boundary to a high-order by combining the ghost-cell approach with a weighted least-squares error method based on a high-order approximating polynomial. The method is validated for canonical acoustic wave scattering and flow-induced noise problems. Applications of this technique to relatively complex cases of practical interest are also presented. PMID:21318129

  3. Observation of Rayleigh phonon scattering through excitation of extremely high overtones in low-loss cryogenic acoustic cavities for hybrid quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Goryachev, Maxim; Creedon, Daniel L; Galliou, Serge; Tobar, Michael E

    2013-08-23

    The confinement of high frequency phonons approaching 1 GHz is demonstrated in phonon-trapping acoustic cavities at cryogenic temperatures using a low-coupled network approach. The frequency range is extended by nearly an order of magnitude, with excitation at greater than the 200th overtone achieved for the first time. Such a high frequency operation reveals Rayleigh-type phonon scattering losses due to highly diluted lattice impurities and corresponding glasslike behavior, with a maximum Q(L)×f product of 8.6×10(17) at 3.8 K and 4×10(17) at 15 mK. This suggests a limit on the Q×f product due to unavoidable crystal disorder. Operation at 15 mK is high enough in frequency that the average phonon occupation number is less than unity, with a loaded quality factor above half a billion. This work represents significant progress towards the utilization of such acoustic cavities for hybrid quantum systems.

  4. Patterns of distribution of sound-scattering zooplankton in warm- and cold-core eddies in the Gulf of Mexico, from a narrowband acoustic Doppler current profiler survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Robert A.; Biggs, Douglas C.

    1999-03-01

    The acoustic backscatter intensity (ABI) reflected from epipelagic zooplankton communities in the central Gulf of Mexico was measured during June 1995 with a vessel-mounted, narrowband-153-kHz acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). Horizontal and vertical variations in ABI were documented in three kinds of mesoscale hydrographic features commonly found in the Gulf of Mexico: the warm-core Loop Current (LC), a warm-core Loop Current eddy (LCE), and a cold-core region that separated the two warm-core features. Since new nitrogen domes close to surface waters in cold-core features whereas surface waters of warm-core features are nutrient depleted, the cold-core region was expected to have higher biological stocks as a result of locally higher primary production. Both ABI and net tow data confirmed that the cold-core region was in fact a zone of local aggregation of zooplankton and micronekton. During both day and night, ABI when integrated for the upper 50 and 100 m in the cold-core region was significantly greater than in the LC or in the LCE, and ABI was positively correlated with standing stock biomass taken by the net tows. Further investigations into the biological differences between Gulf of Mexico divergence and convergence regimes are warranted, and the ADCP will be a useful tool for examination of the distribution of sound scatterers in such features.

  5. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  6. Optical absorption and scattering properties in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; He, Xian-qiang; Chen, Xiao-yan; Hao, Zeng-zhou; Huang, Haiqing; Zhu, Qiankun

    2011-11-01

    The absorption and particulate backscattering coefficients are the basic parameters of the water inherent optical properties (IOPs), which are also the basic parameters for the development and validation of the semi-analysis models of the ocean color remote sensing. In this work, the absorption and backscattering coefficients in the East China Sea (ECS) were measured in the summer and winter of 2009 using the three in-situ optical instruments, including the WET Labs acs, and the HOBI Labs HydroScat-6. Based on the in-situ measured data, the distribution of the absorption and backscattering coefficients in the ECS are analyzed. The results show that in the summer the water absorption coefficient at 440nm (a(440nm),excluding the absorption of the pure sea water) in the surface layer is ranged from 0.022 to 0.067 m-1, and the particulate backscattering coefficient at 442nm(bbp(442nm), is between 0.00064 and 0.03274 m-1. As a whole, both of the absorption and backscattering coefficients decrease with the offshore direction, and the high values located at the mouth of Changjiang River. In the winter, a(440nm) is between 0.051 and 0.887 m-1, and bbp(442nm) is ranged from 0.000639 to 0.14614 m-1 at the surface layer. The spatial distributions in winter are similar as the summer, with the high value in the coast and low value in the offshore. The absorption and backscattering coefficients in winter are significantly larger than the summer's, especially in coastal area near the mouth of Changjiang River, which maybe caused by the southward Fujian-Zhejiang coastal current occurring in winter. As the vertical profile distributions, we find that both of the absorption and backscattering coefficients present a layer structure, which caused by the stratification of the sea water in the summer; while in the winter, affected by the strong wind disturbing, both of the absorption and backscattering coefficients are thoroughly vertical mixing. To our knowledge, it is the first time

  7. Improvements to the Two-Thickness Method for Deriving Acoustic Properties of Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Jones, Michael G.; Klos, Jacob; Park, Junhong

    2004-01-01

    The characteristic impedance and other derivative acoustic properties of a material can be derived from impedance tube data using the specific impedance measured from samples with two different thicknesses. In practice, samples are chosen so that their respective thicknesses differ by a factor of 2. This simplifies the solution of the equations relating the properties of the two samples so that the computation of the characteristic impedance is straightforward. This approach has at least two drawbacks. One is that it is often difficult to acquire or produce samples with precisely a factor of 2 difference in thickness. A second drawback is that the phase information contained in the imaginary part of the propagation constant must be unwrapped before subsequent computations are performed. For well-behaved samples, this is not a problem. For ill behaved samples of unknown properties, the phase unwrapping process can be tedious and difficult to automate. Two alternative approaches have been evaluated which remove the factor-of-2 sample thickness requirement and directly compute unwrapped phase angles. One uses a Newton-Raphson approach to solve for the roots of the samples' simultaneous equations. The other produces a wave number space diagram in which the roots are clearly discernable and easily extracted. Results are presented which illustrate the flexibility of analysis provided by the new approaches and how this can be used to better understand the limitations of the impedance tube data.

  8. Optical and Physicochemical Properties of Brown Carbon Aerosol: Light Scattering, FTIR Extinction Spectroscopy, and Hygroscopic Growth.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Alexander, Jennifer M; Kwon, Deokhyeon; Estillore, Armando D; Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A; Kleiber, Paul D; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-23

    A great deal of attention has been paid to brown carbon aerosol in the troposphere because it can both scatter and absorb solar radiation, thus affecting the Earth's climate. However, knowledge of the optical and chemical properties of brown carbon aerosol is still limited. In this study, we have investigated different aspects of the optical properties of brown carbon aerosol that have not been previously explored. These properties include extinction spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region and light scattering at two different visible wavelengths, 532 and 402 nm. A proxy for atmospheric brown carbon aerosol was formed from the aqueous reaction of ammonium sulfate with methylglyoxal. The different optical properties were measured as a function of reaction time for a period of up to 19 days. UV/vis absorption experiments of bulk solutions showed that the optical absorption of aqueous brown carbon solution significantly increases as a function of reaction time in the spectral range from 200 to 700 nm. The analysis of the light scattering data, however, showed no significant differences between ammonium sulfate and brown carbon aerosol particles in the measured scattering phase functions, linear polarization profiles, or the derived real parts of the refractive indices at either 532 or 402 nm, even for the longest reaction times with greatest visible extinction. The light scattering experiments are relatively insensitive to the imaginary part of the refractive index, and it was only possible to place an upper limit of k ≤ 0.01 on the imaginary index values. These results suggest that after the reaction with methylglyoxal the single scattering albedo of ammonium sulfate aerosol is significantly reduced but that the light scattering properties including the scattering asymmetry parameter, which is a measure of the relative amount of forward-to-backward scattering, remain essentially unchanged from that of unprocessed ammonium sulfate. The optical extinction properties

  9. Optical and Physicochemical Properties of Brown Carbon Aerosol: Light Scattering, FTIR Extinction Spectroscopy, and Hygroscopic Growth.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Alexander, Jennifer M; Kwon, Deokhyeon; Estillore, Armando D; Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A; Kleiber, Paul D; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-23

    A great deal of attention has been paid to brown carbon aerosol in the troposphere because it can both scatter and absorb solar radiation, thus affecting the Earth's climate. However, knowledge of the optical and chemical properties of brown carbon aerosol is still limited. In this study, we have investigated different aspects of the optical properties of brown carbon aerosol that have not been previously explored. These properties include extinction spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region and light scattering at two different visible wavelengths, 532 and 402 nm. A proxy for atmospheric brown carbon aerosol was formed from the aqueous reaction of ammonium sulfate with methylglyoxal. The different optical properties were measured as a function of reaction time for a period of up to 19 days. UV/vis absorption experiments of bulk solutions showed that the optical absorption of aqueous brown carbon solution significantly increases as a function of reaction time in the spectral range from 200 to 700 nm. The analysis of the light scattering data, however, showed no significant differences between ammonium sulfate and brown carbon aerosol particles in the measured scattering phase functions, linear polarization profiles, or the derived real parts of the refractive indices at either 532 or 402 nm, even for the longest reaction times with greatest visible extinction. The light scattering experiments are relatively insensitive to the imaginary part of the refractive index, and it was only possible to place an upper limit of k ≤ 0.01 on the imaginary index values. These results suggest that after the reaction with methylglyoxal the single scattering albedo of ammonium sulfate aerosol is significantly reduced but that the light scattering properties including the scattering asymmetry parameter, which is a measure of the relative amount of forward-to-backward scattering, remain essentially unchanged from that of unprocessed ammonium sulfate. The optical extinction properties

  10. Light-scattering properties of plate and column ice crystals generated in a laboratory cold chamber.

    PubMed

    Barkey, Brian; Bailey, Matt; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Hallett, John

    2002-09-20

    Angular scattering properties of ice crystal particles generated in a laboratory cloud chamber are measured with a lightweight polar nephelometer with a diode laser beam. This cloud chamber produces distinct plate and hollow column ice crystal types for light-scattering experiments and provides a controlled test bed for comparison with results computed from theory. Ice clouds composed predominantly of plates and hollow columns generated noticeable 22 degrees and 46 degrees halo patterns, which are predicted from geometric ray-tracing calculations. With the measured ice crystal shape and size distribution, the angular scattering patterns computed from geometrical optics with a significant contribution by rough surfaces closely match those observed from the nephelometer. PMID:12269578

  11. Determination of the Far-Ultraviolet Dust Scattering Properties in NGC 2023

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgh, E. B.

    2001-12-01

    The reflection nebula NGC 2023 was observed by a rocket-borne long-slit imaging spectrograph in the 900--1400 Å bandpass on 11 Feb 2000. A spectrum of the central star, HD 37903, as well as that of the nebular scattered light was recorded. Through the use of a Monte Carlo modeling process, the scattering properties of the dust were derived. The albedo is low, 0.2--0.4, and decreasing toward shorter wavelengths, while the phase function asymmetry parameter is consistent with highly forward-scattering grains, g ~0.85. The decrease in albedo, while the optical depth increases to shorter wavelengths, implies that the far-UV rise in the extinction curve is due to an increase in absorption efficiency. This work was supported by NASA grant NAG5-5122 to the Johns Hopkins University.

  12. Measurement and Modeling of the Optical Scattering Properties of Crop Canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Grant, L.

    1984-01-01

    Progress and results in the measurement and scattering properties of crop canopies was examined. The following accomplishments are reported: (1) analysis of inhouse polarization, Sun/view angle data set of wheat was completed; (2) polarization photometer instrument system was completed; (3) light polarization properties (measured with polarization photometer) of individual plant leaves initiated, and twenty two species/varieties were measured before frost; (4) light polarizing properties of both moisture-stressed corn leaves and diseased wheat leaves were measured; (5) Sun/view angle data and ancillary data were acquired on two wheat canopies on two dates and on one sorghum canopy on two adjacent days.

  13. Interactions of surface plasmons with surface acoustic waves and the study of the properties of Ag films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Shiokawa, S.; Matsui, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies on the interactions of surface plasmons with surface acoustic waves have been carried out. Surface acoustic waves were generated on the hypotenuse face of a LiNbO3 prism at f0=85 MHz and 3f0=255 MHz, respectively, which acted as ``dynamic'' gratings for the conversion of incident light into surface plasmons. The experiment results demonstrated excellent agreement with theoretical calculations based on Fresnel's formulas for a layered structure and the theory for light diffraction in association with surface acoustic waves. Furthermore, interesting changes in the interaction spectra were observed that have been related to the Ag film's oxidization. From these observations, variations in Ag film properties have been evaluated.

  14. Nonlinear acoustic properties of ex vivo bovine liver and the effects of temperature and denaturation.

    PubMed

    Jackson, E J; Coussios, C-C; Cleveland, R O

    2014-06-21

    Thermal ablation by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has a great potential for the non-invasive treatment of solid tumours. Due to the high pressure amplitudes involved, nonlinear acoustic effects must be understood and the relevant medium property is the parameter of nonlinearity B/A. Here, B/A was measured in ex vivo bovine liver, over a heating/cooling cycle replicating temperatures reached during HIFU ablation, adapting a finite amplitude insertion technique, which also allowed for measurement of sound-speed and attenuation. The method measures the nonlinear progression of a plane wave through liver and B/A was chosen so that numerical simulations matched the measured waveforms. To create plane-wave conditions, sinusoidal bursts were transmitted by a 100 mm diameter 1.125 MHz unfocused transducer and measured using a 15 mm diameter 2.25 MHz broadband transducer in the near field. Attenuation and sound-speed were calculated using a reflected pulse from the smaller transducer using the larger transducer as the reflecting interface. Results showed that attenuation initially decreased with heating then increased after denaturation, the sound-speed initially increased with temperature and then decreased, and B/A showed an increase with temperature but no significant post-heating change. The B/A data disagree with other reports that show a significant change and we suggest that any nonlinear enhancement in the received ultrasound signal post-treatment is likely due to acoustic cavitation rather than changes in tissue nonlinearity.

  15. Non-resonant Mie scattering: Emergent optical properties of core-shell polymer nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Khudiyev, Tural; Huseyinoglu, Ersin; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    We provide the in-depth characterization of light-polymer nanowire interactions in the context of an effective Mie scattering regime associated with low refractive index materials. Properties of this regime sharply contrast with these of resonant Mie scattering, and involve the formation of strictly forward-scattered and coupling-free optical fields in the vicinity of core-shell polymer nanowires. Scattering from these optical fields is shown to be non-resonant in nature and independent from incident polarization. In order to demonstrate the potential utility of this scattering regime in one-dimensional (1D) polymeric nanostructures, we fabricate polycarbonate (PC) - polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) core-shell nanowires using a novel iterative thermal drawing process that yields uniform and indefinitely long core-shell nanostructures. These nanowires are successfully engineered for novel nanophotonics applications, including size-dependent structural coloration, efficient light capture on thin-film solar cells, optical nano-sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity and a mask-free photolithography method suitable for the straightforward production of 1D nanopatterns. PMID:24714206

  16. Non-resonant Mie scattering: emergent optical properties of core-shell polymer nanowires.

    PubMed

    Khudiyev, Tural; Huseyinoglu, Ersin; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    We provide the in-depth characterization of light-polymer nanowire interactions in the context of an effective Mie scattering regime associated with low refractive index materials. Properties of this regime sharply contrast with these of resonant Mie scattering, and involve the formation of strictly forward-scattered and coupling-free optical fields in the vicinity of core-shell polymer nanowires. Scattering from these optical fields is shown to be non-resonant in nature and independent from incident polarization. In order to demonstrate the potential utility of this scattering regime in one-dimensional (1D) polymeric nanostructures, we fabricate polycarbonate (PC) - polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) core-shell nanowires using a novel iterative thermal drawing process that yields uniform and indefinitely long core-shell nanostructures. These nanowires are successfully engineered for novel nanophotonics applications, including size-dependent structural coloration, efficient light capture on thin-film solar cells, optical nano-sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity and a mask-free photolithography method suitable for the straightforward production of 1D nanopatterns. PMID:24714206

  17. Computational studies of the x-ray scattering properties of laser aligned stilbene

    SciTech Connect

    Debnarova, Andrea; Techert, Simone; Schmatz, Stefan

    2011-02-07

    The enhancement of the x-ray scattering signal from partially aligned molecular samples is investigated. The alignment properties of the studied molecular system are modeled based on the method of laser alignment. With the advances in the area of laser alignment of molecules, the application of this sample manipulation technique promises a great potential for x-ray scattering measurements. Preferential alignment of molecules in an otherwise amorphous sample leads to constructive interference and thus increases the scattering intensity. This enhances the structural information encoded in the scattering images and enables improved resolution in studies of reaction dynamics, as in this work is shown for the example of the photo-isomerization of stilbene. We demonstrate that the scattering signal is strongly influenced by the alignment axis. Even the most basic one-dimensional alignment offers significant improvement compared to the structural information provided by a randomly oriented sample. Although the signal is sensitive to the uncertainty in the alignment angle, it offers encouraging results even at realistic alignment uncertainties.

  18. Non-resonant Mie scattering: Emergent optical properties of core-shell polymer nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudiyev, Tural; Huseyinoglu, Ersin; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2014-04-01

    We provide the in-depth characterization of light-polymer nanowire interactions in the context of an effective Mie scattering regime associated with low refractive index materials. Properties of this regime sharply contrast with these of resonant Mie scattering, and involve the formation of strictly forward-scattered and coupling-free optical fields in the vicinity of core-shell polymer nanowires. Scattering from these optical fields is shown to be non-resonant in nature and independent from incident polarization. In order to demonstrate the potential utility of this scattering regime in one-dimensional (1D) polymeric nanostructures, we fabricate polycarbonate (PC) - polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) core-shell nanowires using a novel iterative thermal drawing process that yields uniform and indefinitely long core-shell nanostructures. These nanowires are successfully engineered for novel nanophotonics applications, including size-dependent structural coloration, efficient light capture on thin-film solar cells, optical nano-sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity and a mask-free photolithography method suitable for the straightforward production of 1D nanopatterns.

  19. On the radiative properties of ice clouds: Light scattering, remote sensing, and radiation parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ping; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Bi, Lei; Liu, Chao; Yi, Bingqi; Baum, Bryan A.

    2015-01-01

    Presented is a review of the radiative properties of ice clouds from three perspectives: light scattering simulations, remote sensing applications, and broadband radiation parameterizations appropriate for numerical models. On the subject of light scattering simulations, several classical computational approaches are reviewed, including the conventional geometric-optics method and its improved forms, the finite-difference time domain technique, the pseudo-spectral time domain technique, the discrete dipole approximation method, and the T-matrix method, with specific applications to the computation of the single-scattering properties of individual ice crystals. The strengths and weaknesses associated with each approach are discussed. With reference to remote sensing, operational retrieval algorithms are reviewed for retrieving cloud optical depth and effective particle size based on solar or thermal infrared (IR) bands. To illustrate the performance of the current solar- and IR-based retrievals, two case studies are presented based on spaceborne observations. The need for a more realistic ice cloud optical model to obtain spectrally consistent retrievals is demonstrated. Furthermore, to complement ice cloud property studies based on passive radiometric measurements, the advantage of incorporating lidar and/or polarimetric measurements is discussed. The performance of ice cloud models based on the use of different ice habits to represent ice particles is illustrated by comparing model results with satellite observations. A summary is provided of a number of parameterization schemes for ice cloud radiative properties that were developed for application to broadband radiative transfer submodels within general circulation models (GCMs). The availability of the single-scattering properties of complex ice habits has led to more accurate radiation parameterizations. In conclusion, the importance of using nonspherical ice particle models in GCM simulations for climate

  20. Study on Transient Properties of Levitated Object in Near-Field Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Bing; Chen, Chao; Zhao, Chun-Sheng

    2011-12-01

    A new approach to the study on the transient properties of the levitated object in near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL) is presented. In this article, the transient response characteristics, including the levitated height of an object with radius of 24 mm and thickness of 5 mm, the radial velocity and pressure difference of gas at the boundary of clearance between the levitated object and radiating surface (squeeze film), is calculated according to several velocity amplitudes of radiating surface. First, the basic equations in fluid areas on Arbitrary Lagrange—Euler (ALE) form are numerically solved by using streamline upwind petrov galerkin (SUPG) finite elements method. Second, the formed algebraic equations and solid control equations are solved by using synchronous alternating method to gain the transient messages of the levitated object and gas in the squeeze film. Through theoretical and numerical analyses, it is found that there is a oscillation time in the transient process and that the response time does not simply increase with the increasing of velocity amplitudes of radiating surface. More investigations in this paper are helpful for the understanding of the transient properties of levitated object in NFAL, which are in favor of enhancing stabilities and responsiveness of levitated object.

  1. Effects of biogenic silica on acoustic and physical properties of clay-rich marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, J.S.; Mackenzie, F.T.; Urmos, J.; O'Brien, D.K.; Manghnani, M.H. )

    1992-06-01

    The physical properties of marine sediments are influenced by compaction and diagenesis during burial. Changes in mineralogy, chemistry, density, porosity, and microfabric all affect a sediment's acoustic and electrical properties. Sediments from the Japan Trench illustrate the dependence of physical properties on biogenic silica content. Increased opal-A content is correlated with increased porosity and decreased grain density and compressional velocity. Variations with depth in opal-A concentration are therefore reflected in highly variable and, at times, inverse velocity-depth gradients. The diagenetic conversion of opal-A to opal-CT and finally to quartz was investigated at a site in the San Miguel Gap, California. Distinct changes in microfabric, particularly in the porosity distribution, accompany the diagenetic reactions and contribute to a sharp velocity discontinuity at the depth of the opal-A to opal-CT conversion. Evaluation of this reaction at several sites indicates a systematic dependence on temperature and age in clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments. In ocean margin regions, sediments are buried rapidly, and opal-A may be converted to opal-CT in less than 10 m.y. Temperatures of conversion range from 30{degree} to 50{degree}C. Much longer times (>40 m.y.) are required to complete the conversion in open ocean deposits which are exposed to temperatures less than 15{degree}C. In the absence of silica diagenesis, velocity-depth gradients of most clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments fall in the narrow range of 0.15 to 0.25 km/s/km which brackets the gradient (0.18 km/s/km) determined for a type pelagic clay section. Relationships such as these can be useful in unraveling the history of a sediment sequence, including the evolution with time of reservoir properties and seismic signatures.

  2. Structure-property relationships in Waspaloy via small angle scattering and electrical resistivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Whelchel, R.; Gerhardt, Dr. Rosario; Littrell, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties in superalloys are controlled by the distribution of the {gamma}{prime} precipitate phase. Electrical measurements have been shown to be sensitive to certain aspects of the precipitation process and show promise for predicting the evolving microstructural state in superalloys. Aging experiments were conducted on Waspaloy samples for temperatures between 600 and 950 C for times ranging from 2min to 500h. Particle size distributions were obtained by modeling of small angle scattering (SAS) data, whereas, small precipitate size information, strain, and lattice mismatch data were obtained from X-ray diffraction. The microstructural information was then used to create a figure of merit of electron scattering intended to correlate electrical properties to the precipitate microstructure. The proposed figure of merit shows an empirical correlation with the electrical resistivity data, demonstrating the sensitivity of the resistivity measurements to the precipitation process and coarsening behavior.

  3. Absorption and scattering properties of carbon nanohorn-based nanofluids for direct sunlight absorbers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, we investigated the scattering and spectrally resolved absorption properties of nanofluids consisting in aqueous and glycol suspensions of single-wall carbon nanohorns. The characteristics of these nanofluids were evaluated in view of their use as sunlight absorber fluids in a solar device. The observed nanoparticle-induced differences in optical properties appeared promising, leading to a considerably higher sunlight absorption with respect to the pure base fluids. Scattered light was found to be not more than about 5% with respect to the total attenuation of light. Both these effects, together with the possible chemical functionalization of carbon nanohorns, make this new kind of nanofluids very interesting for increasing the overall efficiency of the sunlight exploiting device. PACS 78.40.Ri, 78.35.+c, 78.67.Bf, 88.40.fh, 88.40.fr, 81.05.U. PMID:21711795

  4. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-04-30

    } and {alpha}{sub h}, using the equations of Abousleiman et al. (1996). A series of experiments have been conducted, on an initially inherently isotropic Berea sandstone rock sample, to dynamically determine these anisotropic Biot's parameters during deformational pathway experiments. Data acquired during hydrostatic, triaxial, and uniaxial strain pathway experiments indicates that Biot's effective stress parameter changes significantly if the applied stresses are not hydrostatic. Variations, as large as 20% between the axial (vertical) and lateral (horizontal) Biot's effective stress parameters, were observed in some experiments. A series of triaxial compression experiments have been conducted on unconsolidated sand (Oil Creek sand) to determine the pressure/stress conditions which would be favorable for liquefaction. Liquefaction of geopressured sands is thought to be one of the major causative mechanisms of damaging shallow water flows. The experiments were developed to determine if: (1) liquefaction could be made to occur in this particular sand at high confining pressures, and (2) the state of liquefication had the same nature at high pressure conditions typical of shallow water flows as it does in low confining pressure soil mechanics tests. A series of undrained triaxial experiments were successfully used to document that the Oil Creek sand could undergo liquefaction. The nature (i.e., the shape of the deformational pathway in mean pressure/shear stress space) was very similar to those observed in soil mechanics experiments. The undrained triaxial experiments also indicated that this sand would strain soften at relatively high confining pressures--a necessary precursor to liquefaction. These experiments serve as a starting point for a series of acoustic experiments to determine the signature of compressional and shear wave properties as the sand packs approach the state of liquefaction (and shallow water flows).

  5. Bulk Scattering Properties for the Remote Sensing of Ice Clouds. Part II: Narrowband Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Bryan A.; Yang, Ping; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Platnick, Steven; King, Michael D.; Hu, Y.-X.; Bedka, Sarah T.

    2005-12-01

    This study examines the development of bulk single-scattering properties of ice clouds, including single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, and phase function, for a set of 1117 particle size distributions obtained from analysis of the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment (FIRE)-I, FIRE-II, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program intensive observation period, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX), and the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers (CRYSTAL) Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (FACE) data. The primary focus is to develop band-averaged models appropriate for use by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imager on the Earth Observing System Terra and Aqua platforms, specifically for bands located at wavelengths of 0.65, 1.64, 2.13, and 3.75 μm. The results indicate that there are substantial differences in the bulk scattering properties of ice clouds formed in areas of deep convection and those that exist in areas of much lower updraft velocities. Band-averaged bulk scattering property results obtained from a particle-size-dependent mixture of ice crystal habits are compared with those obtained assuming only solid hexagonal columns. The single-scattering albedo is lower for hexagonal columns than for a habit mixture for the 1.64-, 2.13-, and 3.75-μm bands, with the differences increasing with wavelength. In contrast, the asymmetry factors obtained from the habit mixture and only the solid hexagonal column are most different at 0.65 μm, with the differences decreasing as wavelength increases. At 3.75 μm, the asymmetry factor results from the two habit assumptions are almost indistinguishable. The asymmetry factor, single-scattering albedo, and scattering phase functions are also compared with the MODIS version-1 (V1) models. Differences between the current and V1 models can be traced to the microphysical models and specifically to the number of both

  6. Scattering of acoustic phonons in disordered matter: A quantitative evaluation of the effects of positional versus orientational disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivchikov, A. I.; Yushchenko, A. N.; Manzhelii, V. G.; Korolyuk, O. A.; Bermejo, F. J.; Fernández-Perea, R.; Cabrillo, C.; González, M. A.

    2006-08-01

    The thermal conductivity of all three disordered solid phases of ethyl alcohol has been measured. That for the orientationally disordered bcc phase is found to be remarkably close to that for the structurally amorphous solid, especially at low temperatures. The results, which emphasize the role of orientational disorder in phonon scattering, are discussed with the aid of computer simulations on single-crystalline models of both bcc and monoclinic crystals.

  7. Effects of Ytterbium Oxide Nanopowder Particle Size on the Acoustic Properties of Silicone Rubber Lens for Medical Echo Array Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yohachi; Yamashita; Hosono, Yasuharu; Yamamoto, Noriko; Itsumi, Kazuhiro

    2008-05-01

    The effects of Yb2O3 powder particle size, namely, 2000, 16, and 8 nm, on the physical and acoustic properties of a high-temperature-vulcanization (HTV) silicone (Q) rubber have been investigated in order to develop an acoustic lens material with a low sound velocity (c) and acoustic attenuation coefficient (α). The Yb2O3-doped HTV Q rubber with the large particle size of 2000 nm showed a density (ρ) of 1.6×103 kg/m3, with c = 828 m/s, characteristic acoustic impedance (Z) = 1.32×106 kg·m-2·s-1, α= 1.32 dB·mm-1·MHz-1, and an α-figure of merit (FOM) (α×c) of 1090 at 5 MHz at 37 °C. For the Yb2O3-doped Q rubber with the small particle size of 8 nm, ρ= 1.57×103 kg/m3, c = 864 m/s, Z = 1.36×106 kg·m-2·s-1, α= 0.68 dB·mm-1·MHz-1, and α-FOM = 590. The 16 nm Yb2O3-doped Q rubber had intermediate values of α= 0.88 dB·mm-1·MHz-1 and α-FOM = 760. These results show that there is a clear dopant particle size dependence on the acoustic properties of Yb2O3-doped HTV Q rubbers. The 8-nm-doped HTV Q rubber also showed an excellent mechanical properties for practical application. Microstructure observation revealed that the low-α rubber shows a uniform Yb2O3 nanopowder distribution in the HTV Q rubber matrix.

  8. Impact of polydispersity on multipolar resonant scattering in emulsions.

    PubMed

    Mascaro, Benoit; Brunet, Thomas; Poncelet, Olivier; Aristégui, Christophe; Raffy, Simon; Mondain-Monval, Olivier; Leng, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    The influence of size polydispersity on the resonant acoustic properties of dilute emulsions, made of fluorinated-oil droplets, is quantitatively investigated. Ultrasound attenuation and dispersion measurements on various samples with controlled size polydispersities, ranging from 1% to 13%, are found to be in excellent agreement with predictions based on the independent scattering approximation. By relating the particle-size distribution of the synthesized emulsions to the quality factor of the predicted multipolar resonances, the number of observable acoustic resonances is shown to be imposed by the sample polydispersity. These results are briefly discussed into the context of metamaterials for which scattering resonances are central to their effective properties. PMID:23556570

  9. Frequency-domain method for measuring spectral properties in multiple-scattering media: methemoglobin absorption spectrum in a tissuelike phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishkin, Joshua B.; So, Peter T. C.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    1995-03-01

    We have measured the optical absorption and scattering coefficient spectra of a multiple-scattering medium (i.e., a biological tissue-simulating phantom comprising a lipid colloid) containing methemoglobin by using frequency-domain techniques. The methemoglobin absorption spectrum determined in the multiple-scattering medium is in excellent agreement with a corrected methemoglobin absorption spectrum obtained from a steady-state spectrophotometer measurement of the optical density of a minimally scattering medium. The determination of the corrected methemoglobin absorption spectrum takes into account the scattering from impurities in the methemoglobin solution containing no lipid colloid. Frequency-domain techniques allow for the separation of the absorbing from the scattering properties of multiple-scattering media, and these techniques thus provide an absolute

  10. Microbial-Induced Heterogeneity in the Acoustic Properties of Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acoustic wave data were acquired over a two-dimensional region of a microbial-stimulated sand column and an unstimulated sand column to assess the spatiotemporal changes in a porous medium caused by microbial growth and biofilm formation. The acoustic signals from the unstimulate...

  11. Effects of Ceramic Nanopowder Dopants on Acoustic Attenuation Properties of Silicone Rubber Lens for Medical Echo Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yohachi (John); Hosono, Yasuharu; Itsumi, Kazuhiro

    2007-07-01

    The effects of fine ceramic powder dopants, namely, TiO2, Al2O3, BaSO4, Fe2O3, ZrO2, and Yb2O3 with primary particle sizes of 16-100 nm, on the acoustic properties of silicone rubber have been investigated, in order to develop an acoustic lens material for medical echo probes with a low acoustic attenuation (α). Silicone rubber doped with Yb2O3 powder having a high density (ρ) of 9.2× 103 kg/m3 and an average particle size of 16 nm showed a lower acoustic attenuation than silicone rubber doped with other powders. The materials showed ρ=1.54× 103 kg/m3, a sound velocity (c)=882 m/s, an acoustic impedance ρ\\cdot c (Z)=1.36× 106 kg m-2 s-1, and an acoustic attenuation α=0.93 dB mm-1 MHz-1 at 37 °C. Silicone rubber doped with Fe2O3 powder having ρ=5.2× 103 kg/m3 and an average particle size of 30 nm showed the highest α=2.36 dB mm-1 MHz-1 and Z=1.47× 106 kg m-2 s-1. Microstructure observation of the rubber by scanning microscopy revealed that the α of the powder-doped rubber is not only determined by the primary particle size of the powders but also by the dispersion and agglomeration of the secondary particles in the rubber matrix. The discovery of the process parameter required to reduce the α of the nanopowder-doped silicone rubber has an important practical consequence.

  12. Systems and methods for biometric identification using the acoustic properties of the ear canal

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Ann Marie; Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    1998-01-01

    The present invention teaches systems and methods for verifying or recognizing a person's identity based on measurements of the acoustic response of the individual's ear canal. The system comprises an acoustic emission device, which emits an acoustic source signal s(t), designated by a computer, into the ear canal of an individual, and an acoustic response detection device, which detects the acoustic response signal f(t). A computer digitizes the response (detected) signal f(t) and stores the data. Computer-implemented algorithms analyze the response signal f(t) to produce ear-canal feature data. The ear-canal feature data obtained during enrollment is stored on the computer, or some other recording medium, to compare the enrollment data with ear-canal feature data produced in a subsequent access attempt, to determine if the individual has previously been enrolled. The system can also be adapted for remote access applications.

  13. Systems and methods for biometric identification using the acoustic properties of the ear canal

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, A.M.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1998-07-28

    The present invention teaches systems and methods for verifying or recognizing a person`s identity based on measurements of the acoustic response of the individual`s ear canal. The system comprises an acoustic emission device, which emits an acoustic source signal s(t), designated by a computer, into the ear canal of an individual, and an acoustic response detection device, which detects the acoustic response signal f(t). A computer digitizes the response (detected) signal f(t) and stores the data. Computer-implemented algorithms analyze the response signal f(t) to produce ear-canal feature data. The ear-canal feature data obtained during enrollment is stored on the computer, or some other recording medium, to compare the enrollment data with ear-canal feature data produced in a subsequent access attempt, to determine if the individual has previously been enrolled. The system can also be adapted for remote access applications. 5 figs.

  14. Optical and Geometric Properties of Free Silica Nanoparticles Studied by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Burkhard; Raschpichler, Christopher; Gruner, Mathias; Antonsson, Egill; Goroncy, Christian; Graf, Christina; Rühl, Eckart

    2016-09-01

    Elastic small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of free silica (SiO2) nanoparticles is reported (d = 100-180 nm). The particles were prepared by a modified Stöber synthesis in narrow size distributions with controlled surface roughness and functionalization. Angle-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering patterns are shown to be sensitive to these changes in particle properties. It is reported that there is an exponential decrease in scattered X-ray intensity towards larger scattering angles as well as distinct oscillations, which is fully explained by Mie theory. Small-angle X-ray scattering of mesoporous nanoparticles with rough surfaces is compared to that of microporous nanoparticles with smooth surfaces, revealing distinct differences that are rationalized by diffuse scattering from nanoparticle pores in addition to the dominating contribution of Mie scattering. Furthermore, results from small-angle X-ray scattering experiments on functionalized silica nanoparticles are presented, where the incorporation of the dye fluorescein isothiocyanate is found to cause changes in the optical properties of the nanoparticles, as compared to non-functionalized samples. Small, but distinct deviations in particle size derived from electron microscopy and from small-angle X-ray scattering are observed. These are rationalized by particle shrinking occurring in electron microscopy as well as slight changes in optical properties of the nanoparticle samples.

  15. The effect of roughness model on scattering properties of ice crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geogdzhayev, Igor; van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan

    2016-07-01

    We compare stochastic models of microscale surface roughness assuming uniform and Weibull distributions of crystal facet tilt angles to calculate scattering by roughened hexagonal ice crystals using the geometric optics (GO) approximation. Both distributions are determined by similar roughness parameters, while the Weibull model depends on the additional shape parameter. Calculations were performed for two visible wavelengths (864 nm and 410 nm) for roughness values between 0.2 and 0.7 and Weibull shape parameters between 0 and 1.0 for crystals with aspect ratios of 0.21, 1 and 4.8. For this range of parameters we find that, for a given roughness level, varying the Weibull shape parameter can change the asymmetry parameter by up to about 0.05. The largest effect of the shape parameter variation on the phase function is found in the backscattering region, while the degree of linear polarization is most affected at the side-scattering angles. For high roughness, scattering properties calculated using the uniform and Weibull models are in relatively close agreement for a given roughness parameter, especially when a Weibull shape parameter of 0.75 is used. For smaller roughness values, a shape parameter close to unity provides a better agreement. Notable differences are observed in the phase function over the scattering angle range from 5° to 20°, where the uniform roughness model produces a plateau while the Weibull model does not.

  16. Variations in the optical scattering properties of skin in murine animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabro, Katherine; Curtis, Allison; Galarneau, Jean-Rene; Krucker, Thomas; Bigio, Irving J.

    2011-03-01

    In the work presented here, the optical scattering properties of mouse skin are investigated in depth with the use of Elastic Scattering Spectroscopy (ESS). In particular, sources of variation that lead to experimental error are identified and examined. The thickness of the dermal layer of the skin is determined to be the primary source of variation due to its high collagen content. Specifically, gender differences in skin thickness are found to cause increases in the reflectance and scattering coefficient value by a factor of two in males as opposed to females. Changes in the hair growth cycle are found to influence scattering strength not only due to changes in skin thickness, but also from melanin collection in hair follicles. Because direct and/or indirect measurement of mouse skin is common in the development of novel biomedical optics techniques (optical biopsy, molecular imaging, in vivo monitoring of glucose/blood oxygenation, etc.), the purpose of this work is to identify sources of experimental variation that may arise in these studies such that care can be taken to avoid or compensate for their affects.

  17. Method and apparatus for determining the physical properties of materials using dynamic light scattering techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A system for determining the physical properties of materials through the use of dynamic light scattering is disclosed. The system includes a probe, a laser source for directing a laser beam into the probe, and a photodetector for converting scattered light detected by the probe into electrical signals. The probe includes at least one optical fiber connected to the laser source and a second optical fiber connected to the photodetector. Each of the fibers may adjoin a gradient index microlens which is capable of providing a collimated laser beam into a scattering medium. The position of the second optical fiber with respect to the optical axis of the probe determines whether homodyne or self-beating detection is provided. Self-beating detection may be provided without a gradient index microlens. This allows a very small probe to be constructed which is insertable through a hypodermic needle or the like into a droplet extending from such a needle. A method of detecting scattered light through the use of a collimated, Gaussian laser beam is also provided. A method for controlling the waist and divergence of the optical field emanating from the free end of an optical fiber is also provided.

  18. Monte Carlo evaluation of accuracy and noise properties of two scatter correction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Narita, Y. |; Eberl, S.; Nakamura, T.

    1996-12-31

    Two independent scatter correction techniques, transmission dependent convolution subtraction (TDCS) and triple-energy window (TEW) method, were evaluated in terms of quantitative accuracy and noise properties using Monte Carlo simulation (EGS4). Emission projections (primary, scatter and scatter plus primary) were simulated for {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 201}Tl for numerical chest phantoms. Data were reconstructed with ordered-subset ML-EM algorithm including attenuation correction using the transmission data. In the chest phantom simulation, TDCS provided better S/N than TEW, and better accuracy, i.e., 1.0% vs -7.2% in myocardium, and -3.7% vs -30.1% in the ventricular chamber for {sup 99m}Tc with TDCS and TEW, respectively. For {sup 201}Tl, TDCS provided good visual and quantitative agreement with simulated true primary image without noticeably increasing the noise after scatter correction. Overall TDCS proved to be more accurate and less noisy than TEW, facilitating quantitative assessment of physiological functions with SPECT.

  19. Numerical analysis of the vibroacoustic properties of plates with embedded grids of acoustic black holes.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Stephen C; Fahnline, John B; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The concept of an Acoustic Black Hole (ABH) has been developed and exploited as an approach for passively attenuating structural vibration. The basic principle of the ABH relies on proper tailoring of the structure geometrical properties in order to produce a gradual reduction of the flexural wave speed, theoretically approaching zero. For practical systems the idealized "zero" wave speed condition cannot be achieved so the structural areas of low wave speed are treated with surface damping layers to allow the ABH to approach the idealized dissipation level. In this work, an investigation was conducted to assess the effects that distributions of ABHs embedded in plate-like structures have on both vibration and structure radiated sound, focusing on characterizing and improving low frequency performance. Finite Element and Boundary Element models were used to assess the vibration response and radiated sound power performance of several plate configurations, comparing baseline uniform plates with embedded periodic ABH designs. The computed modal loss factors showed the importance of the ABH unit cell low order modes in the overall vibration reduction effectiveness of the embedded ABH plates at low frequencies where the free plate bending wavelengths are longer than the scale of the ABH.

  20. Acoustical properties of air-saturated porous material with periodically distributed dead-end pores.

    PubMed

    Leclaire, P; Umnova, O; Dupont, T; Panneton, R

    2015-04-01

    A theoretical and numerical study of the sound propagation in air-saturated porous media with straight main pores bearing lateral cavities (dead-ends) is presented. The lateral cavities are located at "nodes" periodically spaced along each main pore. The effect of periodicity in the distribution of the lateral cavities is studied, and the low frequency limit valid for the closely spaced dead-ends is considered separately. It is shown that the absorption coefficient and transmission loss are influenced by the viscous and thermal losses in the main pores as well as their perforation rate. The presence of long or short dead-ends significantly alters the acoustical properties of the material and can increase significantly the absorption at low frequencies (a few hundred hertz). These depend strongly on the geometry (diameter and length) of the dead-ends, on their number per node, and on the periodicity along the propagation axis. These effects are primarily due to low sound speed in the main pores and to thermal losses in the dead-end pores. The model predictions are compared with experimental results. Possible designs of materials of a few cm thicknesses displaying enhanced low frequency absorption at a few hundred hertz are proposed. PMID:25920830

  1. Effect of boundary slip on the acoustical properties of microfibrous materials.

    PubMed

    Umnova, Olga; Tsiklauri, David; Venegas, Rodolfo

    2009-10-01

    A variety of new porous materials with unusually small pores have been manufactured in the past decades. To predict their acoustical properties, the conventional models need to be modified. When pore size becomes comparable to the molecular mean free path of a saturating fluid, the no-slip conditions on the pore surface are no longer accurate and hence the slip effects have to be taken into account. In this paper, sound propagation in microfibrous materials is modeled analytically, approximating the geometry by a regular array of rigid parallel cylinders. It has been shown that velocity and thermal slip on a cylinder surface significantly changes the model predictions leading to lower attenuation coefficient and higher sound speed values. The influence of material porosity, fiber orientation, and size on these effects is investigated. Finite element method is used to numerically solve the oscillatory flow and heat transfer problems in a square array of cylindrical fibres. Numerical results are compared with predictions of the analytical model and the range of its validity is identified.

  2. Acoustical properties of air-saturated porous material with periodically distributed dead-end pores.

    PubMed

    Leclaire, P; Umnova, O; Dupont, T; Panneton, R

    2015-04-01

    A theoretical and numerical study of the sound propagation in air-saturated porous media with straight main pores bearing lateral cavities (dead-ends) is presented. The lateral cavities are located at "nodes" periodically spaced along each main pore. The effect of periodicity in the distribution of the lateral cavities is studied, and the low frequency limit valid for the closely spaced dead-ends is considered separately. It is shown that the absorption coefficient and transmission loss are influenced by the viscous and thermal losses in the main pores as well as their perforation rate. The presence of long or short dead-ends significantly alters the acoustical properties of the material and can increase significantly the absorption at low frequencies (a few hundred hertz). These depend strongly on the geometry (diameter and length) of the dead-ends, on their number per node, and on the periodicity along the propagation axis. These effects are primarily due to low sound speed in the main pores and to thermal losses in the dead-end pores. The model predictions are compared with experimental results. Possible designs of materials of a few cm thicknesses displaying enhanced low frequency absorption at a few hundred hertz are proposed.

  3. Numerical analysis of the vibroacoustic properties of plates with embedded grids of acoustic black holes.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Stephen C; Fahnline, John B; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The concept of an Acoustic Black Hole (ABH) has been developed and exploited as an approach for passively attenuating structural vibration. The basic principle of the ABH relies on proper tailoring of the structure geometrical properties in order to produce a gradual reduction of the flexural wave speed, theoretically approaching zero. For practical systems the idealized "zero" wave speed condition cannot be achieved so the structural areas of low wave speed are treated with surface damping layers to allow the ABH to approach the idealized dissipation level. In this work, an investigation was conducted to assess the effects that distributions of ABHs embedded in plate-like structures have on both vibration and structure radiated sound, focusing on characterizing and improving low frequency performance. Finite Element and Boundary Element models were used to assess the vibration response and radiated sound power performance of several plate configurations, comparing baseline uniform plates with embedded periodic ABH designs. The computed modal loss factors showed the importance of the ABH unit cell low order modes in the overall vibration reduction effectiveness of the embedded ABH plates at low frequencies where the free plate bending wavelengths are longer than the scale of the ABH. PMID:25618073

  4. Theory of the lattice Boltzmann method: acoustic and thermal properties in two and three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Lallemand, Pierre; Luo, Li-Shi

    2003-09-01

    The focus of the present work is to provide an analysis for the acoustic and thermal properties of the energy-conserving lattice Boltzmann models, and a solution to the numerical defects and instability associated with these models in two and three dimensions. We discover that a spurious algebraic coupling between the shear and energy modes of the linearized evolution operator is a defect universal to the energy-conserving Boltzmann models in two and three dimensions. This spurious mode coupling is highly anisotropic and may occur at small values of wave number k along certain directions, and it is a direct consequence of the following key features of the lattice Boltzmann equation: (1) its simple spatial-temporal dynamics, (2) the linearity of the relaxation modeling for collision operator, and (3) the energy-conservation constraint. To eliminate the spurious mode coupling, we propose a hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann equation (HTLBE) in which the mass and momentum conservation equations are solved by using the multiple-relaxation-time model due to d'Humières, whereas the diffusion-advection equation for the temperature is solved separately by using finite-difference technique (or other means). Through the Chapman-Enskog analysis we show that the hydrodynamic equations derived from the proposed HTLBE model include the equivalent effect of gamma=C(P)/C(V) in both the speed and attenuation of sound. Appropriate coupling between the energy and velocity field is introduced to attain correct acoustics in the model. The numerical stability of the HTLBE scheme is analyzed by solving the dispersion equation of the linearized collision operator. We find that the numerical stability of the lattice Boltzmann scheme improves drastically once the spurious mode coupling is removed. It is shown that the HTLBE scheme is far superior to the existing thermal LBE schemes in terms of numerical stability, flexibility, and possible generalization for complex fluids. We also present

  5. Light-scattering properties of a Venetian blind slat used for daylighting applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Annica M.; Jonsson, Jacob C.

    2010-12-15

    The low cost, simplicity, and aesthetic appearance of external and internal shading devices, make them commonly used for daylighting and glare-control applications. Shading devices, such as Venetian blinds, screens, and roller shades, generally exhibit light scattering and/or light redirecting properties. This requires the bi-directional scattering distribution function (BSDF) of the material to be known in order to accurately predict the daylight distribution and energy flow through the fenestration system. Acquiring the complete BSDF is not a straightforward task, and to complete the process it is often required that a model is used to complement the measured data. In this project, a Venetian blind slat with a white top surface and a brushed aluminum bottom surface was optically characterized. A goniophotometer and an integrating sphere spectrophotometer were used to determine the angle resolved and hemispherical reflectance of the sample, respectively. The acquired data were fitted to a scattering model providing one Lambertian and one angle dependent description of the surface properties. These were used in combination with raytracing to obtain the complete BSDFs of the Venetian blind system. (author)

  6. Acoustic Imaging of Microstructure and Evaluation of the Adhesive's Physical, Mechanical and Chemical Properties Changes at Different Cure States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severina, I. A.; Fabre, A. J.; Maeva, E. Yu.

    Epoxy thermoset adhesives transform during cure from liquid state into the highly cross-linked solid. Cure state of the material depends on condition of the reaction (temperature, pressure, time etc.) and resin/hardener ratio. It is known that the cure degree of the adhesive correlates with adhesion strength, which is critical for structural adhesives used in automotive, aerospace and marine industries. In this work, characterization of cure process of the adhesive with acoustic methods is presented. Evolution of the acoustic and elastic properties (attenuation, sound velocity, density, elastic moduli) during cure reaction was monitored in relation to the substantial physical and chemical changes of the material. These macro parameters of the adhesive were compared with the material's microstructure obtained by high-resolution acoustic microscopy technique in frequencies range of 50-400 MHz. Development of the microstructure of the adhesive as it cures at different conditions has been investigated. Appearance and development of the granular structure on the adhesive interface during cure reaction has been demonstrated. Acoustic images were analyzed by mathematical method to quantitatively characterize distribution of the adhesive's components. Statistical analysis of such images provides an accurate quantitative measure of the degree of cure of such samples. Research results presented in this paper can be useful as a basis for non-destructive evaluation of the adhesive materials

  7. The effect of particle shape and size distribution on the acoustical properties of mixtures of hemp particles.

    PubMed

    Glé, Philippe; Gourdon, Emmanuel; Arnaud, Laurent; Horoshenkov, Kirill-V; Khan, Amir

    2013-12-01

    Hemp concrete is an attractive alternative to traditional materials used in building construction. It has a very low environmental impact, and it is characterized by high thermal insulation. Hemp aggregate particles are parallelepiped in shape and can be organized in a plurality of ways to create a considerable proportion of open pores with a complex connectivity pattern, the acoustical properties of which have never been examined systematically. Therefore this paper is focused on the fundamental understanding of the relations between the particle shape and size distribution, pore size distribution, and the acoustical properties of the resultant porous material mixture. The sound absorption and the transmission loss of various hemp aggregates is characterized using laboratory experiments and three theoretical models. These models are used to relate the particle size distribution to the pore size distribution. It is shown that the shape of particles and particle size control the pore size distribution and tortuosity in shiv. These properties in turn relate directly to the observed acoustical behavior. PMID:25669282

  8. Analysis of key properties for optical power limiting and the influence of nonlinear scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerber, M.; Azarian, A.; Schwarz, B.; Eberle, B.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we propose ways to study the optical limiting behavior of dissolved nanoparticles. We want to present two different approaches. First, we identify the key properties responsible for the critical fluence threshold using a principal component analysis. For metallic nanoparticles, we found that the real part of the complex dielectric function must have a negative value as low as possible, while the imaginary part must be close to zero. Additionally, the solvent should have a low refractive index as well as a low absorption. Furthermore, nonlinear scattering seems to be an important limiting mechanism for nanoparticle limiters. Here, we present a thermal finite element model to predict the temporal evolution of the temperature profile in the nanoparticles and their vicinity. The temperature profile leads to vapor bubbles around the nanoparticles and Mie theory is used to calculate the induced scattering. We demonstrate the functionality of the model by simulating an Au-nanoparticle in an ethanol solution.

  9. Effects of intervalley scattering on the transport properties in one−dimensional valleytronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiaojiao; Cheng, Shuguang; You, Wen-Long; Jiang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Based on a one-dimensional valley junction model, the effects of intervalley scattering on the valley transport properties are studied. We analytically investigate the valley transport phenomena in three typical junctions with both intervalley and intravalley scattering included. For the tunneling between two gapless valley materials, different from conventional Klein tunneling theory, the transmission probability of the carrier is less than 100% while the pure valley polarization feature still holds. If the junction is composed of at least one gapped valley material, the valley polarization of the carrier is generally imperfect during the tunneling process. Interestingly, in such circumstance, we discover a resonance of valley polarization that can be tuned by the junction potential. The extension of our results to realistic valley materials are also discussed. PMID:26980163

  10. A re-expansion method for determining the acoustical impedance and the scattering matrix for the waveguide discontinuity problem

    PubMed Central

    Homentcovschi, Dorel; Miles, Ronald N.

    2010-01-01

    The paper gives a new method for analyzing planar discontinuities in rectangular waveguides. The method consists of a re-expansion of the normal modes in the two ducts at the junction plane into a system of functions accounting for the velocity singularities at the corner points. As the new expansion has an exponential convergence, only a few terms have to be considered for obtaining the solution of most practical problems. To see how the method works some closed form solutions, obtained by the conformal mapping method, are used to discuss the convergence of the re-expanded series when the number of retained terms increases. The equivalent impedance accounting for nonplanar waves into a plane-wave analysis is determined. Finally, the paper yields the scattering matrix which describes the coupling of arbitrary modes at each side of the discontinuity valid in the case of many propagating modes in both parts of the duct. PMID:20707432

  11. A re-expansion method for determining the acoustical impedance and the scattering matrix for the waveguide discontinuity problem.

    PubMed

    Homentcovschi, Dorel; Miles, Ronald N

    2010-08-01

    The paper gives a new method for analyzing planar discontinuities in rectangular waveguides. The method consists of a re-expansion of the normal modes in the two ducts at the junction plane into a system of functions accounting for the velocity singularities at the corner points. As the new expansion has an exponential convergence, only a few terms have to be considered for obtaining the solution of most practical problems. To see how the method works some closed form solutions, obtained by the conformal mapping method, are used to discuss the convergence of the re-expanded series when the number of retained terms increases. The equivalent impedance accounting for nonplanar waves into a plane-wave analysis is determined. Finally, the paper yields the scattering matrix which describes the coupling of arbitrary modes at each side of the discontinuity valid in the case of many propagating modes in both parts of the duct.

  12. Frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry employed for optical properties and dynamics studies of turbid media

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Liang; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Svanberg, Sune

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, fiber-based frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry (FMLSI) is developed and employed for studies of optical properties and dynamics in liquid phantoms made from Intralipid®. The fiber-based FMLSI system retrieves the optical properties by examining the intensity fluctuations through the turbid medium in a heterodyne detection scheme using a continuous-wave frequency-modulated coherent light source. A time resolution of 21 ps is obtained, and the experimental results for the diluted Intralipid phantoms show good agreement with the predicted results based on published data. The present system shows great potential for assessment of optical properties as well as dynamic studies in liquid phantoms, dairy products, and human tissues. PMID:25136504

  13. Scattering Properties of Jovian Tropospheric Cloud Particles Inferred from Cassini/ISS: Mie Scattering Phase Function and Particle Size in South Tropical Zone III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Satoh, T.; Kasaba, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The three distinct cloud layers were predicted by an equilibrium cloud condensation model (ECCM) of Jupiter. An ammonia ice cloud (NH3), an ammonia hydrosulfide cloud (NH4SH), and a water ice (H2O) cloud would be based at altitudes corresponding to pressures of about 0.7, 2.2 and 6 bars, respectively. However, there are significant gaps in our knowledge of the vertical cloud structure, despite the continuing effort by numerous ground-based, space-based, and in-situ observations and theory. Methane (CH4) is considered that its altitude distribution is globally uniform because it does not condense in Jovian atmosphere. Therefore, it is possible to derive the vertical cloud structure and the optical properties of clouds (i.e., optical thickness and single scattering albedo) by observing reflected sunlight in CH4 bands (727, 890 nm) and continuum in visible to near-infrared spectral ranges. Since we need to consider multiple scattering by clouds, it is essential to know scattering properties (e.g., scattering phase function) of clouds for determination of vertical cloud structure. However, we cannot derive those from ground-based and Earth-orbit observations because of the limitation of solar phase angle as viewed from the Earth. Then, most previous studies have used the scattering phase function deduced from the Pioneer 10/IPP data (blue: 440 nm, red: 640nm) [Tomasko et al., 1978]. There are two shortcomings in the Pioneer scattering phase function. One is that we have to use this scattering phase function at red as a substitute for analyses of imaging photometry using CH4 bands (center: 727 and 890 nm), although clouds should have wavelength dependency. The other is that the red pass band of IPP was so broad (595-720 nm) that this scattering phase function in red just show wavelength-averaged scattering properties of clouds. To provide a new reference scattering phase function with wavelength dependency, we have analyzed the Cassini/ISS data in BL1 (451 nm), CB1 (619

  14. The elastic constants and related properties of the epsilon polymorph of the energetic material CL-20 determined by Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Haycraft, James J

    2009-12-01

    The acoustic phonons of the epsilon polymorph of 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazatetracyclo [5.5.0.0(5,9).0(3,11)] dodecane (epsilon-CL-20) have been studied using Brillouin scattering spectroscopy. Analysis of the acoustic phonon velocities allowed determination of the complete stiffness tensor for this energetic material. The results are compared to a theoretical determination of the epsilon-CL-20 elastic constants, bulk moduli, and shear moduli. The observed ordering of elastic constants, C(22)>C(33)>C(11), is noted to be different from other nitramine energetic materials. Finally, the elasticity of epsilon-CL-20 is compared to recently published reports on cyclotrimethylene trinitramine's (RDX) elasticity and the beta polymorph of cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine's (beta-HMX) elasticity. PMID:19968345

  15. The elastic constants and related properties of the epsilon polymorph of the energetic material CL-20 determined by Brillouin scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haycraft, James J.

    2009-12-01

    The acoustic phonons of the epsilon polymorph of 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazatetracyclo [5.5.0.05,9.03,11] dodecane (ɛ-CL-20) have been studied using Brillouin scattering spectroscopy. Analysis of the acoustic phonon velocities allowed determination of the complete stiffness tensor for this energetic material. The results are compared to a theoretical determination of the ɛ-CL-20 elastic constants, bulk moduli, and shear moduli. The observed ordering of elastic constants, C22>C33>C11, is noted to be different from other nitramine energetic materials. Finally, the elasticity of ɛ-CL-20 is compared to recently published reports on cyclotrimethylene trinitramine's (RDX) elasticity and the beta polymorph of cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine's (β-HMX) elasticity.

  16. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2001-07-01

    Mechanically weak formations, such as chalks, high porosity sandstones, and marine sediments, pose significant problems for oil and gas operators. Problems such as compaction, subsidence, and loss of permeability can affect reservoir production operations. For example, the unexpected subsidence of the Ekofisk chalk in the North Sea required over one billion dollars to re-engineer production facilities to account for losses created during that compaction (Sulak 1991). Another problem in weak formations is that of shallow water flows (SWF). Deep water drilling operations sometimes encounter cases where the marine sediments, at shallow depths just below the seafloor, begin to uncontrollably flow up and around the drill pipe. SWF problems created a loss of $150 million for the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The goal of this project is to provide a database on both the rock mechanical properties and the geophysical properties of weak rocks and sediments. These could be used by oil and gas companies to detect, evaluate, and alleviate potential production and drilling problems. The results will be useful in, for example, pre-drill detection of events such as SWF's by allowing a correlation of seismic data (such as hazard surveys) to rock mechanical properties. The data sets could also be useful for 4-D monitoring of the compaction and subsidence of an existing reservoir and imaging the zones of damage. During the second quarter of the project the research team has: (1) completed acoustic sensor construction, (2) conducted reconnaissance tests to map the deformational behaviors of the various rocks, (3) developed a sample assembly for the measurement of dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters during triaxial testing, and (4) conducted a detailed review of the scientific literature and compiled a bibliography of that review. During the first quarter of the project the research team acquired several rock types for testing

  17. Localized acoustic surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  18. Solution Properties of 1,3-Cyclohexadiene Polymers by Small Angle Neutron and Light Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Seok I; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Wignall, George D; Hong, Kunlun; Mays, Jimmy; Britt, Phillip F; Terao, Ken; Nakamura, Yo

    2006-01-01

    1,3-Cyclohexdiene polymers (PCHD) and their derivatives are of interest due to the six-member rings in the main chain, which are expected to impart higher mechanical strength and better thermal and chemical stability, as compared to common vinyl polymers. For example, hydrogenated PCHD has the highest glass transition temperature (T{sub g} {approx} 231 C) of all hydrocarbon polymers, and it also shows good heat, weather, impact, abrasion, and chemical resistance as well as low water absorption. In addition, PCHD has unique photochemical properties, such as excellent transparency, due to the isolated double bonds in the main chain. Also, block copolymers containing PCHD show unusual phase separation behavior. For example, a styrene/1,3-CHD block copolymer (PS-b-PCHD) with 50 vol % CHD (1,4/1,2 {approx} 95/5) exhibits a core-shell or hollow cylinder morphology, while a typical styrene/acyclic diene (isoprene or butadiene) block copolymer with similar composition exhibits a lamellar structure. Such phase behavior and many other properties strongly depend on the conformation of the polymer in solution or bulk. However, almost no data have been reported on the conformation of PCHD, probably because of the lack of well-defined and well-characterized samples. Here we report solution properties of PCHD in tetrahydrofuran (THF) and chloroform by multiangle laser light scattering, viscometry, and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS).

  19. Comparative acoustic performance and mechanical properties of silk membranes for the repair of chronic tympanic membrane perforations.

    PubMed

    Allardyce, Benjamin J; Rajkhowa, Rangam; Dilley, Rodney J; Xie, Zhigang; Campbell, Luke; Keating, Adrian; Atlas, Marcus D; von Unge, Magnus; Wang, Xungai

    2016-12-01

    The acoustic and mechanical properties of silk membranes of different thicknesses were tested to determine their suitability as a repair material for tympanic membrane perforations. Membranes of different thickness (10-100μm) were tested to determine their frequency response and their resistance to pressure loads in a simulated ear canal model. Their mechanical rigidity to pressure loads was confirmed by tensile testing. These membranes were tested alongside animal cartilage, currently the strongest available myringoplasty graft as well as paper, which is commonly used for simpler procedures. Silk membranes showed resonant frequencies within the human hearing range and a higher vibrational amplitude than cartilage, suggesting that silk may offer good acoustic energy transfer characteristics. Silk membranes were also highly resistant to simulated pressure changes in the middle ear, suggesting they can resist retraction, a common cause of graft failure resulting from chronic negative pressures in the middle ear. Part of this strength can be explained by the substantially higher modulus of silk films compared with cartilage. This allows for the production of films that are much thinner than cartilage, with superior acoustic properties, but that still provide the same level of mechanical support as thicker cartilage. Together, these in vitro results suggest that silk membranes may provide good hearing outcomes while offering similar levels of mechanical support to the reconstructed middle ear. PMID:27479895

  20. Preliminary study of copper oxide nanoparticles acoustic and magnetic properties for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlman, Or; Weitz, Iris S.; Azhari, Haim

    2015-03-01

    The implementation of multimodal imaging in medicine is highly beneficial as different physical properties may provide complementary information, augmented detection ability, and diagnosis verification. Nanoparticles have been recently used as contrast agents for various imaging modalities. Their significant advantage over conventional large-scale contrast agents is the ability of detection at early stages of the disease, being less prone to obstacles on their path to the target region, and possible conjunction to therapeutics. Copper ions play essential role in human health. They are used as a cofactor for multiple key enzymes involved in various fundamental biochemistry processes. Extremely small size copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs) are readily soluble in water with high colloidal stability yielding high bioavailability. The goal of this study was to examine the magnetic and acoustic characteristics of CuO-NPs in order to evaluate their potential to serve as contrast imaging agent for both MRI and ultrasound. CuO-NPs 7nm in diameter were synthesized by hot solution method. The particles were scanned using a 9.4T MRI and demonstrated a concentration dependent T1 relaxation time shortening phenomenon. In addition, it was revealed that CuO-NPs can be detected using the ultrasonic B-scan imaging. Finally, speed of sound based ultrasonic computed tomography was applied and showed that CuO-NPs can be clearly imaged. In conclusion, the preliminary results obtained, positively indicate that CuO-NPs may be imaged by both MRI and ultrasound. The results motivate additional in-vivo studies, in which the clinical utility of fused images derived from both modalities for diagnosis improvement will be studied.

  1. Surface acoustic wave technique for the characterization of porous properties of microporous silicate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, Susan Leslie

    1997-12-01

    Features of gas adsorption onto sol-gel derived microporous silicate thin films, for characterization of porous properties, are detailed using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) technique. Mass uptake and film effective modulus changes calculated from the SAW data are investigated in detail. The effects of stress and surface tension on the SAW sensor are calculated and found to be negligible in these experiments. Transient behavior recorded during nitrogen adsorption at 77 K is discussed in the context of mass uptake and effective modulus contributions. The time constant associated with the effective modulus calculation is consistent with that of diffusivity of nitrogen into a 5A zeolite. Further calculations indicate that the transient behavior is not due to thermal effects. A unique dual sensor SAW experiment to decouple the mass and effective modulus contributions to the frequency response was performed in conjunction with a Silicon beam-bending experiment. The beam-bending experiment results in a calculation of stress induced during adsorption of methanol on a microporous silicate thin film. The decoupled mass and effective modulus calculated from the SAW data have similar shaped isotherms, and are quite different from that of the stress developed in the Silicon beam. The total effective modulus change calculated from the SAW data is consistent with that calculated using Gassmann's equation. The SAW system developed for this work included unique electronics and customized hardware which is suitable for work under vacuum and at temperatures from 77K to 473K. This unique setup is suitable for running thin film samples on a Micromeritics ASAP 2000 Gas Adsorption unit in automatic mode. This setup is also general enough to be compatible with a custom gas adsorption unit and the beam bending apparatus, both using standard vacuum assemblies.

  2. Design and synthesis of model transparent aqueous colloids with optimal scattering properties.

    PubMed

    Perro, Adeline; Meng, Guangnan; Fung, Jerome; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2009-10-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis and self-assembly of colloidal particles with independently controlled diameter and scattering cross section. We show that it is possible to prepare bulk colloidal suspensions that are nearly transparent in water, while the particles themselves can be individually resolved using optical microscopy. These particles may be ideal model colloids for real-space studies of self-assembly in aqueous media. Moreover, they illustrate the degree to which the optical properties of colloids can be engineered through straightforward chemistry.

  3. The single scattering properties of hygroscopic soot aggregates with water coated monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YU, W.; Tianhai, C.; Hao, C.; Lijuan, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols, such as soot, have modified the Earth's radiation balance by scattering and absorbing solar and long-wave radiative transmission, which have largely influenced the global climate change since the industrial era. Based on transmission electron microscope images (TEM), soot particles are shown as the complex, fractal-like aggregate structures. In humid atmospheric environments, these soot aggregates tend to acquire a water coating, which introduces further complexity to the problem of determining the optical properties of the aggregates. The hygroscopic growth of soot aggregates is important for the aging of these absorbing aerosols, which can significantly influence the optical properties of these kinds of soot particles. In this paper, according to the specific volume fractions of soot core in the water coated soot particle, the monomers of fractal soot aggregates are modeled as semi-external mixtures (physical contact) with constant radius of soot core and variable size of water coating. The single scattering properties of these hygroscopic soot particles, such as phase function, the cross sections of extinction, absorption and scatting, single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (ASY), are calculated using the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method. The morphological effects are compared with different monomer numbers and fractal dimension of the soot aggregates, as well as different size of water coating for these spherical monomers. The results have shown that the extinction and absorption cross sections are decreased for the soot aggregates with more thick water coating on monomers, but the single scattering albedo is increased for the larger water coating. It is found that the SSA of aged soot aggregates with hygroscopic grown are remarkably (~50% for volume fraction of soot aggregates is 0.5) larger than fresh soot particles without the consideration of water coating, due to the size of water coating and the

  4. Design and synthesis of model transparent aqueous colloids with optimal scattering properties.

    PubMed

    Perro, Adeline; Meng, Guangnan; Fung, Jerome; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2009-10-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis and self-assembly of colloidal particles with independently controlled diameter and scattering cross section. We show that it is possible to prepare bulk colloidal suspensions that are nearly transparent in water, while the particles themselves can be individually resolved using optical microscopy. These particles may be ideal model colloids for real-space studies of self-assembly in aqueous media. Moreover, they illustrate the degree to which the optical properties of colloids can be engineered through straightforward chemistry. PMID:19728724

  5. Ground state properties of cold bosonic atoms at large scattering lengths.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun Liang; Zhou, Fei

    2009-07-10

    In this Letter, we study bosonic atoms at large scattering lengths using a variational method where the condensate amplitude is a variational parameter. We further examine momentum distribution functions, chemical potentials, the speed of sound, and spatial density profiles of cold bosonic atoms in a trap in this limit. The latter two properties turn out to bear similarities to those of Fermi gases. The estimates obtained here are applicable near Feshbach resonances, particularly when the fraction of atoms forming three-body structures is small and can be tested in future cold atom experiments. PMID:19659218

  6. [Effect of weather condition on the aerosol scattering property at Shangdianzi].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiu-Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Pu, Wei-Wei; Meng, Wei

    2011-11-01

    A study on the effect of weather condition on the aerosol scattering property has been carried out using one year measurement data sets of aerosol scattering coefficient (ASC) and meteorological parameters at Shangdianzi (SDZ). The results showed that the ASC was highest in haze-fog day with 608.4 Mm(-1) and higher in fog day with 500.6 Mm(-1) and haze day with 423.7 Mm (-1) those were 6.4-9.2 times higher than the ASC in normal day. The ASC was highest in summer in all kinds of weather conditions. The lower ASC in fog day and haze-fog day was observed in autumn and winter, respectively. There was no evident difference of the ASC between other three seasons in haze day and normal day. Pronounced seasonal variation of the mass scattering efficiency (MSE) of PM2.5 was observed in fog day with the highest value in summer. Significant diurnal variations in ASC were observed in haze-fog day and normal day with a unimodal pattern and a bimodal pattern, respectively. The wind was the most important factor for the ASC at SDZ. The transport of aerosol particles by the strong southwest wind should be responsible for the higher level of ASC in SDZ area and regional scale in low visibility weather conditions. The northeast wind was favourable to the reduction of ASC, especially in normal day.

  7. Bound and scattering properties in waveguides around free-space Feshbach resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaoren; Giannakeas, Panogiotis; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The two-body bound and scattering properties in an one-dimensional (1D) harmonic waveguide in the vicinity of free-space magnetic Feshbach resonances are investigated based on the local frame transformation approach. The multichannel characteristics of the interatomic interaction is taken into account. We examine the crossing between the bound state in the waveguide and the ground level of the transverse confinement, i.e. when the bound state crosses the scattering threshold in the waveguide and turns into a continuum state. For s-wave collision, the crossing occurs at the magnetic field where the effective 1D interaction strength g1 D vanishes, and the effective 1D scattering length a1 D diverges. This observation indicates that the molecular formation or atom loss signal in a harmonic waveguide is expected at the magnetic field where a1 D is infinite. Molecule formation is absent at position of the confinement induced resonance which is characterized by the divergence of g1 D . Financial support from Alexander von Humboldt Foundation is acknowledged.

  8. Scattering properties of sands. 2. Results for sands from different origins.

    PubMed

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Francis, Mirvatte; Hadamcik, Edith; Daugeron, Daniel; Couté, Benoît; Gaubicher, Bertrand; Jeannot, Matthieu

    2010-06-20

    Mineral sand is a major component of aerosols in the atmosphere. It is necessary to have a laboratory database to interpret the remote sensing measurements of light scattered by such grains. For this purpose, the PROGRA2 experiment is dedicated to the retrieval of polarization and brightness phase curves, in the visible wavelength domain, of various grains that can be found in Earth's atmosphere and in space. The measurements of the scattered light by levitating clouds of grains are conducted at two wavelengths, 632.8 and 543.5nm, with PROGRA2-VIS. Large grains (at least tens of micrometers) are studied in microgravity conditions during parabolic flights; smaller (micrometer-sized) grains are lifted by an air draught in ground-based conditions. The PROGRA2-SURF instrument allows measurements on the grains deposited on a plane surface, at the same wavelengths. New data for the scattering properties are presented for sands of various origins, including fine clay. The polarimetric phase curves for levitating grains are close to each other for all the samples (except for black sands); small discrepancies are mainly due to grains' light absorption differences. The polarization curves for levitating grains differ strongly from those of deposited grains (dry or wet). In particular, these curves can be used to interpret remote sensing measurements to distinguish between grains at ground and grains transported by winds.

  9. Analytic studies of dispersive properties of shear Alfvén and acoustic wave spectra in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chavdarovski, Ilija; Zonca, Fulvio

    2014-05-15

    The properties of the low frequency shear Alfvén and acoustic wave spectra in toroidal geometry are examined analytically and numerically considering wave particle interactions with magnetically trapped and circulating particles, using the theoretical model described in [I. Chavdarovski and F. Zonca, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 51, 115001 (2009)] and following the framework of the generalized fishbone-like dispersion relation. Effects of trapped particles as well as diamagnetic effects on the frequencies and damping rates of the beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes, kinetic ballooning modes and beta-induced Alfvén-acoustic eigenmodes are discussed and shown to be crucial to give a proper assessment of mode structure and stability conditions. Present results also demonstrate the mutual coupling of these various branches and suggest that frequency as well as mode polarization are crucial for their identification on the basis of experimental evidence.

  10. Piezoelectric Ca3NbGa3Si2O14 crystal: crystal growth, piezoelectric and acoustic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Plotitcyna, Olga; Erko, Alexei; Zizak, Ivo; Vadilonga, Simone; Irzhak, Dmitry; Emelin, Evgenii; Buzanov, Oleg; Leitenberger, Wolfram

    2016-08-01

    Ca3NbGa3Si2O14 (CNGS), a five-component crystal of lanthanum-gallium silicate group, was grown by the Czochralski method. The parameters of the elementary unit cell of the crystal were measured by powder diffraction. The independent piezoelectric strain coefficients d{}_{11} and d_{14} were determined by the triple-axis X-ray diffraction in the Bragg and Laue geometries. Excitation and propagation of surface acoustic waves (SAW) were studied by high-resolution X-ray diffraction at BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. The velocity of SAW propagation and power flow angles in the Y-, X- and yxl/{+}36°-cuts of the CNGS crystal were determined from the analysis of the diffraction spectra. The CNGS crystal was found practically isotropic by its acoustic properties.

  11. Light scattering and absorption properties of aerosol particles in the urban environment of Granada, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyamani, H.; Olmo, F. J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    Surface measurements of optical and physical aerosol properties were made at an urban site, Granada (Spain) (37.18°N, 3.58°W, 680 m a.s.l), during winter 2005-2006. Measurements included the aerosol scattering, σsca, and backscattering coefficients, σbsca, at three wavelengths (450, 550 and 700 nm) measured at low relative humidity (RH<50%) by an integrating nephelometer, the absorption coefficient at 670 nm, σabs, measured with a multi-angle absorption photometer, and aerosol size distribution in the 0.5-20 μm aerodynamic diameter range registered by an aerodynamic aerosol sizer (APS-3321, TSI). The hourly average of σsca (550 nm) ranged from 2 to 424 M m -1 with an average value of 84±62 M m -1 (±S.D.). The Angstrom exponent presented an average value of 1.8±0.3, suggesting a large fraction of fine particles at the site, an observation confirmed by aerosol size distribution measurements. The hourly average of σabs (670 nm) ranged from 1.7 to 120.5 M m -1 with an average value of 28±20 M m -1. The results indicate that the aerosol absorption coefficient in Granada was relatively large. The largest σsca value was associated with air masses that passed over heavily polluted European areas and local stagnation conditions. High absorbing aerosol level was obtained during dust transport from North Africa probably due to the presence of hematite. Based on the measured scattering and absorption coefficients, a very low average value of the single scattering albedo of 0.66±0.11 at 670 nm was calculated, suggesting that urban aerosols in this region contain a large fraction of absorbing material. A clear diurnal pattern was observed in scattering and absorption coefficients and particle concentrations with two local maxima occurring in early morning and late evening. This behavior can be explained in terms of local conditions that control the particle sources associated with traffic and upward mixing of the aerosol during the daytime development of a

  12. The thermophysical properties of gases determined using an annular acoustic resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxton, Amanda Jane

    A novel annular acoustic resonator was constructed for measurements of the speed of sound in gases at pressures below 1 MPa. The resonator was designed to allow measurements of the speed and absorption of sound at low pressure in gases with large bulk viscosities. Measurements in propene, for which the speed of sound is known, served to characterise the geometry of the resonator and provide a test of the acoustic model for the system. A detailed description of the resonator which has an outer radius of 140 mm is given. The large radius provides low frequency resonance modes that minimise acoustic losses in the bulk of the gas. Three substances were studied: trifluoromethane, sulfur hexafluoride and a binary mixture consisting of methane and ethane with mole fraction composition {0.85 CH4 + 0.15 C2H6}. Measurements were conducted over the temperature range 230 to 350 K, and the results analysed to obtain perfect gas heat capacities and second acoustic virial coefficients. The heat capacity data are compared to literature sources. Values for the second (p,V,T) virial coefficients were obtained from the second acoustic virial coefficients and the results are compared with previous determinations. Analysis of the acoustic loss mechanisms allows the shear viscosity, thermal conductivity and bulk viscosity of the gas to be estimated. The values obtained do not have the accuracy that may be achieved using specialised techniques and a comparison is made where data is available. The estimates of the thermal conductivity and shear and bulk viscosities provide a new self consistent method for the analysis of the acoustic results which does not rely on literature values for the transport coefficients. Where possible vibrational relaxation times are evaluated from the bulk viscosity and are compared with results from other sources.

  13. Acoustical Properties of Preferred Choral Performance Rooms in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupere, George Henry

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to provide simple architectural and acoustic principles which other professional musicians could employ when involved with the planning and building of rooms that were to be used for the performance of choral music. It was determined that accomplished and recognized choral conductors should be consulted for their choice of rooms. Eight choral performance rooms were selected by four esteemed choral conductors from a midwest region including the states of Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. The conductors were selected by other choral conductors from the region who were members of the American Choral Directors Association and who were directing at the college/university level. With the technical assistance of an acoustician, the researcher visited each of the eight sites. Architectural features were investigated, such as room dimensions and shape, building materials, construction techniques, and any acoustical treatments. Acoustical measurements were conducted and reduced to reverberation curves. The acoustic qualities of the spaces were investigated through a variety of methods, drawing upon the researcher's experience and the acoustician's vast background in architectural acoustics. In the body of the paper photographs are provided for each of the rooms along with floor plans and longitudinal sections. Dimensions and specifications are listed and compared. It was found that the conductors preferred rooms with reverberation times greater than 2.0 seconds. They also preferred rooms that were greater in length than in width and rooms with a height greater than forty-three feet. Generalizations about construction materials and techniques were summarized along with their respective acoustic principles. The study concludes with a recommended plan for a choral performance room based on the principles ascertained from the research. This room is described, both acoustically and architecturally. A floor plan and longitudinal section are

  14. Detection of dinoflagellates by the light scattering properties of the chiral structure of their chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianping; Kattawar, George W.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most prominent properties of dinoflagellates is their large sized and highly chromosome-laden nucleus, which contains dozens of cylindrically shaped chromosomes. With such high chromatic concentration, these chromosomes condense into ordered helical structures and were claimed to be responsible for the large circular polarization effects observed in the light scattering from dinoflagellates. In previous research, a thin helix model of a chromosome was used to compare the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) and the analytical Born approximation calculations. However, for such a simplified model only modest qualitative agreements with experimental measurements were achieved. Moreover, only one chromosome in one nucleus was simulated, overlooking the effects of interactions between chromosomes. In this work, we adopt the helical plywood liquid crystal model with a capsule shape, in which parallel fibrils lie in plains perpendicular to the helix axis and the orientations of these fibrils twist at a constant angle between two neighboring layers. The ADDA code is applied to calculate the 16 Mueller matrix elements of light scattering from a single chromosome and from the nucleus, which is composed of a collection of randomly positioned and randomly orientated chromosomes. Special attention is paid to the S14 Mueller matrix element, which describes the ability of differentiating left and right circularly polarized light. Our results show that large S14 back scattering signals from the dinoflagellate nucleus results from the underlying helical structures of its chromosomes. These signals are sensitive to the light wavelength and pitch of the chromatic helix, the latter of which is species specific. Therefore, detecting back scattering S14 signal could be a promising method to monitor dinoflagellates such as Karenia brevis, the causal agent of the Florida red tide.

  15. Acoustic effects analysis utilizing speckle pattern with fixed-particle Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, Ali; Hollmann, Joseph A.; Holt, R. Glynn; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging in a turbid medium is limited because of multiple scattering a photon undergoes while traveling through the medium. Therefore, optical imaging is unable to provide high resolution information deep in the medium. In the case of soft tissue, acoustic waves unlike light, can travel through the medium with negligible scattering. However, acoustic waves cannot provide medically relevant contrast as good as light. Hybrid solutions have been applied to use the benefits of both imaging methods. A focused acoustic wave generates a force inside an acoustically absorbing medium known as acoustic radiation force (ARF). ARF induces particle displacement within the medium. The amount of displacement is a function of mechanical properties of the medium and the applied force. To monitor the displacement induced by the ARF, speckle pattern analysis can be used. The speckle pattern is the result of interfering optical waves with different phases. As light travels through the medium, it undergoes several scattering events. Hence, it generates different scattering paths which depends on the location of the particles. Light waves that travel along these paths have different phases (different optical path lengths). ARF induces displacement to scatterers within the acoustic focal volume, and changes the optical path length. In addition, temperature rise due to conversion of absorbed acoustic energy to heat, changes the index of refraction and therefore, changes the optical path length of the scattering paths. The result is a change in the speckle pattern. Results suggest that the average change in the speckle pattern measures the displacement of particles and temperature rise within the acoustic wave focal area, hence can provide mechanical and thermal properties of the medium.

  16. Acoustic manipulation of oscillating spherical bodies: Emergence of axial negative acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Majid; Mojahed, Alireza

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, emergence of negative axial acoustic radiation force on a rigid oscillating spherical body is investigated for acoustic manipulation purposes. The problem of plane acoustic wave scattering from an oscillating spherical body submerged in an ideal acoustic fluid medium is solved. For the case of oscillating direction collinear with the wave propagation wave number vector (desired path), it has been shown that the acoustic radiation force, as a result of nonlinear acoustic wave interaction with bodies can be expressed as a linear function of incident wave field and the oscillation properties of the oscillator (i.e., amplitude and phase of oscillation). The negative (i.e., pulling effects) and positive (i.e., pushing effects) radiation force situations are divided in oscillation complex plane with a specific frequency-dependant straight line. This characteristic line defines the radiation force cancellation state. In order to investigate the stability of the mentioned manipulation strategy, the case of misaligned oscillation of sphere with the wave propagation direction is studied. The proposed methodology may suggest a novel concept of single-beam acoustic handling techniques based on smart carriers.

  17. Why are Korean tense stops acquired so early: The role of acoustic properties

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Eun Jong; Beckman, Mary E.; Edwards, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Transcription-based studies have shown that tense stops appear before aspirated or lax stops in most Korean-acquiring children's speech. This order of mastery is predicted by the short lag Voice Onset Time (VOT) values of Korean tense stops, as this is the earliest acquired phonation type across languages. However, the tense stop also has greater motor demands than the other two phonation types, given its pressed voice quality (negative H1-H2) and its relatively high f0 value at vowel onset, word-initially. In order to explain the observed order of mastery of Korean stops, we need a more sensitive quantitative model of the role of multiple acoustic parameters in production and perception. This study explores the relationship between native speakers' transcriptions/categorizations of children's stop productions and three acoustic characteristics (VOT, H1-H2 and f0). The results showed that the primary acoustic parameter that adult listeners used to differentiate tense vs. non-tense stops was VOT. Listeners used VOT and the additional acoustic parameter of f0 to differentiate lax vs. aspirated stops. Thus, the early acquisition of tense stops is explained both by their short-lag VOT values and the fact that children need to learn to control only a single acoustic parameter to produce them. PMID:21643475

  18. From the single-scattering properties of ice crystals to climate prediction: A way forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Anthony J.

    2012-08-01

    Cirrus is composed of non-spherical ice crystals, and against the blue background of the sky, they appear as tenuous wispy clouds, usually located at altitudes greater than about 6 km. Their spatial and temporal distribution about the Earth's atmosphere is significant. With such distributions, their contributions to the Earth's natural greenhouse effect and hydrological cycle are important. Therefore, it is important that climate models are able to predict the radiative effect of cirrus, as well as their contribution to the total amount of ice mass that occurs in the Earth's atmosphere. However, cirrus is composed of ice crystals that can take on a variety of geometrical shapes, from pristine habits such as hexagonal ice columns, hexagonal ice plates and bullet-rosettes, to highly randomized habits, which may have roughened surfaces and/or air cavities. These habits also aggregate together, to form chains of aggregates and compact aggregates. The sizes of these habits may also vary, from about less than 10 μm, to several cm, with the smaller ice crystals usually existing toward cloud-top and the larger ice crystals existing toward the cloud-bottom. Due to this variability of geometrical complexity, size, and ice mass, predicting the magnitude of the cirrus greenhouse effect has proven problematic. To try to constrain these radiative and hydrological uncertainties, since about 2006 there is now available the A-train constellation of satellites, which attempt to quantify the radiative and hydrological contributions of cirrus to the Earth's atmosphere. The A-train obtains nearly simultaneous measurements of cirrus from across the electromagnetic spectrum. Such simultaneous measurements pose challenges for theoretical scattering models of cirrus, as these models must conserve ice mass and be physically consistent across the electromagnetic spectrum. In this review paper, the microphysical properties of cirrus are summarized. The current idealized habit mixture models

  19. Unphysical consequences of negative absorbed power in linear passive scattering: Implications for radiation force and torque.

    PubMed

    Marston, Philip L; Zhang, Likun

    2016-06-01

    Contrary to some claims, the absorbed power associated with linear scattering of sound by passive objects in ideal fluids must be non-negative. Such unphysical claims suggest analytical or computational error, or use of an unphysical constitutive relation for material properties. The close connection with the evaluation of acoustic radiation force on targets according to Westervelt's formulation [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 29, 26-29 (1957)], recently generalized to certain acoustic beams, is briefly reviewed along with the theory of acoustic radiation torque on axisymmetric targets with power absorption. Applications to viscous dissipation and to issues pertaining to active targets are also examined. PMID:27369138

  20. Properties of X-ray resonant scattering in the Bragg case revealed on the Riemann surface.

    PubMed

    Saka, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Continuing the work described in the previous paper [Saka (2016). Acta Cryst. A72, 338-348], the dynamical theory for perfect crystals in the Bragg case is reformulated using the Riemann surface. In particular, diffraction under resonant scattering conditions is investigated. The characteristic features of the dispersion surface and the rocking curve are analytically revealed using four parameters, which are the real and imaginary parts of two quantities specifying the degree of departure from the exact Bragg conditions and the reflection strength. Characteristic properties that have been deduced through numerical analysis are derived analytically using these four parameters. Visualization of the geometric relationships between the four parameters on the Riemann surface is useful for understanding many properties such as symmetry and sharpness of the rocking curve under special conditions. Therefore, employing the Riemann surface is instructive for numerical analysis and useful for understanding dynamical diffraction in the Bragg case. PMID:27357849

  1. Laboratory study of microphysical and scattering properties of corona-producing cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, E; Vochezer, P; Möhler, O; Schnaiter, M

    2014-11-01

    Corona-producing cirrus clouds were generated and measured under chamber conditions at the AIDA cloud chamber in Karlsruhe. We were able to measure the scattering properties as well as microphysical properties of these clouds under well-defined laboratory conditions in contrast with previous studies of corona-producing clouds, where the measurements were conducted by means of lidar and in situ aircraft measurements. Our results are in agreement with those of previous studies, confirming that corona-producing cirrus clouds consist of a narrow distribution of small (median Dp=19-32  μm) and compact ice crystals. We showed that the ice crystals in these clouds are most likely formed in homogeneous freezing processes. As a result of the homogeneous freezing process, the ice crystals grow uniformly in size; furthermore, the majority of the ice crystals have rough surface features.

  2. Laboratory study of microphysical and scattering properties of corona-producing cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, E; Vochezer, P; Möhler, O; Schnaiter, M

    2014-11-01

    Corona-producing cirrus clouds were generated and measured under chamber conditions at the AIDA cloud chamber in Karlsruhe. We were able to measure the scattering properties as well as microphysical properties of these clouds under well-defined laboratory conditions in contrast with previous studies of corona-producing clouds, where the measurements were conducted by means of lidar and in situ aircraft measurements. Our results are in agreement with those of previous studies, confirming that corona-producing cirrus clouds consist of a narrow distribution of small (median Dp=19-32  μm) and compact ice crystals. We showed that the ice crystals in these clouds are most likely formed in homogeneous freezing processes. As a result of the homogeneous freezing process, the ice crystals grow uniformly in size; furthermore, the majority of the ice crystals have rough surface features. PMID:25402925

  3. On the possibility of using X-ray Compton scattering to study magnetoelectrical properties of crystals.

    PubMed

    Collins, S P; Laundy, D; Connolley, T; van der Laan, G; Fabrizi, F; Janssen, O; Cooper, M J; Ebert, H; Mankovsky, S

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of using Compton scattering--an inelastic X-ray scattering process that yields a projection of the electron momentum density--to probe magnetoelectrical properties. It is shown that an antisymmetric component of the momentum density is a unique fingerprint of such time- and parity-odd physics. It is argued that polar ferromagnets are ideal candidates to demonstrate this phenomenon and the first experimental results are shown, on a single-domain crystal of GaFeO3. The measured antisymmetric Compton profile is very small (≃ 10(-5) of the symmetric part) and of the same order of magnitude as the statistical errors. Relativistic first-principles simulations of the antisymmetric Compton profile are presented and it is shown that, while the effect is indeed predicted by theory, and scales with the size of the valence spin-orbit interaction, its magnitude is significantly overestimated. The paper outlines some important constraints on the properties of the antisymmetric Compton profile arising from the underlying crystallographic symmetry of the sample. PMID:26919371

  4. Absorption and scattering properties of the Martian dust in the solar wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ockert-Bell, M. E.; Pollack, J. B.; McKay, C. P.; Forget, F.

    1997-01-01

    A new wavelength-dependent model of the single-scattering properties of the Martian dust is presented. The model encompasses the solar wavelengths (0.3 to 4.3 micrometers at 0.02 micrometer resolution) and does not assume a particular mineralogical composition of the particles. We use the particle size distribution, shape, and single-scattering properties at Viking Lander wavelengths presented by Pollack et al. [1995]. We expand the wavelength range of the aerosol model by assuming that the atmospheric dust complex index of refraction is the same as that of dust particles in the bright surface geologic units. The new wavelength-dependent model is compared to observations taken by the Viking Orbiter Infrared Thermal Mapper solar channel instrument during two dust storms. The model accurately matches afternoon observations and some morning observations. Some of the early morning observations are much brighter than the model results. The increased reflectance can be ascribed to the formation of a water ice shell around the dust particles, thus creating the water ice clouds which Colburn et al. [1989], among others, have predicted.

  5. Absorption and scattering properties of the Martian dust in the solar wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Ockert-Bell, M E; Bell JF 3rd; Pollack, J B; McKay, C P; Forget, F

    1997-04-25

    A new wavelength-dependent model of the single-scattering properties of the Martian dust is presented. The model encompasses the solar wavelengths (0.3 to 4.3 micrometers at 0.02 micrometer resolution) and does not assume a particular mineralogical composition of the particles. We use the particle size distribution, shape, and single-scattering properties at Viking Lander wavelengths presented by Pollack et al. [1995]. We expand the wavelength range of the aerosol model by assuming that the atmospheric dust complex index of refraction is the same as that of dust particles in the bright surface geologic units. The new wavelength-dependent model is compared to observations taken by the Viking Orbiter Infrared Thermal Mapper solar channel instrument during two dust storms. The model accurately matches afternoon observations and some morning observations. Some of the early morning observations are much brighter than the model results. The increased reflectance can be ascribed to the formation of a water ice shell around the dust particles, thus creating the water ice clouds which Colburn et al. [1989], among others, have predicted.

  6. The unique radar scattering properties of silicic lava flows and domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jeffrey J.; Stofan, Ellen R.; Anderson, Steven W.; Crown, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Silicic (silica-rich) lava flows, such as rhyolite, rhyodacite, and dacite, possess unique physical properties primarily because of the relatively high viscosity of the molten lava. Silicic flows tend to be thicker than basaltic flows, and the resulting large-scale morphology is typically a steep-sided dome or flow lobe, with aspect ratios (height/length) sometimes approaching unity. The upper surfaces of silicic domes and flows are normally emplaced as relatively cool, brittle slabs that fracture as they are extruded from the central vent areas, and are then rafted away toward the flow margin as a brittle carapace above a more ductile interior layer. This mode of emplacement results in a surface with unique roughness characteristics, which can be well-characterized by multiparameter synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations. In this paper, we examine the scattering properties of several silicic domes in the Inyo volcanic chain in the Eastern Sierra of California, using AIRSAR and TOPSAR data. Field measurements of intermediate-scale (cm to tens of m) surface topography and block size are used to assess the mechanisms of the scattering process, and to quantify the unique roughness characteristics of the flow surfaces.

  7. On the possibility of using X-ray Compton scattering to study magnetoelectrical properties of crystals

    PubMed Central

    Collins, S. P.; Laundy, D.; Connolley, T.; van der Laan, G.; Fabrizi, F.; Janssen, O.; Cooper, M. J.; Ebert, H.; Mankovsky, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of using Compton scattering – an inelastic X-ray scattering process that yields a projection of the electron momentum density – to probe magnetoelectrical properties. It is shown that an antisymmetric component of the momentum density is a unique fingerprint of such time- and parity-odd physics. It is argued that polar ferromagnets are ideal candidates to demonstrate this phenomenon and the first experimental results are shown, on a single-domain crystal of GaFeO3. The measured antisymmetric Compton profile is very small (≃ 10−5 of the symmetric part) and of the same order of magnitude as the statistical errors. Relativistic first-principles simulations of the antisymmetric Compton profile are presented and it is shown that, while the effect is indeed predicted by theory, and scales with the size of the valence spin–orbit interaction, its magnitude is significantly overestimated. The paper outlines some important constraints on the properties of the antisymmetric Compton profile arising from the underlying crystallographic symmetry of the sample. PMID:26919371

  8. Elastic wave scattering to characterize heterogeneities in the borehole environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiao-Ming; Li, Zhen; Hei, Chuang; Su, Yuan-Da

    2016-04-01

    Scattering due to small-scale heterogeneities in the rock formation surrounding a wellbore can significantly change the acoustic waveform from a logging measurement which in turn can be used to characterize the formation heterogeneities. This study simulates the elastic heterogeneity scattering in monopole and dipole acoustic logging and analyse the resulting effects on the waveforms. The results show that significant coda waves are generated in both monopole and dipole waveforms and the dipole coda is dominated by S-to-S scattering, which can be effectively utilized to diagnose the heterogeneity in the rock formation. The coda wave modelling and analysis were used to characterize dipole acoustic data logged before and after fracturing a reservoir interval, with significant coda wave in the after-fracturing data indicating fracturing-induced heterogeneous property change in the rock volume surrounding the borehole.

  9. Scattering and polarization properties of the scarab beetle Cyphochilus insulanus cuticle.

    PubMed

    Åkerlind, Christina; Arwin, Hans; Hallberg, Tomas; Landin, Jan; Gustafsson, Johan; Kariis, Hans; Järrendahl, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Optical properties of natural photonic structures can inspire material developments in diversified areas, such as the spectral design of surfaces for camouflage. Here, reflectance, scattering, and polarization properties of the cuticle of the scarab beetle Cyphochilus insulanus are studied with spectral directional hemispherical reflectance, bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF) measurements, and Mueller-matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry (MMSE). At normal incidence, a reflectance (0.6-0.75) is found in the spectral range of 400-1600 nm and a weaker reflectance <0.2 in the UV range as well as for wavelengths >1600  nm. A whiteness of W=42 is observed for mainly the elytra of the beetle. Chitin is a major constituent of the insect cuticle which is verified by the close similarity of the measured IR spectrum to that of α-chitin. The BRDF signal shows close-to-Lambertian properties of the beetle for visible light at small angles of incidence. From the MMSE measurement it is found that the beetles appear as dielectric reflectors reflecting linearly polarized light at oblique incidence with low gloss and a low degree of polarization. The measured beetle properties are properties that can be beneficial in a camouflage material. PMID:26193149

  10. A database of microwave and sub-millimetre ice particle single scattering properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelund, Robin; Eriksson, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Ice crystal particles are today a large contributing factor as to why cold-type clouds such as cirrus remain a large uncertainty in global climate models and measurements. The reason for this is the complex and varied morphology in which ice particles appear, as compared to liquid droplets with an in general spheroidal shape, thus making the description of electromagnetic properties of ice particles more complicated. Single scattering properties of frozen hydrometers have traditionally been approximated by representing the particles as spheres using Mie theory. While such practices may work well in radio applications, where the size parameter of the particles is generally low, comparisons with measurements and simulations show that this assumption is insufficient when observing tropospheric cloud ice in the microwave or sub-millimetre regions. In order to assist the radiative transfer and remote sensing communities, a database of single scattering properties of semi-realistic particles is being produced. The data is being produced using DDA (Discrete Dipole Approximation) code which can treat arbitrarily shaped particles, and Tmatrix code for simpler shapes when found sufficiently accurate. The aim has been to mainly cover frequencies used by the upcoming ICI (Ice Cloud Imager) mission with launch in 2022. Examples of particles to be included are columns, plates, bullet rosettes, sector snowflakes and aggregates. The idea is to treat particles with good average optical properties with respect to the multitude of particles and aggregate types appearing in nature. The database will initially only cover macroscopically isotropic orientation, but will eventually also include horizontally aligned particles. Databases of DDA particles do already exist with varying accessibility. The goal of this database is to complement existing data. Regarding the distribution of the data, the plan is that the database shall be available in conjunction with the ARTS (Atmospheric

  11. Property evaluation of thermal sprayed metallic coating by acoustic emission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Asako; Mizutani, Yoshihiro; Takemoto, Mikio; Ono, Kanji

    2000-03-01

    The authors analyzed acoustic emission signals from plasma sprayed sheets by first obtaining the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and density. The sheets of a high Cr-Ni alloy (55Cr-41Ni-Mo, Si, B) were made by low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS) and heat treated. Utilizing laser induced surface acoustic waves (SAWs), the group velocity dispersion data of Rayleigh waves was obtained and matched to that computed by Adler's matrix transfer method. They monitored the acoustic emissions (Lamb waves) produced by microfractures in free standing as sprayed coating subjected to bending. Fast cleavage type microfracture with source rise time of around 2 {micro}s occurred as precursors to the final brittle fracture. The velocity and time-frequency amplitude spectrograms (wavelet contour maps) of the Lamb waves were utilized for the source location and fracture kinetic analyses.

  12. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  13. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  14. Scattering properties of Saturn's rings in the far ultraviolet from Cassini UVIS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, E. Todd; Colwell, Joshua E.; Esposito, Larry W.

    2013-07-01

    We use Cassini UVIS data to determine the scattering properties of Saturn's ring particles in the FUV. We have replaced the scattering function from the classical Chandrasekhar single scattering radiative transfer equation for reflectance with a ring wake model for the A and B rings derived from stellar occultations. The free parameters in this model are the ring particle Bond albedo, AB, and the ring particle asymmetry parameter, g, which equals the cosine of the most probable scattering angle of a photon from a ring particle. The spectrum of Saturn's rings from 140 to 190 nm shows an absorption feature due to water ice shortward of 165 nm. We compare our model values for I/F to lit-side data at 155 nm and at 180 nm for regions in both the A and B rings. We used the unmodified Chandrasekhar model for the C ring and Cassini Division, and in all cases we determined AB and g in the FUV for the first time. Values of AB vary between 0.04 and 0.091 at 180 nm and between 0.012 and 0.019 at 155 nm. The variations across the ring of AB at 180 nm is consistent with a greater abundance of non-ice contaminant in the C ring and Cassini Division and a minimum in contaminant abundance in the outer B ring. There is little variation in AB at 155 nm across the rings, which suggests that the reflectance of the water ice and non-water ice material shortward of the 165 nm absorption edge are about the same. Values of g vary between -0.68 and -0.78 at 180 nm and between -0.63 and -0.77 at 155 nm showing that the ring particles are highly backscattering in the FUV. We find that the wavelength of the absorption feature varies with ring region and viewing geometry indicating a different photon mean path length, L, through the outer layer of the ring particle (Bradley, E.T., Colwell, J.E., Esposito, L.W., Cuzzi, J.N., Tollerud, H., Chambers, L. [2010]. Icarus 206 (2), 458-466). We compared I/F from 152 to 185 nm to a radiative transfer spectral model developed by Shkuratov et al

  15. Tunable wideband bandstop acoustic filter based on two-dimensional multiphysical phenomena periodic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-García, V.; Sánchez-Pérez, J. V.; Garcia-Raffi, L. M.

    2011-07-01

    The physical properties of a periodic distribution of absorbent resonators is used in this work to design a tunable wideband bandstop acoustic filter. Analytical and numerical simulations as well as experimental validations show that the control of the resonances and the absorption of the scatterers along with their periodic arrangement in air introduce high technological possibilities to control noise. Sound manipulation is perhaps the most obvious application of the structures presented in this work. We apply this methodology to develop a device as an alternative to the conventional acoustic barriers with several properties from the acoustical point of view but also with additional esthetic and constructive characteristics.

  16. Monitoring Microbe-Induced Physical Property Changes Using High-Frequency Acoustic Waveform Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. H.; Brockman, F. J.; Johnson, L. R.

    2002-12-01

    A laboratory investigation was undertaken to determine the effect of microbially generated gas in controlled, saturated sediment columns utilizing a novel technique involving acoustic wave propagation. Specifically, the effect of N2 gas production and the resulting hypothesized plugging of pore throats by gas bubbles was evaluated during denitrification by Pseudomonas stutzeri in pre-sterilized sediment columns. The propagation of high frequency acoustic waves through the sediment columns was used to locate those regions in the column where gas accumulation occurred. Over a period of six weeks, regions of gas accumulation resulted in the attenuation of acoustic wave energies with the decreases in amplitude typically greater than one order of magnitude. The temporal production of N2 gas was evaluated quantitatively using the stable isotope 15N in the form of added Na15NO3. This was done to ascertain the origin (biotic or abiotic) of any produced gas with the results showing a dramatic increase in microbe-respired 15N2. Hydraulic conductivity (Ks) measurements made over the experimental period establish the rate and degree of pore throat blocking with the result being a reduction in Ks by more than 70 percent. The results were compared to a nutrient-amended but non-inoculated control column which showed neither a decrease in acoustic wave amplitudes nor hydraulic conductivity over the same time-period. Final destructive analysis of one column was performed in order to assess the cell density of denitrifying microbes throughout the column. Cell densities were found to be in close agreement with the stoichiometric predictions made prior to initiation of the experiment. Evaluation of the multiple data sets suggests that microbial gas production is both directly detectable using the high frequency acoustic wave approach and capable of significantly altering saturated flow conditions. The acoustic approach may be useful for time-course monitoring of locations of high

  17. Piezoelectric surface acoustical phonon amplification in graphene on a GaAs substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, O. A. C.

    2014-06-01

    We study the interaction of Dirac Fermions in monolayer graphene on a GaAs substrate in an applied electric field by the combined action of the extrinsic potential of piezoelectric surface acoustical phonons of GaAs (piezoelectric acoustical (PA)) and of the intrinsic deformation potential of acoustical phonons in graphene (deformation acoustical (DA)). We find that provided the dc field exceeds a threshold value, emission of piezoelectric (PA) and deformation (DA) acoustical phonons can be obtained in a wide frequency range up to terahertz at low and high temperatures. We found that the phonon amplification rate RPA ,DA scales with TBGS -1 (S =PA,DA), TBGS being the Block -Gru¨neisen temperature. In the high-T Block -Gru¨neisen regime, extrinsic PA phonon scattering is suppressed by intrinsic DA phonon scattering, where the ratio RPA/RDA scales with ≈1/√n , n being the carrier concentration. We found that only for carrier concentration n ≤1010cm-2, RPA/RDA>1. In the low-T Block -Gru¨neisen regime, and for n =1010cm-2, the ratio RPA/RDA scales with TBGDA/TBGPA≈7.5 and RPA/RDA>1. In this regime, PA phonon dominates the electron scattering and RPA/RDA<1 otherwise. This study is relevant to the exploration of the acoustic properties of graphene and to the application of graphene as an acoustical phonon amplifier and a frequency-tunable acoustical phonon device.

  18. Holographic interpretation of acoustic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xian-Hui; Sun, Jia-Rui; Tian, Yu; Wu, Xiao-Ning; Zhang, Yun-Long

    2015-10-01

    With the attempt to find the holographic description of the usual acoustic black holes in fluid, we construct an acoustic black hole formed in the d -dimensional fluid located at the timelike cutoff surface of a neutral black brane in asymptotically AdSd +1 spacetime; the bulk gravitational dual of the acoustic black hole is presented at the first order of the hydrodynamic fluctuation. Moreover, the Hawking-like temperature of the acoustic black hole horizon is showed to be connected to the Hawking temperature of the real anti-de Sitter (AdS) black brane in the bulk, and the duality between the phonon scattering in the acoustic black hole and the sound channel quasinormal mode propagating in the bulk perturbed AdS black brane is extracted. We thus point out that the acoustic black hole appearing in fluid, which was originally proposed as an analogous model to simulate Hawking radiation of the real black hole, is not merely an analogy, it can indeed be used to describe specific properties of the real AdS black holes, in the spirit of the fluid/gravity duality.

  19. Elastic properties of aspirin in its crystalline and glassy phases studied by micro-Brillouin scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Lee, Kwang-Sei; Ike, Yuji; Kojima, Seiji

    2008-11-01

    The acoustic waves propagating along the direction perpendicular to the (1 0 0) cleavage plane of aspirin crystal were investigated using micro-Brillouin spectroscopy from which C11, C55 and C66 were obtained. The temperature dependence of the longitudinal acoustic waves could be explained by normal anharmonic lattice models, while the transverse acoustic waves showed an abnormal increase in the hypersonic attenuation at low temperatures indicating their coupling to local remnant dynamics. The sound velocity as well as the attenuation of the longitudinal acoustic waves of glassy aspirin showed a substantial change at ˜235 K confirming a transition from glassy to supercooled liquid state in vitreous aspirin.

  20. Design of a broadband ultra-large area acoustic cloak based on a fluid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Chen, Tianning; Liang, Qingxuan; Wang, Xiaopeng; Jiang, Ping

    2014-10-01

    A broadband ultra-large area acoustic cloak based on fluid medium was designed and numerically implemented with homogeneous metamaterials according to the transformation acoustics. In the present work, fluid medium as the body of the inclusion could be tuned by changing the fluid to satisfy the variant acoustic parameters instead of redesign the whole cloak. The effective density and bulk modulus of the composite materials were designed to agree with the parameters calculated from the coordinate transformation methodology by using the effective medium theory. Numerical simulation results showed that the sound propagation and scattering signature could be controlled in the broadband ultra-large area acoustic invisibility cloak, and good cloaking performance has been achieved and physically realized with homogeneous materials. The broadband ultra-large area acoustic cloaking properties have demonstrated great potentials in the promotion of the practical applications of acoustic cloak.