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Sample records for acoustic seafloor discrimination

  1. Seafloor monitoring west of Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea) using the acoustic ground discrimination system RoxAnn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hass, H. Christian; Mielck, Finn; Fiorentino, Dario; Papenmeier, Svenja; Holler, Peter; Bartholomä, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Marine habitats of shelf seas are in constant dynamic change and therefore need regular assessment particularly in areas of special interest. In this study, the single-beam acoustic ground discrimination system RoxAnn served to assess seafloor hardness and roughness, and combine these parameters into one variable expressed as RGB (red green blue) color code followed by k-means fuzzy cluster analysis (FCA). The data were collected at a monitoring site west of the island of Helgoland (German Bight, SE North Sea) in the course of four surveys between September 2011 and November 2014. The study area has complex characteristics varying from outcropping bedrock to sandy and muddy sectors with mostly gradual transitions. RoxAnn data enabled to discriminate all seafloor types that were suggested by ground-truth information (seafloor samples, video). The area appears to be quite stable overall; sediment import (including fluid mud) was detected only from the NW. Although hard substrates (boulders, bedrock) are clearly identified, the signal can be modified by inclination and biocover. Manually, six RoxAnn zones were identified; for the FCA, only three classes are suggested. The latter classification based on `hard' boundaries would suffice for stakeholder issues, but the former classification based on `soft' boundaries is preferred to meet state-of-the-art scientific objectives.

  2. Seafloor monitoring west of Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea) using the acoustic ground discrimination system RoxAnn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hass, H. Christian; Mielck, Finn; Fiorentino, Dario; Papenmeier, Svenja; Holler, Peter; Bartholomä, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Marine habitats of shelf seas are in constant dynamic change and therefore need regular assessment particularly in areas of special interest. In this study, the single-beam acoustic ground discrimination system RoxAnn served to assess seafloor hardness and roughness, and combine these parameters into one variable expressed as RGB (red green blue) color code followed by k-means fuzzy cluster analysis (FCA). The data were collected at a monitoring site west of the island of Helgoland (German Bight, SE North Sea) in the course of four surveys between September 2011 and November 2014. The study area has complex characteristics varying from outcropping bedrock to sandy and muddy sectors with mostly gradual transitions. RoxAnn data enabled to discriminate all seafloor types that were suggested by ground-truth information (seafloor samples, video). The area appears to be quite stable overall; sediment import (including fluid mud) was detected only from the NW. Although hard substrates (boulders, bedrock) are clearly identified, the signal can be modified by inclination and biocover. Manually, six RoxAnn zones were identified; for the FCA, only three classes are suggested. The latter classification based on `hard' boundaries would suffice for stakeholder issues, but the former classification based on `soft' boundaries is preferred to meet state-of-the-art scientific objectives.

  3. Development of the seafloor acoustic ranging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Y.; Kido, M.; Fujimoto, H.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a seafloor acoustic ranging system, which simulates an operation with the DONET (Development of Dense Ocean-floor Network System for Earthquake and Tsunami) cable, to monitor seafloor crustal movement. The seafloor acoustic ranging system was based on the precise acoustic transponder (PXP). We have a few problems for the improvement of the resolution. One thing is the variation of sound speed. Another is the bending of ray path. A PXP measures horizontal distances on the seafloor from the round trip travel times of acoustic pulses between pairs of PXP. The PXP was equipped with the pressure, temperature gauge and tilt-meter. The variation of sound speed in seawater has a direct effect on the measurement. Therefore we collect the data of temperature and pressure. But we don't collect the data of salinity because of less influence than temperature and pressure. Accordingly a ray path of acoustic wave tends to be bent upward in the deep sea due to the Snell's law. As the acoustic transducer of each PXPs held about 3.0m above the seafloor, the baseline is too long for altitude from the seafloor. In this year we carried out the experiment for the seafloor acoustic ranging system. We deployed two PXPs at about 750m spacing on Kumano-nada. The water depth is about 2050m. We collected the 660 data in this experiment during one day. The round trip travel time show the variation with peak-to-peak amplitude of about 0.03msec. It was confirmed to explain the majority in this change by the change in sound speed according to the temperature and pressure. This results shows the resolution of acoustic measurements is +/-2mm. Acknowledgement This study is supported by 'DONET' of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

  4. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  5. Development of precision acoustic transponders for GPS/Acoustic observation on the deep seafloor near the Japan Trench axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, H.; Kido, M.

    2012-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake has let most of researchers recognize the importance of seafloor geodetic observation, especially near the trench axis. Iinuma et al. (2012a) estimated the coseismic slip distribution combining onshore GPS data with the seafloor geodetic data. Their results reveal that a huge (> 50 m) slip occurred in a small area (about 40 km in width and 120 km in length) near the Japan Trench and generated the huge tsunami. After the Tohoku-oki earthquake, seismic coupling near the trench axis has become a key to understand giant earthquakes in subduction zones, and it is GPS/Acoustic (GPS/A) repeated seafloor positioning that can give an observational constraint to it. Observation of postseimic deformation is another and urgent task required in the Japan Trench. Seafloor geodetic observation indicates posteseimic deformation near the Japan Trench axis in the north and south of the huge slip area (Iinuma et al., 2012b). The result is clearly different from that of onshore GPS observation. Postseismic deformation is estimated to be a key observation that can discriminate proper models from several ones that can explain the occurrence of the mega thrust. Tohoku University plans to deploy extensive GPS/A observation array along the Japan Trench in 2012 with a fund from MEXT, Japan, to cope with these requests (Kido et al., in this meeting). Precision acoustic transponders have newly been developed for the array to enable the following three requests: (1) observation on the deep seafloor, (2) compatibility among three institutions in Japan, and (3) observation for ten years. The first is the observation on the deep seafloor near the trench. While the Japan Trench axis is deeper than 7000 m, the existing GPS/A sites along the Japan Trench have remained on the seafloor shallower than 2500 m except the one nearest to the trench, where we observed coseismic slip of 31 m (Kido et al., 2011). We deployed 4 units of the new transponders supplied by Kaiyo

  6. Novel Acoustic Scattering Processes for Target Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    acoustic signal using algorithms originally developed for high-frequency acoustical holography [11]. Data is only acquired by scanning a hydrophone ...by the application of a back-propagation algorithm based on the methods of acoustic holography . Selected results relevant to the interpretation of...Novel Acoustic Scattering Processes for Target Discrimination Philip L. Marston Physics and Astronomy Dept., Washington State University, Pullman

  7. GPS-Acoustic Seafloor Geodesy using a Wave Glider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwell, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    The conventional approach to implement the GPS-Acoustic technique uses a ship or buoy for the interface between GPS and Acoustics. The high cost and limited availability of ships restricts occupations to infrequent campaign-style measurements. A new approach to address this problem uses a remote controlled, wave-powered sea surface vehicle, the Wave Glider. The Wave Glider uses sea-surface wave action for forward propulsion with both upward and downward motions producing forward thrust. It uses solar energy for power with solar panels charging the onboard 660 W-h battery for near continuous operation. It uses Iridium for communication providing command and control from shore plus status and user data via the satellite link. Given both the sea-surface wave action and solar energy are renewable, the vehicle can operate for extended periods (months) remotely. The vehicle can be launched from a small boat and can travel at ~ 1 kt to locations offshore. We have adapted a Wave Glider for seafloor geodesy by adding a dual frequency GPS receiver embedded in an Inertial Navigation Unit, a second GPS antenna/receiver to align the INU, and a high precision acoustic ranging system. We will report results of initial testing of the system conducted at SIO. In 2014, the new approach will be used for seafloor geodetic measurements of plate motion in the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The project is for a three-year effort to measure plate motion at three sites along an East-West profile at latitude 44.6 N, offshore Newport Oregon. One site will be located on the incoming plate to measure the present day convergence between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates and two additional sites will be located on the continental slope of NA to measure the elastic deformation due to stick-slip behavior on the mega-thrust fault. These new seafloor data will constrain existing models of slip behavior that presently are poorly constrained by land geodetic data 100 km from the deformation front.

  8. Deep Seafloor Acoustic Backscattering Measurements Using Sea Beam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    seafloor down to maximum ocean depth (11 km). Since 1977 when the first system became operational aboard the French R/V Jean Charcot , nine other...Geological Observatory), Surveyor (National Oceanographic • and Atmospheric Administration), and Jean Charcot (IFREMER). Sea Beam •investigators who...1967. Renard, V. and J. P. Allenou, Seabeam, multi-beam echo-sounding in " Jean Charcot " . Description, evaluation and first results, Internat’l

  9. Discrimination and identification of acoustic transient patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballas, J. A.; Howard, J. H., Jr.

    1981-08-01

    The relation between the discrimination and the identification of acoustic patterns can be addressed psychophysically or cognitively. The psychophysical approach predicts a monotonic relationship between performance on the two tasks. Cognitively, the relationship may depend upon the type of structure encoded from the patterns. Structure based upon similarities in runs could enhance discrimination but degrade identification. Hierarchical structural encoding might enhance both tasks. The relationship was investigated in three dual task experiments. In one experiment, trial and error learning was used whereas in the other two, observation of positive examples was used. All three experiments indicated that discrimination was superior to identification, and that the concurrent identification task improved discrimination performance above what has been obtained in single task discrimination studies. The effects of structure in the two tasks were equivocal but implied that the type of structured encoding is important and may be influenced by the procedure used to acquire the patterns.

  10. Estimation of spatiotemporal variation of acoustic velocity in ocean and its modeling for GPS/Acoustic seafloor positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, S.; Tadokoro, K.; Ikuta, R.; Watanabe, T.; Okuda, T.; Sayanagi, K.; Miyata, K.; Nagao, T.

    2009-12-01

    We have been developing an observation system with the GPS/Acoustic combination technique for monitoring of seafloor crustal deformation. We installed two sets of triangular array of acoustic transponders as geodetic reference sites on the Suruga trough, central Japan, where the Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath the Eurasian plate at a rate of 2 cm/yr. In our campaign observation, we measured ranges to acoustic transponders from an on-board acoustic transducer whose position was determined by kinematic GPS. Repeated our campaign observations can reveal directly seafloor crustal deformation in focal area of subduction zone. Present analysis method simultaneously estimates temporal variation of acoustic velocity and positions of acoustic transponders assuming the horizontally-layered structure of acoustic velocity. However, actual structure might have stable spatial variation due to oceanic current and internal wave. The stable spatial variation causes bias error on the positioning. For reduction of the bias error and shortening observation time, we should measure and/or estimate the spatial variation of acoustic velocity. In this presentation, for an investigation of horizontal scales of the spatial variation of acoustic velocity, we estimated spectrum of oceanic internal wave using by continuous measurements of temperature and pressure in ocean. In addition, we evaluate a new seafloor positioning method which simultaneously estimates spatiotemporal variation of acoustic velocity through numerical experiments. The continuous measurements in parallel with acoustic ranging were conducted by mooring temperature and pressure sensors attached rope with an interval of 50 m. The continuous measurements were made for five hours with a sampling interval of three seconds in each day in August and October 2008. For reduction of measurement noise, we carried out two-dimensional B-spline fitting of temperature and pressure with ABIC minimization. By the fitting, we

  11. Tools to evaluate seafloor integrity: comparison of multi-device acoustic seafloor classifications for benthic macrofauna-driven patterns in the German Bight, southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, Peter; Markert, Edith; Bartholomä, Alexander; Capperucci, Ruggero; Hass, H. Christian; Kröncke, Ingrid; Mielck, Finn; Reimers, H. Christian

    2016-12-01

    To determine the spatial resolution of sediment properties and benthic macrofauna communities in acoustic backscatter, the suitability of four acoustic seafloor classification devices (single-beam echosounder with RoxAnn and QTC 5.5 seafloor classification system, sidescan sonar with QTC Swathview seafloor classification, and multi-beam echosounder with QTC Swathview seafloor classification) was compared in a study area of approx. 6 km2 northwest of the island of Helgoland in the German Bight, southern North Sea. This was based on a simple similarity index between simultaneous sidescan sonar, single-beam echosounder and multi-beam echosounder profiling spanning the period 2011-2014. The results show a high similarity between seafloor classifications based on sidescan sonar and RoxAnn single-beam systems, in turn associated with a lower similarity for the multi-beam echosounder system. Analyses of surface sediment samples at 39 locations along four transects (0.1 m2 Van Veen grab) revealed the presence of sandy mud (southern and western parts), coarse sand, gravel and cobbles. Rock outcrops were identified in the north-eastern and eastern parts. A typical Nucula nitidosa-Abra alba community was found in sandy muds to muddy sands in the northern part, whereas the southern part is characterised by widespread occurrence of the ophiuroid brittle star Amphiura filiformis. A transitional N. nitidosa-A. filiformis community was detected in the central part. Moreover, the southern part is characterised by a high abundance of A. filiformis and its commensal bivalve Kurtiella bidentata. The high number of A. filiformis feeding arms (up to ca. 6,800 per m2) can largely explain the gentle change of backscatter intensity along the tracks, because sediment composition and/or seafloor structures showed no significant variability.

  12. Tools to evaluate seafloor integrity: comparison of multi-device acoustic seafloor classifications for benthic macrofauna-driven patterns in the German Bight, southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, Peter; Markert, Edith; Bartholomä, Alexander; Capperucci, Ruggero; Hass, H. Christian; Kröncke, Ingrid; Mielck, Finn; Reimers, H. Christian

    2017-04-01

    To determine the spatial resolution of sediment properties and benthic macrofauna communities in acoustic backscatter, the suitability of four acoustic seafloor classification devices (single-beam echosounder with RoxAnn and QTC 5.5 seafloor classification system, sidescan sonar with QTC Swathview seafloor classification, and multi-beam echosounder with QTC Swathview seafloor classification) was compared in a study area of approx. 6 km2 northwest of the island of Helgoland in the German Bight, southern North Sea. This was based on a simple similarity index between simultaneous sidescan sonar, single-beam echosounder and multi-beam echosounder profiling spanning the period 2011-2014. The results show a high similarity between seafloor classifications based on sidescan sonar and RoxAnn single-beam systems, in turn associated with a lower similarity for the multi-beam echosounder system. Analyses of surface sediment samples at 39 locations along four transects (0.1 m2 Van Veen grab) revealed the presence of sandy mud (southern and western parts), coarse sand, gravel and cobbles. Rock outcrops were identified in the north-eastern and eastern parts. A typical Nucula nitidosa- Abra alba community was found in sandy muds to muddy sands in the northern part, whereas the southern part is characterised by widespread occurrence of the ophiuroid brittle star Amphiura filiformis. A transitional N. nitidosa- A. filiformis community was detected in the central part. Moreover, the southern part is characterised by a high abundance of A. filiformis and its commensal bivalve Kurtiella bidentata. The high number of A. filiformis feeding arms (up to ca. 6,800 per m2) can largely explain the gentle change of backscatter intensity along the tracks, because sediment composition and/or seafloor structures showed no significant variability.

  13. Heterogeneous interplate coupling along the Nankai Trough, Japan, detected by GPS-acoustic seafloor geodetic observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Sato, Mariko; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Saito, Hiroaki; Ujihara, Naoto; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Toyama, Shin-ichi; Fujita, Masayuki; Yabuki, Tetsuichiro; Mochizuki, Masashi; Asada, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The recurring devastating earthquake that occurs in the Nankai Trough subduction zone between the Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian plate has the potential to cause an extremely dangerous natural disaster in the foreseeable future. Many previous studies have assumed interplate-coupling ratios for this region along the trench axis using onshore geodetic data in order to understand this recursive event. However, the offshore region that has the potential to drive a devastating tsunami cannot be resolved sufficiently because the observation network is biased to the land area. Therefore, the Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department of Japan constructed a geodetic observation network on the seafloor along the Nankai Trough using a GPS-acoustic combination technique and has used it to observe seafloor crustal movements directly above the Nankai Trough subduction zone. We have set six seafloor sites and cumulated enough data to determine the displacement rate from 2006 to January 2011. Our seafloor geodetic observations at these sites revealed a heterogeneous interplate coupling that has three particular features. The fast displacement rates observed in the easternmost area indicate strong interplate coupling (>75%) around not only the future Tokai earthquake source region but also the Paleo-Zenisu ridge. The slow displacement rates near the trench axis in the Kumano-nada Sea, a shallow part of the 1944 Tonankai earthquake source region, show a lower coupling ratio (50% to 75%). The slow displacement rate observed in the area shallower than the 1946 Nankaido earthquake source region off Cape Muroto-zaki reflects weakening interplate coupling (about 50%) probably due to a subducting seamount. Our observations above the subducting ridge and seamount indicate that the effect of a subducting seamount on an interplate-coupling region depends on various conditions such as the geometry of the seamount and the friction parameters on the plate boundary.

  14. Bathymetry, acoustic backscatter, and seafloor character of Farallon Escarpment and Rittenburg Bank, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Finlayson, David P.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Coastal and Marine Geology Program acquired bathymetry and acoustic-backscatter data along the upper slope of the Farallon Escarpment and Rittenburg Bank within the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary offshore of the San Francisco Bay area. The surveys were funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program to identify potential deep sea coral habitat prior to planned sampling efforts. Bathymetry and acoustic-backscatter data can be used to map seafloor geology (rock, sand, mud), and slope of the sea floor, both of which are useful for the prediction of deep sea coral habitat. The data also can be used for the prediction of sediment and contaminant budgets and transport, and for the assessment of earthquake and tsunami hazards. The surveys were conducted aboard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Marine Sanctuary Program’s 67-foot-long research vessel Fulmar outfitted with a U.S. Geological Survey 100-kHz Reson 7111 multibeam-echosounder system. This report provides the bathymetry and backscatter data acquired during these surveys, interpretive seafloor character maps in several formats, a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata.

  15. Spatial Variability of Seafloor and Shallow Sub-surface Acoustic Properties, Shallow Water Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orange, D.; Garcia-Garcia, A.; Orange, A.; Henning, A.; Broillete, D.; Martin, P.; Brouillete, T.; Shiffer, R.; Willias, J.; Henderson, D.; Jewell, M.; McGuire, M.; Willias, S.; Tapia, J.; Spear, C.; Monsalve, B.

    2007-12-01

    In June 2007 we carried out the first of two ONR field programs aboard the R/V 'Pelican' designed to evaluate variations in seafloor and shallow sub-surface acoustic properties at three sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The follow-up field program is scheduled for January, 2008, and will use the same boat and same systems to survey the same sites to determine whether there are any seasonal variations in the datasets as well spatial variability between the sites. Data acquisition includes multibeam bathymetry, multibeam backscatter, side scan sonar, and sub-bottom profiling. In addition to temporal (seasonal) and spatial variations, we are examining the differences in acoustic signature of the seafloor at different frequencies. The three areas of interest in this two-year program are: (1) off the coast of Louisiana, west of Atchafalaya Bay, at the site of the ONR multi-year research program 'Mechanism of Fluid-Mud Interactions Under Waves' (MURI), (2) off Panama city, Florida in an area of known sub-surface features and (3) off Louisiana's Southwest Pass in an area of where mudflows triggered by Hurricanes Ivan and Katrina destroyed or damaged platforms and pipelines (West Delta). Water depths in the areas of interest range from 3.5 to 96 m. Preliminary analysis of the data indicates spatial differences between and within the sites. Within individual sites there are differences in the data as a function of the frequencies used to map the seafloor. Off Southwest Pass we find differences in mudflow character associated with a known dredge site suggesting a possible anthropogenic component to mudflow sourcing and level of activity.

  16. GPS/acoustic seafloor geodetic observation in the subduction zone around Japan (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.; Kido, M.; Tadokoro, K.; Fujimoto, H.

    2013-12-01

    GPS/acoustic (GPS/A) seafloor geodetic observation is a precise seafloor positioning technique and has made great progress over the last decade. GPS/A observation determines the positions of acoustic mirror-type transponders installed on the seafloor by combining the two techniques of kinematic GPS and acoustic ranging through a ship or a buoy. The original idea was proposed by Prof. Spiess at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1985 and its protocol and hardware were made through research and development of his group by the mid-1990s. In Japan, three research groups, Japan Coast Guard, Tohoku University and Nagoya University, began to develop the GPS/A observation system in the 1990s, established GPS/A observation sites mainly on the landward slope of the plate boundaries around Japan, such as the Japan Trench and the Nankai trough, and have been carrying out campaign observations since around 2000. The primary purpose of our observation is to detect and monitor the crustal deformation caused by the subduction of the oceanic plate near the plate boundary where large interplate earthquakes have repeatedly occurred. By continuous efforts for over a decade, the positioning precision has achieved a few centimeters and seafloor movements such as intraplate deformation and coseismic displacements have been successfully detected. In particular, regarding the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (M9.0), which occurred off northeastern Japan on March 11, 2011, east-southeastward coseismic displacements of up to 31 m were observed above the focal region, especially close to the epicenter, while those detected by on-land GPS measurements over 100 km away from the epicenter, conducted by the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan, was up to 5.3 m. Coseismic slip models on the plate boundary estimated from not only GPS data but also GPS/A results indicate that a huge slip of more than 50 m generated close to the trench axis, which was much larger than that estimated from GPS

  17. Novel Acoustic Scattering Processes for Target Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    based on acoustic holography algorithms): It has been possible to form images from data acquired as noted in item (2) by the application of a back...propagation algorithm based on the methods of acoustic holography . Selected results relevant to the interpretation of Bistatic SAS images are noted...to back-propagate the sampled acoustic signal using algorithms originally developed for high-frequency acoustical holography [10]. Data is only

  18. GPS/acoustic Seafloor Geodetic Observations Near the Nankai Trough Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, K.; Yasuda, K.; Fujii, C.; Watanabe, T.; Nagai, S.

    2013-12-01

    The GPS/acoustic seafloor geodetic observation system, which uses precise acoustic ranging and kinematic GPS positioning techniques, has been developed as a useful tool for observing seafloor crustal deformations associated with plate convergence and with earthquakes that occurred in ocean area including the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake of Mw 9.0. Our research group installed eight seafloor benchmarks for this observation system in source areas of anticipated major interplate earthquakes along the Nankai Trough, off southwestern Japan. We have performed campaign measurement for 4-8 years until the end of 2012. The error of displacement rate is almost 5 mm/y through the monitoring for more than four years. At the northern-most potion of the Nankai (Suruga) Trough, the observed steady horizontal displacement rate is 45 mm/y toward west. Also no significant velocity difference is observed across the trough, indicating strong interplate locking up to the shallowest segments. On the other hand, site velocities are 40 mm/y in the direction of N75W at the central region of the Nankai trough, 70-90 km landward from the trough axis. Although this result is the strong evidence for interplate locking, with coupling ratios of 60-80% on the basis of the back-slip model, it has no resolution for the interplate locking at the most-shallowest segments whose depths are 0-10 km. In other words, seaward up-dip limit of locked zone is never resolved from the present seafloor benchmark network [Tadokoro et al., 2012] . Large co-seismic slips larger than 40-50 m on the shallowest interplate segment [Ito et al., 2011; Fujii et al., 2011; Iinuma et al., 2012] are the cause of the unexpected high tsunami that has attacked the pacific coasts of the Tohoku region during the Tohoku-oki Earthquake; it is, therefore, essential to understand slip deficit or strain accumulation condition near the trench axis, also for the anticipated mega-thrust earthquake at the Nankai Trough. For this reason, we

  19. Time-dependent seafloor acoustic backscatter (10-100 kHz).

    PubMed

    Sternlicht, Daniel D; de Moustier, Christian P

    2003-11-01

    A time-dependent model of the acoustic intensity backscattered by the seafloor is described and compared with data from a calibrated, vertically oriented, echo-sounder operating at 33 and 93 kHz. The model incorporates the characteristics of the echo-sounder and transmitted pulse, and the water column spreading and absorption losses. Scattering from the water-sediment interface is predicted using Helmholtz-Kirchhoff theory, parametrized by the mean grain size, the coherent reflection coefficient, and the strength and exponent of a power-law roughness spectrum. The composite roughness approach of Jackson et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 79, 1410-1422 (1986)], modified for the finite duration of the transmitted signal, is used to predict backscatter from subbottom inhomogeneities. It depends on the sediment's volume scattering and attenuation coefficients, as well as the interface characteristics governing sound transmission into the sediment. Estimation of model parameters (mean grain size, roughness spectrum strength and exponent, volume scattering coefficient) reveals ambiguous ranges for the two spectral components. Analyses of model outputs and of physical measurements reported in the literature yield practical constraints on roughness spectrum parameter settings appropriate for echo-envelope-based sediment classification procedures.

  20. In-situ geophysical measurements in marine sediments: Applications in seafloor acoustics and paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgas, Thomas Joerg

    Acoustic in-situ sound speeds and attenuation were measured on the Eel River shelf, CA, with the Acoustic Lance between 5 and 15 kHz to 2.0 meters below seafloor (mbsf). A comparison with laboratory ultrasonic geoacoustic data obtained at 400 kHz on cored sediments showed faster in-situ and ultrasonic sound speeds in coarse-grained deposits in water depths to 60 m than in fine-grained deposits below that contour line. Ultrasonic attenuation was often greater than in-situ values and remained almost constant below 0.4 mbsf in these heterogeneous deposits. In-situ attenuation decreased with depth. These observations partly agree with results from other field studies, and with theoretical models that incorporate intergranular friction and dispersion from viscosity as main controls on acoustic wave propagation in marine sediments. Deviations among in-situ and laboratory acoustic data from the Eel Margin with theoretical studies were linked to scattering effects. Acoustic Lance was also deployed in homogeneous, fine-grained sediments on the inner shelf of SE Korea, where free gas was identified in late-September, but not in mid-September 1999. Free gas was evidenced by an abrupt decrease of in-situ sound speed and by characteristic changes in acoustic waveforms. These results suggest the presence of a gassy sediment layer as shallow as 2 mbsf along the 70 m bathymetry line, and was attributed to a variable abundance of free gas on short-term and/or small-regional scales on the SE Korea shelf. Bulk density variations in marine sediments obtained along the Walvis Ridge/Basin, SW Africa, at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 1081 to 1084 were spectral-analyzed to compute high-resolution sedimentation rates (SRs) in both the time- and age domains by correctly identifying Milankovitch cycles (MCs). SRs for the ODP sites yielded age-depth models that often correlate positively with biostratigraphic data and with organic mass accumulation rates (MAR Corg), a proxy for

  1. On the stability of horizontal positions of acoustic transponders for seafloor geodesy deployed on thick sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, H.; Sweeney, A. D.; Uchida, N.; Miura, S.; Koizumi, K.

    2002-12-01

    The Japan Trench east of northeastern Japan is an appropriate site for the study of seismic coupling in subduction zones. The Pacific plate is subducted there at an average convergence rate of 85 mm/year, and large earthquakes occur there at relatively short intervals. For example, earthquakes off Miyagi Prefecture in northeastern Japan occur at intervals of 26 to 42 years with an average of 37 years between events. The seismic coupling, however, has been estimated to be less than 40 percent (Kawasaki et al., 2001). Leveling data support the hypothesis that post-seismic deformation is an important contributor to the low seismic coupling (Uyeda, 2002). Planning to make in situ observations of seismic coupling and motion of the Pacific Plate near the Japan Trench (about 200 km from the coast), we deployed three precision acoustic transponders (PXPs) in 2001 on both the Pacific plate (70 km from the trench axis at a depth of 5450 m) and the landward slope (70 km from the axis at a depth of 2800 m). The PXP system was developed for the full ocean depth in collaboration with a group at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Fujimoto et al., 2001). We have also demonstrated an accuracy of 2-3 cm for the sea-surface kinematic GPS positioning at a baseline length of 350 km (Miura et al., 2002). One of the remaining questions is how well the acoustic transponders are anchored to the old oceanic crust underlying thick sediment. The acoustic transducer is mounted one meter above the seafloor. If the transponder frame tilts by 1 degree due to differential settling, the horizontal position of the transducer shifts by 1.7 cm. Horizontal motion of the transponder independent of real crustal motion is undesirable. We have confirmed the anchor stability through visual inspection of PXPs deployed on the Pacific Plate seaward of the Japan Trench. We recently replaced the original PXPs with new ones due to a hardware problem in the old design. Three new PXPs were deployed from the

  2. High-Frequency CTD Measurements for Accurate GPS/acoustic Sea-floor Crustal Deformation Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, K.; Yasuda, K.; Taniguchi, S.; Uemura, Y.; Matsuhiro, K.

    2015-12-01

    The GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement system has developed as a useful tool to observe tectonic deformation especially at subduction zones. One of the factors preventing accurate GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement is horizontal heterogeneity of sound speed in the ocean. It is therefore necessary to measure the gradient directly from sound speed structure. We report results of high-frequency CTD measurements using Underway CTD (UCTD) in the Kuroshio region. We perform the UCTD measurements on May 2nd, 2015 at two stations (TCA and TOA) above the sea-floor benchmarks installed across the Nankai Trough, off the south-east of Kii Peninsula, middle Japan. The number of measurement points is six at each station along circles with a diameter of 1.8 nautical miles around the sea-floor benchmark. The stations TCA and TOA are located on the edge and the interior of the Kuroshio current, respectively, judging from difference in sea water density measured at the two stations, as well as a satellite image of sea-surface temperature distribution. We detect a sound speed gradient of high speeds in the southern part and low speeds in the northern part at the two stations. At the TCA station, the gradient is noticeable down to 300 m in depth; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 5 m/s. The sound speed difference is as small as +/- 1.3 m/s at depths below 300 m, which causes seafloor benchmark positioning error as large as 1 m. At the TOA station, the gradient is extremely small down to 100 m in depth. The maximum difference in sound speed is less than +/- 0.3 m/s that is negligible small for seafloor benchmark positioning error. Clear gradient of high speed is observed to the depths; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 0.8-0.9 m/s, causing seafloor benchmark positioning error of several tens centimeters. The UCTD measurement is effective tool to detect sound speed gradient. We establish a method for accurate sea-floor

  3. Monitoring of seafloor crustal deformation using GPS/Acoustic technique along the Nankai Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, K.; Tadokoro, K.; Ikuta, R.; Watanabe, T.; Fujii, C.; Matsuhiro, K.; Sayanagi, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor crustal deformation is crucial for estimating the interplate locking at the shallow subduction zone and has been carried out at subduction margins in Japan, e.g., Japan Trench and Nankai Trough [Sato et al., 2011; Tadokoro et al., 2012]. Iinuma et al. [2012] derived slip distributions during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake using GPS/Acoustic data and on-land GPS data. The result showed that maximum slip is more than 85 m near the trench axis. The focal area along the Nankai trough extended to the trough axis affected this earthquake by cabinet office, government of Japan.  We monitored seafloor crustal deformation along the Nankai trough, Japan. Observation regions are at the eastern end of Nankai trough (named Suruga trough) and at the central Nankai trough. We established and monitored by two sites across the trough at each region. In the Suruga trough region, we repeatedly observed from 2005 to 2013. We observed 13 and 14 times at a foot wall side (SNE) and at a hanging wall side (SNW), respectively. We estimated the displacement velocities with relative to the Amurian plate from the result of repeated observation. The estimated displacement velocity vectors at SNE and SNW are 42±8 mm/y to N94±3˚W direction and 39±11 mm/y to N84±9˚W direction, respectively. The directions are the same as those measured at the on-land GPS stations. The magnitudes of velocity vector indicate significant shortening by approximately 4 mm/y between SNW and on-land GPS stations at hanging wall side of the Suruga Trough. This result shows that the plate interface at the northernmost Suruga trough is strongly locked. In the central Nankai trough region, we established new two stations across the central Nankai trough (Both stations are about 15km distance from trough) and observed only three times, August 2013, January 2014, and June 2014. We report the results of monitoring performed in this year.

  4. Novel Acoustic Scattering Processes for Target Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-31

    Astronomy Department Washington State University Pullman, WA 99164-2814 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER N00014-10-1-0093-FR 9. SPONSORING... Astronomy Department, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2814 Phone: (509) 335-5343, Fax: (509) 335-7816, E-Mail: marston@wsu.edu Table...Target Discrimination (2010) Philip L. Marston Physics and Astronomy Dept., Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2814 phone: (509) 335

  5. Age-related decline in emotional prosody discrimination: acoustic correlates.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Rachel L C; Kingston, Rachel A

    2014-01-01

    It is now accepted that older adults have difficulty recognizing prosodic emotion cues, but it is not clear at what processing stage this ability breaks down. We manipulated the acoustic characteristics of tones in pitch, amplitude, and duration discrimination tasks to assess whether impaired basic auditory perception coexisted with our previously demonstrated age-related prosodic emotion perception impairment. It was found that pitch perception was particularly impaired in older adults, and that it displayed the strongest correlation with prosodic emotion discrimination. We conclude that an important cause of age-related impairment in prosodic emotion comprehension exists at the fundamental sensory level of processing.

  6. Intensive sound speed monitoring in ocean and its impact on the GPS/acoustic seafloor geodetic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Motoyuki

    2016-04-01

    GPS/acoustic (GPS/A) technique, based on GPS positioning and acoustic ranging, is now getting a popular tool to measure seafloor crustal movement. Several groups in the world have been intensively conducted campaign surveys in the region of scientifically interest. As the technology of measurement has been matured and plenty of data are accumulated, researchers are now aware of the limit of its precision mainly due to unexpected undulation of sound speed in ocean, which significantly degrades acoustic ranging. If sound speed structure keeps its figure during survey period, e.g., more than a couple of hours, it can be estimated by a moving survey to get sufficient paths from various directions to illustrate the structure. However the sound speed structure often varies quickly with in a hour due to internal gravitational wave excited by interaction of tidal current and seafloor topography. In this case one cannot separate temporal and spatial variations. We revisited our numerous sound speed profile data derived from numbers of XBT measurements, which were concurrently carried out with GPS/A survey along the Nankai Trough and Japan Trench. Among the measurements, we found notably short-period variation in sound speed profile through intensive XBT survey repeatedly cast every 6 minutes for one hour, which also appeared in residuals in traveltime of acoustic ranging. The same feature is also found in more moderate rate for semidiurnal undulation, in which vertical oscillation of the middle of the profile can be clearly seen rather than variation of absolute sound speed. This also reflects traveltime residuals in the GPS/A measurement. These typical frequencies represent dominant wavelengths of spatial sound speed variation. In the latter, local horizontal variation can be negligible in the vicinity of a point survey area and the traditional analysis can be applicable that assumes time-varying stratified sound speed structure. In the former case, on the contrary, local

  7. Perceptual susceptibility to acoustic manipulations in speaker discrimination.

    PubMed

    Sell, Gregory; Suied, Clara; Elhilali, Mounya; Shamma, Shihab

    2015-02-01

    Listeners' ability to discriminate unfamiliar voices is often susceptible to the effects of manipulations of acoustic characteristics of the utterances. This vulnerability was quantified within a task in which participants determined if two utterances were spoken by the same or different speakers. Results of this task were analyzed in relation to a set of historical and novel parameters in order to hypothesize the role of those parameters in the decision process. Listener performance was first measured in a baseline task with unmodified stimuli, and then compared to responses with resynthesized stimuli under three conditions: (1) normalized mean-pitch; (2) normalized duration; and (3) normalized linear predictive coefficients (LPCs). The results of these experiments suggest that perceptual speaker discrimination is robust to acoustic changes, though mean-pitch and LPC modifications are more detrimental to a listener's ability to successfully identify same or different speaker pairings. However, this susceptibility was also found to be partially dependent on the specific speaker and utterances.

  8. Nonlinear seismo-acoustic land mine detection and discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donskoy, Dimitri; Ekimov, Alexander; Sedunov, Nikolay; Tsionskiy, Mikhail

    2002-06-01

    A novel technique for detection and discrimination of artificial objects, such as land mines, pipes, containers, etc., buried in the ground, has been developed and tested. The developed approach utilizes vibration (using seismic or airborne acoustic waves) of buried objects, remote measurements of soil surface vibration (using laser or microwave vibrometers), and processing of the measured vibration to extract mine's "vibration signatures." The technique does not depend upon the material from which the mine is fabricated whether it be metal, plastic, wood, or any other material. It depends upon the fact that a mine is a "container" whose purpose is to contain explosive materials and associated detonation apparatus. The mine container is in contact with the soil in which it is buried. The container is an acoustically compliant article, whose compliance is notably different from the compliance of the surrounding soil. Dynamic interaction of the compliant container and soil on top of it leads to specific linear and nonlinear effects used for mine detection and discrimination. The mass of the soil on top of a compliant container creates a classical mass-spring system with a well-defined resonance response. Besides, the connection between mass (soil) and spring (mine) is not elastic (linear) but rather nonlinear, due to the separation of the soil/mine interface in the tensile phase of applied dynamic stress. These two effects, constituting the mine's vibration signature have been measured in numerous laboratory and field tests, which proved that the resonance and nonlinear responses of a mine/soil system can be used for detection and discrimination of buried mines. Thus, the fact that the mine is buried is turned into a detection advantage. Because the seismo-acoustic technique intrinsically detects buried containers, it can discriminate mines from noncompliant false targets such as rocks, tree roots, chunks of metal, bricks, etc. This was also confirmed experimentally

  9. Seafloor Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürgmann, Roland; Chadwell, David

    2014-05-01

    Seafloor geodetic techniques allow for measurements of crustal deformation over the ˜70% of Earth's surface that is inaccessible to the standard tools of tectonic geodesy. Precise underwater measurement of position, displacement, strain, and gravity poses technical, logistical, and cost challenges. Nonetheless, acoustic ranging; pressure sensors; underwater strain-, tilt- and gravimeters; and repeat multibeam sonar and seismic measurements are able to capture small-scale or regional deformation with approximately centimeter-level precision. Pioneering seafloor geodetic measurements offshore Japan, Cascadia, and Hawaii have substantially contributed to advances in our understanding of the motion and deformation of oceanic tectonic plates, earthquake cycle deformation in subduction zones, and the deformation of submarine volcanoes. Nontectonic deformation related to down-slope mass movement and underwater extraction of hydrocarbons or other resources represent other important targets. Recent technological advances promise further improvements in precision as well as the development of smaller, more autonomous, and less costly seafloor geodetic systems.

  10. Seismic and Acoustic Studies from a Seafloor Array on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Mark Armstrong

    This dissertation consists of two related but separate studies, one a refraction seismic study of the oceanic crust and the other an acoustic study of whale behavior in the presence of noise, both using seafloor array data. The goal of the first study was to measure the lateral thickness variability in the extrusive volcanic layer on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The Juan de Fuca Ridge is a medium rate (6 cm per year full rate), active spreading center, separating the Juan de Fuca and Pacific plates. It is a site of volcanic eruptions, associated with creation of new oceanic crust, and hydrothermal vents which are important in the chemical balance of the oceans. To better understand the mechanisms controlling hydrothermal venting and the creation of new crust, a seismic refraction survey was conducted over a 20 km by 30 km area of the ridge. This survey, conducted in August of 1990, used airguns as energy sources and ocean bottom seismometers as recorders. A 3-dimensional traveltime inversion was used to interpret extrusive volcanic layer thickness changes of 300 m, occurring over less than several kilometers laterally. These thickness changes are interpreted as lava accumulations on the low side of listric faults in an episodic spreading system. The traveltime inversion also reveals a large horizontal seismic velocity anisotropy which is confined to the upper 500 m of crust. Compressional velocities are 3.35 km/s in the ridge strike direction and 2.25 km/s across strike. This anisotropy is believed to be caused by oriented fractures within the extrusive layer. The second study involved the tracking and analysis of whale vocalizations which were recorded on the array 10 percent of the time. The goal was to determine if noises such as generated by the airguns, shipping or earthquakes affected the behavior of these fin and blue whales. The vocalization patterns allow analysis of swimming speed, direction, respiration cycle and call interaction. While no clear noise

  11. Acoustic mapping of the regional seafloor geology in and around Hawaiian ocean dredged-material disposal sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torresan, Michael E.; Gardner, James V.

    2000-01-01

    During January and February 1998 the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Team (USGS) conducted regional high-resolution multibeam mapping surveys of the area surrounding EPA-designated ocean disposal sites located offshore of the Hawaiian Islands of Oahu, Kauai, Maui, and Hawaii. The sites are all located within 5 nautical miles of shore on insular shelves or slopes. Regional maps were required of areas much larger than the disposal sites themselves to assess both the regional seafloor geology and the immediate vicinity of the disposal sites. The purpose of the disposal site surveys was to delimit the extent of disposal material by producing detailed bathymetric and backscatter maps of the seafloor with a ± 1 m spatial accuracy and <1% depth error. The advantage of using multibeam over conventional towed, single-beam sidescan sonar is that the multibeam data are accurately georeferenced for precise location of all imaged features. The multibeam produces a coregistered acoustic-backscatter map that is often required to locate individual disposal deposits. These data were collected by the USGS as part of its regional seafloor mapping and in support of ocean disposal site monitoring studies conducted in cooperation with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE).

  12. Predicting spatial kelp abundance in shallow coastal waters using the acoustic ground discrimination system RoxAnn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielck, F.; Bartsch, I.; Hass, H. C.; Wölfl, A.-C.; Bürk, D.; Betzler, C.

    2014-04-01

    Kelp forests represent a major habitat type in coastal waters worldwide and their structure and distribution is predicted to change due to global warming. Despite their ecological and economical importance, there is still a lack of reliable spatial information on their abundance and distribution. In recent years, various hydroacoustic mapping techniques for sublittoral environments evolved. However, in turbid coastal waters, such as off the island of Helgoland (Germany, North Sea), the kelp vegetation is present in shallow water depths normally excluded from hydroacoustic surveys. In this study, single beam survey data consisting of the two seafloor parameters roughness and hardness were obtained with RoxAnn from water depth between 2 and 18 m. Our primary aim was to reliably detect the kelp forest habitat with different densities and distinguish it from other vegetated zones. Five habitat classes were identified using underwater-video and were applied for classification of acoustic signatures. Subsequently, spatial prediction maps were produced via two classification approaches: Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and manual classification routine (MC). LDA was able to distinguish dense kelp forest from other habitats (i.e. mixed seaweed vegetation, sand, and barren bedrock), but no variances in kelp density. In contrast, MC also provided information on medium dense kelp distribution which is characterized by intermediate roughness and hardness values evoked by reduced kelp abundances. The prediction maps reach accordance levels of 62% (LDA) and 68% (MC). The presence of vegetation (kelp and mixed seaweed vegetation) was determined with higher prediction abilities of 75% (LDA) and 76% (MC). Since the different habitat classes reveal acoustic signatures that strongly overlap, the manual classification method was more appropriate for separating different kelp forest densities and low-lying vegetation. It became evident that the occurrence of kelp in this area is not

  13. Seafloor crustal movement observed off Miyagi after the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake using GPS-Acoustic observation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Y.; Kido, M.; Ito, Y.; Ohta, Y.; Hino, R.; Fujimoto, H.

    2012-12-01

    Large interplate earthquake repeatedly occurred in Japan Trench. Recently, the detail crustal deformation revealed by the nation-wide inland GPS network called as GEONET by GSI. However, the maximum displacement region for interplate earthquake is mainly located offshore region. Based on this background, we has been developed a GPS-Acoustic observation (GPS-A) system for the seafloor crustal deformation monitoring. A major earthquake struck in Japan Trench on March 11, 2011, named as the "2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku earthquake" (here after 2011 Tohoku earthquake). Kido et al (2011) investigated the coseismic seafloor deformation by the GPS-A system. They reported the 15 and 31m coseismic displacements in GJT4, and GJT3, respectively. Both sites moved toward ESE direction, which is opposite direction of the plate subduction. These results suggested the heterogeneity of the coseismic slip distribution in the plate interface [e.g. Iinuma et al. 2012]. After such large earthquake, the large postseismic deformation is also expected which may be caused by the afterslip for short (~several year) time period. The spatial coverage of the GPS/A sites is still not enough because of we have only two sites in and around the focal area. For more detail information for the postseismic deformation, we has been deployed one more GPS/A site (GJT1) from 2011 May. We observed 4 times for the GJT3 for postseismic deformation in 2011 April, August, October, and 2012 July. As the result of 3 campaigns, we obtained 1.2 m displacement toward the ENE direction in GJT3. It is clearly larger than the displacement expected from the postseismic slip inferred from inland GEONET time series (Ozawa et al., 2012). It suggests that the estimated postseismic slip based on the inland GPS data may underestimate the actual postseismic slip amount in the offshore region. Iinuma et al. (this meeting) constructed a postseismic slip distribution using onshore and seafloor displacement (GPS/Acoustic

  14. Acoustic measurement method of the volume flux of a seafloor hydrothermal plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Measuring fluxes (volume, chemical, heat, etc.) of the deep sea hydrothermal vents has been a crucial but challenging task faced by the scientific community since the discovery of the vent systems. However, the great depths and complexities of the hydrothermal vents make traditional sampling methods laborious and almost daunting missions. Furthermore, the samples, in most cases both sparse in space and sporadic in time, are hardly enough to provide a result with moderate uncertainty. In September 2010, our Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar System (COVIS, http://vizlab.rutgers.edu/AcoustImag/covis.html) was connected to the Neptune Canada underwater ocean observatory network (http://www.neptunecanada.ca) at the Main Endeavour vent field on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. During the experiment, the COVIS system produced 3D images of the buoyant plume discharged from the vent complex Grotto by measuring the back-scattering intensity of the acoustic signal. Building on the methodology developed in our previous work, the vertical flow velocity of the plume is estimated from the Doppler shift of the acoustic signal using geometric correction to compensate for the ambient horizontal currents. A Gaussian distribution curve is fitted to the horizontal back-scattering intensity profile to determine the back-scattering intensity at the boundary of the plume. Such a boundary value is used as the threshold in a window function for separating the plume from background signal. Finally, the volume flux is obtained by integrating the resulting 2D vertical velocity profile over the horizontal cross-section of the plume. In this presentation, we discuss preliminary results from the COVIS experiment. In addition, several alternative approaches are applied to determination of the accuracy of the estimated plume vertical velocity in the absence of direct measurements. First, the results from our previous experiment (conducted in 2000 at the same vent complex using a

  15. Results from an Integrated Optical/Acoustic Communication System Installed at CORK 857D: Implications for Future Seafloor Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, M.; Farr, N.; Ware, J.; Pontbriand, C.

    2011-12-01

    A CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) borehole represents all of the basic components required for a seafloor observatory: a stable environment for long-term continuous measurements of earth and ocean phenomena, access to a unique environment below the seafloor under controlled conditions (e.g. hydrologically sealed), and a standard interface for communication. Typically, however, due to power constraints and a limited frequency of data download opportunities, data sampling has been limited to rates on the order of several minutes. For full seismic wave sampling, at least 1 Hz or better is required. While some CORK systems are now being connected to an underwater cable to provide continuous power and real-time data (cf. Neptune network in the Northeast Pacific), there will be locations where cabled observatories are not viable. Another mode of communication is required to enable both high data rate communication and access for data download via more conventional vessels and not limited to those with ROV or submersibles. We here report on technology to enable high data rate download and transfer of data and information using underwater optical communications, which can be accomplished from a surface vessel of opportunity or, in the future, by autonomous underwater vehicle. In 2010, we successfully deployed and tested an underwater optical communication system that provides high data rate communications over a range of 100 meters from a deep sea CORK borehole observatory located in the northeast Pacific at IODP Hole 857D. The CORK is instrumented with a thermistor string and pressure sensors that record downhole formation pressures and temperatures within oceanic basement and is pressure sealed from the overlying water column. The seafloor Optical Telemetry System (OTS) was plugged into the CORK's existing underwater matable connector to provide an optical and acoustic communication interface and additional data storage and battery power for the CORK to sample

  16. Analysis of Backscatter and Seafloor Acoustical Properties across deepwater sandwaves in Cook Strait, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurton, X.; Lamarche, G.

    2011-12-01

    Central Cook Strait, New Zealand presents a variety of geological landforms subjected to intense hydrodynamic conditions. A comprehensive EM300 multibeam coverage of the strait was used to develop a method to objectively characterise the seafloor substrate. Specific post-processing was applied to the backscatter data to correct the signal from sensor bias, and was completed by correlating a quantitative description of backscatter with the field data. The final calibrated Backscattering Strength (BS) provides information on the physical characteristics of the seafloor. The BS imagery was used for both qualitative and quantitative interpretation, and give access to a level of detail higher than with conventional multibeam bathymetry. We developed a functional descriptive model of the physical BS angular response, describing satisfactorily the various typical BS responses met over Cook Strait and providing a first-order interpretation of the substrate composition. The full model needs 6 input parameters, but a practical classification can be obtained with only two (the BS value at 45° and the specular-to-oblique contrast). We analyse the BS angular response of sandwaves and erosional bedforms typically met in the central Cook Strait. The sandwave fields occur in 200-350 m of water depth and exhibit large-scale topographical features (wavelengths 100 - 250 m; vertical amplitudes 2 - 10 m). They are conspicuous in the backscatter imagery, and analysing their BS variations according to topography is specially informative. The BS level has a sharp minimum at the wave crests and is maximal inside the troughs, with a typical dynamics of 6 dB. Such a variation cannot be explained by the dependence on incident angle retrieved from local high-resolution bathymetry. Hence we infer that the reflectivity variations observed on the sandwaves are due to sediment facies changes, from fine to coarse sand in this case. This is corroborated by the fact that some sandwave fields with

  17. A scanning acoustic microscope discriminates cancer cells in fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Katsutoshi; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) discriminates lesions in sections by assessing the speed of sound (SOS) or attenuation of sound (AOS) through tissues within a few minutes without staining; however, its clinical use in cytological diagnosis is unknown. We applied a thin layer preparation method to observe benign and malignant effusions using SAM. Although SAM is inferior in detecting nuclear features than light microscopy, it can differentiate malignant from benign cells using the higher SOS and AOS values and large irregular cell clusters that are typical features of carcinomas. Moreover, each single malignant cell exhibits characteristic cytoplasmic features such as a large size, irregular borders and secretory or cytoskeletal content. By adjusting the observation range, malignant cells are differentiated from benign cells easily using SAM. Subtle changes in the functional and structural heterogeneity of tumour cells were pursuable with a different digital data of SAM. SAM can be a useful tool for screening malignant cells in effusions before light microscopic observation. Higher AOS values in malignant cells compared with those of benign cells support the feasibility of a novel sonodynamic therapy for malignant effusions.

  18. An acoustic startle-based method of assessing frequency discrimination in mice.

    PubMed

    Clause, Amanda; Nguyen, Tuan; Kandler, Karl

    2011-08-30

    The acoustic startle response (ASR) is a reflexive contraction of skeletal muscles in response to a loud, abrupt acoustic stimulus. ASR magnitude is reduced if the startle stimulus is preceded by a weaker acoustic or non-acoustic stimulus, a phenomenon known as prepulse inhibition (PPI). PPI has been used to test various aspects of sensory discrimination in both animals and humans. Here we show that PPI of the ASR is an advantageous method of assessing frequency discrimination. We describe the apparatus and its performance testing frequency discrimination in young CD1 mice. Compared to classical conditioning paradigms, PPI of the ASR is less time consuming, produces robust results, and can be used without training even in young animals. This approach can be used to investigate the neuronal mechanisms underlying frequency discrimination, its maturation during development, and its relationship to tonotopic organization.

  19. Employment of Adaptive Learning Techniques for the Discrimination of Acoustic Emissions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    8D-1Ai38 142 EMPLOYMENT OP ADAPTIVE LEARNING TECHNIQUES FOR THE I DISCRIMINATION OF ACOU..(U) GENERAL ELECTRIC CORPORATE U Ch, RESEARCH AND...OFSTNDRD-96- 1.5%. 111 11 :%____ 111. %I1~.~ 11 1 - 111 -- k. -Jr -. P. -L -. b. EMPLOYMENT OF ADAPTIVE LEARNING TECHNIQUESEli FOR THE DISCRIMINATION OF...8217Include Security Claaaaficatiano Employment of Adaptive * Learning Techniques for the Discrimination Of Acoustic Emissions (Unclassified) 12.’ PE SNAU.R S

  20. Comparison of navigation in ROV and AUV surveys with high frequency acoustic systems in deep seafloor hydrothermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bas, T.; Murton, B. J.; Webber, A.

    2013-12-01

    As high frequency acoustic waves are highly attenuated over short distances it is essential that all high resolution surveys must be conducted close to the seafloor. In the deep ocean (over 2500m) this means that the location of a survey vehicle compared to a ship's well constrained position has some significant issues. This paper compares various methods and results of a ROV and AUV multibeam survey over the Mid Cayman Spreading Centre hydrothermal vent sites. The results show the difficulties encountered in processing when navigation uncertainty is considerably higher than the resolution of survey data. For example the best ROV positional accuracy in 5000m water depth is about 10m using USBL, whereas high-frequency multibeam systems used on ROVs and AUVs has a resolution of 50cm or better. AUV location has different navigational challenges. While the continuous movement of an AUV during surveying provides a constant that can be modelled and used to correct any relative locational uncertainty, absolute positioning at sufficient precision and accuracy for swath mapping remains problematic. In response to these uncertainties, we present a method of navigation correction that provides high-precision, internally consistent positioning and external accuracy. Using features identified on overlapping near-bottom multibeam bathymetry swathes, a correlation can be made between adjacent survey tracks. Internal consistency of the survey can be achieved by matching contours of these features by warping adjacent swaths to fit one another. We find that contour matching is extremely effective as the human eye is particularly good at identifying similar feature patterns, and the contours allow control points to be identified at sufficient spatial resolution to match that of the swath data, and then co-located with lower resolution shipboard swath maps. Examples of swath data from a variety of AUV and ROV systems will be presented including those from the deepest hydrothermal vent

  1. Discriminative likelihood score weighting based on acoustic-phonetic classification for speaker identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Youngjoo; Kim, Hoirin

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a new discriminative likelihood score weighting technique is proposed for speaker identification. The proposed method employs a discriminative weighting of frame-level log-likelihood scores with acoustic-phonetic classification in the Gaussian mixture model (GMM)-based speaker identification. Experiments performed on the Aurora noise-corrupted TIMIT database showed that the proposed approach provides meaningful performance improvement with an overall relative error reduction of 15.8% over the maximum likelihood-based baseline GMM approach.

  2. The phase transformation of methane caused by pressure change during its rise from the seafloor revealed by video observation and acoustic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, C.

    2013-12-01

    Acoustic reflection depending on physical property differences among solid of methane hydrates and methane gas bubbles from seafloor and sea water.By sending ultrasonic waves from the transducer of an echo sounder or a sonar system through the water and measuring the echo of the back-scatterings from the methane hydrates or bubbles,it is possible that a visualized image of the methane plumes is displayed on the display of an echo sounder or a sonar system.Estimates of the amount of the methane plumes are extremely important for the global environment as part of the carbon cycle.The observations were carried out at Umitaka Spur and Joetsu knoll in the Sea of Japan every year since 2004. There are many methane plumes in the same ocean area. Thus, we investigate minutely about methane plumes in this study.In order to recognize estimates of the methane plumes, we observed the image of methane plumes using a remotely operated submarine vehicle (Hyper Dolphin, of the Japan Agency of Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)), and captured the methane bubble using a funnel.We observe the images of the methane plumes seeping points on the seafloor taken by a high-definition camera loaded in the vehicle, measure the surfacing velocity of the gushed methane plumes, and compute the surfacing velocity of the gas and solid substance using a theoretical formula.The observation was carried out at Umitaka Spur in the Japan Sea. The depth was 1000 m and the seawater temperature was 0.3 C°.From 3 seeping points, we gathered 300ml of methane in 643 seconds in the funnel with an opening of 20 cm in diameter.If it is assumed that the seeping points are equally scattered in the area, the seeping volume per unit area is 5.4×104cm3 per hour, which is 4.7×102m3 per year.The experiment in the ocean revealed the followings.The methane hydrate particles that are seeping out from seafloor are solid substances just above the seafloor.In the studied ocean area, 7.7×104m3 of methane

  3. Exploration of Acoustic Features for Automatic Vowel Discrimination in Spontaneous Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyson, Na'im R.

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to understand what acoustic/auditory feature sets motivated transcribers towards certain labeling decisions, I built machine learning models that were capable of discriminating between canonical and non-canonical vowels excised from the Buckeye Corpus. Specifically, I wanted to model when the dictionary form and the transcribed-form…

  4. Infants' Discrimination of Consonants: Interplay between Word Position and Acoustic Saliency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Stephanie L.; Zamuner, Tania; Engel, Kathleen; Fais, Laurel; Curtin, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that young infants use contrasting acoustic information to distinguish consonants. This has been used to argue that by 12 months, infants have homed in on their native language sound categories. However, this ability seems to be positionally constrained, with contrasts at the beginning of words (onsets) discriminated earlier.…

  5. Can humans discriminate between dogs on the base of the acoustic parameters of barks?

    PubMed

    Molnár, Csaba; Pongrácz, Péter; Dóka, Antal; Miklósi, Adám

    2006-07-01

    In this study we tested the often suggested claim that people are able to recognize their dogs by their barks. Earlier studies in other species indicated that reliable discrimination between individuals cannot be made by listening to chaotically noisy vocalizations. As barking is typically such a chaotic noisy vocalization, we have hypothesized that reliable discrimination between individuals is not possible by listening to barks. In this study, playback experiments were conducted to explore (1) how accurately humans discriminate between dogs by hearing only their barks, (2) the impact of the eliciting context of calls on these discrimination performances, and (3) how much such discrimination depends on acoustic parameters (tonality and frequency of barks, and the intervals between the individual barks). Our findings were consistent with the previous studies: human performances did not pass the empirical threshold of reliable discrimination in most cases. But a significant effect of tonality was found: discrimination between individuals was more successful when listeners were listening to low harmonic-to-noise ratio (HNR) barks. The contexts in which barks were recorded affected significantly the listeners' performances: if the dog barked at a stranger, listeners were able to discriminate the vocalizations better than if they were listening to sounds recorded when the dog was separated from its owner. It is rendered probable that the bark might be a more efficient communication system between humans and dogs for communicating the motivational state of an animal than for discrimination among strange individuals.

  6. No significant steady state surface creep along the North Anatolian Fault offshore Istanbul: Results of 6 months of seafloor acoustic ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakic, P.; Piété, H.; Ballu, V.; Royer, J.-Y.; Kopp, H.; Lange, D.; Petersen, F.; Özeren, M. S.; Ergintav, S.; Geli, L.; Henry, P.; Deschamps, A.

    2016-07-01

    The submarine Istanbul-Silivri fault segment, within 15 km of Istanbul, is the only portion of the North Anatolian Fault that has not ruptured in the last 250 years. We report first results of a seafloor acoustic ranging experiment to quantify current horizontal deformation along this segment and assess whether the segment is creeping aseismically or accumulating stress to be released in a future event. Ten transponders were installed to monitor length variations along 15 baselines. A joint least squares inversion for across-fault baseline changes, accounting for sound speed drift at each transponder, precludes fault displacement rates larger than a few millimeters per year during the 6 month observation period. Forward modeling shows that the data better fit a locked state or a very moderate surface creep—less than 6 mm/yr compared to a far-field slip rate of over 20 mm/yr—suggesting that the fault segment is currently accumulating stress.

  7. A photographic and acoustic transect across two deep-water seafloor mounds, Mississippi Canyon, northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, P.E.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Gardner, J.; Carney, R.S.; Fornari, D.

    2008-01-01

    In the northern Gulf of Mexico, a series of seafloor mounds lie along the floor of the Mississippi Canyon in Atwater Valley lease blocks 13 and 14. The mounds, one of which was drilled by the Chevron Joint Industry Project on Methane Hydrates in 2005, are interpreted to be vent-related features that may contain significant accumulations of gas hydrate adjacent to gas and fluid migration pathways. The mounds are located ???150 km south of Louisiana at ???1300 m water depth. New side-scan sonar data, multibeam bathymetry, and near-bottom photography along a 4 km northwest-southeast transect crossing two of the mounds (labeled D and F) reveal the mounds' detailed morphology and surficial characteristics. Mound D, ???250 m in diameter and 7-10 m in height, has exposures of authigenic carbonates and appears to result from a seafloor vent of slow-to-moderate flux. Mound F, which is ???400 m in diameter and 10-15 m high, is covered on its southwest flank by extruded mud flows, a characteristic associated with moderate-to-rapid flux. Chemosynthetic communities visible on the bottom photographs are restricted to bacterial mats on both mounds and mussels at Mound D. No indications of surficial gas hydrates are evident on the bottom photographs.

  8. Intermodal transfer in temporal discrimination. [of visual and acoustic stimuli duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warm, J. S.; Stutz, R. M.; Vassolo, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    This study determined if training for accuracy in temporal discrimination would transfer across sensory modalities. A fractionation method was used in which subjects bisected the durations of acoustic and visual signals at three standard intervals (6, 12, and 18 sec). Absolute error was the performance index. Half of the subjects were trained with acoustic stimuli and then tested in vision; the remainder were trained in vision and tested in audition. Similar negatively accelerated acquisition functions were noted for both modalities. Positive intermodal transfer, characterized by symmetry across modalities, was obtained at all standard durations. The results were considered to provide support for the notion that a common mechanism underlies temporal discriminations in different sensory systems.

  9. Sub-seafloor acoustic characterization of seamounts near the Ogasawara Fracture Zone in the western Pacific using chirp (3-7 kHz) subbottom profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, T.-G.; Hein, J.R.; Lee, Kenneth; Moon, J.-W.; Ko, Y.-T.

    2005-01-01

    A detailed analysis of chirp (3-7 kHz) subbottom profiles and bathymetry was performed on data collected from seamounts near the Ogasawara Fracture Zone (OFZ) in the western Pacific. The OFZ, which is a 150 km wide rift zone showing 600 km of right-lateral movement in a NW-SE direction, is unique among the fracture zones of the Pacific in that it includes many old seamounts (e.g., Magellan Seamounts and seamounts on Dutton Ridge). Sub-seafloor acoustic echoes on the seamounts are classified into nine specific types based on the nature and continuity of the echoes, subbottom structure, and morphology of the seafloor: (1) distinct echoes (types I-1, I-2, I-3), (2) indistinct echoes (types II-1, II-2, II-3), and (3) hyperbolic echoes (types III-1, III-2, III-3). Type I-2 pelagic sediments, characterized by thin and intermittent coverage, were probably deposited in topographically sheltered areas when bottom currents were strong, whereas type I-1 pelagic sediments accumulated during continuous and widespread sedimentation. Development of seamount flank rift zones in the OFZ may have been influenced by preexisting structures in the transform fracture zone at the time of volcanism, whereas those on Ita Mai Tai seamount in the Pigafetta Basin originated solely by edifice-building processes. Flank rift zones that formed by dike intrusions and eruptions played an important role in mass wasting. Mass-wasting processes included block faulting or block slides around the summit margin, sliding/slumping, debris flows, and turbidites, which may have been triggered by faulting, volcanism, dike injection, and weathering during various stages in the evolution of the seamounts. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Early acoustic discrimination experience ameliorates auditory processing deficits in male rats with cortical developmental disruption

    PubMed Central

    Threlkeld, Steven W.; Hill, Courtney A.; Rosen, Glenn D.; Fitch, R. Holly

    2014-01-01

    Auditory temporal processing deficits have been suggested to play a causal role in language learning impairments, and evidence of cortical developmental anomalies (microgyria (MG), ectopia) has been reported for language-impaired populations. Rodent models have linked these features, by showing deficits in auditory temporal discrimination for rats with neuronal migration anomalies (MG, ectopia). Since evidence from human studies suggests that training with both speech and non-speech acoustic stimuli may improve language performance in developmentally language-disabled populations, we were interested in whether/how maturation and early experience might influence auditory processing deficits seen in male rats with induced focal cortical MG. Results showed that for both simple (Normal single tone), as well as increasingly complex auditory discrimination tasks (Silent gap in white noise and FM sweep), prior experience significantly improved acoustic discrimination performance -- in fact, beyond improvements seen with maturation only. Further, we replicated evidence that young adult rats with MG were significantly impaired at discriminating FM sweeps compared to shams. However, these MG effects were no longer seen when experienced subjects were retested in adulthood (even though deficits in short duration FM sweep detection were seen for adult MG rats with no early experience). Thus while some improvements in auditory processing were seen with normal maturation, the effects of early experience were even more profound, in fact resulting in amelioration of MG effects seen at earlier ages. These findings support the clinical view that early training intervention with appropriate acoustic stimuli could similarly ameliorate long-term processing impairments seen in some language-impaired children. PMID:19460626

  11. Discrimination of acoustic patterns in rats using the water T-maze

    PubMed Central

    de la Mora, Daniela M.; Toro, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    The extraction of abstract rules and their generalization to new items has been proposed to be at the heart of higher cognitive functions such as language. Research with animals has shown that various species can extract rather complex patterns from the input, as well as establish abstract same/different relations. However, much of these findings have been observed after extensive training procedures. Here, we tested rats’ capacity to discriminate and generalize tone triplets that entailed a repetition from triplets that followed an ordinal, non-repeating pattern following a relatively short discrimination training procedure in a water T-maze. Our findings demonstrate that, under this procedure and after only 12 sessions, rats can learn to discriminate both patterns when a reliable difference in pitch variations is present across them (Experiment 1). When differences in pitch are eliminated (Experiment 2), no discrimination between patterns is found. Results suggest a procedure based on a water T-maze might be used to explore discrimination of acoustic patterns in rodents. PMID:25729120

  12. Female rhesus macaques discriminate unfamiliar paternal sisters in playback experiments: support for acoustic phenotype matching

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferle, Dana; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V.; Widdig, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Widespread evidence exists that when relatives live together, kinship plays a central role in shaping the evolution of social behaviour. Previous studies showed that female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) recognize familiar maternal kin using vocal cues. Recognizing paternal kin might, however, be more difficult as rhesus females mate promiscuously during the possible conception period, most probably concealing paternity. Behavioural observations indicate that semi free-ranging female rhesus macaques prefer to associate with their paternal half-sisters in comparison to unrelated females within the same group, particularly when born within the same age cohort. However, the cues and mechanism/s used in paternal kin discrimination remain under debate. Here, we investigated whether female rhesus macaques use the acoustic modality to discriminate between paternal half-sisters and non-kin, and tested familiarity and phenotype matching as the underlying mechanisms. We found that test females responded more often to calls of paternal half-sisters compared with calls of unrelated females, and that this discrimination ability was independent of the level of familiarity between callers and test females, which provides, to our knowledge, the first evidence for acoustic phenotype matching. Our study strengthens the evidence that female rhesus macaques can recognize their paternal kin, and that vocalizations are used as a cue. PMID:24225452

  13. Research on the acoustic scattering function and coherence properties from rough seafloor based on finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Bo; Yang, Yi-Xin; Ma, Yuan-Liang; Chen, Dong-Xu

    2016-12-01

    Acoustic scattering from a rough sea bottom is recognized as a main source of reverberation. In this study, scattering properties from a layered bottom were exploited based on the finite element model. The scattering strength and loss from the layered rough seabed were investigated by ensembling the realizations of rough interface. They were found to be dependent on the thickness of sediment, and interference was significant in the case of thin sediment. Through verification of the finite element model, the scattering loss could be evaluated using the Eckart model with a proper sound speed in the thick sediment. The multiple scattering effect on the sound field was also exploited. It revealed that the effect depended strongly on the bottom type. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61571366), the Natural Science Basic Research in Shaanxi Province of China (Grant No. 2015JQ5199), and the Fund of Science and Technology from the Underwater Test and Control Laboratory (Grant No. 9140c260201130c26096).

  14. Discrimination of speech stimuli based on neuronal response phase patterns depends on acoustics but not comprehension.

    PubMed

    Howard, Mary F; Poeppel, David

    2010-11-01

    Speech stimuli give rise to neural activity in the listener that can be observed as waveforms using magnetoencephalography. Although waveforms vary greatly from trial to trial due to activity unrelated to the stimulus, it has been demonstrated that spoken sentences can be discriminated based on theta-band (3-7 Hz) phase patterns in single-trial response waveforms. Furthermore, manipulations of the speech signal envelope and fine structure that reduced intelligibility were found to produce correlated reductions in discrimination performance, suggesting a relationship between theta-band phase patterns and speech comprehension. This study investigates the nature of this relationship, hypothesizing that theta-band phase patterns primarily reflect cortical processing of low-frequency (<40 Hz) modulations present in the acoustic signal and required for intelligibility, rather than processing exclusively related to comprehension (e.g., lexical, syntactic, semantic). Using stimuli that are quite similar to normal spoken sentences in terms of low-frequency modulation characteristics but are unintelligible (i.e., their time-inverted counterparts), we find that discrimination performance based on theta-band phase patterns is equal for both types of stimuli. Consistent with earlier findings, we also observe that whereas theta-band phase patterns differ across stimuli, power patterns do not. We use a simulation model of the single-trial response to spoken sentence stimuli to demonstrate that phase-locked responses to low-frequency modulations of the acoustic signal can account not only for the phase but also for the power results. The simulation offers insight into the interpretation of the empirical results with respect to phase-resetting and power-enhancement models of the evoked response.

  15. Discrimination of Speech Stimuli Based on Neuronal Response Phase Patterns Depends on Acoustics But Not Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Poeppel, David

    2010-01-01

    Speech stimuli give rise to neural activity in the listener that can be observed as waveforms using magnetoencephalography. Although waveforms vary greatly from trial to trial due to activity unrelated to the stimulus, it has been demonstrated that spoken sentences can be discriminated based on theta-band (3–7 Hz) phase patterns in single-trial response waveforms. Furthermore, manipulations of the speech signal envelope and fine structure that reduced intelligibility were found to produce correlated reductions in discrimination performance, suggesting a relationship between theta-band phase patterns and speech comprehension. This study investigates the nature of this relationship, hypothesizing that theta-band phase patterns primarily reflect cortical processing of low-frequency (<40 Hz) modulations present in the acoustic signal and required for intelligibility, rather than processing exclusively related to comprehension (e.g., lexical, syntactic, semantic). Using stimuli that are quite similar to normal spoken sentences in terms of low-frequency modulation characteristics but are unintelligible (i.e., their time-inverted counterparts), we find that discrimination performance based on theta-band phase patterns is equal for both types of stimuli. Consistent with earlier findings, we also observe that whereas theta-band phase patterns differ across stimuli, power patterns do not. We use a simulation model of the single-trial response to spoken sentence stimuli to demonstrate that phase-locked responses to low-frequency modulations of the acoustic signal can account not only for the phase but also for the power results. The simulation offers insight into the interpretation of the empirical results with respect to phase-resetting and power-enhancement models of the evoked response. PMID:20484530

  16. The discrimination of man-made explosions from earthquakes using seismo-acoustic analysis in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Il-Young; Jeon, Jeong-Soo

    2010-05-01

    Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) operates an infrasound network consisting of seven seismo-acoustic arrays in South Korea. Development of the arrays began in 1999, partially in collaboration with Southern Methodist University, with the goal of detecting distant infrasound signals from natural and anthropogenic phenomena in and around the Korean Peninsula. The main operational purpose of this network is to discriminate man-made seismic events from seismicity including thousands of seismic events per year in the region. The man-made seismic events are major cause of error in estimating the natural seismicity, especially where the seismic activity is weak or moderate such as in the Korean Peninsula. In order to discriminate the man-made explosions from earthquakes, we have applied the seismo-acoustic analysis associating seismic and infrasonic signals generated from surface explosion. The observations of infrasound at multiple arrays made it possible to discriminate surface explosion, because small or moderate size earthquake is not sufficient to generate infrasound. Till now we have annually discriminated hundreds of seismic events in seismological catalog as surface explosions by the seismo-acoustic analysis. Besides of the surface explosions, the network also detected infrasound signals from other sources, such as bolide, typhoons, rocket launches, and underground nuclear test occurred in and around the Korean Peninsula. In this study, ten years of seismo-acoustic data are reviewed with recent infrasonic detection algorithm and association method that finally linked to the seismic monitoring system of the KIGAM to increase the detection rate of surface explosions. We present the long-term results of seismo-acoustic analysis, the detection capability of the multiple arrays, and implications for seismic source location. Since the seismo-acoustic analysis is proved as a definite method to discriminate surface explosion, the analysis will be

  17. Neural codes for perceptual discrimination of acoustic flutter in the primate auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lemus, Luis; Hernández, Adrián; Romo, Ranulfo

    2009-01-01

    We recorded from single neurons of the primary auditory cortex (A1), while trained monkeys reported a decision based on the comparison of 2 acoustic flutter stimuli. Crucially, to form the decision, monkeys had to compare the second stimulus rate to the memory trace of the first stimulus rate. We found that the responses of A1 neurons encode stimulus rates both through their periodicity and through their firing rates during the stimulation periods, but not during the working memory and decision components of this task. Neurometric thresholds based on firing rate were very similar to the monkey's discrimination thresholds, whereas neurometric thresholds based on periodicity were lower than the experimental thresholds. Thus, an observer could solve this task with a precision similar to that of the monkey based only on the firing rates evoked by the stimuli. These results suggest that the A1 is exclusively associated with the sensory and not with the cognitive components of this task. PMID:19458263

  18. Implementation of algorithms to discriminate chemical/biological airbursts from high explosive airbursts utilizing acoustic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohil, Myron E.; Desai, Sachi; Morcos, Amir

    2006-05-01

    The Army is currently developing acoustic sensor systems that will provide extended range surveillance, detection, and identification for force protection and tactical security. A network of such sensors remotely deployed in conjunction with a central processing node (or gateway) will provide early warning and assessment of enemy threats, near real-time situational awareness to commanders, and may reduce potential hazards to the soldier. In contrast, the current detection of chemical/biological (CB) agents expelled into a battlefield environment is limited to the response of chemical sensors that must be located within close proximity to the CB agent. Since chemical sensors detect hazardous agents through contact, the sensor range to an airburst is the key-limiting factor in identifying a potential CB weapon attack. The associated sensor reporting latencies must be minimized to give sufficient preparation time to field commanders, who must assess if an attack is about to occur, has occurred, or if occurred, the type of agent that soldiers might be exposed to. The long-range propagation of acoustic blast waves from heavy artillery blasts, which are typical in a battlefield environment, introduces a feature for using acoustics and other sensor suite technologies for the early detection and identification of CB threats. Employing disparate sensor technologies implies that warning of a potential CB attack can be provided to the solider more rapidly and from a safer distance when compared to current conventional methods. Distinct characteristics arise within the different airburst signatures because High Explosive (HE) warheads emphasize concussive and shrapnel effects, while chemical/biological warheads are designed to disperse their contents over immense areas, therefore utilizing a slower burning, less intensive explosion to mix and distribute their contents. Highly reliable discrimination (100%) has been demonstrated at the Portable Area Warning Surveillance System

  19. Hybrid optical acoustic seafloor mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglis, Gabrielle

    The oceanographic research and industrial communities have a persistent demand for detailed three dimensional sea floor maps which convey both shape and texture. Such data products are used for archeology, geology, ship inspection, biology, and habitat classification. There are a variety of sensing modalities and processing techniques available to produce these maps and each have their own potential benefits and related challenges. Multibeam sonar and stereo vision are such two sensors with complementary strengths making them ideally suited for data fusion. Data fusion approaches however, have seen only limited application to underwater mapping and there are no established methods for creating hybrid, 3D reconstructions from two underwater sensing modalities. This thesis develops a processing pipeline to synthesize hybrid maps from multi-modal survey data. It is helpful to think of this processing pipeline as having two distinct phases: Navigation Refinement and Map Construction. This thesis extends existing work in underwater navigation refinement by incorporating methods which increase measurement consistency between both multibeam and camera. The result is a self consistent 3D point cloud comprised of camera and multibeam measurements. In map construction phase, a subset of the multi-modal point cloud retaining the best characteristics of each sensor is selected to be part of the final map. To quantify the desired traits of a map several characteristics of a useful map are distilled into specific criteria. The different ways that hybrid maps can address these criteria provides justification for producing them as an alternative to current methodologies. The processing pipeline implements multi-modal data fusion and outlier rejection with emphasis on different aspects of map fidelity. The resulting point cloud is evaluated in terms of how well it addresses the map criteria. The final hybrid maps retain the strengths of both sensors and show significant improvement over the single modality maps and naively assembled multi-modal maps.

  20. Reliable discrimination of high explosive and chemical/biological artillery using acoustic UGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohil, Myron E.; Desai, Sachi

    2005-10-01

    discrimination between conventional and simulated chemical/biological artillery rounds using acoustic signals produced during detonation. Distinct characteristics arise within the different airburst signatures because high explosive warheads emphasize concussive and shrapnel effects, while chemical/biological warheads are designed to disperse their contents over large areas, therefore employing a slower burning, less intense explosive to mix and spread their contents. The ensuing blast waves are readily characterized by variations in the corresponding peak pressure and rise time of the blast, differences in the ratio of positive pressure amplitude to the negative amplitude, and variations in the overall duration of the resulting waveform. We show that, highly reliable discrimination (> 98%) between conventional and potentially chemical/biological artillery is achieved at ranges exceeding 3km. A feedforward neural network classifier, trained on a feature space derived from the distribution of wavelet coefficients found within different levels of the multiresolution decomposition yields.

  1. Seafloor classification using hydroacoustic methods in the shallow coastal North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielck, F.; Hass, H.

    2012-12-01

    Seabed environments reveal important insights into marine ecosystems and hydrodynamics. However, the knowledge regarding their distribution in the North Sea is still fragmentary since data interpretation and mapping is very time consuming. Hydroacoustic devices are able to provide rapid and reliable information on the acoustic characteristics of the seafloor that are instrumental for seafloor discrimination. In this study we compare data of two different hydroacoustic devices: Sidescan sonar data provide acoustic images of the seafloor including bedforms and grain-size distribution. The acoustic ground discrimination system RoxAnn (200 kHz) was used to measure backscatter intensities which indicate roughness (first echo return) and hardness (second echo return) parameters of the seafloor. The data were acquired in an exclusively sandy and relatively shallow investigation area in the Sylt-Rømø Basin (SE North Sea) which is typical for the European Wadden Sea. For ground-truthing surface-sediment samples were taken. The results reveal surficial sediments ranging from fine to coarse sand. Finer material is rather restricted to the shallow areas while coarser sediments characterize the deeper tidal channels. The determined roughness and hardness parameters also strongly increase within these inlets following the change in grain size. The sidescan sonar imagery shows flow-transverse subaqueous dunes of different sizes (0.7 to 35 m from crest to crest). Both, ebb- and flood-dominated structures occur. Altogether six physically different environmental units were defined using grain-size data of the grab samples as well as bedform and backscatter data provided by the sidescan sonar. Not all of these units can be discriminated by the RoxAnn. In particular those showing similar grain sizes or superimposed bedforms yield no clear signature in the hardness vs. roughness scatter plots. However, there are some areas characterized by fine sand that reveal completely different

  2. California Seafloor Mapping Program video and photograph portal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golden, Nadine E.; Cochrane, Guy R.

    2013-01-01

    This portal provides access to marine spatial data for the state of California. These data have been generated and compiled by the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), which has the goal of developing a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The approach of the CSMP is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of seafloor video, seafloor photography, swath sonar bathymetry, acoustic backscatter, high-resolution seismic-reflection profile, and bottom-sediment sampling data. This interactive map displays all CSMP video and imagery and published CSMP GIS spatial data layers. The data layers display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology.

  3. Categorization and discrimination of nonspeech sounds: Differences between steady-state and rapidly-changing acoustic cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirman, Daniel; Holt, Lori L.; McClelland, James L.

    2004-08-01

    Different patterns of performance across vowels and consonants in tests of categorization and discrimination indicate that vowels tend to be perceived more continuously, or less categorically, than consonants. The present experiments examined whether analogous differences in perception would arise in nonspeech sounds that share critical transient acoustic cues of consonants and steady-state spectral cues of simplified synthetic vowels. Listeners were trained to categorize novel nonspeech sounds varying along a continuum defined by a steady-state cue, a rapidly-changing cue, or both cues. Listeners' categorization of stimuli varying on the rapidly changing cue showed a sharp category boundary and posttraining discrimination was well predicted from the assumption of categorical perception. Listeners more accurately discriminated but less accurately categorized steady-state nonspeech stimuli. When listeners categorized stimuli defined by both rapidly-changing and steady-state cues, discrimination performance was accurate and the categorization function exhibited a sharp boundary. These data are similar to those found in experiments with dynamic vowels, which are defined by both steady-state and rapidly-changing acoustic cues. A general account for the speech and nonspeech patterns is proposed based on the supposition that the perceptual trace of rapidly-changing sounds decays faster than the trace of steady-state sounds.

  4. Parametric sonars for seafloor characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiti, Andrea; Bergem, Oddbjorn; Dybedal, Johnny

    1999-12-01

    Parametric sonars are instruments capable of transmitting acoustic signals in the water with a very narrow beam and almost no sidelobes. These features are exploited in this paper to define a methodology for quantitative estimation of the geo-acoustic and morphological properties of the uppermost seafloor sediment layer. The three major components of the approach are the parametric instrument itself; the modelling of the forward-propagation problem, with the use of the Kirchhoff approximation for surface scattering and of the small-perturbation theory for the volume scattering; and the definition of a criterion for comparison between data and model predictions, which is accomplished by a generalized time-frequency analysis. In this way the estimation becomes one of a model-based identification, or a model-based inverse problem. Results from a field trial in a shallow water area of the Mediterranean are shown, and compared with independently gathered ground truth.

  5. Layer filtering for seafloor scatterers imaging.

    PubMed

    Pinson, S; Holland, C W

    2015-05-01

    The image source method in acoustics is well known to simulate reverberation. It has also been recently used for characterization of seafloor sound-speed structure. The idea is to detect image sources by imaging techniques to obtain information about the environment. In this paper, the idea is to use the detection of image sources to remove reflections from plane interfaces in recorded signals and perform imaging with this filtered signal. This imaging process highlights scatterers because their wave front shapes are different than those from plane interfaces. Applications can be in seafloor buried object detection or scattering analysis from interface roughnesses or volume heterogeneities.

  6. Discrimination of acoustic communication signals by grasshoppers (Chorthippus biguttulus): temporal resolution, temporal integration, and the impact of intrinsic noise.

    PubMed

    Ronacher, Bernhard; Wohlgemuth, Sandra; Vogel, Astrid; Krahe, Rüdiger

    2008-08-01

    A characteristic feature of hearing systems is their ability to resolve both fast and subtle amplitude modulations of acoustic signals. This applies also to grasshoppers, which for mate identification rely mainly on the characteristic temporal patterns of their communication signals. Usually the signals arriving at a receiver are contaminated by various kinds of noise. In addition to extrinsic noise, intrinsic noise caused by stochastic processes within the nervous system contributes to making signal recognition a difficult task. The authors asked to what degree intrinsic noise affects temporal resolution and, particularly, the discrimination of similar acoustic signals. This study aims at exploring the neuronal basis for sexual selection, which depends on exploiting subtle differences between basically similar signals. Applying a metric, by which the similarities of spike trains can be assessed, the authors investigated how well the communication signals of different individuals of the same species could be discriminated and correctly classified based on the responses of auditory neurons. This spike train metric yields clues to the optimal temporal resolution with which spike trains should be evaluated.

  7. Sexual Selection and Predator Avoidance in the Acoustic Lepidoptera: Discriminating Females Take Fewer Risks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP022934 TITLE: Sexual Selection and Predator Avoidance in the Acoustic...technical report. The following component part numbers comprise the compilation report: ADP022883 thru ADP023022 UNCLASSIFIED Sexual Selection and...a fundamental expectation of sexual selection theory that mating activities incur risk. Normally, these risks are considered from the perspective of

  8. Multi buoy system observation for GPS/A seafloor positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukaiyama, H.; Ikuta, R.; Tadokoro, K.; Yasuda, K.; Watanabe, T.; Chiba, H.; Sayanagi, K.

    2014-12-01

    We are developing a method for observation of seafloor crustal deformation using kinematic GPS and acoustic ranging system. The system measures seafloor crustal deformation by determining position of benchmarks on the seafloor using a vessel which link-up GPS and acoustic signals. Acoustic ranging is used to measure distance between the vessel and the seafloor benchmarks. And kinematic GPS is used to locate the moving vessel every 0.2 seconds. Now we have deployed 4 seafloor benchmark units at Suruga Bay and 4 units at Kumano Basin both off-pacific coast Japan. At each survey site, three seafloor transponders are settled to define a benchmark unit. In this system, each measurement takes about ten hours and both sound speed structure and the benchmark unit positions were determined simultaneously for the each measurement using a tomographic technique. This tomographic technique was adopted based on assumption that the sound speed structure is horizontally layered and changes only in time, not in space. However, when sound speed structure has a heterogeneity, the assumption of a horizontal layering causes systematic error in the determination of seafloor benchmarks(Ikuta et al 2009AGU). So we are developing a new system using multi-buoy. Multi-buoy plays the role of vessel. Conducting observation using the buoys, we can estimate spatial variation of sound speed structures as a sloped structure every moment. With the single vessel system, we solve a kind of average sound speed over the different paths to the three seafloor transponders. Using the multi-buoy system, they can detect the lateral variation as difference of the average sound speeds obtained by different buoys, which improve the accuracy of the benchmark locations. In November 2013, Observation of seafloor crustal deformation using the buoys was held in Suruga Bay. In this study, we report the result of estimations of heterogeneous sound speed structures.

  9. Discriminating silt-and-clay from suspended-sand in rivers using side-looking acoustic profilers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Scott A.; Topping, David J.; Williams, Cory A.

    2010-01-01

    techniques rely on measurements of ancillary properties that correlate with suspended-sediment concentration and particle size and thus require the collection of traditional samples for calibration. Through in situ deployments, these methods can provide the high temporal resolution that cannot be achieved through traditional sampling. Here we focus on the evaluation of acoustic profiling techniques (e.g. acoustic-Doppler sideways-looking profilers, or ADPs). One major advantage of acoustic profiling is the ability to concurrently measure water velocity (using Doppler-shift methods) and suspended-sediment concentration such that suspended-sediment flux can be directly computed using data from a single instrument. Acoustic-Doppler profilers have become popular for measuring water velocity and discharge in rivers, through both moving-boat operations and from fixed deployments such as bank-mounted sideways-looking instruments (Hirsch and Costa, 2004, Muste et al., 2007). The method presented herein is most suited to sideways-looking applications as a complement to the "index velocity" technique, whereby an index velocity from a sideways-looking instrument is related to the cross-section average velocity (determined from moving-boat discharge measurements) as a means for developing a continuous water-discharge record (Ruhl and Simpson, 2005). Topping et al. (2007) presented a method for discriminating silt-and-clay from suspended sand, using single frequency ADPs. This method takes advantage of the relations among acoustic backscatter, sediment-induced acoustic attenuation, suspended-sediment concentration (SSC), and particle size distribution (PSD). Backscatter is the amount of sound scattered back and received at the transducer while sediment-induced attenuation is the amount of sound scattered in other directions and absorbed by the sediment particles. Both of these parameters can be measured with an ADP, and their different dependencies on SSC and PSD allow for the

  10. Acoustical correlates of performance on a dynamic range compression discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Sabin, Andrew T; Gallun, Frederick J; Souza, Pamela E

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic range compression is widely used to reduce the difference between the most and least intense portions of a signal. Such compression distorts the shape of the amplitude envelope of a signal, but it is unclear to what extent such distortions are actually perceivable by listeners. Here, the ability to distinguish between compressed and uncompressed versions of a noise vocoded sentence was initially measured in listeners with normal hearing while varying the threshold, ratio, attack, and release parameters. This narrow condition was selected in order to characterize perception under the most favorable listening conditions. The average behavioral sensitivity to compression was highly correlated to several acoustical indices of modulation depth. In particular, performance was highly correlated to the Euclidean distance between the modulation spectra of the uncompressed and compressed signals. Suggesting that this relationship is not restricted to the initial test conditions, the correlation remained largely unchanged both (1) when listeners with normal hearing were tested using a time-compressed version of the original signal, and (2) when listeners with impaired hearing were tested using the original signal. If this relationship generalizes to more ecologically valid conditions, it will provide a straightforward method for predicting the detectability of compression-induced distortions.

  11. An investigation of vocal tract characteristics for acoustic discrimination of pathological voices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Won; Kang, Hong-Goo; Choi, Jeung-Yoon; Son, Young-Ik

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the effectiveness of measures related to vocal tract characteristics in classifying normal and pathological speech. Unlike conventional approaches that mainly focus on features related to the vocal source, vocal tract characteristics are examined to determine if interaction effects between vocal folds and the vocal tract can be used to detect pathological speech. Especially, this paper examines features related to formant frequencies to see if vocal tract characteristics are affected by the nature of the vocal fold-related pathology. To test this hypothesis, stationary fragments of vowel /aa/ produced by 223 normal subjects, 472 vocal fold polyp subjects, and 195 unilateral vocal cord paralysis subjects are analyzed. Based on the acoustic-articulatory relationships, phonation for pathological subjects is found to be associated with measures correlated with a raised tongue body or an advanced tongue root. Vocal tract-related features are also found to be statistically significant from the Kruskal-Wallis test in distinguishing normal and pathological speech. Classification results demonstrate that combining the formant measurements with vocal fold-related features results in improved performance in differentiating vocal pathologies including vocal polyps and unilateral vocal cord paralysis, which suggests that measures related to vocal tract characteristics may provide additional information in diagnosing vocal disorders.

  12. Observations of backscatter from sand and gravel seafloors between 170 and 250 kHz.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas C; Ward, Larry G

    2015-10-01

    Interpreting observations of frequency-dependence in backscatter from the seafloor offers many challenges, either because multiple frequencies are used for different observations that will later be merged or simply because seafloor scattering models are not well-understood above 100 kHz. Hindering the understanding of these observations is the paucity of reported, calibrated acoustic measurements above 100 kHz. This manuscript seeks to help elucidate the linkages between seafloor properties and frequency-dependent seafloor backscatter by describing observations of backscatter collected from sand, gravel, and bedrock seafloors at frequencies between 170 and 250 kHz and at a grazing angle of 45°. Overall, the frequency dependence appeared weak for all seafloor types, with a slight increase in seafloor scattering strength with increasing frequency for an area with unimodal, very poorly to moderately well sorted, slightly granular to granular medium sand with significant amounts of shell debris and a slight decrease in all other locations.

  13. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-19

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-093015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...number. 1. REPORT DATE OCT 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2015 to 30-09-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to develop

  14. A Neural Substrate for Rapid Timbre Recognition? Neural and Behavioral Discrimination of Very Brief Acoustic Vowels.

    PubMed

    Occelli, F; Suied, C; Pressnitzer, D; Edeline, J-M; Gourévitch, B

    2016-06-01

    The timbre of a sound plays an important role in our ability to discriminate between behaviorally relevant auditory categories, such as different vowels in speech. Here, we investigated, in the primary auditory cortex (A1) of anesthetized guinea pigs, the neural representation of vowels with impoverished timbre cues. Five different vowels were presented with durations ranging from 2 to 128 ms. A psychophysical experiment involving human listeners showed that identification performance was near ceiling for the longer durations and degraded close to chance level for the shortest durations. This was likely due to spectral splatter, which reduced the contrast between the spectral profiles of the vowels at short durations. Effects of vowel duration on cortical responses were well predicted by the linear frequency responses of A1 neurons. Using mutual information, we found that auditory cortical neurons in the guinea pig could be used to reliably identify several vowels for all durations. Information carried by each cortical site was low on average, but the population code was accurate even for durations where human behavioral performance was poor. These results suggest that a place population code is available at the level of A1 to encode spectral profile cues for even very short sounds.

  15. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  16. An Autonomous, Low Cost Platform for Seafloor Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericksen, T.; Foster, J. H.; Bingham, B. S.; Oshiro, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Pacific GPS Facility and the Field Robotics Laboratory at the University of Hawaii have developed an approach to significantly reduce costs below ship based methods of accurately measuring short-term vertical motions of the seafloor and maintaining a continuous long-term record of seafloor pressure. Our goal has been to reduce the primary barrier preventing us from acquiring the observations we need to understand geodetic processes, and the hazards they present, at subduction zones, submarine volcanoes, and subsea landslides. To this end, we have designed a payload package for one of the University of Hawaii Wave Gliders which incorporates an acoustic telemetry package, a dual frequency geodetic-grade Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, meteorological sensors, processing computer, and cellular communications. The Wave Glider will interrogate high accuracy pressure sensors on the seafloor to maintain a near-continuous stream of pressure and temperature data. The seafloor geodetic monument seats a sensor capable of recording pressure, temperature, and sound velocity for a deployment duration of over 5 years with an acoustic modem for communications, and an integral acoustic release for recovery and replacement of batteries. The design of the geodetic monument allows for precise repositioning of the sensor to extend the pressure record beyond a single 5+ year deployment, and includes the capability to install a mobile pressure recorder for calibration of the linear drift of the continuous pressure sensor. We will present the design of the Wave Glider payload and seafloor geodetic monument, as well as a discussion of nearshore and offshore field tests and operational procedures. An assessment of our ability to determine cm-scale vertical seafloor motions will be made by integrating the seafloor pressure measurements recovered during field testing with independent measurements of sea surface pressure and sea surface height made by the sea surface payload.

  17. Sex differences in the acoustic structure of vowel-like grunt vocalizations in baboons and their perceptual discrimination by baboon listeners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendall, Drew; Owren, Michael J.; Weerts, Elise; Hienz, Robert D.

    2004-01-01

    This study quantifies sex differences in the acoustic structure of vowel-like grunt vocalizations in baboons (Papio spp.) and tests the basic perceptual discriminability of these differences to baboon listeners. Acoustic analyses were performed on 1028 grunts recorded from 27 adult baboons (11 males and 16 females) in southern Africa, focusing specifically on the fundamental frequency (F0) and formant frequencies. The mean F0 and the mean frequencies of the first three formants were all significantly lower in males than they were in females, more dramatically so for F0. Experiments using standard psychophysical procedures subsequently tested the discriminability of adult male and adult female grunts. After learning to discriminate the grunt of one male from that of one female, five baboon subjects subsequently generalized this discrimination both to new call tokens from the same individuals and to grunts from novel males and females. These results are discussed in the context of both the possible vocal anatomical basis for sex differences in call structure and the potential perceptual mechanisms involved in their processing by listeners, particularly as these relate to analogous issues in human speech production and perception.

  18. Seafloor geodetic reference station branched from submarine cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, M.; Asada, A.; Ura, T.; Asakawa, K.; Yokobiki, T.; Iwase, R.; Goto, T.; Sato, M.; Nagahashi, K.; Tanaka, T.

    2008-12-01

    to the transponder as well as power. The new cable transponder can realize acoustic ranging between sea surface and bottom with much higher accuracy than the current system. Submarine cable system off Toyohashi (Tokai-SCANNER) in central Japan is located on the source region of the huge repeated earthquakes. It is under the control of the JAMSTEC and used for long-term geophysical monitoring. This cable is one to which we are planning to connect newly developed seafloor transponder. The cruise of JAMSTEC"fS ROV "KAIKO 7000 II" and R/V "KAIREI" is scheduled to deploy and connect the seafloor transponder to the Tokai-SCANNER cable system from Sep. 18, 2008. We will report the overview of the cable transponder system and its deployment procedure in this presentation.

  19. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-043016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to...improve our understanding. During the past few years, the physics effects studied have been three-dimensional propagation on global scales, deep water

  20. An Autonomous, Low Cost Platform for Seafloor Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericksen, T.; Foster, J. H.; Bingham, B. S.; Oshiro, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Pacific GPS Facility and the Field Robotics Laboratory at the University of Hawaii have developed an approach to significantly reduce the costs of accurately measuring short-term vertical motions of the seafloor and maintaining a continuous long-term record of seafloor pressure. Traditional ship-based methods of acquiring these measurements are often prohibitively expensive. Our goal has been to reduce the primary barrier preventing us from acquiring the observations we need to understand geodetic processes, and the hazards they present, at subduction zones, submarine volcanoes, and subsea landslides. To this end, we have designed a payload package for the University of Hawaii Wave Glider which incorporates an acoustic telemetry package, a dual frequency geodetic-grade Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, meteorological sensors, processing computer, and cellular communications. The Wave Glider is able to interrogate high accuracy pressure sensors on the seafloor to maintain a near-continuous stream of ocean bottom pressure and temperature data. The Wave Glider also functions as an integral part of the seafloor geodetic observing system, recording accurate sea surface elevations and barometric pressure; direct measurements of two of the primary sources of seafloor pressure change. The seafloor geodetic monument seats a sensor capable of recording pressure, temperature, and sound velocity for a deployment duration of over 5 years with an acoustic modem for communications, and an integral acoustic release for recovery and replacement of batteries. The design of the geodetic monument allows for precise repositioning of the sensor to extend the pressure record beyond a single 5+ year deployment, and includes the capability to install a mobile pressure recorder for calibration of the linear drift of the continuous pressure sensor. We will present the results of our field tests and an assessment of our ability to determine cm-scale vertical seafloor motions by

  1. Bistatic Sonar and Quantification of Seafloor Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloghrie, P.; BLONDEL, P.; Pace, N. G.; Heald, G. J.; Brothers, R.

    2001-12-01

    Sonar has proved the best tool for investigation of seafloor processes. Calibrated sonars provide a wealth of quantitative information unattainable through other means, but are limited to backscattering geometries, where the acoustic source and receiver are on the same platform. Recent developments in acoustic theory and design have shown the advantage of bistatic instruments, where the source and receiver(s) are physically decoupled and can be anywhere in the water column. Although there are many theoretical studies of bistatic scattering, their applicability is limited by the very low number of actual experiments. Using the large tank facilities at the University of Bath, we are currently investigating the bistatic scattering from several realistic types of seabeds and different morphologies, at high frequency (250 kHz). These studies are used in conjunction with state-of-the-art acoustic models (Blondel et al., 2001), and compared with data from complementary sea trials (Pace et al., in prep.). The results show the huge potential of bistatic systems for accurate and detailed mapping of seafloor structures and their topography. We also demonstrate how the relative contributions of surface and volume processes to acoustic scattering change with the imaging geometry, and how this can be used to maximise the information gained during mapping. Versatile and efficient, bistatic systems can be deployed from surface vessels, ROVs or AUVs. These new tools can be used for Rapid Environmental Assessment, to study sediment transport and deposition, and to access the detailed morphology of the seabed and the near sub-surface. They can in particular be used for the investigation of the small-scale structure of sand ridges and ripples, the distribution of tidal or glacial deposits on the seabed, and the quantification of multi-scale surface roughness in sedimentary and non-sedimentary terrains alike. Crown Copyright 2001 DERA. Published with the permission of the Defence

  2. Acoustic Mechanisms of a Species-Based Discrimination of the chick-a-dee Call in Sympatric Black-Capped (Poecile atricapillus) and Mountain Chickadees (P. gambeli)

    PubMed Central

    Guillette, Lauren M.; Farrell, Tara M.; Hoeschele, Marisa; Sturdy, Christopher B.

    2010-01-01

    Previous perceptual research with black-capped and mountain chickadees has demonstrated that these species treat each other's namesake chick-a-dee calls as belonging to separate, open-ended categories. Further, the terminal dee portion of the call has been implicated as the most prominent species marker. However, statistical classification using acoustic summary features suggests that all note-types contained within the chick-a-dee call should be sufficient for species classification. The current study seeks to better understand the note-type based mechanisms underlying species-based classification of the chick-a-dee call by black-capped and mountain chickadees. In two, complementary, operant discrimination experiments, both species were trained to discriminate the species of the signaler using either entire chick-a-dee calls, or individual note-types from chick-a-dee calls. In agreement with previous perceptual work we find that the D note had significant stimulus control over species-based discrimination. However, in line with statistical classifications, we find that all note-types carry species information. We discuss reasons why the most easily discriminated note-types are likely candidates to carry species-based cues. PMID:21833284

  3. Acoustic Mechanisms of a Species-Based Discrimination of the chick-a-dee Call in Sympatric Black-Capped (Poecile atricapillus) and Mountain Chickadees (P. gambeli).

    PubMed

    Guillette, Lauren M; Farrell, Tara M; Hoeschele, Marisa; Sturdy, Christopher B

    2010-01-01

    Previous perceptual research with black-capped and mountain chickadees has demonstrated that these species treat each other's namesake chick-a-dee calls as belonging to separate, open-ended categories. Further, the terminal dee portion of the call has been implicated as the most prominent species marker. However, statistical classification using acoustic summary features suggests that all note-types contained within the chick-a-dee call should be sufficient for species classification. The current study seeks to better understand the note-type based mechanisms underlying species-based classification of the chick-a-dee call by black-capped and mountain chickadees. In two, complementary, operant discrimination experiments, both species were trained to discriminate the species of the signaler using either entire chick-a-dee calls, or individual note-types from chick-a-dee calls. In agreement with previous perceptual work we find that the D note had significant stimulus control over species-based discrimination. However, in line with statistical classifications, we find that all note-types carry species information. We discuss reasons why the most easily discriminated note-types are likely candidates to carry species-based cues.

  4. Trials for better precision of seafloor geodetic observation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, M.; Sato, M.; Fujita, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Yabuki, T.; Asada, A.

    2002-12-01

    Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, and Hydrographic Department, Japan, have been developing seafloor geodetic observation system and conducting observations using the system. Precise acoustic ranging and kinematic GPS positioning techniques are combined into the system. Seafloor reference station which consists of four mirror type transponders is deployed on the seafloor and measures its position in reference to GPS stations on land and ship. Fourteen seafloor geodetic reference stations have been distributed on the forearc areas of Japan island arc. Subsea crustal deformation due to subducting two oceanic plates of the Pacific and the Philippine sea can be monitored by using the seafloor reference stations. Although we obtained satisfactory results with the already existing system, we come up with possible improvements of the system as we accumulate the experience of the observations using the system. Trials to improve the system are always done. In this poster, we will present two of such trials. 1. To improve the stability of the rigid pole connecting the GPS antenna and the ship-board transducer. The bending of the GPS pole was found by examining the offsets in the acoustic ranging residuals. Acoustic ranging is made with condition that the ship drifts over sea surface. Drag force generated between surface current and the pole makes the pole itself bend. The pole was replaced by new, more rigid pole to overcome the problem. Also, we monitor amount of bending of the pole, that is, the offset between the GPS antenna and the transducer, using tiltmeter through the observation. 2. To reduce the acoustic ranging error due to shape of the transducer. Coded sinusoidal acoustic wave with 15cm wave length is used as the ranging signal. This wave length is comparable to the dimension of the cylindrical transducers employed both on the ship-board system and on the seafloor transponder. Transducer can not be regarded as a point considering the wave

  5. Predicted seafloor facies of Central Santa Monica Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Peter; Gardner, James V.

    2004-01-01

    Summary -- Mapping surficial seafloor facies (sand, silt, muddy sand, rock, etc.) should be the first step in marine geological studies and is crucial when modeling sediment processes, pollution transport, deciphering tectonics, and defining benthic habitats. This report outlines an empirical technique that predicts the distribution of seafloor facies for a large area offshore Los Angeles, CA using high-resolution bathymetry and co-registered, calibrated backscatter from multibeam echosounders (MBES) correlated to ground-truth sediment samples. The technique uses a series of procedures that involve supervised classification and a hierarchical decision tree classification that are now available in advanced image-analysis software packages. Derivative variance images of both bathymetry and acoustic backscatter are calculated from the MBES data and then used in a hierarchical decision-tree framework to classify the MBES data into areas of rock, gravelly muddy sand, muddy sand, and mud. A quantitative accuracy assessment on the classification results is performed using ground-truth sediment samples. The predicted facies map is also ground-truthed using seafloor photographs and high-resolution sub-bottom seismic-reflection profiles. This Open-File Report contains the predicted seafloor facies map as a georeferenced TIFF image along with the multibeam bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data used in the study as well as an explanation of the empirical classification process.

  6. GeoSEA: Geodetic Earthquake Observatory on the Seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Heidrun; Lange, Dietrich; Flueh, Ernst R.; Petersen, Florian; Behrmann, Jan-Hinrich; Devey, Colin

    2014-05-01

    Space geodetic observations of crustal deformation have contributed greatly to our understanding of plate tectonic processes in general, and plate subduction in particular. Measurements of interseismic strain have documented the active accumulation of strain, and subsequent strain release during earthquakes. However, techniques such as GPS cannot be applied below the water surface because the electromagnetic energy is strongly attenuated in the water column. Evidence suggests that much of the elastic strain build up and release (and particularly that responsible for both tsunami generation and giant earthquakes) occurs offshore. To quantify strain accumulation and assess the resultant hazard potential we urgently need systems to resolve seafloor crustal deformation. Here we report on first results of sea trials of a newly implemented seafloor geodesy array. The GeoSEA (Geodetic Earthquake Observatory on the Seafloor) array consists of a seafloor transponder network comprising 35 units and a wave glider acting as a surface unit (GeoSURF) to ensure satellite correspondence, data transfer and monitor system health. Seafloor displacement occurs in the horizontal (x,y) and vertical direction (z). The vertical displacement is measured by monitoring pressure variations at the seafloor. Horizontal seafloor displacement can be measured either using an acoustic/GPS combination to provide absolute positioning (requiring a suitably equipped vessel to perform repeated cruises to provide the GPS fixes) or by long-term acoustic telemetry between different beacons fixed on the seafloor to determine relative distances by using the travel time observations to each other, which is the technique tested during our short sea trials. For horizontal direct path measurements, the system utilizes acoustic ranging techniques with a ranging precision better than 15 mm and long term stability over 2 km distances. Vertical motion is obtained from pressure gauges. Integrated inclinometers

  7. Seafloor identification in sonar imagery via simulations of Helmholtz equations and discrete optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engquist, Björn; Frederick, Christina; Huynh, Quyen; Zhou, Haomin

    2017-06-01

    We present a multiscale approach for identifying features in ocean beds by solving inverse problems in high frequency seafloor acoustics. The setting is based on Sound Navigation And Ranging (SONAR) imaging used in scientific, commercial, and military applications. The forward model incorporates multiscale simulations, by coupling Helmholtz equations and geometrical optics for a wide range of spatial scales in the seafloor geometry. This allows for detailed recovery of seafloor parameters including material type. Simulated backscattered data is generated using numerical microlocal analysis techniques. In order to lower the computational cost of the large-scale simulations in the inversion process, we take advantage of a pre-computed library of representative acoustic responses from various seafloor parameterizations.

  8. A Physical Sediment Model for the Prediction of Seafloor Geoacoustic Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    Technical Report TR-216227 N00014-82-C-0121 A PHYSICAL SEDIMENT MODEL FOR THE PREDICTION OF SEAFLOOR GEOACOUSTIC PROPERTIES Burlie A. Brunson Eugene...Final Report PREDICTION OF SEAFLOOR GEOACOUSTIC 1 Jan 82-30 Jul 82 PROPERTIES 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER TR-216227 7. AUTHOR(*) 8. CONTRACT OR...geoacoustic properties needed by current Navy acoustic or bottom loss calculation models. Particular attention was paid to the depth and frequency depen

  9. APL - North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    been spread over adjacent depths in the same manner as in the plots of the measured data in Figures 2 and 3. Histograms of intensity normalized...Mercer, J. A., Colosi, J. A., and Howe, B. M., “Deep seafloor arrivals in long range ocean acoustic propagation,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am., in press

  10. Seafloor Geodesy for Approaching Great Earthquakes Around Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, M.; Sato, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Watanabe, S. I.; Yokota, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor geodesy has been developed as an application of space geodetic technique for the purpose of investigating geodynamic phenomena having their major information in offshore regions. One of such targets is the occurrence of disastrous earthquakes in plate subduction areas. Japan, among others, has repeatedly experienced offshore megathrust earthquakes because of its tectonic location, where multiple plates interact with each other. Most recently, an earthquake of M9.0 occurred off the Pacific coast of east Japan in 2011 with a subsequent huge tsunami, which totally devastated coastal areas and claimed nearly 20,000 lives including those still missing. We, the group of Japan Coast Guard (JCG), have developed a seafloor geodetic technique combining the GPS positioning and underwater acoustic ranging, which is able to measure the position of the seafloor reference point consisting of multiple acoustic transponders with a precision of a few centimeters. We have deployed our seafloor reference points over two regions on the Pacific side of Japan; one is the region along the Japan trench off the eastern coast where the huge 2011 event occurred and another is the region along the Nankai Trough off the southern coast where earthquakes of around M8 have repeated every 100-150 years. With these measurements, we have so far successfully obtained important results providing exclusive information for elucidating the plate boundary behavior causing huge earthquakes. In particular, in the region off east Japan, we have revealed different phases of seafloor movements during the period between several years before and after the 2011 event. They include linear intraplate movements with several centimeters per year before the event, which were the first significant offshore geodetic signals detected around Japan, as well as the coseismic displacements of unprecedentedly huge amount over 20 m close to the epicenter and subsequent postseismic movements with various characteristics

  11. A Seafloor Benchmark for 3-dimensional Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwell, C. D.; Webb, S. C.; Nooner, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed an inexpensive, permanent seafloor benchmark to increase the longevity of seafloor geodetic measurements. The benchmark provides a physical tie to the sea floor lasting for decades (perhaps longer) on which geodetic sensors can be repeatedly placed and removed with millimeter resolution. Global coordinates estimated with seafloor geodetic techniques will remain attached to the benchmark allowing for the interchange of sensors as they fail or become obsolete, or for the sensors to be removed and used elsewhere, all the while maintaining a coherent series of positions referenced to the benchmark. The benchmark has been designed to free fall from the sea surface with transponders attached. The transponder can be recalled via an acoustic command sent from the surface to release from the benchmark and freely float to the sea surface for recovery. The duration of the sensor attachment to the benchmark will last from a few days to a few years depending on the specific needs of the experiment. The recovered sensors are then available to be reused at other locations, or again at the same site in the future. Three pins on the sensor frame mate precisely and unambiguously with three grooves on the benchmark. To reoccupy a benchmark a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) uses its manipulator arm to place the sensor pins into the benchmark grooves. In June 2014 we deployed four benchmarks offshore central Oregon. We used the ROV Jason to successfully demonstrate the removal and replacement of packages onto the benchmark. We will show the benchmark design and its operational capabilities. Presently models of megathrust slip within the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) are mostly constrained by the sub-aerial GPS vectors from the Plate Boundary Observatory, a part of Earthscope. More long-lived seafloor geodetic measures are needed to better understand the earthquake and tsunami risk associated with a large rupture of the thrust fault within the Cascadia subduction zone

  12. Long Range Acoustic Communication in Deep Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Acoustic communication at long range in the ocean is challenging due to the substantial propagation loss, multipath delay spread , and channel...20 Hz in the upward refracting Arctic acoustic channel. However, the seafloor topography in the region of the Chukchi Plateau is very uneven over...which the depth was 600 m and thus the seafloor affected every mode of the ACOUS signal except for mode 1 which was confined to the upper 200 m. In April

  13. Seafloor Geodetic Monitoring of the Central Andean Subduction Zone: The Geosea Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, H.; Lange, D.; Contreras Reyes, E.; Behrmann, J. H.; McGuire, J. J.; Flueh, E. R.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor geodesy has been identified as one of the central tools in marine geosciences to monitor seafloor deformation at high resolution. To quantify strain accumulation and assess the resultant hazard potential we urgently need systems to resolve seafloor crustal deformation. The GeoSEA (Geodetic Earthquake Observatory on the Seafloor) array consists of a seafloor transponder network comprising a total of 35 units and a wave glider acting as a surface unit (GeoSURF) to ensure satellite correspondence, data transfer and monitor system health. For horizontal direct path measurements, the system utilizes acoustic ranging techniques with a ranging precision better than 15 mm and long term stability over 2 km distance. Vertical motion is obtained from pressure gauges. Integrated inclinometers monitor station settlement in two horizontal directions. Travel time between instruments and the local water sound velocity will be recorded autonomously subsea without system or human intervention for up to 3.5 years. Data from the autonomous network on the seafloor can be retrieved via the integrated high-speed acoustic telemetry link without recovering the seafloor units. In late 2015 GeoSEA will be installed on the Iquique segment of the South America - Nazca convergent plate boundary to monitor crustal deformation. The Iquique seismic gap experienced the 2014 Mw 8.1 Pisagua earthquake, which apparently occurred within a local locking minimum. It is thus crucial to better resolve resolve strain in the forearc between the mainland and the trench in order to improve our understanding of forearc deformation required for hazard assessment. Mobile autonomous seafloor arrays for continuous measurement of active seafloor deformation in hazard zones have the potential to lead to transformative discoveries of plate boundary/fault zone tectonic processes and address a novel element of marine geophysical research.

  14. Scientific concepts for hydroacoustic seafloor mapping in the coastal zone and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hass, H. Christian; Bartholomä, Alexander; Bürk, Dietmar; Holler, Peter; Mielck, Finn; Reimers, Hans-Christian

    2013-04-01

    Hydroacoustic seafloor mapping is a reliable and cost-effective method to investigate and monitor the seafloor in high spatial and temporal resolution. The results are important for the evaluation of benthic habitats and help to identify vulnerable environments that require protection. Yet, how can we overcome the problems that occur when different gear produces different results, which are evaluated by people that have different points of view and different backgrounds? These aspects form an integer part of the project WIMO ("Scientific concepts for monitoring the German Bight, SE North Sea", Subproject 1.1: "Hydroacoustic Habitat Mapping"). It aims at comparing different hydroacoustic gear, methodologies and workflows in order to work out basic routines for universal use in marine benthic habitat mapping. The project investigates a number of target areas in the German Bight (North Sea) using different sidescan sonars (SSS), acoustic seafloor-classification systems (AGDS), multibeams, and different sampling and grain-size analytical methods as well as sea-floor imaging methods. We tested different gear on different ships, on the same ship but not synchronously, and as many instruments as possible measuring at the same time on the same ship. Our results suggest that guidelines and requirements for surveys can hardly be standardized as they depend largely on the water depth, the seabed, and on the vessel and the equipment available. All of these frame conditions usually differ from survey to survey. Taking this into account, we present a reasonable workflow for time and cost-effective benthic habitat mapping and monitoring. Transect-line distances as well as monitoring frequencies, number and positioning of ground-truth samples and seabed imaging are discussed. We recommend frequency combinations and appropriate swath widths and overlaps for SSS and show a way to ground-truth lower-frequency data using high-frequency data. Acoustic ground discrimination systems are

  15. Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Ronald E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents the Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) instructional module on Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults. The module includes activities and materials required, procedures, summary questions, and extension ideas for teaching Sea-Floor Spreading. (SL)

  16. An Autonomous, Low Cost Platform for Seafloor Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericksen, T.; Foster, J. H.; Bingham, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    The high cost of acquiring geodetic data from the sea floor has limited the observations available to help us understand and model the behavior of seafloor geodetic processes. To address this problem, the Pacific GPS Facility at the University of Hawaii is developing a cost effective approach for accurately measuring short-term vertical motions of the seafloor and maintaining a continuous long-term record of seafloor pressure without the requirement for costly ship time. There is a recognized need to vastly increase our underwater geodetic observing capacity. Most of the largest recorded earthquakes and most devastating tsunamis are generated at subduction zones underwater. Similarly, many volcanoes are partly (e.g. Santorini) or completely (e.g. Loihi) submerged, and are not well observed and understood. Furthermore, landslide features ring many ocean basins, and huge debris deposits surround many volcanic oceanic islands. Our approach will lower the cost of collecting sea-floor geodetic data, reducing the barriers preventing us from acquiring the information we need to observe and understand these types of structures and provide a direct societal benefit in improving hazard assessment. The capability is being developed by equipping one of the University of Hawaii Wave Gliders with an integrated acoustic telemetry package, a dual frequency geodetic-grade Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, processing unit, and cellular communications. The Wave Glider will interrogate high accuracy pressure sensors on the sea floor to maintain a near-continuous stream of pressure and temperature data, but seafloor pressure data includes contribution from a variety of sources and on its own may not provide the accuracy required for geodetic investigations. Independent measurements of sea surface pressure and sea surface height can be used to remove these contributions from the observed sea floor pressure timeseries. We will integrate our seafloor pressure measurements with air

  17. Sea-Floor Mapping and Benthic Habitat GIS for the Elwha River Delta Nearshore, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Warrick, Jonathan A.; Sagy, Yael; Finlayson, David; Harney, Jodi

    2008-01-01

    From March 1531, 2005, more than 252 km (19.5 km2) of seafloor offshore of the Elwha River Delta in the central Strait of Juan de Fuca was mapped by the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program. The purpose of this nearshore mapping was to (1) obtain high resolution bathymetry and acoustic reflectance properties of the seabed, (2) examine and record geologic characteristics of the seafloor, and (3) construct maps of sea-floor geomorphology and habitat. Substrate distribution was characterized with video-supervised statistical classification of the sonar data. Substrate of the survey was dominated by mixed sand-gravel and sand. Numerous boulder reefs were observed west of the river mouth within Freshwater Bay, whereas the sea-floor immediately adjacent to the river mouth was dominated by sand.

  18. Behavioral determination of stimulus pair discrimination of auditory acoustic and electrical stimuli using a classical conditioning and heart-rate approach.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Simeon J; Paolini, Antonio G

    2012-06-06

    Acute animal preparations have been used in research prospectively investigating electrode designs and stimulation techniques for integration into neural auditory prostheses, such as auditory brainstem implants and auditory midbrain implants. While acute experiments can give initial insight to the effectiveness of the implant, testing the chronically implanted and awake animals provides the advantage of examining the psychophysical properties of the sensations induced using implanted devices. Several techniques such as reward-based operant conditioning, conditioned avoidance, or classical fear conditioning have been used to provide behavioral confirmation of detection of a relevant stimulus attribute. Selection of a technique involves balancing aspects including time efficiency (often poor in reward-based approaches), the ability to test a plurality of stimulus attributes simultaneously (limited in conditioned avoidance), and measure reliability of repeated stimuli (a potential constraint when physiological measures are employed). Here, a classical fear conditioning behavioral method is presented which may be used to simultaneously test both detection of a stimulus, and discrimination between two stimuli. Heart-rate is used as a measure of fear response, which reduces or eliminates the requirement for time-consuming video coding for freeze behaviour or other such measures (although such measures could be included to provide convergent evidence). Animals were conditioned using these techniques in three 2-hour conditioning sessions, each providing 48 stimulus trials. Subsequent 48-trial testing sessions were then used to test for detection of each stimulus in presented pairs, and test discrimination between the member stimuli of each pair. This behavioral method is presented in the context of its utilisation in auditory prosthetic research. The implantation of electrocardiogram telemetry devices is shown. Subsequent implantation of brain electrodes into the Cochlear

  19. North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory: Deep Water Acoustic Propagation in the Philippine Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-09

    J. A., and Howe, B. M. (2013). "Deep seafloor arrivals in long range ocean acoustic propagation," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134,3307-3317. Udovydchenkov... Spread , steepness and skewness of surface slopes," Annual Review of Marine Science 1, 377-415. Skarsoulis, E. K., Comuelle, B. D., and Dzieciuch, M...Dzieciuch, M. A., Worcester, P. F., Andrew, R. K., Buck, L. J., Mercer, J. A., Colosi, J. A., and Howe, B. M. (2009). "Deep seafloor arrivals: An

  20. Muddy Seafloors and Tidal Flats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    shown in Figure 3. The seafloor was covered with a 30-cm thick layer of yogurt -like mud (density about 1.6 g/l [G. Kineke and S. Bentley]) that caused...observations to test components of the NOPP nearshore community model, as well as other models (eg, DELFT3D) for nearshore waves, currents, and

  1. Seafloor Rocks and Sediments of the Continental Shelf From Monterey Bay to Point Sur, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eittreim, Stephen L.; Anima, Roberto J.; Stevenson, Andrew J.; Wong, Florence L.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction Acoustic swath mapping of the greater Monterey Bay area continental shelf from Point Ano Nuevo to Point Sur reveals complex patterns of rock outcrops on the shelf, and coarse sand bodies that occur in distinct depressions on the inner and mid-shelves. This publication portrays the seafloor components in a 36- by 48-inch map sheet at 1:100,000 scale.

  2. Acoustic emission signals can discriminate between compressive bone fractures and tensile ligament injuries in the spine during dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Van Toen, C; Street, J; Oxland, T R; Cripton, P A

    2012-06-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) sensors are a reliable tool in detecting fracture; however they have not been used to differentiate between compressive osseous and tensile ligamentous failures in the spine. This study evaluated the effectiveness of AE data in detecting the time of injury of ligamentum flavum (LF) and vertebral body (VB) specimens tested in tension and compression, respectively, and in differentiating between these failures. AE signals were collected while LF (n=7) and VB (n=7) specimens from human cadavers were tested in tension and compression (0.4m/s), respectively. Times of injury (time of peak AE amplitude) were compared to those using traditional methods (VB: time of peak force, LF: visual evidence in high speed video). Peak AE signal amplitudes and frequencies (using Fourier and wavelet transformations) for the LF and VB specimens were compared. In each group, six specimens failed (VB, fracture; LF, periosteal stripping or attenuation) and one did not. Time of injury using AE signals for VB and LF specimens produced average absolute differences to traditional methods of 0.7 (SD=0.2) ms and 2.4 (SD=1.5) ms (representing 14% and 20% of the average loading time), respectively. AE signals from VB fractures had higher amplitudes and frequencies than those from LF failures (average peak amplitude 87.7 (SD=6.9) dB vs. 71.8 (SD=9.8)dB for the inferior sensor, p<0.05; median characteristic frequency from the inferior sensor 97 (interquartile range, IQR, 41) kHz vs. 31 (IQR 2) kHz, p<0.05). These findings demonstrate that AE signals could be used to delineate complex failures of the spine.

  3. Seafloor Control on Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Clemente-Colon, P.; Rigor, I. G.; Hall, D. K.; Neumann, G.

    2011-01-01

    The seafloor has a profound role in Arctic sea ice formation and seasonal evolution. Ocean bathymetry controls the distribution and mixing of warm and cold waters, which may originate from different sources, thereby dictating the pattern of sea ice on the ocean surface. Sea ice dynamics, forced by surface winds, are also guided by seafloor features in preferential directions. Here, satellite mapping of sea ice together with buoy measurements are used to reveal the bathymetric control on sea ice growth and dynamics. Bathymetric effects on sea ice formation are clearly observed in the conformation between sea ice patterns and bathymetric characteristics in the peripheral seas. Beyond local features, bathymetric control appears over extensive ice-prone regions across the Arctic Ocean. The large-scale conformation between bathymetry and patterns of different synoptic sea ice classes, including seasonal and perennial sea ice, is identified. An implication of the bathymetric influence is that the maximum extent of the total sea ice cover is relatively stable, as observed by scatterometer data in the decade of the 2000s, while the minimum ice extent has decreased drastically. Because of the geologic control, the sea ice cover can expand only as far as it reaches the seashore, the continental shelf break, or other pronounced bathymetric features in the peripheral seas. Since the seafloor does not change significantly for decades or centuries, sea ice patterns can be recurrent around certain bathymetric features, which, once identified, may help improve short-term forecast and seasonal outlook of the sea ice cover. Moreover, the seafloor can indirectly influence cloud cover by its control on sea ice distribution, which differentially modulates the latent heat flux through ice covered and open water areas.

  4. Electrical properties of seafloor massive sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnoli, Giovanni; Hannington, Mark; Bairlein, Katharina; Hördt, Andreas; Jegen, Marion; Petersen, Sven; Laurila, Tea

    2016-06-01

    Seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) deposits are increasingly seen as important marine metal resources for the future. A growing number of industrialized nations are involved in the surveying and sampling of such deposits by drilling. Drill ships are expensive and their availability can be limited; seabed drill rigs are a cost-effective alternative and more suitable for obtaining cores for resource evaluation. In order to achieve the objectives of resource evaluations, details are required of the geological, mineralogical, and physical properties of the polymetallic deposits and their host rocks. Electrical properties of the deposits and their ore minerals are distinct from their unmineralized host rocks. Therefore, the use of electrical methods to detect SMS while drilling and recovering drill cores could decrease the costs and accelerate offshore operations by limiting the amount of drilling in unmineralized material. This paper presents new data regarding the electrical properties of SMS cores that can be used in that assessment. Frequency-dependent complex electrical resistivity in the frequency range between 0.002 and 100 Hz was examined in order to potentially discriminate between different types of fresh rocks, alteration and mineralization. Forty mini-cores of SMS and unmineralized host rocks were tested in the laboratory, originating from different tectonic settings such as the intermediate-spreading ridges of the Galapagos and Axial Seamount, and the Pacmanus back-arc basin. The results indicate that there is a clear potential to distinguish between mineralized and non-mineralized samples, with some evidence that even different types of mineralization can be discriminated. This could be achieved using resistivity magnitude alone with appropriate rig-mounted electrical sensors. Exploiting the frequency-dependent behavior of resistivity might amplify the differences and further improve the rock characterization.

  5. Automated Acoustic Identification of Bats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    discrimination for such acoustically similar and cryptic species. Quantitative methods depend upon automatically extracting call descriptive parameters...constructing a dichotomous key, we iterated the highest performing classification choices at each step in a hierarchical classification scheme to...prevents unambiguous discrimination (Figure 31). For such acoustically cryptic species, identification remains in the realm of calculating a statistical

  6. Physical Conditions Associated with Widespread Seafloor Methane Discharge on the Northern US Atlantic Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarke, A. D.; Ruppel, C. D.; Brothers, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    Recent analysis of water column backscatter data and remotely operated vehicle (ROV) video imagery collected by NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer between 2011 and 2013 revealed methane discharge from the seafloor at over 570 gas seep locations along the northern US Atlantic margin. To the best of our knowledge, such large-scale seepage has not previously been observed on a passive margin outside the Arctic or not spatially associated with a petroleum basin. This seepage has implications for the global carbon cycle, ocean chemistry (e.g., acidification), and in some cases, the climate system. Using data collected by Okeanos Explorer and NOAA's Deep Discoverer ROV, we combine water column backscatter data with video imagery and seafloor backscatter data to estimate gas flux and constrain the geoacoustic properties of the seabed at methane discharge sites. The total methane flux from the northern US Atlantic margin seeps is conservatively estimated at ~15-90 Mg y-1, based on observations of gas bubble volume, discharge rates, and discharge points per site. However, fewer than 1% of the identified seep sites have been inspected with a ROV, and this estimate is likely to be revised upward as the characteristics of the seeps are further constrained. Another important observation to emerge from our analysis is the lack of spatial correlation between seep sites and the ~5000 pockmarks mapped on the northern part of the US Atlantic margin. In this region, pockmarks, which are often easily identified by geophysical imaging of the seafloor, should not be considered potential target sites for finding undiscovered areas of seepage. Conversely, discrete patches of elevated relative seafloor acoustic backscatter amplitude do appear to be correlated with the spatial distribution of methane seeps, implying anomalous seafloor characteristic at seep loci. This finding is consistent with ROV video observations of authigenic carbonate outcrops and extensive chemosynthetic bivalve communities

  7. Design and Testing of a Seafloor Geodetic System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Marie C.

    A conclusion of the National Research Council's Panel on Crustal Movement Measurements was to "recommend development of a capability to measure, to a 10 cm accuracy, motions of points on the ocean floor up to several hundred kilometers offshore with respect to reference points on land." The geodetic system described in this dissertation attempts to meet this recommendation. This system locates points (benchmarks) on the seafloor relative to one another, or to a point on land, at the subdecimeter level. The underwater portion of this system is acoustic and may be tied into a global reference frame via GPS receivers at the sea surface. The first step in developing this system was to design and implement a relative positioning system on the seafloor. This approach uses acoustic ranges between precision transponders mounted on benchmarks in the seafloor. Achievement of subdecimeter level positioning required the development of precision transponders and a precision sound velocimeter, used in calculating distances from travel times. The precision transponders are interrogated from a deeply towed vehicle, on which the precision sound velocimeter is mounted. During sea tests in March 1988, controlled testing of the components of the underwater positioning system was conducted and a three transponder network was surveyed, validating the seafloor positioning system concept and establishing accuracy limits. The precision transponders were shown to be capable of determining short (100 meters) baseline lengths to within 1 cm accuracy. The sound velocimeter was shown to have a resolution and repeatability of 0.0078 m/s, better than the part in 10^5 accuracy needed to calculate ranges from travel times with centimeter level accuracies. Finally, ranging data in a network of three transponders was used, along with sound speed field measurements, to determine transponder to vehicle ranges with an rms error of 8 cm. The results of a previous computer simulation show that transponder

  8. Observations of Seafloor Roughness in a Tidally Modulated Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippmann, T. C.; Hunt, J.

    2014-12-01

    The vertical structure of shallow water flows are influenced by the presence of a bottom boundary layer, which spans the water column for long period waves or mean flows. The nature of the boundary is determined in part by the roughness elements that make up the seafloor, and includes sometimes complex undulations associated with regular and irregular shaped bedforms whose scales range several orders of magnitude from orbital wave ripples (10-1 m) to mega-ripples (100 m) and even larger features (101-103) such as sand waves, bars, and dunes. Modeling efforts often parameterize the effects of roughness elements on flow fields, depending on the complexity of the boundary layer formulations. The problem is exacerbated by the transient nature of bedforms and their large spatial extent and variability. This is particularly important in high flow areas with large sediment transport, such as tidally dominated sandy inlets like New River Inlet, NC. Quantification of small scale seafloor variability over large spatial areas requires the use of mobile platforms that can measure with fine scale (order cm) accuracy in wide swaths. The problem is difficult in shallow water where waves and currents are large, and water clarity is often limited. In this work, we present results from bathymetric surveys obtained with the Coastal Bathymetry Survey System, a personal watercraft equipped with a Imagenex multibeam acoustic echosounder and Applanix POS-MV 320 GPS-aided inertial measurement unit. This system is able to measure shallow water seafloor bathymetry and backscatter intensity with very fine scale (10-1 m) resolution and over relatively large scales (103 m) in the presence of high waves and currents. Wavenumber spectra show that the noise floor of the resolved multibeam bathymetry is on the order of 2.5 - 5 cm in amplitude, depending on water depths ranging 2 - 6 m, and about 30 cm in wavelength. Seafloor roughness elements are estimated from wavenumber spectra across the inlet

  9. Repeated Observation of Seafloor Crustal Deformation at the Nankai Margin, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, K.; Ando, M.; Okuda, T.; Sugimoto, S.; Aizawa, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Yasuda, J.; Muto, D.; Kuno, M.

    2006-12-01

    The Nankai Trough is one of the active plate boundaries where the major subduction earthquakes, Nankai and Tonankai earthquakes, repeatedly occur. The source regions of the earthquakes are located beneath the see bottom, and it is necessary to monitor the crustal activities, such as seismicity and crustal deformation, for the sake of earthquake prediction and disaster prevention. One of the useful tools to monitor seafloor crustal deformation is the observation system composed of the acoustic ranging and kinematic GPS positioning techniques. We install seafloor benchmark composed of three sea bottom transponders for acoustic ranging. We have installed the seafloor benchmarks at three sites close to the Nankai Trough. We repeatedly observed at the two sites among them ten and six times from 2004. The result of the repeated observation shows that the repeatability of the measurement is +/-3 cm for each horizontal component. The coseismic crustal deformation due to M7 class earthquakes was also detected at the sea bottom benchmark. Our next target is continuous monitoring of seafloor crustal deformation associated with plate convergence. This study is promoted by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. We are grateful to the captain and crews of Research Vessel, Asama, of Mie Prefectural Science and Technology Promotion Center, Japan.

  10. Observations of polarized seismoacoustic T waves at and beneath the seafloor in the abyssal Pacific ocean.

    PubMed

    Butler, Rhett

    2006-12-01

    Combined seismic and hydrophone observations show that the traditional T wave propagates as a seismoacoustic polarized interface wave (Ti) coupled to the seafloor. Seismoacoustic Ti waves propagating at the sound speed of water are routinely observed over megameter distances at the deep (4979 m) seafloor Hawaii-2 Observatory (H2O) between Hawaii and California, even though the seafloor site is within a shadow zone for acoustic wave propagation. Ti has also been observed on seismometers 225 km SSW of Oahu at the OSN1 site at the seafloor and within an ODP borehole into the basalt basement. Analyses of timing, apparent velocity, energy, and polarization of these interface waves are presented. At low frequency (< approximately 5 Hz) Ti propagates dominantly in the sediments and is consistent with higher-mode Rayleigh waves. At higher frequencies the observed Ti waves dominantly propagate acoustically with characteristics suggesting local scattering. The observation of Ti from an earthquake in Guatemala at OSN1, whose path is blocked by the Island of Hawaii, is consistent with scattering from the vicinity of the Cross Seamount.

  11. Pulsations, interpulsations, and sea-floor spreading.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pessagno, E. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    It is postulated that worldwide transgressions (pulsations) and regressions (interpulsations) through the course of geologic time are related to the elevation and subsidence of oceanic ridge systems and to sea-floor spreading. Two multiple working hypotheses are advanced to explain major transgressions and regressions and the elevation and subsidence of oceanic ridge systems. One hypothesis interrelates the sea-floor spreading hypothesis to the hypothesis of sub-Mohorovicic serpentinization. The second hypothesis relates the sea-floor spreading hypothesis to a hypothesis involving thermal expansion and contraction.

  12. EMSO: European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favali, P.; Partnership, Emso

    2009-04-01

    EMSO, a Research Infrastructure listed within ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) Roadmap), is the European-scale network of multidisciplinary seafloor observatories from the Arctic to the Black Sea with the scientific objective of long-term real-time monitoring of processes related to geosphere/biosphere/hydrosphere interactions. EMSO will enhance our understanding of processes through long time series appropriate to the scale of the phenomena, constituting the new frontier of studying Earth interior, deep-sea biology and chemistry and ocean processes. EMSO will reply also to the need expressed in the frame of GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) to develop a marine segment integrated in the in situ and satellite global monitoring system. The EMSO development relays upon the synergy between the scientific community and the industry to improve the European competitiveness with respect to countries like USA/Canada, NEPTUNE, VENUS and MARS projects, Taiwan, MACHO project, and Japan, DONET project. In Europe the development of an underwater network is based on previous EU-funded projects since early '90, and presently supported by EU initiatives. The EMSO infrastructure will constitute the extension to the sea of the land-based networks. Examples of data recorded by seafloor observatories will be presented. EMSO is presently at the stage of Preparatory Phase (PP), funded in the EC FP7 Capacities Programme. The project has started in April 2008 and will last 4 years with the participation of 12 Institutions representing 12 countries. EMSO potential will be significantly increased also with the interaction with other Research Infrastructures addressed to Earth Science. 2. IFREMER-Institut Français de Recherche pour l'exploitation de la mer (France, ref. Roland Person); KDM-Konsortium Deutsche Meeresforschung e.V. (Germany, ref. Christoph Waldmann); IMI-Irish Marine Institute (Ireland, ref. Michael Gillooly); UTM-CSIC-Unidad de

  13. Mapping Seafloor Tectonics from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandwell, D. T.; Smith, W. H.

    2005-12-01

    Our current understanding of the topography and tectonics of the ocean basins is largely derived from dense satellite altimeter measurements of the marine gravity field combined with sparse geophysical measurements from research vessels. First generation satellite altimetry was initiated in the 1970s by NASA with the Skylab and GEOS-3 missions, followed by the brief but highly successful Seasat mission of 1978. Seasat provided the first global view of the marine gravity field, well illustrated by Bill Haxby's maps of the early 1980s. It is difficult to express the excitement in the scientific community when the global signatures of the postulated ridges, transforms, and subduction zones were revealed. Moreover, Seasat proved that non-repeat orbit altimetry was the obvious way to map the ocean basins and the US Navy quickly developed Geosat in 1985 to finish the job. For 10 years the Geosat data remained classified until ESA's ERS-1 duplicated the secret information. The sudden availability of dense measurements from these second generation altimeters (Geosat and ERS-1) is perhaps the most important ocean science observation in the last two decades. These data provided not only a spectacular confirmation of plate tectonics but also partly revealed smaller-scale structures including thousands of seamounts, propagating rifts, ridge jumps, and global-scale variations in seafloor roughness. In addition, the dense gravity information was combined with sparse ship soundings to construct global bathymetry maps at ~10 km resolution - a great improvement over hand-drawn maps but still far worse than our current maps of Mars, Venus, and the Moon. While these data filled a huge gap in our understanding of the ocean basins, they also triggered a thirst for more. Third generation altimeters with improved range precision are on the horizon. The scientific rationale for a factor of 5 improvement in altimeter precision spans three broad areas of earth science: one, resolving the

  14. Seafloor earthquake measurement system, SEMS IV

    SciTech Connect

    Platzbecker, M.R.; Ehasz, J.P.; Franco, R.J.

    1997-07-01

    Staff of the Telemetry Technology Development Department (2664) have, in support of the U.S. Interior Department Mineral Management Services (MMS), developed and deployed the Seafloor Earthquake Measurement System IV (SEMS IV). The result of this development project is a series of three fully operational seafloor seismic monitor systems located at offshore platforms: Eureka, Grace, and Irene. The instrument probes are embedded from three to seven feet into the seafloor and hardwired to seismic data recorders installed top side at the offshore platforms. The probes and underwater cables were designed to survive the seafloor environment with an operation life of five years. The units have been operational for two years and have produced recordings of several minor earthquakes in that time. Sandia Labs will transfer operation of SEMS IV to MMS contractors in the coming months. 29 figs., 25 tabs.

  15. Wave dissipation by muddy seafloors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgar, Steve; Raubenheimer, Britt

    2008-04-01

    Muddy seafloors cause tremendous dissipation of ocean waves. Here, observations and numerical simulations of waves propagating between 5- and 2-m water depths across the muddy Louisiana continental shelf are used to estimate a frequency- and depth-dependent dissipation rate function. Short-period sea (4 s) and swell (7 s) waves are shown to transfer energy to long-period (14 s) infragravity waves, where, in contrast with theories for fluid mud, the observed dissipation rates are highest. The nonlinear energy transfers are most rapid in shallow water, consistent with the unexpected strong increase of the dissipation rate with decreasing depth. These new results may explain why the southwest coast of India offers protection for fishing (and for the 15th century Portuguese fleet) only after large waves and strong currents at the start of the monsoon move nearshore mud banks from about 5- to 2-m water depth. When used with a numerical nonlinear wave model, the new dissipation rate function accurately simulates the large reduction in wave energy observed in the Gulf of Mexico.

  16. Seafloor seismic measurements in the southern Bering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickerson, J. P.

    Plans are being made to monitor the earthquake response of seafloor sediments in and near southwestern Alaskan offshore leasing areas. These sites possess high seismicity for which limited data exist. The Sandia Seafloor Earthquake Measurement System (SEMS) would be deployed to collect the necessary data over an eight year time span. A proposal for a joint industry-government project to accomplish this goal has been circulated.

  17. Crustal deformation at the Nankai Trough estimated from seafloor geodetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Tadokoro, K.; Ikuta, R.; Okuda, T.; Nagai, S.; Kuno, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Philippine Sea plate subducts beneath the southwest Japan along the Nankai Trough with a rate of about 4-6 cm/yr, where megathrust earthquakes have repeatedly occurred every 100-150 years. Because the region expected to be the hypocentral area of next Nankai and Tonankai earthquakes is almost located in offshore area, it is important to know the spatio-temporal variation of crustal deformation accompanied with plate interaction in high precision. For this issue, we have conducted seafloor geodetic observation at the Nankai Trough using a GPS/Acoustic technique since 2004. In this system, we estimate the position of a surveying vessel by Kinematic GPS analysis and measure the distance between the vessel and the benchmark on the seafloor by Acoustic measurements. Next we determine the location of the benchmark. For the repeatability of this observation, the location of benchmark is determined within a precision of 2-3 cm at horizontal components. Several seafloor benchmarks are located at the Nankai Trough, which are individually operated by Japan Coast Guard, Tohoku University, and Nagoya University. In the Kumano Basin, we have three seafloor benchmarks located about 60-80 km away from the deformation front of the Nankai Trough. The observations from 2005 to 2011 have illustrated that those benchmarks are moving at rates of about 4 cm/yr toward west-northwest with velocity uncertainties of about 2 cm/yr relative to the Amurian plate. In this study, to explain the crustal deformation derived from seafloor geodetic observations especially at the shallower part of the Nankai Trough, we conduct numerical simulations using finite element method and then discuss the interplate coupling at the Nankai Trough.

  18. Studying Fin Whales with Seafloor Seismic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, W. S.; Soule, D. C.; Weirathmueller, M.; Thomson, R.

    2011-12-01

    Baleen whales are found throughout the world's oceans and their welfare captivates the general public. Depending on the species, baleen whales vocalize at frequencies ranging from ~10 Hz to several kilohertz. Passive acoustic studies of whale calls are used to investigate behavior and habitat usage, monitor the recovery of populations from whaling and assess the impacts of anthropogenic sounds. Since airguns are a significant source of sound in the oceans, the research goals of academic seismologists can lead to conflicts with those who advocate for whale conservation while being unwilling to consider the societal benefits of marine geophysical studies. In contrast, studies that monitor earthquakes with ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) provide an opportunity to enhance studies of baleen whales and improve relationships with environmental advocates. The bandwidth of the typical high-frequency or intermediate-band ocean bottom seismometer overlaps the call frequency of the two largest baleen whale species; blue whales generate sequences of 10- to 20-s-long calls centered at ~16 Hz and fin whales produce long sequences of downswept 1-s-long chirps centered at ~20 Hz. Several studies have demonstrated the potential of OBS networks to monitor calling patterns and determine tracks for fin and blue whales. We will summarize the results from a study to track fin whales near the Endeavour hydrothermal vent fields on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and investigate a potential correlation between the density of whales and enhanced zooplankton found throughout the water column overlying the vent fields. From 2003-2006 an 8-station local seismic network that was designed to monitor hydrothermal earthquakes also recorded ~300,000 fin whale vocalizations, mostly in the fall and winter. Automatic picking and localization techniques that are analogous to those used to analyze earthquakes are employed to determine whale tracks. The tracks are then used to interpret calling patterns in the

  19. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor; Hearing loss - acoustic; Tinnitus - acoustic ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  20. Bottom Interaction in Long Range Acoustic Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    the implications for seafloor receptions in shallower water. OBJECTIVES On previous NPAL (North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory) tests acoustic...south, east, and west from the DVLA in comparable water depths). Water depth along the 3200km path to the furthest transmission station varied between...been carried out on all of the available OBS hydrophone and geophone data. The geophone (South OBS, East OBS and West OBS) and DVLA (lower most

  1. A High-Speed Optical Modem Communication System for CORK Seafloor Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, N.; Tivey, M.; Ware, J.; Pontbriand, C.; Pelletier, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    High-speed communications underwater is an increasing requirement for data intensive seafloor sensors. Acoustic modems provide dependable long-range communications underwater, but data rates are limited to <57Kbps. Free-water optical modems (OMs) offer high data rate, 10Mbps communications over a range of 200 m - a distance for ROVs, AUVs or wire-lowered packages to communicate without the need to directly plug-in or retrieve the instrument. Over the past 4 years, we have demonstrated the functionality and utility of OM technology using a CORK borehole observatory as a test case. A CORK represents all of the basic components required for a seafloor observatory: a stable environment for long-term continuous measurements of earth and ocean phenomena, access to a unique environment below the seafloor and a standard communication interface. The CORK-OM features a high-bandwidth, low-latency optical system based on LED emitters and PMT receivers and an acoustic command and control system. OM tests established a communication link from 20 to 200 meters range at rates of 1, 5 and 10 Mbps with no bit errors. The seafloor OM was plugged into the CORK's existing underwater wet mateable connector and provided additional power to the CORK to boost the data rate to 1 Hz from the normal 1 minute sample period. To communicate with the seafloor CORK-OM, a number of different modalities were used. One method was an OM mounted to a CTD frame on a lowered wire from a ship with an SDSL link over the conducting wire. Other methods utilized OMs mounted to both ROV Jason and submersible Alvin. We deployed OMs at two CORKs in 2012 in the northeast pacific at sites 857D and 1025C. The CORKs were visited in 2013 by a vessel of opportunity to download data and were put into sleep mode. The CORKs were revisited in 2014, woken up and successfully interrogated for data. ALVIN retrieved the CORK-OMs for corrosion, biofouling and battery performance assessment. We also performed tests of a next

  2. Installation of a seafloor geodetic network offshore northern Chile (GeoSEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Heidrun; Lange, Dietrich; Hannemann, Katrin; Petersen, Florian; Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The seafloor stores crucial information on sub-seafloor processes, including stress, elastic strain, and earthquake and tsunami generation. This information may be extracted through the nascent scientific field of seafloor geodesy. The target of the recently installed GeoSEA array (Geodetic Earthquake Observatory on the SEAfloor) is to measure crustal deformation in mm-scale on the marine forearc and outer rise of the South American subduction system around 21°S. This segment of the Nazca-South American plate boundary has last ruptured in an earthquake in 1877 and was identified as a seismic gap prior to the 2014 Iquique/Pisagua earthquake (Mw=8.1). The southern portion of the segment remains unbroken by a recent earthquake. Seafloor geodetic measurements provide a way to monitor crustal deformation at high resolution comparable to the satellite-based GPS technique upon which terrestrial geodesy is largely based. The GeoSEA Network consists of autonomous seafloor transponders installed on 4 m high tripods, which were lowered to the seabed on the deep-sea cable of RV SONNE in December 2015. The transponders within an array intercommunicate via acoustic signals for a period of up to 3.5 years and measure acoustic distance, tilt and pressure. An additional component of the network is GeoSURF, a self-steering autonomous surface vehicle (Wave Glider), which monitors system health and is capable to upload the seafloor data to the sea surface and to transfer it via satellite. We have chosen three areas on the middle and lower slope and the outer rise for the set-up of three sub-arrays. The array in Area 1 on the middle continental slope consists of 8 transponders located in pairs on four topographic ridges, which are surface expressions of faults at depth. Area 2 is located on the outer rise seaward of the trench where 5 stations monitor extension across plate-bending related normal faults. The third area is located at water depth >5000 m on the lower continental slope

  3. EMSO: European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favali, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    EMSO, a Research Infrastructure listed within ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) Roadmap (Report 2006, http://cordis.europa.eu/esfri/roadmap.htm), is the European-scale network of multidisciplinary seafloor observatories from the Arctic to the Black Sea with the scientific objective of long-term real-time monitoring of processes related to geosphere/biosphere/hydrosphere interactions. EMSO will enhance our understanding of processes through long time series appropriate to the scale of the phenomena, constituting the new frontier of studying Earth interior, deep-sea biology and chemistry and ocean processes. The development of an underwater network is based on previous EU-funded projects since early '90 and is being supported by several EU initiatives, as the on-going ESONET-NoE, coordinated by IFREMER (2007-2011, http://www.esonet-emso.org/esonet-noe/), and aims at gathering together the Research Community of the Ocean Observatories. In 2006 the FP7 Capacities Programme launched a call for Preparatory Phase (PP) projects, that will provide the support to create the legal and organisational entities in charge of managing the infrastructures, and coordinating the financial effort among the countries. Under this call the EMSO-PP project was approved in 2007 with the coordination of INGV and the participation of other 11 Institutions of 11 countries. The project has started in April 2008 and will last 4 years. The EMSO is a key-infrastructure both for Ocean Sciences and for Solid Earth Sciences. In this respect it will enhance and complement profitably the capabilities of other European research infrastructures such as EPOS, ERICON-Aurora Borealis, and SIOS. The perspective of the synergy among EMSO and other ESFRI Research Infrastructures will be outlined. EMSO Partners: IFREMER-Institut Français de Recherche pour l'exploitation de la mer (France, ref. Roland Person); KDM-Konsortium Deutsche Meeresforschung e.V. (Germany, ref. Christoph

  4. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  5. Wavelet Preprocessing of Acoustic Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    wavelet transform to preprocess acoustic broadband signals in a system that discriminates between different classes of acoustic bursts. This is motivated by the similarity between the proportional bandwidth filters provided by the wavelet transform and those found in biological hearing systems. The experiment involves comparing statistical pattern classifier effects of wavelet and FFT preprocessed acoustic signals. The data used was from the DARPA Phase I database, which consists of artificially generated signals with real ocean background. The

  6. Normal mode solutions for seismo-acoustic propagation resulting from shear and combined wave point sources.

    PubMed

    Nealy, Jennifer L; Collis, Jon M; Frank, Scott D

    2016-04-01

    Normal mode solutions to range-independent seismo-acoustic problems are benchmarked against elastic parabolic equation solutions and then used to benchmark the shear elastic parabolic equation self-starter [Frank, Odom, and Collis, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 1358-1367 (2013)]. The Pekeris waveguide with an elastic seafloor is considered for a point source located in the ocean emitting compressional waves, or in the seafloor, emitting both compressional and shear waves. Accurate solutions are obtained when the source is in the seafloor, and when the source is at the interface between the fluid and elastic layers.

  7. Monitoring of Seafloor Crustal Deformation Along the Suruga-Nankai Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, K.; Watanabe, T.; Nagai, S.; Okuda, T.; Ikuta, R.; Eto, S.; Yasuda, K.; Sakata, T.; Sayanagi, K.

    2011-12-01

    \\ \\ \\ The Suruga-Nankai Trough is one of the active plate boundaries in the world. The Philippine Sea plate subducts beneath the Amurian (Eurasian) plate along the Suruga-Nankai Trough, causing major subduction earthquakes. The subduction earthquakes, Nankai and Tonankai earthquakes, have repeatedly occurred with intervals of about 100-150 years. Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion, Japanese Government [2011] estimates the 30-years probabilities of the next major earthquakes at 60-70 %. It is necessary to monitor crustal deformation above the source regions of the major earthquakes. The source regions are located beneath the seafloor, and we developed a system for monitoring seafloor crustal deformation [Tadokoro et al., 2006, GRL; Ikuta et al., 2008, JGR]. The system is composed of the precise acoustic ranging with ultrasonic waves and kinematic GPS positioning techniques. \\ \\ \\ We monitor seafloor crustal deformation at five sites altogether along the Suruga-Nankai Trough, three in the Kumano region and two in the Suruga region, with the use of this system. We have repeatedly measured the coordinate of seafloor benchmark installed beforehand every about 2-3 months on the average. The monitoring results, the horizontal site velocities with relative to the Amurian Plate, as of 2010 are approximately 3-4 cm/yr in the direction of N70W at the three sites in the Kumano region, and approximately 2-4 cm/yr in the direction of N85-100W at the two sites in the Suruga region. The observed horizontal seafloor crustal deformations are consistent to the plate convergence along the Suruga-Nankai Trough, showing strain accumulation before the next major subduction earthquakes. Acknowledgments: We are grateful to the captain and crews of R/Vs "Hokuto," Tokai University and "Asama," Mie Prefecture Fisheries Research Institute, Japan. This study has been promoted by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japanese Government.

  8. Seafloor bathymetry is not a paleoclimate proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olive, J. A. L.; Behn, M. D.; Ito, G.; Buck, W. R.; Escartin, J.; Howell, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have proposed that the fabric of seafloor formed at mid-ocean ridges (MORs) records rapid (23-100 kyr) fluctuations in ridge magma supply caused by sea level changes modulating melt production in the underlying mantle. We assess the plausibility of this claim using models of crustal emplacement and faulting to derive the response function of seafloor bathymetry to a fluctuating ridge magmatic flux. First, we show that crustal thickness variations inherited from melt supply modulation on Milankovitch time scales cannot generate any sizeable topography through isostatic or flexural compensation. Further, we expect this modulation to only generate limited (<< 600 m) crustal thickness variations, because the magma storage region beneath the ridge axis is sufficiently wide to damp rapid oscillations in melt flux. Second, we consider the development of topography related to volcanic extrusion on the seafloor modulated by changes in crustal thickness. We estimate this process to generate at most 40 m of topography, which could be significantly reduced by cross-axis lava flow emplacement. Finally, if seafloor bathymetry did record Milankovitch cycles, its dominant wavelengths should increase with increasing spreading rate. This is opposite to the observation of abyssal hill spacing decreasing from ~10 km down to ~2 km at slow to fast-spreading MORs. This observation is best explained by a model in which dominant seafloor wavelengths correspond to the spacing between successive normal faults that interact with dike injection at the ridge axis as they grow. Our models show that fault spacing is controlled by the time-average rate of magma injection and is insensitive to variations in injection rates on all Milankovitch frequencies. Thus, we conclude that the "climate frequencies" found in some bathymetry datasets reflect only the inherent spacing of faults, set by the mechanical properties of the lithosphere and the average MOR magma supply.

  9. Seafloor weathering buffering climate: numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, N. X.; Archer, D. E.; Abbot, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    Continental silicate weathering is widely held to consume atmospheric CO2 at a rate controlled in part by temperature, resulting in a climate-weathering feedback [Walker et al., 1981]. It has been suggested that weathering of oceanic crust of warm mid-ocean ridge flanks also has a CO2 uptake rate that is controlled by climate [Sleep and Zahnle, 2001; Brady and Gislason, 1997]. Although this effect might not be significant on present-day Earth [Caldeira, 1995], seafloor weathering may be more pronounced during snowball states [Le Hir et al., 2008], during the Archean when seafloor spreading rates were faster [Sleep and Zahnle, 2001], and on waterworld planets [Abbot et al., 2012]. Previous studies of seafloor weathering have made significant contributions using qualitative, generally one-box, models, and the logical next step is to extend this work using a spatially resolved model. For example, experiments demonstrate that seafloor weathering reactions are temperature dependent, but it is not clear whether the deep ocean temperature affects the temperature at which the reactions occur, or if instead this temperature is set only by geothermal processes. Our goal is to develop a 2-D numerical model that can simulate hydrothermal circulation and resulting alteration of oceanic basalts, and can therefore address such questions. A model of diffusive and convective heat transfer in fluid-saturated porous media simulates hydrothermal circulation through porous oceanic basalt. Unsteady natural convection is solved for using a Darcy model of porous media flow that has been extensively benchmarked. Background hydrothermal circulation is coupled to mineral reaction kinetics of basaltic alteration and hydrothermal mineral precipitation. In order to quantify seafloor weathering as a climate-weathering feedback process, this model focuses on hydrothermal reactions that influence carbon uptake as well as ocean alkalinity: silicate rock dissolution, calcium and magnesium leaching

  10. Seafloor Morphology Associated With Deep-Water Gas Plumes Near Eel Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwiazda, R.; Paull, C. K.; Caress, D. W.; Lundsten, E.; Anderson, K.; Thomas, H.

    2011-12-01

    During a surface ship multibeam mapping cruise associated with NOAA's Ocean Exploration (OE) program, five water column acoustic anomalies that extended up to 1,400 m upwards from the seafloor were encountered above both sides of the Eel Submarine Canyon off the coast of northern California (Gardner et al., 2010). These anomalies are believed to be methane gas plumes, originating from the seafloor at depths well within the gas hydrate stability field. To explore the sources of these plumes, higher resolution multi-beam bathymetry (vertical precision of 0.15 m and horizontal resolution of 1.0 m) and 1-4.5 kHz chirp seismic reflection profiles of the seafloor, surrounding these plumes, were collected in July 2011. These surveys were conducted during four 17.5-hour-long autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) dives in up to 2 km water depths. The largest persistent water column plume appears to emanate from a distinctive topographic mound that is ~650 m long, 350 m wide, and stands nearly 60 m higher than the surrounding seafloor at 1,850 m depth. This topographic mound occurs on a ~2 km wide relatively level bench formed at the base of a 3.5 km wide scallop-shaped slide scar. Chirp profiles show that at least 40 m of layered sediment drape the bottom and sidewalls of this scar, suggesting that the slope failure that shaped this landscape was not a recent event. The surface of this mound is characterized by a distinctive hummocky topography consisting of small sometimes circular ~0.5 m deep pits, local highs and lows, separated by ~0.5 m high ledges that could have been formed by irregular erosion of the bedding surfaces. A semicircular crater-like depression occurs on the flank of this mound that is ~80 m across and more than 10 m deep. Because similar seafloor textures have been observed in other AUV surveys associated with methane-derived carbonate bearing sites known to overlie nearby seafloor gas hydrate deposits (e.g., Hydrate Ridge, Bullseye Vent, Santa Monica

  11. Methods and apparatus for multi-parameter acoustic signature inspection

    DOEpatents

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Samuel, Todd J.; Valencia, Juan D.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Tucker, Brian J.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Skorpik, James R.; Reid, Larry D.; Munley, John T.; Pappas, Richard A.; Wright, Bob W.; Panetta, Paul D.; Thompson, Jason S.

    2007-07-24

    A multiparameter acoustic signature inspection device and method are described for non-invasive inspection of containers. Dual acoustic signatures discriminate between various fluids and materials for identification of the same.

  12. Geochemical Arrays at Woolsey Mound Seafloor Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleeper, K.; Wilson, R. M.; Chanton, J.; Lapham, L.; Farr, N.; Camilli, R.; Martens, C. S.; Pontbriand, C.

    2011-12-01

    A suite of geochemical monitoring arrays has been developed for the Woolsey Mound Seafloor Observatory in the northern Gulf of Mexico to evaluate the oceanographic and tectonic forcing factors on the formation and stability of gas hydrates. These arrays are designed to collect sustained, time-series data of chemical concentrations, gradients and fluxes from the subsurface to the seafloor and into the near bottom water column. A Pore Fluid Array provides time-series measurements of methane, sulfate and salinity in subsurface pore waters to evaluate microbial activity, hydrate formation and/or hydrate dissociation. A Chimney Sampler Array collects in situ chemical and physical readings at the benthic boundary. The array is designed around a vertical cylinder with a known volume and washout rate for measuring chemical gradients and flux at the seafloor. The Benthic Boundary Layer Array extends into the water column with a package of sensors in a node close to the seafloor and a similar node 20 m above the seafloor to evaluate upward, downward and transversely advecting fluids. The three arrays can be used in concert to evaluate a release of methane by the dissociation of gas hydrates: the Pore Fluid Array identifies the breakdown of gas hydrates in the subsurface, the Chimney Array determines the rate of flux at the seafloor and the Benthic Boundary Layer Array evaluates the fate of the release in the water column. Combining the data from the geochemical arrays with output from the geophysical arrays provides key information to evaluate the specific and relative importance of tectonic and oceanographic triggers for hydrate dissociation. New probes and deployment platforms have been developed for the installation and maintenance of the arrays and new systems are in place and under development for the recovery of the data. Generally, the complete array or its components have to be recovered to download the data. However, this summer 2011, a new optic modem system was

  13. Satellite altimetry reveals seafloor tectonic fabric

    SciTech Connect

    Mcadoo, D.C.; Marks, K.M. )

    1992-01-01

    Seasat altimeter observations of sea-surface topography have revealed much that was unsuspected about the marine gravity field and seafloor topography, which in conjunction with crustal/upper-mantle density variations generates short wavelength (less than 200-km) marine gravity field fluctuations. Such high-resolution altimeter data is currently available, however, only for 6 percent of the world's ocean surface area; future efforts with Geosat Geodetic Mission and ERS-1 data will expand coverage to the entire world ocean. 4 refs.

  14. Internal waves trapped below a virtual seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinney, Harry

    2016-11-01

    Numerical simulations of tidal flow over random topography with the ocean seafloor spectrum reveal that the time-averaged tidal energy converted into far field internal wave radiation arises only from topography that rises above a local "virtual" seafloor. For topography below the virtual seafloor, destructive wave interference leads to no time-averaged far field internal wave power. The concept of a virtual floor extends the applicability of linear theory to global predictions of the conversion of tidal energy into internal wave energy in the oceans. The simulations show that for increasing topographic RMS height the emergent interference of internal waves from neighboring generation sites leads to a transition in the radiated power dependence on topographic height from quadratic to linear. The internal wave power radiated by random topography is found to increase as the horizontal spatial resolution scale is decreased, down to a length scale of typically 300 m, but smaller scales generate at most a few percent of the radiated power. Tidal flow past 3D seamounts generates much less total internal wave power than that radiated by quasi-2D ridges.

  15. Macaque Monkeys Discriminate Pitch Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosch, Michael; Selezneva, Elena; Bucks, Cornelia; Scheich, Henning

    2004-01-01

    This study demonstrates that non-human primates can categorize the direction of the pitch change of tones in a sequence. Two "Macaca fascicularis" were trained in a positive-reinforcement behavioral paradigm in which they listened to sequences of a variable number of different acoustic items. The training of discriminating pitch direction was…

  16. ATRIS seafloor images – Crocker Reef, Florida, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zawada, David G.; Thornton, Lance; Thompson, Philip R.; Resnick, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Underwater digital images, single-beam bathymetry, and global positioning system (GPS) data were collected June 24-25, 2014 within a 1-km x 1-km area around Crocker Reef in the Florida Keys, USA. A total of 91,206 images of the seafloor and water column were collected along pre-defined transect lines and organized into 3 sets: track1, track2, and track3. This data release contains a subset of those images (25,485 images), all of which were used for benthic habitat classification, and contain GPS data. The data were collected using the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) shallow Along-Track Reef-Imaging System (sATRIS), a boat-based, pole-mounted sensor package for mapping shallow-water benthic environments. Two other implementations exist: A towed system called Deep ATRIS and a profiling system called Drift ATRIS. All three ATRIS implementations incorporate a digital still camera and an acoustic depth sounder.For further information regarding data collection methods refer to DOI: 10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-12-00078.1

  17. Sea-floor character and sedimentary processes of Great Round Shoal Channel, offshore Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Foster, David S.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Moser, M.S.; Stewart, H.F.; Glomb, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    The imagery, interpretive data layers, and data presented herein were derived from multibeam echo-sounder and sidescan-sonar data collected in the vicinity of Great Round Shoal Channel, the main passage through shoals located at the eastern entrance to Nantucket Sound, Massachusetts, and from the stations occupied to verify these acoustic data (fig. 1). Basic data layers show sea-floor topography, sun-illuminated shaded relief, and backscatter intensity; interpretive layers show the distributions of surficial sediment, sedimentary environments, and sea-floor features. Presented verification data include sediment grain-size analyses and a gallery of still photographs of the seabed. The multibeam and sidescan data, which together cover an approximately 39.9-km² area of sea floor, were collected during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) hydrographic survey H11079 (fig. 1). Although originally collected for charting purposes, these data provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities along this part of the Massachusetts coastline (Noji and others, 2004), show the composition and terrain of the seabed, and provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat. This publication is the third in a series of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) digital reports describing the sea-floor geology around Cape Cod. The first focused on the area off the eastern shore of the outer Cape (Poppe and others, 2006); the second on a passage through the Elizabeth Islands (Poppe and others, 2007).

  18. Effects of using inclined parametric echosounding on sub-bottom acoustic imaging and advances in buried object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Held, Philipp; Feldens, Peter; Wilken, Dennis

    2016-04-01

    This study reports an adaptation of a parametric echosounder system using 15 kHz as secondary frequency to investigate the angular response of sub-bottom backscatter strength of layered mud, providing a new method for enhanced acoustic detection of buried targets. Adaptions to achieve both vertical (0°) and non-vertical inclination (1-15°, 30°, 45° and 60°) comprise mechanical tilting of the acoustic transducer and electronic beam steering. Data were acquired at 18 m water depth at a study site characterized by a flat, muddy seafloor where a 0.1 m diameter power cable lies 1-2 m below the seafloor. Surveying the cable with vertical incidence revealed that the buried cable can hardly be discriminated against the backscatter strength of the layered mud. However, the backscatter strength of layered mud decreases strongly at >3±0.5° incidence and the layered mud echo pattern vanishes beyond 5°. As a consequence, the backscatter pattern of the buried cable is very pronounced in acoustic images gathered at 15°, 30°, 45° and 60° incidence. The size of the cable echo pattern increases linearly with incidence. These effects are attributed to reflection loss from layered mud at larger incidence and to the scattering of the 0.1 m diameter buried cable. Data analyses support the visual impression of superior detection of the cable with an up to 2.6-fold increase of the signal-to-noise ratio at 40° incidence compared to the vertical incidence case.

  19. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... search IRSA's site Unique Hits since January 2003 Acoustic Neuroma Click Here for Acoustic Neuroma Practice Guideline ... to microsurgery. One doctor's story of having an acoustic neuroma In August 1991, Dr. Thomas F. Morgan ...

  20. Sea-floor geology and topography offshore in northeastern Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Ackerman, S.D.; Glomb, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Datasets of gridded multibeam bathymetry, covering approximately 52.9 square kilometers, were used to interpret character and geology of the sea floor in northeastern Long Island Sound. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H12012, these acoustic data and the sea-floor sampling and photography stations subsequently occupied to verify the acoustic data are interpreted (1) to define the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) to provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) as part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and resource management (for example, cables, pipelines, and dredging) activities in this major east coast estuary.

  1. A Volterra series-based method for extracting target echoes in the seafloor mining environment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiming; Ji, Yaqian; Hong, Yujiu; Hao, Qi; Ma, Liyong

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the applicability of the Volterra adaptive method to predict the target echo of an ultrasonic signal in an underwater seafloor mining environment. There is growing interest in mining of seafloor minerals because they offer an alternative source of rare metals. Mining the minerals cause the seafloor sediments to be stirred up and suspended in sea water. In such an environment, the target signals used for seafloor mapping are unable to be detected because of the unavoidable presence of volume reverberation induced by the suspended sediments. The detection of target signals in reverberation is currently performed using a stochastic model (for example, the autoregressive (AR) model) based on the statistical characterisation of reverberation. However, we examined a new method of signal detection in volume reverberation based on the Volterra series by confirming that the reverberation is a chaotic signal and generated by a deterministic process. The advantage of this method over the stochastic model is that attributions of the specific physical process are considered in the signal detection problem. To test the Volterra series based method and its applicability to target signal detection in the volume reverberation environment derived from the seafloor mining process, we simulated the real-life conditions of seafloor mining in a water filled tank of dimensions of 5×3×1.8m. The bottom of the tank was covered with 10cm of an irregular sand layer under which 5cm of an irregular cobalt-rich crusts layer was placed. The bottom was interrogated by an acoustic wave generated as 16μs pulses of 500kHz frequency. This frequency is demonstrated to ensure a resolution on the order of one centimetre, which is adequate in exploration practice. Echo signals were collected with a data acquisition card (PCI 1714 UL, 12-bit). Detection of the target echo in these signals was performed by both the Volterra series based model and the AR model

  2. ATOC/Pioneer Seamount cable after 8 years on the seafloor: Observations, environmental impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, Irina; Paull, Charles K.; Kuhnz, Linda A.; Burton, Erica J.; von Thun, Susan; Gary Greene, H.; Barry, James P.

    2006-04-01

    A study was conducted on the impacts of the presence of the Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate (ATOC)/Pioneer Seamount cable on the benthos from nearshore waters adjacent to its origin at Pillar Point Air Force Station in Half Moon Bay, California to its terminus 95 km along its length on Pioneer Seamount. The coaxial Type SD cable was installed, unburied on the seafloor in 1995. Thirteen sites along the cable route were surveyed using the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) ROVs Ventana and Tiburon equipped with cable-tracking tools. Quantitative comparisons of biological communities and seafloor features between cable and control sites were performed at nine stations. Forty-two hours of video footage and 138 push cores were collected over 15.1 km of seafloor. Approximately 12.1 km of the cable was observed (13% of the cable route). This study documents the appearance and condition of the cable and the underlying seafloor, and the effects of the cable on biological communities along its route. Limited self-burial of the cable has occurred during the 8-year deployment, particularly over the continental shelf and upper slope. Cable strumming by nearshore wave action has incised rocky siltstone outcrops. Several observations of kinks and snags in the cable on the upper slope (˜240 m depth) suggest contact with trawling gear. Few changes in the abundance or distribution of benthic fauna were detectable from video observations (epifaunal) and sediment core samples (infauna). Of 17 megafaunal groups and 19 infaunal taxa, no tests evaluating the overall effect of the cable were statistically significant. While these results indicate that the biological impacts of the cable are minor at most, three megafaunal groups exhibited cable-related changes at one or more stations. Actiniarians (sea anemones) colonized the cable when it was exposed on the seafloor, and were therefore generally more abundant on the cable than in surrounding, sediment

  3. Evidence of Viscoelastic Deformation following the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake Revealed from Seafloor Geodetic Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S. I.; Sato, M.; Fujita, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Yokota, Y.; Ujihara, N.; Asada, A.

    2014-12-01

    The great Tohoku-oki earthquake (M9.0) occurred on 11th March, 2011 along the Japan Trench, off the Pacific coast of eastern Japan. The source region spreads over an area with a length of 500 km and a width of 200 km, almost all part of which is beneath the seafloor. We, the group of Japan Coast Guard (JCG), have continued repeated GPS-acoustic seafloor positioning after the Tohoku-oki earthquake at six seafloor sites in the offshore source region, the results of which are expected to provide information leading to better understandings of postseismic processes. In contrast to the coastal GNSS sites where trenchward-upward movements were reported, the offshore sites above the main rupture zone in the northern part of the source region exhibit landward displacements of tens of centimeters with significant subsidence from more than three years of repeated observations. At the sites above around the edge of the main rupture zone, smaller amount of trench-normal movements were found. Although the terrestrial movements were reasonably interpreted by afterslip beneath the coastal area, these offshore results are rather consistent with effects predicted from viscoelastic relaxation in the upper mantle, providing definitive evidence of its occurrence. On the other hand, a site in the southern part of the source region with relatively small coseismic slips shows not only trenchward movements with logarithmical decay with time but also significant subsidence, which imply superposition of effects from viscoelastic relaxation and afterslip. In this presentation, we report our latest observation results and discuss postseismic movements on the seafloor just above the source region for more than three years after the earthquake.

  4. Development of GPS/A Seafloor Geodetic Network Along Japan Trench and Onset of Its Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, M.; Fujimoto, H.; Osada, Y.; Ohta, Y.; Yamamoto, J.; Tadokoro, K.; Okuda, T.; Watanabe, T.; Nagai, S.; Kenji, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Tohoku-oki earthquake in 2011 revealed that an M9-class giant earthquake could occur even in the old subduction zone and that coseismic slip can reach its frontal wedge, where we considered no significant stress had been accumulated in. One of the leading figure of such finding is in situ seafloor geodetic measurement, such as GPS/A technique for horizontal displacement and pressure gauge for vertical displacement. Japan Coast Guard and Japanese university group had developed several GPS/A sites near the source region of the Tohoku-oki earthquake and detected quite large coseismic movements over 20 m in there. Displacement vectors observed these sites showed systematic variation, i.e., mainly confined in the off-Miyagi area and getting larger near the trench. However, subsequent post-seismic deformation shows inexplicable distribution. In order to elucidate this complex feature, MEXT Japan has decided to construct dense and widely-extended GPS/A network along Japan trench, including deep area (~6000m). We, Tohoku and Nagoya universities, have firstly developed high-powered seafloor transponders with an omnidirectional acoustic unit that works at 6000 m deep ocean and enable acoustic ranging over 13 km slant length. In addition, using high-energy density battery, its lifetime is expected 10 years with normal operation. Secondly, we examined the optimal distribution of GPS/A sites forming a network, taken pre-existing sites into consideration. The new network consists of 20 sites (roughly four transponders at a single site and 86 transponders in total). The distribution is dense near the area of complex post-seismic deformation and extended over 400 km to cover the adjacent area of the source region, in where induced earthquake may be expected. The largest obstacle to draw network plan is seafloor topography. Because a GPS/A site is a seafloor benchmark, its installation must be on flat and locally stable spot. Since a single GPS/A site consists of three or more

  5. How supercontinents and superoceans affect seafloor roughness.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Joanne M; Müller, R Dietmar; Roest, Walter R; Wessel, Paul; Smith, Walter H F

    2008-12-18

    Seafloor roughness varies considerably across the world's ocean basins and is fundamental to controlling the circulation and mixing of heat in the ocean and dissipating eddy kinetic energy. Models derived from analyses of active mid-ocean ridges suggest that ocean floor roughness depends on seafloor spreading rates, with rougher basement forming below a half-spreading rate threshold of 30-35 mm yr(-1) (refs 4, 5), as well as on the local interaction of mid-ocean ridges with mantle plumes or cold-spots. Here we present a global analysis of marine gravity-derived roughness, sediment thickness, seafloor isochrons and palaeo-spreading rates of Cretaceous to Cenozoic ridge flanks. Our analysis reveals that, after eliminating effects related to spreading rate and sediment thickness, residual roughness anomalies of 5-20 mGal remain over large swaths of ocean floor. We found that the roughness as a function of palaeo-spreading directions and isochron orientations indicates that most of the observed excess roughness is not related to spreading obliquity, as this effect is restricted to relatively rare occurrences of very high obliquity angles (>45 degrees ). Cretaceous Atlantic ocean floor, formed over mantle previously overlain by the Pangaea supercontinent, displays anomalously low roughness away from mantle plumes and is independent of spreading rates. We attribute this observation to a sub-Pangaean supercontinental mantle temperature anomaly leading to slightly thicker than normal Late Jurassic and Cretaceous Atlantic crust, reduced brittle fracturing and smoother basement relief. In contrast, ocean crust formed above Pacific superswells, probably reflecting metasomatized lithosphere underlain by mantle at only slightly elevated temperatures, is not associated with basement roughness anomalies. These results highlight a fundamental difference in the nature of large-scale mantle upwellings below supercontinents and superoceans, and their impact on oceanic crustal

  6. Anhydrite precipitation in seafloor hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theissen-Krah, Sonja; Rüpke, Lars H.

    2016-04-01

    The composition and metal concentration of hydrothermal fluids venting at the seafloor is strongly temperature-dependent and fluids above 300°C are required to transport metals to the seafloor (Hannington et al. 2010). Ore-forming hydrothermal systems and high temperature vents in general are often associated with faults and fracture zones, i.e. zones of enhanced permeabilities that act as channels for the uprising hydrothermal fluid (Heinrich & Candela, 2014). Previous numerical models (Jupp and Schultz, 2000; Andersen et al. 2015) however have shown that high permeabilities tend to decrease fluid flow temperatures due to mixing with cold seawater and the resulting high fluid fluxes that lead to short residence times of the fluid near the heat source. A possible mechanism to reduce the permeability and thereby to focus high temperature fluid flow are mineral precipitation reactions that clog the pore space. Anhydrite for example precipitates from seawater if it is heated to temperatures above ~150°C or due to mixing of seawater with hydrothermal fluids that usually have high Calcium concentrations. We have implemented anhydrite reactions (precipitation and dissolution) in our finite element numerical models of hydrothermal circulation. The initial results show that the precipitation of anhydrite efficiently alters the permeability field, which affects the hydrothermal flow field as well as the resulting vent temperatures. C. Andersen et al. (2015), Fault geometry and permeability contrast control vent temperatures at the Logatchev 1 hydrothermal field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Geology, 43(1), 51-54. M. D. Hannington et al. (2010), Modern Sea-Floor Massive Sulfides and Base Metal Resources: Toward an Estimate of Global Sea-Floor Massive Sulfide Potential, in The Challenge of Finding New Mineral Resources: Global Metallogeny, Innovative Exploration, and New Discoveries, edited by R. J. Goldfarb, E. E. Marsh and T. Monecke, pp. 317-338, Society of Economic Geologists

  7. The inherent instability of leveed seafloor channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorrell, Robert M.; Burns, Alan D.; McCaffrey, William D.

    2015-05-01

    New analytical models demonstrate that under aggradational flow conditions, seafloor channel-levee systems are inherently unstable; both channel area and stability necessarily decrease at long timescales. In time such systems must avulse purely through internal (autogenic) forcing. Although autogenic instabilities likely arise over long enough time for additional allogenic forcing to be expected, channel-levee sensitivity to variations in flow character depends on the prior degree of system evolution. Recalibrated modern Amazon Fan avulsion timings are consistent with this model, challenging accepted interpretations of avulsion triggering.

  8. Quantifying Methane Flux from a Prominent Seafloor Crater with Water Column Imagery Filtering and Bubble Quantification Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, G. A.; Gharib, J. J.; Doolittle, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    Methane gas flux from the seafloor to atmosphere is an important variable for global carbon cycle and climate models, yet is poorly constrained. Methodologies used to estimate seafloor gas flux commonly employ a combination of acoustic and optical techniques. These techniques often use hull-mounted multibeam echosounders (MBES) to quickly ensonify large volumes of the water column for acoustic backscatter anomalies indicative of gas bubble plumes. Detection of these water column anomalies with a MBES provides information on the lateral distribution of the plumes, the midwater dimensions of the plumes, and their positions on the seafloor. Seafloor plume locations are targeted for visual investigations using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to determine bubble emission rates, venting behaviors, bubble sizes, and ascent velocities. Once these variables are measured in-situ, an extrapolation of gas flux is made over the survey area using the number of remotely-mapped flares. This methodology was applied to a geophysical survey conducted in 2013 over a large seafloor crater that developed in response to an oil well blowout in 1983 offshore Papua New Guinea. The site was investigated by multibeam and sidescan mapping, sub-bottom profiling, 2-D high-resolution multi-channel seismic reflection, and ROV video and coring operations. Numerous water column plumes were detected in the data suggesting vigorously active vents within and near the seafloor crater (Figure 1). This study uses dual-frequency MBES datasets (Reson 7125, 200/400 kHz) and ROV video imagery of the active hydrocarbon seeps to estimate total gas flux from the crater. Plumes of bubbles were extracted from the water column data using threshold filtering techniques. Analysis of video images of the seep emission sites within the crater provided estimates on bubble size, expulsion frequency, and ascent velocity. The average gas flux characteristics made from ROV video observations is extrapolated over the number

  9. Long Range Acoustic Communication in Deep Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    ocean is challenging due to the substantial propagation loss, multipath delay spread , and channel variability. Analysis of deep-water data collected...were exploited. In addition, a robust algorithm (double differentially coded spread spectrum) was demonstrated recently using the LRAC10 data [10...Spray gliders with a commercial acoustic modem for data retrieval from subsurface moorings and seafloor systems installed with a similar modem in deep

  10. Acoustic Differences between Humorous and Sincere Communicative Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoicka, Elena; Gattis, Merideth

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that the acoustic features of speech discriminate between positive and negative communicative intentions, such as approval and prohibition. Two studies investigated whether acoustic features of speech can discriminate between two positive communicative intentions: humour and sweet-sincerity, where sweet-sincerity involved…

  11. Seafloor off Lighthouse Point Park, Santa Cruz, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Gibbons, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The seafloor off Lighthouse Point Park, Santa Cruz, California, is extremely varied, with sandy flats, boulder fields, faults, and complex bedrock ridges. These ridges support rich marine ecosystems; some of them form the "reefs" that produce world-class surf breaks. Colors indicate seafloor depth, from red-orange (about 2 meters or 7 feet) to magenta (25 meters or 82 feet).

  12. Seafloor off Natural Bridges State Beach, Santa Cruz, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Gibbons, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The seafloor off Natural Bridges State Beach, Santa Cruz, California, is extremely varied, with sandy flats, boulder fields, faults, and complex bedrock ridges. These ridges support rich marine ecosystems; some of them form the "reefs" that produce world-class surf breaks. Colors indicate seafloor depth, from red-orange (about 2 meters or 7 feet) to magenta (25 meters or 82 feet).

  13. Seafloor off Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Gibbons, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The seafloor off Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California, is extremely varied, with sandy flats, boulder fields, faults, and complex bedrock ridges. These ridges support rich marine ecosystems; some of them form the "reefs" that produce world-class surf breaks. Colors indicate seafloor depth, from red-orange (about 2 meters or 7 feet) to magenta (25 meters or 82 feet)

  14. Seafloor morphology in the different domains of the Calabrian Arc subduction complex - Ionian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riminucci, F.; Polonia, A.; Torelli, L.; Mussoni, P.

    2010-05-01

    The Calabrian Arc (CA) is a subduction system that develops along the African-Eurasian plate boundary in the Ionian Sea and connects the E-W trending Sicilian Maghrebian belt with the NW-SE trending Southern Apennines. The first systematic geophysical investigation in the offshore region of the CA was conducted during the 70's by the Institute of Marine Geology (now ISMAR) with the R/V 'Bannock' [1]. In the last 30 years, further geophysical data (high penetration multichannel seismics, CHIRP and multibeam data) has been acquired in the offshore of the CA, down to the Ionian Abyssal Plain. The integrated interpretation of the existing geophysical data [2] has outlined the regional architecture of the subduction complex, the main tectonic features absorbing plate motion and variation of seafloor morphology in the different structural domains. Pre-stack depth migrated seismic profiles has revealed that the accretionary complex is constituted by two distinct wedges whose geometry, structural style and seafloor morphology widely vary. The outermost accretionary wedge has been emplaced in post-messinian times. It is a salt-bearing complex as pointed out by the internal structure of the wedge (acoustically transparent assemblage), very low taper angle and high seismic velocities. The seafloor shows a rough morphology, short wavelength folds and depressions superimposed on a rather constant gentle regional slope. Landward of the outer wedge, the evaporites are no longer present and the transition to the clastic rock assemblage is reflected in a different structural architecture, which shows steeper slopes and a succession of topographic scarps separated by sedimentary basins and mid slope terraces. The topographic scarps are controlled in depth by a series of high angle landward dipping reflectors, that we interpreted as out of sequence thrust faults absorbing shortening at the rear of the wedge. Landward of the inner wedge a mid slope terrace develops (inner plateau

  15. Outdoor Synthetic Aperture Acoustic Ground Target Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-19

    1341 (2003). [11] C. A. Dimarzio, T. Shi, F. J. Blonigen et al., “ Laser -Induced Acoustic Landmine Detection,” The Journal Of The Acoustical Society...High Frequency A/S Coupling For Ap Buried Landmine Detection Using Laser Doppler Vibrometers,” Proc. SPIE 5415(1), 35-41 (2004). [16] Bishop, S... Dolphin Echolocation Clicks For Target Discrimination,” The Journal Of The Acoustical Society Of America 124(1), 657-666 (2008). [20] Y. Nakamura

  16. Seafloor seismological/geodetic observations in the rupture area of the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Ryota; Shinohara, Masanao; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-01

    A number of important aspects of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (Mw 9.0) were clarified by the seafloor seismological and geodetic observation above the rupture area of the earthquake. Besides the extraordinarily large coseismic displacements, various kinds of slow slip phenomena associated with intensive micro-seismicity on the plate boundary fault were identified by near field ocean bottom seismographs and seafloor geodetic observation networks. The Tohoku-oki earthquake was preceded by evident foreshock activity with a spatial expansion of this seismicity. The activity became significantly intense after the occurrence of the largest foreshock two days before the mainshock rupture. During the period, clear continuous seafloor deformation was identified caused by the aseismic slip following the largest foreshock. Another different type of aseismic slip event had occurred before this pre-imminent activity had started about a month before the largest foreshock happened. The observed increased seismicity associated with aseismic slip suggests that there must have been some chain reaction like interplay of seismic and interseismic slips before the large earthquake broke out. However, no evident deformation signals were observed indicating acceleration of fault slip immediately before the mainshock. Seafloor geodetic measurements reveals that the postseismic deformation around the rupture area of the Tohoku-oki earthquake shows complex spatial pattern and the complexity is mostly due to significant viscoelastic relaxation induced by the huge coseismic slip. The effects of viscoelastic deformation makes it difficult to identify the deformation associated with the after slip or regaining of interplate coupling and requires us to enhance the abilities of seafloor monitoring to detect the slip activities on the fault. We started an array of seismometer arrays observation including broad-band seismographs to detect and locate slow-slip events and low-frequency tremors

  17. Mapping the seafloor geology offshore of Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, Walter A.; Andrews, Brian D.

    2006-01-01

    Geologic and bathymetric maps help us understand the evolutionary history of the Massachusetts coast and the processes that have shaped it. The maps show the distribution of bottom types (for example, bedrock, gravel, sand, mud) and water depths over large areas of the seafloor. In turn, these two fundamental parameters largely determine the species of flora and fauna that inhabit a particular area. Knowledge of bottom types and water depths provides a framework for mapping benthic habitats and managing marine resources. The need for coastal–zone mapping to inform policy and management is widely recognized as critical for mitigating hazards, creating resource inventories, and tracking environmental changes (National Research Council, 2004; U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, 2004).

  18. Hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers,

    SciTech Connect

    Rona, P.A.; Bostrom, K.; Laubier, L.; Smith, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    This book examines research on the description and interpretation of hydrothermal and associated phenomena at seafloor spreading centers. An interdisciplinary overview of the subject is presented, including geological, geophysical, geochemical, and biological discoveries. The implications of the discoveries for understanding the earth's heat transfer, geochemical mass balances and cycles, mineralization, and biological adaptation are discussed. Topics considered include geologic setting (e.g., the four dimensions of the spreading axis, geological processes of the mid-ocean ridge), hydrothermal convection (e.g., oxygen and hydrogen isotope studies, the basic physics of water penetration into hot rock), Iceland and oceanic ridges (e.g., chemical evidence from Icelandic geothermal systems, the physical environment of hydrothermal systems), mass balances and cycles (e.g., reduced gases and bacteria in hydrothermal fluids, the effects of hydrothermal activity on sedimentary organic matter), ferromanganese deposits, hydrothermal mineralization, and the biology of hydrothermal vents.

  19. Hydrothermal mineralization at seafloor spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    1984-01-01

    The recent recognition that metallic mineral deposits are concentrated by hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers constitutes a scientific breakthrough that opens active sites at seafloor spreading centers as natural laboratories to investigate ore-forming processes of such economically useful deposits as massive sulfides in volcanogenic rocks on land, and that enhances the metallic mineral potential of oceanic crust covering two-thirds of the Earth both beneath ocean basins and exposed on land in ophiolite belts. This paper reviews our knowledge of processes of hydrothermal mineralization and the occurrence and distribution of hydrothermal mineral deposits at the global oceanic ridge-rift system. Sub-seafloor hydrothermal convection involving circulation of seawater through fractured rocks of oceanic crust driven by heat supplied by generation of new lithosphere is nearly ubiquitous at seafloor spreading centers. However, ore-forming hydrothermal systems are extremely localized where conditions of anomalously high thermal gradients and permeability increase hydrothermal activity from the ubiquitous low-intensity background level (⩽ 200°C) to high-intensity characterized by high temperatures ( > 200-c.400°C), and a rate and volume of flow sufficient to sustain chemical reactions that produce acid, reducing, metal-rich primary hydrothermal solutions. A series of mineral phases with sulfides and oxides as high- and low-temperature end members, respectively, are precipitated along the upwelling limb and in the discharge zone of single-phase systems as a function of increasing admixture of normal seawater. The occurrence of hydrothermal mineral deposits is considered in terms of spatial and temporal frames of reference. Spatial frames of reference comprise structural features along-axis (linear sections that are the loci of seafloor spreading alternating with transform faults) and perpendicular to axis (axial zone of volcanic extrusion and marginal

  20. Seafloor studies of Mamala Bay, Honolulu, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torresan, Michael E.

    No comprehensive study of the effects of disposal of dredge spoils has been conducted to determine if the environment has suffered. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has regularly dredged the shipping channels of Honolulu Harbor and Pearl Harbor for commercial and military purposes. The 5-year frequency for new dredging activity has led to the formation of extensive offshore wide deposits of relatively coarse sediments being created in a sedimentary environment that naturally collects much finer-grained materials. At the same time, the rapid growth of Honolulu and its suburban region over the past 3 decades has added nutrient-enriched sewage outfall to the artificially-heavy sediment load. The combined effects of dredge-spoil disposal and contaminant loads are not well-documented, and are poorly understood. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a comprehensive study to characterize the seafloor of Mamala Bay.In 1993, the USGS initiated a program sponsored by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that produced a detailed map of the seafloor, especially of the distribution of dredge spoils, and a preliminary analysis of the environmental effects of dredge-spoils disposal and the chemical effects of the introduction of nutrient-rich outfall. Part of the work would involve sediment sampling, biological testing, and evaluation. Of particular interest is tissue sampling and analysis of endemic shrimp to determine the rates of absorption of toxic elements, such as heavy metals, that are easily brought into the food chain.

  1. Development of a Wideband Acoustic Recording Tag to Assess the Acoustic Behavior of Marine Wildlife

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Atlantic and Pacific Oceans . Many challenges arose during the project, however, extending the development schedule far longer than originally...supported applications NOAA NOAA Ocean Acoustics Program Dr. Dajun Tang Seafloor geoacoustics and geophysics ONR 321OA, NOAA University of Washington Tang...While high frequencies require greater gain, low frequencies (below ∼1 kHz) typically require less. Ambient ocean noise is strongest at low

  2. Seafloor Scattering in Shallow Water Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-18

    Topographical information for the seabed was obtained by Anthony Lyons using the NURC photogrammetry system [5], where surface height fields for an...acoustic backscatter was derived. Photographs captured using the NURC photogrammetry system were calibrated and processed according to standard...for the remote sensing of benthic activity. These models will likely be complex, and will require experimental verification using a photogrammetry

  3. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  4. The North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory deep-water acoustic propagation experiments in the Philippine Sea.

    PubMed

    Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Mercer, James A; Andrew, Rex K; Dushaw, Brian D; Baggeroer, Arthur B; Heaney, Kevin D; D'Spain, Gerald L; Colosi, John A; Stephen, Ralph A; Kemp, John N; Howe, Bruce M; Van Uffelen, Lora J; Wage, Kathleen E

    2013-10-01

    A series of experiments conducted in the Philippine Sea during 2009-2011 investigated deep-water acoustic propagation and ambient noise in this oceanographically and geologically complex region: (i) the 2009 North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory (NPAL) Pilot Study/Engineering Test, (ii) the 2010-2011 NPAL Philippine Sea Experiment, and (iii) the Ocean Bottom Seismometer Augmentation of the 2010-2011 NPAL Philippine Sea Experiment. The experimental goals included (a) understanding the impacts of fronts, eddies, and internal tides on acoustic propagation, (b) determining whether acoustic methods, together with other measurements and ocean modeling, can yield estimates of the time-evolving ocean state useful for making improved acoustic predictions, (c) improving our understanding of the physics of scattering by internal waves and spice, (d) characterizing the depth dependence and temporal variability of ambient noise, and (e) understanding the relationship between the acoustic field in the water column and the seismic field in the seafloor. In these experiments, moored and ship-suspended low-frequency acoustic sources transmitted to a newly developed distributed vertical line array receiver capable of spanning the water column in the deep ocean. The acoustic transmissions and ambient noise were also recorded by a towed hydrophone array, by acoustic Seagliders, and by ocean bottom seismometers.

  5. First Observation of Coseismic Seafloor Crustal Deformation due to M7 Class Earthquakes in the Philippine Sea Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, K.; Ikuta, R.; Ando, M.; Okuda, T.; Sugimoto, S.; Besana, G. M.; Kuno, M.

    2005-12-01

    The Mw7.3 and 7.5 earthquakes (Off Kii-Peninsula Earthquakes) occurred close to the source region of the anticipated Tonankai Trough in September 5, 2004. The focal mechanisms of the two earthquakes have no low angle nodal planes, which shows that the earthquakes are intraplate earthquakes in the Philippine Sea Plate. We observed coseismic horizontal displacement due to the Off Kii-Peninsula Earthquakes by means of a system for observing seafloor crustal deformation, which is the first observation of coseismic seafloor displacement in the world. We have developed a system for observing seafloor crustal deformation. The observation system is composed of 1) acoustic measurement between a ship transducer and sea-bottom transponders, and 2) kinematic GPS positioning of the observation vessel. We have installed a seafloor benchmark close to the epicenters of the Off Kii-Peninsula Earthquakes. The benchmark is composed of three sea-bottom transponders. The location of benchmark is defined as the weight center of the three transponders. We can determine the location of benchmark with an accuracy of about 5 cm at each observation. We have repeatedly measured the seafloor benchmark six times up to now: 1) July 12-16 and 21-22, 2004, 2) November 9-10, 3) January 19, 2005, 4) May 18-20, 5) July 19-20, and 6) August 18-19 and 29-30. The Off Kii-Peninsula Earthquakes occurred during the above monitoring period. The coseismic horizontal displacement of about 21 cm toward SSE was observed at our seafloor benchmark. The displacement is 3.5 times as large as the maximum displacement observed by on land GPS network in Japan, GEONET. The monitoring of seafloor crustal deformation is effective to detect the deformations associated with earthquakes occurring in ocean areas. This study is promoted by "Research Revolution 2002" of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. We are grateful to the captain and crews of Research Vessel, Asama, of Mie Prefectural

  6. Acoustic Seaglider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-07

    a national naval responsibility. Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial...problem and acoustic navigation and communications within the context of distributed autonomous persistent undersea surveillance sensor networks...Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial coherence and the description of ambient

  7. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  8. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  9. High-directivity acoustic antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Sum, H. M. A.

    1974-01-01

    Acoustic antenna with unique electronic steering control is used to identify and define aerodynamic noise sources in free field, particularly in wind tunnel which is quite reverberant. Provision is made for high directivity as well as improved discrimination against unwanted background noise such as reverberation or echoes.

  10. Seafloor Spreading Reorganization South of Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, R. N.; Martinez, F.; Benediktsdottir, A.; Hoskuldsson, A.

    2011-12-01

    There is a major ongoing diachronous reorganization of North Atlantic seafloor spreading occurring at present south of Iceland, from an orthogonal ridge/transform geometry to the present oblique spreading geometry without transform faults on the Reykjanes Ridge. This reorganization is presently interpreted as a thermal phenomenon, with a pulse of warmer mantle expanding away from the Iceland plume causing a progressive change in subaxial mantle rheology from brittle to ductile, so that transform faults can no longer be maintained. Given that this is certainly the most obvious and arguably the type-example of active plate boundary reorganization, it is somewhat surprising that a thermal mechanism has near universal acceptance here whereas most if not all other seafloor spreading reorganizations are equally universally thought to result from the tectonic rift propagation mechanism. This suggests the possibility that either the thermal model might be wrong here, or that the propagating rift (PR) model might be wrong elsewhere. The reason the PR alternative was ignored here was that the younger seafloor record flanking the Reykjanes Ridge consisting of V-shaped ridges, troughs & scarps (VSRs) enclosed by the reorganization wake seemed to prove that there had been no rift propagation. It had long been thought that these VSRs were symmetric about the spreading axis, & if this conventional wisdom (that led directly to the pulsing Iceland plume model) were true, rift propagation, which must produce asymmetry, could not have occurred. However, our expedition collected marine geophysical data that showed that the VSRs actually have an asymmetric geometry consistent with rift propagation, not with previous pulsing plume models, & thus they can no longer be considered convincing proof of a pulsing Iceland plume. Although we had previously noted that plume pulses might drive the propagators away from Iceland, a significant new result (Benediktsdóttir et al., 2011) is that

  11. Sea-floor character and surface processes in the vicinity of Quicks Hole, Elizabeth Islands, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Foster, David S.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Butman, Bradford; Moser, M.S.; Stewart, H.F.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (MA CZM), is producing detailed geologic maps of the coastal sea floor. The imagery, interpretive data layers, and data presented herein were derived from multibeam echo-sounder and sidescan sonar surveys conducted in the vicinity of Quicks Hole, a passage through the Elizabeth Islands, which extend in a chain southwest off Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and from the stations occupied to verify these acoustic data (fig. 1). Basic data layers show sea-floor topography, sun-illuminated shaded relief, and backscatter intensity; interpretive layers show the distributions of surficial sediment, sedimentary environments, and sea-floor features. Presented verification data include sediment grain-size analyses and a gallery of still photographs of the seabed. The multibeam and sidescan data, which cover an approximately 22.9-km2 area of sea floor that extends from Vineyard Sound on the south to Buzzards Bay on the north, were collected during NOAA hydrographic survey H11076 (fig. 1). Although originally collected for charting purposes, these data provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities along this part of the Massachusetts coastline (Noji and others, 2004), show the composition and terrain of the seabed, and provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat.

  12. Seafloor geology and benthic habitats, San Pedro Shelf, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Florence L.; Dartnell, Peter; Edwards, Brian D.; Phillips, Eleyne L.

    2012-01-01

    Seafloor samples, videography, still photography, and real-time descriptions of geologic and biologic constituents at or near the seafloor of the San Pedro Shelf, southern California, advance the study of natural and man-made processes on this coastal area off the metropolitan Los Angeles area. Multibeam echo-sounder data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1998 and 1999 guided sampling and camera work in 2004 resulting in a new seafloor character map that shows possible benthic habitats in much higher resolution (4- and 16-m pixels) than previously available. The seafloor is characterized by primarily muddy sand and sand with outcrops of Miocene and Pliocene bedrock along the Palos Verdes Fault Zone. Observed benthic populations indicate low abiotic complexity, low biotic complexity, and low biotic coverage. The data are provided for use in geographic information systems (GIS).

  13. Sea-floor character and sedimentary processes of Block Island Sound, offshore Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Danforth, W.W.; McMullen, K.Y.; Blankenship, M.A.; Glomb, K.A.; Wright, D.B.; Smith, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Gridded multibeam bathymetry covers approximately 634 square kilometers of sea floor in Block Island Sound. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic surveys H12009, H12010, H12011, H12015, H12033, H12137, and H12139, these combined acoustic data and the sea-floor sediment sampling and photography stations subsequently occupied to verify them during U.S. Geological Survey cruise 2011-006-FA (1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities (for example, wind farms and fisheries) along the Rhode Island inner continental shelf.

  14. Seafloor Weathering Dependence on Temperature and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, D. S.; Farahat, N. X.; Archer, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Most thinking on Earth's carbon cycle implicates silicate weathering as the dominant control of atmospheric CO2 concentration over long timescales. Recent analyses of alteration of basalt at the seafloor, however, suggest that seafloor weathering (low-temperature (<60C) chemical alteration of the upper oceanic crust due to hydrothermal seawater circulation) increases dramatically in warm, high CO2 periods of Earth's history. This raises the possibility that seafloor weathering could complement silicate weathering in maintaining Earth's long term climate stability. Moreover, seafloor weathering would be the only type of weathering available on an exoplanet entirely covered by water, so understanding how it might work is essential for understanding the habitable zones of such waterworlds. We have built a 2D numerical model of the flow of seawater through porous basalt coupled to chemical alteration reactions that can calculate alkalinity fluxes and carbonate deposition (seafloor weathering). I will present simulations in which we vary the seawater temperature and dissolved inorganic carbon concentration, which are boundary conditions to our model, over large ranges. These results will provide a constraint on the ability of seafloor weathering to act as an effective climate buffer on Earth and other planets. I can't give you a preview of the results yet because at the time of writing this abstract we haven't completed the simulations!

  15. Sea-floor character and geology off the entrance to the Connecticut River, northeastern Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; McMullen, Katherine Y.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Guberski, Megan R.; Wood, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Datasets of gridded multibeam bathymetry and sidescan-sonar backscatter, together covering approximately 29.1 square kilometers, were used to interpret character and geology of the sea floor off the entrance to the Connecticut River in northeastern Long Island Sound. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H12013, these acoustic data, sidescan-sonar imagery, and the sea-floor sampling and photography stations subsequently occupied to verify the acoustic data (1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and resource management (for example, cables, pipelines, and dredging) activities in this major east coast estuary.

  16. KIGAM Seafloor Observation System (KISOS) for the baseline study in monitoring of gas hydrate test production in the Ulleung Basin, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-rock; Chun, Jong-hwa

    2013-04-01

    For the baseline study in the monitoring gas hydrate test production in the Ulleung Basin, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) has developed the KIGAM Seafloor Observation System (KISOS) for seafloor exploration using unmanned remotely operated vehicle connected with a ship by a cable. The KISOS consists of a transponder of an acoustic positioning system (USBL), a bottom finding pinger, still camera, video camera, water sampler, and measuring devices (methane, oxygen, CTD, and turbidity sensors) mounted on the unmanned ROV, and a sediment collecting device collecting sediment on the seafloor. It is very important to monitoring the environmental risks (gas leakage and production water/drilling mud discharge) which may be occurred during the gas hydrate test production drilling. The KISOS will be applied to solely conduct baseline study with the KIGAM seafloor monitoring system (KIMOS) of the Korean gas hydrate program in the future. The large scale of environmental monitoring program includes the environmental impact assessment such as seafloor disturbance and subsidence, detection of methane gas leakage around well and cold seep, methane bubbles and dissolved methane, change of marine environments, chemical factor variation of water column and seabed, diffusion of drilling mud and production water, and biological factors of biodiversity and marine habitats before and after drilling test well and nearby areas. The design of the baseline survey will be determined based on the result of SIMAP simulation in 2013. The baseline survey will be performed to provide the gas leakage and production water/drilling mud discharge before and after gas hydrate test production. The field data of the baseline study will be evaluated by the simulation and verification of SIMAP simulator in 2014. In the presentation, the authors would like introduce the configuration of KISOS and applicability to the seafloor observation for the gas hydrate test production in

  17. Seafloor Weathering As a Long-Term Climate Regulation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, N. X.; Abbot, D. S.; Archer, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    The global carbon cycle determines the distribution of carbon between the atmosphere, ocean, and solid earth. Carbon from the mantle enters the Earth's surficial environment as CO2 by volcanic outgassing, and carbon is buried in the oceanic crust as carbonate rocks during silicate rock weathering. The subduction of carbonate-rich oceanic plates returns carbon to the mantle, closing the cycle. Subtle adjustments in continental silicate weathering, widely held to consume atmospheric CO2 at a rate controlled by climate, are believed to have maintained habitable conditions throughout Earth's history. This long term climate regulation mechanism is known as a climate-weathering feedback. Seafloor weathering, low-temperature basalt alteration and carbonate precipitation in the permeable upper oceanic crust, has been proposed as a climate-weathering feedback as well, but the link to climate is presently poorly understood. Such a climate regulation mechanism would be particularly important on waterworld planets where continental silicate weathering cannot regulate climate. It has so far not been possible to determine whether changes in seafloor weathering could contribute to climate regulation on Earth or in a waterworld scenario because the necessary modeling framework has not yet been developed. However, advances in porous media flow modeling and reactive transport modeling, as well as the availability of inexpensive computational power, allow the seafloor weathering problem to be looked at in greater detail. We have developed a spatially resolved two-dimmensional (2D) numerical model of seafloor weathering in the permeable upper oceanic crust. This model simulates 2D off-axis hydrothermal flow coupled to geochemical alteration of seafloor basalt by modeling reactive transport of chemical species in seawater-derived hydrothermal fluids. The focus of this research is to use the model to determine the effect of geological and climatic factors on seafloor weathering, which

  18. Enhanced Syllable Discrimination Thresholds in Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heesoo; Lakshminarayanan, Kala; Gabrieli, John D. E.; Tallal, Paula; Gaab, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    Speech processing inherently relies on the perception of specific, rapidly changing spectral and temporal acoustic features. Advanced acoustic perception is also integral to musical expertise, and accordingly several studies have demonstrated a significant relationship between musical training and superior processing of various aspects of speech. Speech and music appear to overlap in spectral and temporal features; however, it remains unclear which of these acoustic features, crucial for speech processing, are most closely associated with musical training. The present study examined the perceptual acuity of musicians to the acoustic components of speech necessary for intra-phonemic discrimination of synthetic syllables. We compared musicians and non-musicians on discrimination thresholds of three synthetic speech syllable continua that varied in their spectral and temporal discrimination demands, specifically voice onset time (VOT) and amplitude envelope cues in the temporal domain. Musicians demonstrated superior discrimination only for syllables that required resolution of temporal cues. Furthermore, performance on the temporal syllable continua positively correlated with the length and intensity of musical training. These findings support one potential mechanism by which musical training may selectively enhance speech perception, namely by reinforcing temporal acuity and/or perception of amplitude rise time, and implications for the translation of musical training to long-term linguistic abilities. PMID:24339875

  19. A Joint Monte Carlo Inversion of Seafloor Compliance, Receiver Functions and Rayleigh Wave Dispersion at OBS Stations off New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. S.; Sheehan, A. F.; Stachnik, J. C.; Collins, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Surface wave dispersion measurements, receiver functions and seafloor compliance data were jointly inverted to produce shear velocity profiles at Ocean Bottom Seismic (OBS) stations off the South Island of New Zealand. Receiver function analysis of OBS data presents a technical challenge due largely to the presence of multiply scattered reverberations in the water and low-velocity sediments at OBS sites. Teleseismic arrivals from interfaces of tectonic interest are obscured by sediment-converted shear waves and water column multiples. Mitigation of these effects typically requires accurate characterization of sediment layer shear velocities and thicknesses. The seismic properties of the sediment column can be probed using shallow mode-converted shear arrivals and the seafloor's response to ocean loading from infragravity waves (seafloor compliance). Data for this study were acquired in 2009-2010 by the Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa (MOANA) experiment, which deployed 30 broadband OBS and differential pressure gauges (DPGs) off the South Island of New Zealand. Seafloor compliance was calculated from MOANA DPG pressure and OBS vertical component acceleration power spectra at periods between 50-250s. The resulting compliance values range from 10-10-10-8 Pa-1 and are sensitive to changes in shear modulus at depths that increase with forcing period. Receiver functions were estimated using events of high SNR from epicentral distances of 30-90 degrees. Forward modeling utilized full-wavefield synthetic seismograms to account for the OBS location at the boundary between acoustic and elastic media. Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves at periods from 6-30s were derived from ambient noise tomography. A Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm was implemented to estimate shear velocity profiles, crustal and sediment thicknesses using these combined observations. Preliminary sediment thickness estimates range from 400m on the Challenger plateau to

  20. Analysis of seafloor seismograms of the 2003 Tokachi-Oki earthquake sequence for earthquake early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, J. J.; Simons, F. J.; Collins, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) algorithms estimate the magnitude of an underway rupture from the first few seconds of the P-wave to allow hazard assessment and mitigation before the S-wave arrival. Many large subduction- zone earthquakes initiate 50­-150 km offshore, potentially allowing seafloor instruments sufficient time to identify large ruptures before the S-waves reach land. We tested an EEW algorithm using accelerograms recorded offshore Hokkaido in the region of the 2003 Mw 8.1 Tokachi-Oki earthquake and its aftershocks. A wavelet transform of the first 4 s of the P-wave concentrates information about earthquake magnitude from both waveform amplitude and frequency content. We find that wavelets with support of a few seconds provide discriminants for EEW that are both accurate enough to be useful and superior to peak acceleration or peak velocity. Additionally, we observe a scaling of wavelet coefficient magnitude above Mw 6.0 indicating that, at least for the mainshock (Mw 8.1) and largest aftershock (Mw 7.1), the final size of a rupture could have been estimated from the initial portion of the seismogram. Our work strengthens the arguments for establishing seafloor based EEW observatories in subduction zones, simply by the unique sensitivity of such data to earthquake source properties. Near-source seismograms are not contaminated with the arrivals of later phases, particularly refracted phases that can distort the waveform's frequency content. Thus, EEW metrics will be more accurately determined from local ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data than regional (on land) data. Moreover, these recordings can include the near and intermediate- field terms, and hence have a greater sensitivity to magnitude. Any seafloor observatory could also include a pressure sensor capable of detecting vertical deformation on the order of 10 cm or greater. Since uplift of the seafloor in the source region is the source term for tsunami generation, this fundamental data type

  1. Recent Observational Results of Seafloor Crustal Deformation Along the Suruga-Nankai Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, K.; Sugimoto, S.; Watanabe, T.; Muto, D.; Kimoto, A.; Okuda, T.; Ikuta, R.; Sayanagi, K.; Kuno, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Suruga-Nankai Trough is one of the active plate boundaries in the world. The Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath the Amurian (Eurasian) plate along the tough, and major subduction earthquakes, Nankai and Tonankai earthquakes, have repeatedly occurred with intervals of about 100-150 years. The 1944 Tonankai and 1946 Nankai earthquakes are the most recent significant earthquakes along the trough. Therefore, the 50-years probabilities of the next major earthquakes are estimated at 80-90% by Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion, Japanese Government. It is, therefore, necessary to start monitoring crustal deformation above the source regions of the major earthquakes where in the ocean area. We developed a new system composed of the precise acoustic ranging and kinematic GPS positioning techniques for monitoring of seafloor crustal deformation [Tadokoro et al., 2006, GRL; Ikuta et al., 2008, JGR]. We had installed seven seafloor benchmarks for acoustic ranging at the Suruga-Nankai Trough region between 2002 and 2004. The water depths at the benchmarks are about 800 to 2000 m. We installed a new seafloor benchmark at the eastern margin of the Kumano Basin on June 23, 2008. Three seafloor benchmarks had been aligned perpendicular to the trough axis. In contrast, the new benchmark was installed eastward relative to the pre-installed benchmarks, and we can monitor lateral variations in crustal deformation at the region. We started the repeated measurements at four benchmarkes (two at the Kumano Basin named KMN and KMS, and the other two at the Suruga Bay named SNW and SNE) in 2005. The number of times we have measured are seven, eleven, three and nine times at KMN, KMS, SNW and SNE, respectively. Recent results of the repeated measurements show the following horizontal velocities with relative to the Amurian Plate: 6.4 cm/yr, N86W at KMN; 5.3 cm/yr, N71W at KMS; 3.3 cm/yr, N57W at SNE. The errors of the horizontal velocities are 1-3 cm/yr. Unfortunately

  2. Psychoacoustic Assessment of Speech Communication Systems. The Diagnostic Discrimination Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grether, Craig Blaine

    The present report traces the rationale, development and experimental evaluation of the Diagnostic Discrimination Test (DDT). The DDT is a three-choice test of consonant discriminability of the perceptual/acoustic dimensions of consonant phonemes within specific vowel contexts. The DDT was created and developed in an attempt to provide a…

  3. Perceptual Adaptation of Voice Gender Discrimination with Spectrally Shifted Vowels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Tianhao; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether perceptual adaptation improves voice gender discrimination of spectrally shifted vowels and, if so, which acoustic cues contribute to the improvement. Method: Voice gender discrimination was measured for 10 normal-hearing subjects, during 5 days of adaptation to spectrally shifted vowels, produced by processing the…

  4. Seismic noise recored by seafloor observatories at Mediterranean sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Caro, Mariagrazia; Monna, Stephen; Frugoni, Francesco; Beranzoli, Laura; Favali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    The Mediterranean region is an area highly exposed to geo-hazards, such as seismic and volcanic activity. Real-time and continuous monitoring of its coastal areas is needed to ensure rapid warning and mitigate the effects of natural disasters. Seafloor observatories for near-real-time and real-time interactive long-term monitoring of ocean processes which are part of the EMSO (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water-column Observatory, www.emso-eu.org) Research Infrastructure, have been deployed in sites of the Mediterranean basin. We present long-term time series acquired by GEOSTAR-class seafloor observatories deployed in four sites of Mediterranean areas: Ionian and Tyrrhenian Seas (deep seafloor Central-Mediterranean sites) and the Marmara Sea and Gulf of Corinth (shallow seafloor Eastern-Mediterranean sites). We generated a reference model of the background seismic noise based on data collected from seismometers installed on board seafloor observatories. We concentrate on interesting and peculiar features of the noise signal in the frequency band 0.003-50 Hz. The main contribution in the short period band >5Hz (<2s) comes from anthropic noise (e.g. shipping noise). In this band we also find a peak around 0.8Hz (1.25s) which appears to be a persistent characteristic of the Mediterranean basins. Seasonal variations (summer-winter) are visible in the microseismic band 0.05-0.5Hz (2-20s). In particular in the Ionian and Tyrrhenian deep seafloor sites we can distinguish the splitting of the DF (Double Frequency peak) in the long period (LPDF) and the short period (SPDF) peaks. Our study shows the presence of the LPDF, well visible at the deep seafloor sites, and seasonal variations of the LPDF and the SPDF amplitudes ratio, suggesting that the SPDF depends on the sea wave regime generated by local winds. For the deep seafloor sites we can also appreciate the contribution of infragravity waves (<0.05Hz). Our observations confirm the dependence of the

  5. Diversity and Biogeography of Bathyal and Abyssal Seafloor Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bienhold, Christina; Zinger, Lucie; Boetius, Antje; Ramette, Alban

    2016-01-01

    The deep ocean floor covers more than 60% of the Earth’s surface, and hosts diverse bacterial communities with important functions in carbon and nutrient cycles. The identification of key bacterial members remains a challenge and their patterns of distribution in seafloor sediment yet remain poorly described. Previous studies were either regionally restricted or included few deep-sea sediments, and did not specifically test biogeographic patterns across the vast oligotrophic bathyal and abyssal seafloor. Here we define the composition of this deep seafloor microbiome by describing those bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTU) that are specifically associated with deep-sea surface sediments at water depths ranging from 1000–5300 m. We show that the microbiome of the surface seafloor is distinct from the subsurface seafloor. The cosmopolitan bacterial OTU were affiliated with the clades JTB255 (class Gammaproteobacteria, order Xanthomonadales) and OM1 (Actinobacteria, order Acidimicrobiales), comprising 21% and 7% of their respective clades, and about 1% of all sequences in the study. Overall, few sequence-abundant bacterial types were globally dispersed and displayed positive range-abundance relationships. Most bacterial populations were rare and exhibited a high degree of endemism, explaining the substantial differences in community composition observed over large spatial scales. Despite the relative physicochemical uniformity of deep-sea sediments, we identified indicators of productivity regimes, especially sediment organic matter content, as factors significantly associated with changes in bacterial community structure across the globe. PMID:26814838

  6. Global patterns and predictions of seafloor biomass using random forests.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chih-Lin; Rowe, Gilbert T; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Boetius, Antje; Soltwedel, Thomas; Caley, M Julian; Soliman, Yousria; Huettmann, Falk; Qu, Fangyuan; Yu, Zishan; Pitcher, C Roland; Haedrich, Richard L; Wicksten, Mary K; Rex, Michael A; Baguley, Jeffrey G; Sharma, Jyotsna; Danovaro, Roberto; MacDonald, Ian R; Nunnally, Clifton C; Deming, Jody W; Montagna, Paul; Lévesque, Mélanie; Weslawski, Jan Marcin; Wlodarska-Kowalczuk, Maria; Ingole, Baban S; Bett, Brian J; Billett, David S M; Yool, Andrew; Bluhm, Bodil A; Iken, Katrin; Narayanaswamy, Bhavani E

    2010-12-30

    A comprehensive seafloor biomass and abundance database has been constructed from 24 oceanographic institutions worldwide within the Census of Marine Life (CoML) field projects. The machine-learning algorithm, Random Forests, was employed to model and predict seafloor standing stocks from surface primary production, water-column integrated and export particulate organic matter (POM), seafloor relief, and bottom water properties. The predictive models explain 63% to 88% of stock variance among the major size groups. Individual and composite maps of predicted global seafloor biomass and abundance are generated for bacteria, meiofauna, macrofauna, and megafauna (invertebrates and fishes). Patterns of benthic standing stocks were positive functions of surface primary production and delivery of the particulate organic carbon (POC) flux to the seafloor. At a regional scale, the census maps illustrate that integrated biomass is highest at the poles, on continental margins associated with coastal upwelling and with broad zones associated with equatorial divergence. Lowest values are consistently encountered on the central abyssal plains of major ocean basins The shift of biomass dominance groups with depth is shown to be affected by the decrease in average body size rather than abundance, presumably due to decrease in quantity and quality of food supply. This biomass census and associated maps are vital components of mechanistic deep-sea food web models and global carbon cycling, and as such provide fundamental information that can be incorporated into evidence-based management.

  7. Global Patterns and Predictions of Seafloor Biomass Using Random Forests

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chih-Lin; Rowe, Gilbert T.; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Boetius, Antje; Soltwedel, Thomas; Caley, M. Julian; Soliman, Yousria; Huettmann, Falk; Qu, Fangyuan; Yu, Zishan; Pitcher, C. Roland; Haedrich, Richard L.; Wicksten, Mary K.; Rex, Michael A.; Baguley, Jeffrey G.; Sharma, Jyotsna; Danovaro, Roberto; MacDonald, Ian R.; Nunnally, Clifton C.; Deming, Jody W.; Montagna, Paul; Lévesque, Mélanie; Weslawski, Jan Marcin; Wlodarska-Kowalczuk, Maria; Ingole, Baban S.; Bett, Brian J.; Billett, David S. M.; Yool, Andrew; Bluhm, Bodil A.; Iken, Katrin; Narayanaswamy, Bhavani E.

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive seafloor biomass and abundance database has been constructed from 24 oceanographic institutions worldwide within the Census of Marine Life (CoML) field projects. The machine-learning algorithm, Random Forests, was employed to model and predict seafloor standing stocks from surface primary production, water-column integrated and export particulate organic matter (POM), seafloor relief, and bottom water properties. The predictive models explain 63% to 88% of stock variance among the major size groups. Individual and composite maps of predicted global seafloor biomass and abundance are generated for bacteria, meiofauna, macrofauna, and megafauna (invertebrates and fishes). Patterns of benthic standing stocks were positive functions of surface primary production and delivery of the particulate organic carbon (POC) flux to the seafloor. At a regional scale, the census maps illustrate that integrated biomass is highest at the poles, on continental margins associated with coastal upwelling and with broad zones associated with equatorial divergence. Lowest values are consistently encountered on the central abyssal plains of major ocean basins The shift of biomass dominance groups with depth is shown to be affected by the decrease in average body size rather than abundance, presumably due to decrease in quantity and quality of food supply. This biomass census and associated maps are vital components of mechanistic deep-sea food web models and global carbon cycling, and as such provide fundamental information that can be incorporated into evidence-based management. PMID:21209928

  8. Imaging and Quantifying Seafloor HydrothermaL Flow Using Sound and Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, P. A.; Bemis, K. G.; Jones, C. D.; Jackson, D. R.; Mitsuzawa, K.; Silver, D.

    2006-05-01

    We are developing and applying methods using acoustics and light to image and measure seafloor hydrothermal flow in order to advance understanding of the role of this flow in mass and energy transfer. We show, with examples from the Main Endeavour Field (MEF) on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the capabilities we have developed and applied in acoustic imaging of hydrothermal flows. These capabilities include reconstructing in 3-D and measuring scalar and vector properties of buoyant plumes of black smokers, mapping areas of diffuse flow, and monitoring these hydrothermal flows on scales from individual vents, to vent clusters, and eventually to entire hydrothermal fields. 1. Hydrothermal plumes: Our acoustic imaging of buoyant hydrothermal plumes is based on intensity of backscatter primarily from suspended metallic mineral particles that are small relative to the wavelength of the acoustic frequency of pulses projected from a sonar transducer (~1 cm at 200 to 330 kHz; particle diameter 1-1000 microns): (a) Scalar properties of plume: Specialized software is used to construct a centerline as a reference for the distribution of properties within a plume and to measure scalar properties as defined in a time-integrated buoyant plume model. These properties include mass and distribution of suspended particulate matter, volume, surface and cross-sectional area and shape, radius with altitude above a vent, connectivity of constituent parts, and degree of bending. (b)Vector properties of plume: Doppler algorithms are used to measure flow velocity in sonar line-of-sight cross-sections with a geometric correction to obtain mean vertical velocity with altitude on the assumption that net velocity in a buoyant plume is vertical. 2. Diffuse flow: Our AST (Acoustic Scintillation Thermography) method uses echo-to echo correlation to detect distortion by index-of-refraction fluctuations of consecutive pings as they pass through warm water and reflect back from the seafloor to a sonar

  9. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  10. Tools to Compare Diving-Animal Kinematics with Acoustic Behavior and Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    vehicle. Bioacoustic Probes have been employed as simple seafloor recorders in several studies, including a behavioral study of beluga - whale habitat usage...2005. Miniature self-contained acoustic recorders applied in a survey of beluga - whale populations in Knik Arm, Alaska (abstract). J. Acoust. Soc. Am...blue whales . Mar. Ecol-Prog. Ser. 330:269–284. [published, refereed] Tang, D. 2005. Inverting for sandy sediment sound speed in very shallow water

  11. Seabed variability and its influence on acoustic prediction uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Charles W.; Calder, Brian; Kraft, Barbara; Mayer, Larry; Goff, John; Harrison, Chris

    2005-09-01

    Kevin LePage (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC), Robert I. Odom (University of Washington, Applied Physics Laboratory), Irina Overeem, James Syvitski (University of Colorado, INSTAAR, Boulder, CO) and Lincoln Pratson (Duke University, Durham, NC). The weakest link in performance prediction for naval systems operating in coastal regions is the environmental data that drive the models. In shallow-water downward refracting environments, the seabed properties and morphology often are the controlling environmental factors. In order to address the issue of uncertainty in seabed properties, we focused on two overarching goals: (1) assess and characterize seafloor variability in shelf environments, (2) determine the impact of the seafloor variability on acoustic prediction uncertainty. Our inherently multidisciplinary approach brought marine geology/geophysics and ocean acoustics together at the intersection of geoacoustic modeling. This talk will review results from a 3-year collaboration under the ONR Capturing Uncertainty DRI. [Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  12. 3D Chirp Sonar Images on Fluid Migration Pathways and Their Implications on Seafloor Stability East of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon Offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. W.; Liu, C. S.; Su, C. C.; Hsu, H. H.; Chen, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    This study utilizes both chirp sonar images and coring results to investigate the unstable seafloor strata east of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon offshore southwestern Taiwan. We have constructed 3D chirp sonar images from a densely surveyed block to trace the attitude of an acoustic transparent layer and features caused by fluid activities. Based on the distribution of this transparent layer and fluid-related features, we suggest that this transparent layer forms a pathway for fluid migration which induces fluid-related characters such as acoustic blanking and fluid chimneys in the 3D chirp sonar images. Cored seafloor samples are used in this study to investigate the sediment compositions. The 210Pb activity profiles of the cores show oscillating and unsteady values at about 20~25 cm from core top. The bulk densities of the core samples in the same section (about 20~25 cm from core top) give values lower than those at deeper parts of the cores. These results indicate that the water content is much higher in the shallow sediments than in the deeper strata. From core sample analyses, we deduce that the local sediments are disturbed by liquefaction. From the analyses of 3D chirp sonar images and core data, we suggest that the seafloor east of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon is in an unstable condition, if disturbed by earthquakes, submarine landslides and gravity flows could be easily triggered and cause some geohazards, like breaking submarine cables during the 2006 Pingtung earthquake event.

  13. Stochastic modeling of seafloor morphology: A parameterized Gaussian model

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, J.A.; Jordan, T.H. )

    1989-01-01

    Stochastic methods of analysis are useful for quantifying ensemble properties of small-scale bathymetric features such as abyssal hills. In this paper the authors model the seafloor as a stationary, zero-mean, Gaussian random field completely specified by its autocovariance function. They formulate an anisotropic autocovariance function that has five free parameters describing the amplitude, anisotropic orientation and aspect ratio, characteristic length, and Hausdorff (fractal) dimension of seafloor topography. Parameters estimated from various seafloor exhibits a wide range of stochastic characteristics within the constraints of the model. Synthetic topography can be generated at arbitrary scale and resolution from the Gaussian model using a Fourier method. Color images of these synthetics are useful for illustrating the stochastic behavior of the model.

  14. Phase relations and adiabats in boiling seafloor geothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of large salinity variations and vent temperatures in the range of 380-400??C suggest that boiling or two-phase separation may be occurring in some seafloor geothermal systems. Consideration of flow rates and the relatively small differences in density between vapors and liquids at the supercritical pressures at depth in these systems suggests that boiling is occurring under closed-system conditions. Salinity and temperature of boiling vents can be used to estimate the pressure-temperature point in the subsurface at which liquid seawater first reached the two-phase boundary. Data are reviewed to construct phase diagrams of coexisting brines and vapors in the two-phase region at pressures corresponding to those of the seafloor geothermal systems. A method is developed for calculating the enthalpy and entropy of the coexisting mixtures, and results are used to construct adiabats from the seafloor to the P-T two-phase boundary. Results for seafloor vents discharging at 2300 m below sea level indicate that a 385??C vent is composed of a brine (7% NaCl equivalent) in equilibrium with a vapor (0.1% NaCl). Brine constitutes 45% by weight of the mixture, and the fluid first boiled at approximately 1 km below the seafloor at 415??C, 330 bar. A 400??C vent is primarily vapor (88 wt.%, 0.044% NaCl) with a small amount of brine (26% NaCl) and first boiled at 2.9 km below the seafloor at 500??C, 520 bar. These results show that adiabatic decompression in the two-phase region results in dramatic cooling of the fluid mixture when there is a large fraction of vapor. ?? 1985.

  15. Detailed seafloor habitat mapping to enhance marine-resource management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zawada, David G.; Hart, Kristen M.

    2010-01-01

    Pictures of the seafloor capture important information about the sediments, exposed geologic features, submerged aquatic vegetation, and animals found in a given habitat. With the emergence of marine protected areas (MPAs) as a favored tactic for preserving coral reef resources, knowledge of essential habitat components is paramount to designing effective management strategies. Surprisingly, detailed information on seafloor habitat components is not available in many areas that are being considered for MPA designation or that are already designated as MPAs. A task of the U.S. Geological Survey Coral Reef Ecosystem STudies (USGS CREST) project is addressing this issue.

  16. How Leaky Are Seafloor Spreading Center Axes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; Martinez, F.; Haymon, R. M.; Nakamura, K.; Walker, S. L.; Ferrini, V.

    2013-12-01

    Some 500 active vent sites, both focused and diffuse, have now been located along spreading centers by either visual confirmation or instrumental detection of the discharging plume. Discovery of the large majority of these sites was made easier by high-volume discharge of particle-laden plumes. These observations led to estimates (as can be derived from the InterRidge Vents Database) of site frequency from ~0.5-5/100 km, generally increasing with spreading rate. Over the last decade, however, the increasing use of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP (mV)) (aka Eh) sensors capable of detecting minute concentrations of reduced hydrothermal chemicals (e.g., Fe+2, sulfides, Mn+2, H2, and others) suggests that these frequency estimates may be far too conservative. This hypothesis is consistent with earlier results from a few large-scale, high-resolution camera tows on some EPR segments. ORP data provide two important advantages for site identification not available with other commonly used continuously recording sensors: (1) detection of low-temperature, particle-scarce plumes, and (2) detection of reduced chemical species with very short residence times, thus increasing the location specificity of the discharge source. Here, we present high-resolution distributions of ORP anomalies observed in past plume surveys along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (19.5°-22.5°S) in 2004 and 2008, the Galápagos Spreading Center (94.6°-86°W) in 2005/6 and 2011, as well as new data (2011) from the East Pacific Rise (9°-10°N). Except for the 2011 GSC data (a standard CTD tow-yo), all data were collected during continuous horizontal tows of ORP sensors at various depths <~120 m above the seafloor. We used two approaches to verify that ORP anomalies were authentic hydrothermal signals and not (especially in the case of small anomalies) produced by some other transient chemical anomaly. First, on the 2008 ELSC and 2011 EPR tows we compared temperature (ΔT) and ORP (ΔORP) data from

  17. Acoustic emission spectral analysis of fiber composite failure mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, D. M.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The acoustic emission of graphite fiber polyimide composite failure mechanisms was investigated with emphasis on frequency spectrum analysis. Although visual examination of spectral densities could not distinguish among fracture sources, a paired-sample t statistical analysis of mean normalized spectral densities did provide quantitative discrimination among acoustic emissions from 10 deg, 90 deg, and plus or minus 45 deg, plus or minus 45 deg sub s specimens. Comparable discrimination was not obtained for 0 deg specimens.

  18. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  19. Sea-Floor geology and character of Eastern Rhode Island Sound West of Gay Head, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Ackerman, S.D.; Blackwood, D.S.; Irwin, B.J.; Schaer, J.D.; Forrest, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Gridded multibeam bathymetry covers approximately 102 square kilometers of sea floor in eastern Rhode Island Sound west of Gay Head, Massachusetts. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H11922, these acoustic data and the sea-floor stations subsequently occupied to verify them (1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities (for example, windfarms and fisheries) along the Massachusetts inner continental shelf. Most of the sea floor in the study area has an undulating to faintly rippled appearance and is composed of bioturbated muddy sand, reflecting processes associated with sediment sorting and reworking. Shallower areas are composed of rippled sand and, where small fields of megaripples are present, indicate sedimentary environments characterized by processes associated with coarse bedload transport. Boulders and gravel were found on the floors of scour depressions and on top of an isolated bathymetric high where erosion has removed the Holocene marine sediments and exposed the underlying relict lag deposits of Pleistocene drift. The numerous scour depressions, which formed during storm-driven events, result in the juxtaposition of sea-floor areas with contrasting sedimentary environments and distinct gravel, sand, and muddy sand textures. This textural heterogeneity in turn creates a complex patchwork of habitats. Our observations of local variations in community structure suggest that this small-scale textural heterogeneity adds dramatically to the sound-wide benthic biological diversity.

  20. Classroom acoustics: Three pilot studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaldino, Joseph J.

    2005-04-01

    This paper summarizes three related pilot projects designed to focus on the possible effects of classroom acoustics on fine auditory discrimination as it relates to language acquisition, especially English as a second language. The first study investigated the influence of improving the signal-to-noise ratio on the differentiation of English phonemes. The results showed better differentiation with better signal-to-noise ratio. The second studied speech perception in noise by young adults for whom English was a second language. The outcome indicated that the second language learners required a better signal-to-noise ratio to perform equally to the native language participants. The last study surveyed the acoustic conditions of preschool and day care classrooms, wherein first and second language learning occurs. The survey suggested an unfavorable acoustic environment for language learning.

  1. Wavelet preprocessing of acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W. Y.; Solorzano, M. R.

    1991-12-01

    This paper describes results using the wavelet transform to preprocess acoustic broadband signals in a system that discriminates between different classes of acoustic bursts. This is motivated by the similarity between the proportional bandwidth filters provided by the wavelet transform and those found in biological hearing systems. The experiment involves comparing statistical pattern classifier effects of wavelet and FFT preprocessed acoustic signals. The data used was from the DARPA Phase 1 database, which consists of artificially generated signals with real ocean background. The results show that the wavelet transform did provide improved performance when classifying in a frame-by-frame basis. The DARPA Phase 1 database is well matched to proportional bandwidth filtering; i.e., signal classes that contain high frequencies do tend to have shorter duration in this database. It is also noted that the decreasing background levels at high frequencies compensate for the poor match of the wavelet transform for long duration (high frequency) signals.

  2. Seafloor Deformation Monitoring for Methane Hydrate Production Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, T.; Matsuda, S.; Takeshima, J.; Sano, K.; Nakatsuka, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In order to observe the seafloor deformation during methane hydrate production test, we have developed a monitoring system for seafloor subsidence and inclination. According to simulation of seafloor deformation around the production well, the range of subsidence will be from 10cm to 30 cm with the continuous production of methane hydrate in a month. This monitoring system has been examined in the offshore of Suruga Bay which has water depth more than 1000m. All the features of this system were confirmed by the examination at the deep sea area. Subsidence is measured with change of water pressure on the seafloor. A pressure gauge we selected is applied a quartz crystal resonator. The range of the pressure gauge is 0 to 1,400m, the resolution is 0.014mm, and actual accuracy is around 10mm in conversion to water level. An inclinometer we selected is applied liquid electrolyte. The range of the inclinometer is from +30 to -30 degreee, resolution is 0.001degree, and actual accuracy is around 0.03-0.3degree depending on measuring condition. We have monitored by using this system during the production test of methane hydrate at East Nankai trough in the beginning of 2013.This work was carried out by OYO corporation with the support of JOGMEC which is a member of MH21 consortium sponsored by Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry in Japan.

  3. Archaeal β diversity patterns under the seafloor along geochemical gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyano, Hitoshi; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Kishino, Hirohisa; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2014-09-01

    Recently, deep drilling into the seafloor has revealed that there are vast sedimentary ecosystems of diverse microorganisms, particularly archaea, in subsurface areas. We investigated the β diversity patterns of archaeal communities in sediment layers under the seafloor and their determinants. This study was accomplished by analyzing large environmental samples of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences and various geochemical data collected from a sediment core of 365.3 m, obtained by drilling into the seafloor off the east coast of the Shimokita Peninsula. To extract the maximum amount of information from these environmental samples, we first developed a method for measuring β diversity using sequence data by applying probability theory on a set of strings developed by two of the authors in a previous publication. We introduced an index of β diversity between sequence populations from which the sequence data were sampled. We then constructed an estimator of the β diversity index based on the sequence data and demonstrated that it converges to the β diversity index between sequence populations with probability of 1 as the number of sampled sequences increases. Next, we applied this new method to quantify β diversities between archaeal sequence populations under the seafloor and constructed a quantitative model of the estimated β diversity patterns. Nearly 90% of the variation in the archaeal β diversity was explained by a model that included as variables the differences in the abundances of chlorine, iodine, and carbon between the sediment layers.

  4. Exploring Seafloor Volcanoes in Cyberspace: NOAA's "Ocean Explorer" Inspires Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjelm, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Seafloor exploration being done by scientists is an ideal way to introduce students to technology as a tool for inquiry. The same technology that allows scientists to share data in near real time can also provide students the tools to become researchers. NOAA's Ocean Explorer Explorations website is a rich research data bank that can be used by…

  5. Improvement of determinating seafloor benchmark position with large-scale horizontal heterogeneity in the ocean area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Y.; Tadokoro, K.; Matsuhiro, K.; Ikuta, R.

    2015-12-01

    The most critical issue in reducing the accuracy of seafloor positioning system, GPS/Acoustic technique, is large-scale thermal gradient of sound-speed structure [Muto et al., 2008] due to the ocean current. For example, Kuroshio Current, near our observation station, forms this structure. To improve the accuracy of seafloor benchmark position (SBP), we need to directly measure the structure frequently, or estimate it from travel time residual. The former, we repeatedly measure the sound-speed at Kuroshio axis using Underway CTD and try to apply analysis method of seafloor positioning [Yasuda et al., 2015 AGU meeting]. The latter, however, we cannot estimate the structure using travel time residual until now. Accordingly, in this study, we focus on azimuthal dependence of Estimated Mean Sound-Speed (EMSS). EMSS is defined as distance between vessel position and estimated SBP divided by travel time. If thermal gradient exists and SBP is true, EMSS should have azimuthal dependence with the assumption of horizontal layered sound-speed structure in our previous analysis method. We use the data at KMC located on the central part of Nankai Trough, Japan on Jan. 28, 2015, because on that day KMC was on the north edge of Kuroshio, where we expect that thermal gradient exists. In our analysis method, the hyper parameter (μ value) weights travel time residual and rate of change of sound speed structure. However, EMSS derived from μ value determined by Ikuta et al. [2008] does not have azimuthal dependence, that is, we cannot estimate thermal gradient. Thus, we expect SBP has a large bias. Therefore, in this study, we use another μ value and examine whether EMSS has azimuthal dependence or not. With the μ value of this study, which is 1 order of magnitude smaller than the previous value, EMSS has azimuthal dependence that is consistent with observation day's thermal gradient. This result shows that we can estimate the thermal gradient adequately. This SBP displaces 25

  6. The New Seafloor Observatory (OBSEA) for Remote and Long-Term Coastal Ecosystem Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Aguzzi, Jacopo; Mànuel, Antoni; Condal, Fernando; Guillén, Jorge; Nogueras, Marc; del Rio, Joaquin; Costa, Corrado; Menesatti, Paolo; Puig, Pere; Sardà, Francesc; Toma, Daniel; Palanques, Albert

    2011-01-01

    A suitable sampling technology to identify species and to estimate population dynamics based on individual counts at different temporal levels in relation to habitat variations is increasingly important for fishery management and biodiversity studies. In the past two decades, as interest in exploring the oceans for valuable resources and in protecting these resources from overexploitation have grown, the number of cabled (permanent) submarine multiparametric platforms with video stations has increased. Prior to the development of seafloor observatories, the majority of autonomous stations were battery powered and stored data locally. The recently installed low-cost, multiparametric, expandable, cabled coastal Seafloor Observatory (OBSEA), located 4 km off of Vilanova i la Gertrú, Barcelona, at a depth of 20 m, is directly connected to a ground station by a telecommunication cable; thus, it is not affected by the limitations associated with previous observation technologies. OBSEA is part of the European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory (EMSO) infrastructure, and its activities are included among the Network of Excellence of the European Seas Observatory NETwork (ESONET). OBSEA enables remote, long-term, and continuous surveys of the local ecosystem by acquiring synchronous multiparametric habitat data and bio-data with the following sensors: Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) sensors for salinity, temperature, and pressure; Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) for current speed and direction, including a turbidity meter and a fluorometer (for the determination of chlorophyll concentration); a hydrophone; a seismometer; and finally, a video camera for automated image analysis in relation to species classification and tracking. Images can be monitored in real time, and all data can be stored for future studies. In this article, the various components of OBSEA are described, including its hardware (the sensors and the network of marine and land nodes

  7. The new Seafloor Observatory (OBSEA) for remote and long-term coastal ecosystem monitoring.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, Jacopo; Mànuel, Antoni; Condal, Fernando; Guillén, Jorge; Nogueras, Marc; del Rio, Joaquin; Costa, Corrado; Menesatti, Paolo; Puig, Pere; Sardà, Francesc; Toma, Daniel; Palanques, Albert

    2011-01-01

    A suitable sampling technology to identify species and to estimate population dynamics based on individual counts at different temporal levels in relation to habitat variations is increasingly important for fishery management and biodiversity studies. In the past two decades, as interest in exploring the oceans for valuable resources and in protecting these resources from overexploitation have grown, the number of cabled (permanent) submarine multiparametric platforms with video stations has increased. Prior to the development of seafloor observatories, the majority of autonomous stations were battery powered and stored data locally. The recently installed low-cost, multiparametric, expandable, cabled coastal Seafloor Observatory (OBSEA), located 4 km off of Vilanova i la Gertrú, Barcelona, at a depth of 20 m, is directly connected to a ground station by a telecommunication cable; thus, it is not affected by the limitations associated with previous observation technologies. OBSEA is part of the European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory (EMSO) infrastructure, and its activities are included among the Network of Excellence of the European Seas Observatory NETwork (ESONET). OBSEA enables remote, long-term, and continuous surveys of the local ecosystem by acquiring synchronous multiparametric habitat data and bio-data with the following sensors: Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) sensors for salinity, temperature, and pressure; Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) for current speed and direction, including a turbidity meter and a fluorometer (for the determination of chlorophyll concentration); a hydrophone; a seismometer; and finally, a video camera for automated image analysis in relation to species classification and tracking. Images can be monitored in real time, and all data can be stored for future studies. In this article, the various components of OBSEA are described, including its hardware (the sensors and the network of marine and land nodes

  8. Alternative Penetrometers to Measure the Near Surface Strength of Soft Seafloor Soils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    Strength of Soft Seafloor Soils Mark R. Tufenkjian Department of Civil Engineering, California State University, Los Angeles 5151 State University... seafloor soils. Further the education of participating undergraduate and graduate students by active involvement in research and mentoring activities...accurately measure the near surface shear strength of soft seafloor soils. APPROACH Review current full-flow penetrometer technology: Review technical

  9. Alternative Penetrometers to Measure the Near Surface Strength of Soft Seafloor Soils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Strength of Soft Seafloor Soils Mark R. Tufenkjian Department of Civil Engineering, California State University, Los Angeles 5151 State University... seafloor soils. Further the education of participating undergraduate and graduate students by active involvement in research and mentoring activities...surface shear strength of soft seafloor soils. APPROACH Review current full-flow penetrometer technology: Review technical literature to evaluate

  10. Acoustic features contributing to the individuality of wild agile gibbon (Hylobates agilis agilis) songs.

    PubMed

    Oyakawa, Chisako; Koda, Hiroki; Sugiura, Hideki

    2007-07-01

    We examined acoustic individuality in wild agile gibbon Hylobates agilis agilis and determined the acoustic variables that contribute to individual discrimination using multivariate analyses. We recorded 125 female-specific songs (great calls) from six groups in west Sumatra and measured 58 acoustic variables for each great call. We performed principal component analysis to summarize the 58 variables into six acoustic principal components (PCs). Generally, each PC corresponded to a part of the great call. Significant individual differences were found across six individual gibbons in each of the six PCs. Moreover, strong acoustic individuality was found in the introductory and climax parts of the great call. In contrast, the terminal part contributed little to individual identification. Discriminant analysis showed that these PCs contributed to individual discrimination with high repeatability. Although we cannot conclude that agile gibbon use these acoustic components for individual discrimination, they are potential candidates for individual recognition.

  11. Tsunami magnetic signals in the Northwestern Pacific seafloor magnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, N. R.; An, C.; Nair, M. C.; Maus, S.

    2013-12-01

    In the past two decades, underwater cables and seafloor magnetometers have observed motional inductance from ocean tsunamis. This study aimed to characterize the electromagnetic signatures of tsunamis from seafloor stations to assist in the long-term goal of real-time tsunami detection and warning systems. Four ocean seafloor stations (T13, T14, T15, T18) in the Northeastern Philippine Sea collected vector measurements of the electric and magnetic fields every minute during the period of 10/05/2005 to 11/30/2007 (Baba et al., 2010 PEPI). During this time, four major tsunamis occurred as a result of moment magnitude 8.0-8.1 earthquakes. These tsunamis include the 05/03/2006 Tonga event, the 01/13/2007 Kuril Islands event, the 04/01/2007 Solomon Islands event, and the 08/15/2007 Peru event. The Cornell Multi-grid Coupled Tsunami model (COMCOT) was used to predict the arrival time of the tsunamis at each of the seafloor stations. The stations' raw magnetic field signals underwent a high pass filter to then be examined for signals of the tsunami arrival. The high pass filtering showed clear tsunami signals for the Tonga event, but a clear signal was not seen for the other events. This may be due to signals from near Earth space with periods similar to tsunamis. To remove extraneous atmospheric magnetic signals, a cross-wavelet analysis was conducted using the horizontal field components from three INTERMAGNET land stations and the vertical component from the seafloor stations. The cross-wavelet analysis showed that for three of the six stations (two of the four tsunami events) the peak in wavelet amplitude matched the arrival of the tsunami. We discuss implications of our finding in magnetic monitoring of tsunamis.

  12. Transient seafloor venting from methane hydrate dissociation on continental slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnell, K.; Flemings, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    We present model results of hydrate dynamics that show the development of a gas chimney at three-phase equilibrium where gas flows through the marine hydrate stability zone and vents into the ocean during transient adjustment to imposed warming. Previous studies show venting occurs at the seaward retreating up-dip boundary of the hydrate stability zone during warming, whereas our results are the first to provide a mechanism for temporary gas venting vertically through the hydrate stability zone during warming. Transient behavior records the combined effect of hydrate dissociation from seafloor warming and secondary hydrate formation from gas produced by hydrate dissociation. We perform simulations of seafloor warming with a 1-d, unsteady, multiphase, fluid-flow model of methane hydrate dynamics. We assume an initial hydrate layer 6o meters thick with 10% pore volume saturation with seawater occupying the remaining domain above and below. We apply an instantaneous temperature increase at the seafloor. The temperature increase propagates downward through the deposit and initiates hydrate dissociation at the base of the deposit. Gas sourced from dissociation migrates upward and re-solidifies as hydrate to a maximum saturation set by a three-phase equilibrium salinity constraint. Additional gas migrates further upward to repeat the process. A chimney defined by dissociation at the bottom, secondary hydrate formation at the top, and maintained at three-phase equilibrium on the interior propagates to the seafloor in 10 kyr. Gas and salt then exit the system by venting into the ocean until dissociation stops producing new gas. Elevated salinities then diffuse to background seawater values. A shorter, shoaled hydrate deposit remains after ~100 kyr. This result shows that temporary venting can potentially occur anywhere along the hydrate stability zone during seafloor warming while retaining a hydrate deposit at steady state.

  13. Design of an ROV-based lidar for seafloor monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsdorf, Stefan; Janssen, Manfred; Reuter, Rainer; Wachowicz, Bernhard

    1997-05-01

    In recent years, accidents of ships with chemical cargo have led to strong impacts on the marine ecosystem, and to risks for pollution control and clean-up teams. In order to enable a fast, safe, and efficient reaction, a new optical instrument has been designed for the inspection of objects on the seafloor by range-gated scattered light images as well as for the detection of substances by measuring the laser induced emission on the seafloor and within the water column. This new lidar is operated as a payload of a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). A Nd:YAG laser is employed as the light source of the lidar. In the video mode, the submarine lidar system uses the 2nd harmonic laser pulse to illuminate the seafloor. Elastically scattered and reflected light is collected with a gateable intensified CCD camera. The beam divergence of the laser is the same as the camera field-of-view. Synchronization of laser emission and camera gate time allows to suppress backscattered light from the water column and to record only the light backscattered by the object. This results in a contrast enhanced video image which increases the visibility range in turbid water up to four times. Substances seeping out from a container are often invisible in video images because of their low contrast. Therefore, a fluorescence lidar mode is integrated into the submarine lidar. the 3rd harmonic Nd:YAG laser pulse is applied, and the emission response of the water body between ROV and seafloor and of the seafloor itself is recorded at variable wavelengths with a maximum depth resolution is realized by a 2D scanner, which allows to select targets within the range-gated image for a measurement of fluorescence. The analysis of the time- and spectral-resolved signals permits the detection, the exact location, and a classification of fluorescent and/or absorbing substances.

  14. Discriminating harmonicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Gerald; Mason, Christine R.; Brughera, Andrew; Chiu, Chung-Yiu Peter

    2003-08-01

    Simultaneous tones that are harmonically related tend to be grouped perceptually to form a unitary auditory image. A partial that is mistuned stands out from the other tones, and harmonic complexes with different fundamental frequencies can readily be perceived as separate auditory objects. These phenomena are evidence for the strong role of harmonicity in perceptual grouping and segregation of sounds. This study measured the discriminability of harmonicity directly. In a two interval, two alternative forced-choice (2I2AFC) paradigm, the listener chose which of two sounds, signal or foil, was composed of tones that more closely matched an exact harmonic relationship. In one experiment, the signal was varied from perfectly harmonic to highly inharmonic by adding frequency perturbation to each component. The foil always had 100% perturbation. Group mean performance decreased from greater than 90% correct for 0% signal perturbation to near chance for 80% signal perturbation. In the second experiment, adding a masker presented simultaneously with the signals and foils disrupted harmonicity. Both monaural and dichotic conditions were tested. Signal level was varied relative to masker level to obtain psychometric functions from which slopes and midpoints were estimated. Dichotic presentation of these audible stimuli improved performance by 3-10 dB, due primarily to a release from ``informational masking'' by the perceptual segregation of the signal from the masker.

  15. Investigation of active volcanic areas through oceanographic data collected by the NEMO-SN1 multiparametric seafloor observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Bue, Nadia; Sgroi, Tiziana; Giovanetti, Gabriele; Marinaro, Giuditta; Embriaco, Davide; Beranzoli, Laura; Favali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the European Research Infrastructure EMSO (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water-column Observatory, www.emso-eu.org), the cabled multidisciplinary seafloor observatory node NEMO-SN1 was deployed in the Western Ionian Sea (Southern Italy) at a depth of 2100 m, about 25 km off-shore Eastern Sicily, close to the Mt. Etna volcano system. The oceanographic payload mounted on this observatory was originally designed to monitor possible variations of the local hydrodynamic playing a crucial role on the redistribution of deep water in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. In particular the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP RDI WorkHorse 600 kHz) was configured with the main aim to record the bottom dynamics, watching few meters of water column above the station (about 30 m). Surprisingly, this sensor offered a spectacular recording of the Mt.Etna pyroclastic activity occurred on 2013 which affected the ESE sector of the volcano. Although the ADCP sensor is commonly used to measure speed and direction of sea currents, it is more often used to monitor concentration suspended matter of controlled areas, such as rivers or coastal marine environments, by the analysis of the acoustic backscatter intensity. This standard condition entails some a-priori knowledge (i.e. suspended sediment concentration, particle size, echo intensity calibration) useful to well configure the sensors before starting its acquisition. However, in the case of Mt. Etna pyroclastic activity, due to the unexpected recording, these information were not available and it was necessary to work in a post-processing mode considering all acquired data. In fact, several different parameters contribute to complete the comprehension of the observed phenomenon: the ADCP acoustic wavelength able to indirectly provide information on the detectable particle size, the intensity of the explosive activity useful to define the starting energy of the volcanic system, the oceanographic local

  16. Dominance of Viscoelastic Relaxation after the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Revealed By Seafloor GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T.; Wang, K.; Hino, R.; Iinuma, T.; He, J.; Fujimoto, H.; Kido, M.; Osada, Y.; Hu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Megathrust rupture is mostly offshore. Using land-based GPS data only, it is difficult to tell whether viscoelastic relaxation, when compared to afterslip, is important in driving post-seismic deformation immediately after the earthquake. GPS/acoustic observations, which measure the displacements of seafloor precision transponder arrays using sea surface platforms equipped with GPS antennas and acoustic transducers, were made by Japan Coast Guard and Tohoku University during and after the 2011 M 9 Tohoku earthquake. Five seafloor sites near the main rupture were reoccupied 4-10 times over the first two years after the earthquake and provide a unique opportunity to study the importance of viscoelastic relaxation. After the large coseismic seaward motion (up to ~ 31 m), the near-trench sites immediately reversed their direction to move landward, opposing the continuing seaward motion of all land sites. This landward motion (~ 30-50 cm over the first year) is faster than the plate convergence rate (8.3 cm/year) and therefore cannot be explained by the relocking of the subduction fault. Using numerical models with transient mantle rheology, we demonstrate that the fast landward motion is caused by viscoelastic relaxation of stresses induced by the asymmetric rupture of the thrust earthquake. For shallow megathrust events, the hanging wall has a lower stiffness and hence always exhibits larger coseismic seaward motion than the landward motion of the footwall. Greater tension is thus induced landward of the rupture area. As the mantle wedge undergoes viscoelastic relaxation, this tension in the upper plate drives the observed landward motion of the trench area. Tests on the effects of mantle rheology, coseismic slip distribution, and plate thickness suggest the wide presence of viscoelastic landward trench motion following large subduction earthquakes. This work indicates that afterslip models assuming a purely elastic Earth substantially overestimated or underestimated

  17. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  18. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors.

  19. Seafloor and sub-seafloor landslide evidences. GIS data model focused on geohazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Ricardo; Gimenez, Julia; Medialdea, Teresa; Somoza, Luis; Gonzalez, Francisco Javier

    2016-04-01

    The wealth of landslide-information preserved over seafloor and inside stratigraphic horizons should be appropriately structured and modeled so that its storage in GIS format can be directly applied in the geohazard analysis. The main aim of risk analysis is to answer the "where, when and how" questions. In this sense, parameters related to: (i) geographical location, (ii) shape and magnitude of the event, (iii) age of event/s - period of recurrence; shall be carefully analyzed to be stored in an interoperable and accessible GIS structure that can be directly applied in the risk analysis. It is important that the above parameters will be stored separately of the trigger information (sedimentation rate, earthquakes, faults locations, seabed geology, etc...) but with a strong related link. The appropriate geographical representation of the landslide event inherits problems of the geomorphological maps and the standardized submarine geomorphological legend. This gives rise to considerations on how to represent-and store a landslide-event. We present a GIS submarine landslides catalogue of the Spanish continental margin and adjacent areas. It comprises the Atlantic and Mediterranean continental margins as well as hot-spot type volcanic islands and seamounts (Canary Archipelago). The catalogue, implemented in a geographic information system, stores a total of 317 submarine landslides and compiles information such as name, location, typology, age, volume, source, and lithology and published references. It is conceived as a first step in the submarine risk analysis, although other applications such as sedimentology, tectonic or volcanic studies or basin evolution are also taken into account.

  20. Acoustic vector sensor beamforming reduces masking from underwater industrial noise during passive monitoring.

    PubMed

    Thode, Aaron M; Kim, Katherine H; Norman, Robert G; Blackwell, Susanna B; Greene, Charles R

    2016-04-01

    Masking from industrial noise can hamper the ability to detect marine mammal sounds near industrial operations, whenever conventional (pressure sensor) hydrophones are used for passive acoustic monitoring. Using data collected from an autonomous recorder with directional capabilities (Directional Autonomous Seafloor Acoustic Recorder), deployed 4.1 km from an arctic drilling site in 2012, the authors demonstrate how conventional beamforming on an acoustic vector sensor can be used to suppress noise arriving from a narrow sector of geographic azimuths. Improvements in signal-to-noise ratio of up to 15 dB are demonstrated on bowhead whale calls, which were otherwise undetectable using conventional hydrophones.

  1. Shallow thermal structure constrained by seafloor temperature and heat flow estimated from BSRs in the Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohde, A.; Otsuka, H.; Kioka, A.; Ashi, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Nankai Trough is a plate convergent boundary where earthquakes with a magnitude of 8 take place repeatedly. Thermal structure in subduction zones affects pore pressure and diagenesis such as consolidation, dewatering and cementation, and constrains physical properties of a fault-slip plane. In the Nankai subduction zone, existence of methane hydrate is confirmed from acoustic reflectors called the Bottom Simulating Reflectors (BSRs) which parallel the seafloor on seismic reflection images with high-amplitude and reverse-polarity waveforms. As a depth of BSR is theoretically constrained by subseafloor profiles of temperature and pressure, the BSR depths effectively produce subseafloor geothermal information over a wide area without heat flow probe penetration or in-situ borehole temperature measurement that is fragmentary. In this study, we aim at calculating precise two-dimensional shallow thermal structure. First, we investigate detailed distribution of the BSRs in the Nankai area ranging from offshore Tokai to Hyuga using two-dimensional multi-channel seismic reflection data. The BSR depths are then forwarded to estimate heat flow values. Second, we use a simple two-dimensional thermal modeling of Blackwell et al. [1980] that takes into account topographical effects of the seafloor roughness. We also employ additional boundary conditions constrained by seafloor temperature and the heat flow estimated from BSR depths. In order to confirm reliability of the modeled thermal structure, we additionally estimate the base of gas hydrate stability zone which is proved to almost equal to observational BSR depths. We find in the modeled thermal structure that the convex portions that are subject to cooling by cold bottom water, while depressions are less subject to the cooling from observational BSRs and theoretical calculation. The thermal structure gained here provides essential data for seismic simulations in subduction zones and for laboratory experiments as

  2. Shallow subsurface geology of the continental shelf, Gulf of the Farallones, California, and its relationship to surficial seafloor characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chin, J.L.; Karl, Herman A.; Maher, N.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Gulf of the Farallones is located on a continental margin that is tectonically active and has experienced eustatic fluctuations of sea level throughout the Quaternary. Bathymetry of the Gulf suggests that it is different from the average continental shelf off California in that instead of a seafloor that slopes gently seaward from the shoreline to the shelf edge (dominantly west to southwest), much of the Gulf shelf slopes to the northwest, a direction that is subparallel to that of the adjacent mainland shoreline. Isobaths are oblique to shore-normal for much of the Gulf shelf as opposed to the more typical shore-parallel isobaths. This northwest trend is parallel to that of the offshore granitic outcrops, the Farallon Island ridge and Cordell Bank. 3.5 kHz shallow subsurface profiles show a regional unconformity (basal unconformity of this study) that truncates bedrock and typically is overlain by a very thin veneer (1-2 m or less) of acoustically transparent unconsolidated sediment. In places, the basal unconformity appears to be coincident with the seafloor. Where the basal unconformity is within 1-2 m of the seafloor, side-scan sonar reveals that either bedrock pierces the seafloor or numerous linear depressions dissect the shelf seafloor. Side-scan sonar shows that the central part of the study area is characterized by numerous linear depressions that are on the order of 1-3 m deep, several meters to 5 km in length, and from 250 m to 2 km in width. The only Holocene unconsolidated sediment in excess of 1-2 m that has accumulated on the Gulf shelf is located where the bedrock surface is topographically depressed. The topographic lows are situated south of the Point Reyes headland and southwest of the Golden Gate. The sediment deposits that overlie these lows attain thicknesses up to 15-20 m; however, their average thickness is less than 10 m. Structure contours on the basal unconformity surface, essentially the top of the bedrock platform, also show that

  3. Directional frequency and recording (DIFAR) sensors in seafloor recorders to locate calling bowhead whales during their fall migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Charles R.; McLennan, Miles Wm.; Norman, Robert G.; McDonald, Trent L.; Jakubczak, Ray S.; Richardson, W. John

    2004-08-01

    Bowhead whales, Balaena mysticetus, migrate west during fall ~10-75 km off the north coast of Alaska, passing the petroleum developments around Prudhoe Bay. Oil production operations on an artificial island 5 km offshore create sounds heard by some whales. As part of an effort to assess whether migrating whales deflect farther offshore at times with high industrial noise, an acoustical approach was selected for localizing calling whales. The technique incorporated DIFAR (directional frequency and recording) sonobuoy techniques. An array of 11 DASARs (directional autonomous seafloor acoustic recorders) was built and installed with unit-to-unit separation of 5 km. When two or more DASARs detected the same call, the whale location was determined from the bearing intersections. This article describes the acoustic methods used to determine the locations of the calling bowhead whales and shows the types and precision of the data acquired. Calibration transmissions at GPS-measured times and locations provided measures of the individual DASAR clock drift and directional orientation. The standard error of the bearing measurements at distances of 3-4 km was ~1.35° after corrections for gain imbalance in the two directional sensors. During 23 days in 2002, 10 587 bowhead calls were detected and 8383 were localized.

  4. Horizontal variability of high-frequency nonlinear internal waves in Massachusetts Bay detected by an array of seafloor pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J. A.; Lerczak, J. A.; Moum, J. N.

    2016-08-01

    A two-dimensional array of 14 seafloor pressure sensors was deployed to measure properties of tidally generated, nonlinear, high-frequency internal waves over a 14 km by 12 km area west of Stellwagen Bank in Massachusetts Bay during summer 2009. Thirteen high-frequency internal wave packets propagated through the region over 6.5 days (one packet every semidiurnal cycle). Propagation speed and direction of wave packets were determined by triangulation, using arrival times and distances between triads of sensor locations. Wavefront curvature ranged from straight to radially spreading, with wave speeds generally faster to the south. Waves propagated to the southwest, rotating to more westward with shoreward propagation. Linear theory predicts a relationship between kinetic energy and bottom pressure variance of internal waves that is sensitive to sheared background currents, water depth, and stratification. By comparison to seafloor acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements, observations nonetheless show a strong relationship between kinetic energy and bottom pressure variance. This is presumably due to phase-locking of the wave packets to the internal tide that dominates background currents and to horizontally uniform and relatively constant stratification throughout the study. This relationship was used to qualitatively describe variations in kinetic energy of the high-frequency wave packets. In general, high-frequency internal wave kinetic energy was greater near the southern extent of wavefronts and greatly decreased upon propagating shoreward of the 40 m isobath.

  5. Developments of next generation of seafloor observatories in MARsite project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Italiano, Francesco; Favali, Paolo; Zaffuto, Alfonso; Zora, Marco; D'Anca, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    The development of new generation of autonomous sea-floor observatories is among the aims of the EC supersite project MARsite (MARMARA Supersite; FP7 EC-funded project, grant n° 308417). An approach based on multiparameter seafloor observatories is considered of basic importance to better understand the role of the fluids in an active tectonic system and their behaviour during the development of the seismogenesis. To continuously collect geochemical and geophysical data from the immediate vicinity of the submerged North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) is one of the possibilities to contribute to the seismic hazard minimization of the Marmara area. The planning of next generation of seafloor observatories for geo-hazard monitoring is a task in one of the MARsite Work Packages (WP8). The activity is carried out combining together either the experience got after years of investigating fluids and their interactions with the seafloor and tectonic structures and the long-term experience on the development and management of permanent seafloor observatories in the main frame of the EMSO (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water-column Observatory, www.emso-eu.org) Research Infrastructure. The new generation of seafloor observatories have to support the observation of both slow and quick variations, thus allow collecting low and high-frequency signals besides the storage of long-term dataset and/or enable the near-real-time mode data transmission. Improvements of some the seafloor equipments have been done so far within MARsite project in terms of the amount of contemporary active instruments, their interlink with "smart sensor" capacities (threshold detection, triggering), quality of the collected data and power consumption reduction. In order to power the multiparameter sensors the digitizer and the microprocessor, an electronic board named PMS (Power Management System) with multi-master, multi-slave, single-ended, serial bus Inter-Integrated Circuit (I²C) interface

  6. Estimating rocky seafloor extent on the Southern California continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, G.R.; Greene, H. Gary

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution sonar data are necessary to map bottom substrate for habitat studies but are lacking over much of the continental shelf. With such data, areas covered by sediment can be distinguished from bedrock areas with an accuracy of ??90%. Without these data, the extent of sediment as thick as 10 m cannot be resolved, and estimates of the extent of rocky seafloor are exaggerated. A study area north of Anacapa Island in Southern California interpreted as a large rocky area after mapping with low-resolution seismic systems was found to have exposed rocky bottom in only 10% of the area when mapped with high-resolution, side-scan sonar. The area of rock was estimated using video-supervised, sonar-image classification of textural derivatives of the data calculated from gray-level co-occurrence matrices. The classification of soft bottom was found to be ??90% accurate using an independent data set, derived from seafloor sampling records. Two general types of rock exposure are observed-sparse linear outcrops of layered sedimentary rocks and more massive, rounded outcrop areas of volcanic rocks. The percentage of exposed rock in volcanic areas exceeded that in sedimentary rock areas by a factor of 5 in the study area north of Anacapa Island. South of Point Arguello, 80% of the shelf seafloor is underlain by sedimentary rock units. The percentage of area that is exposed, rocky-reef habitat may be greater in other areas of coastal seafloor if the bedrock is predominantly volcanic. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  7. Sea-floor geology and sedimentary processes in the vicinity of Cross Rip Channel, Nantucket Sound, offshore southeastern Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Ackerman, S.D.; Schaer, J.D.; Wright, D.B.

    2012-01-01

    Gridded multibeam bathymetry covers approximately 10.4 square kilometers of sea floor in the vicinity of Cross Rip Channel in Nantucket Sound, offshore southeastern Massachusetts. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H12007, these acoustic data, and the sea-floor sediment sampling and bottom photography stations subsequently occupied to verify them, show the composition and terrain of the seabed and provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat. This report is part of an expanding series of cooperative studies by the U.S. Geological Survey, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management that provide a fundamental framework for research and resource-management activities (for example, windfarms, pipelines, and dredging) along the inner continental shelf offshore of Massachusetts.

  8. Nonlinear Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-02-14

    Wester- velt. [60] Streaming. In 1831, Michael Faraday [61] noted that currents of air were set up in the neighborhood of vibrating plates-the first... ducei in the case of a paramettc amy (from Berktay an Leahy 141). C’ "". k•, SEC 10.1 NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS 345 The principal results of their analysis

  9. Similar Microbial Communities Found on Two Distant Seafloor Basalts.

    PubMed

    Singer, Esther; Chong, Lauren S; Heidelberg, John F; Edwards, Katrina J

    2015-01-01

    The oceanic crust forms two thirds of the Earth's surface and hosts a large phylogenetic and functional diversity of microorganisms. While advances have been made in the sedimentary realm, our understanding of the igneous rock portion as a microbial habitat has remained limited. We present the first comparative metagenomic microbial community analysis from ocean floor basalt environments at the Lō'ihi Seamount, Hawai'i, and the East Pacific Rise (EPR; 9°N). Phylogenetic analysis indicates the presence of a total of 43 bacterial and archaeal mono-phyletic groups, dominated by Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, as well as Thaumarchaeota. Functional gene analysis suggests that these Thaumarchaeota play an important role in ammonium oxidation on seafloor basalts. In addition to ammonium oxidation, the seafloor basalt habitat reveals a wide spectrum of other metabolic potentials, including CO2 fixation, denitrification, dissimilatory sulfate reduction, and sulfur oxidation. Basalt communities from Lō'ihi and the EPR show considerable metabolic and phylogenetic overlap down to the genus level despite geographic distance and slightly different seafloor basalt mineralogy.

  10. Similar Microbial Communities Found on Two Distant Seafloor Basalts

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Esther; Chong, Lauren S.; Heidelberg, John F.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2015-01-01

    The oceanic crust forms two thirds of the Earth’s surface and hosts a large phylogenetic and functional diversity of microorganisms. While advances have been made in the sedimentary realm, our understanding of the igneous rock portion as a microbial habitat has remained limited. We present the first comparative metagenomic microbial community analysis from ocean floor basalt environments at the Lō’ihi Seamount, Hawai’i, and the East Pacific Rise (EPR; 9°N). Phylogenetic analysis indicates the presence of a total of 43 bacterial and archaeal mono-phyletic groups, dominated by Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, as well as Thaumarchaeota. Functional gene analysis suggests that these Thaumarchaeota play an important role in ammonium oxidation on seafloor basalts. In addition to ammonium oxidation, the seafloor basalt habitat reveals a wide spectrum of other metabolic potentials, including CO2 fixation, denitrification, dissimilatory sulfate reduction, and sulfur oxidation. Basalt communities from Lō’ihi and the EPR show considerable metabolic and phylogenetic overlap down to the genus level despite geographic distance and slightly different seafloor basalt mineralogy. PMID:26733957

  11. Study of abyssal seafloor isolation of contaminated sediments concluded

    SciTech Connect

    Valent, P.

    1998-12-31

    Recognizing the rapidly decreasing availability of disposal sites on land, in 1993 Congress directed the Department of Defense to assess the technical and scientific feasibility of isolating contaminated dredged material on the abyssal seafloor. The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) conducted and managed the assessment, which was funded during its first year by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program and in the following two years by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. NRL carried out the projects in collaboration with participants from academic institutions and industrial organizations. The seafloor isolation concept is an attractive management option for contaminated dredged material because, if abyssal isolation is feasible and environmentally sound, air, land, or water supplies would not be contaminated. The participants concluded that it is technically and environmentally feasible. In ports where shipping costs are high, abyssal seafloor isolation is a cost-competitive strategy. They also outlined the architecture of a system to monitor conditions at the site and to detect and measure possible leaks of contaminated material.

  12. A Seafloor Microbial Biome Hosted within Incipient Ferromanganese Crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Templeton, Alexis S.; Knowles, A. S.; Eldridge, D. L.; Arey, Bruce W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Webb, Samuel M.; Bailey, B. E.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Staudigel, Hubert

    2009-11-15

    Unsedimented volcanic rocks exposed on the seafloor at ridge systems and Seamounts host complex, abundant and diverse microbial communities that are relatively cosmopolitan in distribution (Lysnes, Thorseth et al. 2004; Mason, Stingl et al. 2007; Santelli, Orcutt et al. 2008). The most commonly held hypothesis is that the energy released by the hydration, dissolution and oxidative alteration of volcanic glasses in seawater drives the formation of an ocean crust biosphere (Thorseth, Furnes et al. 1992; Fisk, Giovannoni et al. 1998; Furnes and Staudigel 1999). The combined thermodynamically favorable weathering reactions could theoretically support anywhere from 105 to 109 cells/gram of rock depending upon the metabolisms utilized and cellular growth rates and turnover (Bach and Edwards 2003; Santelli, Orcutt et al. 2008). Yet microbially-mediated basalt alteration and energy conservation has not been directly demonstrated on the seafloor. By using synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe mapping, x-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy observations of young volcanic glasses recovered from the outer flanks of Loihi Seamount, we intended to identify the initial rates and mechanisms of microbial basalt colonization and bioalteration. Instead, here we show that microbial biofilms are intimately associated with ferromanganese crusts precipitating onto basalt surfaces from cold seawater. Thus we hypothesize that microbial communities colonizing seafloor rocks are established and sustained by external inputs of potential energy sources, such as dissolved and particulate Fe(II), Mn(II) and organic matter, rather than rock dissolution.

  13. Words from spontaneous conversational speech can be recognized with human-like accuracy by an error-driven learning algorithm that discriminates between meanings straight from smart acoustic features, bypassing the phoneme as recognition unit.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Denis; Tomaschek, Fabian; Sering, Konstantin; Lopez, Florence; Baayen, R Harald

    2017-01-01

    Sound units play a pivotal role in cognitive models of auditory comprehension. The general consensus is that during perception listeners break down speech into auditory words and subsequently phones. Indeed, cognitive speech recognition is typically taken to be computationally intractable without phones. Here we present a computational model trained on 20 hours of conversational speech that recognizes word meanings within the range of human performance (model 25%, native speakers 20-44%), without making use of phone or word form representations. Our model also generates successfully predictions about the speed and accuracy of human auditory comprehension. At the heart of the model is a 'wide' yet sparse two-layer artificial neural network with some hundred thousand input units representing summaries of changes in acoustic frequency bands, and proxies for lexical meanings as output units. We believe that our model holds promise for resolving longstanding theoretical problems surrounding the notion of the phone in linguistic theory.

  14. The Effects of Sediment Porosity on Acoustic Reflection and Transmission at the Seafloor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    of geophysics. The foundations of the Biot theory were laid by Rayleigh [ Strutt (1883)] who considered propagation in a porous medium whose solid...Soc. Am., 70. 149-156, 1981. Strutt , J.W. (Lord Rayleigh ), "On Porous Bodies in Relation to Sound," Philos. Mag. 16 (5), 181-186, 1883. van der...distribution unlimited 91 I>0 Z i Charles William Holland Penn State University REUYMuHl Applied Research taboratory P.O. Box 30 State College, PA 16804

  15. Observations of the volume flux of a seafloor hydrothermal plume using an acoustic imaging sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2013-07-01

    We present a 26 day time series (October 2010) of physical properties (volume flux, flow velocity, expansion rate) of a vigorous deep-sea hydrothermal plume measured using our Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS), which is connected to the Northeast Pacific Time Series Underwater Experiment Canada Cabled Observatory at the Main Endeavour Field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. COVIS quantitatively monitors the initial buoyant rise of the plume from ˜5 m to ˜15 m above the vents. The time series exhibits temporal variations of the plume vertical volume flux (1.93-5.09 m3/s ), centerline vertical velocity component (0.11-0.24 m/s ) and expansion rate (0.082-0.21 m/m ); these variations have major spectral peaks at semidiurnal (˜2 cycle/day) and inertial oscillation (˜1.5 cycle/day) frequencies. The plume expansion rate (average ˜0.14 m/m ) is inversely proportional to the plume centerline vertical velocity component (coefficient of determination R2˜0.5). This inverse proportionality, as well as the semidiurnal frequency, indicates interaction between the plume and ambient ocean currents consistent with an entrainment of ambient seawater that increases with the magnitude of ambient currents. The inertial oscillations observed in the time series provide evidence for the influence of surface storms on the dynamics of hydrothermal plumes.

  16. Stochastic Modeling of Seafloor Morphology in Support of the Acoustic Reverberation SRP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-29

    Ocean near the Cocos -Pacific spreading center of the east Pacific Rise, and SMl-A, corresponding to a 100km x 100km area of the North Atlantic Ocean...the Cocos -Pacific spreading center of the East Pacific Rise and SMI-A, corresponding to a 100 km x 100 km area of the North Atlantic Ocean west of the...ranging from 100 km to 0.1 m. The two areas selected for this study are a 100 km x 100 km region of the east central Pacific Ocean, near the Cocos -Pacific

  17. Temporal and Frequency-Based Variations in Seafloor Bathymetry and Acoustic Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    software (both incorporate the GeoCoder backscatter processing routines to minimize the angular dependence of multibeam backscatter...integrated suite of processing algorithms called Geocoder (developed by Luciano Fonseca and Brian Calder of the University of New Hampshire, see Fonseca and... Geocoder uses the original acquisition data, considers any modifications made to it, and then applies various radiometric and geometric corrections

  18. Precise GPS/Acoustic Positioning of Seafloor Reference Points for Tectonic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiess, F. N.; Chadwell, C.; Hildebrand, J. A.; Young, L. E.; Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Dragert, H.

    1998-01-01

    Global networks for crustal strain measurement provide important constraints for studies of tectonic plate motion and deformation. To date, crustal strain measurements have been possible only in terrestrial settings: on continental plates and island sites within oceanic plates.

  19. Acoustic Observation of the Time Dependence of the Roughness of Sandy Seafloors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-25

    currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. REPORT DATE IDD-MM-YYYY) 04-10-2009 2. REPORT TYPE Journal...CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Darrell r. Jackson, Michael d . Richardson, Kevin L. Williams...Anthony P. Lyons, Christopher D . Jones, Kevin B. Briggs, Dajun Tang 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING

  20. Backscatter from a limestone seafloor at 2-3.5 kHz: measurements and modeling.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Raymond J; Gragg, Robert F

    2003-05-01

    Physics-based interface scattering models for the seafloor [H.-H. Essen, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 95, 1299-1310 (1994); Gragg et al., ibid. 110, 2878-2901 (2001)] exhibit features in their predicted grazing angle dependence. These features have a strong dependence on the assumed composition and roughness of the bottom. Verifying such predictions requires data that cover a wide range of grazing angles and involve minimal sub-bottom penetration. Such measurements were performed in the frequency band 2-3.5 kHz over an exposed limestone bottom off the Carolina coast during the second Littoral Warfare Advanced Development Focused Technology Experiment of 1996 (LWAD FTE 96-2). Direct-path bottom scattering strengths were obtained in shallow water (198-310 m deep) for grazing angles from 8 degrees to 75 degrees using data fusion from multiple experimental geometries coupled with careful signal processing. The processing included corrections for the surface-reflected path, other multipaths, and characteristics of the reverberation decay observed over the pulse duration at higher grazing angles. The resulting frequency and grazing-angle dependences exhibit trends consistent with theoretical predictions, and geoacoustic parameters obtained by inversion are consistent with values expected for limestone.

  1. Seafloor mapping and benthic habitat GIS for southern California, volume III

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Dartnell, Pete; Schroeder, Donna M.; Finlayson, David P.

    2007-01-01

    From August 8-27, 2005, more than 75 km of the continental shelf (Fig. 1) in water depths of 20-70m southeast of Santa Barbara, were surveyed during the USGS cruise S-1-05-SC (http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/s/s105sc/html/s-1-05-sc.meta.html). Both Interferometric sonar and 14 hours of both vertical and oblique georeferenced submarine digital video were collected to (1) obtain geophysical data (bathymetry and acoustic reflectance), (2) examine and record geologic characteristics of the sea floor, and (3) construct maps of seafloor geomorphology and habitat distribution. Substrate distribution is predicted using a modified version of Cochrane and Lafferty (2002) video-supervised statistical classification of sonar data that includes derivatives of bathymetry data. Specific details of the methods can be found in the meatadata of the bathymetry data file. Substrates observed are predominantly sand with some rock. Rocky substrates were restricted primarily to an east-west trending bathymetric high 2,000 m north of oil platforms. This is an updated report (version 2.0) from the earlier 2007-1271 (version 1.0) open-file report. This updated report re-releases the data files in UTM, zone 11, WGS84 coordinates. Also, the bathymetry data has been corrected for a vertical offset discovered in the earlier 2007-1271 (version 1.0) report.

  2. Sea-floor geology and topography offshore in Eastern Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Ackerman, S.D.; Blackwood, D.S.; Schaer, J.D.; Forrest, M.R.; Ostapenko, A.J.; Doran, E.F.

    2011-01-01

    A gridded multibeam bathymetric dataset covers approximately 133.7 square kilometers of sea floor offshore in eastern Long Island Sound. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H11997, these acoustic data, and the sea-floor sampling and photography stations subsequently occupied to verify them during USGS cruise 2010-015-FA, are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and resource management (for example, cables, pipelines, and dredging) activities in this major East Coast estuary. Results show the composition and terrain of the seabed and provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat. Bedrock outcrops, erosional outliers, lag deposits of boulders, scour depressions, and extensive gravel pavements are common in the eastern part of the study area. These features, which result from the near-constant exposure to strong tidal currents, indicate sedimentary environments dominated by processes associated with erosion. Large fields of transverse and barchanoid sand waves in the western part of the study area reflect slightly lower energy levels and sedimentary environments where processes associated with coarse bedload transport prevail.

  3. Seafloor morphology south of Cyprus: Bathymetry and sediment echosounder profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, R.; Ehrhardt, A.; Huebscher, C. P.; Christiansen, B.

    2010-12-01

    The Eratosthenes Seamount is the most striking bathymetric feature situated in the midst of the eastern Mediterranean seafloor about 100 km south of Cyprus. The tabular top is about 120 by 80 km wide lying at a depth of 700 m and rising more than 1000 m above the adjacent seafloor. This Seamount comprises of a continental fragment of the African Plate. The seamount started to collide with the Cypriot Arc during the early Pleistocene, which triggered a series of synchronous deformations across the collision zone between the African-Sinai-Arabia and Eurasia-Anatolia plates, including the entire eastern Mediterranean region. New bathymetry data acquired in spring 2010 shed light on cascading geo-hazards resulting from the incipient continent-continent collision.The slopes of the Eratosthenes Seamount are characterized by numerous slumps or debris flows of various generations and canyons, indicating mass wasting processes at its flanks. At the eastern side e.g. one slump complex is around 15 km long and 3.5 km wide in its middle part. Here, the canyons are intersected by graben related faults, which proves that the canyons evolved prior to the early Pliocene collision. The seamount is surrounded by a 5-20 km wide trench. Meandering channels with a high sinuosity incised into the flat seafloor of this trench and the wavy adjacent seafloor. The longest meandering channel can be traced over more than 120 km in the study area. Width of this channel is around 800 m with a depth of 25-40 m. With the exception of the western study area the outer edge of the trench is marked by a 200-600 m high escarpment. The surrounding seafloor of the Levantine and Herodotus Basins exhibits elongated folds which correspond to the surface of the underlying Messinian evaporites. The folding results from thin-skinned compression due to lateral salt creeping. Meandering channels cut through the elongated folds, thus indicating a recent formation. Parametric subbottom profiler data reveal mainly

  4. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  5. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  6. Shallow-water imaging multibeam sonars: A new tool for investigating seafloor processes in the coastal zone and on the continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes Clarke, John E.; Mayer, Larry A.; Wells, David E.

    1996-12-01

    Hydrographic quality bathymetry and quantitative acoustic backscatter data are now being acquired in shallow water on a routine basis using high frequency multibeam sonars. The data provided by these systems produce hitherto unobtainable information about geomorphology and seafloor geologic processes in the coastal zone and on the continental shelf. Before one can use the multibeam data for hydrography or quantitative acoustic backscatter studies, however, it is essential to be able to correct for systematic errors in the data. For bathymetric data, artifacts common to deep-water systems (roll, refraction, positioning) need to be corrected. In addition, the potentially far greater effects of tides, heave, vessel lift/squat, antenna motion and internal time delays become of increasing importance in shallower water. Such artifacts now cause greater errors in hydrographic data quality than bottom detection. Many of these artifacts are a result of imperfect motion sensing, however, new methods such as differential GPS hold great potential for resolving such limitations. For backscatter data, while the system response is well characterised, significant post processing is required to remove residual effects of imaging geometry, gain adjustments and water column effects. With the removal of these system artifacts and the establishment of a calibrated test site in intertidal regions (where the seabed may be intimately examined by eye) one can build up a sediment classification scheme for routine regional seafloor identification. When properly processed, high frequency multibeam sonar data can provide a view of seafloor geology and geomorphology at resolutions of as little as a few decimetres. Specific applications include quantitative estimation of sediment transport rates in large-scale sediment waves, volume effects of iceberg scouring, extent and style of seafloor mass-wasting and delineation of structural trends in bedrock. In addition, the imagery potentially provides

  7. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  9. Discrimination of brief speech sounds is impaired in rats with auditory cortex lesions.

    PubMed

    Porter, Benjamin A; Rosenthal, Tara R; Ranasinghe, Kamalini G; Kilgard, Michael P

    2011-05-16

    Auditory cortex (AC) lesions impair complex sound discrimination. However, a recent study demonstrated spared performance on an acoustic startle response test of speech discrimination following AC lesions (Floody et al., 2010). The current study reports the effects of AC lesions on two operant speech discrimination tasks. AC lesions caused a modest and quickly recovered impairment in the ability of rats to discriminate consonant-vowel-consonant speech sounds. This result seems to suggest that AC does not play a role in speech discrimination. However, the speech sounds used in both studies differed in many acoustic dimensions and an adaptive change in discrimination strategy could allow the rats to use an acoustic difference that does not require an intact AC to discriminate. Based on our earlier observation that the first 40 ms of the spatiotemporal activity patterns elicited by speech sounds best correlate with behavioral discriminations of these sounds (Engineer et al., 2008), we predicted that eliminating additional cues by truncating speech sounds to the first 40 ms would render the stimuli indistinguishable to a rat with AC lesions. Although the initial discrimination of truncated sounds took longer to learn, the final performance paralleled rats using full-length consonant-vowel-consonant sounds. After 20 days of testing, half of the rats using speech onsets received bilateral AC lesions. Lesions severely impaired speech onset discrimination for at least one-month post lesion. These results support the hypothesis that auditory cortex is required to accurately discriminate the subtle differences between similar consonant and vowel sounds.

  10. Calibration of an acoustic system for measuring 2-D temperature distribution around hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Chen, Ying

    2013-04-01

    One of the fundamental purposes of quantitative acoustic surveys of seafloor hydrothermal vents is to measure their 2-D temperature distributions. Knowing the system latencies and the acoustic center-to-center distances between the underwater transducers in an acoustic tomography system is fundamental to the overall accuracy of the temperature reconstruction. However, commercial transducer sources typically do not supply the needed data. Here we present a novel calibration algorithm to automatically determine the system latencies and the acoustic center-to-center distances. The possible system latency error and the resulting temperature error are derived and analyzed. We have also developed the experimental setup for calibration. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed calibration method, an experimental study was performed on acoustic imaging of underwater temperature fields in Lake Qiezishan, located at Longling County, Yunnan Province, China. Using the calibrated data, the reconstructed temperature distributions closely resemble the actual distributions measured with thermocouples, thus confirming the effectiveness of our algorithm.

  11. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  12. Characteristic Morphology, Backscatter, and Sub-seafloor Structures of Cold-Vents on the Northern Cascadia Margin from High-Resolution Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francolin, Camila Clemente

    In this thesis seafloor cold vents are examined using autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and remotely operated vehicle (ROV) data on the Northern Cascadia margin. These data were collected in a 2009 joint cruise between the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). High-resolution bathymetry data, acoustic reflectivity (backscatter) data, and 3.5 kHz sub bottom profiler data were examined for cold-vent-related features that include pockmarks, chemosynthetic biological communities (CBC), and authigenic carbonate. Additionally subsequent ROV observations, sediments from push cores and seafloor video/photos were used to ground truth AUV data. Numerous prolific venting sites were examined in detail and a model for the evolution of venting was generated. Vents are categorized as juvenile, intermediate, or mature depending on the presence and or absence of cold-vent-features. High near-surface reflection amplitudes are coincident with an anomalous area of seafloor backscatter. In June of 2012, NEPTUNE (North East Pacific Time-series Underwater Networked Experiment) collected a near-surface push core with their ROV ROPOS (Remotely Operated Platform for Ocean Sciences) in the high reflective area. The retrieved core showed stacked turbidites in the top 0.5 meters of the sediment column. Closely spaced high-velocity turbidite sands are highly reflective and inhibit acoustic penetration to depth. The presence of high-density, high-velocity sands in the near surface is linked to steady ocean bottom currents. These bottom currents progress northeast to southwest over the study area and differentially erode the surface sediments by removing muds and leaving heavy sands over the exposed area.

  13. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  14. Terrestrial subaqueous seafloor dunes: Possible analogs for Venus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neakrase, Lynn D.V.; Klose, Martina; Titus, Timothy N.

    2017-01-01

    Dunes on Venus, first discovered with Magellan Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) in the early 1990s, have fueled discussions about the viability of Venusian dunes and aeolian grain transport. Confined to two locations on Venus, the existence of the interpreted dunes provides evidence that there could be transportable material being mobilized into aeolian bedforms at the surface. However, because of the high-pressure high-temperature surface conditions, laboratory analog studies are difficult to conduct and results are difficult to extrapolate to full-sized, aeolian bedforms. Field sites of desert dunes, which are well-studied on Earth and Mars, are not analogous to what is observed on Venus because of the differences in the fluid environments. One potentially underexplored possibility in planetary science for Venus-analog dune fields could be subaqueous, seafloor dune fields on Earth. Known to the marine geology communities since the early 1960s, seafloor dunes are rarely cited in planetary aeolian bedform literature, but could provide a necessary thick-atmosphere extension to the classically studied aeolian dune environment literature for thinner atmospheres. Through discussion of the similarity of the two environments, and examples of dunes and ripples cited in marine literature, we provide evidence that subaqueous seafloor dunes could serve as analogs for dunes on Venus. Furthermore, the evidence presented here demonstrates the usefulness of the marine literature for thick-atmosphere planetary environments and potentially for upcoming habitable worlds and oceanic environment research program opportunities. Such useful cross-disciplinary discussion of dune environments is applicable to many planetary environments (Earth, Mars, Venus, Titan, etc.) and potential future missions.

  15. Seafloor doming driven by active mantle degassing offshore Naples (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Guido; Passaro, Salvatore; Tamburrino, Stella; Vallefuoco, Mattia; Tassi, Franco; Vaselli, Orlando; Giannini, Luciano; Caliro, Stefano; Chiodini, Giovanni; Sacchi, Marco; Rizzo, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Structures and processes associated with shallow water hydrothermal fluid discharges on continental shelves are poorly known. We report geomorphological, geophysical, and geochemical evidences of a 5.5 x 5.3 km seabed doming located 5 km offshore the Naples harbor (Italy). The dome lies between 100 and 170 m of water depth and it is 15-20 m higher than the surrounding seafloor. It is characterized by a hummocky morphology due to 280 sub-circular to elliptical mounds, about 660 cones, and 30 pockmarks. The mounds and pockmarks alignments follow those of the main structural discontinuity affecting the Gulf of Naples. The seafloor swelling and breaching require relatively low pressures (about 2-3 MPa), and the sub-seafloor structures, which consists of 'pagodas' affecting the present-day seabed, record the active upraise, pressurization, and release of magmatic fluids. The gas composition of the sampled submarine emissions is consistent with that of the emissions from the hydrothermal systems of Ischia, CampiFlegrei and Somma-Vesuvius active volcanoes, and CO2 has a magmatic/thermometamorphic origin. The 3He/4He ratios (1.66-1.96 Ra) are slightly lower than in the Somma-Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei volcanoes (~2.6-3.0 Ra) indicating the contamination of fluids originated from the same magmatic source by crustal-derived radiogenic 4He. All these evidences concur to hypothesize an extended magmatic reservoir beneath Naples and its offshore. Seabed doming, faulting, and hydrothermal discharges are manifestations of non-volcanic unrests potentially preluding submarine eruptions and/or hydrothermal explosions. We conclude that seabed deformations and hydrothermal discharge must be included in the coastal hazard studies.

  16. Observation of hydrothermal flows with acoustic video camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, M.; Asada, A.; Tamaki, K.; Scientific Team Of Yk09-13 Leg 1

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate hydrothermal discharging and its diffusion process along the ocean ridge is necessary for understanding balance of mass and flux in the ocean, ecosystem around hydrothermal fields and so on. However, it has been difficult for us to measure hydrothermal activities without disturbance caused by observation platform ( submersible, ROV, AUV ). We wanted to have some observational method to observe hydrothermal discharging behavior as it was. DIDSON (Dual-Frequency IDentification SONar) is acoustic lens-based sonar. It has sufficiently high resolution and rapid refresh rate that it can substitute for optical system in turbid or dark water where optical systems fail. DIDSON operates at two frequencies, 1.8MHz or 1.1MHz, and forms 96 beams spaced 0.3° apart or 48 beams spaced 0.6° apart respectively. It images out to 12m at 1.8MHz and 40m at 1.1MHz. The transmit and receive beams are formed with acoustic lenses with rectangular apertures and made of polymethylpentene plastic and FC-70 liquid. This physical beam forming allows DIDSON to consume only 30W of power. DIDSON updates its image between 20 to 1 frames/s depending on the operating frequency and the maximum range imaged. It communicates its host using Ethernet. Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo ( IIS ) has understood DIDSON’s superior performance and tried to find new method for utilization of it. The observation systems that IIS has ever developed based on DIDSON are waterside surveillance system, automatic measurement system for fish length, automatic system for fish counting, diagnosis system for deterioration of underwater structure and so on. A next challenge is to develop an observation method based on DIDSON for hydrothermal discharging from seafloor vent. We expected DIDSON to reveal whole image of hydrothermal plume as well as detail inside the plume. In October 2009, we conducted seafloor reconnaissance using a manned deep-sea submersible Shinkai6500 in Central Indian

  17. Developing of 10-year EEZ seafloor mapping and research program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockwood, M.; Hill, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    The intent of expanding the exploration already begun on the outer continental shelf to the frontier of the EEZ (Exclusive Economic Zone) is to determine the "characteristics' and resource potential of this region. To coordinate this exploration, a Joint Office for Mapping and Research (JOMAR) has been established by the US Geological Survey (in the Department of the Interior) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (in the Department of Commerce). JOMAR's main purpose is to help direct and coordinate ongoing and planned seafloor related activities in the EEZ and prepare a 10-year plan for mapping and research. -from Authors

  18. Virtual seafloor reduces internal wave generation by tidal flow.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Likun; Swinney, Harry L

    2014-03-14

    Our numerical simulations of tidal flow of a stratified fluid over periodic knife-edge ridges and random topography reveal that the time-averaged tidal energy converted into internal gravity wave radiation arises only from the section of a ridge above a virtual seafloor. The average radiated power is approximated by the power predicted by linear theory if the height of the ridge is measured relative to the virtual floor. The concept of a virtual floor can extend the applicability of linear theory to global predictions of the conversion of tidal energy into internal wave energy in the oceans.

  19. Revealing the early seafloor spreading history between India and Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-09-01

    The Perth Abyssal Plain, a section of ocean floor that lies off the western coast of Australia, formed as India and Australia broke away from what had been the supercontinent Gondwana, beginning around 130 million years ago. Oceanic crust within the Perth Abyssal Plain is the only region of preserved seafloor that directly records the early history of relative motion between India and Australia, but the lack of magnetic data collected in that region had made it difficult for scientists to validate tectonic models of the motion of those continents.

  20. PP and PS interferometric images of near-seafloor sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    I present interferometric processing examples from an ocean-bottom cable OBC dataset collected at a water depth of 800 m in the Gulf of Mexico. Virtual source and receiver gathers created through cross-correlation of full wavefields show clear PP reflections and PS conversions from near-seafloor layers of interest. Virtual gathers from wavefield-separated data show improved PP and PS arrivals. PP and PS brute stacks from the wavefield-separated data compare favorably with images from a non-interferometric processing flow. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  1. Comment on "The directionality of acoustic T-phase signals from small magnitude submarine earthquakes" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 3669-3675 (2006)].

    PubMed

    Bohnenstiehl, Delwayne R

    2007-03-01

    In a recent paper, Chapman and Marrett [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 3669-3675 (2006)] examined the tertiary (T-) waves associated with three subduction-related earthquakes within the South Fiji Basin. In that paper it is argued that acoustic energy is radiated into the sound channel by downslope propagation along abyssal seamounts and ridges that lie distant to the epicenter. A reexamination of the travel-time constraints indicates that this interpretation is not well supported. Rather, the propagation model that is described would require the high-amplitude T-wave components to be sourced well to the east of the region identified, along a relatively flat-lying seafloor.

  2. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-15

    31, 20 15 I. Introduction The goal of this research is to increase our understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental...agree the following things had to be done: 1.) Adjust the peregrine water depth so that the seafloor depth matched that of Ram (this involved 1...requirement for examining sonar performance issues associated with coherence, signal time spread and multi path stability . In Figure## below, the

  3. Speech Music Discrimination Using Class-Specific Features

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    Speech Music Discrimination Using Class-Specific Features Thomas Beierholm...between speech and music . Feature extraction is class-specific and can therefore be tailored to each class meaning that segment size, model orders...interest. Some of the applications of audio signal classification are speech/ music classification [1], acoustical environmental classification [2][3

  4. Experiment in Learning to Discriminate Frequency Transposed Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahlstrom, K.G.; And Others

    In order to improve speech perception by transposing the speech signals to lower frequencies, to determine which aspects of the information in the acoustic speech signals were influenced by transposition, and to compare two different methods of training speech perception, 44 subjects were trained to discriminate between transposed words or…

  5. Improved determination of seafloor absolute magnetization from uneven, near-seafloor magnetic measurements and high-resolution bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szitkar, F.; Dyment, J.; Choi, Y.; Fouquet, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Vector magnetometers installed on deep-sea submersibles offer a unique opportunity to achieve high resolution magnetic investigations at the scale of hundred to thousand meters. Once corrected for the vehicle induced and remanent magnetization, the measurements mostly reflect variations of the topography and the submersible path - i.e. the distance between the sources and the observation points. The interesting parameter, however, is the seafloor magnetization that can be interpreted in terms of geological processes. Here we present methods to compute absolute magnetization of the seafloor by taking advantage of the uneven track of the submersible. In these methods, synthetic anomalies are computed for a unit magnetization assuming the geometry of the experiment, i.e. the source and the submersible path. The absolute magnetization is determined by a comparison between the observed anomalies and the synthetic ones along sliding windows. The coherency between the two signals gives an estimation of the quality of the determination, and the phase provides information on the magnetic polarity, and therefore the age of volcanic features. Such a method has been developed by Honsho et al. (JGR, 2009) using deep-sea submersible data only, i.e. magnetic anomaly, depth and altitude of the submersible. The synthetic anomalies are computed using 2D forward modeling, i.e. assuming the structures to be infinite in the direction perpendicular to the submersible path. The method has been applied with success to linear profiles crossing elongated structures such as mid-ocean ridges, but may fail for structures departing from the 2D assumption. The adaptation of improving multibeam systems to autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) has opened the way to the collection of very high resolution bathymetric data (around 2m between each measurement). This development has triggered a new strategy to explore the seafloor using manned submersibles: an AUV is operated during night time to

  6. Strain Accumulation Estimated from Seafloor Crustal Deformation at the Nankai Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, K.; Watanabe, T.; Nagai, S.; Ikuta, R.; Okuda, T.; Kenji, Y.; Sakata, T.

    2012-12-01

    Our research has developed an observation system for seafloor crustal deformation composed of the kinematic GPS and acoustic ranging techniques [Tadokoro et al., 2006; Ikuta et al., 2008]. We monitored crustal deformation at the Nankai Trough, Japan, where the Philippine Sea Plate subducts beneath the Amurian Plate. The convergence rate is predicted at 60 mm/y in the N59W direction by the Euler vector of REVEL [Sella et al., 2002]. We installed three monitoring sites (named KMN, KMS, and KME) on the seafloor at depths of about 1920-2030 m. The sites KMN and KMS are installed perpendicular to the trough axis with a spacing of 20 km; the site KME is 50 km from KMN and KMS in the direction parallel to the trough axis. The monitoring was started in 2004, 2005, and 2008 at KMS, KMN, and KME, respectively. The numbers of measurements are 16, 20, and 5 times at KMN, KMS, and KME, respectively. We obtained 3-7 years averaged horizontal site velocities within ITRF2000 adopting a robust estimation method with Tukey's biweight function to the time series of site position measured until the end of 2011. Substituting the synthetic rigid block motions of the Amurian Plate from the velocities within ITRF2000, we obtained the following site velocities with respect to the Amurian Plate [Tadokoro et al., 2012]: KMN 41±4 mm/y, N77±7W KMS 43±5 mm/y, N80±6W KME 42±5 mm/y, N80±7W In contrast, the on-land GPS horizontal velocities along the coast is 23-33 mm/y toward N74-80W. The present observational results show: (1) the velocity vectors are all the same length and direction, which indicates no internal deformation in this region; (2) the back-slip model predicts that the plate interface beneath the region is uniformly locked with coupling ratios of 60-80 %, indicating strain accumulation that will be released during the anticipated mega-thrust Tonankai earthquake; and (3) the directions of site velocities differ from that of convergence vector by 20 degrees, which is affected by

  7. New developments in Seafloor observatory technologies: the SED Module developed in the MONSOON project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Italiano, Francesco; Caruso, Cinzia; Corbo, Andrea; Lazzaro, Gianluca; Nigrelli, Alessandra; Sprovieri, Mario; Oliveri, Elvira; Bagnato, Emanuela; Favali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    In the main frame of the wide range of scientific and technological activities developed by EMSO (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water-column Observatory, www.emso-eu.org) Research Infrastructure. The MONSOON project (MONitoraggio SOttOmariNo for environmental and energetic purposes) is a FESR (i.e. European funds for social development) funded project by "Regione Siciliana" (industrial call). The final target of the project is to build up a prototype of a seafloor observatory named SED (Submarine Energy Device),.for which specific technological developments in terms of power consumption reduction, new data logger and new sensors have been planned. The SED observatory is planned to operate down to a water depth of 2000m in an extreme marine environment, with the presence of hydrothermal vents. SED is designed to operate as "stand-alone" or near-real-time observatory when connected to a buoy. The final version of the prototype it is planned to be released in June-July 2015 after tests completion. All the components of the observatory have been planned and laboratory-tested by the INGV and CNR public Research Institutions, while the executive plan and the manufacturing has been carried out by the industrial partnership (Eurobuilding SpA, Hitec2000 srl and Innova SpA). All the partners are going to take care of the tests in a real environment. The selected test site is located in the Aeolian islands where the shallow hydrothermal system off the coasts of the Panarea island provided an easy-to access extreme submarine environment with temperatures up to 140°C, pH less than 3 and electrical conductivity double of the normal sea-water. In this hostile environment we tested all the materials planned to be used to manufacture the different parts of the observatory, as well as all the sensors including those off-the-shelf and those planned within the MONSOON project: probes for acoustic signals, dissolved CO2 data, optical fibre-based temperature and pressure The

  8. Luxuriant life on the Galápagos seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Marine life found unexpectedly in 1977 in the vicinity of hydrothermal vents along the Galápagos Rift has proven to be of considerable interest because of newly discovered growth mechanisms. Among the life forms observed were giant tube worms, clams, mussels, and plantlike animals. If the sizes alone were beyond belief, the hostility of the living environment—noxious, hydrogen sulfide-rich warm pockets—appeared bizarre. Even though life at depths of 2.5 km on the seafloor is known normally to be sparse in comparison with shallow-water biological systems, the heated water pockets seem to account for the localized contradictions. What was difficult to explain was the toxic environment and the apparent lack of nutrients. Furthermore, the tube worms had no mouths, not even digestive systems. Recent reports in Science (November 20, 1981), and by the Smithsonian Institution (Research Reports), describe findings on bivalves studied at the hydrothermal vents and tube worms returned to the laboratory by the U.S. Navy research submersible Alvin. The growth rates are among the highest known for deep-sea life. The way the deep seafloor marine life are understood to ‘eat’ (absorb nutrients would be a better description) involves mechanisms never observed before that breakdown hydrogen sulfide with bacteria.

  9. Seafloor erosional processes offshore of the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twichell, David C.; Brock, John C.

    2011-01-01

    The Chandeleur Islands are a chain of barrier islands that lies along the eastern side of the modern Mississippi River Delta plain. The island chain is located near the seaward edge of the relict St. Bernard Delta, the part of the Mississippi Delta that formed between approximately 4,000 and 2,000 years before present and was later abandoned as sedimentation shifted southward. After abandonment of the St. Bernard Delta, deposits were reworked, and the sandy component was shaped into the Chandeleur Islands. With continued subsidence, the islands became separated from their original delta headland sources and presently are isolated from the mainland by the shallow Chandeleur Sound. Newly acquired geophysical data and vibracores provide an opportunity to better understand the processes that are shaping seafloor morphology (i.e., shape, geometry, and structure of the seafloor) on the inner shelf adjacent to the Chandeleur Islands. The inner shelf offshore of the Chandeleur Islands was mapped in 2006 and 2007 using swath bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and high-resolution seismic-reflection techniques. The detailed results of this study were published in December 2009 (Twichell and others, 2009) as part of a special issue of Geo-Marine Letters that documents early results from the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project. This study addresses questions and concerns related to limited sand resources along the Louisiana shelf and their implications to long-term relative sea-level rise and storm impacts.

  10. Rapid growth of mineral deposits at artificial seafloor hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Shimada, Kazuhiko; Nagase, Toshiro; Takaya, Yutaro; Kato, Yasuhiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Watsuji, Tomoo; Shibuya, Takazo; Yamada, Ryoichi; Saruhashi, Tomokazu; Kyo, Masanori; Takai, Ken

    2016-02-25

    Seafloor massive sulphide deposits are potential resources for base and precious metals (Cu-Pb-Zn ± Ag ± Au), but difficulties in estimating precise reserves and assessing environmental impacts hinder exploration and commercial mining. Here, we report petrological and geochemical properties of sulphide chimneys less than 2 years old that formed where scientific boreholes vented hydrothermal fluids in the Iheya-North field, Okinawa Trough, in East China Sea. One of these infant chimneys, dominated by Cu-Pb-Zn-rich sulphide minerals, grew a height of 15 m within 25 months. Portions of infant chimneys are dominated by sulphate minerals. Some infant chimneys are sulphide-rich similar to high-grade Cu-Pb-Zn bodies on land, albeit with relatively low As and Sb concentrations. The high growth rate reaching the 15 m height within 25 months is attributed to the large hydrothermal vent more than 50 cm in diameter created by the borehole, which induced slow mixing with the ambient seawater and enhanced efficiency of sulphide deposition. These observations suggest the possibility of cultivating seafloor sulphide deposits and even controlling their growth and grades through manipulations of how to mix and quench hydrothermal fluids with the ambient seawater.

  11. Impacts on seafloor geology of drilling disturbance in shallow waters.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Iran C S; Toldo, Elírio E; Toledo, Felipe A L

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes the effects of drilling disturbance on the seafloor of the upper continental slope of the Campos Basin, Brazil, as a result of the project Environmental Monitoring of Offshore Drilling for Petroleum Exploration--MAPEM. Field sampling was carried out surrounding wells, operated by the company PETROBRAS, to compare sediment properties of the seafloor, including grain-size distribution, total organic carbon, and clay mineral composition, prior to drilling with samples obtained 3 and 22 months after drilling. The sampling grid used had 74 stations, 68 of which were located along 7 radials from the well up to a distance of 500 m. The other 6 stations were used as reference, and were located 2,500 m from the well. The results show no significant sedimentological variation in the area affected by drilling activity. The observed sedimentological changes include a fining of grain size, increase in total organic carbon, an increase in gibbsite, illite, and smectite, and a decrease in kaolinite after drilling took place.

  12. Rapid growth of mineral deposits at artificial seafloor hydrothermal vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Shimada, Kazuhiko; Nagase, Toshiro; Takaya, Yutaro; Kato, Yasuhiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Watsuji, Tomoo; Shibuya, Takazo; Yamada, Ryoichi; Saruhashi, Tomokazu; Kyo, Masanori; Takai, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Seafloor massive sulphide deposits are potential resources for base and precious metals (Cu-Pb-Zn ± Ag ± Au), but difficulties in estimating precise reserves and assessing environmental impacts hinder exploration and commercial mining. Here, we report petrological and geochemical properties of sulphide chimneys less than 2 years old that formed where scientific boreholes vented hydrothermal fluids in the Iheya-North field, Okinawa Trough, in East China Sea. One of these infant chimneys, dominated by Cu-Pb-Zn-rich sulphide minerals, grew a height of 15 m within 25 months. Portions of infant chimneys are dominated by sulphate minerals. Some infant chimneys are sulphide-rich similar to high-grade Cu-Pb-Zn bodies on land, albeit with relatively low As and Sb concentrations. The high growth rate reaching the 15 m height within 25 months is attributed to the large hydrothermal vent more than 50 cm in diameter created by the borehole, which induced slow mixing with the ambient seawater and enhanced efficiency of sulphide deposition. These observations suggest the possibility of cultivating seafloor sulphide deposits and even controlling their growth and grades through manipulations of how to mix and quench hydrothermal fluids with the ambient seawater.

  13. Rapid growth of mineral deposits at artificial seafloor hydrothermal vents

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Shimada, Kazuhiko; Nagase, Toshiro; Takaya, Yutaro; Kato, Yasuhiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Watsuji, Tomoo; Shibuya, Takazo; Yamada, Ryoichi; Saruhashi, Tomokazu; Kyo, Masanori; Takai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Seafloor massive sulphide deposits are potential resources for base and precious metals (Cu-Pb-Zn ± Ag ± Au), but difficulties in estimating precise reserves and assessing environmental impacts hinder exploration and commercial mining. Here, we report petrological and geochemical properties of sulphide chimneys less than 2 years old that formed where scientific boreholes vented hydrothermal fluids in the Iheya-North field, Okinawa Trough, in East China Sea. One of these infant chimneys, dominated by Cu-Pb-Zn-rich sulphide minerals, grew a height of 15 m within 25 months. Portions of infant chimneys are dominated by sulphate minerals. Some infant chimneys are sulphide-rich similar to high-grade Cu-Pb-Zn bodies on land, albeit with relatively low As and Sb concentrations. The high growth rate reaching the 15 m height within 25 months is attributed to the large hydrothermal vent more than 50 cm in diameter created by the borehole, which induced slow mixing with the ambient seawater and enhanced efficiency of sulphide deposition. These observations suggest the possibility of cultivating seafloor sulphide deposits and even controlling their growth and grades through manipulations of how to mix and quench hydrothermal fluids with the ambient seawater. PMID:26911272

  14. Along ridge variation of the seafloor cooling and subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Po-Ju; Chiao, Ling-Yun

    2013-04-01

    Bathymetry is linearly proportional to the square root of the seafloor age according to decades of observations. It is well explained by the essentially one-dimensional thermal contraction such as that demonstrated in the classical half-space cooling model and the subsequent 2-D modifications such as the plate model, GDH1 model, PSM model etc. However, much less efforts have been undertaken on study of variation of seafloor cooling along the ridge axis. We carefully examine corridors in the spreading direction that avoid seamounts and other some secondary structures, in addition to the sediment correction. We find that subsidence rates vary along major mid-ocean ridges. It would require a range of 400 to -600°C difference if the subsidence rate variations are attributed entirely to sub-ridge mantle temperature anomalies. Pronounced anomalies include the noticeable lows at the equator in the mid-Atlantic ridge and the northern section of East Pacific Rise that might be attributed to the close by continental lithosphere. The eastern section in mid-Indian ridge is also significantly cooler within regions of the Australian-Antarctic Discordance (AAD), which has been attributed to an ancient slab stalled beneath the present-day Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR). Further researches that take into account of trends of geoid data is underway to make consistent interpretations.

  15. A seafloor microbial biome hosted within incipient ferromanganese crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, A. S.; Knowles, E. J.; Eldridge, D. L.; Arey, B. W.; Dohnalkova, A. C.; Webb, S. M.; Bailey, B. E.; Tebo, B. M.; Staudigel, H.

    2009-12-01

    Exposed rocks at underwater volcanoes and ridges host complex, abundant and diverse microbial communities. The volcanic glasses associated with these features constitute one of the most geochemically reactive components of the Earth's crust. The most commonly held hypothesis is that their oxidation in sea water provides the energy necessary to establish a seafloor biosphere. However, this hypothesis has yet to be directly tested. Here we used synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe mapping, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques to examine the initial chemical changes that occur as the glassy rims of young pillow basalts are colonized by microbial organisms at Loihi seamount, Hawaii. We found little evidence of basalt dissolution. Instead, microbial biofilms were intimately associated with Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides that had precipitated from sea water onto the fresh basalt surfaces. These accumulations of secondary minerals probably represent the earliest stages of ferromanganese crust formation. We suggest that fluid-derived energy sources, such as dissolved and particulate Fe(II), Mn(II) and organic matter, may support the microbial communities colonizing seafloor rocks to a greater degree than local rock dissolution.

  16. The Nature of Auditory Discrimination Problems in Children with Specific Language Impairment: An MMN Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davids, Nina; Segers, Eliane; van den Brink, Danielle; Mitterer, Holger; van Balkom, Hans; Hagoort, Peter; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2011-01-01

    Many children with specific language impairment (SLI) show impairments in discriminating auditorily presented stimuli. The present study investigates whether these discrimination problems are speech specific or of a general auditory nature. This was studied using a linguistic and nonlinguistic contrast that were matched for acoustic complexity in…

  17. Longitudinal Changes in Auditory Discrimination in Normal Children and Children with Language-Learning Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Lois L.; Hammer, Michael A.

    1988-01-01

    Using a set of fine-grained auditory discrimination tasks, 21 children with language-learning problems were compared with 21 normal children, aged six-nine. Across three years, children with language-learning problems showed poorer auditory discrimination for temporally based acoustic differences, poorer receptive vocabulary and language…

  18. Acoustic iridescence.

    PubMed

    Cox, Trevor J

    2011-03-01

    An investigation has been undertaken into acoustic iridescence, exploring how a device can be constructed which alter sound waves, in a similar way to structures in nature that act on light to produce optical iridescence. The main construction had many thin perforated sheets spaced half a wavelength apart for a specified design frequency. The sheets create the necessary impedance discontinuities to create backscattered waves, which then interfere to create strongly reflected sound at certain frequencies. Predictions and measurements show a set of harmonics, evenly spaced in frequency, for which sound is reflected strongly. And the frequency of these harmonics increases as the angle of observation gets larger, mimicking the iridescence seen in natural optical systems. Similar to optical systems, the reflections become weaker for oblique angles of reflection. A second construction was briefly examined which exploited a metamaterial made from elements and inclusions which were much smaller than the wavelength. Boundary element method predictions confirmed the potential for creating acoustic iridescence from layers of such a material.

  19. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  20. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  1. Multivariate acoustic detection of small explosions using Fisher's combined probability test.

    PubMed

    Arrowsmith, Stephen J; Taylor, Steven R

    2013-03-01

    A methodology for the combined acoustic detection and discrimination of explosions, which uses three discriminants, is developed for the purpose of identifying weak explosion signals embedded in complex background noise. By utilizing physical models for simple explosions that are formulated as statistical hypothesis tests, the detection/discrimination approach does not require a model for the background noise, which can be highly complex and variable in practice. Fisher's Combined Probability Test is used to combine the p-values from all multivariate discriminants. This framework is applied to acoustic data from a 400 g explosion conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  2. Color measurement and discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with new results which show that for test lights with slow temporal modulations, and thus little effect on the luminance system, the vector-difference hypothesis represents an adequate characterization of discrimination data. It is pointed out that for certain experimental conditions color measurements can be successfully extended to include a difference measure which predicts the discriminability of pairs of lights. When discrimination depends principally on opponent-channel responses, discrimination thresholds can be predicted from the detection contour alone. Attention is given to discriminations with a 6-Hz Gabor function, the categorization of stimulus regions, and the nature of the visual mechanisms.

  3. Potential for biogeochemical cycling of sulfur, iron and carbon within massive sulfide deposits below the seafloor.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shingo; Ikehata, Kei; Shibuya, Takazo; Urabe, Tetsuro; Ohkuma, Moriya; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2015-05-01

    Seafloor massive sulfides are a potential energy source for the support of chemosynthetic ecosystems in dark, deep-sea environments; however, little is known about microbial communities in these ecosystems, especially below the seafloor. In the present study, we performed culture-independent molecular analyses of sub-seafloor sulfide samples collected in the Southern Mariana Trough by drilling. The depth for the samples ranged from 0.52 m to 2.67 m below the seafloor. A combination of 16S rRNA and functional gene analyses suggested the presence of chemoautotrophs, sulfur-oxidizers, sulfate-reducers, iron-oxidizers and iron-reducers. In addition, mineralogical and thermodynamic analyses are consistent with chemosynthetic microbial communities sustained by sulfide minerals below the seafloor. Although distinct bacterial community compositions were found among the sub-seafloor sulfide samples and hydrothermally inactive sulfide chimneys on the seafloor collected from various areas, we also found common bacterial members at species level including the sulfur-oxidizers and sulfate-reducers, suggesting that the common members are widely distributed within massive sulfide deposits on and below the seafloor and play a key role in the ecosystem function.

  4. Tools to Compare Diving-Animal Kinematics with Acoustic Behavior and Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    field tests of the 3B were being planned, contacts with the Vancouver Aquarium began in hopes of conducting joint captive studies with beluga whales ...Bioacoustic Probes and Acousondes have been employed as simple seafloor recorders in several studies, including a behavioral study of beluga - whale ...survey of beluga - whale populations in Knik Arm, Alaska (abstract). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117:2524. [published] Chadwick, W. W., K. V. Cashman, R. W

  5. Quantifying Acoustic Uncertainty Due to Marine Mammals and Fish Near the Shelfbreak Front off Cape Hatteras

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    with other seafloor features consistently observed by both AUVs (see Figure 1). With the improved source position estimates, numerical acoustic...broadband PE model agree with the data very well in terms of the arrival time and pulse spread durations (see Figure 3). Because the numerical model...Soundspeed profile and eigenrays for a typical source to receiver range and azimuth. 5 Figure 3. Arrival pattern, showing spread due to

  6. Discrimination of events in superheated liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, Simon

    2010-02-01

    PICASSO is a Dark Matter search experiment using superheated droplets of C4F10 as the active detector material, suspended in an elastic polymer. If a WIMP (Weakly Interacting Massive Particle) hits a nucleus inside a droplet, the recoiling nucleus will deposit its energy in a heat spike, triggering a phase transition. The setup, installed at SNOLab, 2 km underground, consists of 32 cylindrical detectors of 4.5L. The acoustic signals emitted during a phase transition are recorded by nine piezo-electric transducers mounted on the detector walls and the waveforms are analysed offline. In this way, different types of events can be identified using different variables. One of these variables, which is proportional to the total energy of the acoustic signal, allows discrimination among neutron or WIMP-induced events, background alpha particle induced events and electronic noise; another discrimination variable is constructed from the Fast Fourier Transform of the signal and allows the discrimination of other classes of backgrounds. )

  7. Where The Wild Seafloor Scientists Are: Using Interactive Picture Books To Educate Children About Sub-seafloor Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, K.

    2015-12-01

    Sub-seafloor scientific research has the power to spark the imaginations of elementary age children with its mysterious nature, cutting-edge research, and its connections to kid friendly science topics, such as volcanoes, the extinction of dinosaurs and the search for extraterrestrial life. These factors have been utilized to create two interactive eBooks for elementary students and teachers, integrating high quality science information, highly engaging and age-appropriate illustrations, and rhyming text. One book introduces children to the research and discoveries of the JOIDES Resolution research vessel. The second focuses on the discoveries of microbial life in the sub-seafloor. The eBooks present information as traditional, linear, illustrated children's books, but the eBook format allows the book to be available online for free to anyone and allows teachers to project the book on a classroom screen so all students can easily see the illustrations. The iPad versions also provide an interactive, learner-led educational experience, where cognitively appropriate videos, photos and other forms of information can be accessed with the tap of a finger to answer reader questions and enrich their learning experience. These projects provide an example and model of the products that can result from high level and meaningful partnerships between scientists, educators, artists and writers.

  8. The Development of Automated Detection Techniques for Passive Acoustic Monitoring as a Tool for Studying Beaked Whale Distribution and Habitat Preferences in the California Current Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yack, Tina M.

    The objectives of this research were to test available automated detection methods for passive acoustic monitoring and integrate the best available method into standard marine mammal monitoring protocols for ship based surveys. The goal of the first chapter was to evaluate the performance and utility of PAMGUARD 1.0 Core software for use in automated detection of marine mammal acoustic signals during towed array surveys. Three different detector configurations of PAMGUARD were compared. These automated detection algorithms were evaluated by comparing them to the results of manual detections made by an experienced bio-acoustician (author TMY). This study provides the first detailed comparisons of PAMGUARD automated detection algorithms to manual detection methods. The results of these comparisons clearly illustrate the utility of automated detection methods for odontocete species. Results of this work showed that the majority of whistles and click events can be reliably detected using PAMGUARD software. The second chapter moves beyond automated detection to examine and test automated classification algorithms for beaked whale species. Beaked whales are notoriously elusive and difficult to study, especially using visual survey methods. The purpose of the second chapter was to test, validate, and compare algorithms for detection of beaked whales in acoustic line-transect survey data. Using data collected at sea from the PAMGUARD classifier developed in Chapter 2 it was possible to measure the clicks from visually verified Baird's beaked whale encounters and use this data to develop classifiers that could discriminate Baird's beaked whales from other beaked whale species in future work. Echolocation clicks from Baird's beaked whales, Berardius bairdii, were recorded during combined visual and acoustic shipboard surveys of cetacean populations in the California Current Ecosystem (CCE) and with autonomous, long-term recorders at four different sites in the Southern

  9. First results from a combination side-scan sonar and seafloor mapping system (SeaMARC II)

    SciTech Connect

    Blackinton, J.G.; Hussong, D.M.; Kosalos, J.G.

    1983-05-01

    SeaMARC II (Sea Mapping and Remote Characterization) is both a conventional side-scan sonar and a bathymetric mapping system. It is a 12kHz, long-range, shallow-towed, high-speed system that produces an ocean floor image up to 10km wide. (By contrast SeaMARC I is a 30kHz deep towed, slow-speed side-scan only system.) Bathymetry is determined by measuring 4000 times each second the magnitude and arrival angle of narrow band acoustic energy returned from each side of ship's track. Off-line processing of this series of vectors produces a seafloor bathymetric map along the track with a width 3.4 times the water depth. A 10 knot tow capability allows more than 4000 square kilometers to be surveyed each day. In practice, the average returns from a relatively flat part of the survey area are used to generate a function relating acoustic arrival angle to measured electrical angle. This procedure corrects for local sound speed structure. With this function, the measurements from returns with adequately large magnitudes are converted to acoustic arrival angle. These angles are corrected for tow body attitude and, with the arrival times (range), are converted to horizontal (X) and vertical (Z) distances from the tow body to the reflector. Side-scan images are a combination of the small scale reflecting properties of the bottom (micro-reflectivity) and the specular reflections from bathymetric slopes (macro-reflectivity). SeaMarc II has the unique ability to acquire synoptic data that will allow the two effects to be separated. This unique combination also allows more accurate and rapid understanding of bottom character than with either output by itself.

  10. Electromagnetic surveying of seafloor mounds in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, M.; Evans, R.L.; Hutchinson, D.; Hart, P.; Gardner, J.; Hagen, R.

    2008-01-01

    Seafloor controlled source electromagnetic data, probing the uppermost 30 m of seafloor sediments, have been collected with a towed magnetic dipole-dipole system across two seafloor mounds at approximately 1300 m water depth in the northern Gulf of Mexico. One of these mounds was the focus of??a recent gas hydrate research drilling program. Rather than the highly resistive response expected of massive gas hydrate within the confines of the mounds, the EM data are dominated by the effects of raised temperatures and pore fluid salinities that result in an electrically conductive seafloor. This structure suggests that fluid advection towards the seafloor is taking place beneath both mounds. Similar responses are seen at discrete locations away from the mounds in areas that might be associated with faults, further suggesting substantial shallow fluid circulation. Raised temperatures and salinities may inhibit gas hydrate formation at depth as has been suggested at other similar locations in the Gulf of Mexico. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Social partner discrimination based on sounds and scents in Asian small-clawed otters ( Aonyx cinereus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemasson, A.; Mikus, M.-A.; Blois-Heulin, C.; Lodé, T.

    2013-03-01

    Ability to discriminate familiar conspecifics is an essential competence in any group-living species, ensuring socio-spatial cohesion, but in many animals, such as mustelids, the relative importance of the different communicative modalities for discrimination is poorly understood. In otters, there is evidence of intra-specific variation in physical appearance and in feces chemical profile, but the potential for acoustic identity coding as well as for identity decoding in visual, acoustic and olfactive domains remains unexplored. We investigated the acoustic structure of contact calls in five captive groups of small-clawed otters and found that it is possible to reliably assign one particular call to a given adult male caller. Females discriminated between familiar and unfamiliar adult males based on their sound (playback) and smell (feces) but not based on their picture, suggesting abilities to memorize and use acoustic and olfactive signatures in their daily social life.

  12. Social partner discrimination based on sounds and scents in Asian small-clawed otters (Aonyx cinereus).

    PubMed

    Lemasson, A; Mikus, M-A; Blois-Heulin, C; Lodé, T

    2013-03-01

    Ability to discriminate familiar conspecifics is an essential competence in any group-living species, ensuring socio-spatial cohesion, but in many animals, such as mustelids, the relative importance of the different communicative modalities for discrimination is poorly understood. In otters, there is evidence of intra-specific variation in physical appearance and in feces chemical profile, but the potential for acoustic identity coding as well as for identity decoding in visual, acoustic and olfactive domains remains unexplored. We investigated the acoustic structure of contact calls in five captive groups of small-clawed otters and found that it is possible to reliably assign one particular call to a given adult male caller. Females discriminated between familiar and unfamiliar adult males based on their sound (playback) and smell (feces) but not based on their picture, suggesting abilities to memorize and use acoustic and olfactive signatures in their daily social life.

  13. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  14. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  15. Seafloor Subsidence, Effective Thermal Conductivity, and Mantle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C. M.; King, S. D.; Rabinowicz, M.; Vidal, V.; Jalobeanu, A.; Yoshida, M.

    2014-12-01

    The subsidence of seafloor is generally considered as a passive phenomenon related to the conductive cooling of the lithosphere since its creation at mid-oceanic ridges. Recent alternative theories suggest that the mantle dynamics plays an important role in the structure and depth of the oceanic lithosphere. However, the link between mantle dynamics and seafloor subsidence has still to be quantitatively assessed. Here we provide a statistic study of the subsidence parameters (subsidence rate and ridge depth) for all the oceans. These parameters are retrieved through the positive outliers method, a classical method used in signal processing. We also model the mantle convection pattern from the S40RTS tomography model. The density anomalies derived from this model are used to compute the instantaneous flow in a global 3D spherical geometry, and the induced dynamic topography. The variations of the mid-oceanic ridge depths are well recovered by the modeled dynamic topography. Moreover, the dynamic topography perfectly matches the subsidence trend away from mid-oceanic ridges. The systematic fit of the bathymetry allows the recovery of the subsidence rate, from which we derive the effective thermal conductivity, keff. This parameter ranges between 1 and 7 Wm-1K-1. We show that departures from the keff=3 Wm-1K-1 standard value are systematically related to mantle convection and not to the lithospheric structure. Regions characterized by keff>3 Wm-1K-1 are associated with the uplift of mantle plumes. Regions characterized by keff<3 Wm-1K-1 are related to large scale mantle downwellings such as the Australia-Antarctic Discordance (ADD) or the return flow from the South Pacific Superswell to the East Pacific rise. This demonstrates that the mantle dynamics plays a major role in the shaping of the oceanic seafloor. In particular, the parameters generally considered to quantify the lithosphere structure, such as the thermal conductivity, are not only representative of this

  16. Visual processing affects the neural basis of auditory discrimination.

    PubMed

    Kislyuk, Daniel S; Möttönen, Riikka; Sams, Mikko

    2008-12-01

    The interaction between auditory and visual speech streams is a seamless and surprisingly effective process. An intriguing example is the "McGurk effect": The acoustic syllable /ba/ presented simultaneously with a mouth articulating /ga/ is typically heard as /da/ [McGurk, H., & MacDonald, J. Hearing lips and seeing voices. Nature, 264, 746-748, 1976]. Previous studies have demonstrated the interaction of auditory and visual streams at the auditory cortex level, but the importance of these interactions for the qualitative perception change remained unclear because the change could result from interactions at higher processing levels as well. In our electroencephalogram experiment, we combined the McGurk effect with mismatch negativity (MMN), a response that is elicited in the auditory cortex at a latency of 100-250 msec by any above-threshold change in a sequence of repetitive sounds. An "odd-ball" sequence of acoustic stimuli consisting of frequent /va/ syllables (standards) and infrequent /ba/ syllables (deviants) was presented to 11 participants. Deviant stimuli in the unisensory acoustic stimulus sequence elicited a typical MMN, reflecting discrimination of acoustic features in the auditory cortex. When the acoustic stimuli were dubbed onto a video of a mouth constantly articulating /va/, the deviant acoustic /ba/ was heard as /va/ due to the McGurk effect and was indistinguishable from the standards. Importantly, such deviants did not elicit MMN, indicating that the auditory cortex failed to discriminate between the acoustic stimuli. Our findings show that visual stream can qualitatively change the auditory percept at the auditory cortex level, profoundly influencing the auditory cortex mechanisms underlying early sound discrimination.

  17. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  18. Control of seafloor roughness on earthquake rupture behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, Susan L.; Schwartz, Susan Y.; Deshon, Heather R.

    2003-05-01

    Earthquake rupture complexity is described for three recent large underthrusting earthquakes along the Costa Rican subduction zone, the 1983 Osa, 1990 Nicoya Gulf, and 1999 Quepos events. These earthquakes occurred in regions characterized by distinctly different morphologic features on the subducting plate. The 1990 and 1999 events occurred along linear projections of subducting seamount chains and had fairly simple earthquake rupture histories. Both events are interpreted as failure of the basal contact of closely spaced isolated seamounts acting as asperities. In contrast, the 1983 event occurred along the subducting Cocos Ridge and had a complex rupture history. Comparison of rupture characteristics of these large underthrusting earthquakes with size and location of subducting features provides evidence that seamounts can be subducted to seismogenic depths and that variations in seafloor bathymetry of the subducting plate strongly influence the earthquake rupture process.

  19. A sea-floor spreading event captured by seismometers.

    PubMed

    Tolstoy, M; Cowen, J P; Baker, E T; Fornari, D J; Rubin, K H; Shank, T M; Waldhauser, F; Bohnenstiehl, D R; Forsyth, D W; Holmes, R C; Love, B; Perfit, M R; Weekly, R T; Soule, S A; Glazer, B

    2006-12-22

    Two-thirds of Earth's surface is formed at mid-ocean ridges, yet sea-floor spreading events are poorly understood because they occur far beneath the ocean surface. At 9 degrees 50'N on the East Pacific Rise, ocean-bottom seismometers recently recorded the microearthquake character of a mid-ocean ridge eruption, including precursory activity. A gradual ramp-up in activity rates since seismic monitoring began at this site in October 2003 suggests that eruptions may be forecast in the fast-spreading environment. The pattern culminates in an intense but brief (approximately 6-hour) inferred diking event on 22 January 2006, followed by rapid tapering to markedly decreased levels of seismicity.

  20. Seafloor topography and tectonic elements of the Western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Parson, Lindsay M; Evans, Alan J

    2005-01-15

    The break-up of Gondwanaland and dispersal of several of its component continental fragments, which eventually formed the margins of the Indian Ocean, have produced an ocean basin of enormous variety, both in relief and in origin of seafloor features. The western half of the Indian Ocean alone contains every type of tectonic plate boundary, both active and fossil, and, along with some of the deepest fracture zones, the most complex mid-ocean ridge configurations and some of the thickest sedimentary sequences in the world's ocean basins. This ocean is one of the most diverse on the face of the globe. We explore the evolution of the morphology of the Indian Ocean floor, and discuss the effect of its variations, maxima and minima, on the interconnectivity of the ocean's water masses.

  1. Seafloor environments in the Long Island Sound estuarine system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, H. J.; Signell, R.P.; Rendigs, R. R.; Poppe, L.J.; List, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Four categories of modern seafloor sedimentary environments have been identified and mapped across the large, glaciated, topographically complex Long Island Sound estuary by means of an extensive regional set of sidescan sonographs, bottom samples, and video-camera observations and supplemental marine-geologic and modeled physical-oceanographic data. (1) Environments of erosion or nondeposition contain sediments which range from boulder fields to gravelly coarse-to-medium sands and appear on the sonographs either as patterns with isolated reflections (caused by outcrops of glacial drift and bedrock) or as patterns of strong backscatter (caused by coarse lag deposits). Areas of erosion or nondeposition were found across the rugged seafloor at the eastern entrance of the Sound and atop bathymetric highs and within constricted depressions in other parts of the basin. (2) Environments of bedload transport contain mostly coarse-to-fine sand with only small amounts of mud and are depicted by sonograph patterns of sand ribbons and sand waves. Areas of bedload transport were found primarily in the eastern Sound where bottom currents have sculptured the surface of a Holocene marine delta and are moving these sediments toward the WSW into the estuary. (3) Environments of sediment sorting and reworking comprise variable amounts of fine sand and mud and are characterized either by patterns of moderate backscatter or by patterns with patches of moderate-to-weak backscatter that reflect a combination of erosion and deposition. Areas of sediment sorting and reworking were found around the periphery of the zone of bedload transport in the eastern Sound and along the southern nearshore margin. They also are located atop low knolls, on the flanks of shoal complexes, and within segments of the axial depression in the western Sound. (4) Environments of deposition are blanketed by muds and muddy fine sands that produce patterns of uniformly weak backscatter. Depositional areas occupy

  2. SEAFLOOR EXPLORATION AND CHARACTERIZATION: PREREQUISITE TO OCEAN SPACE UTILIZATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, Gary; Lockwood, Millington

    1987-01-01

    A historical survey of US bathymetric mapping is presented up through the major mapping project begun in response to the 1983, establishment of an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), 200 nautical miles seaward. The EEZ extends sovereign rights for the purposes of exploring, exploiting, conserving, and managing natural resources in the coastal ocean. This new area is approximately 3. 4 million square nautical miles or about 1. 3 times the total US land area. To characterize the resources within it, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the US Geological Survey (USGS) are undertaking systematic mapping programs of the EEZ. NOAA's effort includes detailed bathymetric mapping of the seabed. The USGS is using a wide-swath side-scan sonar system to map the EEZ seafloor on a reconaissance scale.

  3. Seafloor geology of the U.S. Line Islands region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M.; Eakins, B.; Barth, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    Marine geophysical surveys of the U.S. Extended Continental Shelf and Exclusive Economic Zone in the U.S. portion of the Line Islands (Kingman Reef and Palmyra Atoll) have permitted the creation of a geologic map of the seafloor surrounding the islands. Source data include modern multibeam swath sonar surveys, GLORIA sidescan sonar imagery, and seismic reflection profiles. The region is principally comprised of a high bathymetric ridge that the islands sit atop, which is the source of significant sediment found in the region, and a seamount province to the northwest; the entire area is elevated above nearby abyssal plains. Analysis of seamount summit depths in the area show that flat-topped seamounts ('guyots') are found down to 1650 meters below sea level, while the summits of peaked seamounts are principally, though not exclusively, found at deeper depths. Landslide deposits, sediment channels and other bedforms are also identified.

  4. Earthquake mechanism and seafloor deformation for tsunami generation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.; Oglesby, David D.; Beer, Michael; Kougioumtzoglou, Ioannis A.; Patelli, Edoardo; Siu-Kui Au, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Tsunamis are generated in the ocean by rapidly displacing the entire water column over a significant area. The potential energy resulting from this disturbance is balanced with the kinetic energy of the waves during propagation. Only a handful of submarine geologic phenomena can generate tsunamis: large-magnitude earthquakes, large landslides, and volcanic processes. Asteroid and subaerial landslide impacts can generate tsunami waves from above the water. Earthquakes are by far the most common generator of tsunamis. Generally, earthquakes greater than magnitude (M) 6.5–7 can generate tsunamis if they occur beneath an ocean and if they result in predominantly vertical displacement. One of the greatest uncertainties in both deterministic and probabilistic hazard assessments of tsunamis is computing seafloor deformation for earthquakes of a given magnitude.

  5. Assessing marine debris in deep seafloor habitats off California.

    PubMed

    Watters, Diana L; Yoklavich, Mary M; Love, Milton S; Schroeder, Donna M

    2010-01-01

    Marine debris is a global concern that pollutes the world's oceans, including deep benthic habitats where little is known about the extent of the problem. We provide the first quantitative assessment of debris on the seafloor (20-365 m depth) in submarine canyons and the continental shelf off California, using the Delta submersible. Fishing activities were the most common contributors of debris. Highest densities occurred close to ports off central California and increased significantly over the 15-year study period. Recreational monofilament fishing line dominated this debris. Debris was less dense and more diverse off southern than central California. Plastic was the most abundant material and will likely persist for centuries. Disturbance to habitat and organisms was low, and debris was used as habitat by some fishes and macroinvertebrates. Future trends in human activities on land and at sea will determine the type and magnitude of debris that accumulates in deep water.

  6. Geological settings and seafloor morphodynamic evolution linked to methane seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Landeghem, Katrien J. J.; Niemann, Helge; Steinle, Lea I.; O'Reilly, Shane S.; Huws, Dei G.; Croker, Peter F.

    2015-08-01

    Methane seeps have been shown to be a powerful agent in modifying seabed morphology, amongst others by cementation processes such as the formation of methane-derived authigenic carbonates (MDACs). The cements stabilise mobile sediment particles and thereby promote the formation of edifices such as mounds on various scales. The release of methane from shallow subsurface sources, when concentrated in seeps, has proven hazardous to offshore construction activities. In this paper, methane cycling and MDAC precipitation is explored as a potential "finger on the pulse" for the recognition of shallow gas pockets and active gas seepage. This would provide a valuable planning tool for seabed engineering developments in areas of potential gas seepage. Measurements of methane concentrations in the Irish Sea are correlated with a unique record of longer-term morphological evolution (up to 11 years) of MDAC structures and subsurface geological settings which would favour the build-up of shallow gas. It was found that gas seepage activity associated with fault zones correlates with carbonate mound steepness. Cessation of gas seepage results in a relatively slow process of erosion and burial of the mounds, eventually producing a subdued carbonate mound morphology after several decades. The Quaternary glacial legacy equally seems to define the distribution and geometry of the MDAC structures. In this case, methane gas locally concentrated in sands and gravels capped by clayey glacial sediments may percolate upwards to the seafloor. A link between methane seeps and the formation of unusually large, trochoidally shaped sediment waves observed on continental shelves worldwide is deemed unlikely. However, the observations suggest that gas percolating through sediment waves may be capped by muddy sediments which have deposited on the sediment waves due to anoxic conditions or eroded from a neighbouring cliff. Other sediment waves in the Irish Sea were found to have a step

  7. Heterospecific discrimination of Poecile vocalizations by zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata).

    PubMed

    Guillette, Lauren M; Hoeschele, Marisa; Hahn, Allison H; Sturdy, Christopher B

    2013-08-01

    Previous perceptual research with black-capped and mountain chickadees has demonstrated that the D note of the namesake chick-a-dee call controlled species-based discrimination compared to other note types in this call. In the current experiment, we sought to determine whether discrimination performance of the chickadees was controlled by stimulus-specific properties or due to learning through experience. To accomplish this, we tested zebra finches, a songbird species that is distantly related to chickadees, and also unfamiliar with black-capped and mountain chickadee vocalizations, on the same species-based discrimination on which black-capped and mountain chickadees were previously trained. We found that zebra finches learned the discrimination in the fewest number of trials with the D note, compared to other note types (i.e., the A, B, and C notes). In addition, we compared the current results to earlier work and found that zebra finches learned the discrimination in fewer trials compared to black-capped chickadees, and, across all species, males learned the discrimination in fewer trials than females. We discuss the roles that acoustic complexity and learning play in classification of the three species of songbirds tested. More generally, these results point to the benefits derived from testing members of each sex in species that vary in their natural history, vocal output, and phylogenetic relatedness as a means to uncover the mechanisms underlying acoustic communication. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Acoustic emission analysis as a non-destructive test procedure for fiber compound structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, J.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of acoustic emission analysis is explained in scientific terms. The detection of acoustic events, their localization, damage discrimination, and event summation curves are discussed. A block diagram of the concept of damage-free testing of fiber-reinforced synthetic materials is depicted. Prospects for application of the concept are assessed.

  9. Convergence of tectonic reconstructions and mantle convection models for significant fluctuations in seafloor spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coltice, N.; Seton, M.; Rolf, T.; Müller, R. D.; Tackley, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    For 50 years of data collection and kinematic reconstruction efforts, plate models have provided alternative scenarios for plate motions and seafloor spreading for the past 200 My. However, these efforts are naturally limited by the incomplete preservation of very old seafloor, and therefore the time-dependence of the production of new seafloor is controversial. There is no consensus on how much it has varied in the past 200 My, and how it could have fluctuated over longer timescales. We explore how seafloor spreading and continental drift evolve over long geological periods using independently derived models: a recently developed geodynamic modelling approach and state-of-the-art plate reconstructions. Both kinematic reconstructions and geodynamic models converge on variations by a factor of 2 in the rate of production of new seafloor over a Wilson cycle, with concomitant changes of the shape of the area-age distribution of the seafloor between end members of rectangular, triangular and skewed distributions. Convection models show that significant fluctuations over longer periods (∼1 Gy) should exist, involving changes in ridge length and global tectonic reorganisations. Although independent, both convection models and kinematic reconstructions suggest that changes in ridge length are at least as significant as spreading rate fluctuations in driving changes in the seafloor area-age distribution through time.

  10. Responses of Ras El Bar seafloor characteristics to the protective engineering structures, Nile delta, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Banna, Mahmoud M.

    2006-03-01

    Bathymetry of the seafloor in the area in front of Ras El Bar coast, the characters of the seafloor sediments and the effects of protective structures on seafloor bathymetry were examined. Seafloor depths in front of Ras El Bar seawall ranged between 2 and 4 m. These depths, coupled with wave climate, result in waves breaking directly onto the wall and exerting high, dynamic pressures on the area at the structure’s toe. The sandy seafloor in front of the wall has been scoured. Sea water has undermined the wall causing removal of sediment, destabilization of its slope and the whole face of the wall has slipped. Toe protection in the form of a rocky apron is required to prevent such damage. West of the seawall, the constructed breakwater system has affected the bathymetry of the seafloor in the area. Shoaling and submerged spits have been formed in the shadow of each breakwater unit. The gaps between the breakwater units have attained deep depths and steep slopes. Scours and steep slopes adjacent to the head of the breakwater units have been recorded. Seaward of the breakwater system, deeper depths and gentle slopes characterize the seafloor. Offshore onshore current and sediment movements toward the northeast is inferred from the configuration of the bottom contour lines.

  11. Impact of source depth on coherent underwater acoustic communications.

    PubMed

    Song, Aijun; Badiey, Mohsen; Song, H C; Hodgkiss, W S

    2010-08-01

    A recent paper [Song et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 123, 856-865 (2008)] investigated ocean variability impact on coherent underwater acoustic communications (8-16 kHz) for a single near-seafloor transmitter in shallow water during an extended period (27 h). This letter extends that investigation to various source depths and receiver subarrays. Specifically, the middle water column source, which is either in or out of the thermocline, experiences performance variability of 6-7 dB in terms of output signal-to-noise ratio. Further, the source below the thermocline consistently outperforms the source above the thermocline when the receiver subarray is located below the thermocline.

  12. Discriminating Simulated Vocal Tremor Source Using Amplitude Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Carbonell, Kathy M.; Lester, Rosemary A.; Story, Brad H.; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Sources of vocal tremor are difficult to categorize perceptually and acoustically. This paper describes a preliminary attempt to discriminate vocal tremor sources through the use of spectral measures of the amplitude envelope. The hypothesis is that different vocal tremor sources are associated with distinct patterns of acoustic amplitude modulations. Study Design Statistical categorization methods (discriminant function analysis) were used to discriminate signals from simulated vocal tremor with different sources using only acoustic measures derived from the amplitude envelopes. Methods Simulations of vocal tremor were created by modulating parameters of a vocal fold model corresponding to oscillations of respiratory driving pressure (respiratory tremor), degree of vocal fold adduction (adductory tremor) and fundamental frequency of vocal fold vibration (F0 tremor). The acoustic measures were based on spectral analyses of the amplitude envelope computed across the entire signal and within select frequency bands. Results The signals could be categorized (with accuracy well above chance) in terms of the simulated tremor source using only measures of the amplitude envelope spectrum even when multiple sources of tremor were included. Conclusions These results supply initial support for an amplitude-envelope based approach to identify the source of vocal tremor and provide further evidence for the rich information about talker characteristics present in the temporal structure of the amplitude envelope. PMID:25532813

  13. Seafloor Geodetic Monitoring of the North Anatolian Fault in the Sea of Marmara: System Installation and its Initial Result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, M.

    2015-12-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) get across the mainland of Turkey is known as a quite active strike slip fault. The earthquake recurrence period for individual segment is estimated roughly 300 years based on historical records. The Marmara Segment is the major seismic gap since the last earthquake in 1766, while the Murefte earthquake occurred in 1912 at its west side and the Izmit earthquake in 1999 at its east side. The relative motion across the NAF is ~22 mm/yr based on the data from space geodesy. Investigating how much degree of this displacement is released by aseismic creep or accumulated by slip deficit in the Marmara Segment is crucial to know the total seismic risk in this region. Because the NAF is submerged in the Sea of Marmara and is inaccessible by space geodesy, we employed seafloor geodetic technique using extensometers, which acoustically monitor baseline length across a strain-localized zone, such as surface trace of a fault. In 2014, we installed five extensometers at the Western High crossing the NAF one after the other, where the surface trace of the NAF is prominent and gas emission from the seafloor is reported in. Totally four beselines of ~1 km range are successfully formed and quality of initial test data was promising. Based on the initial data, detectable level of the baseline change is estimated to be ~2mm, which owing to quite stable seawater near the bottom due to strong density stratification in the Sea of Marmara. The extensometers are designed that data can be recovered via acoustic modem without disrupt the monitoring. Since the installation, we have visited the site twice and have recovered the data for ten months in total. Temperature measured by thermistor equipped on each extensometer showed coherent change and gradual increase by 0.007 degree during the period. This reflects apparent beseline shortening due to the corresponding increase of the sound speed. In the preliminary temperature correction, difference of the change

  14. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  15. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  16. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... ANAUSA.org Connect with us! What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Each heading slides to reveal information. Important ... Acoustic Neuroma Important Points To Know About an Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular ...

  17. TGDA: Nonparametric Discriminant Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Norval F.; Bruno, Albert V.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program for two-group nonparametric discriminant analysis is presented. Based on Bayes' Theorem for probability revision, the statistical rationale for this program uses the calculation of maximum likelihood estimates of group membership. The program compares the Bayesian procedure to the standard Linear Discriminant Function.…

  18. Flash-Type Discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the significant progress made in the flash-type discrimination algorithm development. The contents include: 1) Highlights of Progress for GLM-R3 Flash-Type discrimination Algorithm Development; 2) Maximum Group Area (MGA) Data; 3) Retrieval Errors from Simulations; and 4) Preliminary Global-scale Retrieval.

  19. The "Taste" for Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiswick, Barry R.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses, in terms of consumers, employers, and employees, how a "taste for discrimination," that is, someone's preference for or against association with some group in the labor market, can influence behavior and hence who gets hired. Argues that people with the strongest tastes for discrimination pay the heaviest cost. (RDN)

  20. Discrimination against Black Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aloud, Ashwaq; Alsulayyim, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Discrimination is a structured way of abusing people based on racial differences, hence barring them from accessing wealth, political participation and engagement in many spheres of human life. Racism and discrimination are inherently rooted in institutions in the society, the problem has spread across many social segments of the society including…

  1. Microscale acceleration history discriminators

    DOEpatents

    Polosky, Marc A.; Plummer, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of micromechanical acceleration history discriminators is claimed. These discriminators allow the precise differentiation of a wide range of acceleration-time histories, thereby allowing adaptive events to be triggered in response to the severity (or lack thereof) of an external environment. Such devices have applications in airbag activation, and other safety and surety applications.

  2. Seafloor structure and uppermost sedimentation in the Pigafetta Basin, Magellan Seamount Chain, and East Mariana Basin of the Central-Western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, N. J.; Oakley, A. J.; Lizarralde, D.; Tominaga, M.; Tivey, M.; Sager, W. W.

    2013-12-01

    We conducted a marine geophysical survey of the Central-Western Pacific seafloor in 2011 aboard the R/V Thomas G. Thompson (TN272). Our survey imaged some of the oldest seafloor on the planet in a region of sparse data coverage. We present new (3.5 kHz) and bathymetry data from the Mesozoic Hawaiian magnetic lineations (Jurassic Quiet Zone) and a transect from the south end of the Pigafetta Basin (PB), west across the Magellan Seamount Chain (MSC) and the East Mariana Basin (EMB) to the Mariana Trench. The Chirp system penetrates the overlying sediment cover to a depth of ~50 meters below seafloor (mbsf). The deepest part of the Chirp record is marked by a strongly reflecting horizon, which occasionally crops out at the seafloor near volcanic peaks or bathymetric highs. Correlation of these data to DSDP/ODP drill sites (801C, 802, 199, 585) enables us to compare seafloor structure and uppermost sedimentation in the Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ), Pigafetta Basin, Magellan Seamounts, and the East Mariana Basin. Within the JQZ, and at the southern end of the PB, a 30- to 50-m-thick, acoustically-transparent sediment layer uniformly overlies the strongly reflecting horizon observed at water depths ranging from 4400m-5900m. We interpret this unit to be composed of pelagic abyssal clay and radiolarian oozes ubiquitous in the central-western Pacific. The basal horizon in this region is most likely formed by a layer of chert-porcelanite. In the southeastern PB (161.3 E, 17 N), this horizon reaches the seafloor at a depth of 5650 m and the transparent sediment package is truncated. In the region of the MSC, ~115 km north of drill sites 199 and 585, Chirp data show numerous volcanic peaks and a 50-m-thick sequence of stratified reflections. Volcaniclastics likely contribute to the layering. We first observe the stratified sediment package near 156.7 E, 15 N after a gap in data coverage. The sediment layer thins to the west and onlaps the basal horizon near the base of a seamount

  3. Impulsive Seafloor Signals from the 2015 Eruption of Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, C.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Tan, Y. J.; Tolstoy, M.

    2015-12-01

    Axial Seamount is a hotspot volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge that has erupted three times over the past two decades. The most recent eruption was recorded by a cabled seismic network in the southern half of the summit caldera that has been operated by the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) since November 2014. After five months of increasing seismicity, a 10-hour seismic crisis involving thousands of earthquakes began at 0500 GMT on April 24, 2015 accompanied by ~2 m of deflation in the central caldera (Nooner et al., this meeting). Local seismicity declined rapidly after the eruption, but thousands of impulsive waterborne events were observed across the network starting immediately after the seismic crisis. Over 1500 events per day were recorded on April 25 and 26, decreasing to less than 500 per day after May 1, and ceasing altogether around May 20. Each event comprises a train of three to five consistently spaced arrivals visible on all 3 seismometer channels with a broad frequency content of 10-100 Hz. The timing of arrivals across the network is consistent with water column multiples from a seafloor source to the north. A subset of events has been manually picked and located by modeling travel times of the first three arrivals assuming flat bathymetry at a range of depths between 1500-1800 m and a sound speed of 1.5 km/s. The preliminary locations are clustered around Axial Seamount's northern rift at a distance of 10-15 km from the north rim of the caldera. In July, an OOI cruise discovered fresh pillow lavas up to 100 m thick and 670 m wide, and extending for 7 km along the rift in the same region (Kelley et al., this meeting). The source of the impulsive events is uncertain and could involve gas explosions, bubble collapse, and thermal or mechanical cracking, but their colocation with the fresh lava flow suggests that ocean bottom seismic networks can not only track the faulting and fracturing associated with subsurface magma movements but also the

  4. Breakup and early seafloor spreading between India and Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Carmen; Müller, R. Dietmar; Brown, Belinda; Ishihara, Takemi; Ivanov, Sergey

    2007-07-01

    We present a tectonic interpretation of the breakup and early seafloor spreading between India and Antarctica based on improved coverage of potential field and seismic data off the east Antarctic margin between the Gunnerus Ridge and the Bruce Rise. We have identified a series of ENE trending Mesozoic magnetic anomalies from chron M9o (~130.2 Ma) to M2o (~124.1 Ma) in the Enderby Basin, and M9o to M4o (~126.7 Ma) in the Princess Elizabeth Trough and Davis Sea Basin, indicating that India-Antarctica and India-Australia breakups were roughly contemporaneous. We present evidence for an abandoned spreading centre south of the Elan Bank microcontinent; the estimated timing of its extinction corresponds to the early surface expression of the Kerguelen Plume at the Southern Kerguelen Plateau around 120 Ma. We observe an increase in spreading rate from west to east, between chron M9 and M4 (38-54 mm yr-1), along the Antarctic margin and suggest the tectono-magmatic segmentation of oceanic crust has been influenced by inherited crustal structure, the kinematics of Gondwanaland breakup and the proximity to the Kerguelen hotspot. A high-amplitude, E-W oriented magnetic lineation named the Mac Robertson Coast Anomaly (MCA), coinciding with a landwards step-down in basement observed in seismic reflection data, is tentatively interpreted as the boundary between continental/transitional zone and oceanic crust. The exposure of lower crustal rocks along the coast suggests that this margin formed in a metamorphic core complex extension mode with a high strength ratio between upper and lower crust, which typically occurs above anomalously hot mantle. Together with the existence of the MCA zone this observation suggests that a mantle temperature anomaly predated the early surface outpouring/steady state magmatic production of the Kerguelen LIP. An alternative model suggests that the northward ridge jump was limited to the Elan Bank region, whereas seafloor spreading continued in the

  5. Seafloor alteration of basaltic glass: Textures, geochemistry, and endolithic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruber, Claudia; Thorseth, Ingunn H.; Pedersen, Rolf B.

    2008-12-01

    The incipient low-temperature alteration of glassy margins of recent seafloor lavas from the Mohns Ridge is characterized by scanning electron microscopy and bulk chemical analyses of major and trace elements. These investigations are designed to evaluate the endolithic microbial biomass, to identify relations between alteration textures and microorganisms, and to identify the chemical processes that take place during alteration. The basaltic glass along intersecting fractures and around vesicles is typically altered to concentrically zoned, yellow-brown amorphous gel-palagonite. In most fractures microorganisms are observed at the outer surfaces of palagonite rims, within porous zones of the rims, and frequently also at the glass-palagonite interfaces. The cells act as nucleation sites for precipitation and become encrusted and embedded in palagonite with time. Zones of porous palagonite containing numerous hollow, fossilized cells alternate with zones of compact palagonite lacking distinct cell structures, which together indicate that the microbial growth is discontinuous. The palagonite has an average organic carbon content of 0.9 wt% (δ13Corg: -22‰), which derive from both living and fossilized biomass. The microbial growth and biomineralization are major controls on the porosity and texture of the palagonite and thus likely on the chemical exchange between glass and seawater. Pit marks in the glass in fractures both with and without microbes indicate that microbial as well as abiotic processes mediate pitting. Elemental and isotope data show that the transformation of glass to gel-palagonite at seafloor conditions with high water/rock ratios results in near complete loss of Si and alkali elements to seawater; formation of Fe- and Al-oxyhydroxides; complete exchange of alkaline earth elements like Sr with seawater; retention of V, Cu, Y, Pb, Th, U, and trivalent REEs, accompanied by a strong gain of these and other elements from seawater. Higher Fe/Ti ratios

  6. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  7. NPL closes acoustics department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Extance, Andy

    2016-11-01

    The UK's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has withdrawn funding for its acoustics, polymer and thermoelectrics groups, triggering concern among airborne acoustics specialists that the move could undermine the country's noise-management policies.

  8. Identifying the Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  9. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-17

    under-ice scattering , bathymetric diffraction and the application of the ocean acoustic Parabolic Equation to infrasound. 2. Tasks a. Task 1...QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Figure 10. Estimated reflection coefficient as a function of frequency by taking the difference of downgoing and...OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

  10. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies James F. Lynch MS #12...N00014-14-1-0040 http://acoustics.whoi.edu/sw06/ LONG TERM GOALS The long term goals of our shallow water acoustics work are to: 1) understand the...nature of low frequency (10-1500 Hz) acoustic propagation, scattering and noise in shallow water when strong oceanic variability is present in the

  11. Recognizing detachment-mode seafloor spreading in the deep geological past.

    PubMed

    Maffione, Marco; Morris, Antony; Anderson, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Large-offset oceanic detachment faults are a characteristic of slow- and ultraslow-spreading ridges, leading to the formation of oceanic core complexes (OCCs) that expose upper mantle and lower crustal rocks on the seafloor. The lithospheric extension accommodated by these structures is now recognized as a fundamentally distinct "detachment-mode" of seafloor spreading compared to classical magmatic accretion. Here we demonstrate a paleomagnetic methodology that allows unequivocal recognition of detachment-mode seafloor spreading in ancient ophiolites and apply this to a potential Jurassic detachment fault system in the Mirdita ophiolite (Albania). We show that footwall and hanging wall blocks either side of an inferred detachment have significantly different magnetizations that can only be explained by relative rotation during seafloor spreading. The style of rotation is shown to be identical to rolling hinge footwall rotation documented recently in OCCs in the Atlantic, confirming that detachment-mode spreading operated at least as far back as the Jurassic.

  12. Recognizing detachment-mode seafloor spreading in the deep geological past

    PubMed Central

    Maffione, Marco; Morris, Antony; Anderson, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Large-offset oceanic detachment faults are a characteristic of slow- and ultraslow-spreading ridges, leading to the formation of oceanic core complexes (OCCs) that expose upper mantle and lower crustal rocks on the seafloor. The lithospheric extension accommodated by these structures is now recognized as a fundamentally distinct “detachment-mode” of seafloor spreading compared to classical magmatic accretion. Here we demonstrate a paleomagnetic methodology that allows unequivocal recognition of detachment-mode seafloor spreading in ancient ophiolites and apply this to a potential Jurassic detachment fault system in the Mirdita ophiolite (Albania). We show that footwall and hanging wall blocks either side of an inferred detachment have significantly different magnetizations that can only be explained by relative rotation during seafloor spreading. The style of rotation is shown to be identical to rolling hinge footwall rotation documented recently in OCCs in the Atlantic, confirming that detachment-mode spreading operated at least as far back as the Jurassic. PMID:23903780

  13. Coding Acoustic Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Xie, Boyang; Tang, Kun; Cheng, Hua; Liu, Zhengyou; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Jianguo

    2017-02-01

    Coding acoustic metasurfaces can combine simple logical bits to acquire sophisticated functions in wave control. The acoustic logical bits can achieve a phase difference of exactly π and a perfect match of the amplitudes for the transmitted waves. By programming the coding sequences, acoustic metasurfaces with various functions, including creating peculiar antenna patterns and waves focusing, have been demonstrated.

  14. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  15. Behavioral evidence for community-wide species discrimination from echolocation calls in bats.

    PubMed

    Schuchmann, Maike; Siemers, Björn M

    2010-07-01

    Recognizing species identity is crucial for many aspects of animal life and is often mediated by acoustic signals. Although most animals are able to distinguish acoustic signals of their own species from other sympatrically occurring species, it is yet unknown whether animals can distinguish among acoustic signals of different closely related sympatric species. In this context, echolocating bats are a particularly interesting model system: their echolocation system evolved primarily for spatial orientation and foraging, but recent studies indicate that echolocation also has an important communicative function. Yet, the role of echolocation calls for species discrimination and thus potentially for interspecific communication has not been investigated. Using a behavioral discrimination assay, we found that two species of wild horseshoe bats could discriminate calls of their own species from those of three sympatric congeneric species. We further show that the bats were able to discriminate between echolocation calls of different congeneric species from the local community. In both cases, discrimination ability was high despite strong overlap of species' call frequency bands. This study provides the first experimental evidence for species discrimination based on echolocation calls. On a more general level, it shows for the first time that animals can distinguish among acoustic signals of different closely related and ecologically similar species from their local community.

  16. Perception of acoustic scale and size in musical instrument sounds

    PubMed Central

    van Dinther, Ralph; Patterson, Roy D.

    2010-01-01

    There is size information in natural sounds. For example, as humans grow in height, their vocal tracts increase in length, producing a predictable decrease in the formant frequencies of speech sounds. Recent studies have shown that listeners can make fine discriminations about which of two speakers has the longer vocal tract, supporting the view that the auditory system discriminates changes on the acoustic-scale dimension. Listeners can also recognize vowels scaled well beyond the range of vocal tracts normally experienced, indicating that perception is robust to changes in acoustic scale. This paper reports two perceptual experiments designed to extend research on acoustic scale and size perception to the domain of musical sounds: The first study shows that listeners can discriminate the scale of musical instrument sounds reliably, although not quite as well as for voices. The second experiment shows that listeners can recognize the family of an instrument sound which has been modified in pitch and scale beyond the range of normal experience. We conclude that processing of acoustic scale in music perception is very similar to processing of acoustic scale in speech perception. PMID:17069313

  17. Distinctive Geomorphology of Gas Venting and Near Seafloor Gas Hydrate-Bearing sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paull, C. K.; Caress, D. W.; Lundsten, E.; Anderson, K.; Gwiazda, R.; McGann, M. L.; Edwards, B. D.; Riedel, M.; Herguera, J.

    2012-12-01

    High-resolution multibeam bathymetry and chirp seismic-reflection profiles collected with an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) complimented by Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) observations and sampling reveal the fine scale geomorphology associated with gas venting and/or near subsurface gas hydrate accumulations along the Pacific North American continental margin (Santa Monica Basin, Hydrate Ridge, Eel River, Barkley Canyon, and Bullseye Vent) and along the transform faults in the Gulf of California. At the 1 m multibeam grid resolution of the new data, distinctive features and textures that are undetectable at lower resolution, show the impact of gas venting, gas hydrate development, and related phenomena on the seafloor morphology. Together a suite of geomorphic characteristics illustrates different stages in the development of seafloor gas venting systems. The more mature and/or impacted areas are associated with widespread exposures of methane-derived carbonates, which form broken and irregular seafloor pavements with karst-like voids in between the cemented blocks. These mature areas also contain elevated features >10 m high and circular seafloor craters with diameters of 3-50 m that appear to be associated with missing sections of the original seafloor. Smaller mound-like features (<10 m in diameter and 1-3 m higher than the surrounding seafloor) occur at multiple sites. Solid lenses of gas hydrate are occasionally exposed along fractures on the sides of these mounds and suggest that these are push-up features associated with gas hydrate growth within the near seafloor sediments. The youngest appearing features are associated with more-subtle (<3 m in diameter and ~0.5 m high) seafloor mounds, the crests of which are crossed with small cracks lined with white bacterial mats. ROV-collected (<1.5 m long) cores obtained from these subtle mounds encountered a hard layer at 30-60 cm sub-bottom. When this layer was penetrated, methane bubbles gushed out and

  18. The deep structure of a sea-floor hydrothermal deposit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zierenberg, R.A.; Fouquet, Y.; Miller, D.J.; Bahr, J.M.; Baker, P.A.; Bjerkgard, T.; Brunner, C.A.; Duckworth, R.C.; Gable, R.; Gieskes, J.; Goodfellow, W.D.; Groschel-Becker, H. M.; Guerin, G.; Ishibashi, J.; Iturrino, G.; James, R.H.; Lackschewitz, K.S.; Marquez, L.L.; Nehlig, P.; Peter, J.M.; Rigsby, C.A.; Schultheiss, P.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Simoneit, B.R.T.; Summit, M.; Teagle, D.A.H.; Urbat, M.; Zuffa, G.G.

    1998-01-01

    Hydrothermal circulation at the crests of mid-ocean ridges plays an important role in transferring heat from the interior of the Earth. A consequence of this hydrothermal circulation is the formation of metallic ore bodies known as volcanic-associated massive sulphide deposits. Such deposits, preserved on land, were important sources of copper for ancient civilizations and continue to provide a significant source of base metals (for example, copper and zinc). Here we present results from Ocean Drilling Program Leg 169, which drilled through a massive sulphide deposit on the northern Juan de Fuca spreading centre and penetrated the hydrothermal feeder zone through which the metal-rich fluids reached the sea floor. We found that the style of feeder-zone mineralization changes with depth in response to changes in the pore pressure of the hydrothermal fluids and discovered a stratified zone of high-grade copper-rich replacement mineralization below the massive sulphide deposit. This copper-rich zone represents a type of mineralization not previously observed below sea-floor deposits, and may provide new targets for land-based mineral exploration.

  19. Meter Accuracy Seafloor Geodesy using Repeated Multibeam Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSanto, J. B.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    Ship-board multibeam surveys are a useful tool in measuring tectonic deformation of the seafloor, having been used to measure the ~50 m of surface slip along the Japan trench during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake with an uncertainty of 20 m (Fujiwara et al, 2011, Science). In this study, we investigate the improvement in positioning accuracy obtainable when comparing multibeam and sidescan surveys repeated along the same track to within 1/10 of the critical baseline and taken at a slow ship speed of 1 knot. We compare two surveys of the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis fitting these criteria with two coincident surveys of the Cocos Ridge, taken at 11 knots. Both pairs of surveys were collected using a Simrad EM120 sonar system aboard the RV Roger Revelle. We find the multibeam surveys of the Juan de Fuca ridge axis sufficient to measure displacements accurate to better than 2 m, a marked improvement over the 50 m accuracy of the Cocos ridge surveys. Likewise, we can measure displacement accurate to 2 m using the sidescan data from the Juan de Fuca surveys. This accuracy is sufficient to observe meter-level horizontal movements on the deep ocean associated with large earthquakes and landslides.

  20. Nondestructive imaging of fragile sea-floor vent deposit samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingston Tivey, Margaret; Singh, Sandipa

    1997-10-01

    X-ray computed tomography was used to detail the internal structure of sea-floor hydrothermal vent samples. A third-generation industrial computed tomography (CT) scanner with a microfocus tube was used to scan a black smoker chimney and cores taken from a white smoker chimney and a block of Fe-rich sulfide. Images of the black smoker chimney clearly show sulfide- versus anhydrite-dominated areas. Display of pore space in three dimensions shows the complex geometry of the main flow conduit, and also much smaller (2 3 mm diameter) conduits within the chimney wall that parallel the main flow conduit. Images of the white smoker sample document the continuity of an anastomosing ˜1-mm-diameter flow conduit, and the pronounced anisotropy of porosity. Tube structures presumed to be casts of worm tubes are clearly evident in images of the Fe-rich sulfide sample. X-ray CT is an excellent technique for rapidly identifying the internal structure of porosity and mineralogy of fragile hydrothermal precipitates on scales of tens of microns to hundreds of millimeters, and data can be used to deduce styles of fluid flow and other processes involved in vent deposit formation.

  1. Response of seafloor ecosystems to abrupt global climate change.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Sarah E; Hill, Tessa M; Roopnarine, Peter D; Kennett, James P

    2015-04-14

    Anthropogenic climate change is predicted to decrease oceanic oxygen (O2) concentrations, with potentially significant effects on marine ecosystems. Geologically recent episodes of abrupt climatic warming provide opportunities to assess the effects of changing oxygenation on marine communities. Thus far, this knowledge has been largely restricted to investigations using Foraminifera, with little being known about ecosystem-scale responses to abrupt, climate-forced deoxygenation. We here present high-resolution records based on the first comprehensive quantitative analysis, to our knowledge, of changes in marine metazoans (Mollusca, Echinodermata, Arthropoda, and Annelida; >5,400 fossils and trace fossils) in response to the global warming associated with the last glacial to interglacial episode. The molluscan archive is dominated by extremophile taxa, including those containing endosymbiotic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Lucinoma aequizonatum) and those that graze on filamentous sulfur-oxidizing benthic bacterial mats (Alia permodesta). This record, from 16,100 to 3,400 y ago, demonstrates that seafloor invertebrate communities are subject to major turnover in response to relatively minor inferred changes in oxygenation (>1.5 to <0.5 mL⋅L(-1) [O2]) associated with abrupt (<100 y) warming of the eastern Pacific. The biotic turnover and recovery events within the record expand known rates of marine biological recovery by an order of magnitude, from <100 to >1,000 y, and illustrate the crucial role of climate and oceanographic change in driving long-term successional changes in ocean ecosystems.

  2. Response of seafloor ecosystems to abrupt global climate change

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Sarah E.; Hill, Tessa M.; Roopnarine, Peter D.; Kennett, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is predicted to decrease oceanic oxygen (O2) concentrations, with potentially significant effects on marine ecosystems. Geologically recent episodes of abrupt climatic warming provide opportunities to assess the effects of changing oxygenation on marine communities. Thus far, this knowledge has been largely restricted to investigations using Foraminifera, with little being known about ecosystem-scale responses to abrupt, climate-forced deoxygenation. We here present high-resolution records based on the first comprehensive quantitative analysis, to our knowledge, of changes in marine metazoans (Mollusca, Echinodermata, Arthropoda, and Annelida; >5,400 fossils and trace fossils) in response to the global warming associated with the last glacial to interglacial episode. The molluscan archive is dominated by extremophile taxa, including those containing endosymbiotic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Lucinoma aequizonatum) and those that graze on filamentous sulfur-oxidizing benthic bacterial mats (Alia permodesta). This record, from 16,100 to 3,400 y ago, demonstrates that seafloor invertebrate communities are subject to major turnover in response to relatively minor inferred changes in oxygenation (>1.5 to <0.5 mL⋅L−1 [O2]) associated with abrupt (<100 y) warming of the eastern Pacific. The biotic turnover and recovery events within the record expand known rates of marine biological recovery by an order of magnitude, from <100 to >1,000 y, and illustrate the crucial role of climate and oceanographic change in driving long-term successional changes in ocean ecosystems. PMID:25825727

  3. Response of seafloor ecosystems to abrupt global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffitt, Sarah E.; Hill, Tessa M.; Roopnarine, Peter D.; Kennett, James P.

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is predicted to decrease oceanic oxygen (O2) concentrations, with potentially significant effects on marine ecosystems. Geologically recent episodes of abrupt climatic warming provide opportunities to assess the effects of changing oxygenation on marine communities. Thus far, this knowledge has been largely restricted to investigations using Foraminifera, with little being known about ecosystem-scale responses to abrupt, climate-forced deoxygenation. We here present high-resolution records based on the first comprehensive quantitative analysis, to our knowledge, of changes in marine metazoans (Mollusca, Echinodermata, Arthropoda, and Annelida; >5,400 fossils and trace fossils) in response to the global warming associated with the last glacial to interglacial episode. The molluscan archive is dominated by extremophile taxa, including those containing endosymbiotic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Lucinoma aequizonatum) and those that graze on filamentous sulfur-oxidizing benthic bacterial mats (Alia permodesta). This record, from 16,100 to 3,400 y ago, demonstrates that seafloor invertebrate communities are subject to major turnover in response to relatively minor inferred changes in oxygenation (>1.5 to <0.5 mLṡL-1 [O2]) associated with abrupt (<100 y) warming of the eastern Pacific. The biotic turnover and recovery events within the record expand known rates of marine biological recovery by an order of magnitude, from <100 to >1,000 y, and illustrate the crucial role of climate and oceanographic change in driving long-term successional changes in ocean ecosystems.

  4. Role of the middle ear muscle apparatus in mechanisms of speech signal discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroz, B. S.; Bazarov, V. G.; Sachenko, S. V.

    1980-01-01

    A method of impedance reflexometry was used to examine 101 students with hearing impairment in order to clarify the interrelation between speech discrimination and the state of the middle ear muscles. Ability to discriminate speech signals depends to some extent on the functional state of intraaural muscles. Speech discrimination was greatly impaired in the absence of stapedial muscle acoustic reflex, in the presence of low thresholds of stimulation and in very small values of reflex amplitude increase. Discrimination was not impeded in positive AR, high values of relative thresholds and normal increase of reflex amplitude in response to speech signals with augmenting intensity.

  5. The Recycling of Biogenic Material at the Seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, W. R.; Sayles, F. L.

    2003-12-01

    The upper 10-50 cm of the marine sediment column is a site of active processing of particles that are deposited onto the sediments from the water column. Upon their arrival at the sediment surface, particles are simultaneously mixed by physical and biological processes through a layer that is ˜10 cm thick, and altered by chemical and microbial processes. These primary particles react with pore-water solutes to produce altered particles and new solutes. In turn, the products of these initial reactions can undergo further alteration. The overall effect of these reactions is to produce solute exchanges across the sediment-water interface and alter the primary particles, so that those that accumulate in the sediments may be substantially different from the rain to the seafloor (Figure 1). The solute exchanges resulting from reactions in surface sediments can be important for the chemistry of oceanic deep water, and to the overall cycles of several elements in the oceans. In addition, the alteration of particles by these reactions must be taken into account when downcore records of the accumulation of sedimentary components are interpreted in terms of past oceanic and atmospheric chemistry. Understanding early diagenetic reactions in the upper few centimeters of the marine sediment column is important both to the study of geochemical cycles in the contemporary ocean and to the reconstruction of past oceanic conditions. (8K)Figure 1. Particle cycling in the surface mixed layer of marine sediments. The processing of the rain of particles to the seafloor results in exchanges of solutes across the sediment-water interface and alteration of the particulate reactants, so that the composition of accumulating sediment is significantly different from that of the particulate rain to the seafloor. The particles that arrive at the seafloor consist, in varying proportions, of lithogenic and biogenic material; the latter consists of organic matter, CaCO3, and biogenic opal. Biogenic

  6. A Comparison between Oceanographic Parameters and Seafloor Pressures; Measured, Theoretical and Modelled, and Terrestrial Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donne, Sarah; Bean, Christopher; Craig, David; Dias, Frederic; Christodoulides, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Microseisms are continuous seismic vibrations which propagate mainly as surface Rayleigh and Love waves. They are generated by the Earth's oceans and there are two main types; primary and secondary microseisms. Primary microseisms are generated through the interaction of travelling surface gravity ocean waves with the seafloor in shallow waters relative to the wavelength of the ocean wave. Secondary microseisms, on the other hand are generated when two opposing wave trains interact and a non-linear second order effect produces a pressure fluctuation which is depth independent. The conditions necessary to produce secondary microseisms are presented in Longuet-Higgins (1950) through the interaction of two travelling waves with the same wave period and which interact at an angle of 180 degrees. Equivalent surface pressure density (p2l) is modelled using the numerical ocean wave model Wavewatch III and this term is considered as the microseism source term. This work presents an investigation of the theoretical second order pressures generated through the interaction of travelling waves with varying wave amplitude, period and angle of incidence. Predicted seafloor pressures calculated off the Southwest coast of Ireland are compared with terrestrially recorded microseism records, measured seafloor pressures and oceanographic parameters. The work presented in this study suggests that a broad set of sea states can generate second order seafloor pressures that are consistent with seafloor pressure measurements. Local seismic arrays throughout Ireland allow us to investigate the temporal covariance of these seafloor pressures with microseism source locations.

  7. Integrating Acoustic Imaging of Flow Regimes With Bathymetry: A Case Study, Main Endeavor Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.; Jackson, D. R.; Jones, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    A unified view of the seafloor and the hydrothermal flow regimes (plumes and diffuse flow) is constructed for three major vent clusters in the Main Endeavour Field (e.g., Grotto, S&M, and Salut) of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. The Main Endeavour Field is one of RIDGE 2000's Integrated Study Sites. A variety of visualization techniques are used to reconstruct the plumes (3D) and the diffuse flow field (2D) based on our acoustic imaging data set (July 2000 cruise). Plumes are identified as volumes of high backscatter intensity (indicating high particulate content or sharp density contrasts due to temperature variations) that remained high intensity when successive acoustic pings were subtracted (indicating that the acoustic targets producing the backscatter were in motion). Areas of diffuse flow are detected using our acoustic scintillation technique (AST). For the Grotto vent region (where a new Doppler technique was used to estimate vertical velocities in the plume), we estimate the areal partitioning between black smoker and diffuse flow in terms of volume fluxes. The volumetric and areal regions, where plume and diffuse flow were imaged, are registered over the bathymetry and compared to geologic maps of each region. The resulting images provide a unified view of the seafloor by integrating hydrothermal flow with geology.

  8. Indoor acoustic gain design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha-Abarca, Justo Andres

    2002-11-01

    The design of sound reinforcement systems includes many variables and usually some of these variables are discussed. There are criteria to optimize the performance of the sound reinforcement systems under indoor conditions. The equivalent acoustic distance, the necessary acoustic gain, and the potential acoustic gain are parameters which must be adjusted with respect to the loudspeaker array, electric power and directionality of loudspeakers, the room acoustics conditions, the distance and distribution of the audience, and the type of the original sources. The design and installation of front of the house and monitoring systems have individual criteria. This article is about this criteria and it proposes general considerations for the indoor acoustic gain design.

  9. Quantity discrimination in salamanders.

    PubMed

    Krusche, Paul; Uller, Claudia; Dicke, Ursula

    2010-06-01

    We investigated discrimination of large quantities in salamanders of the genus Plethodon. Animals were challenged with two different quantities (8 vs 12 or 8 vs 16) in a two-alternative choice task. Stimuli were live crickets, videos of live crickets or images animated by a computer program. Salamanders reliably chose the larger of two quantities when the ratio between the sets was 1:2 and stimuli were live crickets or videos thereof. Magnitude discrimination was not successful when the ratio was 2:3, or when the ratio was 1:2 when stimuli were computer animated. Analysis of the salamanders' success and failure as well as analysis of stimulus features points towards movement as a dominant feature for quantity discrimination. The results are generally consistent with large quantity discrimination investigated in many other animals (e.g. primates, fish), current models of quantity representation (analogue magnitudes) and data on sensory aspects of amphibian prey-catching behaviour (neuronal motion processing).

  10. Mass discrimination during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment concerned with the ability of astronauts to discriminate between the mass of objects when both the objects and the astronauts are in weightless states is described. The main object of the experiment is to compare the threshold for weight-discrimination on Earth with that for mass-discrimination in orbit. Tests will be conducted premission and postmission and early and late during the mission while the crew is experiencing weightlessness. A comparison of early and late tests inflight and postflight will reveal the rate of adaptation to zero-gravity and 1-g. The mass discrimination box holds 24 balls which the astronaut will compare to one another in a random routine.

  11. Fluctuations in seafloor spreading predicted by tectonic reconstructions and mantle convection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coltice, Nicolas; Seton, Maria; Rolf, Tobias; Müller, R. Dietmar; Tackley, Paul J.

    2013-04-01

    The theory of plate tectonics theory has enabled possible the reconstruction of the ancient seafloor and paleogeography. Over 50 years of data collection and kinematic reconstruction efforts, plate models have improved significantly (Seton et al., 2012) although reconstructions of ancient seafloor are naturally limited by the limited preservation of of very old seafloor. It is challenging to reconstruct ancient ocean basins and associated plate boundaries for times earlier than 200 Ma, since seafloor of this age is not preserved. This means we can merely reconstruct only 5% of the history of the planet in this fashion. However, geodynamic models can now help evaluate how seafloor spreading may evolve over longer time periods, since recent developments of numerical models of mantle convection with pseudo-plasticity can generate long-term solutions that simulate a form of seafloor spreading (Moresi and Solomatov, 1998; Tackley, 2000a; Tackley, 2000b). The introduction of models of continental lithosphere further improves the quality of the predictions: the computed distribution of seafloor ages reproduces the consumption of young seafloor as observed on the present-day Earth (Coltice et al., 2012). The time-dependence of the production of new seafloor has long been debated and there is no consensus on how much it has varied in the past 150My, and how it could have fluctuated over longer time-scales. Using plate reconstructions, Parsons (1982) and Rowley (2002) proposed the area vs. age distribution of the seafloor could have experienced limited fluctuations in the past 150My while others suggest stronger variations would fit the observations equally well (Seton et al., 2009. Here we propose to investigate the global dynamics of seafloor spreading using state-of-the-art plate reconstructions and geodynamic models. We focus on the evolution of the distribution of seafloor ages because fundamental geophysical observations like mantle heat flow or sea level provide

  12. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  13. Neural encoding of auditory discrimination in ventral premotor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lemus, Luis; Hernández, Adrián; Romo, Ranulfo

    2009-01-01

    Monkeys have the capacity to accurately discriminate the difference between two acoustic flutter stimuli. In this task, monkeys must compare information about the second stimulus to the memory trace of the first stimulus, and must postpone the decision report until a sensory cue triggers the beginning of the decision motor report. The neuronal processes associated with the different components of this task have been investigated in the primary auditory cortex (A1); but, A1 seems exclusively associated with the sensory and not with the working memory and decision components of this task. Here, we show that ventral premotor cortex (VPC) neurons reflect in their activities the current and remembered acoustic stimulus, their comparison, and the result of the animal's decision report. These results provide evidence that the neural dynamics of VPC is involved in the processing steps that link sensation and decision-making during auditory discrimination. PMID:19667191

  14. Full-circular surface acoustic wave excitation for high resolution acoustic microscopy using spherical lens and time gate technology.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, I; Katakura, K; Ogura, Y

    1999-01-01

    With a fixed gate width under the condition where the focus of an acoustic lens was set inside the sample, we varied signal taking-in time. Discrimination was made between differences in time required for an ultrasonic signal reflected from the sample to reach the acoustic lens. This process also enabled three types of images to be obtained separately: the surface reflection wave image, a combination of images based on the interference of the surface reflection wave with surface acoustic waves, and the surface acoustic wave image. Thus it was presumed that this process also would reveal the causes of image contrast and allow an easy interpretation of images. Furthermore, the image resolution was improved, because the surface acoustic wave image was drawn by an ultrasonic beam produced by full-circular surface acoustic wave excitation propagating toward the center converging concentrically; the theoretical resolution was 0.4 times the value of the surface acoustic wave wavelength lambda(R) and independent of the defocus value of the acoustic lens. Several kinds of samples were observed with this method. The results showed that the new method permitted observation of the internal structures of samples while offering new knowledge through the data reflecting the ultrasonic wave damping and scatter drawn on the display.

  15. A review of marine geomorphometry, the quantitative study of the seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecours, Vincent; Dolan, Margaret F. J.; Micallef, Aaron; Lucieer, Vanessa L.

    2016-08-01

    Geomorphometry, the science of quantitative terrain characterization, has traditionally focused on the investigation of terrestrial landscapes. However, the dramatic increase in the availability of digital bathymetric data and the increasing ease by which geomorphometry can be investigated using geographic information systems (GISs) and spatial analysis software has prompted interest in employing geomorphometric techniques to investigate the marine environment. Over the last decade or so, a multitude of geomorphometric techniques (e.g. terrain attributes, feature extraction, automated classification) have been applied to characterize seabed terrain from the coastal zone to the deep sea. Geomorphometric techniques are, however, not as varied, nor as extensively applied, in marine as they are in terrestrial environments. This is at least partly due to difficulties associated with capturing, classifying, and validating terrain characteristics underwater. There is, nevertheless, much common ground between terrestrial and marine geomorphometry applications and it is important that, in developing marine geomorphometry, we learn from experiences in terrestrial studies. However, not all terrestrial solutions can be adopted by marine geomorphometric studies since the dynamic, four-dimensional (4-D) nature of the marine environment causes its own issues throughout the geomorphometry workflow. For instance, issues with underwater positioning, variations in sound velocity in the water column affecting acoustic-based mapping, and our inability to directly observe and measure depth and morphological features on the seafloor are all issues specific to the application of geomorphometry in the marine environment. Such issues fuel the need for a dedicated scientific effort in marine geomorphometry.This review aims to highlight the relatively recent growth of marine geomorphometry as a distinct discipline, and offers the first comprehensive overview of marine geomorphometry to date

  16. Seafloor Sounding in Polar and Remote Regions (SSPARR) Project - Initial Field Trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognstad, M. R.; Anderson, R. M.; Chayes, D. N.; Mayer, L. A.

    2005-12-01

    The Seafloor Sounding in Polar and Remote Regions (SSPARR) project, under sponsorship of the National Science Foundation, is developing the capability to acquire autonomous bathymetric observations in remote regions, by means of an inexpensive (expendable) depth sounder supported by a GPS navigation receiver and global satellite telemetry capability. The depth sounder component operates at 12 kHz and is packaged in a watertight housing suspended approximately 10 meters below the water surface. A sonar transducer is mounted on the bottom of the cylindrical sounder housing; electronics and batteries for powering the sounder are contained in the housing. A cable carrying data and control signals connects to the surface package, which houses the telemetry and control system, GPS receiver, and batteries. This surface package would include flotation, so the SSPARR system could be deployed as a drifting buoy or installed in suitable ice floes. The depth sounder electronics utilize a Freescale Semiconductor DSP56309 digital signal processor to synthesize the transmitted signal, and to acquire and process the acoustic echoes. The signal processing involves quadrature detection at 12 kHz, matched filtering and decimation; data are acquired for intervals ranging from 125 milliseconds to 8 seconds, depending upon the desired range. At present, the sounder software records data for the entire acquisition interval; this raw data is being used to test bottom detection algorithms. In order to minimize the likelihood that a mid-water scattering layer or ice keel mask the true bottom reflection, the desired algorithm will report multiple reflections to the control and telemetry processor when they are detected. The bottom detection function has been evaluated with field trial data will be incorporated into the final sounder design. A test of the sounder transducer was conducted in May 2004 aboard the R/V Kilo Moana, using electronics from the University of Hawaii's Integrated

  17. Fault system and dynamic seafloor deformation in the 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, T.; Kanamatsu, T.; Kawamura, K.; Arai, K.; Fujikura, K.; Ito, Y.; Ashi, J.; Kinoshita, M.; Matsuoka, T.; YK11-04 Shipboard Scientific Party

    2011-12-01

    Faults related to the 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0) were investigated by using seismic reflection data acquired in 1999 (KR99-08) and submersible seafloor observations before the earthquake (YK08-06 in 2008) and after the earthquake (YK11-04 in 2011). Because the surveyed area includes the region where the largest vertical displacement is predicted to have occurred, the shallow faults here are likely to be directly related to the tsunami characteristics. On the seismic profile off Miyagi (MY102), we identified three predominant faults branching from the plate interface; (A) a backstop reverse fault working as a boundary between seaward accreted sequence and landward less-deformed Cretaceous sequence (von Huene et al., 1994 JGR; Tsuru et al., 2002 JGR), (B) a branch reverse fault constructing the significant seafloor slope break, and (C) a landward dipping normal fault located at the boundary between outer and inner wedge (Tsuji et al., 2011 EPS). Ito et al. (2011, GRL) revealed that degree of seafloor horizontal displacement is much changed across the branch normal fault, suggesting that the normal fault could be ruptured associated with the earthquake. Several normal faults are further observed within the continental crust. These normal faults may be generated by tensile stress due to large displacement along the plate interface near the trench (Tsuji et al., 2011, EPS). We reveal dynamic change of seafloor geometry and environment associated with the 2011 Tohoku earthquake by comparing the seafloor fault traces before and after the earthquake. The seafloor observation before the earthquake (YK08-06) demonstrated that cold-seep communities along the trace of the branch reverse fault and a high scarp associated with the trace of a normal fault. However, the observation after the earthquake (YK11-04) demonstrates that several fissures are developed along the seafloor trace of reverse fault. These fissures were not observed in pre-earthquake observations (YK08

  18. Flare-Shaped Acoustic Anomalies in the Water Column Along the Ecuadorian Margin: Relationship with Active Tectonics and Gas Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, Francois; Proust, Jean-Noël; Dano, Alexandre; Collot, Jean-Yves; Guiyeligou, Grâce Daniella; Hernández Salazar, María José; Ratzov, Gueorgui; Martillo, Carlos; Pouderoux, Hugo; Schenini, Laure; Lebrun, Jean-Frederic; Loayza, Glenda

    2016-10-01

    With hull-mounted multibeam echosounder data, we report for the first time along the active Ecuadorian margin, acoustic signatures of water column fluid emissions and seep-related structures on the seafloor. In total 17 flare-shaped acoustic anomalies were detected from the upper slope (1250 m) to the shelf break (140 m). Nearly half of the flare-shaped acoustic anomalies rise 200-500 m above the seafloor. The base of the flares is generally associated with high-reflectivity backscatter patches contrasting with the neighboring seafloor. We interpret these flares as caused by fluid escape in the water column, most likely gases. High-resolution seismic profiles show that most flares occur close to the surface expression of active faults, deformed areas, slope instabilities or diapiric structures. In two areas tectonic deformation disrupts a Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR), suggesting that buried frozen gas hydrates are destabilized, thus supplying free gas emissions and related flares. This discovery is important as it opens the way to determine the nature and origin of the emitted fluids and their potential link with the hydrocarbon system of the forearc basins along the Ecuadorian margin.

  19. Integration of seafloor point data in usSEABED

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Jane A.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Zimmermann, Mark; Jenkins, Chris; Golden, Nadine E.

    2007-01-01

    Sediments of the beach, nearshore, and continental shelves record a complex interplay of processes including wave energy and direction , currents, beach erosion or accretion, bluff or cliff retreat, fluvial input, sediment longshore and cross-shelf transport processes, contaminant content and transport, sediment sources and sinks, and others. In turn, sediments and rocks modify wave patterns, affect recreation and tourism, and provide habitat for fish, epifauna, and infauna. Character of the surficial seafloor also influences navigation, commercial and recreational fishing and gathering of other food sources, communication, piplines, national defense, and provides geologic resources including sand and gravel aggregates, minerals, and real or potential energy sources. The beaches, nearshore, and continental margins fall under overlapping levels of managerial responsibility between Federal, State, regional, and local government agencies and consortia. In addition, universities and other academic institutions investigate these places for pure or applied scientific reasons. Mapping is usually the first step in understanding any issue and is often comprised of remotely gathered geophysical data such as bathymetry and backscatter imagery, and groundtruthing; that is, the collection of physical and virtual samples to tie the remotely gathered data to reality. The physical samples are described and (or) carefully analyzed for grain-size information -- which records both the site's physical conditions and geologic past -- and commonly, for constituent components such as mineral and rock types (to determine onland sources and in situ chemical processes), carbonate and organic content and microfossils (for biological and oceanographic influences), and structure such as layering and bioturbation (for physical influences). The samples may also be subjected to physical tests such as comp[action analyses, liquefaction or plasticity limits, ans other parameters important when

  20. On-Line Operating 3-D Seafloor Positioning System (1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, T.

    2003-12-01

    We propose a new observation system of on-line 3-D positioning which will be deployed on the sea-bottom of convergent type plate boundaries where large inter-plate seismic events occurred historically. The system has observation sites at assigned intervals along optical fiber cables. Using the several cables, crossing each other, we can construct a real-time operating network of triangular base lines. Each observing site on the cable will be equipped with two-kind high gain instruments i.e., the laser ranging and pressure gauge sensors, as well as additional apparatuses to remove the influence of temperature and salinity etc. on the data. Attenuation rate of visible rays in seawater is relatively smaller at bands of blue-color (wave length; ˜ 450nm) to yellowish green-color ( ˜ 550nm). The attenuation rate of optical signals of blue to yellow-green color in highly transparent seawater is 0.1 ˜ 0.5 dB/m. If we can utilize the high power optical laser output of the blue to yellow-green band for the positioning, the signals can reach the target receiver station with highly sensitive detector located at the distance of 10**2 m or larger. Using additional data of thermal and salinity fields etc. for compensating refractive index of laser signal ray path in clean seawater, we may attain the resolution of laser ranging at an order of 1 mm for each triangular base line with the total length of 1 ˜ 2 km. The base line consists of several secondary positioning stations with the spacing of ˜ 10**2 m. To improve the data resolution, we apply signal processing such as low-pass filtering etc. As is important, we cannot decompose the change of the base line distance data into 3-D individual components. We need another kind data, such as pure vertical coordinate of the positioning sites to resolve the 3-D components. To measure the vertical coordinate of the seafloor stations, we utilize data from the high gain pressure sensor. In the case of crystallized quartz

  1. An oceanographic observation of the 2013 Mt.Etna pyroclastic fallout in the Ionian deep seafloor: multiparametric investigation through benthic observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Bue, Nadia; Sgroi, Tiziana; Giovanetti, Gabriele; Marinaro, Giuditta; Embriaco, Davide; Beranzoli, Laura; Favali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Very large amounts of volcanic ash are released into the atmosphere during eruptive events. Taken over the atmospheric forcing tephra may be carried over great distances remaining in suspension for a long time. Nevertheless, the wind is not the only responsible for transport and dispersion of volcanic particles, but, especially in volcanic areas close to the coast, the ash fallout in marine areas plays an interesting role in the sedimentation processes affecting the benthic environments. During the Mt. Etna eruptive events of 2013, the volcanic ash fallout occurred in the Western Ionian Sea deep layers was recorded by an oceanographic sensor mounted on the cabled benthic node NEMO-SN1. The seafloor observatory was deployed in the framework of the European Research Infrastructure EMSO (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water-column Observatory) at a depth of 2100 m, about 25 km off-shore Eastern Sicily. The presence of a specific Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) able to monitor currents and direction of water particles in a depth range of about 30-50m above the seafloor, allowed to watch interesting episodes of suspended matter at the deep layers in correspondence with the pyroclastic activity which affected the ESE sector of the Etna volcano. The analysis of the acoustic backscattering signal of this sensor, combined with seismological and oceanographic data recorded by the benthic station, allowed to carry out a multidisciplinary study about the possible interaction between the Mt. Etna eruptive activity and the local oceanographic dynamic. This approach leads to consider that sedimentation processes of volcanic ash occurred, allowing to investigate on the very fast horizontal and vertical transport observed. Moreover, the surprising sedimentation rate recorded, probably results from intense aggregation and alteration processes affecting the ash particles in seawater. The importance of the presence of a multidisciplinary benthic observatory in

  2. Association among active seafloor deformation, mound formation, and gas hydrate growth and accumulation within the seafloor of the Santa Monica Basin, offshore California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paull, C.K.; Normark, W.R.; Ussler, W.; Caress, D.W.; Keaten, R.

    2008-01-01

    Seafloor blister-like mounds, methane migration and gas hydrate formation were investigated through detailed seafloor surveys in Santa Monica Basin, offshore of Los Angeles, California. Two distinct deep-water (??? 800??m water depth) topographic mounds were surveyed using an autonomous underwater vehicle (carrying a multibeam sonar and a chirp sub-bottom profiler) and one of these was explored with the remotely operated vehicle Tiburon. The mounds are > 10??m high and > 100??m wide dome-shaped bathymetric features. These mounds protrude from crests of broad anticlines (~ 20??m high and 1 to 3??km long) formed within latest Quaternary-aged seafloor sediment associated with compression between lateral offsets in regional faults. No allochthonous sediments were observed on the mounds, except slumped material off the steep slopes of the mounds. Continuous streams of methane gas bubbles emanate from the crest of the northeastern mound, and extensive methane-derived authigenic carbonate pavements and chemosynthetic communities mantle the mound surface. The large local vertical displacements needed to produce these mounds suggests a corresponding net mass accumulation has occurred within the immediate subsurface. Formation and accumulation of pure gas hydrate lenses in the subsurface is proposed as a mechanism to blister the seafloor and form these mounds. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Amino Acid Synthesis in Seafloor Environments on Icy Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Erika; Barge, Laura; VanderVelde, David; Kallas, Kayo; Baum, Marc M.; Russell, Michael J.; Kanik, Isik

    2016-10-01

    In 2005, the Cassini mission detected plumes erupting from Enceladus' surface, containing carbon dioxide, methane, silica, and possibly ammonia. Subsequent laboratory experiments indicated that the silica particles in the plumes were generated under alkaline conditions and at moderate temperatures of ~90°C (Hsu et al., 2015); one scenario for such conditions would be the existence of alkaline (serpentinization-driven) hydrothermal activity within Enceladus. Alkaline vents are significant since they have been proposed as a likely environment for the emergence of metabolism on the early Earth (Russell et al. 2014) and thus could also provide a mechanism for origin of life on ocean worlds with a water-rock interface. Alkaline vents in an acidic, iron-containing ocean could produce mineral precipitates that could act as primitive enzymes or catalysts mediating organic reactions; for example, metal sulfides can catalyze the reductive amination of pyruvate to alanine (Novikov and Copley 2013). We have conducted experiments testing the synthesis of amino acids catalyzed by other iron minerals that might be expected to precipitate on the seafloor of early Earth or Enceladus. Preliminary results indicate that amino acids as well as other organic products can be synthesized in 1-3 days under alkaline hydrothermal conditions. We also find that the yield and type of organic products is highly dependent on pH and temperature, implying that understanding the specifics of the geochemical hydrothermal gradients on Enceladus (or other ocean worlds) will be significant in determining their potential for synthesizing building blocks for life.Hsu, H.-W. et al. (2015), Nature 519, 207-210.Russell, M. J. et al. (2014), Astrobiology, 14, 308-43.Novikov Y. and Copley S. D. (2013) PNAS 110, 33, 13283-13288.

  4. Global reductions in seafloor biomass in response to climate change.

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel O B; Yool, Andrew; Wei, Chih-Lin; Henson, Stephanie A; Ruhl, Henry A; Watson, Reg A; Gehlen, Marion

    2014-06-01

    Seafloor organisms are vital for healthy marine ecosystems, contributing to elemental cycling, benthic remineralization, and ultimately sequestration of carbon. Deep-sea life is primarily reliant on the export flux of particulate organic carbon from the surface ocean for food, but most ocean biogeochemistry models predict global decreases in export flux resulting from 21st century anthropogenically induced warming. Here we show that decadal-to-century scale changes in carbon export associated with climate change lead to an estimated 5.2% decrease in future (2091-2100) global open ocean benthic biomass under RCP8.5 (reduction of 5.2 Mt C) compared with contemporary conditions (2006-2015). Our projections use multi-model mean export flux estimates from eight fully coupled earth system models, which contributed to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5, that have been forced by high and low representative concentration pathways (RCP8.5 and 4.5, respectively). These export flux estimates are used in conjunction with published empirical relationships to predict changes in benthic biomass. The polar oceans and some upwelling areas may experience increases in benthic biomass, but most other regions show decreases, with up to 38% reductions in parts of the northeast Atlantic. Our analysis projects a future ocean with smaller sized infaunal benthos, potentially reducing energy transfer rates though benthic multicellular food webs. More than 80% of potential deep-water biodiversity hotspots known around the world, including canyons, seamounts, and cold-water coral reefs, are projected to experience negative changes in biomass. These major reductions in biomass may lead to widespread change in benthic ecosystems and the functions and services they provide.

  5. Lithium isotope traces magmatic fluid in a seafloor hydrothermal system

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dan; Hou, Zengqian; Zhao, Yue; Hou, Kejun; Yang, Zhiming; Tian, Shihong; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium isotopic compositions of fluid inclusions and hosted gangue quartz from a giant volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit in China provide robust evidence for inputting of magmatic fluids into a Triassic submarine hydrothermal system. The δ7Li results vary from +4.5‰ to +13.8‰ for fluid inclusions and from +6.7‰ to +21.0‰ for the hosted gangue quartz(9 gangue quartz samples containing primary fluid inclusions). These data confirm the temperature-dependent Li isotopic fractionation between hydrothermal quartz and fluid (i.e., Δδ7Liquartz-fluid = –8.9382 × (1000/T) + 22.22(R2 = 0.98; 175 °C–340 °C)), which suggests that the fluid inclusions are in equilibrium with their hosted quartz, thus allowing to determine the composition of the fluids by using δ7Liquartz data. Accordingly, we estimate that the ore-forming fluids have a δ7Li range from −0.7‰ to +18.4‰ at temperatures of 175–340 °C. This δ7Li range, together with Li–O modeling , suggest that magmatic fluid played a significant role in the ore formation. This study demonstrates that Li isotope can be effectively used to trace magmatic fluids in a seafloor hydrothermal system and has the potential to monitor fluid mixing and ore-forming process. PMID:26347051

  6. Cellular content of biomolecules in sub-seafloor microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Stefan; Morono, Yuki; Becker, Kevin W.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Kjeldsen, Kasper U.; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Lomstein, Bente Aa.

    2016-09-01

    Microbial biomolecules, typically from the cell envelope, can provide crucial information about distribution, activity, and adaptations of sub-seafloor microbial communities. However, when cells die these molecules can be preserved in the sediment on timescales that are likely longer than the lifetime of their microbial sources. Here we provide for the first time measurements of the cellular content of biomolecules in sedimentary microbial cells. We separated intact cells from sediment matrices in samples from surficial, deeply buried, organic-rich, and organic-lean marine sediments by density centrifugation. Amino acids, amino sugars, muramic acid, and intact polar lipids were analyzed in both whole sediment and cell extract, and cell separation was optimized and evaluated in terms of purity, separation efficiency, taxonomic resemblance, and compatibility to high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for biomolecule analyses. Because cell extracts from density centrifugation still contained considerable amounts of detrital particles and non-cellular biomolecules, we further purified cells from two samples by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Cells from these highly purified cell extracts had an average content of amino acids and lipids of 23-28 fg cell-1 and 2.3 fg cell-1, respectively, with an estimated carbon content of 19-24 fg cell-1. In the sediment, the amount of biomolecules associated with vegetative cells was up to 70-fold lower than the total biomolecule content. We find that the cellular content of biomolecules in the marine subsurface is up to four times lower than previous estimates. Our approach will facilitate and improve the use of biomolecules as proxies for microbial abundance in environmental samples and ultimately provide better global estimates of microbial biomass.

  7. Global reductions in seafloor biomass in response to climate change

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Daniel O B; Yool, Andrew; Wei, Chih-Lin; Henson, Stephanie A; Ruhl, Henry A; Watson, Reg A; Gehlen, Marion

    2014-01-01

    Seafloor organisms are vital for healthy marine ecosystems, contributing to elemental cycling, benthic remineralization, and ultimately sequestration of carbon. Deep-sea life is primarily reliant on the export flux of particulate organic carbon from the surface ocean for food, but most ocean biogeochemistry models predict global decreases in export flux resulting from 21st century anthropogenically induced warming. Here we show that decadal-to-century scale changes in carbon export associated with climate change lead to an estimated 5.2% decrease in future (2091–2100) global open ocean benthic biomass under RCP8.5 (reduction of 5.2 Mt C) compared with contemporary conditions (2006–2015). Our projections use multi-model mean export flux estimates from eight fully coupled earth system models, which contributed to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5, that have been forced by high and low representative concentration pathways (RCP8.5 and 4.5, respectively). These export flux estimates are used in conjunction with published empirical relationships to predict changes in benthic biomass. The polar oceans and some upwelling areas may experience increases in benthic biomass, but most other regions show decreases, with up to 38% reductions in parts of the northeast Atlantic. Our analysis projects a future ocean with smaller sized infaunal benthos, potentially reducing energy transfer rates though benthic multicellular food webs. More than 80% of potential deep-water biodiversity hotspots known around the world, including canyons, seamounts, and cold-water coral reefs, are projected to experience negative changes in biomass. These major reductions in biomass may lead to widespread change in benthic ecosystems and the functions and services they provide. PMID:24382828

  8. Imaging Active and Relict Seafloor Methane Seep Sites: a Comparison of Seafloor 3D Seismic Reflectivity and Multibeam Sonar Backscatter Intensity at Omakere Ridge, Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, T. V.; Pecher, I. A.; Crutchley, G. J.; Klaeschen, D.; Papenberg, C. A.; Bialas, J.; Greinert, J.; Townend, J.; SO214 Shipboard Scientific Party

    2011-12-01

    Omakere Ridge is an anticlinal thrust ridge in water depths of 1100-1700 m on the Hikurangi Margin, east of the North Island of New Zealand, and an area of active seafloor methane seepage associated with an extensive gas hydrate province. Methane seep sites on the Hikurangi Margin are characterised by localised build-ups of hard authigenic carbonate and chemosynthetic seep fauna that exist on a seafloor otherwise characterised by soft, muddy sediments. Previous studies have shown that these seep sites appear as areas of high backscatter in sonar images, but backscatter data alone do not provide detailed information on the present level of activity of a seep site, or the thickness of the carbonate build-up. Here we present a comparison of seafloor seismic reflectivity and multibeam sonar backscatter intensity data collected from active and relict methane seep sites on Omakere Ridge. High-resolution P-Cable 3D seismic reflection data and 12 kHz EM120 multibeam sonar data were collected in March 2011 during the RV Sonne cruise SO214. Seafloor seismic amplitude maps have been derived from the shipboard post-stack migrated data cube. A pronounced acquisition artifact is manifest in the seafloor horizon slice as high and low amplitude stripes that alternate periodically in the crossline direction. We have removed this artifact from the seafloor horizon slice using Kx-Ky filtering, followed by direct sampling and deterministic removal of the very-low-frequency components in the spatial domain. The seismic amplitude map has then been transformed into a calibrated seafloor reflection coefficient map. Sonar backscatter mosaics have been created after correcting for instrument response, angular variation in backscatter and bathymetry. Several backscatter mosaics were incorporated into a stacked mosaic over the study area to attenuate random noise. The high sonar backscatter response at the seep sites is generally accompanied by high seismic reflectivity. However, the

  9. Discrimination of speaker size from syllable phrasesa)

    PubMed Central

    Ives, D. Timothy; Smith, David R. R.; Patterson, Roy D.

    2008-01-01

    The length of the vocal tract is correlated with speaker size and, so, speech sounds have information about the size of the speaker in a form that is interpretable by the listener. A wide range of different vocal tract lengths exist in the population and humans are able to distinguish speaker size from the speech. Smith et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 305–318 (2005)] presented vowel sounds to listeners and showed that the ability to discriminate speaker size extends beyond the normal range of speaker sizes which suggests that information about the size and shape of the vocal tract is segregated automatically at an early stage in the processing. This paper reports an extension of the size discrimination research using a much larger set of speech sounds, namely, 180 consonant-vowel and vowel-consonant syllables. Despite the pronounced increase in stimulus variability, there was actually an improvement in discrimination performance over that supported by vowel sounds alone. Performance with vowel-consonant syllables was slightly better than with consonant-vowel syllables. These results support the hypothesis that information about the length of the vocal tract is segregated at an early stage in auditory processing. PMID:16419826

  10. Discrimination of speaker size from syllable phrases.

    PubMed

    Ives, D Timothy; Smith, David R R; Patterson, Roy D

    2005-12-01

    The length of the vocal tract is correlated with speaker size and, so, speech sounds have information about the size of the speaker in a form that is interpretable by the listener. A wide range of different vocal tract lengths exist in the population and humans are able to distinguish speaker size from the speech. Smith et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 305-318 (2005)] presented vowel sounds to listeners and showed that the ability to discriminate speaker size extends beyond the normal range of speaker sizes which suggests that information about the size and shape of the vocal tract is segregated automatically at an early stage in the processing. This paper reports an extension of the size discrimination research using a much larger set of speech sounds, namely, 180 consonant-vowel and vowel-consonant syllables. Despite the pronounced increase in stimulus variability, there was actually an improvement in discrimination performance over that supported by vowel sounds alone. Performance with vowel-consonant syllables was slightly better than with consonant-vowel syllables. These results support the hypothesis that information about the length of the vocal tract is segregated at an early stage in auditory processing.

  11. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate

    PubMed Central

    Camilli, Richard; Di Iorio, Daniela; Bowen, Andrew; Reddy, Christopher M.; Techet, Alexandra H.; Yoerger, Dana R.; Whitcomb, Louis L.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Sylva, Sean P.; Fenwick, Judith

    2012-01-01

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and acoustic Doppler sonar operating onboard a remotely operated vehicle for noncontact measurement of flow cross-section and velocity from the well’s two leak sites. Over 2,500 sonar cross-sections and over 85,000 Doppler velocity measurements were recorded during the acquisition process. These data were then applied to turbulent jet and plume flow models to account for entrained water and calculate a combined hydrocarbon flow rate from the two leak sites at seafloor conditions. Based on the chemical composition of end-member samples collected from within the well, this bulk volumetric rate was then normalized to account for contributions from gases and condensates at initial leak source conditions. Results from this investigation indicate that on May 31, 2010, the well’s oil flow rate was approximately 0.10 ± 0.017 m3 s-1 at seafloor conditions, or approximately 85 ± 15 kg s-1 (7.4 ± 1.3 Gg d-1), equivalent to approximately 57,000 ± 9,800 barrels of oil per day at surface conditions. End-member chemical composition indicates that this oil release rate was accompanied by approximately an additional 24 ± 4.2 kg s-1 (2.1 ± 0.37 Gg d-1) of natural gas (methane through pentanes), yielding a total hydrocarbon release rate of 110 ± 19 kg s-1 (9.5 ± 1.6 Gg d-1). PMID:21903931

  12. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate.

    PubMed

    Camilli, Richard; Di Iorio, Daniela; Bowen, Andrew; Reddy, Christopher M; Techet, Alexandra H; Yoerger, Dana R; Whitcomb, Louis L; Seewald, Jeffrey S; Sylva, Sean P; Fenwick, Judith

    2012-12-11

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and acoustic Doppler sonar operating onboard a remotely operated vehicle for noncontact measurement of flow cross-section and velocity from the well's two leak sites. Over 2,500 sonar cross-sections and over 85,000 Doppler velocity measurements were recorded during the acquisition process. These data were then applied to turbulent jet and plume flow models to account for entrained water and calculate a combined hydrocarbon flow rate from the two leak sites at seafloor conditions. Based on the chemical composition of end-member samples collected from within the well, this bulk volumetric rate was then normalized to account for contributions from gases and condensates at initial leak source conditions. Results from this investigation indicate that on May 31, 2010, the well's oil flow rate was approximately 0.10 ± 0.017 m(3) s(-1) at seafloor conditions, or approximately 85 ± 15 kg s(-1) (7.4 ± 1.3 Gg d(-1)), equivalent to approximately 57,000 ± 9,800 barrels of oil per day at surface conditions. End-member chemical composition indicates that this oil release rate was accompanied by approximately an additional 24 ± 4.2 kg s(-1) (2.1 ± 0.37 Gg d(-1)) of natural gas (methane through pentanes), yielding a total hydrocarbon release rate of 110 ± 19 kg s(-1) (9.5 ± 1.6 Gg d(-1)).

  13. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  14. Detection and Discrimination of Complex Sounds by Pigeons (Columba livia)

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Robert G.; Qadri, Muhammad A. J.; Oliveira, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Auditory scene analysis is the process by which sounds are separated and identified from each other and from the background to make functional auditory objects. One challenge in making these psychological units is that complex sounds often continuously differ in composition over their duration. Here we examined the acoustic basis of complex sound processing in four pigeons by evaluating their performance in an ongoing same/different (S/D) task. This provided an opportunity to investigate avian auditory processing in a non-vocal learning, non-songbird. These pigeons were already successfully discriminating 18.5 s sequences of all different 1.5 s sounds (ABCD . . .) from sequences of one sound repeating (AAAA . . ., BBBB . . ., etc.) in a go/no-go procedure. The stimuli for these same/different sequences consisted of 504 tonal sounds (36 chromatic notes × 14 different instruments), 36 pure tones, and 72 complex sounds. Not all of these sounds were equally effective in supporting S/D discrimination. As identified by a stepwise regression modeling of ten acoustic properties, tonal and complex sounds with intermediate levels of acoustic content tended to support better discrimination. The results suggest that pigeons have the auditory and cognitive capabilities to recognize and group continuously changing sound elements into larger functional units that can serve to differentiate long sequences of same and different sounds. PMID:26616672

  15. Past and present seafloor age distributions and the temporal evolution of plate tectonic heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Thorsten W.; Conrad, Clinton P.; Buffett, Bruce; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2009-02-01

    Variations in Earth's rates of seafloor generation and recycling have far-reaching consequences for sea level, ocean chemistry, and climate. However, there is little agreement on the correct parameterization for the time-dependent evolution of plate motions. A strong constraint is given by seafloor age distributions, which are affected by variations in average spreading rate, ridge length, and the age distribution of seafloor being removed by subduction. Using a simplified evolution model, we explore which physical parameterizations of these quantities are compatible with broad trends in the area per seafloor age statistics for the present-day and back to 140 Ma from paleo-age reconstructions. We show that a probability of subduction based on plate buoyancy (slab-pull, or "sqrt(age)") and a time-varying spreading rate fits the observed age distributions as well as, or better than, a subduction probability consistent with an unvarying "triangular" age distribution and age-independent destruction of ocean floor. Instead, we interpret the present near-triangular distribution of ages as a snapshot of a transient state of the evolving oceanic plate system. Current seafloor ages still contain hints of a ˜ 60 Myr periodicity in seafloor production, and using paleoages, we find that a ˜ 250 Myr period variation is consistent with geologically-based reconstructions of production rate variations. These long-period variations also imply a decrease of oceanic heat flow by ˜ - 0.25%/Ma during the last 140 Ma, caused by a 25-50% decrease in the rate of seafloor production. Our study offers an improved understanding of the non-uniformitarian evolution of plate tectonics and the interplay between continental cycles and the self-organization of the oceanic plates.

  16. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  17. Response to Comment on "Sensitivity of seafloor bathymetry to climate-driven fluctuations in mid-ocean ridge magma supply".

    PubMed

    Olive, J-A; Behn, M D; Ito, G; Buck, W R; Escartín, J; Howell, S

    2016-07-15

    Tolstoy reports the existence of a characteristic 100 thousand year (ky) period in the bathymetry of fast-spreading seafloor but does not argue that sea level change is a first-order control on seafloor morphology worldwide. Upon evaluating the overlap between tectonic and Milankovitch periodicities across spreading rates, we reemphasize that fast-spreading ridges are the best potential recorders of a sea level signature in seafloor bathymetry.

  18. Postseismic deformation associated with the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake (M9.0) based on terrestrial and seafloor geodetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, T.; Hino, R.; Sun, T.; Kido, M.; Osada, Y.; Wang, K.; Ohta, Y.; Sato, M.; Inazu, D.; Fujimoto, H.; Ito, Y.; Suzuki, S.

    2013-12-01

    On 11 March 2011, the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake (M 9.0) occurred on the plate boundary between the subducting Pacific and overriding continental plates. This earthquake and other past large earthquakes around the Japanese Islands all induced postseismic deformation. For example, postseismic slip associated with the 1993 Sanriku-Haruka-Oki (Mw 7.6) and 2005 Miyagi-Oki (Mw 7.2) earthquakes released moments as large as their main shocks [e.g., Heki et al., 1997; Miura et al., 2006]. Ozawa et al. [2011] have already reported the postseismic following the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake based on terrestrial continuous GPS observations. However, we cannot estimate postseismic slip at the very shallow portion on the plate interface precisely based only on the terrestrial GPS data, because such offshore areas are too far from the coast of the northeastern Japan. Thus, We investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of the postseismic slip on the plate interface based not only on the terrestrial GPS data but also on the seafloor geodetic data such as crustal movements measured by means of GPS/Acoustic ranging and vertical displacements observed by using Ocean Bottom Pressure gauges. We estimate displacements due to the postseismic slip by subtracting those due to the large aftershocks and viscoelastic relaxation from the original displacement time series data. Displacement field due to the viscoelastic relaxation is estimated by applying a spherical FEM model including the actual 3D shape of the subducting Pacific slab and transient as well as steady-state mantle viscosities. The coseismic slip model based on the terrestrial and seafloor geodetic data [Iinuma et al., 2012] is used to initialize the viscoelastic relaxation process. A time-dependent inversion method devised by Yagi and Kikuchi [2003] is then applied to estimate the postseismic slip distributions. Preliminary results show that the postseismic slip distribution has the following two features; 1) Large postseismic slip

  19. Seafloor morphology: nature of the seabed and the cold water corals of the Levante Canyon (eastern Ligurian Sea, NW Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbono, Ivana; Ivaldi, Roberta; Pratellesi, Marta; Fanelli, Emanuela; Peirano, Andrea; Cocito, Silvia; Dialti, Lorenzo; Delfanti, Roberta

    2014-05-01

    The Levante Canyon, located approximately in the offshore area of Cinque Terre (eastern Ligurian Sea, NW Mediterranean), was investigated in autumn 2013 onboard Italian Navy Ships through high resolution multibeam (MB), side scan sonar (SSS) and image data acquired by a Remotely Operating Vehicle (ROV) in order to study the seafloor features and ecological characters. First data allow us to product a seabed mapping of the study area with high detail of seafloor shapes, to be extended to other similar sectors of the canyon catchment area, constituted by a dendritic pattern of each individual gully network. The highest values of slope (17°) can be found in the steep canyon heads and flanks. Slope values up to 10° can be seen depicting sea-bed mounds on the northernmost and central interfluve. MB and SSS data show higher acoustic backscatter in the deepest sections of the canyon than interfluve and the changes in the sea-bed nature over the mounds are highlighted as areas of variable intensity. ROV images were recorded from 510 m depth up to 370 m and suggested the presence of biological communities, mainly typical of deep muddy bottom, and small cold water coral colonies, possibly identified as Madrepora oculata. This survey provides not only a detailed mapping of the variable morphology of the proximal area of the Levante Canyon, but it also investigates the seabed nature and biological communities within the canyon system for the assessment of a potential Site of Community Importance (SCI) under the European Commission Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC). In particular cold water corals (CWC) provide a complex structural marine habitat hosting high levels of biological diversity, which are in the reef habitat three times higher compared to the surrounding seabed. For this reason they fall within the habitats that deserve protection (EU-Habitat 1170 "Reefs"). Preliminary observations and data interpretations suggest that the Levante Canyon shows interesting

  20. A tale of two seafloor eruptions: Comparing seismic data from the 2006 East Pacific Rise and 2015 Axial Seamount eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstoy, M.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Tan, Y. J.; Waldhauser, F.

    2015-12-01

    In January 2006 at 9°50'N on the East Pacific Rise, a three-OBS array captured the first in situ seismic data from a mid-ocean ridge eruption. The data show a steady build up in seismicity over the preceding 2+ years leading to a seismic crisis on January 22nd2006 that lasted approximately 6 hours, with one particularly intense hour interpreted as a rising dike (Tolstoy et al., 2006). This was followed by approximately 10 days of dwindling activity. In April-May 2015, at the ridge-hotspot Axial Seamount, an eight-OBS array captured the second in situ seismic data, and first real-time data, from a mid-ocean ridge eruption. This eruption was also preceded by high seismicity rates, though data were only available for ~6 months prior to the eruption. An ~10 hr seismic crisis on April 24thwas followed by almost a month of dwindling activity. Immediately following the end of the crisis, previously unknown impulsive waterborne signals were observed coming from two sites along the north rift of Axial Seamount (Wilcock et al., this meeting; Garcia et al., this meeting). The signals were interpreted as being associated with lava reaching the seafloor, and subsequent multibeam mapping and an ROV dive confirmed the presence of fresh lava at these sites (Kelley et al., this meeting). Re-examination of the East Pacific Rise eruption data has shown that the same impulsive waterborne signals were also observed there starting ~3 hrs after the beginning of the 2006 seismic crisis (Tan et al., this meeting). The locations of these signals track the mapped lava flow associated with this eruption (Soule et al., 2007), further supporting their association with lava extrusion onto the seafloor. These two eruptions show similar characteristics including ~6-10 hr seismic crises, and lava likely reaching the surface within ~3 hrs (EPR) and ~10 hrs (Axial) of the initiation of seismic crisis activity. They also show similar tremor activity, likely suggesting similar magma movement processes

  1. JAMSTEC multibeam surveys and submersible dives around the Hawaiian Islands: a collaborative Japan-USA exploration of Hawaii's deep seafloor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Joel E.; Eakins, Barry W.; Kanamatsu, Toshiya; Naka, Jiro; Takahashi, Eiichi; Satake, Kenji; Smith, John R.; Clague, David A.; Yokose, Hisayoshi

    2006-01-01

    This database release, USGS Data Series 171, contains data collected during four Japan-USA collaborative cruises that characterize the seafloor around the Hawaiian Islands. The Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) sponsored cruises in 1998, 1999, 2001, and 2002, to build a greater understanding of the deep marine geology around the Hawaiian Islands. During these cruises, scientists surveyed over 600,000 square kilometers of the seafloor with a hull-mounted multibeam seafloor-mapping sonar system (SEA BEAM® 2112), observed the seafloor and collected samples using robotic and manned submersible dives, collected dredge and piston-core samples, and performed single-channel seismic surveys.

  2. Contactless Acoustic Manipulation and Sorting of Particles by Dynamic Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Marco Aurelio; Skotis, George D; Ritchie, Scott; Cumming, David R S; Riehle, Mathis O; Bernassau, Anne L

    2016-09-12

    This paper presents a contactless, acoustic technique to manipulate and sort particles of varying size in both liquid and air media. An acoustic standing wave is generated by the superposition of counter-propagating waves emitted by two opposing emitters. The acoustic radiation force traps the smallest particles at the pressure nodes of the acoustic standing wave. The position of the particles can be manipulated by dynamically changing the phase difference between the two emitters. By applying a dynamic acoustic field (DAF), it is demonstrated that particles can be manipulated spatially and sorted according to size. The discrimination (sorting dynamic range) capability is initially demonstrated in liquid media by separating three different sets of polystyrene particles, ranging in size from 5 to 45 μm in diameter. The separation between particles was performed up to a ratio of 5/6 in diameter (20 % diameter difference). Finally, the scalability of the DAF method is demonstrated by sorting expanded polystyrene particles of 2 and 5 mm diameter in air.

  3. Discriminant learning analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing; Zhang, Peng; Riedel, Norbert

    2008-12-01

    Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) as a dimension reduction method is widely used in classification such as face recognition. However, it suffers from the small sample size (SSS) problem when data dimensionality is greater than the sample size, as in images where features are high dimensional and correlated. In this paper, we propose to address the SSS problem in the framework of statistical learning theory. We compute linear discriminants by regularized least squares regression, where the singularity problem is resolved. The resulting discriminants are complete in that they include both regular and irregular information. We show that our proposal and its nonlinear extension belong to the same framework where powerful classifiers such as support vector machines are formulated. In addition, our approach allows us to establish an error bound for LDA. Finally, our experiments validate our theoretical analysis results.

  4. Bias, discrimination, and obesity.

    PubMed

    Puhl, R; Brownell, K D

    2001-12-01

    This article reviews information on discriminatory attitudes and behaviors against obese individuals, integrates this to show whether systematic discrimination occurs and why, and discusses needed work in the field. Clear and consistent stigmatization, and in some cases discrimination, can be documented in three important areas of living: employment, education, and health care. Among the findings are that 28% of teachers in one study said that becoming obese is the worst thing that can happen to a person; 24% of nurses said that they are "repulsed" by obese persons; and, controlling for income and grades, parents provide less college support for their overweight than for their thin children. There are also suggestions but not yet documentation of discrimination occurring in adoption proceedings, jury selection, housing, and other areas. Given the vast numbers of people potentially affected, it is important to consider the research-related, educational, and social policy implications of these findings.

  5. Nearfield Acoustical Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Sabih I.

    Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is a method by which a set of acoustic pressure measurements at points located on a specific surface (called a hologram) can be used to image sources on vibrating surfaces on the acoustic field in three-dimensional space. NAH data are processed to take advantage of the evanescent wavefield to image sources that are separated less that one-eighth of a wavelength.

  6. Deep Water Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-28

    Estimates of basin-wide sound speed ( temperature ) fields obtained by the combination of acoustic, altimetry, and other data types with ocean...of acoustic coherence at long ranges in the ocean. Estimates of basin-wide sound speed ( temperature ) fields obtained by the combination of acoustic...index.html Award Number N00014-13-1-0053 LONG-TERM GOALS The ultimate limitations to the performance of long-range sonar are due to ocean sound speed

  7. Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-14

    Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD Tam Nguyen 2531 Jefferson Davis Hwy Arlington, VA 22242 phone: (703) 604-6013 ext 520 fax: (703) 604-6056...email: NguyenTL@navsea.navy.mil Award # N0001499PD30007 LONG-TERM GOALS The goal of the recently completed Acoustic Communications Advanced...Technology Demonstration program (ACOMMS ATD) was to demonstrate long range and moderate data rate underwater acoustic communications between a submarine

  8. Determination of Strength Parameters of Soil Samples Recovered from Eastern Nankai Trough for Seafloor Stability Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, S.; Ogisako, E.; Denda, A.; Mitachi, T.; Hirakawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    In Japan, the interest in methane hydrate is increasing rapidly owing to increasing recognition of its potential as a next-generation energy resource that can replace conventional fossil fuels. To produce methane gas safely and minimize the associated environmental damage, we need to address many wide-ranging environmental issues. One such issue entails assessing seafloor stability during methane gas production. Methane hydrate binds the sand grains that make up the strata under the seafloor. It has been suggested that methane production may lead to seafloor deformation because the strata become unstable following the removal of methane hydrate. The geotechnical properties of ground have significant effects on its deformation behavior, but deep seafloors have not been thoroughly investigated yet. The world's first offshore test gas production from methane hydrate was conducted in the eastern Nankai Trough. We present geotechnical properties of the samples recovered from the gas production site; these properties were determined by means of laboratory tests. Soil index tests, consolidation tests, K0 consolidated undrained triaxial compression/extension tests and direct box shear tests were conducted for obtaining the geotechnical parameters necessary for deep seafloor stability analysis. The strength parameters corresponding to peak and residual states were determined by the reversal direct box shear tests. This study is supported by the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan. We wish to express our appreciation to the MH21 Research Consortium and Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation for their permission to use the laboratory test data.

  9. Sub-seafloor bacterial community structures within massive sulfide deposits at the Southern Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, A.; Kato, S.; Moriya, O.; Urabe, T.

    2012-12-01

    Yet-uncharacterized sub-seafloor bacterial communities within massive sulfide deposits important for ocean elemental flux were investigated by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Shallow sub-seafloor drilling was performed in a deep-sea hydrothermal field (called Pika site) of the Southern Mariana Trough (SMT). The borehole length was 4.252 m and the length of the core sample obtained was 2,920 mm (¬68.7% recovery). The core sample mainly consisted of pyrite (FeS2), sphalerite (ZnS) and chalcopyrite (CuFeS2), and contained barite (BaSO4) as minor components. Three subsamples (upper, middle and lower) of the core sample were picked up from different depth points (0.77, 1.14, 2.37 mbsf). Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis was performed for the three subsamples. The community structures based on the detected clones were clearly different from one another. The dominant clone detected in each subsample was related to Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Ignavibacteria, or Nitrospirae, respectively. Many clones detected from the sub-seafloor massive sulfide deposits were similar to those from sulfide chimneys of inactive vents or basaltic lavas on the seafloor including SMT and other areas. Comparative analysis revealed the commonality and difference of the community structures with those in surrounding seafloor environments depending on the sampling depth.

  10. Near seafloor bioluminescence, macrozooplankton and macroparticles at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Jessica; Youngbluth, Marsh; Jamieson, Alan J.; Priede, Imants G.

    2015-04-01

    The benthic boundary layer is a region often perceived to be high in faunal abundance and biomass. In this study, we investigated the distribution of near seafloor bioluminescent zooplankton (BL), macrozooplankton (>1 cm) and macroparticles (>430 μm) at the Northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge at ca. 2500 m depth. At sites south of 52°N, the Charlie Gibbs Fracture Zone, BL density increased weakly towards the seafloor. This trend was driven by small bioluminescent crustaceans, comprising ca. 90% of the total BL density. Macroparticle density was coherent with BL density, exhibiting a small increase towards the seafloor. Appendicularians (animals as well as occupied and discarded houses) were the most abundant macrozooplankton, and the only group to show a significant increase in density towards the seafloor. The absence of pronounced increases in BL and macroparticle density, and no increase in macrozooplankton (except appendicularians), towards the seafloor do not support the conventional view of high concentrations of particulate organic matter and zooplankton biomass in the benthic boundary layer relative to overlying waters.

  11. Sensitivity of seafloor bathymetry to climate-driven fluctuations in mid-ocean ridge magma supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olive, Jean-Arthur; Behn, Mark; Ito, Garrett; Escartin, Javier; Buck, Roger; Howell, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    Abyssal hills are the most common topographic feature on the surface of the solid Earth, yet the detailed mechanisms through which they are formed remain a matter of debate. Classical seafloor observations suggest hills acquire their shape at mid-ocean ridges through a combination of normal faulting and volcanic accretion. However, recent studies have proposed that the fabric of the seafloor reflects rapid fluctuations in ridge magma supply caused by oscillations in sea level modulating the partial melting process beneath the ridge [Crowley et al., 2015, Science]. In order to move this debate forward, we propose a modeling framework relating the magma supply of a mid-ocean ridge to the morphology of the seafloor it produces, i.e., the spacing and amplitude of abyssal hills. We specifically assess whether fluctuations in melt supply of a given periodicity can be recorded in seafloor bathymetry through (1) static compensation of crustal thickness oscillations, (2) volcanic extrusion, and (3) fault growth modulated by dike injection. We find that topography-building processes are generally insensitive to fluctuations in melt supply on time scales shorter than ~50-100 kyr. Further, we show that the characteristic wavelengths found in seafloor bathymetry across all spreading rates are best explained by simple tectono-magmatic interaction models, and require no periodic (climatic) forcing. Finally, we explore different spreading regimes where a smaller amplitude sea-level signal super-imposed on the dominant faulting signal could be most easily resolved.

  12. Joint inversion for transmitter navigation and seafloor resistivity for frequency-domain marine CSEM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Li, Yuguo

    2017-01-01

    We present a joint inversion method for the transmitter navigation and the seafloor resistivity for frequency domain marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data. The inversion approach is based on the modified BFGS scheme, which has an advantage that one can update the Hessian matrix by using the BFGS scheme rather than computing the Hessian matrix itself during the inversion process. The partial derivatives of the electromagnetic field responses with respect to both the seafloor resistivity and the transmitter navigation parameters including the azimuth, dip and horizontal positions of the transmitter antenna are analytically calculated. We invert for both the navigation parameters of the towed dipole source (including antenna azimuth, dip, and horizontal positions) and seafloor resistivity by using the whole range of data instead of the near-field data (usually source-receiver offset <1 km). An eigenparameter analysis shows that seafloor resistivities and transmitter navigation parameters can be independently resolved, and a better reconstruction can be obtained with multiple frequency data. The inversions of both the synthetical and field data sets indicate that our inversion method can simultaneously reconstruct seafloor resistivity structures and transmitter navigation parameters.

  13. Seafloor environments in Cape Cod Bay, a large coastal embayment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, H. J.; Rendigs, R. R.; List, J.H.; Signell, R.P.

    1996-01-01

    Cape Cod Bay is a glacial, semi-enclosed embayment that has a patchy distribution of modern seafloor sedimentary environments of erosion or nondeposition, deposition, and sediment reworking. Sidescan-sonar records and supplemental bathymetric, sedimentary, subbottom, and physical- oceanographic data indicate that the characteristics and distribution of these three categories of bottom environments are controlled by a combination of geologic and oceanographic processes that range from episodic to long-term and from regional to local. (1) Environments of erosion or nondeposition comprise exposares of bedrock, glacial drift, and coarse lag deposits that contain sediments (where present) ranging from boulder fields to gravelly coarse-to-medium sands. These environments are dominant on the shallow margins of the bay (water depths <30 m) where they reflect sediment resuspension, winnowing, and transport during modern northerly storms. (2) Environments of deposition are blanketed by fine-grained sediments ranging from muds to muddy fine sands. These environments are dominant across the floor of the central basin (water depths= 30-60 m) where fine- grained sediments (derived from regional and local sources and emplaced primarily during episodic wind- and density-driven flow) settle through the water column and accumulate under weak bottom currents during nonstorm conditions. (3) Environments of sediment reworking contain patches with diverse textures ranging from gravelly sands to muds. These environments occupy much of the transitional slopes between the margins and the basin floor and reflect a combination of erosion and deposition. The patchy distribution of sedimentary environments within the bay reflects not only regional changes in processes between the margins and the basin but local changes within each part of the bay as well. Small-scale patchiness is caused by local changes in the strengths of wave- and wind-driven currents and (on the margins) by local

  14. Measuring fluid flow and heat output in seafloor hydrothermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, Leonid N.; Hurt, Robert S.; Smith, Joshua E.; Genc, Gence; Lowell, Robert P.

    2015-12-01

    We review techniques for measuring fluid flow and advective heat output from seafloor hydrothermal systems and describe new anemometer and turbine flowmeter devices we have designed, built, calibrated, and tested. These devices allow measuring fluid velocity at high- and low-temperature focused and diffuse discharge sites at oceanic spreading centers. The devices perform at ocean floor depths and black smoker temperatures and can be used to measure flow rates ranging over 2 orders of magnitude. Flow velocity is determined from the rotation rate of the rotor blades or paddle assembly. These devices have an open bearing design that eliminates clogging by particles or chemical precipitates as the fluid passes by the rotors. The devices are compact and lightweight enough for deployment from either an occupied or remotely operated submersible. The measured flow rates can be used in conjunction with vent temperature or geochemical measurements to obtain heat outputs or geochemical fluxes from both vent chimneys and diffuse flow regions. The devices have been tested on 30 Alvin dives on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and 3 Jason dives on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). We measured an anomalously low entrainment coefficient (0.064) and report 104 new measurements over a wide range of discharge temperatures (5°-363°C), velocities (2-199 cm/s), and depths (1517-2511 m). These include the first advective heat output measurements at the High Rise vent field and the first direct fluid flow measurement at Middle Valley. Our data suggest that black smoker heat output at the Main Endeavour vent field may have declined since 1994 and that after the 2005-2006 eruption, the high-temperature advective flow at the EPR 9°50'N field may have become more channelized, predominately discharging through the Bio 9 structure. We also report 16 measurements on 10 Alvin dives and 2 Jason dives with flow meters that predate devices described in this work and were used in the process of their development

  15. ECORD-IODP new opportunities in sub-seafloor investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camoin, G.; Mevel, C.; Gatliff, R.; McInroy, D.

    2012-04-01

    Scientific ocean drilling has traditionally been conducted within a framework of international programmes. The current phase, IODP (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program), started in 2004. As opposed to its predecessors, IODP has a multiplatform approach allowing to encompass most oceanic environments and therefore expands the scientific opportunities. USA operates the non-riser vessel JOIDES Resolution. Japan operates the Chikyu, a vessel specially built for scientific purposes and equipped with a riser system that allows drilling in unstable formation and down to ~6 km beneath the seafloor. The creation of ECORD (European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling), consortium of 16 (now 17) European countries and Canada that joined IODP as a single member, made possible the development of the concept of Mission Specific Platforms (MSPs). MSPs are platforms of opportunity contracted on a case by case basis that have allowed scientific ocean drilling to recover cores from ice-covered and shallow water targets that are generally inaccessible to the two dedicated IODP platforms. The current phase of IODP is ending in September 2013 and the new phase of ocean drilling is being prepared. A new science plan, elaborated by the international science community, was released in June 2011: http://www.iodp.org/Science-Plan-for-2013-2023/. The three current major players (USA, Japan and ECORD) are willing to participate in the next phase and continue providing access to all three platforms, although final funding decisions are still pending at the national level. The new organizational framework for scientific ocean drilling will be streamlined for a more efficient proposal review system and a better use of resources. An international evaluation for drilling proposals will be maintained, but the platforms will be operated independently by the country/consortia providing them. At the ECORD level, the new organisation may secure more funding for MSP operations and the goal is to

  16. Preliminary Seafloor Controlled Source EM Results From APPLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, J. P.; MacGregor, L.; Constable, S.; Everett, M.

    2001-12-01

    Certain events in the life cycle of oceanic lithosphere are dominantly two-dimensional. These include formation of crust at axial spreading centers and deformation at the lithosphere - asthenosphere boundary. These processes may result in an electrically anisotropic oceanic lithosphere by creating conductive pathways in preferred orientations. Controlled Source Electromagnetic (CSEM) soundings and Magnetotelluric (MT) soundings were made during the Anisotropy and Physics of the Pacific Lithosphere Experiment (APPLE), carried out in February/March 2001 approximately 600 km west of San Diego, California. Twenty seafloor electromagnetic field sensors were deployed: 4 long-wire CSEM recorders with 200 m electrode offsets, 6 high-frequency MT/CSEM recorders with two orthogonal 10 m offset electrodes and two orthogonal induction coil magnetometers, and 10 low-frequency MT recorders with a three-component fluxgate magnetometer and two orthogonal 10 m electric dipoles, 5 of which also recorded CSEM data. Every instrument was recovered, with data, during this primary cruise and a follow-up recovery cruise for the long-period instruments in August 2001. The deep-towed EM transmitter (DASI) was a 100 m horizontal electric dipole, which was towed in a 30 km radius circle around a central core of recorders. A radial tow was also performed. DASI transmitted a 4 Hz square wave throughout the CSEM phase of the experiment. Initial processing of the CSEM data reveals evidence of crustal anisotropy. In particular, transmitted electromagnetic energy is attenuated more strongly when propagating from west to east than from north to south. The difference in attenuation is about a factor of two, at a range of 30 km and a frequency of 4Hz. This confirms earlier results from the PEGASUS experiment, which proposed that oceanic lower crust and upper mantle with east-west trending lineaments of increased conductivity will exhibit greater attenuation of electric fields in the east

  17. Seafloor magnetotelluric soundings in the Mariana Island Arc area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filloux, J. H.

    Two seafloor magnetotelluric soundings have been performed in the Mariana Island arc and subduction area, the first (station 1) in the Mariana Trough near International Phase of Oceanic Drilling (IPOD) hole 454 (position 18° 01'N, 144° 32'E, depth 3770 m), the second (station 2) in the fore arc basin near IPOD hole 458 (position 18° 06'N, 146° 45'E, depth 3602 m). The electrical conductivity beneath the postulated spreading zone of the Mariana Trough appears to be unexpectedly low in the upper 40 km, increasing slowly and monotonically downward, to 1 S m-1 at 700 km. It does not display any significant feature such as lithosphere-asthenosphere or phase transition boundaries. The character of this profile differs considerably from those obtained near the Pacific Rise, suggesting deep as well as shallow structures, generally cooler, and implying less active magmatic processes. Cooler structures may in turn contribute in part to the greater depth versus age of the Mariana Trough compared to that of the main oceanic basins. No indication of the existence of extensive magma concentration of the kind detected on the Pacific Rise at 21°N is recognizable in the magnetic data. This fact, however, may simply result from the distance between station 1 and the spreading axis (˜30 km). A cautious speculation on the cause of the implied overall low conductivity values is presented. The MT sounding from the fore arc basin points to (1) very high conductance in the upper zone (0-10 km), accountable for by the sediment blanket, (2) moderate to high conductance in the fore arc upper mantle wedge below, possibly indicative of a moderately high temperature (composition and hydration by water subducted with sediments may also play a role, (3) a large cross section (300-400 km) of unusually little conducting materials, believed to represent the sinking slab and the cooled down environment adjacent to it, and (4) a 20-fold conductivity increase around 420 km depth, sustained over

  18. Size and Carbon Content of Sub-seafloor Microbial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, S.; Morono, Y.; Littmann, S.; Jørgensen, B. B.; Lomstein, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Into the seafloor, a radical decline in nutrient and energy availability poses strong metabolic demands to any residing life. However, a sedimentary microbial ecosystem seems to maintain itself close to what we understand to be the energetic limit of life. Since a complex sediment matrix is interfering with the analysis of whole cells and sub-cellular compounds such as cell wall and membrane molecules, little is known about the physiological properties of cells in the deep biosphere. Here we focus on the size and carbon content of cells from a 90-m sediment drill core retrieved in October 2013 at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea, in 437 meters water depth. To determine their shape and volume, cells were separated from the sediment matrix by multi-layer density centrifugation and visualized via fluorescence microscopy (FM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED). Total cell-carbon was calculated from amino acid-carbon, which was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography after cells had additionally been purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Cell-carbon turnover times were estimated using an amino acid racemization model that is based on the built-in molecular clock of aspartic acid, which due to racemization alternates between the D- and L-isomeric configurations over timescales of thousands of years at low in-situ temperatures (≈4˚C). We find that the majority of microbial cells in the sediment have coccoid or rod-shaped morphology, and that absolute values for cell volume are strongly dependent on the method used, spanning three orders of magnitude from approximately 0.001 to 1 µm3 for both coccoid and rod-shaped cells. From the surface to the deepest sample measured (≈60 mbsf), cell volume decreases by an order of magnitude, and carbon content is in the lower range (<20 fg C cell-1) of what has been reported in the literature as conversion factors. Cell-carbon is turned over approximately

  19. Mobile/Real-Time Seafloor Seismic Observation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, H.; Kawaguchi, K.; Mikada, H.; Suyehiro, K.

    2001-12-01

    Since 1997, Japan Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC) started a project to develop submarine cable systems for building a series of geophysical observation network at active seismogenic zones around Japan. These cabled systems are very powerful tool for real-time and long-term geophysical observation. However, it has weakness in mobility compared to a land or a free-fall, pop-up ocean bottom observation systems. We developed an adaptable observation system with a concept to realize both mobile and real-time observations. This system consists of a Branch Multiplexer (B-MUX), a Joint Multiplexer (J-MUX), a fiber cable, a battery pack and a sensor package. The B-MUX branches the main optical-fiber line and allows to install J-MUX at the end of the branched line. The J-MUX is a hub for adaptable observatories, which can be accept up to 4 satellite stations extending up to 10 km distance away. All this setup can be done using a towed vehicle and ROV. No cable ship is required. First of all, a broadband seismometer (3-component Guralp CMG-1T system) was installed off Kushiro-Tokachi, Hokkaido, at a water depth of 2133 m, in July 2001. Real-time seismic data are being successfully acquired at 100 Hz sampling rate. The system has an advantage which the sensor control signals can be transmitted from the land station and are demultiplexed and distributed by the telemetry unit to the each interface through the B-MUX. The battery pack can operate the sensor system for 7.5 months. Several large teleseismic earthquake (M > 6.5) were recorded with high S/N. The prominent microseism peak at 0.2 Hz divides into long- and short-period quiet bands. The longer period band between 0.03 and 0.1 Hz provides a low-noise window for the detection of long-period body waves and higher mode Rayleigh waves propagated from the teleseismic earthquakes. Our mobile observation system provides an opportunity to extend existing seafloor observation network, and that any geo

  20. Scaling and dimensional analysis of acoustic streaming jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moudjed, B.; Botton, V.; Henry, D.; Ben Hadid, H.; Garandet, J.-P.

    2014-09-01

    This paper focuses on acoustic streaming free jets. This is to say that progressive acoustic waves are used to generate a steady flow far from any wall. The derivation of the governing equations under the form of a nonlinear hydrodynamics problem coupled with an acoustic propagation problem is made on the basis of a time scale discrimination approach. This approach is preferred to the usually invoked amplitude perturbations expansion since it is consistent with experimental observations of acoustic streaming flows featuring hydrodynamic nonlinearities and turbulence. Experimental results obtained with a plane transducer in water are also presented together with a review of the former experimental investigations using similar configurations. A comparison of the shape of the acoustic field with the shape of the velocity field shows that diffraction is a key ingredient in the problem though it is rarely accounted for in the literature. A scaling analysis is made and leads to two scaling laws for the typical velocity level in acoustic streaming free jets; these are both observed in our setup and in former studies by other teams. We also perform a dimensional analysis of this problem: a set of seven dimensionless groups is required to describe a typical acoustic experiment. We find that a full similarity is usually not possible between two acoustic streaming experiments featuring different fluids. We then choose to relax the similarity with respect to sound attenuation and to focus on the case of a scaled water experiment representing an acoustic streaming application in liquid metals, in particular, in liquid silicon and in liquid sodium. We show that small acoustic powers can yield relatively high Reynolds numbers and velocity levels; this could be a virtue for heat and mass transfer applications, but a drawback for ultrasonic velocimetry.

  1. Scaling and dimensional analysis of acoustic streaming jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moudjed, B.; Botton, V.; Henry, D.; Ben Hadid, H.

    2014-09-15

    This paper focuses on acoustic streaming free jets. This is to say that progressive acoustic waves are used to generate a steady flow far from any wall. The derivation of the governing equations under the form of a nonlinear hydrodynamics problem coupled with an acoustic propagation problem is made on the basis of a time scale discrimination approach. This approach is preferred to the usually invoked amplitude perturbations expansion since it is consistent with experimental observations of acoustic streaming flows featuring hydrodynamic nonlinearities and turbulence. Experimental results obtained with a plane transducer in water are also presented together with a review of the former experimental investigations using similar configurations. A comparison of the shape of the acoustic field with the shape of the velocity field shows that diffraction is a key ingredient in the problem though it is rarely accounted for in the literature. A scaling analysis is made and leads to two scaling laws for the typical velocity level in acoustic streaming free jets; these are both observed in our setup and in former studies by other teams. We also perform a dimensional analysis of this problem: a set of seven dimensionless groups is required to describe a typical acoustic experiment. We find that a full similarity is usually not possible between two acoustic streaming experiments featuring different fluids. We then choose to relax the similarity with respect to sound attenuation and to focus on the case of a scaled water experiment representing an acoustic streaming application in liquid metals, in particular, in liquid silicon and in liquid sodium. We show that small acoustic powers can yield relatively high Reynolds numbers and velocity levels; this could be a virtue for heat and mass transfer applications, but a drawback for ultrasonic velocimetry.

  2. Optical fiber phase discriminator.

    PubMed

    Danielson, B L

    1978-11-15

    Phase discriminators are devices widely used at rf and microwave frequencies to convert phase, or frequency, changes to amplitude changes. They find widespread use in generating audio feedback signals for frequency stabilization of oscillators and in angle demodulation applications. This paper demonstrates that similar devices, with similar functions, can be constructed in the visible region using optical fibers as delay-line elements. The operating principles of an optical-fiber delay-line phase discriminator are discussed. The sensitivity is shown to be proportional to the fiber propagation-delay time. A device working at 0.6328 microm is described and compared with predictions.

  3. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  4. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-07

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  5. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  6. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  7. Acoustic NLOS Identification Using Acoustic Channel Characteristics for Smartphone Indoor Localization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Huang, Danjie; Wang, Xinheng; Schindelhauer, Christian; Wang, Zhi

    2017-03-30

    As the demand for indoor localization is increasing to support our daily life in large and complex indoor environments, sound-based localization technologies have attracted researchers' attention because they have the advantages of being fully compatible with commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) smartphones, they have high positioning accuracy and low-cost infrastructure. However, the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) phenomenon poses a great challenge and has become the technology bottleneck for practical applications of acoustic smartphone indoor localization. Through identifying and discarding the NLOS measurements, the positioning performance can be improved by incorporating only the LOS measurements. In this paper, we focus on identifying NLOS components by characterizing the acoustic channels. Firstly, by analyzing indoor acoustic propagations, the changes of acoustic channel from the line-of-sight (LOS) condition to the NLOS condition are characterized as the difference of channel gain and channel delay between the two propagation scenarios. Then, an efficient approach to estimate relative channel gain and delay based on the cross-correlation method is proposed, which considers the mitigation of the Doppler Effect and reduction of the computational complexity. Nine novel features have been extracted, and a support vector machine (SVM) classifier with a radial-based function (RBF) kernel is used to realize NLOS identification. The experimental result with an overall 98.9% classification accuracy based on a data set with more than 10 thousand measurements shows that the proposed identification approach and features are effective in acoustic NLOS identification for acoustic indoor localization via a smartphone. In order to further evaluate the performance of the proposed SVM classifier, the performance of an SVM classifier is compared with that of traditional classifiers based on logistic regression (LR) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). The results also show that a

  8. Sensitivity of seafloor bathymetry to climate-driven fluctuations in mid-ocean ridge magma supply.

    PubMed

    Olive, J-A; Behn, M D; Ito, G; Buck, W R; Escartín, J; Howell, S

    2015-10-16

    Recent studies have proposed that the bathymetric fabric of the seafloor formed at mid-ocean ridges records rapid (23,000 to 100,000 years) fluctuations in ridge magma supply caused by sealevel changes that modulate melt production in the underlying mantle. Using quantitative models of faulting and magma emplacement, we demonstrate that, in fact, seafloor-shaping processes act as a low-pass filter on variations in magma supply, strongly damping fluctuations shorter than about 100,000 years. We show that the systematic decrease in dominant seafloor wavelengths with increasing spreading rate is best explained by a model of fault growth and abandonment under a steady magma input. This provides a robust framework for deciphering the footprint of mantle melting in the fabric of abyssal hills, the most common topographic feature on Earth.

  9. Sensitivity of seafloor bathymetry to climate-driven fluctuations in mid-ocean ridge magma supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olive, J.-A.; Behn, M. D.; Ito, G.; Buck, W. R.; Escartín, J.; Howell, S.

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have proposed that the bathymetric fabric of the seafloor formed at mid-ocean ridges records rapid (23,000 to 100,000 years) fluctuations in ridge magma supply caused by sealevel changes that modulate melt production in the underlying mantle. Using quantitative models of faulting and magma emplacement, we demonstrate that, in fact, seafloor-shaping processes act as a low-pass filter on variations in magma supply, strongly damping fluctuations shorter than about 100,000 years. We show that the systematic decrease in dominant seafloor wavelengths with increasing spreading rate is best explained by a model of fault growth and abandonment under a steady magma input. This provides a robust framework for deciphering the footprint of mantle melting in the fabric of abyssal hills, the most common topographic feature on Earth.

  10. Education and Gender Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumi, V. S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the status of women education in present education system and some measures to overcome the lags existing. Discrimination against girls and women in the developing world is a devastating reality. It results in millions of individual tragedies, which add up to lost potential for entire countries. Gender bias in education is an…

  11. Analytic boosted boson discrimination

    DOE PAGES

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2016-05-20

    Observables which discriminate boosted topologies from massive QCD jets are of great importance for the success of the jet substructure program at the Large Hadron Collider. Such observables, while both widely and successfully used, have been studied almost exclusively with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present the first all-orders factorization theorem for a two-prong discriminant based on a jet shape variable, D2, valid for both signal and background jets. Our factorization theorem simultaneously describes the production of both collinear and soft subjets, and we introduce a novel zero-bin procedure to correctly describe the transition region between these limits.more » By proving an all orders factorization theorem, we enable a systematically improvable description, and allow for precision comparisons between data, Monte Carlo, and first principles QCD calculations for jet substructure observables. Using our factorization theorem, we present numerical results for the discrimination of a boosted Z boson from massive QCD background jets. We compare our results with Monte Carlo predictions which allows for a detailed understanding of the extent to which these generators accurately describe the formation of two-prong QCD jets, and informs their usage in substructure analyses. In conclusion, our calculation also provides considerable insight into the discrimination power and calculability of jet substructure observables in general.« less

  12. Analytic boosted boson discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2016-05-20

    Observables which discriminate boosted topologies from massive QCD jets are of great importance for the success of the jet substructure program at the Large Hadron Collider. Such observables, while both widely and successfully used, have been studied almost exclusively with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present the first all-orders factorization theorem for a two-prong discriminant based on a jet shape variable, D2, valid for both signal and background jets. Our factorization theorem simultaneously describes the production of both collinear and soft subjets, and we introduce a novel zero-bin procedure to correctly describe the transition region between these limits. By proving an all orders factorization theorem, we enable a systematically improvable description, and allow for precision comparisons between data, Monte Carlo, and first principles QCD calculations for jet substructure observables. Using our factorization theorem, we present numerical results for the discrimination of a boosted Z boson from massive QCD background jets. We compare our results with Monte Carlo predictions which allows for a detailed understanding of the extent to which these generators accurately describe the formation of two-prong QCD jets, and informs their usage in substructure analyses. In conclusion, our calculation also provides considerable insight into the discrimination power and calculability of jet substructure observables in general.

  13. Airborne particulate discriminator

    DOEpatents

    Creek, Kathryn Louise; Castro, Alonso; Gray, Perry Clayton

    2009-08-11

    A method and apparatus for rapid and accurate detection and discrimination of biological, radiological, and chemical particles in air. A suspect aerosol of the target particulates is treated with a taggant aerosol of ultrafine particulates. Coagulation of the taggant and target particles causes a change in fluorescent properties of the cloud, providing an indication of the presence of the target.

  14. Discrimination Learning in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochocki, Thomas E.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Examined the learning performance of 192 fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-grade children on either a two or four choice simultaneous color discrimination task. Compared the use of verbal reinforcement and/or punishment, under conditions of either complete or incomplete instructions. (Author/SDH)

  15. RISE TIME DELAY DISCRIMINATOR

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1959-09-29

    A pulse-height discriminator for generating an output pulse when the accepted input pulse is approximately at its maximum value is described. A gating tube and a negative bias generator responsive to the derivative of the input pulse and means for impressing the output of the bias generator to at least one control electrode of the gating tube are included.

  16. Aptitude Tests and Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coupland, D. E.

    1970-01-01

    Explains why in the United States the feeling is increasing that much of the aptitude testing now being done discriminates against minority group members seeking employment. Skeptical of eliminating the discriminatory aspects of testing, the article raises the question of eliminating testing itself. (DM)

  17. Sex Discrimination in Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessem, Lawrence

    1980-01-01

    Even in situations in which the underpayment of girls' coaches is due to the sex of the students coached rather than to the sex of the coaches, the coaches and the girls coached are victims of unlawful discrimination. Available from Harvard Women's Law Journal, Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA 02138. (Author/IRT)

  18. Color measurement and discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Theories of color measurement attempt to provide a quantative means for predicting whether two lights will be discriminable to an average observer. All color measurement theories can be characterized as follows: suppose lights a and b evoke responses from three color channels characterized as vectors, v(a) and v(b); the vector difference v(a) - v(b) corresponds to a set of channel responses that would be generated by some real light, call it *. According to theory a and b will be discriminable when * is detectable. A detailed development and test of the classic color measurement approach are reported. In the absence of a luminance component in the test stimuli, a and b, the theory holds well. In the presence of a luminance component, the theory is clearly false. When a luminance component is present discrimination judgements depend largely on whether the lights being discriminated fall in separate, categorical regions of color space. The results suggest that sensory estimation of surface color uses different methods, and the choice of method depends upon properties of the image. When there is significant luminance variation a categorical method is used, while in the absence of significant luminance variation judgments are continuous and consistant with the measurement approach.

  19. Discrimination. Opposing Viewpoints Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Mary E., Ed.

    Books in the Opposing Viewpoints series challenge readers to question their own opinions and assumptions. By reading carefully balanced views, readers confront new ideas on the topic of interest. The Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibited job discrimination based on age, race, religion, gender, or national origin, provided the groundwork for…

  20. Past and present seafloor age distributions and the temporal evolution of plate tectonic heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. W.; Conrad, C. P.; Buffett, B.; Muller, D.; Loyd, S.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.; Corsetti, F.

    2008-12-01

    Variations in the rates of seafloor generation and recycling have potentially far-reaching consequences for sea level, ocean chemistry and climate. A parameterized framework to describe such variations could guide the study of non-uniformitarian plate tectonic activity, but there is little agreement on the appropriate mechanical description of the surface boundary layer. A strong constraint on the statistics of oceanic convection systems comes from the preserved seafloor age distribution, and additional inferences are possible when paleo-seafloor is modeled based on plate motion reconstructions. Based on previously reconstructed seafloor ages, we recently inferred that oceanic heat flow was larger by ~15% at 60~Ma than today. This signal is mainly caused by the smaller plates that existed previously in the Pacific basin with relatively larger ridge-proximal area of young seafloor. The associated decrease in heat flow is larger than any plausible decrease due to cooling, and therefore hint at cyclic behavior in plate tectonics. We also consider area-per-age statistics for the present-day and back to 140~Ma from new paleo-age reconstructions. Using a simplified seafloor age evolution model we explore which physical parameterizations for the average behavior of the oceanic lithosphere are compatible with broad trends in the data. In particular, we show that a subduction probability based on lithospheric buoyancy ("sqrt(age)") leads to results that are comparable to, or better than, that of the probability distribution that is required to obtain the "triangular" age distribution with age-independent destruction of ocean floor. The current, near triangular distribution of ages and the relative lull in heat flow are likely only snapshots of a transient state during the Wilson cycle. Current seafloor ages still contain hints of a ≤sssim 60~Myr period, cyclic variation of seafloor production, and using paleo-ages for 140~Ma, we find a ~ 400~Myr best-fitting variation

  1. Stable isotopes in seafloor hydrothermal systems: Vent fluids, hydrothermal deposits, hydrothermal alteration, and microbial processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanks, Wayne C.

    2001-01-01

    The recognition of abundant and widespread hydrothermal activity and associated unique life-forms on the ocean floor is one of the great scientific discoveries of the latter half of the twentieth century. Studies of seafloor hydrothermal processes have led to revolutions in understanding fluid convection and the cooling of the ocean crust, the chemical and isotopic mass balance of the oceans, the origin of stratiform and statabound massive-sulfide ore-deposits, the origin of greenstones and serpentinites, and the potential importance of the subseafloor biosphere. Stable isotope geochemistry has been a critical and definitive tool from the very beginning of the modern era of seafloor exploration.

  2. Engineering concepts for the placement of wastes on the abyssal seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valent, Philip J.; Palowitch, Andrew W.; Young, David K.

    1998-05-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), with industry and academic participation, has completed a study of the concept of isolating industrial wastes (i.e., sewage sludge, fly ash from municipal incinerators, and dredged material) on the abyssal seafloor. This paper presents results of the technical and economic assessment of this waste management concept. The results of the environmental impacts portion of the study are presented in a companion paper. The technical assessment began with identification of 128 patents addressing waste disposal in the ocean. From these 128 patents, five methods for transporting wastes through the water column and emplacing wastes within an easily monitored area on the abyssal seafloor were synthesized for technical assessment. In one method waste is lowered to the seafloor in a bucket of 190 m 3. In a second method waste is pumped down to the seafloor in pipes, 1.37 m in diameter and 6100 m in length. In a third method waste is free-fallen from the ocean surface in 380-m 3 geosynthetic fabric containers (GFCs). In the fourth and fifth methods, waste is carried to near the seafloor in GFCs transported in (a) a 20,000 metric ton displacement (loaded), unpowered, unmanned submersible glider, or (b) a 2085 metric ton displacement (loaded) disk-shaped transporter traversing to and from the seafloor much like an untethered elevator. In the last two methods the transporter releases the GFCs to free-fall the last few hundred meters to the seafloor. Two reliability analyses, a Fault Tree Analysis (FTA), and a Failure Modes, Effects, and Criticality Analysis (FMECA), showed that the free-fall GFC method posed the least overall relative risk, provided that fabric container and transporter designs eliminate the potential for tearing of the containers on release from the surface transporter. Of the five methods, the three GFC methods were shown to offer cost-effective waste management options when compared with present-day waste management

  3. The Acoustical Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melissa

    Asserting that without an adequate acoustical environment, learning activities can be hindered, this paper reviews the literature on classroom acoustics, particularly noise, reverberation, signal-to-noise ratio, task performance, and recommendations for improvement. Through this review, the paper seeks to determine whether portable classrooms…

  4. Cystic acoustic schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, P; Missori, P; Mastronardi, L; Fortuna, A

    1991-01-01

    Three cases with large space-occupying cysts in the cerebellopontine angle are reported. CT and MRI findings were not typical for acoustic schwannomas but at operation, besides the large cysts, small acoustic schwannomas could be detected and removed. The clinical and neuroradiological features of this unusual variety and the CT and MRI differential diagnosis of cerebellopontine angle lesions are discussed.

  5. Real-time visual mosaicking and navigation on the seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Kristof

    Remote robotic exploration holds vast potential for gaining knowledge about extreme environments accessible to humans only with great difficulty. Robotic explorers have been sent to other solar system bodies, and on this planet into inaccessible areas such as caves and volcanoes. In fact, the largest unexplored land area on earth lies hidden in the airless cold and intense pressure of the ocean depths. Exploration in the oceans is further hindered by water's high absorption of electromagnetic radiation, which both inhibits remote sensing from the surface, and limits communications with the bottom. The Earth's oceans thus provide an attractive target for developing remote exploration capabilities. As a result, numerous robotic vehicles now routinely survey this environment, from remotely operated vehicles piloted over tethers from the surface to torpedo-shaped autonomous underwater vehicles surveying the mid-waters. However, these vehicles are limited in their ability to navigate relative to their environment. This limits their ability to return to sites with precision without the use of external navigation aids, and to maneuver near and interact with objects autonomously in the water and on the sea floor. The enabling of environment-relative positioning on fully autonomous underwater vehicles will greatly extend their power and utility for remote exploration in the furthest reaches of the Earth's waters---even under ice and under ground---and eventually in extraterrestrial liquid environments such as Europa's oceans. This thesis presents an operational, fielded system for visual navigation of underwater robotic vehicles in unexplored areas of the seafloor. The system does not depend on external sensing systems, using only instruments on board the vehicle. As an area is explored, a camera is used to capture images and a composite view, or visual mosaic, of the ocean bottom is created in real time. Side-to-side visual registration of images is combined with dead

  6. Selenium Isotopes as Biosignatures in Seafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouxel, O.; Ludden, J.; Fouquet, Y.

    2001-12-01

    Chemically similar to sulphur, Se occurs as +6, +4, 0 and -2 valences in a variety of organic compounds and geological settings. This makes the study of Se stable isotope ratios a potential indicator of geological and biological processes. Se isotopes were first determined in the early 60's (Krouse and Thode, 1962; Rashid et al., 1978) using gas-source MS and recently by N-TIMS (Herbel et al., 2000; Johnson et al., 1999) using the double spike technique. The previous results showed that the 82Se/76Se ratio vary by as much as 15‰ and indicate that abiotic and bacterial reduction of soluble oxyanions is the dominant cause of Se isotope fractionation. Our isotopic analyses of Se were performed using a continuous flow hydride generation system coupled to a Micromass MC-ICP-MS after chemical purification. The estimated external precision of the 82Se/76Se isotope ratio is 0.25‰ (2σ ) for a quantity of Se per analysis as low as 50 ng and the data are reported relative to our internal standards (MERCK elemental standard solution). In this study we have used Se isotopes in conjunction with S isotopes to provide additional constraints on the fractionation processes in seafloor hydrothermal systems. Several fields were studied along the Mid Atlantic Ridge and include the Lucky Strike field where the setting is in a caldera system with abundant low-permeability layers of cemented breccia which result in fluid cooling and mixing below the hydrothermal vents. Based on vent structures, mineral abundance, and geochemistry, two types of hydrothermal deposits were identified: (1) high-T vents with δ 34S between 1.5 and 4.5‰ and Se values up to 2000 ppm; (2) low-T vents where pyrite and marcasite generally have lower δ 34S values (down to -1.0‰ ) and low concentration of Se (<50ppm). Se-depletion in low temperature hydrothermal deposits is interpreted as a result of subsurface precipitation of sulfides (scavenging Se from the fluid) during the conductive cooling of the

  7. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  8. Acoustic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic levitation system is described, with single acoustic source and a small reflector to stably levitate a small object while the object is processed as by coating or heating it. The system includes a concave acoustic source which has locations on opposite sides of its axis that vibrate towards and away from a focal point to generate a converging acoustic field. A small reflector is located near the focal point, and preferably slightly beyond it, to create an intense acoustic field that stably supports a small object near the reflector. The reflector is located about one-half wavelength from the focal point and is concavely curved to a radius of curvature (L) of about one-half the wavelength, to stably support an object one-quarter wavelength (N) from the reflector.

  9. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  10. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  11. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  12. Direct Field Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Paul; Goldstein, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the methods and procedures used in Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT). The paper will discuss some of the recent techniques and developments that are currently being used and the future publication of a reference standard. Acoustic testing using commercial sound system components is becoming a popular and cost effective way of generating a required acoustic test environment both in and out of a reverberant chamber. This paper will present the DFAT test method, the usual setup and procedure and the development and use of a closed-loop, narrow-band control system. Narrow-band control of the acoustic PSD allows all standard techniques and procedures currently used in random control to be applied to acoustics and some examples are given. The paper will conclude with a summary of the development of a standard practice guideline that is hoped to be available in the first quarter of next year.

  13. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-03-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  14. The Struggle against Sex Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Jane

    1982-01-01

    Provides overview of laws, policies, and regulations available to women to secure their job rights when faced with sex discrimination. Equal pay, sexual harassment, pregnancy discrimination, and affirmative action are discussed, noting procedures involved in filing a complaint. (EJS)

  15. The Case for Positive Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses both three basic strategies, preferences, allocational priorities, and incentives--and four principles of positive discrimination--compensation and rectification, appropriate meritocratic criteria, the development of the discriminated, and fairness. (JM)

  16. Genetic discrimination in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Miller, P S

    1998-01-01

    Author argues that the Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination against workers based on their genetic makeup. He also examines state legislation and recently proposed federal legislation prohibiting genetic discrimination.

  17. Stimulus Structure, Discrimination, and Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runquist, Willard N.

    1975-01-01

    The general purpose of this experiment was to determine whether differences in stimulus discrimination, as determined by the MIR (missing-item recognition) test, are correlated with interference in recall, as demanded by the discriminative coding hypothesis. (Author/RK)

  18. Seafloor geology of the Monterey Bay area continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eittreim, S.L.; Anima, R.J.; Stevenson, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Acoustic swath-mapping of the greater Monterey Bay area continental shelf from Point An??o Nuevo to Point Sur reveals complex patterns of rock outcrops on the shelf, and coarse-sand bodies that occur in distinct depressions on the inner and mid-shelves. Most of the rock outcrops are erosional cuestas of dipping Tertiary rocks that make up the bedrock of the surrounding lands. A mid-shelf mud belt of Holocene sediment buries the Tertiary rocks in a continuous, 6-km-wide zone on the northern Monterey Bay shelf. Rock exposures occur on the inner shelf, near tectonically uplifting highlands, and on the outer shelf, beyond the reach of the mud depositing on the mid-shelf since the Holocene sea-level rise. The sediment-starved shelf off the Monterey Peninsula and south to Point Sur has a very thin cover of Holocene sediment, and bedrock outcrops occur across the whole shelf, with Salinian granite outcrops surrounding the Monterey Peninsula. Coarse-sand deposits occur both bounded within low-relief rippled scour depressions, and in broad sheets in areas like the Sur Platform where fine sediment sources are limited. The greatest concentrations of coarse-sand deposits occur on the southern Monterey Bay shelf and the Sur shelf. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Development from the seafloor to the sea surface of the cabled NEMO-SN1 observatory in the Western Ionian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparnocchia, Stefania; Beranzoli, Laura; Borghini, Mireno; Durante, Sara; Favali, Paolo; Giovanetti, Gabriele; Italiano, Francesco; Marinaro, Giuditta; Meccia, Virna; Papaleo, Riccardo; Riccobene, Giorgio; Schroeder, Katrin

    2015-04-01

    A prototype of cabled deep-sea observatory has been operating in real-time since 2005 in Southern Italy (East Sicily, 37°30' N - 15°06'E), at 2100 m water depth, 25 km from the harbor of the city of Catania. It is the first-established real-time node of the "European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water column Observatory" (EMSO, http://www.emso-eu.org) a research infrastructure of the Sector Environment of ESFRI. In the present configuration it consists of two components: the multi-parametric station NEMO-SN1 (TSN branch) equipped with geophysical and environmental sensors for measurements at the seafloor, and the NEMO-OνDE station (TSS branch) equipped with 4 wideband hydrophones. A 28 km long electro-optical cable connects the observatory to a shore laboratory in the Catania harbor, hosting the data acquisition system and supplying power and data transmission to the underwater instrumentation. The NEMO-SN1 observatory is located in an area particularly suited to multidisciplinary studies. The site is one of the most seismically active areas of the Mediterranean (some of the strongest earthquakes occurred in 1169, 1693 and 1908, also causing very intense tsunami waves) and is close to Mount Etna, one of the largest and most active volcanoes in Europe. The deployment area is also a key site for monitoring deep-water dynamics in the Ionian Sea, connecting the Levantine basin to the southern Adriatic basin where intermediate and deep waters are formed, and finally to the western Mediterranean Sea via the Strait of Sicily. The observatory is being further developed under EMSO MedIT (http://www.emso-medit.it/en/), a structural enhancement project contributing to the consolidation and enhancement of the European research infrastructure EMSO in Italian Convergence Regions. In this framework, a new Junction Box will be connected to the TSN branch and will provide wired and wireless (acoustic connections) for seafloor platforms and moorings. This will allow the

  20. Calibration techniques and sampling resolution requirements for groundtruthing multibeam acoustic backscatter (EM3000) and QTC VIEW™ classification technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, T. F.; Galloway, J.; Loschiavo, R.; Levings, C. D.; Hare, R.

    2007-12-01

    Both acoustic and sediment surveys were carried out in the Broughton Archipelago, British Columbia, in order to map a former aquaculture site and calibrate acoustic surveys with georeferenced sediment properties. The acoustic surveys included EM3000 Multibeam (including backscatter) and QTC VIEW™ (Series IV) technologies, while the geotechnical survey entailed Van Veen grab sampling of surface sediments and associated analyses. The two acoustic technologies were consistent in their ability to identify distinct regions of seafloor characterized by rock outcrops, consolidated substrates, or gel-mud depositional fields. Both multibeam backscatter data and QTC VIEW™ number-coded classifications were extracted across a range of circular areas located at each georeferenced sampling station (radii: 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 12, 16, 20 m). Statistical correlations were observed between backscatter and certain geotechnical properties, such as sediment porosity, sediment grain size fractions (<2 μm, silt content), and particulate sulfur concentration. The areal resolution of backscatter extraction was explored in terms of determining a sensitive calibration technique between backscatter and sediment properties. In general the highest r2 values between backscatter and sediment variables were observed across extraction radii between 8 and 20 m. Such groundtruthing techniques could be used to interpolate seafloor characteristics between sampling stations and provide a steering tool for sampling designs associated with benthic monitoring programs.

  1. Transgender Discrimination and the Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Richard

    2010-01-01

    An emerging area of law is developing regarding sex/gender identity discrimination, also referred to as transgender discrimination, as distinguished from discrimination based on sexual orientation. A transgendered individual is defined as "a person who has a gender-identity disorder which is a persistent discomfort about one?s assigned sex or…

  2. Price Discrimination: A Classroom Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguiló, Paula; Sard, Maria; Tugores, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a classroom experiment aimed at familiarizing students with different types of price discrimination (first-, second-, and third-degree price discrimination). During the experiment, the students were asked to decide what tariffs to set as monopolists for each of the price discrimination scenarios under…

  3. Price Discrimination: Lessons for Consumers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynes, E. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Explains price and product discrimination, showing how intelligent consumers can achieve increased purchasing power of their income and discusses how consumer educators can explain this discrimination. Evaluates the pros and cons of price/product discrimination from the social viewpoint. (Author/JOW)

  4. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Pete; Finlayson, David; Conrad, Jamie; Cochrane, Guy; Johnson, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    In the summer of 2008, as part of the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP) the U.S. Geological Survey, Coastal and Marine Geology mapped a nearshore region of the northern Santa Barbara Channel in Southern California (fig 1). The CSMP is a cooperative partnership between Federal and State agencies, Universities, and Industry to create a comprehensive coastal/marine geologic and habitat basemap series to support the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) inititive. The program is supported by the California Ocean Protection Council and the California Coastal Conservancy. The 2008 mapping collected high resolution bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data using a bathymetric side scan system within State waters from about the 10-m isobath out over 3-nautical miles. This Open-File Report provides these data in a number of different formats, as well as a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and FGDC metadata.

  5. FET Frequency Discriminator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    conversion . characteristic of the frequency discriminator is significant and :ending upon the specific system - may be the limiting factor in the accu of...the results obtained did not .-" allow for the accurate determinat ion of the change in impedance, addit ional 14 -~ 12V - - Figure 7. Impedance plot...44*. -. 7 ’I -- -..- ,. -, 4., /-.,’ .3 8 V ............... ... .. .$, L- 12v - Figure 9. Impedance plot tor five diodes inl parallel. A circuit was

  6. Symmetry impedes symmetry discrimination.

    PubMed

    Tjan, Bosco S; Liu, Zili

    2005-12-16

    Objects in the world, natural and artificial alike, are often bilaterally symmetric. The visual system is likely to take advantage of this regularity to encode shapes for efficient object recognition. The nature of encoding a symmetric shape, and of encoding any departure from it, is therefore an important matter in visual perception. We addressed this issue of shape encoding empirically, noting that a particular encoding scheme necessarily leads to a specific profile of sensitivity in perceptual discriminations. We studied symmetry discrimination using human faces and random dots. Each face stimulus was a frontal view of a three-dimensional (3-D) face model. The 3-D face model was a linearly weighted average (a morph) between the model of an original face and that of the corresponding mirror face. Using this morphing technique to vary the degree of asymmetry, we found that, for faces and analogously generated random-dot patterns alike, symmetry discrimination was worst when the stimuli were nearly symmetric, in apparent opposition to almost all studies in the literature. We analyzed the previous work and reconciled the old and new results using a generic model with a simple nonlinearity. By defining asymmetry as the minimal difference between the left and right halves of an object, we found that the visual system was disproportionately more sensitive to larger departures from symmetry than to smaller ones. We further demonstrated that our empirical and modeling results were consistent with Weber-Fechner's and Stevens's laws.

  7. Discrimination in lexical decision

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Laurie Beth; Ramscar, Michael; Hendrix, Peter; Baayen, R. Harald

    2017-01-01

    In this study we present a novel set of discrimination-based indicators of language processing derived from Naive Discriminative Learning (ndl) theory. We compare the effectiveness of these new measures with classical lexical-distributional measures—in particular, frequency counts and form similarity measures—to predict lexical decision latencies when a complete morphological segmentation of masked primes is or is not possible. Data derive from a re-analysis of a large subset of decision latencies from the English Lexicon Project, as well as from the results of two new masked priming studies. Results demonstrate the superiority of discrimination-based predictors over lexical-distributional predictors alone, across both the simple and primed lexical decision tasks. Comparable priming after masked corner and cornea type primes, across two experiments, fails to support early obligatory segmentation into morphemes as predicted by the morpho-orthographic account of reading. Results fit well with ndl theory, which, in conformity with Word and Paradigm theory, rejects the morpheme as a relevant unit of analysis. Furthermore, results indicate that readers with greater spelling proficiency and larger vocabularies make better use of orthographic priors and handle lexical competition more efficiently. PMID:28235015

  8. Workplace discrimination and cancer.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Maureen A; Fabian, Ellen; Hurley, Jessica E; McMahon, Brian T; West, Steven L

    2007-01-01

    Data from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) Integrated Mission System database were analyzed with specific reference to allegations of workplace discrimination filed by individuals with cancer under ADA Title One. These 6,832 allegations, filed between July 27, 1992 and September 30, 2003, were compared to 167,798 allegations from a general disability population on the following dimensions: type of workplace discrimination; demographic characteristics of the charging parties (CPs); the industry designation, location, and size of employers; and the outcome or resolution of EEOC investigations. Results showed allegations derived from CPs with cancer were more likely than those in the general disability population to include issues involving discharge, terms and conditions of employment, lay-off, wages, and demotion. Compared to the general disability group, CPs with cancer were more likely to be female, older, and White. Allegations derived from CPs with cancer were also more likely to be filed against smaller employers (15-100 workers) or those in service industries. Finally, the resolution of allegations by CPs with cancer were more likely to be meritorious than those filed from the general disability population; that is, actual discrimination is more likely to have occurred.

  9. [Comment on] Statistical discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, Douglas

    In the December 8, 1981, issue of Eos, a news item reported the conclusion of a National Research Council study that sexual discrimination against women with Ph.D.'s exists in the field of geophysics. Basically, the item reported that even when allowances are made for motherhood the percentage of female Ph.D.'s holding high university and corporate positions is significantly lower than the percentage of male Ph.D.'s holding the same types of positions. The sexual discrimination conclusion, based only on these statistics, assumes that there are no basic psychological differences between men and women that might cause different populations in the employment group studied. Therefore, the reasoning goes, after taking into account possible effects from differences related to anatomy, such as women stopping their careers in order to bear and raise children, the statistical distributions of positions held by male and female Ph.D.'s ought to be very similar to one another. Any significant differences between the distributions must be caused primarily by sexual discrimination.

  10. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  11. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  12. Acoustic sniper localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  13. Auditory discrimination of force of impact

    PubMed Central

    Lutfi, Robert A.; Liu, Ching-Ju; Stoelinga, Christophe N. J.

    2011-01-01

    The auditory discrimination of force of impact was measured for three groups of listeners using sounds synthesized according to first-order equations of motion for the homogenous, isotropic bar [Morse and Ingard (1968). Theoretical Acoustics pp. 175–191]. The three groups were professional percussionists, nonmusicians, and individuals recruited from the general population without regard to musical background. In the two-interval, forced-choice procedure, listeners chose the sound corresponding to the greater force of impact as the length of the bar varied from one presentation to the next. From the equations of motion, a maximum-likelihood test for the task was determined to be of the form Δlog A + αΔ log f > 0, where A and f are the amplitude and frequency of any one partial and α = 0.5. Relative decision weights on Δ log f were obtained from the trial-by-trial responses of listeners and compared to α. Percussionists generally outperformed the other groups; however, the obtained decision weights of all listeners deviated significantly from α and showed variability within groups far in excess of the variability associated with replication. Providing correct feedback after each trial had little effect on the decision weights. The variability in these measures was comparable to that seen in studies involving the auditory discrimination of other source attributes. PMID:21476666

  14. Discriminating Dysarthria Type From Envelope Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the rhythmicity of speech within specified frequency bands. Method EMS was conducted on sentences produced by 43 speakers with 1 of 4 types of dysarthria and healthy controls. The EMS consisted of the spectra of the slow-rate (up to 10 Hz) amplitude modulations of the full signal and 7 octave bands ranging in center frequency from 125 to 8000 Hz. Six variables were calculated for each band relating to peak frequency and amplitude and relative energy above, below, and in the region of 4 Hz. Discriminant function analyses (DFA) determined which sets of predictor variables best discriminated between and among groups. Results Each of 6 DFAs identified 2–6 of the 48 predictor variables. These variables achieved 84%–100% classification accuracy for group membership. Conclusions Dysarthrias can be characterized by quantifiable temporal patterns in acoustic output. Because EMS analysis is automated and requires no editing or linguistic assumptions, it shows promise as a clinical and research tool. PMID:20643800

  15. Auditory discrimination of force of impact.

    PubMed

    Lutfi, Robert A; Liu, Ching-Ju; Stoelinga, Christophe N J

    2011-04-01

    The auditory discrimination of force of impact was measured for three groups of listeners using sounds synthesized according to first-order equations of motion for the homogenous, isotropic bar [Morse and Ingard (1968). Theoretical Acoustics pp. 175-191]. The three groups were professional percussionists, nonmusicians, and individuals recruited from the general population without regard to musical background. In the two-interval, forced-choice procedure, listeners chose the sound corresponding to the greater force of impact as the length of the bar varied from one presentation to the next. From the equations of motion, a maximum-likelihood test for the task was determined to be of the form Δlog A + αΔ log f > 0, where A and f are the amplitude and frequency of any one partial and α = 0.5. Relative decision weights on Δ log f were obtained from the trial-by-trial responses of listeners and compared to α. Percussionists generally outperformed the other groups; however, the obtained decision weights of all listeners deviated significantly from α and showed variability within groups far in excess of the variability associated with replication. Providing correct feedback after each trial had little effect on the decision weights. The variability in these measures was comparable to that seen in studies involving the auditory discrimination of other source attributes.

  16. Geophysical monitoring from seafloor observatories in Italian volcanic sites: Marsili Seamount, Etna Volcano and Stromboli Island.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanetti, Gabriele; Monna, Stephen; Lo Bue, Nadia; Embriaco, Davide; Frugoni, Francesco; Marinaro, Giuditta; De Caro, Mariagrazia; Sgroi, Tiziana; Montuori, Caterina; De Santis, Angelo; Cianchini, Gianfranco; Favali, Paolo; Beranzoli, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Many volcanoes on Earth are located within or near the oceans and observations from the seafloor can be very important for a more complete understanding of the structure and nature of these volcanoes. We present some results obtained from data acquired in volcanic sites in the Central Mediterranean Sea. Data were taken by means of stand-alone free-fall systems, and fixed-point ocean observatories, both cabled and autonomous, some of which are part of the European research infrastructure EMSO (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water-column Observatory, www.emso-eu.org). EMSO observatories strongly rely on a multidisciplinary approach, in spite of the many technical challenges that the operation of very different sensors by means of a single acquisition system presents. We focus on three volcanic sites near the coasts of Italy (Marsili seamount, Stromboli Island and Etna Volcano) involved in subduction processes and to the opening of the Central Mediterranean basin. Through multidisciplinary analysis we were able to associate geophysical and oceanographic signals to a common volcanic source in a more reliable way with respect to single sensor analysis, showing the potential of long-term seafloor monitoring in unravelling otherwise still obscure aspects of such volcanoes. The very strong expansion of seafloor monitoring, which is taking place both in the quantity of the infrastructures and in the technological capabilities, suggests that there will be important developments in the near future.

  17. Continuous Seafloor Gas Hydrate Monitoring on the Ocean Networks Canada NEPTUNE Cabled Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherwath, M.; Heesemann, M.; Moran, K.; Insua, T. L.; Roemer, M.; Riedel, M.; Spence, G.; Thomsen, L.; Purser, A.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term seafloor experiments provide high-resolution data that allow new kinds of observations on the dynamics and variability of gas hydrates. In the north-east Pacific, Canadian as well as US efforts on building cabled seafloor observatories enable the scientific community to study the Cascadia margin gas hydrates at various locations independent of dedicated ship cruises and unstable weather, without power saving restrictions and with near realtime access to the data and the ability to influence the in-situ data acquisition in reaction to events. We show scientific highlights from Barkley Canyon and Clayoquot Slope off Vancouver Island on of the gas hydrate stability and variability on and below the seafloor as well as gas release into the water column, using some standard measurements from core instruments such as temperature, salinity, bottom pressure, currents, as well as sonar, seismometer and camera image data. Correlations of these various data sets shed light on the dependence of the observed gas hydrate dynamics on various environmental factors, some still subject to debate and longer-term monitoring requirements. Global efforts on cabling the seafloor elsewhere are underway and an exciting future on gas hydrate research lies ahead. Ocean Networks Canada invites the research community to participate, propose experiments, download data and collaborate (www.oceannetworks.ca).

  18. Marine litter on the seafloor of the Faial-Pico Passage, Azores Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Yasmina; Pham, Christopher K

    2017-03-15

    Plastic pollution in the marine environment attracts much attention from both researchers and the general public. Plastic items and other debris are commonly observed everywhere in the ocean, from the surface down to the deep ocean floor. In this study, we analysed 45.2km of video footage, collected during 56 transects surveying the seafloor of the Faial-Pico Passage in order to quantify the abundance of marine litter and its interactions with benthic fauna. The footage was collected by a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) and a manned submersible at depths ranging between 40 and 525m. The mean litter density in the passage was 0.26±0.03 items·100m(-1) (±SE) and was significantly higher between 151 and 250m compared to other depth strata. Overall, derelict fishing gear, mostly made of plastic, were the most common objects found on the seafloor, representing 64% of all items. Although we observed few evidence of direct deleterious effects by the litter, interactions with fauna were observed in more than half of the items. This study makes an important contribution in quantifying the abundance of marine litter on the seafloor of the Azores. The location of the Faial-Pico Passage, close to shore, makes it an appropriate site for long-term monitoring of litter on the seafloor and evaluate the efficiency of upcoming public policies aimed at reducing litter input into the oceans.

  19. Dynamics of a seafloor-spreading episode at the East Pacific Rise.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yen Joe; Tolstoy, Maya; Waldhauser, Felix; Wilcock, William S D

    2016-12-08

    Seafloor spreading is largely unobserved because 98 per cent of the global mid-ocean-ridge system is below the ocean surface. Our understanding of the dynamic processes that control seafloor spreading is thus inferred largely from geophysical observations of spreading events on land at Afar in East Africa and Iceland. However, these are slow-spreading centres influenced by mantle plumes. The roles of magma pressure and tectonic stress in the development of seafloor spreading are still unclear. Here we use seismic observations to show that the most recent eruption at the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise just North of the Equator initiated at a melt-rich segment about 5 kilometres long. The change in static stress then promoted almost-concurrent rupturing along at least 35 kilometres of the ridge axis, where tectonic stress had built up to a critical level, triggering magma movement. The location of impulsive seismic events indicative of lava reaching the seafloor suggests that lava subsequently erupted from multiple isolated magma lenses (reservoir chambers) with variable magma ascent rates, mostly within 48 hours. Therefore, even at magmatically robust fast-spreading ridges, a substantial portion of the spreading may be due to tectonic stress building up to a critical level rather than magma overpressure in the underlying magma lenses.

  20. Dynamics of a seafloor-spreading episode at the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yen Joe; Tolstoy, Maya; Waldhauser, Felix; Wilcock, William S. D.

    2016-12-01

    Seafloor spreading is largely unobserved because 98 per cent of the global mid-ocean-ridge system is below the ocean surface. Our understanding of the dynamic processes that control seafloor spreading is thus inferred largely from geophysical observations of spreading events on land at Afar in East Africa and Iceland. However, these are slow-spreading centres influenced by mantle plumes. The roles of magma pressure and tectonic stress in the development of seafloor spreading are still unclear. Here we use seismic observations to show that the most recent eruption at the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise just North of the Equator initiated at a melt-rich segment about 5 kilometres long. The change in static stress then promoted almost-concurrent rupturing along at least 35 kilometres of the ridge axis, where tectonic stress had built up to a critical level, triggering magma movement. The location of impulsive seismic events indicative of lava reaching the seafloor suggests that lava subsequently erupted from multiple isolated magma lenses (reservoir chambers) with variable magma ascent rates, mostly within 48 hours. Therefore, even at magmatically robust fast-spreading ridges, a substantial portion of the spreading may be due to tectonic stress building up to a critical level rather than magma overpressure in the underlying magma lenses.

  1. Seafloor Gravity and Pressure Measurements - Geodetic Observations of Deformation and Mass Redistribution (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasagawa, G. S.; Zumberge, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Gravity and pressure geodetic measurements can monitor deformation of the seafloor. Such signals can be caused by tectonic or volcanic activity, or by hydrocarbon production from an offshore reservoir. We report on continued instrument development and applications of seafloor relative gravity and pressure surveys. Using an remotely operated vehicle and seafloor benchmarks, gravity and pressure measurements with a repeatability of order 0.003 mGal and 5 mm have been achieved. We also report on a new instrument, which can provide continuous drift-corrected pressure measurements. Pressure sensors based on quartz strain gauge technology can detect the pressure shift associated with subsidence or uplift of the seafloor by as little as 1 cm. However, most gauges undergo a slow drift having unpredictable sign and magnitude. The new instruments incorporate a pair of quartz pressure gauges recording ambient seawater pressure, which are periodically connected to a piston gauge calibrator. The piston gauge provides a time-invariant reference pressure which independently determines the instrument drift in situ. In a 104 day test in 664 m of water off the California coast, a precision of about 1 cm in depth variation was achieved after removal of drift determined from calibrations occurring for 20 minutes every ten days. Deployments are planned at Axial Volcano and the Gulf of Mexico in the fall of 2013. The planned deployments focus on volcanic processes and geotechnical monitoring.

  2. Methane hydrates:The promising contributions and benefits underlying the offshore Japan seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, S.; Aoyama, C.

    2014-12-01

    Authors has been engaged in developing methodologies of exploring methane hydrates (MH) which are abundant in the seafloor surface surrounding Japanese archipelago, including (disputed) Senkaku Islands. Unlike the MH found hundreds of meters under seafloor, those MH blocks exposed on the seafloor surface are steadily decomposed - gasified and are making large-scale "methane plume" consisting of bubbles, sometimes exceeding 600 meters high. Authors has obtained patents of several nations to detect methane plumes using commercial fishermen's sonars, however, no royalty has been required to use for scientific purposes. Authors have been insisting that those are one of most promising natural resources because to develop mining technology must be easier. A new regional municipality union to promote seafloor surface MH resource development, named as the Association of Ocean Energy Exploitation of Resources Promotion in the Sea of Japan, was established in September 2012. This association has been mobilizing prefecture government vessels to estimate the distribution and availability of the resource. In our invited presentation, achievements of the resource survey activities and some of proposed mining methods and their sustainability will be introduced.

  3. Seafloor Geodetic Investigation of Shallow Slow Slip Events at the Hikurangi Subduction Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Spahr C.; Wallace, Laura M.; Ito, Yoshihiro; Mochizuki, Kimihiro; Hino, Ryota; Henrys, Stuart; Schwartz, Susan; Sheehan, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Shallow slow slip events (<10-15 km depth) are well-documented at the northern Hikurangi subduction margin, New Zealand. During the Hikurangi Ocean Bottom Investigation of Tremor and Slow Slip (HOBITSS) project, we deployed and successfully recovered a dense network (<10 km spacing) of 24 Absolute Pressure Gauges (APG) and 15 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) to investigate vertical seafloor deformation and seismicity related to shallow slow slip. The HOBITSS network was deployed for one year from May 2014 to June 2015, in a region directly above an area of large, shallow slow slip events offshore Gisborne, New Zealand. A large slow slip event occurred directly beneath the HOBITSS network in September/October of 2014. The APG data reveal the detailed distribution of seafloor deformation above a shallow (< 10 km depth) offshore subduction thrust for the first time ever. We show evidence that slow slip events can occur very close to the trench and within 2km of the seafloor, where very low pressures and temperatures exist. APGs are a viable tool to detect detailed vertical deformation (on the order of 1-4 cm) of the seafloor and thus enable geodetic investigations of shallow SSEs and other similar-sized transient deformation events at offshore plate boundaries.

  4. Seafloor habitat mapping of the New York Bight incorporating sidescan sonar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lathrop, R.G.; Cole, M.; Senyk, N.; Butman, B.

    2006-01-01

    The efficacy of using sidescan sonar imagery, image classification algorithms and geographic information system (GIS) techniques to characterize the seafloor bottom of the New York Bight were assessed. The resulting seafloor bottom type map was compared with fish trawl survey data to determine whether there were any discernable habitat associations. An unsupervised classification with 20 spectral classes was produced using the sidescan sonar imagery, bathymetry and secondarily derived spatial heterogeneity to characterize homogenous regions within the study area. The spectral classes, geologic interpretations of the study region, bathymetry and a bottom landform index were used to produce a seafloor bottom type map of 9 different bottom types. Examination of sediment sample data by bottom type indicated that each bottom type class had a distinct composition of sediments. Analysis of adult summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus, and adult silver hake, Merluccius bilinearis, presence/absence data from trawl surveys did not show evidence of strong associations between the species distributions and seafloor bottom type. However, the absence of strong habitat associations may be more attributable to the coarse scale and geographic uncertainty of the trawl sampling data than conclusive evidence that no habitat associations exist for these two species. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pockmark asymmetry and seafloor currents in the Santos Basin offshore Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schattner, U.; Lazar, M.; Souza, L. A. P.; ten Brink, U.; Mahiques, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    Pockmarks form by gas/fluid expulsion into the ocean and are preserved under conditions of negligible sedimentation. Ideally, they are circular at the seafloor and symmetrical in profile. Elliptical pockmarks are more enigmatic. They are associated with seafloor currents while asymmetry is connected to sedimentation patterns. This study examines these associations through morphological analysis of new multibeam data collected across the Santos continental slope offshore Brazil in 2011 (353-865 mbsl). Of 984 pockmarks, 78% are both elliptical and asymmetric. Geometric criteria divide the pockmarks into three depth ranges that correlate with a transition between two currents: the Brazil Current transfers Tropical Water and South Atlantic Central Water southwestwards while the Intermediate Western Boundary Current transfers Antarctic Intermediate Water northeastwards. It is suggested that the velocity of seafloor currents and their persistence dictate pockmark ellipticity, orientation and profile asymmetry. Fast currents (>20 cm/s) are capable of maintaining pockmark flank steepness close to the angle of repose. These morphological expressions present direct evidence for an edge effect of the South Atlantic Subtropical Gyre and, in general, provide a correlation between pockmark geometry and seafloor currents that can be applied at other locations worldwide.

  6. Pockmark asymmetry and seafloor currents in the Santos Basin offshore Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schattner, U.; Lazar, M.; Souza, L. A. P.; Brink, Uri ten; Mahiques, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Pockmarks form by gas/fluid expulsion into the ocean and are preserved under conditions of negligible sedimentation. Ideally, they are circular at the seafloor and symmetrical in profile. Elliptical pockmarks are more enigmatic. They are associated with seafloor currents while asymmetry is connected to sedimentation patterns. This study examines these associations through morphological analysis of new multibeam data collected across the Santos continental slope offshore Brazil in 2011 (353–865 mbsl). Of 984 pockmarks, 78% are both elliptical and asymmetric. Geometric criteria divide the pockmarks into three depth ranges that correlate with a transition between two currents: the Brazil Current transfers Tropical Water and South Atlantic Central Water southwestwards while the Intermediate Western Boundary Current transfers Antarctic Intermediate Water northeastwards. It is suggested that the velocity of seafloor currents and their persistence dictate pockmark ellipticity, orientation and profile asymmetry. Fast currents (>20 cm/s) are capable of maintaining pockmark flank steepness close to the angle of repose. These morphological expressions present direct evidence for an edge effect of the South Atlantic Subtropical Gyre and, in general, provide a correlation between pockmark geometry and seafloor currents that can be applied at other locations worldwide.

  7. The room acoustic rendering equation.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Lokki, Tapio; Kiminki, Sami; Savioja, Lauri

    2007-09-01

    An integral equation generalizing a variety of known geometrical room acoustics modeling algorithms is presented. The formulation of the room acoustic rendering equation is adopted from computer graphics. Based on the room acoustic rendering equation, an acoustic radiance transfer method, which can handle both diffuse and nondiffuse reflections, is derived. In a case study, the method is used to predict several acoustic parameters of a room model. The results are compared to measured data of the actual room and to the results given by other acoustics prediction software. It is concluded that the method can predict most acoustic parameters reliably and provides results as accurate as current commercial room acoustic prediction software. Although the presented acoustic radiance transfer method relies on geometrical acoustics, it can be extended to model diffraction and transmission through materials in future.

  8. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  9. Acoustic well cleaner

    DOEpatents

    Maki, Jr., Voldi E.; Sharma, Mukul M.

    1997-01-21

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

  10. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  11. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  12. Adding articulatory features to acoustic features for automatic speech recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Zlokarnik, I.

    1995-05-01

    A hidden-Markov-model (HMM) based speech recognition system was evaluated that makes use of simultaneously recorded acoustic and articulatory data. The articulatory measurements were gathered by means of electromagnetic articulography and describe the movement of small coils fixed to the speakers` tongue and jaw during the production of German V{sub 1}CV{sub 2} sequences [P. Hoole and S. Gfoerer, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Suppl. 1 {bold 87}, S123 (1990)]. Using the coordinates of the coil positions as an articulatory representation, acoustic and articulatory features were combined to make up an acoustic--articulatory feature vector. The discriminant power of this combined representation was evaluated for two subjects on a speaker-dependent isolated word recognition task. When the articulatory measurements were used both for training and testing the HMMs, the articulatory representation was capable of reducing the error rate of comparable acoustic-based HMMs by a relative percentage of more than 60%. In a separate experiment, the articulatory movements during the testing phase were estimated using a multilayer perceptron that performed an acoustic-to-articulatory mapping. Under these more realistic conditions, when articulatory measurements are only available during the training, the error rate could be reduced by a relative percentage of 18% to 25%.

  13. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors.

    PubMed

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-06-10

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L).

  14. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L). PMID:27294937

  15. Perceptual learning in maze discriminations.

    PubMed

    Trobalon, J B; Sansa, J; Chamizo, V D; Mackintosh, N J

    1991-11-01

    In Experiment 1, rats were trained on a discrimination between rubber- and sandpaper-covered arms of a maze after one group had been pre-exposed to these intra-maze cues. Pre-exposure facilitated subsequent discrimination learning, unless the discrimination was made easier by adding further discriminative stimuli, when it now significantly retarded learning. In Experiment 2, rats were trained on an extra-maze spatial discrimination, again after one group, but not another, had been pre-exposed to the extra-maze landmarks. Here too, pre-exposure facilitated subsequent discrimination learning, unless the discrimination was made substantially easier by arranging that the two arms between which rats had to choose were always separated by 135 degrees. The results of both experiments can be explained by supposing that perceptual learning depends on the presence of features common to S+ and S-.

  16. Area-wide seafloor mapping in the SE North Sea using hydroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielck, Finn; Hass, H. Christian

    2013-04-01

    Mapping seafloor properties has become increasingly important for understanding marine ecosystems and providing basic data for sustainable management. However, the knowledge regarding the distribution of seabed environments in the German part of the North Sea is still fragmentary. It is mainly derived from single case studies and from a 1:250,000 scale map based on grab samples published in 1981. In recent years, hydroacoustic devices became a powerful tool to quickly obtain reliable information of the seafloor. In the years 2007-2012 various hydroacoustic surveys were performed in order to map the seafloor in the coastal zone of the NE German Bight comprising an area of approximately 1,500 km². Measurements were carried out with a sidescan sonar (Imagenex YellowFin, 330 kHz) at a resolution of 25 cm. For ground truthing several hundred sediment samples were taken. The seafloor in the investigation area is mainly characterized by fine and medium sand. West off Sylt relics of former Pleistocene moraines stretch perpendicular to the coast in westerly directions. These relics consist of wide bands of coarse to medium sand and are basically linked to the morphological structures such as ridges and channels. The truncated push moraines from the Saalian glacial represent the seaward extension of the recent moraine core ('Geest') of Sylt. In addition a great number of smaller scaled structures, generally known as sorted bedforms were detected. Sidescan sonography of the same area carried out in two consecutive years reveals that these bedforms are dynamic and therefore subject to flow-directed movement across the seafloor. They are linked with large-scale sediment transport that occurs in this highly dynamic area as a result of vigorous tidal currents. Ongoing investigations aim at relating the occurrence of different bedforms to current speed and net sediment transport direction to calculate sediment budget. These govern erosion and accumulation processes that are

  17. Application of musical timbre discrimination features to active sonar classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Victor W.; Hines, Paul C.; Pecknold, Sean

    2005-04-01

    In musical acoustics significant effort has been devoted to uncovering the physical basis of timbre perception. Most investigations into timbre rely on multidimensional scaling (MDS), in which different musical sounds are arranged as points in multidimensional space. The Euclidean distance between points corresponds to the perceptual distance between sounds and the multidimensional axes are linked to measurable properties of the sounds. MDS has identified numerous temporal and spectral features believed to be important to timbre perception. There is reason to believe that some of these features may have wider application in the disparate field of underwater acoustics, since anecdotal evidence suggests active sonar returns from metallic objects sound different than natural clutter returns when auralized by human operators. This is particularly encouraging since attempts to develop robust automatic classifiers capable of target-clutter discrimination over a wide range of operational conditions have met with limited success. Spectral features relevant to target-clutter discrimination are believed to include click-pitch and envelope irregularity; relevant temporal features are believed to include duration, sub-band attack/decay time, and time separation pitch. Preliminary results from an investigation into the role of these timbre features in target-clutter discrimination will be presented. [Work supported by NSERC and GDC.

  18. A 14-year-long Measurement of the Convergence Rate of the Juan de Fuca and North America Plates Offshore Central Oregon using GPS-Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwell, C. D.; Webb, S. C.; Nooner, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The motion of the sea floor was measured at a 3000-m-deep site approximately 120 km offshore Central Oregon using the GPS-Acoustic technique in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003 and 2014. The GPS-Acoustic derived motion relative to the interior of North America agrees with the geomagnetically-derived value within their measurement uncertainties. The time series from the early 2000's was resurrected using two new innovations. The first innovation, a permanent benchmark that has locating channels and mating pins, allows reoccupation of an established benchmark at any later date using an ROV to replace the transponder on the benchmark. The second innovation: an autonomous platform based on a Waveglider that carries a GPS navigated acoustic transponder interrogation system that is wave and solar powered. This enables measurements to be obtained over a GPSA site without requiring a large ship, greatly reducing the cost of a GPSA measurement. Combining data at this site with data from two other GPS-Acoustic seafloor sites on the Juan de Fuca plate, makes it possible to determine a present-day Euler Pole for the Juan de Fuca - North America plates using GPS-Acoustics seafloor geodesy.

  19. Acoustic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  20. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  1. Acoustic borehole logging

    SciTech Connect

    Medlin, W.L.; Manzi, S.J.

    1990-10-09

    This patent describes an acoustic borehole logging method. It comprises traversing a borehole with a borehole logging tool containing a transmitter of acoustic energy having a free-field frequency spectrum with at least one characteristic resonant frequency of vibration and spaced-apart receiver, repeatedly exciting the transmitter with a swept frequency tone burst of a duration sufficiently greater than the travel time of acoustic energy between the transmitter and the receiver to allow borehole cavity resonances to be established within the borehole cavity formed between the borehole logging tool and the borehole wall, detecting acoustic energy amplitude modulated by the borehole cavity resonances with the spaced-apart receiver, and recording an amplitude verses frequency output of the receiver in correlation with depth as a log of the borehole frequency spectrum representative of the subsurface formation comprising the borehole wall.

  2. Acoustic imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Tool detects noise sources by scanning sound "scene" and displaying relative location of noise-producing elements in area. System consists of ellipsoidal acoustic mirror and microphone and a display device.

  3. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  4. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  5. Acoustic bubble traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Reinhard; Kurz, Thomas; Lauterborn, Werner

    2000-07-01

    A small, oscillating bubble in a liquid can be trapped in the antinode of an acoustic standing wave field. Bubble stability is required for the study of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). The properties of the acoustic resonator are essential for the stable trapping of sonoluminescing bubbles. Resonators can be chosen according to the intended application: size and geometry can be varied in a wide range. In this work, the acoustic responses of different resonators were measured by means of holographic interferometry, hydrophones and a laser vibrometer. Also, high-speed photography was used to observe the bubble dynamics. Several single, stable sonoluminescent bubbles were trapped simultaneously within an acoustic resonator in the pressure antinodes of a higher harmonic mode (few bubble sonoluminescence, FBSL).

  6. Department of Cybernetic Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The development of the theory, instrumentation and applications of methods and systems for the measurement, analysis, processing and synthesis of acoustic signals within the audio frequency range, particularly of the speech signal and the vibro-acoustic signal emitted by technical and industrial equipments treated as noise and vibration sources was discussed. The research work, both theoretical and experimental, aims at applications in various branches of science, and medicine, such as: acoustical diagnostics and phoniatric rehabilitation of pathological and postoperative states of the speech organ; bilateral ""man-machine'' speech communication based on the analysis, recognition and synthesis of the speech signal; vibro-acoustical diagnostics and continuous monitoring of the state of machines, technical equipments and technological processes.

  7. Basic Linear Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Alan D.

    This chapter deals with the physical and mathematical aspects of sound when the disturbances are, in some sense, small. Acoustics is usually concerned with small-amplitude phenomena, and consequently a linear description is usually acoustics applicable. Disturbances are governed by the properties of the medium in which they occur, and the governing equations are the equations of continuum mechanics, which apply equally to gases, liquids, and solids. These include the mass, momentum, and energy equations, as well as thermodynamic principles. The viscosity and thermal conduction enter into the versions of these equations that apply to fluids. Fluids of typical great interest are air and sea water, and consequently this chapter includes a summary of their relevant acoustic properties. The foundation is also laid for the consideration of acoustic waves in elastic solids, suspensions, bubbly liquids, and porous media.

  8. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  9. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... this sponsor... Platinum Sponsor More from this sponsor... Gold Sponsor University of Colorado Acoustic Neuroma Program Rocky Mountain Gamma Knife Center More from this sponsor... Gold Sponsor NYU Langone Medical Center Departments of Neurosurgery ...

  10. Two Years of Regional Cabled Seafloor Observations Across Northern Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, K.; Juniper, K.; Heesemann, M.; Hoeberechts, M.; Matabos, M.; Mihaly, S.; Scherwath, M.

    2012-04-01

    NEPTUNE Canada completed the installation and is now operating an 800 km, regional cabled ocean network that spans the northern Juan de Fuca tectonic plate and continental shelf/slope in the northeastern Pacific. The NEPTUNE Canada network is part of the Ocean Networks Canada Observatory. Public data flow started in 2009 and interactive instruments continue to be added to this technically advanced system which provides continuous power and high bandwidth for enabling the collection of real-time physical, chemical, geological, and biological oceanographic data at resolutions relevant for furthering our understanding of the dynamics of the earth-ocean system. Recent results at five NEPTUNE nodes are presented. Inshore at Folger Passage and Barkley Sound experiments focus on understanding biological productivity and the effects that marine processes have on fish and marine mammals. Experiments further offshore at Barkley Canyon allow quantification of changes in benthic activity with nutrient and sediment transport. Barkley Canyon and further north along the mid-continental slope near ODP Site 889, instruments are monitoring changes in the distribution, structure, related biotas and venting of gas hydrates. A Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit (CORK) at our mid-plate site (ODP 1027) monitors crustal temperature and pressure, particularly related to triggered events, such as earthquakes, tsunamis, hydrothermal convection. On the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the Endeavour node observes volcanic, tectonic, hydrothermal, and associated biological processes. NEPTUNE Canada provides high resolution acoustic and seismic monitoring across the entire network, important for understanding subduction earthquake processes and contributing to a near-field tsunami detection system. An array of bottom pressure recorders is used for the determination of trans-Pacific open ocean tsunami amplitude, propagation direction, and as model input to examine tsunami interaction with the complex coast

  11. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-11-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell’s law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  12. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-11-24

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  13. Ocean Acoustic Observatory Federation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    J., C. G. Fox, and F. K. Duennebier, Hydroacoustic detection of submarine landslides on Kilauea volcano , Geophys. Res. Lett., vol. 28, 1811-1814...acoustic tomography experiments in the vicinity of coastal North America, • Monitor, in real time, marine mammals, earthquakes and volcanoes in the...distances, coastal tomography and thermometry, and earthquakes and volcanoes in the northern Pacific. APPROACH The members of the Ocean Acoustic

  14. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  15. The neonatal acoustic reflex.

    PubMed

    Weatherby, L A; Bennett, M J

    1980-01-01

    Probe tones from 220 Hz to 2 000 Hz were used to measure the static and dynamic acoustic impedance of 44 neonates. Acoustic reflex thresholds to broad band noise were obtained from every neonate tested when employing the higher frequency probe tones. The reflex threshold levels measured are similar to those of adults. The static impedance values are discussed to give a possible explanation of why reflex thresholds cannot be detected using conventional 220 Hz impedance bridges.

  16. Directional Acoustic Density Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-13

    fluctuations of fluid density at a point . (2) DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART [0004] Conventional vector sensors measure particle velocity, v (vx,Vytvz...dipole-type or first order sensor that is realized by measuring particle velocity at a point , (which is the vector sensor sensing approach for...underwater sensors), or by measuring the gradient of the acoustic pressure at two closely spaced (less than the wavelength of an acoustic wave) points as it

  17. Low Frequency Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    with NOAA , ONR is providing technical services that will help establish a baseline for assessment of long- term VLF acoustic trends in selected...ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 sponsored by NOAA , was added to the...with NOAA (NMFS) and other parties has dealt with ocean acoustics related to issues stimulated by the Marine Mammal Protection Act. A focal point has

  18. Imaging and detection of mines from acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, Alan J.; DiMarzio, Charles A.; Li, Wen; McKnight, Stephen W.

    1999-08-01

    A laboratory-scale acoustic experiment is described where a buried target, a hockey puck cut in half, is shallowly buried in a sand box. To avoid the need for source and receiver coupling to the host sand, an acoustic wave is generated in the subsurface by a pulsed laser suspended above the air-sand interface. Similarly, an airborne microphone is suspended above this interface and moved in unison with the laser. After some pre-processing of the data, reflections for the target, although weak, could clearly be identified. While the existence and location of the target can be determined by inspection of the data, its unique shape can not. Since target discrimination is important in mine detection, a 3D imaging algorithm was applied to the acquired acoustic data. This algorithm yielded a reconstructed image where the shape of the target was resolved.

  19. Formation of Hydro-acoustic Waves in Dissipative Coupled Weakly Compressible Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolali, A.; Kirby, J. T., Jr.; Bellotti, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in deep sea measurement technology provide an increasing opportunity to detect and interpret hydro-acoustic waves as a component in improved Tsunami Early Warning Systems (TEWS). For the idealized case of a homogeneous water column above a moving but otherwise rigid bottom (in terms of assessing acoustic wave interaction), the description of the infinite family of acoustic modes is characterized by local water depth at source area; i.e. the period of the first acoustic mode is given by four times the required time for sound to travel from the seabed to the surface. Spreading off from earthquake zone, the dominant spectrum is filtered and enriched by seamounts and barriers. This study focuses on the characteristics of hydro-acoustic waves generated by sudden sea bottom motion in a weakly compressible fluid coupled with an underlying sedimentary layer, where the added complexity of the sediment layer rheology leads to both the lowering of dominant spectral peaks and wave attenuation across the full spectrum. To overcome the computational difficulties of three-dimensional models, we derive a depth integrated equation valid for varying water depth and sediment thickness. Damping behavior of the two layered system is initially taken into account by introducing the viscosity of fluid-like sedimentary layer. We show that low frequency pressure waves which are precursor components of tsunamis contain information of seafloor motion.

  20. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.