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Sample records for acoustic shield concept

  1. Free jet feasibility study of a thermal acoustic shield concept for AST/VCE application: Single stream nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majjigi, R. K.; Brausch, J. F.; Janardan, B. A.; Balsa, T. F.; Knott, P. R.; Pickup, N.

    1984-01-01

    A technology base for the thermal acoustic shield concept as a noise suppression device for single stream exhaust nozzles was developed. Acoustic data for 314 test points for 9 scale model nozzle configurations were obtained. Five of these configurations employed an unsuppressed annular plug core jet and the remaining four nozzles employed a 32 chute suppressor core nozzle. Influence of simulated flight and selected geometric and aerodynamic flow variables on the acoustic behavior of the thermal acoustic shield was determined. Laser velocimeter and aerodynamic measurements were employed to yield valuable diagnostic information regarding the flow field characteristics of these nozzles. An existing theoretical aeroacoustic prediction method was modified to predict the acoustic characteristics of partial thermal acoustic shields.

  2. Free jet feasibility study of a thermal acoustic shield concept for AST/VCE application: Dual stream nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of selected geometric and aerodynamic flow variables of an unsuppressed coannular plug nozzle and a coannular plug nozzle with a 20-chute outer stream suppressor were experimentally determined. A total of 136 static and simulated flight acoustic test points were conducted with 9 scale model nozzles. Also, aerodynamic measurements of four selected plumes were made with a laser velocimeter. The presence of the 180 deg shield produced different mixing characteristics on the shield side compared to the unshield side because of the reduced mixing with ambient air on the shielded side. This resulted in a stretching of the jet, yielding a higher peak mean velocity up to a length of 10 equivalent diameters from the nozzle exit. The 180 deg shield in community orientation around the suppressed coannular plug nozzle yielded acoustic benefit at all observer angles for a simulated takeoff. While the effect of shield-to-outer stream velocity ratio was small at angles up to 120 deg, beyond this angle significant acoustic benefit was realized with a shield-to-outer stream velocity ratio of 0.64.

  3. Free jet feasibility study of a thermal acoustic shield concept for AST/VCE application-dual flow. Comprehensive data report. Volume 1: Test nozzles and acoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Brausch, J. F.; Price, A. O.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic and diagnostic data that were obtained to determine the influence of selected geometric and aerodynamic flow variables of coannular nozzles with thermal acoustic shields are summarized in this comprehensive data report. A total of 136 static and simulated flight acoustic test points were conducted with 9 scale-model nozzles The tested nozzles included baseline (unshielded), 180 deg shielded, and 360 deg shielded dual flow coannular plug configurations. The baseline configurations include a high radius ratio unsuppressed coannular plug nozzle and a coanuular plug nozzle and a coannular plug nozzle with a 20-chute outer stream suppressor. The tests were conducted at nozzle temperatures and pressure typical of operating conditions of variable cycle engine.

  4. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-03-29

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  5. Acoustic and Thermal Testing of an Integrated Multilayer Insulation and Broad Area Cooling Shield System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Jessica J.; Foster, Lee W.

    2013-01-01

    A Multilayer Insulation (MLI) and Broad Area Cooling (BAC) shield thermal control system shows promise for long-duration storage of cryogenic propellant. The NASA Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) project is investigating the thermal and structural performance of this tank-applied integrated system. The MLI/BAC Shield Acoustic and Thermal Test was performed to evaluate the MLI/BAC shield's structural performance by subjecting it to worst-case launch acoustic loads. Identical thermal tests using Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) were performed before and after the acoustic test. The data from these tests was compared to determine if any degradation occurred in the thermal performance of the system as a result of exposure to the acoustic loads. The thermal test series consisted of two primary components: a passive boil-off test to evaluate the MLI performance and an active cooling test to evaluate the integrated MLI/BAC shield system with chilled vapor circulating through the BAC shield tubes. The acoustic test used loads closely matching the worst-case envelope of all launch vehicles currently under consideration for CPST. Acoustic test results yielded reasonable responses for the given load. The thermal test matrix was completed prior to the acoustic test and successfully repeated after the acoustic test. Data was compared and yielded near identical results, indicating that the MLI/BAC shield configuration tested in this series is an option for structurally implementing this thermal control system concept.

  6. Acoustic and Aero-Mixing Experimental Results for Fluid Shield Scale Model Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Mengle, V. G.; Shin, H. W.; Majjigi, R. K.

    2005-01-01

    The principle objectives of this investigation are to evaluate the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of fluid shield nozzle concept and to assess Far 36, Stage 3 potential for fluid shield nozzle with Flade Cycle. Acoustic data for nine scale model nozzle configurations are obtained. The effects of simulated flight and geometric and aerothermodynamic flow variables on the acoustic behavior of the fluid shield are determined. The acoustic tests are aimed at studying the effect of: (1) shield thickness, (2) wrap angle, (3) mass flow and velocity ratios between shield and core streams at constant cycle specific thrust (i.e., mixed velocity), (4) porous plug, and (5) subsonic shield. Shadowgraphs of six nozzle configurations are obtained to understand the plume flowfield features. Static pressure data on suppressor chutes in the core stream (shielded and unshielded) sides and on plug surface are acquired to determine the impact of fluid shield on base drag of the 36-chute suppressor nozzle and the thrust augmentation due to the plug, respectively.

  7. Free-jet feasibility study of a thermal acoustic shield concept for AST/VCE application-dual stream nozzles. Comprehensive data report. Volume 2: Laser velocimeter and suppressor. Base pressure data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Brausch, J. F.; Price, A. O.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic and diagnostic data that were obtained to determine the influence of selected geometric and aerodynamic flow variables of coannular nozzles with thermal acoustic shields are summarized in this comprehensive data report. A total of 136 static and simulated flight acoustic test points were conducted with 9 scale-model nozzles. Aerodynamic laser velocimeter measurements were made for four selected plumes. In addition, static pressure data in the chute base region of the suppressor configurations were obtained to assess the influence of the shield stream on the suppressor base drag.

  8. Novel Concepts for Radiation Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    It is critical that safety factors be maximized with respect to long duration, extraterrestrial space flight. Any significant improvement in radiation protection will be critical in ensuring the safety of crew and hardware on such missions. The project goal is to study novel concepts for radiation shielding materials that can be used for long-duration space missions. As part of this project we will investigate the use of thin films for the evaluation of a containment system that can retain liquid hydrogen and provide the necessary hydrogen density for effective shielding.

  9. Integral Face Shield Concept for Firefighter's Helmet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeles, F.; Hansberry, E.; Himel, V.

    1982-01-01

    Stowable face shield could be made integral part of helmet worn by firefighters. Shield, made from same tough clear plastic as removable face shields presently used, would be pivoted at temples to slide up inside helmet when not needed. Stowable face shield, being stored in helmet, is always available, ready for use, and is protected when not being used.

  10. Acoustically shielded exhaust system for high thrust jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, John P. (Inventor); Lee, Robert (Inventor); Majjigi, Rudramuni K. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A flade exhaust nozzle for a high thrust jet engine is configured to form an acoustic shield around the core engine exhaust flowstream while supplementing engine thrust during all flight conditions, particularly during takeoff. The flade airflow is converted from an annular 360.degree. flowstream to an arcuate flowstream extending around the lower half of the core engine exhaust flowstream so as to suppress exhaust noise directed at the surrounding community.

  11. Acoustic Shielding by Cavitation Bubbles in Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.; Evan, Andrew P.

    2006-05-01

    Lithotripter pulses (˜7-10 μs) initiate the growth of cavitation bubbles, which collapse hundreds of microseconds later. Since the bubble growth-collapse cycle trails passage of the pulse, and is ˜1000 times shorter than the pulse interval at clinically relevant firing rates, it is not expected that cavitation will affect pulse propagation. However, pressure measurements with a fiber-optic hydrophone (FOPH-500) indicate that bubbles generated by a pulse can, indeed, shield the propagation of the negative tail. Shielding was detected within 1 μs of arrival of the negative wave, contemporaneous with the first observation of expanding bubbles by high-speed camera. Reduced negative pressure was observed at 2 Hz compared to 0.5 Hz firing rate, and in water with a higher content of dissolved gas. We propose that shielding of the negative tail can be attributed to loss of acoustic energy into the expansion of cavitation bubbles.

  12. ISS Radiation Shielding and Acoustic Simulation Using an Immersive Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhage, Joshua E.; Sandridge, Chris A.; Qualls, Garry D.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station Environment Simulator (ISSES) is a virtual reality application that uses high-performance computing, graphics, and audio rendering to simulate the radiation and acoustic environments of the International Space Station (ISS). This CAVE application allows the user to maneuver to different locations inside or outside of the ISS and interactively compute and display the radiation dose at a point. The directional dose data is displayed as a color-mapped sphere that indicates the relative levels of radiation from all directions about the center of the sphere. The noise environment is rendered in real time over headphones or speakers and includes non-spatial background noise, such as air-handling equipment, and spatial sounds associated with specific equipment racks, such as compressors or fans. Changes can be made to equipment rack locations that produce changes in both the radiation shielding and system noise. The ISSES application allows for interactive investigation and collaborative trade studies between radiation shielding and noise for crew safety and comfort.

  13. Investigation of Acoustical Shielding by a Wedge-Shaped Airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Clark, Lorenzo R.; Dunn, Mark H.; Tweed, John

    2004-01-01

    Experiments on a scale model of an advanced unconventional subsonic transport concept, the Blended Wing Body (BWB), have demonstrated significant shielding of inlet-radiated noise. A computational model of the shielding mechanism has been developed using a combination of boundary integral equation method (BIEM) and equivalent source method (ESM). The computation models the incident sound from a point source in a nacelle and determines the scattered sound field. In this way the sound fields with and without the airfoil can be estimated for comparison to experiment. An experimental test bed using a simplified wedge-shape airfoil and a broadband point noise source in a simulated nacelle has been developed for the purposes of verifying the analytical model and also to study the effect of engine nacelle placement on shielding. The experimental study is conducted in the Anechoic Noise Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The analytic and experimental results are compared at 6300 and 8000 Hz. These frequencies correspond to approximately 150 Hz on the full scale aircraft. Comparison between the experimental and analytic results is quite good, not only for the noise scattering by the airframe, but also for the total sound pressure in the far field. Many of the details of the sound field that the analytic model predicts are seen or indicated in the experiment, within the spatial resolution limitations of the experiment. Changing nacelle location produces comparable changes in noise shielding contours evaluated analytically and experimentally. Future work in the project will be enhancement of the analytic model to extend the analysis to higher frequencies corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the high bypass ratio ducted fan engines that are expected to power the BWB.

  14. Investigation of Acoustical Shielding by a Wedge-Shaped Airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Clark, Lorenzo R.; Dunn, Mark H.; Tweed, John

    2006-01-01

    Experiments on a scale model of an advanced unconventional subsonic transport concept, the Blended Wing Body (BWB), have demonstrated significant shielding of inlet-radiated noise. A computational model of the shielding mechanism has been developed using a combination of boundary integral equation method (BIEM) and equivalent source method (ESM). The computation models the incident sound from a point source in a nacelle and determines the scattered sound field. In this way the sound fields with and without the airfoil can be estimated for comparison to experiment. An experimental test bed using a simplified wedge-shape airfoil and a broadband point noise source in a simulated nacelle has been developed for the purposes of verifying the analytical model and also to study the effect of engine nacelle placement on shielding. The experimental study is conducted in the Anechoic Noise Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The analytic and experimental results are compared at 6300 and 8000 Hz. These frequencies correspond to approximately 150 Hz on the full scale aircraft. Comparison between the experimental and analytic results is quite good, not only for the noise scattering by the airframe, but also for the total sound pressure in the far field. Many of the details of the sound field that the analytic model predicts are seen or indicated in the experiment, within the spatial resolution limitations of the experiment. Changing nacelle location produces comparable changes in noise shielding contours evaluated analytically and experimentally. Future work in the project will be enhancement of the analytic model to extend the analysis to higher frequencies corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the high bypass ratio ducted fan engines that are expected to power the BWB.

  15. Advanced Concepts for Underwater Acoustic Channel Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etter, P. C.; Haas, C. H.; Ramani, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines nearshore underwater-acoustic channel modeling concepts and compares channel-state information requirements against existing modeling capabilities. This process defines a subset of candidate acoustic models suitable for simulating signal propagation in underwater communications. Underwater-acoustic communications find many practical applications in coastal oceanography, and networking is the enabling technology for these applications. Such networks can be formed by establishing two-way acoustic links between autonomous underwater vehicles and moored oceanographic sensors. These networks can be connected to a surface unit for further data transfer to ships, satellites, or shore stations via a radio-frequency link. This configuration establishes an interactive environment in which researchers can extract real-time data from multiple, but distant, underwater instruments. After evaluating the obtained data, control messages can be sent back to individual instruments to adapt the networks to changing situations. Underwater networks can also be used to increase the operating ranges of autonomous underwater vehicles by hopping the control and data messages through networks that cover large areas. A model of the ocean medium between acoustic sources and receivers is called a channel model. In an oceanic channel, characteristics of the acoustic signals change as they travel from transmitters to receivers. These characteristics depend upon the acoustic frequency, the distances between sources and receivers, the paths followed by the signals, and the prevailing ocean environment in the vicinity of the paths. Properties of the received signals can be derived from those of the transmitted signals using these channel models. This study concludes that ray-theory models are best suited to the simulation of acoustic signal propagation in oceanic channels and identifies 33 such models that are eligible candidates.

  16. Structural performance of two aerobrake hexagonal heat shield panel concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Dyess, James W.

    1992-01-01

    Structural sizing and performance are presented for two structural concepts for an aerobrake hexagonal heat shield panel. One concept features a sandwich construction with an aluminum honeycomb core and thin quasi-isotropic graphite-epoxy face sheets. The other concept features a skin-rib isogrid construction with thin quasi-isotropic graphite-epoxy skins and graphite-epoxy ribs oriented at 0, +60, and -60 degs along the panel. Linear static, linear bifurcation buckling, and nonlinear static analyses were performed to compare the structural performance of the two panel concepts and assess their feasibility for a lunar transfer vehicle aerobrake application.

  17. Acoustical concept for measuring particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, D.S.; Kaufman, M.

    1981-02-01

    A new concept is investigated for measuring particle size and distribution for air pollution control applications. This study illustrates that the proposed device--the Acoustic Particulate Monitor (APM)--can measure total mass loading, mean particle diameter, and width of particle size distributions on an in-situ basis. The concept for such an instrument is based upon experimental and theoretical observations that the presence of dust in air causes a reduction in the speed of sound as a function of the transmitted frequency. These percentage reductions in the speed of sound are small and the research results illustrate how the accompanying shift in the acoustical phase is a highly sensitive method for detecting such effects. The magnitudes of the phase shift are related to mass loading. The frequency associated with the maximum phase shift is defined as the acoustic frequency, fA. Experimentally determining fA provides a measure of the mean particle size of the distribution. The detailed shape of the phase shift as a function of frequency is a measure of the spread in the size distribution of the entrained particulate. Experiments were performed using several configurations. Results were verified using direct mass measurements and microphotographs.

  18. A novel sensor for monitoring acoustic cavitation. Part I: Concept, theory, and prototype development.

    PubMed

    Zeqiri, Bajram; Gélat, Pierre N; Hodnett, Mark; Lee, Nigel D

    2003-10-01

    This paper describes a new concept for an ultrasonic cavitation sensor designed specifically for monitoring acoustic emissions generated by small microbubbles when driven by an applied acoustic field. Its novel features include a hollow, open-ended, cylindrical shape, with the sensor being a right circular cylinder of height 32 mm and external diameter 38 mm. The internal diameter of the sensor is 30 mm; its inner surface is fabricated from a 110-microm layer of piezoelectrically active film whose measurement bandwidth is sufficient to enable acoustic emissions up to and beyond 10 MHz to be monitored. When in use, the sensor is immersed within the liquid test medium and high frequency (megahertz) acoustic emissions occurring within the hollow body of the sensor are monitored. In order to shield the sensor response from events occurring outside the cylinder, the outer surface of the sensor cylinder is encapsulated within a special 4-mm thick polyurethane-based cavitation shield with acoustic properties specifically developed to be minimally perturbing to the 40 kHz applied acoustic field but attenuating to ultrasound generated at megahertz frequencies (plane-wave transmission loss > 30 dB at 1 MHz). This paper introduces the rationale behind the new sensor, describing details of its construction and the materials formulation program undertaken to develop the cavitation shield. PMID:14609074

  19. Revolutionary Concepts of Radiation Shielding for Human Exploration of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Hathaway, D. H.; Grugel, R. N.; Watts, J. W.; Parnell, T. A.; Gregory, J. C.; Winglee, R. M.

    2005-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum covers revolutionary ideas for space radiation shielding that would mitigate mission costs while limiting human exposure, as studied in a workshop held at Marshall Space Flight Center at the request of NASA Headquarters. None of the revolutionary new ideas examined for the .rst time in this workshop showed clear promise. The workshop attendees felt that some previously examined concepts were de.nitely useful and should be pursued. The workshop attendees also concluded that several of the new concepts warranted further investigation to clarify their value.

  20. Analysis of a Lunar Base Electrostatic Radiation Shield Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, Charles R.

    2004-01-01

    Space weather can be defined as the total ensemble of radiation in space, as well as on the surface of moons and asteroids. It consists of electromagnetic, charged-particle, and neutral particle radiation. The fundamental goal behind this NIAC Phase I research is to investigate methods of generating a static electric-field potential phi(x, y, z) in the volume above and around a "safe" or protected area on the lunar surface so that trajectories of harmful charged particle radiation are modified (deflected or reflected), thus creating a shadow over that region. Since the charged particles are not neutralized but merely redirected, there will be areas outside of the shadowed protected region that will have a higher flux concentration of radiation. One of the fundamental limitations of the static electric (electrostatic)-field approach to radiation shielding is that complete shadowing is accomplished only by complete reflection, which can only occur for shield voltages greater than or equal to the kinetic energy (in electron volts) of the incoming charged particles. Just as habitats on Earth are protected from severe weather events and conditions, such as extreme temperatures, high winds, and UV radiation, using multiple methods of shielding protection from severe space weather will undoubtedly require multiple strategies. The electrostatic shield concept may be one of many methods employed to protect astronaut habitats on the lunar surface from some of the harmful effects of space weather.

  1. Accuracy of the Kirchoff formula in determining acoustic shielding with the use of a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabrielsen, R. E.; Davis, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    It has been suggested that if jet engines of aircraft were placed at above the wing instead of below it, the wing would provide a partial shielding of the noise generated by the engines relative to observers on the ground. The shielding effects of an idealized three-dimensional barrier in the presence of an idealized engine noise source was predicted by the Kirchoff formula. Based on the good agreement between experimental measurements and the numerical results of the current study, it was concluded that the Kirchoff approximation provides a good qualitative estimate of the acoustic shielding of a point source by a rectangular flat plate for measurements taken in the far field of the flat plate at frequencies ranging from 1 kHz to 20 kHz. At frequencies greater than 4 kHz the Kirchoff approximation provides accurate quantitative predictions of acoustic shielding.

  2. Visualizing Sound: Demonstrations to Teach Acoustic Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennoll, Valerie

    Interference, a phenomenon in which two sound waves superpose to form a resultant wave of greater or lower amplitude, is a key concept when learning about the physics of sound waves. Typical interference demonstrations involve students listening for changes in sound level as they move throughout a room. Here, new tools are developed to teach this concept that provide a visual component, allowing individuals to see changes in sound level on a light display. This is accomplished using a microcontroller that analyzes sound levels collected by a microphone and displays the sound level in real-time on an LED strip. The light display is placed on a sliding rail between two speakers to show the interference occurring between two sound waves. When a long-exposure photograph is taken of the light display being slid from one end of the rail to the other, a wave of the interference pattern can be captured. By providing a visual component, these tools will help students and the general public to better understand interference, a key concept in acoustics.

  3. Advanced Nacelle Acoustic Lining Concepts Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielak, G.; Gallman, J.; Kunze, R.; Murray, P.; Premo, J.; Kosanchick, M.; Hersh, A.; Celano, J.; Walker, B.; Yu, J.; Parrott, Tony L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The work reported in this document consisted of six distinct liner technology development subtasks: 1) Analysis of Model Scale ADP Fan Duct Lining Data (Boeing): An evaluation of an AST Milestone experiment to demonstrate 1995 liner technology superiority relative to that of 1992 was performed on 1:5.9 scale model fan rig (Advanced Ducted Propeller) test data acquired in the NASA Glenn 9 x 15 foot wind tunnel. The goal of 50% improvement was deemed satisfied. 2) Bias Flow Liner Investigation (Boeing, VCES): The ability to control liner impedance by low velocity bias flow through liner was demonstrated. An impedance prediction model to include bias flow was developed. 3) Grazing Flow Impedance Testing (Boeing): Grazing flow impedance tests were conducted for comparison with results achieved at four different laboratories. 4) Micro-Perforate Acoustic Liner Technology (BFG, HAE, NG): Proof of concept testing of a "linear liner." 5) Extended Reaction Liners (Boeing, NG): Bandwidth improvements for non-locally reacting liner were investigated with porous honeycomb core test liners. 6) Development of a Hybrid Active/Passive Lining Concept (HAE): Synergism between active and passive attenuation of noise radiated by a model inlet was demonstrated.

  4. Experimental and analytical studies of shielding concepts for point sources and jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, R. L. M.

    1983-05-01

    Concepts for jet noise shielding were explored. Model experiments center on solid planar shields, simulating engine-over-wing installations and sugar scoop shields. Tradeoff on effective shielding length is set by interference "edge noise' as the shield trailing edge approaches the spreading jet. In general, shielding attentuation increases steadily with frequency, following low frequency enhancement by edge noise. Although broadband attenuation is typically only several decibels, the reduction of the subjectively weighted perceived noise levels is higher. Calculated ground contours of peak PN dB (perceived noise level) show a substantial contraction due to shielding: this reaches 66% for one of the sugar scoop shields for the 90 PN dB contour. The experiments are complemented by analytical predictions. They are divided into an engineering scheme for jet noise shielding and more rigorous analysis for point source shielding.

  5. CONCEPTS FOR CAPACITIVELY RF-SHIELDED BELLOWS IN CRYOGENIC STRUCTURES.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO,Y.HAHN,H.

    2004-03-24

    Bellows are frequently required in accelerators and colliders. Usually RF-shields with spring fingers are employed to screen the bellows. The lack of accessibility in cryogenic systems can be a problem and asks for alternate solutions to eliminate possible overheating, sparking, etc that occurred in intensive beams. This note addresses an alternate kind of RF shield, which uses capacitive contact instead of mechanical contact. The analysis, as well as numerical example of a superconducting cavity structure, shows that the capacitive RF shield satisfies the impedance requirements of both beam and HOMs. The capability of thermal isolation is also analyzed.

  6. Shield Optimization in Simple Geometry for the Gateway Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Simonsen, L. C.; Nealy, J. E.; Troutman, P. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    The great cost of added radiation shielding is a potential limiting factor in many deep space missions. For this enabling technology, we are developing tools for optimized shield design over multi-segmented missions involving multiple work and living areas in the transport and duty phase of various space missions. The total shield mass over all pieces of equipment and habitats is optimized subject to career dose and dose rate constraints. Preliminary studies of deep space missions indicate that for long duration space missions, improved shield materials will be required. The details of this new method and its impact on space missions and other technologies will be discussed. This study will provide a vital tool for evaluating Gateway designs in their usage context. Providing protection against the hazards of space radiation is one of the challenges to the Gateway infrastructure designs. We will use the mission optimization software to scope the impact of Gateway operations on human exposures and the effectiveness of alternate shielding materials on Gateway infrastructure designs. This study will provide a guide to the effectiveness of multifunctional materials in preparation to more detailed geometry studies in progress.

  7. Radiation protection effectiveness of a proposed magnetic shielding concept for manned Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Shinn, J. L.; Nealy, John E.; Simonsen, Lisa C.

    1990-01-01

    The effectiveness of a proposed concept for shielding a manned Mars vehicle using a confined magnetic field configuration is evaluated by computing estimated crew radiation exposures resulting from galactic cosmic rays and a large solar flare event. In the study the incident radiation spectra are transported through the spacecraft structure/magnetic shield using the deterministic space radiation transport computer codes developed at Langley Research Center. The calculated exposures unequivocally demonstrate that magnetic shielding could provide an effective barrier against solar flare protons but is virtually transparent to the more energetic galactic cosmic rays. It is then demonstrated that through proper selection of materials and shield configuration, adequate and reliable bulk material shielding can be provided for the same total mass as needed to generate and support the more risky magnetic field configuration.

  8. Experimental and Analytical Studies of Shielding Concepts for Point Sources and Jet Noises.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Raymond Lee Man

    This analytical and experimental study explores concepts for jet noise shielding. Model experiments centre on solid planar shields, simulating engine-over-wing installations, and 'sugar scoop' shields. Tradeoff on effective shielding length is set by interference 'edge noise' as the shield trailing edge approaches the spreading jet. Edge noise is minimized by (i) hyperbolic cutouts which trim off the portions of most intense interference between the jet flow and the barrier and (ii) hybrid shields--a thermal refractive extension (a flame); for (ii) the tradeoff is combustion noise. In general, shielding attenuation increases steadily with frequency, following low frequency enhancement by edge noise. Although broadband attenuation is typically only several dB, the reduction of the subjectively weighted perceived noise levels is higher. In addition, calculated ground contours of peak PN dB show a substantial contraction due to shielding: this reaches 66% for one of the 'sugar scoop' shields for the 90 PN dB contour. The experiments are complemented by analytical predictions. They are divided into an engineering scheme for jet noise shielding and more rigorous analysis for point source shielding. The former approach combines point source shielding with a suitable jet source distribution. The results are synthesized into a predictive algorithm for jet noise shielding: the jet is modelled as a line distribution of incoherent sources with narrow band frequency (TURN)(axial distance)('-1). The predictive version agrees well with experiment (1 to 1.5 dB) up to moderate frequencies. The insertion loss deduced from the point source measurements for semi-infinite as well as finite rectangular shields agrees rather well with theoretical calculation based on the exact half plane solution and the superposition of asymptotic closed-form solutions. An approximate theory, the Maggi-Rubinowicz line integral, is found to yield reasonable predictions for thin barriers including

  9. Comparison of the acoustic characteristics of large-scale models of several propulsive-lift concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falarski, M. D.; Aiken, T. N.; Aoyagi, K.; Koenig, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    Wind-tunnel acoustic investigations were performed to determine the acoustic characteristics and the effect of forward speed on the over-the-wing externally blown jet flap (OTW), the under-the-wing externally blown jet flap (UTW), the internally blown jet flap (IBF), and the augmentor wing (AW). The data presented represent the basic noise generated by the powered-lift system without acoustic treatment, assuming all other noise sources, such as the turbofan compressor noise, have been suppressed. Under these conditions, when scaled to a 100,000-lb aircraft, the OTW concept exhibited the lowest perceived noise levels, because of dominant low-frequency noise and wing shielding of the high-frequency noise. The AW was the loudest configuration, because of dominant high-frequency noise created by the high jet velocities and small nozzle dimensions. All four configurations emitted noise 10 to 15 PNdB higher than the noise goal of 95 PNdB at 500 ft.

  10. On the Assessment of Acoustic Scattering and Shielding by Time Domain Boundary Integral Equation Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Fang Q.; Pizzo, Michelle E.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the time domain boundary integral equation formulation of the linear convective wave equation, a computational tool dubbed Time Domain Fast Acoustic Scattering Toolkit (TD-FAST) has recently been under development. The time domain approach has a distinct advantage that the solutions at all frequencies are obtained in a single computation. In this paper, the formulation of the integral equation, as well as its stabilization by the Burton-Miller type reformulation, is extended to cases of a constant mean flow in an arbitrary direction. In addition, a "Source Surface" is also introduced in the formulation that can be employed to encapsulate regions of noise sources and to facilitate coupling with CFD simulations. This is particularly useful for applications where the noise sources are not easily described by analytical source terms. Numerical examples are presented to assess the accuracy of the formulation, including a computation of noise shielding by a thin barrier motivated by recent Historical Baseline F31A31 open rotor noise shielding experiments. Furthermore, spatial resolution requirements of the time domain boundary element method are also assessed using point per wavelength metrics. It is found that, using only constant basis functions and high-order quadrature for surface integration, relative errors of less than 2% may be obtained when the surface spatial resolution is 5 points-per-wavelength (PPW) or 25 points-per-wavelength squared (PPW2).

  11. Computer simulations in room acoustics: concepts and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Vorländer, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Geometrical acoustics are used as a standard model for room acoustic design and consulting. Research on room acoustic simulation focuses on a more accurate modeling of propagation effects such as diffraction and other wave effects in rooms, and on scattering. Much progress was made in this field so that wave models also (for example, the boundary element method and the finite differences in time domain) can now be used for higher frequencies. The concepts and implementations of room simulation methods are briefly reviewed. After all, simulations in architectural acoustics are indeed powerful tools, but their reliability depends on the skills of the operator who has to create an adequate polygon model and has to choose the correct input data of boundary conditions such as absorption and scattering. Very little is known about the uncertainty of this input data. With the theory of error propagation of uncertainties it can be shown that prediction of reverberation times with accuracy better than the just noticeable difference requires input data in a quality which is not available from reverberation room measurements. PMID:23463991

  12. Acoustic Shielding for a Model Scale Counter-rotation Open Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David B.; Edmane, Envia

    2012-01-01

    The noise shielding benefit of installing an open rotor above a simplified wing or tail is explored experimentally. The test results provide both a benchmark data set for validating shielding prediction tools and an opportunity for a system level evaluation of the noise reduction potential of propulsion noise shielding by an airframe component. A short barrier near the open rotor was found to provide up to 8.5 dB of attenuation at some directivity angles, with tonal sound particularly well shielded. Predictions from two simple shielding theories were found to overestimate the shielding benefit.

  13. Duct wall impedance control as an advanced concept for acoustic impression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Tester, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    Models and tests on an acoustic duct liner system which has the property of controlled-variable acoustic impedance are described. This is achieved by a novel concept which uses the effect of steady air flow through a multi-layer, locally reacting, resonant-cavity absorber. The scope of this work was limited to a 'proof of concept.' The test of the concept was implemented by means of a small-scale, square-section flow duct facility designed specifically for acoustic measurements, with one side of the duct acoustically lined. The test liners were designed with the aid of previously established duct acoustic theory and a semi-empirical impedance model of the liner system. Over the limited range tested, the liner behaved primarily as predicted, exhibiting significant changes in resistance and reactance, thus providing the necessary concept validation.

  14. Experimental performance and acoustic investigation of modern, counterrotating blade concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoff, G. E.

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamic, acoustic, and aeromechanical performance of counterrotating blade concepts were evaluated both theoretically and experimentally. Analytical methods development and design are addressed. Utilizing the analytical methods which evolved during the conduct of this work, aerodynamic and aeroacoustic predictions were developed, which were compared to NASA and GE wind tunnel test results. The detailed mechanical design and fabrication of five different composite shell/titanium spar counterrotating blade set configurations are presented. Design philosophy, analyses methods, and material geometry are addressed, as well as the influence of aerodynamics, aeromechanics, and aeroacoustics on the design procedures. Blade fabrication and quality control procedures are detailed; bench testing procedures and results of blade integrity verification are presented; and instrumentation associated with the bench testing also is identified. Additional hardware to support specialized testing is described, as are operating blade instrumentation and the associated stress limits. The five counterrotating blade concepts were scaled to a tip diameter of 2 feet, so they could be incorporated into MPS (model propulsion simulators). Aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performance testing was conducted in the NASA Lewis 8 x 6 supersonic and 9 x 15 V/STOL (vertical or short takeoff and landing) wind tunnels and in the GE freejet anechoic test chamber (Cell 41) to generate an experimental data base for these counterrotating blade designs. Test facility and MPS vehicle matrices are provided, and test procedures are presented. Effects on performance of rotor-to-rotor spacing, angle-of-attack, pylon proximity, blade number, reduced-diameter aft blades, and mismatched rotor speeds are addressed. Counterrotating blade and specialized aeromechanical hub stability test results are also furnished.

  15. The Conceptional Design of the Shielding Layout and Beam Absorber at the PXIE

    SciTech Connect

    Eidelman, Yu.; Kerby, J.; Lebedev, V.; Leibfritz, J.; Leveling, T.; Nagaisev, S.; Stanek, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    Project X is a high intensity proton facility conceived to support a world-leading physics program at Fermilab. Project X will provide high intensity beams for neutrino, kaon, muon, and nuclei based experiments and for studies supporting energy applications. The Project X Injector Experiment (PIXIE) is a prototype of the Project X front end. A 30 MeV 50 kW beam will be used to validate the design concept of the Project X. This paper discusses a design of the accelerator enclosure radiation shielding and the beam dump.

  16. Advanced Jet Noise Exhaust Concepts in NASA's N+2 Supersonics Validation Study and the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project's Upcoming Hybrid Wing Body Acoustics Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Doty, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic and flow-field experiments were conducted on exhaust concepts for the next generation supersonic, commercial aircraft. The concepts were developed by Lockheed Martin (LM), Rolls-Royce Liberty Works (RRLW), and General Electric Global Research (GEGR) as part of an N+2 (next generation forward) aircraft system study initiated by the Supersonics Project in NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program. The experiments were conducted in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The exhaust concepts presented here utilized lobed-mixers and ejectors. A powered third-stream was implemented to improve ejector acoustic performance. One concept was found to produce stagnant flow within the ejector and the other produced discrete-frequency tones (due to flow separations within the model) that degraded the acoustic performance of the exhaust concept. NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project has been investigating a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft as a possible configuration for meeting N+2 system level goals for noise, emissions, and fuel burn. A recently completed NRA led by Boeing Research and Technology resulted in a full-scale aircraft design and wind tunnel model. This model will be tested acoustically in NASA Langley's 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel and will include dual jet engine simulators and broadband engine noise simulators as part of the test campaign. The objectives of the test are to characterize the system level noise, quantify the effects of shielding, and generate a valuable database for prediction method development. Further details of the test and various component preparations are described.

  17. Evaluation of Parallel-Element, Variable-Impedance, Broadband Acoustic Liner Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Howerton, Brian M.; Ayle, Earl

    2012-01-01

    Recent trends in aircraft engine design have highlighted the need for acoustic liners that provide broadband sound absorption with reduced liner thickness. Three such liner concepts are evaluated using the NASA normal incidence tube. Two concepts employ additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate liners with variable chamber depths. The first relies on scrubbing losses within narrow chambers to provide acoustic resistance necessary for sound absorption. The second employs wide chambers that provide minimal resistance, and relies on a perforated sheet to provide acoustic resistance. The variable-depth chambers used in both concepts result in reactance spectra near zero. The third liner concept employs mesh-caps (resistive sheets) embedded at variable depths within adjacent honeycomb chambers to achieve a desired impedance spectrum. Each of these liner concepts is suitable for use as a broadband sound absorber design, and a transmission line model is presented that provides good comparison with their respective acoustic impedance spectra. This model can therefore be used to design acoustic liners to accurately achieve selected impedance spectra. Finally, the effects of increasing the perforated facesheet thickness are demonstrated, and the validity of prediction models based on lumped element and wave propagation approaches is investigated. The lumped element model compares favorably with measured results for liners with thin facesheets, but the wave propagation model provides good comparisons for a wide range of facesheet thicknesses.

  18. Acoustic gunshot location in complex environments: concepts and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showen, R. L.; Calhoun, R. B.; Chu, Wai C.; Dunham, J. W.

    2008-04-01

    A gunshot location system can be implemented in complex urban environments using a distributed array of acoustic sensors. A primary difficulty in computing the source location is that unknown path obstructions in the environment interfere with the reception of the sound at the sensor, by blocking the sound entirely, by refracting the path, or by creating echoes. Other complications are created by the similarity between gunshot sounds and other less interesting urban noises, frequency-dependent absorption of sound, and possible computational difficulty when multiple gunshots generate large data sets that stress real-time analysis routines. The ShotSpotter Gunshot Location System®1, deployed in over two dozen cities in the United States, detects and locates gunfire using a network of acoustic sensors placed on rooftops and utility poles, on moving vehicles, or on personnel. This sensor network, combined with a software system to collate and compute location results from the array of sensors, accurately locates gunshot sounds in complex urban environments. A classifier discards solutions incorporating non-gunshot audio pulses produced by the complex environment. Examples of difficult detection problems, including gunshots from a moving source, show that the detection and classification algorithms described are effective at recovering useful results from signals found in real-world urban scenarios.

  19. Duct wall impedance control as an advanced concept for acoustic suppression enhancement. [engine noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.

    1978-01-01

    A systems concept procedure is described for the optimization of acoustic duct liner design for both uniform and multisegment types. The concept was implemented by the use of a double reverberant chamber flow duct facility coupled with sophisticated computer control and acoustic analysis systems. The optimization procedure for liner insertion loss was based on the concept of variable liner impedance produced by bias air flow through a multilayer, resonant cavity liner. A multiple microphone technique for in situ wall impedance measurements was used and successfully adapted to produce automated measurements for all liner configurations tested. The complete validation of the systems concept was prevented by the inability to optimize the insertion loss using bias flow induced wall impedance changes. This inability appeared to be a direct function of the presence of a higher order energy carrying modes which were not influenced significantly by the wall impedance changes.

  20. Instrumentation concepts and requirements for a space vacuum research facility. [molecular shield for spaceborne experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, H. N.

    1979-01-01

    An earth-orbiting molecular shield that offers a unique opportunity for conducting physics, chemistry, and material processing experiments under a combination of environmental conditions that are not available in terrestrial laboratories is equipped with apparatus for forming a molecular beam from the freestream. Experiments are carried out using a moderate energy, high flux density, high purity atomic oxygen beam in the very low density environment within the molecular shield. As a minimum, the following instruments are required for the molecular shield: (1) a mass spectrometer; (2) a multifunction material analysis instrumentation system; and (3) optical spectrometry equipment. The design is given of a furlable molecular shield that allows deployment and retrieval of the system (including instrumentation and experiments) to be performed without contamination. Interfaces between the molecular shield system and the associated spacecraft are given. An in-flight deployment sequence is discussed that minimizes the spacecraft-induced contamination in the vicinity of the shield. Design approaches toward a precursor molecular shield system are shown.

  1. Proof-of-Concept Assessment of a Photofission-Based Interrogation System for the Detection of Shielded Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J. L.; Yoon, W. Y.; Harker, Y. D.; Hoggan, J. M.; Haskell, K. J.; VanAusdeln, L. A.

    2000-11-01

    A photonuclear interrogation method was experimentally assessed for the detection of shielded nuclear materials. Proof-of-Concept assessment was performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) TA-18 facility and used the INEEL VARITRON electron accelerator. Experiments were performed to assess and characterize the delayed neutron emission responses for different nuclear materials with various shield configurations using three ''nominal'' electron beam energies; 8-, 10-, and 11-MeV. With the exception of highly enriched uranium (HEU), the nuclear materials assessed represent material types commonly encountered in commerce. The specific nuclear materials studied include a solid 4.8-kg HEU sphere, a 5-kg multiple-object, depleted uranium (DU) [uranium with about 0.2% enrichment with U-235] target, and two 11-kg thorium disks. The shield materials selected include polyethylene, borated-polyethylene, and lead. Experimental results, supported with numerical predictions, have shown that the photonuclear interrogation technique is quite capable of detecting shielded nuclear material via the direct measurement of the photofission-induced delayed neutron emissions. To identify or discriminate between nuclear material types (i.e., depleted uranium, HEU, and thorium), a ratio of delayed neutron counts at two different beam energies is utilized. This latter method, referred to as the dual-beam energy ratio Figure-of-Merit, allows one to differentiate among the three nuclear material types.

  2. Concept for Dismantling the Reactor Vessel and the Biological Shield of the Compact Sodium-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Facility (KNK)

    SciTech Connect

    Hillebrand, I.; Benkert, J.

    2002-02-27

    The Compact Sodium-cooled Nuclear Reactor Facility (KNK) was an experimental nuclear power plant of 20 MW electric power erected on the premises of the Karlsruhe Research Center. The plant was initially run as KNK I with a thermal core between 1971 and 1974 and then, between 1977 and 1991, with a fast core as the KNK II fast breeder plant. Under the decommissioning concept, the plant is to be decommissioned completely to green field conditions at the end of 2005 in ten steps, i.e. under the corresponding ten decommissioning permits. To this day, nine decommissioning permits have been issued, the first one in 1993 and the most recent one, number nine, in 2001. The decommissioning and demolition activities covered by decommissioning permits 1 to 7 have been completed. Under the 8th Decommissioning Permit, the components of the primary system and the rotating reactor top shield are to be removed by late 2001. Under the 9th Decommissioning Permit, the reactor vessel with its internals, the primary shield, and the biological shield are to be dismantled. The residual sodium volume in the reactor vessel was estimated to amount to approx. 30 l. The maximum Co-60 activation is on the order of 107-108 Bq/g; the maximum dose rate in the middle of the vessel was measured in April 1997 to be 55 Sv/h. The difficulty involved especially in dismantling KNK, on the one hand, is posed by the residual sodium in the plant, which determines the choice of neither wet nor thermical techniques to be used in disassembly. Another difficulty is caused by the depth of activation by fast neutrons, as a result of which not only the reactor vessel proper, but also the entire primary shield (60 cm of grey cast iron) and large parts of the biological shield must be disassembled and disposed of under remote control.

  3. New concepts on MV distribution from insulated shield wires of HV lines

    SciTech Connect

    Iliceto, F. ); Cinieri, E. . Ist. di Fisica); Casely-Hayford, L. )

    1989-10-01

    The paper deals with the problem of the most cost effective power supply to the villages and communities of developing countries, located along the route of HV lines, up to 100 km distant from the HV/MV transformer stations. In the first part of the paper a novel solution is presented. This consists of: (i) insulation of the shield wire(s) of an HV line, and wire(s) energization at MV (10 to 34.5 kV) from the closest transformer station; (ii) supply of villages along the line route by means of standard MV/LV distribution transformers connected between the shield wire(s) and ground. Four different schemes are presented, two of them suitable for single-phase distribution, the others for 3-phase supply. The behaviour in steady-state and in transient conditions is analyzed. The second part of the paper reports the positive results of 33 months of operation of an experimental scheme tested in Ghana for supply of single-phase and 3-phase loads from the two insulated shield wires of a 161 kV line. Finally the paper describes the distribution schemes along 407 km of new 161 kV lines in Northern Ghana, where the novel solution is applied to supply power to both domestic and industrial loads in 12 small towns with a design aggregate load of 5000 kW.

  4. Validation of a phase-mass characterization concept and interface for acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Montagut, Yeison; García, José V; Jiménez, Yolanda; March, Carmen; Montoya, Angel; Arnau, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic wave resonator techniques are widely used in in-liquid biochemical applications. The main challenges remaining are the improvement of sensitivity and limit of detection, as well as multianalysis capabilities and reliability. The sensitivity improvement issue has been addressed by increasing the sensor frequency, using different techniques such as high fundamental frequency quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs), surface generated acoustic waves (SGAWs) and film bulk acoustic resonators (FBARs). However, this sensitivity improvement has not been completely matched in terms of limit of detection. The decrease on frequency stability due to the increase of the phase noise, particularly in oscillators, has made it impossible to increase the resolution. A new concept of sensor characterization at constant frequency has been recently proposed based on the phase/mass sensitivity equation: Δφ/Δm ≈ -1/m(L), where m(L) is the liquid mass perturbed by the resonator. The validation of the new concept is presented in this article. An immunosensor application for the detection of a low molecular weight pollutant, the insecticide carbaryl, has been chosen as a validation model. PMID:22163871

  5. Shielding concepts for low-background proportional counter arrays in surface laboratories.

    PubMed

    Aalseth, C E; Humble, P H; Mace, E K; Orrell, J L; Seifert, A; Williams, R M

    2016-02-01

    Development of ultra low background gas proportional counters has made the contribution from naturally occurring radioactive isotopes - primarily α and β activity in the uranium and thorium decay chains - inconsequential to instrumental sensitivity levels when measurements are performed in above ground surface laboratories. Simple lead shielding is enough to mitigate against gamma rays as gas proportional counters are already relatively insensitive to naturally occurring gamma radiation. The dominant background in these surface laboratory measurements using ultra low background gas proportional counters is due to cosmic ray generated muons, neutrons, and protons. Studies of measurements with ultra low background gas proportional counters in surface and underground laboratories as well as radiation transport Monte Carlo simulations suggest a preferred conceptual design to achieve the highest possible sensitivity from an array of low background gas proportional counters when operated in a surface laboratory. The basis for a low background gas proportional counter array and the preferred shielding configuration is reported, especially in relation to measurements of radioactive gases having low energy decays such as (37)Ar. PMID:26720259

  6. Hypervelocity impact tests and simulations of single Whipple bumper shield concepts at 10 km/s

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Hertel, E.S. ); Hill, S.A. )

    1992-01-01

    A series of experiments has been performed to evaluate the effectiveness of a Whipple bumper shield to orbital space debris at impact velocities of [approximately] 10 km/s. Upon impact by a 19 mm (0.87 nun thick, L/D [approximately]0.5) flier plate, the thin aluminum bumper shield disintegrates into a debris cloud. The debris cloud front propagates axially at velocities of [approximately]14 km/s and expands radially at a velocity of [approximately]7 km/s. Subsequent loading by the debris on a 3.2 mm thick aluminum substructure placed 114 mm from the bumper penetrates the substructure completely. However, when the diameter of the flier plate is reduced to 12.7 mm, the substructure, although damaged, is not perforated over the duration of the experiment. Numerical simulations performed using the multi-dimensional hydrodynamics code CTH also predict complete perforation of the substructure by the subsequent debris cloud for the larger flier plate. The numerical simulation for a 12.7 mm flier plate, however, shows a strong dependence on assumed impact geometry, i.e., a spherical projectile impact geometry does not result in perforation of the substructure by the subsequent debris cloud, while the flat plate impact geometry results in perforation.

  7. Hypervelocity impact tests and simulations of single Whipple bumper shield concepts at 10 km/s

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Hertel, E.S.; Hill, S.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of experiments has been performed to evaluate the effectiveness of a Whipple bumper shield to orbital space debris at impact velocities of {approximately} 10 km/s. Upon impact by a 19 mm (0.87 nun thick, L/D {approximately}0.5) flier plate, the thin aluminum bumper shield disintegrates into a debris cloud. The debris cloud front propagates axially at velocities of {approximately}14 km/s and expands radially at a velocity of {approximately}7 km/s. Subsequent loading by the debris on a 3.2 mm thick aluminum substructure placed 114 mm from the bumper penetrates the substructure completely. However, when the diameter of the flier plate is reduced to 12.7 mm, the substructure, although damaged, is not perforated over the duration of the experiment. Numerical simulations performed using the multi-dimensional hydrodynamics code CTH also predict complete perforation of the substructure by the subsequent debris cloud for the larger flier plate. The numerical simulation for a 12.7 mm flier plate, however, shows a strong dependence on assumed impact geometry, i.e., a spherical projectile impact geometry does not result in perforation of the substructure by the subsequent debris cloud, while the flat plate impact geometry results in perforation.

  8. The concept of cyclic sound intensity and its application to acoustical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, B.; Antoni, J.; Sidahmed, M.; Polac, L.

    2011-04-01

    This paper demonstrates how to take advantage of the cyclostationarity property of engine signals to define a new acoustical quantity, the cyclic sound intensity, which displays the instantaneous flux of acoustical energy in the angle-frequency domain during an average engine cycle. This quantity is attractive in that it possesses the ability of being instantaneous and averaged at the same time, thus reconciling two conflicting properties into a rigourous and unambiguous framework. Cyclic sound intensity is a rich concept with several original ramifications. Among other things, it returns a unique decomposition into instantaneous active and reactive parts. Associated to acoustical imaging techniques, it allows the construction of sound radiation movies that evolve within the engine cycle and whose each frame is a sound intensity map calculated at a specific time - or crankshaft angle - in the engine cycle. This enables the accurate localisation of sources in space, in frequency and in time (crankshaft angle). Furthermore, associated to cyclic Wiener filtering, this methodology makes it possible to decompose the overall radiated sound into several noise source contributions whose cyclic sound intensities can then be analysed independently.

  9. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  10. Foundation, excavation and radiation shielding concepts for a 16-m large lunar telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, Koon M.; Johnson, Stewart W.

    1991-01-01

    NASA is considering a 16-m diameter optical telescope on the moon as a part of the Space Exploration Initiative. Fundamental concepts of engineering activities on the moon and how they can be applied to the establishment of a 16-m large lunar telescope (LLT) are discussed. These fundamental concepts include the engineering response of lunar soils and how they affect construction activities, namely, drilling, blasting, ripping, digging and compaction. A mirror support structure and foundation design concept is proposed. The foundation considered is a multiple contact points spud-can type footing. It does not appear that a deep foundation or the presence of bedrock is required to achieve the telescope foundation stiffness. The LLT system will include a regolith covered housing, the size of a small room, which will contain sensitive electronic equipment including charge coupled devices which need protection from cosmic radiation effects. A brief discussion is made on radiation, radiation transport and radiation effects on electronics and on humans. Radiation protection techniques and the different emplacement schemes for the LLT instrument housing for radiation protection are suggested. A structural concept of an early lunar based telescope is also presented.

  11. Progress Toward Electrostatic Radiation Shielding of Interplanetary Spacecraft: Strategies, Concepts and Technical Challenges of Human Exploration Beyond Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    The radiation problem is a serious obstacle to solar system exploration. Electrostatic shielding was previously dismissed as unworkable. This was based on the false assumption that radial symmetry is needed to provide isotropic protection. KSC recently demonstrated the feasibility of asymmetric, multipole electrostatic shielding. Combined with passive shielding it might solve the radiation problem

  12. Heat shields for aircraft - A new concept to save lives in crash fires.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neel, C. B.; Parker, J. A.; Fish, R. H.; Henshaw, J.; Newland, J. H.; Tempesta, F. L.

    1971-01-01

    A passenger compartment surrounded by a fire-retardant shell, to protect the occupants long enough for the fire to burn out or for fire-fighting equipment to reach the aircraft and extinguish it, is proposed as a new concept for saving lives in crash fires. This concept is made possible by the recent development of two new fire-retardant materials: a very lightweight foam plastic, called polyisocyanurate foam, and an intumescent paint. Exposed to heat, the intumescent paint expands to many times its original thickness and insulates the surface underneath it. Demonstration tests are illustrated, described and discussed. However, some problems, such as preventing fuselage rupture and protecting windows, must be solved before such a system can be used.

  13. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  14. A deployable high temperature superconducting coil (DHTSC) - A novel concept for producing magnetic shields against both solar flare and Galactic radiation during manned interplanetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocks, F. Hadley

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of materials which are superconducting above 100 K makes possible the use of superconducting coils deployed beyong the hull of an interplanetary spacecraft to produce a magnetic shield capable of giving protection not only against solar flare radiation, but also even against Galactic radiation. Such deployed coils can be of very large size and can thus achieve the great magnetic moments required using only relatively low currents. Deployable high-temperature-superconducting coil magnetic shields appear to offer very substantial reductions in mass and energy compared to other concepts and could readily provide the radiation protection needed for a Mars mission or space colonies.

  15. Cost and schedule estimate to construct the tunnel and shaft remedial shielding concept, Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-30

    The report provides an estimate of the cost and associated schedule to construct the tunnel and shaft remedial shielding concept. The cost and schedule estimate is based on a preliminary concept intended to address the potential radiation effects on Line D and Line Facilities in event of a beam spill. The construction approach utilizes careful tunneling methods based on available excavation and ground support technology. The tunneling rates and overall productivity on which the cost and project schedule are estimated are based on conservative assumptions with appropriate contingencies to address the uncertainty associated with geological conditions. The report is intended to provide supplemental information which will assist in assessing the feasibility of the tunnel and shaft concept and justification for future development of this particular aspect of remedial shielding for Line D and Line D Facilities.

  16. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2011-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). By increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate concept MLI blankets for MMOD shields. In conjunction, these MLI blankets and the subsequent MMOD shields were also evaluated for their radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. These concepts were evaluated against the ISS MLI blankets and the ISS MMOD shield, which acted as the baseline. These radiation shielding assessments were performed using the high charge and energy transport software (HZETRN). This software is based on a one-dimensional formula of the Boltzmann transport equation with a straight-ahead approximation. Each configuration was evaluated against the following environments to provide a diverse view of radiation shielding effectiveness in most space environments within the heliosphere: August 1972 solar particle event, October 1989 solar particle event, 1982 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar maximum), 1987 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar minimum), and a low earth orbit environment in 1970 that corresponded to an altitude of 400 km and inclination of 51.6 . Both the absorbed dose and the dose equivalent were analyzed, but the focus of the discussion was on the dose equivalent since the data is most concerned with radiation shielding of the crew. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for

  17. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). Increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate a concept MLI blanket for an MMOD shield. In conjunction, this MLI blanket and the subsequent MMOD shield was also evaluated for its radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. The overall MMOD shielding system using the concept MLI blanket proved to only have a marginal increase in the radiation mitigating properties. Therefore, subsequent analysis was performed on various conceptual MMOD shields to determine the combination of materials that may prove superior for radiation mitigating purposes. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for radiation shielding effectiveness.

  18. Morphology, acoustic characteristics, and Late Quaternary growth of conception Fan, Santa Barbara basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, S.M.C.

    1986-04-01

    A radial borderland-basin fan in the western half of the Santa Barbara basin, the Conception Fan, shows characteristics of a debris slope. More than 3000 mi of closely spaced (3.5 kHz) high-resolution profiles, 270 gravity cores, and 8 borings were used to map channel and fan morphology, and channel, levee, and lobe acoustic facies. Two major unconformities are recognized on the seismic profiles. The upper unconformity represents the 10-k.y.B.P. horizon. The lower unconformity is the erosional surface of the late Wisconsinan lowstand of sea level, 18-26 k.y.B.P. Eustasy and tectonism produced two pulses of deposition, each from a different point source, during the Flandrian transgression. Prior to the late Pleistocene, the Conception Fan was fed by one major canyon/channel system, above the western part of the fan. During the late Pleistocene, two small submarine canyons were cut into the slope 7 mi east. Four major channels, smaller than the western channel system, were incised into the fan surface, indicating the eustatic decrease in sediment input. The fault-controlled western canyon (Sacate) fed all but the eastern channel. Faulting and slumping on the slope cut the eastern canyon (Gaviota) and formed the eastern channel. Numerous slope gullies influenced eastern canyon and channel development. Holocene currents rounding Point Conception have winnowed fine sediments in the western channel region, resulting in hummocky topography and the scoured appearance of the channel. Hemipelagic deposition dominates the lower-middle and lower fan of the eastern part of the fan. The western part of the fan seems to be receiving slope-like deposits over the relict fan surface.

  19. Shipboard acoustic Doppler profiler velocity observations near Point Conception: Spring 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, J. A.; Brink, K. H.

    1987-04-01

    During April 1983, shipboard Doppler acoustic log current profiles were collected in an effort to characterize the flow field near points Conception and Arguello, California. Subsurface velocity maps derived from these profiles have been used to describe spatial flow structures both on and off the shelf and to investigate flow variability as a function of time and of wind stress. Persistent westward flow out of the northern half of the Santa Barbara Channel and eastward flow into its southern half were observed regardless of the direction of the local wind stress. During one well-documented upwelling-favorable wind event, currents responded in the form of an energetic (maximum 21-m speeds of >60 cm s-1) offshore squirt of cold water. During weak or downwelling-favorable winds, currents continuous with the Santa Barbara Channel outflow were observed flowing to the northwest following the local isobaths before turning offshore west of Point Arguello. Evidence for wind forcing of current fluctuations nearshore between the points and north of Point Arguello was found. Lack of a thermal wind balance between directly measured velocity shear and horizontal density gradient was explained by the presence of large accelerations in the momentum equations. Lack of a consistent relation between velocity and temperature gradient illustrates the difficulty in estimating velocity from temperature information alone in this area.

  20. Thermocouple shield

    SciTech Connect

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2009-11-24

    A thermocouple shield for use in radio frequency fields. In some embodiments the shield includes an electrically conductive tube that houses a standard thermocouple having a thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube protects the thermocouple from damage by an RF (including microwave) field and mitigates erroneous temperature readings due to the microwave or RF field. The thermocouple may be surrounded by a ceramic sheath to further protect the thermocouple. The ceramic sheath is generally formed from a material that is transparent to the wavelength of the microwave or RF energy. The microwave transparency property precludes heating of the ceramic sheath due to microwave coupling, which could affect the accuracy of temperature measurements. The ceramic sheath material is typically an electrically insulating material. The electrically insulative properties of the ceramic sheath help avert electrical arcing, which could damage the thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube is generally disposed around the thermocouple junction and disposed around at least a portion of the ceramic sheath. The concepts of the thermocouple shield may be incorporated into an integrated shielded thermocouple assembly.

  1. Lightweight Shield Against Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.; Lawson, Bobby E.; Miller, Andre E.; Cobb, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents concept for lightweight, deployable shield protecting orbiting spacecraft against meteoroids and debris, and functions as barrier to conductive and radiative losses of heat. Shield made in four segments providing 360 degree coverage of cylindrical space-station module.

  2. SU-C-16A-04: Dosimetric Validation of a Partially-Shielded Gd-153 Brachytherapy Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X; Adams, Q; Flynn, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate by measurement that using partially shielded Gd-153 sources for rotating-shield brachytherapy (RSBT) is feasible. RSBT is a potentially superior alternative to conventional high-dose-rate brachytherapy and provides the opportunity to dramatically improve tumor dose conformity for the treatment of, for example, prostate cancer. Methods: A custom-built, stainless steel encapsulated 150 mCi Gd-153 capsule with an outer length of 12.8 mm, outer diameter of 2.10 mm, active length of 9.98 mm, and active diameter of 1.53 mm was used. A partially shielded catheter was constructed with a 500 μm platinum shield and a 500 μm aluminum emission window, both with 180° azimuthal coverage. An acrylic phantom was constructed to measure the dose distributions from the shielded catheter in the transverse plane using Gafchromic EBT3 films. Film calibration curves were generated from 50, 70, and 100 kVp x-ray beams with NIST-traceable air kerma values to account for energy variation. Results: The transmission ratios of platinum to aluminum shielding at 1 cm off-axis are 7.5% and 7.6% for Monte Carlo (MCNP5) predicted and experimental results, respectively. The predicted/measured relative dose rates at 1 cm, 2 cm and 3 cm off-axis through the Al window were 100%/92.9%, 28.6%/27.0% and 13.8%/12.7%, respectively. Through the Pt shield, the predicted/measured relative dose rates were 7.5%/7.1%, 3.8%/3.0% and 2.4%/1.7%, respectively. Conclusion: Using partially-shielded Gd-153 sources for RSBT is a promising approach to improving brachytherapy dose distributions. The next step in making Gd-153 based RSBT a reality is developing a Gd-153 source that is small enough such that the source, shield, and catheter all fit within a 16 gauge needle, which has a 1.65 mm diameter. University of Iowa Research Foundation.

  3. A model of acoustic interspeaker variability based on the concept of formant-cavity affiliation.

    PubMed

    Apostol, Lian; Perrier, Pascal; Bailly, Gérard

    2004-01-01

    A method is proposed to model the interspeaker variability of formant patterns for oral vowels. It is assumed that this variability originates in the differences existing among speakers in the respective lengths of their front and back vocal-tract cavities. In order to characterize, from the spectral description of the acoustic speech signal, these vocal-tract differences between speakers, each formant is interpreted, according to the concept of formant-cavity affiliation, as a resonance of a specific vocal-tract cavity. Its frequency can thus be directly related to the corresponding cavity length, and a transformation model can be proposed from a speaker A to a speaker B on the basis of the frequency ratios of the formants corresponding to the same resonances. In order to minimize the number of sounds to be recorded for each speaker in order to carry out this speaker transformation, the frequency ratios are exactly computed only for the three extreme cardinal vowels [i, a, u] and they are approximated for the remaining vowels through an interpolation function. The method is evaluated through its capacity to transform the (F1,F2) formant patterns of eight oral vowels pronounced by five male speakers into the (F1,F2) patterns of the corresponding vowels generated by an articulatory model of the vocal tract. The resulting formant patterns are compared to those provided by normalization techniques published in the literature. The proposed method is found to be efficient, but a number of limitations are also observed and discussed. These limitations can be associated with the formant-cavity affiliation model itself or with a possible influence of speaker-specific vocal-tract geometry in the cross-sectional direction, which the model might not have taken into account. PMID:14759026

  4. A model of acoustic interspeaker variability based on the concept of formant-cavity affiliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, Lian; Perrier, Pascal; Bailly, Gérard

    2004-01-01

    A method is proposed to model the interspeaker variability of formant patterns for oral vowels. It is assumed that this variability originates in the differences existing among speakers in the respective lengths of their front and back vocal-tract cavities. In order to characterize, from the spectral description of the acoustic speech signal, these vocal-tract differences between speakers, each formant is interpreted, according to the concept of formant-cavity affiliation, as a resonance of a specific vocal-tract cavity. Its frequency can thus be directly related to the corresponding cavity length, and a transformation model can be proposed from a speaker A to a speaker B on the basis of the frequency ratios of the formants corresponding to the same resonances. In order to minimize the number of sounds to be recorded for each speaker in order to carry out this speaker transformation, the frequency ratios are exactly computed only for the three extreme cardinal vowels [eye, aye, you] and they are approximated for the remaining vowels through an interpolation function. The method is evaluated through its capacity to transform the (F1,F2) formant patterns of eight oral vowels pronounced by five male speakers into the (F1,F2) patterns of the corresponding vowels generated by an articulatory model of the vocal tract. The resulting formant patterns are compared to those provided by normalization techniques published in the literature. The proposed method is found to be efficient, but a number of limitations are also observed and discussed. These limitations can be associated with the formant-cavity affiliation model itself or with a possible influence of speaker-specific vocal-tract geometry in the cross-sectional direction, which the model might not have taken into account.

  5. Measuring the parameters of sea-surface roughness by underwater acoustic systems: discussion of the device concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaev, V. Yu.; Kanevsky, M. B.; Meshkov, E. M.

    2011-02-01

    We consider the concept of an underwater acoustic wave gauge designed to measure statistical characteristics of sea-surface roughness. It is proposed to be based on a centimeter-wave underwater sonar sending probing signals vertically upwards. It is shown that the use of three antennas in such a system is sufficient to measure all statistical second-order moments of sea roughness which is large-scale compared with the acoustic-radiation wavelength. This method can be used for the first time to measure the sea wave parameters which determine the characteristics of the reflected radar signals. The proposed acoustic wave gauge can be used as an independent measuring device, as well as an additional underwater unit of a conventional sea buoy. This will allow one to increase the amount of information about surface waves, which is received from the buoy, at a minimal cost and will make it possible to calibrate new remote sounding systems capable of measuring the variance of sea-surface slopes.

  6. Mapping acoustic emissions from hydraulic fracture treatments using coherent array processing: Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.B.; Sherwood, R.J.; Jarpe, S.P.; Harben, P.E.

    1991-09-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a widely-used well completion technique for enhancing the recovery of gas and oil in low-permeability formations. Hydraulic fracturing consists of pumping fluids into a well under high pressure (1000--5000 psi) to wedge-open and extend a fracture into the producing formation. The fracture acts as a conduit for gas and oil to flow back to the well, significantly increasing communication with larger volumes of the producing formation. A considerable amount of research has been conducted on the use of acoustic (microseismic) emission to delineate fracture growth. The use of transient signals to map the location of discrete sites of emission along fractures has been the focus of most research on methods for delineating fractures. These methods depend upon timing the arrival of compressional (P) or shear (S) waves from discrete fracturing events at one or more clamped geophones in the treatment well or in adjacent monitoring wells. Using a propagation model, the arrival times are used to estimate the distance from each sensor to the fracturing event. Coherent processing methods appear to have sufficient resolution in the 75 to 200 Hz band to delineate the extent of fractures induced by hydraulic fracturing. The medium velocity structure must be known with a 10% accuracy or better and no major discontinuities should be undetected. For best results, the receiving array must be positioned directly opposite the perforations (same depths) at a horizontal range of 200 to 400 feet from the region to be imaged. Sources of acoustic emission may be detectable down to a single-sensor SNR of 0.25 or somewhat less. These conclusions are limited by the assumptions of this study: good coupling to the formation, acoustic propagation, and accurate knowledge of the velocity structure.

  7. Shields-1, A SmallSat Radiation Shielding Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, D. Laurence, III; Kim, Wousik; Cutler, James W.

    2015-01-01

    out of low earth orbit (LEO) missions by using these tested material concepts as shielding for sensitive components and new spaceflight hardware

  8. Two-leg longwall shield mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Barczak, T.M.; Schwemmer, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    This report investigates shield mechanics by describing the elastic response and interaction of shield components to applied vertical and horizontal displacements for various canopy and base contact configurations. This research provides information on generalized shield mechanics, which is applicable in describing the behavior of all two-leg shield supports. Utilizing mechanics of materials concepts and known kinematic relationships for two-leg shield supports, free-body diagrams are constructed for each shield component illustrating internal axial, shear, and bending moment responses required to maintain equilibrium for each load case evaluated. Predicted shield (component) responses are verified by controlled displacements of instrumented longwall shields in a mine roof simulator. Conclusions drawn from these analyses indicate shield structural responses are significantly dependent upon canopy and base contact configurations. Applications of shield mechanics to in situ support monitoring are discussed. An objective of this research program is to establish unique shield responses to identify in situ load conditions.

  9. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  10. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers. PMID:25839273

  11. Active Shielding and Control of Environmental Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, S. V.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the research project supported by NASA under grant # NAG-1-01064, we have studied the mathematical aspects of the problem of active control of sound, i.e., time-harmonic acoustic disturbances. The foundations of the methodology are described in our paper [1]. Unlike. many other existing techniques, the approach of [1] provides for the exact volumetric cancellation of the unwanted noise on a given predetermined region airspace, while leaving unaltered those components of the total acoustic field that are deemed as friendly. The key finding of the work is that for eliminating the unwanted component of the acoustic field in a given area, one needs to know relatively little; in particular, neither the locations nor structure nor strength of the exterior noise sources need to be known. Likewise, there is no need to know the volumetric properties of the supporting medium across which the acoustic signals propagate, except, maybe, in a narrow area of space near the perimeter of the protected region. The controls are built based solely on the measurements performed on the perimeter of the domain to be shielded; moreover, the controls themselves (i.e., additional sources) are concentrated also only on or near this perimeter. Perhaps as important, the measured quantities can refer to the total acoustic field rather than to its unwanted component only, and the methodology can automatically distinguish between the two. In [1], we have constructed the general solution for controls. The apparatus used for deriving this general solution is closely connected to the concepts of generalized potentials and boundary projections of Calderon's type. For a given total wave field, the application of a Calderon's projection allows one to definitively tell between its incoming and outgoing components with respect to a particular domain of interest, which may have arbitrary shape. Then, the controls are designed so that they suppress the incoming component for the domain

  12. Modular shield

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Keith W.

    2002-01-01

    A modular system for containing projectiles has a sheet of material including at least a polycarbonate layer held by a metal frame having a straight frame member corresponding to each straight edge of the sheet. Each frame member has a U-shaped shield channel covering and holding a straight edge of the sheet and an adjacent U-shaped clamp channel rigidly held against the shield channel. A flexible gasket separates each sheet edge from its respective shield channel; and each frame member is fastened to each adjacent frame member only by clamps extending between adjacent clamp channels.

  13. Shielding analysis of a small compact space nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodrow, Lee L., Jr.

    1987-08-01

    The SP-100 reactor, currently in its developmental stage, has a layered tungsten-lithium hydride shield. Studies indicate that this shield configuration is the lightest weight shield. This configuration and three other shielding concepts were analyzed to determine the lightest shield and to determine the shield configuration with the smallest volume. The other concepts were a boron carbide-beryllium layered shield, and a lithium hydride-beryllium shield. FEMP2D and FEMP1D codes were used in this analysis. These codes were developed at Sandia National Laboatory (SNL), using the input from another code, RFCC, which produced enery dependent dose conversion factors, and determined the shields' ability to attenuate the neutron and gamma radiation to permissible dose limits. The results of this analysis show that the lithium hydribe-tungsten layered shield was indeed the lightest weight shield. Volume, not weight, may be the driving factor in determining the shield configuration.

  14. REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  15. Shielding for thermoacoustic tomography with RF excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, M.; Becker, G.; Dey, P.; Generotzky, J.; Patch, S. K.

    2008-02-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) pulses used to generate thermoacoustic computerized tomography (TCT) signal couple directly into the pulser-receiver and oscilloscope, swamping true TCT signal. We use a standard RF enclosure housing both RF amplifier and object being imaged. This is similar to RF shielding of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suites and protects electronics outside from stray RF. Unlike MRI, TCT receivers are ultrasound transducers, which must also be shielded from RF. A transducer housing that simultaneously shields RF and permits acoustic transmission was developed specifically for TCT. We compare TCT signals measured with and without RF shielding.

  16. Measurement of the transient shielding effectiveness of shielding cabinets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlemann, H.; Koch, M.

    2008-05-01

    Recently, new definitions of shielding effectiveness (SE) for high-frequency and transient electromagnetic fields were introduced by Klinkenbusch (2005). Analytical results were shown for closed as well as for non closed cylindrical shields. In the present work, the shielding performance of different shielding cabinets is investigated by means of numerical simulations and measurements inside a fully anechoic chamber and a GTEM-cell. For the GTEM-cell-measurements, a downscaled model of the shielding cabinet is used. For the simulations, the numerical tools CONCEPT II and COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS were available. The numerical results agree well with the measurements. They can be used to interpret the behaviour of the shielding effectiveness of enclosures as function of frequency. From the measurement of the electric and magnetic fields with and without the enclosure in place, the electric and magnetic shielding effectiveness as well as the transient shielding effectiveness of the enclosure are calculated. The transient SE of four different shielding cabinets is determined and discussed.

  17. Exploratory Environmental Tests of Several Heat Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, George P.; Betts, John, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    Exploratory tests have been conducted with several conceptual radiative heat shields of composite construction. Measured transient temperature distributions were obtained for a graphite heat shield without insulation and with three types of insulating materials, and for a metal multipost heat shield, at surface temperatures of approximately 2,000 F and 1,450 F, respectively, by use of a radiant-heat facility. The graphite configurations suffered loss of surface material under repeated irradiation. Temperature distribution calculated for the metal heat shield by a numerical procedure was in good agreement with measured data. Environmental survival tests of the graphite heat shield without insulation, an insulated multipost heat shield, and a stainless-steel-tile heat shield were made at temperatures of 2,000 F and dynamic pressures of approximately 6,000 lb/sq ft, provided by an ethylene-heated jet operating at a Mach number of 2.0 and sea-level conditions. The graphite heat shield survived the simulated aerodynamic heating and pressure loading. A problem area exists in the design and materials for heat-resistant fasteners between the graphite shield and the base structure. The insulated multipost heat shield was found to be superior to the stainless-steel-tile heat shield in retarding heat flow. Over-lapped face-plate joints and surface smoothness of the insulated multi- post heat shield were not adversely affected by the test environment. The graphite heat shield without insulation survived tests made in the acoustic environment of a large air jet. This acoustic environment is random in frequency and has an overall noise level of 160 decibels.

  18. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  19. A Numerical Investigation of Turbine Noise Source Hierarchy and Its Acoustic Transmission Characteristics: Proof-of-Concept Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane

    2008-01-01

    A CFD-based simulation of single-stage turbine was done using the TURBO code to assess its viability for determining acoustic transmission through blade rows. Temporal and spectral analysis of the unsteady pressure data from the numerical simulations showed the allowable Tyler-Sofrin modes that are consistent with expectations. This indicated that high-fidelity acoustic transmission calculations are feasible with TURBO.

  20. Radiation shielding for lunar bases using lunar concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, S. L.; Oishi, K.; Saito, T.

    1992-08-01

    The radiation shielding requirements for an advanced lunar base concept which uses concrete made from lunar resources are evaluated. Some of the features of this lunar base concept are discussed. The results of radiation transport calculations are presented to determine the radiation dose as a function of shielding depth. The shielding effectiveness of concrete is compared with that of aluminum, lunar regolith, and water. It is shown that lunar concrete is a fairly effective radiation shield, and that the concrete lunar base concept can provide a significant amount of intrinsic shielding without requiring additional parasitic shielding.

  1. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  2. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  3. Concepts and Tests for the Remote-Controlled Dismantling of the Biological Shield and Form work of the KNK Reactor - 13425

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Sylvia; Graf, Anja; Petrick, Holger; Rothschmitt, Stefan; Klute, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    The compact sodium-cooled nuclear reactor facility Karlsruhe (KNK), a prototype Fast Breeder, is currently in an advanced stage of dismantling. Complete dismantling is based on 10 partial licensing steps. In the frame of the 9. decommissioning permit, which is currently ongoing, the dismantling of the biological shield is foreseen. The biological shield consists of heavy reinforced concrete with built-in steel fitments, such as form-work of the reactor tank, pipe sleeves, ventilation channels, and measuring devices. Due to the activation of the inner part of the biological shield, dismantling has to be done remote-controlled. During a comprehensive basic design phase a practical dismantling strategy was developed. Necessary equipment and tools were defined. Preliminary tests revealed that hot wire plasma cutting is the most favorable cutting technology due to the geometrical boundary conditions, the varying distance between cutter and material, and the heavy concrete behind the steel form-work. The cutting devices will be operated remotely via a carrier system with an industrial manipulator. The carrier system has expandable claws to adjust to the varying diameter of the reactor shaft during dismantling progress. For design approval of this prototype development, interaction between manipulator and hot wire plasma cutting was tested in a real configuration. For the demolition of the concrete structure, an excavator with appropriate tools, such as a hydraulic hammer, was selected. Other mechanical cutting devices, such as a grinder or rope saw, were eliminated because of concrete containing steel spheres added to increase the shielding factor of the heavy concrete. Dismantling of the biological shield will be done in a ring-wise manner due to static reasons. During the demolition process, the excavator is positioned on its tripod in three concrete recesses made prior to the dismantling of the separate concrete rings. The excavator and the manipulator carrier system

  4. Sound shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, T. R., Jr.; Beckwith, I. E. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An improved test section for a supersonic or hypersonic wind tunnel is disclosed wherein the model tested is shielded from the noise normally radiated by the turbulent tunnel wall boundary layer. A vacuum plenum surrounds spaced rod elements making up the test chamber to extract some of the boundary layer as formed along the rod elements during a test to thereby delay the tendency of the rod boundary layers to become turbulent. Novel rod construction involves bending each rod slightly prior to machining the bent area to provide a flat segment on each rod for connection with the flat entrance fairing. Rods and fairing are secured to provide a test chamber incline on the order of 1 deg outward from the noise shield centerline to produce up to 65% reduction of the root mean square (rms) pressure over previously employed wind tunnel test sections at equivalent Reynolds numbers.

  5. Flexible Shields for Protecting Spacecraft Against Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Crews, Jeanne Lee

    2004-01-01

    A report presents the concept of Flexshield a class of versatile, lightweight, flexible shields for protecting spacecraft against impacts by small meteors and orbiting debris. The Flexshield concept incorporates elements of, but goes beyond, prior spacecraft-shielding concepts, including those of Whipple shields and, more recently, multi-shock shields and multi-shock blankets. A shield of the Flexshield type includes multiple outer layers (called bumpers in the art) made, variously, of advanced ceramic and/or polymeric fibers spaced apart from each other by a lightweight foam. As in prior such shields, the bumpers serve to shock an impinging hypervelocity particle, causing it to disintegrate vaporize, and spread out over a larger area so that it can be stopped by an innermost layer (back sheet). The flexibility of the fabric layers and compressibility of the foam make it possible to compress and fold the shield for transport, then deploy the shield for use. The shield can be attached to a spacecraft by use of snaps, hook-and-pile patches, or other devices. The shield can also contain multilayer insulation material, so that it provides some thermal protection in addition to mechanical protection.

  6. Remedial shielding concepts for Line D and Line D facilities, Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico: Appendix 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pye, J.H.

    1992-05-28

    This appendix contains the structural embankment analysis of the following Line D tunnel sections: 6(T/21), 5(21/21), 3(21/21), 2(21/21), 1(21/21), 2(21/24), 6(T/21), 3(23/23), 5(21/21)S, and 5(2/8). The structural assessment is for each section being covered with a 30 ft tuff berm used as shielding in the event of a beam spill. Each tunnel section is subject to vertical and horizontal loads estimated as 115 lbs/ft{sup 2} for each 1 ft or overburden and horizontal loads equivalent to 0.2948 of the vertical load, due to the weight of the tuff berm placed over the structure. The profile of the berm is based on preliminary shielding assessments. Shear, axial and bending stresses are determined with the associated tunnel deformations.

  7. Wake shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannister, Tommy; Karr, Gerald R.

    1987-01-01

    Progress on the modeling of the flow field around a wake shield using a recently obtained code based on the Monte Carlo method is discussed. The direct simulation Monte Carlo method is a method for solving the Boltzman Equation using an approximation to the collision integral term. The collision integrand is evaluated for randomly selected values of its arguments and the summation will approach the integral for large enough samples. The collision effects may be modeled for either hard sphere or various power law potentials. The convective side of the Boltzman equation is approximated over a time step using a simple trajectory calculation of molecules as they travel through the domain of interest.

  8. Corium shield

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Douglas B.; Buchholz, Carol E.

    1994-01-01

    A shield for restricting molten corium from flowing into a water sump disposed in a floor of a containment vessel includes upper and lower walls which extend vertically upwardly and downwardly from the floor for laterally bounding the sump. The upper wall includes a plurality of laterally spaced apart flow channels extending horizontally therethrough, with each channel having a bottom disposed coextensively with the floor for channeling water therefrom into the sump. Each channel has a height and a length predeterminedly selected for allowing heat from the molten corium to dissipate through the upper and lower walls as it flows therethrough for solidifying the molten corium therein to prevent accumulation thereof in the sump.

  9. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  10. Magnetic shielding for interplanetary spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.; Merrill, B.J.

    1991-12-01

    The protection of spacecraft crews from the radiation produced by high energy electrons, protons and heavier ions in the space environment is a major health concern on long duration missions. Conventional approaches to radiation shielding in space have relied on thicker spacecraft walls to stop the high energy charged particles and to absorb the resulting gamma and bremsstrahlung photons. The shielding concept described here uses superconducting magnets to deflect charged particles before they collide with the spacecraft, thus avoiding the production of secondary particles. A number of spacecraft configurations and sizes have been analyzed, ranging from a small ``storm cellar`` for use during solar flares to continuous shielding for space stations having a crew of 15--25. The effectiveness of the magnetic shielding has been analyzed using a Monte Carlo program with incident proton energies from 0.5 to 1000 MeV. Typically the shield deflects 35--99 percent of the incident particles, depending, of course on particle energy and magnetic field strength. Further evaluation studies have been performed to assess weight comparisons between magnetic and conventional shielding; to determine magnet current distributions which minimize the magnetic field within the spacecraft itself; and to assess the potential role of ceramic superconductors. 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. Magnetic shielding for interplanetary spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.; Merrill, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    The protection of spacecraft crews from the radiation produced by high energy electrons, protons and heavier ions in the space environment is a major health concern on long duration missions. Conventional approaches to radiation shielding in space have relied on thicker spacecraft walls to stop the high energy charged particles and to absorb the resulting gamma and bremsstrahlung photons. The shielding concept described here uses superconducting magnets to deflect charged particles before they collide with the spacecraft, thus avoiding the production of secondary particles. A number of spacecraft configurations and sizes have been analyzed, ranging from a small storm cellar'' for use during solar flares to continuous shielding for space stations having a crew of 15--25. The effectiveness of the magnetic shielding has been analyzed using a Monte Carlo program with incident proton energies from 0.5 to 1000 MeV. Typically the shield deflects 35--99 percent of the incident particles, depending, of course on particle energy and magnetic field strength. Further evaluation studies have been performed to assess weight comparisons between magnetic and conventional shielding; to determine magnet current distributions which minimize the magnetic field within the spacecraft itself; and to assess the potential role of ceramic superconductors. 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions must contend with a harsh radiation environment Impacts to crew and electronics. Need to invest in multifunctionality for spacecraft optimization. MMOD shield. Goals: Increase radiation mitigation potential. Retain overall MMOD shielding performance.

  13. Static Aerodynamic Performance Investigation of a Fluid Shield Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balan, C.; Askew, J. W.

    2005-01-01

    In pursuit of an acoustically acceptable, high performance exhaust system capable of meeting Federal Aviation Regulation 36 Stage 3 noise goals for the High Speed Civil Transport application, General Electric Aircraft Engines conducted a design study to incorporate a fluid shield into a 36-chute suppressor exhaust-nozzle system. After a full scale preliminary mechanical design of the resulting fluid shield exhaust system, scale model aerodynamic performance tests and acoustic tests were conducted to establish both aerodynamic performance and acoustic characteristics. Data are presented as thrust coefficients, discharge coefficients, chute-base pressure drags, and plug static pressure distributions.

  14. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  15. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  16. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  17. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, John A.; Stone, Roger R.; Fabyan, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  18. Localized acoustic surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  19. Space reactor shielding fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, F. H.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication of space reactor neutron shielding by a melting and casting process utilizing lithium hydride is described. The first neutron shield fabricated is a large pancake shape 86 inches in diameter, containing about 1700 pounds of lithium hydride. This shield, fabricated by the unique melting and casting process, is the largest lithium hydride shield ever built.

  20. Hyper-velocity impact test and simulation of a double-wall shield concept for the Wide Field Monitor aboard LOFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perinati, E.; Rott, M.; Santangelo, A.; Suchy, S.; Tenzer, C.; Del Monte, E.; den Herder, J.-W.; Diebold, S.; Feroci, M.; Rachevski, A.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2014-07-01

    The space mission LOFT (Large Observatory For X-ray Timing) was selected in 2011 by ESA as one of the candidates for the M3 launch opportunity. LOFT is equipped with two instruments, the Large Area Detector (LAD) and the Wide Field Monitor (WFM), based on Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs). In orbit, they would be exposed to hyper-velocity impacts by environmental dust particles, which might alter the surface properties of the SDDs. In order to assess the risk posed by these events, we performed simulations in ESABASE2 and laboratory tests. Tests on SDD prototypes aimed at verifying to what extent the structural damages produced by impacts affect the SDD functionality have been performed at the Van de Graaff dust accelerator at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg. For the WFM, where we expect a rate of risky impacts notably higher than for the LAD, we designed, simulated and successfully tested at the plasma accelerator at the Technical University in Munich (TUM) a double-wall shielding configuration based on thin foils of Kapton and Polypropylene. In this paper we summarize all the assessment, focussing on the experimental test campaign at TUM.

  1. Meteoroid/Debris Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides innovative, low-weight shielding solutions for spacecraft and the ballistic limit equations that define the shield's performance in the meteoroid/debris environment. Analyses and hypervelocity impact testing results are described that have been used in developing the shields and equations. Spacecraft shielding design and operational practices described in this report are used to provide effective spacecraft protection from meteoroid and debris impacts. Specific shield applications for the International Space Station (ISS), Space Shuttle Orbiter and the CONTOUR (Comet Nucleus Tour) space probe are provided. Whipple, Multi-Shock and Stuffed Whipple shield applications are described.

  2. Testing the bioelectric shield.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Susan J; Rose, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    A pendant was claimed to provide numerous health benefits, including reduced stress, increased strength, and protection from electromagnetic radiation from computers and mobile phones. Three experiments tested the effectiveness of this pendant's effect as a bioelectric shield. In the first experiment, 12 subjects who work with computers wore shields (6 real, 6 sham) for several weeks and were regularly tested for hand strength and mood changes. Both types of shield increased calmness, but the real shields did not have any greater effect. In 2 further studies (in each N=40) hand strength was measured at baseline, with mobile phone, and with mobile phone and bioelectric or sham shield. The shields did not differ in their effects. Both studies showed a significant correlation between the change in strength with and without the shield and subjects'scores on a questionnaire concerning their belief in and use of alternative therapies. The shields appear to produce a measurable placebo effect but are otherwise ineffective. PMID:12233804

  3. Space shuttle holddown post blast shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larracas, F. B.

    1991-01-01

    The original and subsequent designs of the Solid Rocket Booster/Holddown Post blast shield assemblies and their associated hardware are described. It presents the major problems encountered during their early use in the Space Shuttle Program, during the Return-to-Flight Modification Phase, and during their fabrication and validation testing phases. The actions taken to correct the problems are discussed, along with the various concepts now being considered to increase the useful life of the blast shield.

  4. Potential Polymeric Sphere Construction Materials for a Spacecraft Electrostatic Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Smith, Trent; Williams, Martha; Youngquist, Robert; Mendell, Wendell

    2006-01-01

    An electrostatic shielding concept for spacecraft radiation protection under NASA s Exploration Systems Research and Technology Program was evaluated for its effectiveness and feasibility. The proposed shield design is reminiscent of a classic quadrupole with positively and negatively charged spheres surrounding the spacecraft. The project addressed materials, shield configuration, power supply, and compared its effectiveness to that of a passive shield. The report herein concerns the identification of commercially available materials that could be used in sphere fabrication. It was found that several materials were needed to potentially construct the spheres for an electrostatic shield operating at 300 MV.

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.

    1957-09-24

    The reactor radiation shield material is comprised of alternate layers of iron-containing material and compressed cellulosic material, such as masonite. The shielding material may be prefabricated in the form of blocks, which can be stacked together in ary desired fashion to form an effective shield.

  6. Rotating shielded crane system

    DOEpatents

    Commander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating, radiation shielded crane system for use in a high radiation test cell, comprises a radiation shielding wall, a cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material and a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling. The ceiling rests on an annular ledge intergrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall. Removable plugs in the ceiling provide access for the crane from the top of the ceiling into the test cell. A seal is provided at the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling.

  7. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  8. Empennage Noise Shielding Benefits for an Open Rotor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    NASA sets aggressive, strategic, civil aircraft performance and environmental goals and develops ambitious technology roadmaps to guide its research efforts. NASA has adopted a phased approach for community noise reduction of civil aircraft. While the goal of the near-term first phase focuses primarily on source noise reduction, the goal of the second phase relies heavily on presumed architecture changes of future aircraft. The departure from conventional airplane configurations to designs that incorporate some type of propulsion noise shielding is anticipated to provide an additional 10 cumulative EPNdB of noise reduction. One candidate propulsion system for these advanced aircraft is the open rotor engine. In some planned applications, twin open rotor propulsors are located on the aft fuselage, with the vehicle s empennage shielding some of their acoustic signature from observers on the ground. This study focuses on predicting the noise certification benefits of a notional open rotor aircraft with tail structures shielding a portion of the rotor noise. The measured noise of an open rotor test article--collected with and without an acoustic barrier wall--is the basis of the prediction. The results are used to help validate NASA s reliance on acoustic shielding to achieve the second phase of its community noise reduction goals. The noise measurements are also compared to a popular empirical diffraction correlation often used at NASA to predict acoustic shielding.

  9. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  10. Wake Shield Target Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Valmianski, Emanuil I.; Petzoldt, Ronald W.; Alexander, Neil B.

    2003-05-15

    The heat flux from both gas convection and chamber radiation on a direct drive target must be limited to avoid target damage from excessive D-T temperature increase. One of the possibilities of protecting the target is a wake shield flying in front of the target. A shield will also reduce drag force on the target, thereby facilitating target tracking and position prediction. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code was used to calculate convection heat loads as boundary conditions input into ANSYS thermal calculations. These were used for studying the quality of target protection depending on various shapes of shields, target-shield distance, and protective properties of the shield moving relative to the target. The results show that the shield can reduce the convective heat flux by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on pressure, temperature, and velocity. The protective effect of a shield moving relative to the target is greater than the protective properties of a fixed shield. However, the protective effect of a shield moving under the drag force is not sufficient for bringing the heat load on the target down to the necessary limit. Some other ways of diminishing heat flux using a protective shield are discussed.

  11. Extraterrestrial Regolith Derived Atmospheric Entry Heat Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    High-mass planetary surface access is one of NASAs technical challenges involving entry, descent and landing (EDL). During the entry and descent phase, frictional interaction with the planetary atmosphere causes a heat build-up to occur on the spacecraft, which will rapidly destroy it if a heat shield is not used. However, the heat shield incurs a mass penalty because it must be launched from Earth with the spacecraft, thus consuming a lot of precious propellant. This NASA Innovative Advanced Concept (NIAC) project investigated an approach to provide heat shield protection to spacecraft after launch and prior to each EDL thus potentially realizing significant launch mass savings. Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Regolith has extremely good insulating properties and the silicates it contains can be used in the fabrication and molding of thermal-protection materials. In this paper, we will describe three types of in situ fabrication methods for heat shields and the testing performed to determine feasibility of this approach.

  12. Acoustic characteristics of a large-scale wind tunnel model of an upper-surface blown flap transport having two engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falarski, M. D.; Aoyagi, K.; Koenig, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    The upper-surface blown (USB) flap as a powered-lift concept has evolved because of the potential acoustic shielding provided when turbofan engines are installed on a wing upper surface. The results from a wind tunnel investigation of a large-scale USB model powered by two JT15D-1 turbofan engines are-presented. The effects of coanda flap extent and deflection, forward speed, and exhaust nozzle configuration were investigated. To determine the wing shielding the acoustics of a single engine nacelle removed from the model were also measured. Effective shielding occurred in the aft underwing quadrant. In the forward quadrant the shielding of the high frequency noise was counteracted by an increase in the lower frequency wing-exhaust interaction noise. The fuselage provided shielding of the opposite engine noise such that the difference between single and double engine operation was 1.5 PNdB under the wing. The effects of coanda flap deflection and extent, angle of attack, and forward speed were small. Forward speed reduced the perceived noise level (PNL) by reducing the wing-exhaust interaction noise.

  13. Shield Design for Lunar Surface Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gregory A.

    2006-01-20

    A shielding concept for lunar surface applications of nuclear power is presented herein. The reactor, primary shield, reactor equipment and power generation module are placed in a cavity in the lunar surface. Support structure and heat rejection radiator panels are on the surface, outside the cavity. The reactor power of 1,320 kWt was sized to deliver 50 kWe from a thermoelectric power conversion subsystem. The dose rate on the surface is less than 0.6 mRem/hr at 100 meters from the reactor. Unoptimized shield mass is 1,020 kg which is much lighter than a comparable 4{pi} shield weighing in at 17,000 kg.

  14. Shield Design for Lunar Surface Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    A shielding concept for lunar surface applications of nuclear power is presented herein. The reactor, primary shield, reactor equipment and power generation module are placed in a cavity in the lunar surface. Support structure and heat rejection radiator panels are on the surface, outside the cavity. The reactor power of 1,320 kWt was sized to deliver 50 kWe from a thermoelectric power conversion subsystem. The dose rate on the surface is less than 0.6 mRem/hr at 100 meters from the reactor. Unoptimized shield mass is 1,020 kg which is much lighter than a comparable 4π shield weighing in at 17,000 kg.

  15. SP-100 low mass shield design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, D. E.

    1985-09-01

    The shielding considerations for an unmanned space reactor system are somewhat different from those for a terrestrial reactor. An unmanned operation in space implies that only a shadow shield, rather than a 4(PI) one, is required to protect payload hardware that typically can tolerate 10(4) to 10(6) times more radiation than can a human crew. On the other hand, the system mass, of which the radiation shield can be a significant fraction, is a severe constraint for space reactors and not normally a problem with terrestrial ones. The object of this paper is to briefly summarize advancements made on various aspects of low mass shield design for space reactors, including materials and their arrangements, geometric factors and their potential impact on system design optimization, and proposed new configuration concepts for further mass reduction.

  16. Space nuclear reactor shielding optimization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Richard D.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    The Institute for Space Nuclear Reactor Studies is investigating optimal techniques for shielding spacecraft (payload) electronics from the combined radiation effects of the SP-100 system nuclear reactor core and the natural space environment. The academic challenge of this research includes the investigation of the combined influences of radiation from the space environment and the radiations from the reactor power source. The technical application includes a series of shielding mass penalty tradeoffs for the SP-100 Program concept between the reactor core shield and the additional shielding of the spacecraft enclosure. These mass penalty tradeoffs are being conducted for several space flight orbits of future interest to the space military and civilian communities. It was shown that several potential mission orbits may pose environmental radiation dosages which are more severe than the SP-100 specification of core escape neutron and gamma ray particle fluences incident on the spacecraft.

  17. Cable shield connecting device

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    A cable shield connecting device for installation on a high voltage cable of the type having a metallic shield, the device including a relatively conformable, looped metal bar for placement around a bared portion of the metallic shield to extend circumferentially around a major portion of the circumference of the metallic shield while being spaced radially therefrom, a plurality of relatively flexible metallic fingers affixed to the bar, projecting from the bar in an axial direction and spaced circumferentially along the bar, each finger being attached to the metallic shield at a portion located remote from the bar to make electrical contact with the metallic shield, and a connecting conductor integral with the bar.

  18. RADIATION SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-23

    ABS>A radiation shield that is suitable for the protection of personnel from both gamma rays and nentrons is described. The shield is comprised of a hollow wall and an aggregate consisting of iron and water in approximately equal amounts by volume substantially filling the wall. A means is provided to circulate the water through the wall to cool the shield when in use.

  19. Performance of solar shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The loss of the micrometeoroid shield from the Orbital Workshop section of Skylab I, about 63 seconds after lift-off, proved to be the harbinger of a prodigious effort to quickly develop a workable substitute for the carefully tailored passive portion of the thermal-control system. The paper describes the intensive ten-day around-the-clock effort in which numerous potential thermal-shield materials were assessed, and during which period ten specific shield designs were developed and carried through various stages of development and test. Thermal-shield materials data are discussed, including optical, strength, fatigue, outgassing, tackiness, ultraviolet radiation, and material 'memory' properties.

  20. RADIATION SHIELDING COMPOSITION

    DOEpatents

    Dunegan, H.L.

    1963-01-29

    A light weight radiation shielding composition is described whose mechanical and radiological properties can be varied within wide limits. The composition of this shielding material consists of four basic ingredients: powder of either Pb or W, a plastic resin, a resin plasticizer, and a polymerization catalyst to promote an interaction of the plasticizer with the plastic resin. Air may be mixed into the above ingredients in order to control the density of the final composition. For equivalent gamma attenuation, the shielding composition weighs one-third to one-half as much as conventional Pb shielding. (AEC)

  1. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  2. Steam generator hand hole shielding.

    PubMed

    Cox, W E

    2000-05-01

    Seabrook Station is an 1198 MWE Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) that began commercial operation in 1990. Expensive and dose intensive Steam Generator Replacement Projects among PWR operators have led to an increase in steam generator preventative maintenance. Most of this preventative maintenance is performed through access ports in the shell of the steam generator just above the tube sheet known as secondary side hand holes. Secondary side work activities performed through the hand holes are typically performed without the shielding benefit of water in the secondary side of the steam generator. An increase in cleaning and inspection work scope has led to an increase in dose attributed to steam generator secondary side maintenance. This increased work scope and the station goal of maintaining personnel radiation dose ALARA led to the development of the shielding concept described in this article. This shield design saved an estimated 2.5 person-rem (25 person-Smv) the first time it was deployed and is expected to save an additional 50 person-rem (500 person-mSv) over the remaining life of the plant. PMID:10770158

  3. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELDING

    DOEpatents

    Borst, L.B.

    1961-07-11

    A special hydrogenous concrete shielding for reactors is described. In addition to Portland cement and water, the concrete essentially comprises 30 to 60% by weight barytes aggregate for enhanced attenuation of fast neutrons. The biological shields of AEC's Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and Materials Testing Reactor are particular embodiments.

  5. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  6. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  7. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  8. Acoustic energy harvesting based on a planar acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuibao; Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically report on an innovative and practical acoustic energy harvester based on a defected acoustic metamaterial (AMM) with piezoelectric material. The idea is to create suitable resonant defects in an AMM to confine the strain energy originating from an acoustic incidence. This scavenged energy is converted into electrical energy by attaching a structured piezoelectric material into the defect area of the AMM. We show an acoustic energy harvester based on a meta-structure capable of producing electrical power from an acoustic pressure. Numerical simulations are provided to analyze and elucidate the principles and the performances of the proposed system. A maximum output voltage of 1.3 V and a power density of 0.54 μW/cm3 are obtained at a frequency of 2257.5 Hz. The proposed concept should have broad applications on energy harvesting as well as on low-frequency sound isolation, since this system acts as both acoustic insulator and energy harvester.

  9. Asymmetric Electrostatic Radiation Shielding for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Lane, John E.

    2005-01-01

    A paper describes the types, sources, and adverse effects of energetic-particle radiation in interplanetary space, and explores a concept of using asymmetric electrostatic shielding to reduce the amount of such radiation impinging on spacecraft. Typically, such shielding would include a system of multiple inflatable, electrically conductive spheres deployed in clusters in the vicinity of a spacecraft on lightweight structures that would maintain the spheres in a predetermined multipole geometry. High-voltage generators would maintain the spheres at potential differences chosen in conjunction with the multipole geometry so that the resulting multipole field would gradually divert approaching energetic atomic nuclei from a central region occupied by the spacecraft. The spheres nearest the center would be the most positive, so as to repel the positively charged impinging nuclei from the center. At the same time, the monopole potential of the overall spacecraft-and-shielding system would be made negative so as to repel thermal electrons. The paper presents results of computational simulations of energetic-particle trajectories and shield efficiency for a trial system of 21 spheres arranged in three clusters in an overall linear quadrupole configuration. Further development would be necessary to make this shielding concept practical.

  10. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  11. Shielding analysis of a small compact space nuclear reactor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Woodrow, L.L.

    1987-08-01

    The SP-100 reactor concept, currently in its developmental stage, has layered tungsten - lithium hydride shield. Studies indicate that this shield configuration is the lightest weight shield. This configuration and three other shielding concepts were analyzed to determine the lightest shield and to determine the shield configuration with the smallest volume. The other three concepts were a boron carbide - beryllium layered shield, and a lithium hydride - beryllium shield. FEMP2D and FEMP1D codes were used in this analysis. These codes were developed at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), using the input from another code, RFCC, which produced energy-dependent dose conversion factors, and determined the shield's ability to attenuate the neutron and gamma radiation to permissible dose limits. The results of this analysis show that the lithium hydride - tungsten layered shield was indeed the lightest weight shield. However, a boron carbide - tungsten shield was calculably volume constrained. Therefore volume, not weight, may be the driving factor in determining the shield configuration.

  12. Using the shield for thermal energy storage in PULSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, G. T.; Wong, C. P. C.; Sze, D.-K.; Bathe, C. G.; Blanchard, J. P.; Brimer, C.; Cheng, E. T.; El-Guebaly, L. A.; Hasan, M. Z.; Najmabadi, F.

    1994-04-01

    The PULSAR pulsed tokamak power plant design utilizes the outboard shield for thermal energy storage to maintain full 1000 MW(e) output during the dwell period of 200 s. Thermal energy resulting from direct nuclear heating is accumulated in the shield during the 7200 s fusion power production phase. The maximum shield temperature may be much higher than that for the blanket because radiation damage is significantly reduced. During the dwell period, thermal power discharged from the shield and coolant temperature are simultaneously regulated by controlling the coolant mass flow rate at the shield inlet. This is facilitated by throttled coolant bypass. Design concepts using helium and lithium coolant have been developed. Two-dimensional, time-dependent thermal hydraulic calculations were performed to confirm performance capabilities required of the design concepts. The results indicate that the system design and performance can accommodate uncertainties in material limits or the length of the dwell period.

  13. RSMASS: A simple model for estimating reactor/shield masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Albert C.

    1987-01-01

    A comparison was completed of the reactor/shield masses obtained from detailed calculations by the proposers of space power reactors. This comparison included a variety of liquid metal cooled, gas cooled and thermionic reactors. An initial goal for agreement between RSMASS (reactor/shield mass model) calculated masses and the masses obtained from detailed calculations was chosen to be a factor of 2. The preliminary comparison demonstrated that the reactor/shield masses estimated by RSMASS agree with the masses obtained from detailed calculations within 50 percent. It can be concluded that RSMASS can provide good estimates of reactor/shield masses for a broad variety of reactor concepts proposed for MMW space power applications. RSMASS is being used to compare the masses of various reactor types and is providing some insights into the mass advantages and disadvantages for the various concepts as a function of operating conditions and reactor or shield parameters. Some mass estimates obtained with RSMASS are presented.

  14. Debye shielding in a nonextensive plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ait Gougam, Leila; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2011-06-15

    The phenomenon of Debye Shielding is revisited within the theoretical framework of the Tsallis statistical mechanics. The plasma consists of nonextensive electrons and ions. Both the effective Debye length {lambda}{sub D}{sup q} and the fall-off of the electrostatic potential {Phi} are considered and a parameter study conducted. Owing to electron nonextensivity, the critical Mach number derived from the modified Bohm sheath criterion may become less than unity allowing therefore ions with speed less than ion-acoustic speed to enter the sheath from the main body of the plasma. Considering the wide relevance of collective processes, our analysis may be viewed as a first step toward a more comprehensive Debye shielding and electrostatic plasma sheath in nonequilibrium plasmas.

  15. Augmentation of orbital debris shielding for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Crews, Jeanne Lee; Horn, Jennifer R.

    1990-01-01

    Augmentation concepts for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) are described in detail and advantages and disadvantages of various proposals are evaluated. It is pointed out that early augmentation of SSF debris shielding, which would take place 6-9 years after the First Element Launch, could provide the greatest advantages to the program in terms of weight, cost, and safety benefits. Potential augmentation concepts include an attached, rigid aluminum second bumper; the multi-shock shield concept; a mesh double bumper concept; a debris shield augmentation element; a multi-shock airbag protection concept for 2-10 cm debris; and a debris sweeper. Requirements for and operation and deployment of these concepts are described in detail and an example of the augmentation effect on cumulative SSF probability of no-failure from debris and meteoroid impacts is given. An estimate of predicted encounter rates between debris and a 100 m radius sphere around SSF is presented.

  16. Acoustic characteristics of twin jets.

    PubMed

    He, F; Zhang, X W

    2002-09-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the acoustic characteristics of underexpanded supersonic twin jets in different azimuthal measurement planes. Compared with two independent jets, the twin jets produced additional noise due to the enhanced mixing and entrainment. The larger pressure ratio for switching from the axisymmetric mode to the helical mode led to lower noise levels at 90 degrees than for two independent jets. For pressure ratios greater than 5.00, the noise reduction was due to cessation of screeching of the twin jets while screeching of a single jet was still detected. The apparent shielding phenomenon was measured for the screech helical mode. The screech tone intensities were attenuated largely due to the shielding effects. The noise reductions due to shielding were obtained over a wide range of pressure ratios relative to the sum of two independent jets. PMID:12243185

  17. MEANS FOR SHIELDING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Garrison, W.M.; McClinton, L.T.; Burton, M.

    1959-03-10

    A reactor of the heterageneous, heavy water moderated type is described. The reactor is comprised of a plurality of vertically disposed fuel element tubes extending through a tank of heavy water moderator and adapted to accommodate a flow of coolant water in contact with the fuel elements. A tank containing outgoing coolant water is disposed above the core to function is a radiation shield. Unsaturated liquid hydrocarbon is floated on top of the water in the shield tank to reduce to a minimum the possibility of the occurrence of explosive gaseous mixtures resulting from the neutron bombardment of the water in the shield tank.

  18. WASTE HANDLING BUILDING SHIELD WALL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    D. Padula

    2000-01-13

    The scope of this analysis is to estimate the shielding wall, ceiling or equivalent door thicknesses that will be required in the Waste Handling Building to maintain the radiation doses to personnel within acceptable limits. The shielding thickness calculated is the minimum required to meet administrative limits, and not necessarily what will be recommended for the final design. The preliminary evaluations will identify the areas which have the greatest impact on mechanical and facility design concepts. The objective is to provide the design teams with the necessary information to assure an efficient and effective design.

  19. What Is Radiation Shielding?

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kerry Lee, NASA Orion radiation system manager, explains how radiation shielding is used to block harmful particles coming into the spacecraft without producing secondary particles that can cause e...

  20. ALS synchrotron radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    This note discusses the assumptions and results of synchrotron radiation shielding estimates for ALS bend magnet and wiggler beamlines. Estimates of gas bremsstrahlung production are not included and are dealt with elsewhere.

  1. SNS shielding analyses overview

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Irina; Gallmeier, Franz; Iverson, Erik B; Lu, Wei; Remec, Igor

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives an overview on on-going shielding analyses for Spallation Neutron Source. Presently, the most of the shielding work is concentrated on the beam lines and instrument enclosures to prepare for commissioning, save operation and adequate radiation background in the future. There is on-going work for the accelerator facility. This includes radiation-protection analyses for radiation monitors placement, designing shielding for additional facilities to test accelerator structures, redesigning some parts of the facility, and designing test facilities to the main accelerator structure for component testing. Neutronics analyses are required as well to support spent structure management, including waste characterisation analyses, choice of proper transport/storage package and shielding enhancement for the package if required.

  2. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  3. Shielded cells transfer automation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J J

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear waste from shielded cells is removed, packaged, and transferred manually in many nuclear facilities. Radiation exposure is absorbed by operators during these operations and limited only through procedural controls. Technological advances in automation using robotics have allowed a production waste removal operation to be automated to reduce radiation exposure. The robotic system bags waste containers out of glove box and transfers them to a shielded container. Operators control the system outside the system work area via television cameras. 9 figures.

  4. Space Station MMOD Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes International Space Station (ISS) shielding for micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) protection, requirements for protection, and the technical approach to meeting requirements. Current activities in MMOD protection for ISS will be described, including efforts to augment MMOD protection by adding shields on-orbit. Observed MMOD impacts on ISS elements such as radiators, modules and returned hardware will be described. Comparisons of the observed damage with predicted damage using risk assessment software will be made.

  5. Concepts and Development of Bio-Inspired Distributed Embedded Wired/Wireless Sensor Array Architectures for Acoustic Wave Sensing in Integrated Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghoshal, Anindya; Prosser, William H.; Kirikera, Goutham; Schulz, Mark J.; Hughes, Derke J.; Orisamolu, Wally

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of acoustic emissions in plate structures and their sensing by embedded or surface bonded piezoelectric sensor arrays. Three different modeling efforts for acoustic emission (AE) wave generation and propagation are discussed briefly along with their advantages and disadvantages. Continuous sensors placed at right angles on a plate are being discussed as a new approach to measure and locate the source of acoustic waves. Evolutionary novel signal processing algorithms and bio-inspired distributed sensor array systems are used on large structures and integrated aerospace vehicles for AE source localization and preliminary results are presented. These systems allow for a great reduction in the amount of data that needs to be processed and also reduce the chances of false alarms from ambient noises. It is envisioned that these biomimetic sensor arrays and signal processing techniques will be useful for both wireless and wired sensor arrays for real time health monitoring of large integrated aerospace vehicles and earth fixed civil structures. The sensor array architectures can also be used with other types of sensors and for other applications.

  6. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... 177. Battista RA. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. Otolaryngol Clin North Am . 2009;42:635-654. ...

  7. Space Shielding Materials for Prometheus Application

    SciTech Connect

    R. Lewis

    2006-01-20

    At the time of Prometheus program restructuring, shield material and design screening efforts had progressed to the point where a down-selection from approximately eighty-eight materials to a set of five ''primary'' materials was in process. The primary materials were beryllium (Be), boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), tungsten (W), lithium hydride (LiH), and water (H{sub 2}O). The primary materials were judged to be sufficient to design a Prometheus shield--excluding structural and insulating materials, that had not been studied in detail. The foremost preconceptual shield concepts included: (1) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W/LiH shield; (2) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W shield; (3) and a Be/B{sub 4}C/H{sub 2}O shield. Since the shield design and materials studies were still preliminary, alternative materials (e.g., {sup nal}B or {sup 10}B metal) were still being screened, but at a low level of effort. Two competing low mass neutron shielding materials are included in the primary materials due to significant materials uncertainties in both. For LiH, irradiation-induced swelling was the key issue, whereas for H{sub 2}O, containment corrosion without active chemistry control was key, Although detailed design studies are required to accurately estimate the mass of shields based on either hydrogenous material, both are expected to be similar in mass, and lower mass than virtually any alternative. Unlike Be, W, and B{sub 4}C, which are not expected to have restrictive temperature limits, shield temperature limits and design accommodations are likely to be needed for either LiH or H{sub 2}O. The NRPCT focused efforts on understanding swelting of LiH, and observed, from approximately fifty prior irradiation tests, that either casting ar thorough out-gassing should reduce swelling. A potential contributor to LiH swelling appears to be LiOH contamination due to exposure to humid air, that can be eliminated by careful processing. To better understand LiH irradiation performance and mitigate the risks in Li

  8. Advances in space radiation shielding codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Qualls, Garry D.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Prael, Richard E.; Norbury, John W.; Heinbockel, John H.; Tweed, John; De Angelis, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    Early space radiation shield code development relied on Monte Carlo methods and made important contributions to the space program. Monte Carlo methods have resorted to restricted one-dimensional problems leading to imperfect representation of appropriate boundary conditions. Even so, intensive computational requirements resulted and shield evaluation was made near the end of the design process. Resolving shielding issues usually had a negative impact on the design. Improved spacecraft shield design requires early entry of radiation constraints into the design process to maximize performance and minimize costs. As a result, we have been investigating high-speed computational procedures to allow shield analysis from the preliminary concept to the final design. For the last few decades, we have pursued deterministic solutions of the Boltzmann equation allowing field mapping within the International Space Station (ISS) in tens of minutes using standard Finite Element Method (FEM) geometry common to engineering design methods. A single ray trace in such geometry requires 14 milliseconds and limits application of Monte Carlo methods to such engineering models. A potential means of improving the Monte Carlo efficiency in coupling to spacecraft geometry is given.

  9. Advances in space radiation shielding codes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John W; Tripathi, Ram K; Qualls, Garry D; Cucinotta, Francis A; Prael, Richard E; Norbury, John W; Heinbockel, John H; Tweed, John; De Angelis, Giovanni

    2002-12-01

    Early space radiation shield code development relied on Monte Carlo methods and made important contributions to the space program. Monte Carlo methods have resorted to restricted one-dimensional problems leading to imperfect representation of appropriate boundary conditions. Even so, intensive computational requirements resulted and shield evaluation was made near the end of the design process. Resolving shielding issues usually had a negative impact on the design. Improved spacecraft shield design requires early entry of radiation constraints into the design process to maximize performance and minimize costs. As a result, we have been investigating high-speed computational procedures to allow shield analysis from the preliminary concept to the final design. For the last few decades, we have pursued deterministic solutions of the Boltzmann equation allowing field mapping within the International Space Station (ISS) in tens of minutes using standard Finite Element Method (FEM) geometry common to engineering design methods. A single ray trace in such geometry requires 14 milliseconds and limits application of Monte Carlo methods to such engineering models. A potential means of improving the Monte Carlo efficiency in coupling to spacecraft geometry is given. PMID:12793737

  10. Jet Noise Shielding Provided by a Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Michael J.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Burley, Casey L.; Bahr, Christopher J.; Pope, Dennis S.

    2014-01-01

    One approach toward achieving NASA's aggressive N+2 noise goal of 42 EPNdB cumulative margin below Stage 4 is through the use of novel vehicle configurations like the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB). Jet noise measurements from an HWB acoustic test in NASA Langley's 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel are described. Two dual-stream, heated Compact Jet Engine Simulator (CJES) units are mounted underneath the inverted HWB model on a traversable support to permit measurement of varying levels of shielding provided by the fuselage. Both an axisymmetric and low noise chevron nozzle set are investigated in the context of shielding. The unshielded chevron nozzle set shows 1 to 2 dB of source noise reduction (relative to the unshielded axisymmetric nozzle set) with some penalties at higher frequencies. Shielding of the axisymmetric nozzles shows up to 6.5 dB of reduction at high frequency. The combination of shielding and low noise chevrons shows benefits beyond the expected additive benefits of the two, up to 10 dB, due to the effective migration of the jet source peak noise location upstream for increased shielding effectiveness. Jet noise source maps from phased array results processed with the Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) algorithm reinforce these observations.

  11. TPX remote maintenance and shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Rennich, M.J.; Nelson, B.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment machine design incorporates comprehensive planning for efficient and safe component maintenance. Three programmatic decisions have been made to insure the successful implementation of this objective. First, the tokamak incorporates radiation shielding to reduce activation of components and limit the dose rate to personnel working on the outside of the machine. This allows most of the ex-vessel equipment to be maintained through conventional ``hands-on`` procedures. Second, to the maximum extent possible, low activation materials will be used inside the shielding volume. This resulted in the selection of Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) for the vacuum vessel and PFC structures. The third decision stipulated that the primary in-vessel components will be replaced or repaired via remote maintenance tools specifically provided for the task. The component designers have been given the responsibility of incorporating maintenance design and for proving the maintainability of the design concepts in full-scale mockup tests prior to the initiation of final fabrication. Remote maintenance of the TPX machine is facilitated by general purpose tools provided by a special purpose design team. Major tools will include an in-vessel transporter, a vessel transfer system and a large component transfer container. In addition, tools such as manipulators and remotely operable impact wrenches will be made available to the component designers by this group. Maintenance systems will also provide the necessary controls for this equipment.

  12. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid

  13. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  14. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  15. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    2000-12-26

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  16. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

    1998-07-28

    A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

  17. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Hoenes, Glenn R.

    1981-01-01

    According to the present invention, a shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user withdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  18. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    A shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user wthdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  19. Bumper shield analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oyer, A.T.

    1986-07-01

    To initially examine the effectiveness of a shield surrounding a reentry vehicle, we used the hypervelocity hydrodynamic impact code, LASOIL. We completed a four-by-four matrix of 16 two-dimensional numerical impact simulations of 1-g tungsten cylinders striking circular plates. The variable parameters were the projectile impact velocity (10, 20, 40, and 80 km/s) and the plate thickness (1, 2, 4, and 8 mm). In each case, the projectile was destroyed in the impact. The shield was penetrated but retained negliible momentum from the impact. The resultant debris cloud was low-density debris and vapor.

  20. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

  1. Optimization of the National Ignition Facility primary shield design

    SciTech Connect

    Annese, C.E.; Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E.; Miller, W.F.; Latkowski, J.; Lee, J.D.; Soran, P.; Tobin, M.L.

    1993-10-01

    Minimum cost design concepts of the primary shield for the National Ignition laser fusion experimental Facility (NIF) are searched with the help of the optimization code SWAN. The computational method developed for this search involves incorporating the time dependence of the delayed photon field within effective delayed photon production cross sections. This method enables one to address the time-dependent problem using relatively simple, time-independent transport calculations, thus significantly simplifying the design process. A novel approach was used for the identification of the optimal combination of constituents that will minimize the shield cost; it involves the generation, with SWAN, of effectiveness functions for replacing materials on an equal cost basis. The minimum cost shield design concept was found to consist of a mixture of polyethylene and low cost, low activation materials such as SiC, with boron added near the shield boundaries.

  2. A magnetic shield/dual purpose mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Seth; Albertelli, Jamil; Copeland, R. Braden; Correll, Eric; Dales, Chris; Davis, Dana; Davis, Nechole; Duck, Rob; Feaster, Sandi; Grant, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this work is to design, build, and fly a dual-purpose payload whose function is to produce a large volume, low intensity magnetic field and to test the concept of using such a magnetic field to protect manned spacecraft against particle radiation. An additional mission objective is to study the effect of this moving field on upper atmosphere plasmas. Both mission objectives appear to be capable of being tested using the same superconducting coil. The potential benefits of this magnetic shield concept apply directly to both earth-orbital and interplanetary missions. This payload would be a first step in assessing the true potential of large volume magnetic fields in the U.S. space program. Either converted launch systems or piggyback payload opportunities may be appropriate for this mission. The use of superconducting coils for magnetic shielding against solar flare radiation during manned interplanetary missions has long been contemplated and was considered in detail in the years preceding the Apollo mission. With the advent of new superconductors, it has now become realistic to reconsider this concept for a Mars mission. Even in near-earth orbits, large volume magnetic fields produced using conventional metallic superconductors allow novel plasma physics experiments to be contemplated. Both deployed field-coil and non-deployed field-coil shielding arrangements have been investigated, with the latter being most suitable for an initial test payload in a polar orbit.

  3. Lightweight blast shield

    DOEpatents

    Mixon, Larry C.; Snyder, George W.; Hill, Scott D.; Johnson, Gregory L.; Wlodarski, J. Frank; von Spakovsky, Alexis P.; Emerson, John D.; Cole, James M.; Tipton, John P.

    1991-01-01

    A tandem warhead missile arrangement that has a composite material housing structure with a first warhead mounted at one end and a second warhead mounted near another end of the composite structure with a dome shaped composite material blast shield mounted between the warheads to protect the second warhead from the blast of the first warhead.

  4. Magsat investigation. [Canadian shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    A computer program was prepared for modeling segments of the Earth's crust allowing for heterogeneity in magnetization in calculating the Earth's field at Magsat heights. This permits investigation of a large number of possible models in assessing the magnetic signatures of subprovinces of the Canadian shield. The fit between the model field and observed fields is optimized in a semi-automatic procedure.

  5. Analysis of shield tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. Q.; Yue, Z. Q.; Tham, L. G.; Zhu, H. H.; Lee, C. F.; Hashimoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a two-dimensional finite element model for the analysis of shield tunnels by taking into account the construction process which is divided into four stages. The soil is assumed to behave as an elasto-plastic medium whereas the shield is simulated by beam-joint discontinuous model in which curved beam elements and joint elements are used to model the segments and joints, respectively. As grout is usually injected to fill the gap between the lining and the soil, the property parameters of the grout are chosen in such a way that they can reflect the state of the grout at each stage. Furthermore, the contact condition between the soil and lining will change with the construction stage, and therefore, different stress-releasing coefficients are used to account for the changes. To assess the accuracy that can be attained by the method in solving practical problems, the shield tunnelling in the No. 7 Subway Line Project in Osaka, Japan, is used as a case history for our study. The numerical results are compared with those measured in the field. The results presented in the paper show that the proposed numerical procedure can be used to effectively estimate the deformation, stresses and moments experienced by the surrounding soils and the concrete lining segments. The analysis and method presented in this paper can be considered to be useful for other subway construction projects involving shield tunnelling in soft soils. Copyright

  6. Shield against radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Grifoni, S.

    1988-02-23

    This patent describes a shield against ionizing radiations that comprises at least one layer of an aggregate-containing cement-based conglomerate or an aggregate-containing cement-based mortar wherein the aggregate consists essentially of floated galena or mixtures thereof which at least one boron mineral.

  7. Shield For Flexible Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Williford, Clifford B.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1995-01-01

    Cylindrical shield designed to fit around flexible pipe to protect nearby workers from injury and equipment from damage if pipe ruptures. Designed as pressure-relief device. Absorbs impact of debris ejected radially from broken flexible pipe. Also redirects flow of pressurized fluid escaping from broken pipe onto flow path allowing for relief of pressure while minimizing potential for harm.

  8. Efficacy of Cosmic Ray Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    This research involved testing various types of shielding with a self-constructed Berkeley style cosmic ray detector, in order to evaluate the materials of each type of shielding's effectiveness at blocking cosmic rays and the cost- and size-efficiency of the shields as well. The detector was constructed, then tested for functionality and reliability. Following confirmation, the detector was then used at three different locations to observe it altitude or atmospheric conditions had any effect on the effectiveness of certain shields. Multiple types of shielding were tested with the detector, including combinations of several shields, primarily aluminum, high-iron steel, polyethylene plastic, water, lead, and a lead-alternative radiation shield utilized in radiology. These tests regarding both the base effectiveness and the overall efficiency of shields is designed to support future space exploratory missions where the risk of exposure to possibly lethal amounts of cosmic rays for crew and the damage caused to unshielded electronics are of serious concern.

  9. Galactic heavy-ion shielding using electrostatic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    The shielding of spacecraft against galactic heavy ions, particularly high-energy Fe(56) nuclei, by electrostatic fields is analyzed for an arrangement of spherical concentric shells. Vacuum breakdown considerations are found to limit the minimum radii of the spheres to over 100 m. This limitation makes it impractical to use the fields for shielding small spacecraft. The voltages necessary to repel these Fe(56) nuclei exceed present electrostatic generating capabilities by over 2 orders of magnitude and render the concept useless as an alternative to traditional bulk-material shielding methods.

  10. SSC environmental radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.D.

    1987-07-01

    The environmental radiation shielding requirements of the SSC have been evaluated using currently available computational tools that incorporate the well known processes of energy loss and degradation of high energy particles into Monte Carlo computer codes. These tools permit determination of isodose contours in the matter surrounding a source point and therefore the specification of minimum thicknesses or extents of shielding in order to assure annual dose equivalents less than some specified design amount. For the general public the annual dose equivalent specified in the design is 10 millirem, small compared to the dose from naturally occurring radiation. The types of radiation fall into two classes for the purposes of shielding determinations-hadrons and muons. The sources of radiation at the SSC of concern for the surrounding environment are the interaction regions, the specially designed beam dumps into which the beams are dumped from time to time, and beam clean-up regions where stops remove the beam halo in order to reduce experimental backgrounds. A final, unlikely source of radiation considered is the accidental loss of the full beam at some point around the ring. Conservative choices of a luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and a beam current three times design have been made in calculating the required shielding and boundaries of the facility. In addition to determination of minimum distances for the annual dose equivalents, the question of possible radioactivity produced in nearby wells or in municipal water supplies is addressed. The designed shielding distances and beam dumps are such that the induced radioactivity in ground water is safely smaller than the levels permitted by EPA and international agencies.

  11. Plasma shield for in-air beam processesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2008-05-01

    A novel concept/apparatus, the Plasma Shield, is introduced in this paper. The purpose of the Plasma Shield is designed to shield a target object chemically and thermally by engulfing an area subjected to beam treatment with inert plasma. The shield consists of a vortex-stabilized arc that is employed to shield beams and workpiece area of interaction from an atmospheric or liquid environment. A vortex-stabilized arc is established between a beam generating device (laser, ion or electron gun) and a target object. The arc, which is composed of a pure noble gas, engulfs the interaction region and shields it from any surrounding liquids like water or reactive gases. The vortex is composed of a sacrificial gas or liquid that swirls around and stabilizes the arc. The successful Plasma Shield was experimentally established and very high-quality electron beam welding with partial plasma shielding was performed. The principle of the operation and experimental results are discussed in the paper.

  12. Description of transport codes for space radiation shielding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Wilson, John W; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2012-11-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation in the space environment is one of the hazards faced by crews in space missions. As space radiations traverse spacecraft, habitat shielding, or tissues, their energies and compositions are altered by interactions with the shielding. Modifications to the radiation fields arise from atomic interactions of charged particles with orbital electrons and nuclear interactions leading to projectile and target fragmentation, including secondary particles such as neutrons, protons, mesons, and nuclear recoils. The transport of space radiation through shielding can be simulated using Monte Carlo techniques or deterministic solutions of the Boltzmann equation. To determine shielding requirements and to resolve radiation constraints for future human missions, the shielding evaluation of a spacecraft concept is required as an early step in the design process. To do this requires (1) accurate knowledge of space environmental models to define the boundary condition for transport calculations, (2) transport codes with detailed shielding and body geometry models to determine particle transmission into areas of internal shielding and at each critical body organ, and (3) the assessment of organ dosimetric quantities and biological risks by applying the corresponding response models for space radiation against the particle spectra that have been accurately determined from the transport code. This paper reviews current transport codes and analyzes their accuracy through comparison to laboratory and spaceflight data. This paper also introduces a probabilistic risk assessment approach for the evaluation of radiation shielding. PMID:23032892

  13. Plasma shield for in-air beam processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2008-05-15

    A novel concept/apparatus, the Plasma Shield, is introduced in this paper. The purpose of the Plasma Shield is designed to shield a target object chemically and thermally by engulfing an area subjected to beam treatment with inert plasma. The shield consists of a vortex-stabilized arc that is employed to shield beams and workpiece area of interaction from an atmospheric or liquid environment. A vortex-stabilized arc is established between a beam generating device (laser, ion or electron gun) and a target object. The arc, which is composed of a pure noble gas, engulfs the interaction region and shields it from any surrounding liquids like water or reactive gases. The vortex is composed of a sacrificial gas or liquid that swirls around and stabilizes the arc. The successful Plasma Shield was experimentally established and very high-quality electron beam welding with partial plasma shielding was performed. The principle of the operation and experimental results are discussed in the paper.

  14. Acoustics of Jet Surface Interaction - Scrubbing Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Concepts envisioned for the future of civil air transport consist of unconventional propulsion systems in the close proximity to the structure or embedded in the airframe. While such integrated systems are intended to shield noise from the community, they also introduce new sources of sound. Sound generation due to interaction of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated here using the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore-Brown equation. The propagation Green's function is solved numerically for a high aspect-ratio rectangular jet starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. It is shown the magnitude of the Green's function decreases with increasing source frequency and/or jet temperature. The phase remains constant for a rigid surface, but varies with source location when subject to an impedance type boundary condition. The Green's function in the absence of the surface, and flight effects are also investigated

  15. Flexible Multi-Shock Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Flexible multi-shock shield system and method are disclosed for defending against hypervelocity particles. The flexible multi-shock shield system and method may include a number of flexible bumpers or shield layers spaced apart by one or more resilient support layers, all of which may be encapsulated in a protective cover. Fasteners associated with the protective cover allow the flexible multi-shock shield to be secured to the surface of a structure to be protected.

  16. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  17. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  18. Underwater Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperman, William A.; Roux, Philippe

    It is well underwater established that sound waves, compared to electromagnetic waves, propagate long distances in the ocean. Hence, in the ocean as opposed to air or a vacuum, one uses sound navigation and ranging (SONAR) instead navigation and ranging (SONAR) of radar, acoustic communication instead of radio, and acoustic imaging and tomography instead of microwave or optical imaging or X-ray tomography. Underwater acoustics is the science of sound in water (most commonly in the ocean) and encompasses not only the study of sound propagation, but also the masking of sound signals by interfering phenomenon and signal processing for extracting these signals from interference. This chapter we will present the basics physics of ocean acoustics and then discuss applications.

  19. Theory of nuclear electric shielding in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeretti, P.; Zanasi, R.

    1981-10-01

    In order to rationalize the effects of an external uniform electric field on a perturbed molecule, we introduce the concept of electric shielding as a tensor which determines the effective field at an arbitrary point in the molecular space. The fundamental properties of the nuclear shielding tensor are analyzed in the case of heteronuclear diatomics HF, HCl, and HBr. It is shown that this quantity is essential in accounting for the deformation of the molecular geometry induced by the external field. Uncoupled and coupled Hartree-Fock perturbation theory is applied in order to obtain quantitative estimates of the shieldings and their derivatives with respect to the interatomic distance in HF, HCl, HBr, H2O, NH3, and CH4 molecules. Accurate linear combination of atomic orbitals wave functions are prepared for the diatomics, and their quality is tested by evaluating a series of first- and second-order electric properties, giving fair agreement with corresponding experimental data. The reliability of the computed shielding is examined to obtain information on the vibrational contribution to the property and the role of the electronic correlation.

  20. Review of active radiation shielding developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Roberto

    The radiation risk due to ionizing particles is a critical issue for long duration manned space missions. The ionization losses in the materials of the spacecraft provide passive shielding effectively stopping low energy particles. However, the estimates of the material required to obtain an acceptable level of radiation result in a prohibitive mass. Active electromagnetic shields, which deflect the charged particles, have been considered as an alternative solution. During the last 10 years the interest in this area has grown. A study of active magnetic shielding based on high-temperature superconductors (HTS) was initiated in an ESA study in 2010, continued in the context of the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) programs (2011-2014) as well as within a dedicated FP7 EU program, SR2S (2013-2015). The aim of these effort was to provide a realistic evaluation of the possibilities based on current technology levels as well extrapolating to reasonable technology advances expected during the next decade. The different configurations considered were assessed in terms of their technical feasibility and shielding efficiency. We present here a status report of the ongoing work and some preliminary results.

  1. Roof Shield for Advance and Retreat Mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Shield sections change their configuration to suit mining mode. Articulation cylinders raise rear shield to advance position, and locking cylinders hold it there. To change to retreat position articulation cylinders lower shield. Locking pins at edge of outermost shield plate latch shield to chock base. Shield accommodates roof heights ranging from 36 to 60 inches (0.9 to 1.52 meters).

  2. Capacitive Proximity Sensors With Additional Driven Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Improved capacitive proximity sensors constructed by incorporating one or more additional driven shield(s). Sensitivity and range of sensor altered by adjusting driving signal(s) applied to shield(s). Includes sensing electrode and driven isolating shield that correspond to sensing electrode and driven shield.

  3. Initial Noise Assessment of an Embedded-wing-propulsion Concept Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James R.; Krejsa, Eugene A.

    2008-01-01

    Vehicle acoustic requirements are considered for a Cruise-Efficient Short Take-Off and Landing (CESTOL) vehicle concept using an Embedded-Wing-Propulsion (EWP) system based on a review of the literature. Successful development of such vehicles would enable more efficient use of existing airports in accommodating the anticipated growth in air traffic while at the same time reducing the noise impact on the community around the airport. A noise prediction capability for CESTOL-EWP aircraft is developed, based largely on NASA's FOOTPR code and other published methods, with new relations for high aspect ratio slot nozzles and wing shielding. The predictive model is applied to a preliminary concept developed by Boeing for NASA GRC. Significant noise reduction for such an aircraft relative to the current state-of-the-art is predicted, and technology issues are identified which should be addressed to assure that the potential of this design concept is fully achieved with minimum technical risk.

  4. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-08-02

    A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

  5. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, Daniel

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  6. Multilayer radiation shield

    SciTech Connect

    Urbahn, John Arthur; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon

    2009-06-16

    A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

  7. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1984-06-05

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  8. Whipple bumper shield simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, E.S.; Chhabildas, L.C. ); Hill, S.A. . George C. Marshall Space Flight Center)

    1991-01-01

    The Whipple bumper is a space shield designed to protect a space station from the most hazardous orbital space debris environment. A series of numerical simulations has been performed using the multi-dimensional hydrodynamics code CTH to estimate the effectiveness of the thin Whipple bumper design. These simulations are performed for impact velocities of {approximately}10 km/s which are now accessible by experiments using the Sandia hypervelocity launcher facility. For a {approximately}10 km/s impact by a 0.7 gm aluminum flier plate, the experimental results indicate that the debris cloud resulting upon impact of the bumper shield by the flier plate, completely penetrates the sub-structure. The CTH simulations also predict complete penetration by the subsequent debris cloud. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Combustor bulkhead heat shield assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Zeisser, M.H.

    1990-06-19

    This paper describes a gas turbine engine having an annular combustion chamber defined by an annular, inner liner, a concentric outer liner, and an upstream annular combustor head, wherein the head includes a radially extending bulkhead having circumferentially distributed openings for each receiving an individual fuel nozzle therethrough. It comprises: a segmented heat shield assembly, disposed between the combustion chamber interior and the bulkhead, including generally planar, sector shaped heat shields, each shield abutting circumferentially with two next adjacent shields and extending radially from proximate the inner liner to proximate the outer liner, the plurality of shields collectively defining an annular protective barrier, and wherein each sector shaped shield further includes an opening, corresponding to one of the bulkhead nozzle openings for likewise receiving the corresponding nozzle therethrough, the shield opening further including an annular lip extending toward the bulkhead and being received within the bulkhead opening, raised ridges on the shield backside, the ridges contacting the facing bulkhead surface and defining a flow path for a flow of cooling air issuing from a sized supply opening disposed in the bulkhead, the flow path running ultimately from adjacent the annular lip to the edges of each shield segment, wherein the raised edges extend fully along the lateral, circumferentially spaced edges of each shield segment and about the adjacent shield segments wherein the raised ridges further extend circumferentially between the annular lip and the abutting edge ridges.

  10. Shielding considerations for satellite microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, W.C.; Drumm, C.R.; Roeske, S.B.; Scrivner, G.J.

    1996-12-01

    Shielding for space microelectronics needs to provide an acceptable dose rate with minimum shield mass. The analysis presented here shows that the best approach is, in general, to use a graded-Z shield, with a high-Z layer sandwiched between two low-Z materials. A graded-Z shield is shown to reduce the electron dose rate by more than sixty percent over a single-material shield of the same areal density. For protons, the optimal shield would consist of a single, low-Z material layer. However, it is shown that a graded-Z shield is nearly as effective as a single-material shield, as long as a low-Z layer is located adjacent to the microelectronics. A specific shield design depends upon the details of the radiation environment, system model, design margins/levels, compatibility of shield materials, etc. Therefore, the authors present here general principles for designing effective shields and describe how the computer codes are used for this application.

  11. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  12. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  13. Skylab Solar Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A sail like sunshade for possible use as a sunscreen for the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) is shown being fabricated in the GE Building across the street from Johnson Space Center, Houston Texas. Three people help the steamstress feed the material through the sewing machine. The three-layered sunshade will be composed of a top layer of aluminized mylar, a middle layer of laminated nylon ripstop, and a bottom layer of thin nylon. Working on the sunshade are from left to right: Dale Gentry, Elizabeth Gauldin, Alyene Baker, and James H. Barnett Jr. Mrs. Baker, a GE employee, operates the double needle Singer sewing machine. Barnett is head of the Crew Equipment Development Section of JSC Crew Systems Division. Mrs. Gauldin is also with the Crew Systems Division. Gentry works for GE. The work shown here is part of the crash program underway to prepare a sunshield for Skylab to replace the orginal shield which was lost when Skylab 1 was launched on May 14, 1973. The improvised solar shield selected to be used will be carried to Earth orbit by the Skylab 2 crewman who will then deploy the reflective parasol to shade part of the OWS from the hot rays of the sun. Loss of the orginal sun shield has caused an overheating problem. in the Orbital Work Shop.

  14. Crumpled Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this image of the spacecraft's crumpled heat shield on Sept. 16, 2008, the 111th Martian day of the mission.

    The 2-1/2 meter (about 8-1/2 feet) heat shield landed southeast of Phoenix, about halfway between the spacecraft and its backshell/parachute. The backshell/parachute touched ground 300 meters (1,000 ft) to the south of the lander.

    The dark area to the right of the heat shield is the 'bounce mark' it made on impact with the Red Planet. This image is the highest-resolution image that will likely be taken by the lander, and is part of the 1,500-image 'Happily Ever After' panorama.

    The Phoenix mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  16. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  17. Acoustic Characterization of Mesoscale Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, D; Huber, R; Chambers, D; Cole, G; Balogun, O; Spicer, J; Murray, T

    2007-03-13

    This report describes the science and engineering performed to provide state-of-the-art acoustic capabilities for nondestructively characterizing mesoscale (millimeter-sized) objects--allowing micrometer resolution over the objects entire volume. Materials and structures used in mesoscale objects necessitate the use of (1) GHz acoustic frequencies and (2) non-contacting laser generation and detection of acoustic waves. This effort demonstrated that acoustic methods at gigahertz frequencies have the necessary penetration depth and spatial resolution to effectively detect density discontinuities, gaps, and delaminations. A prototype laser-based ultrasonic system was designed and built. The system uses a micro-chip laser for excitation of broadband ultrasonic waves with frequency components reaching 1.0 GHz, and a path-stabilized Michelson interferometer for detection. The proof-of-concept for mesoscale characterization is demonstrated by imaging a micro-fabricated etched pattern in a 70 {micro}m thick silicon wafer.

  18. Acoustic tractor beam.

    PubMed

    Démoré, Christine E M; Dahl, Patrick M; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P; Spalding, Gabriel C

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system. PMID:24836252

  19. Acoustic Tractor Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démoré, Christine E. M.; Dahl, Patrick M.; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P.; Spalding, Gabriel C.

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system.

  20. Relationship between dust acoustic waves in two and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Piel, A.; Goree, J.

    2006-10-15

    Low frequency electrostatic waves are investigated for a monolayer suspension of dust particles that are shielded by an ambient plasma of three-dimensional extension. The dispersion of the resulting dust acoustic surface waves is compared with dust acoustic waves in three dimensions and with lattice modes in two dimensions. It is found that the wave dispersion is determined by shielding of electric fields by electrons and ions on either side of the dust monolayer; this differs from previously studied cases of charged sheets in a vacuum. The phase velocity of these surface waves suggests the definition of a proper dust plasma frequency for monolayer systems.

  1. Relationship between dust acoustic waves in two and three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, A.; Goree, J.

    2006-10-01

    Low frequency electrostatic waves are investigated for a monolayer suspension of dust particles that are shielded by an ambient plasma of three-dimensional extension. The dispersion of the resulting dust acoustic surface waves is compared with dust acoustic waves in three dimensions and with lattice modes in two dimensions. It is found that the wave dispersion is determined by shielding of electric fields by electrons and ions on either side of the dust monolayer; this differs from previously studied cases of charged sheets in a vacuum. The phase velocity of these surface waves suggests the definition of a proper dust plasma frequency for monolayer systems.

  2. Overview of active methods for shielding spacecraft from energetic space radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    During the 1960's and into the early 1970's, investigations were conducted related to the feasibility of using active radiation shielding methods, such as afforded by electromagnetic fields, as alternatives to passive, bulk material shielding to attenuate space radiations. These active concepts fall into four categories: (1) electrostatic fields; (2) plasma shields; (3) confined magnetic fields; and (4) unconfined magnetic fields. In nearly all of these investigations, consideration was given only to shielding against protons or electrons, or both. During the 1980's and 1990's there were additional studies related to proton shielding and some new studies regarding the efficacy of using active methods to shield from the high energy heavy ion (HZE particle) component of the galactic cosmic ray spectrum. In this overview, each concept category is reviewed and its applicability and limitations for the various types of space radiations are described. Recommendations for future research on this topic are made.

  3. Overview of active methods for shielding spacecraft from energetic space radiation.

    PubMed

    Townsend, L W

    2001-01-01

    During the 1960's and into the early 1970's, investigations were conducted related to the feasibility of using active radiation shielding methods, such as afforded by electromagnetic fields, as alternatives to passive, bulk material shielding to attenuate space radiations. These active concepts fall into four categories: (1) electrostatic fields; (2) plasma shields; (3) confined magnetic fields; and (4) unconfined magnetic fields. In nearly all of these investigations, consideration was given only to shielding against protons or electrons, or both. During the 1980's and 1990's there were additional studies related to proton shielding and some new studies regarding the efficacy of using active methods to shield from the high energy heavy ion (HZE particle) component of the galactic cosmic ray spectrum. In this overview, each concept category is reviewed and its applicability and limitations for the various types of space radiations are described. Recommendations for future research on this topic are made. PMID:11770543

  4. Imaging marine geophysical environments with vector acoustics.

    PubMed

    Lindwall, Dennis

    2006-09-01

    Using vector acoustic sensors for marine geoacoustic surveys instead of the usual scalar hydrophones enables one to acquire three-dimensional (3D) survey data with instrumentation and logistics similar to current 2D surveys. Vector acoustic sensors measure the sound wave direction directly without the cumbersome arrays that hydrophones require. This concept was tested by a scaled experiment in an acoustic water tank that had a well-controlled environment with a few targets. Using vector acoustic data from a single line of sources, the three-dimensional tank environment was imaged by directly locating the source and all reflectors. PMID:17004497

  5. Acoustic fault injection tool (AFIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.

    1999-05-01

    On September 18, 1997, Honeywell Technology Center (HTC) successfully completed a three-week flight test of its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS) at Patuxent River Flight Test Center. This flight test was the culmination of an ambitious 38-month proof-of-concept effort directed at demonstrating the feasibility of detecting crack propagation in helicopter rotor components. The program was funded as part of the U.S. Navy's Air Vehicle Diagnostic Systems (AVDS) program. Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. The application of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults has proven the feasibility of the technology. The flight-test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. During the RAMS flight test, 12 test flights were flown from which 25 Gbyte of digital acoustic data and about 15 hours of analog flight data recorder (FDR) data were collected from the eight on-rotor acoustic sensors. The focus of this paper is to describe the CH-46 flight-test configuration and present design details about a new innovative machinery diagnostic technology called acoustic fault injection. This technology involves the injection of acoustic sound into machinery to assess health and characterize operational status. The paper will also address the development of the Acoustic Fault Injection Tool (AFIT), which was successfully demonstrated during the CH-46 flight tests.

  6. Space Radiation and the Challenges Towards Effective Shielding Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, Abdulnasser

    2014-01-01

    The hazards of space radiation and their effective mitigation strategies continue to pose special science and technology challenges to NASA. It is widely accepted now that shielding space vehicles and structures will have to rely on new and innovative materials since aluminum, like all high Z materials, are poor shields against the particulate and highly ionizing nature of space radiation. Shielding solutions, motivated and constrained by power and mass limitations, couple this realization with "multifunctionality," both in design concept as well as in material function and composition. Materials endowed with effective shielding properties as well as with some degree of multi-functionality may be the kernel of the so-called "radiation-smart" structures and designs. This talk will present some of the challenges and potential mitigation ideas towards the realization of such structures and designs.

  7. Air-coupled acoustic thermography for in-situ evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N. (Inventor); Winfree, William P. (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic thermography uses a housing configured for thermal, acoustic and infrared radiation shielding. For in-situ applications, the housing has an open side adapted to be sealingly coupled to a surface region of a structure such that an enclosed chamber filled with air is defined. One or more acoustic sources are positioned to direct acoustic waves through the air in the enclosed chamber and towards the surface region. To activate and control each acoustic source, a pulsed signal is applied thereto. An infrared imager focused on the surface region detects a thermal image of the surface region. A data capture device records the thermal image in synchronicity with each pulse of the pulsed signal such that a time series of thermal images is generated. For enhanced sensitivity and/or repeatability, sound and/or vibrations at the surface region can be used in feedback control of the pulsed signal applied to the acoustic sources.

  8. Spacecraft ceramic protective shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larriva, Rene F. (Inventor); Nelson, Anne (M.); Czechanski, James G. (Inventor); Poff, Ray E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A low areal density protective shield apparatus, and method for making same, for protecting spacecraft structures from impact with hypervelocity objects, including a bumper member comprising a bumper ceramic layer, a bumper shock attenuator layer, and a bumper confining layer. The bumper ceramic layer can be SiC or B.sub.4 C; the bumper shock attenuator layer can be zirconia felt; and the bumper confining layer can be aluminum. A base armor member can be spaced from the bumper member and a ceramic fiber-based curtain can be positioned between the bumper and base armor members.

  9. Passive Shielding in CUORE

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, F.; Cosmelli, C.; Dafinei, I.; Diemoz, S.; Faccini, R.; Ferroni, F.; Gargiulo, C.; Longo, E.; Morganti, S.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.; Alessandria, F.; Andreotti, E.; Foggetta, L.; Giuliani, A.; Pedretti, M.; Sangiorgio, S.; Ardito, R.; Arnaboldi, C.; Brofferio, C.

    2007-03-28

    The nature of neutrino mass is one of the friontier problems of fundamental physics. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (0{nu}DBD) is a powerful tool to investigate the mass hierarchy and possible extensions of the Standard Model. CUORE is a 1-Ton next generation experiment, made of 1000 Te bolometers, aiming at reaching a background of 0.01 (possibly 0.001) counts keV-1kg-1y-1 and therefore a mass sensitivity of few tens of meV The background contribution due to environmental neutrons, muon-induced neutrons in the shieldings and external gamma is discussed.

  10. Effects of shields on cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Aircraft wiring subjected to rapidly changing electromagnetic fields was considered. The ways in which shielded cables reduce surge voltages were studied along with the ways in which common practice regarding the use of shields may be at variance with the use required for the control of lightning effects. Courses in which this apparent conflict of use may be resolved were suggested. Noise currents flowing on shields of cables related to the noise signals coupled onto signal conductors were also investigated.

  11. Stiffness characteristics of longwall shields

    SciTech Connect

    Barczak, T.M.; Schwemmer, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Since longwall strata activity is characterized by roof-to-floor and face-to-waste displacements, a model with two degrees of freedom was used to describe the load-displacement relationship of the shield structure. The model considers the support as an elastic body and relates horizontal and vertical resultant forces acting on the support to associated displacements as a function of the stiffness of the support structure. Stiffness coefficients under full canopy and base contact configurations were determined by controlled displacement loading of longwall shields in the Bureau's Mine Roof Simulator. These two-legged longwall shields of different manufacture were investigated. The stiffness characteristics of these shields were evaluated relative to two parameters, namely, shield height and setting pressure. The tests results indicate a reduction in shield stiffness for increasing height. Setting pressure was found to have less of an effect on shield stiffness, producing only a slight increase in stiffness as setting pressure increased. Similar trends were observed for all three shields, indicating a similarity in stiffness characteristics for shields of the same basic configuration.

  12. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Cork, Christopher P.; Becker, John A.; Knapp, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  13. Hypervelocity impact shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cour-Palais, Burton G. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne Lee (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact shield and method for protecting a wall structure, such as a spacecraft wall, from impact with particles of debris having densities of about 2.7 g/cu cm and impact velocities up to 16 km/s are disclosed. The shield comprises a stack of ultra thin sheets of impactor disrupting material supported and arranged by support means in spaced relationship to one another and mounted to cover the wall in a position for intercepting the particles. The sheets are of a number and spacing such that the impacting particle and the resulting particulates of the impacting particle and sheet material are successively impact-shocked to a thermal state of total melt and/or vaporization to a degree as precludes perforation of the wall. The ratio of individual sheet thickness to the theoretical diameter of particles of debris which may be of spherical form is in the range of 0.03 to 0.05. The spacing between adjacent sheets is such that the debris cloud plume of liquid and vapor resulting from an impacting particle penetrating a sheet does not puncture the next adjacent sheet prior to the arrival thereat of fragment particulates of sheet material and the debris particle produced by a previous impact.

  14. Cruise summary for P-1-02-SC: acoustic imaging of natural oil and gas seeps and measurement of dissolved methane concentration in coastal waters near Pt. Conception, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenson, T.D.; Dougherty, Jennifer A.; Ussler, William, III; Paull, Charles K.

    2003-01-01

    Water-column acoustic anomalies and methane concentrations were documented in coastal waters surrounding Pt. Conception, California, in March 2002. The purpose of this survey, supported by the Minerals Management Service, was to locate active oil and gas seeps in the area as a background for further studies to determine hydrocarbon flux, mainly oil, into the environment. Objectives in reaching this goal are to (1) document the locations and geochemically fingerprint natural seeps within the offshore southern Santa Maria Basin; (2) geochemically fingerprint coastal tar residues and potential sources, both onshore and offshore, in this region; (3) establish chemical correlations between offshore active seeps and coastal residues thus linking seep sources to oil residues; (4) measure the rate of natural seepage of individual seeps and attempt to assess regional natural oil and gas seepage rates; (5) attempt to predict transport pathways of oil from seep sources to the coastline and; (6) interpret the petroleum system history for the natural seeps. This survey, addressing objective 1, focused on the area from offshore Surf Beach to the north and Gaviota to the south in water depths ranging from 20 to 500m. In addition, nine stations were sampled outside this area to provide a regional context. Water-column methane concentrations were measured in water samples collected from the R/V Point Sur with Niskin bottles from various depths. A total of 724 water samples from 94 stations were collected.

  15. Iron shielded MRI optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, C. A.; Fabbri, M.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the main current systems of an actively shielded and of an iron shielded MRI device for nuclear resonance imaging, is considered. The model for the analysis of the magnetic induction produced by the current system, is based on the combination of a Boundary Element technique and of the integration of two Fredholm integral equations of the first and the second kind. The equivalent current magnetization model is used for the calculation of the magnetization produced by the iron shield. High field uniformity in a spherical region inside the device, and a low stray field in the neighborhood of the device are required. In order to meet the design requirements a multi-objective global minimization problem is solved. The minimization method is based on the combination of the filled function technique and the (1+1) evolution strategy algorithm. The multi-objective problem is treated by means of a penalty method. The actively shielded MRI system results to utilize larger amount of conductor and produce higher magnetic energy than the iron shield device. On veut étudier le projet du système des courants principaux d'un MRI à écran en fer et d'un MRI à écran actif. Le modèle d'analyse du champ magnétique produit par le système de courants est basé sur la combinaison d'une technique Boundary Element et de l'intégration de deux équations intégrales de Fredholm de première et de seconde sorte. On utilise pour calculer la magnétisation produite par l'écran en fer le modèle à cou rants de magné ti sa tion équivalents. On exige une élévation uniforme du champ dans une région sphérique au cœur de l'appareil et un bas champ magnétique dispersé à proximité de l'appareil. Dans le but de répondre aux impératifs du projet, on va résoudre un problème multiobjectif de minimisation globale. On utilise une technique de minimisation obtenue par la combinaison des méthodes “Filled Function” et “(1+1) Evolution Strategy”. Le probl

  16. PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of stepped penetrations and brick layout scheme for valve stem extension sleeve. Aerojet Nuclear Company. Date: May 1976. INEEL index no. 761-0620-00-400-195280 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Determination of minimum effective height of transparent radiation face shielding for fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Prater, Scott; Rees, Chet R; Bruner, Angela; Savage, Clare

    2011-11-01

    During interventional procedures, the vast majority of scatter radiation originates from the patient and table and travels in all directions in straight lines. Because the operator's head is much higher than the patient and at an angle upward and to the side of the patient (not directly above), the scatter received by the operator's head is projected in an upward angle. Thus a face shield could potentially be lower than the object it is shielding, e.g., below the eyes. This principle may be used as an advantage to design the lowest shield that effectively protects the head while providing optimum vision, appearance, acoustics, low weight, and sense of openness. A flat acrylic plate shield, 0.5 mm Pb equivalence, was suspended vertically in front of a 451P dosimeter. A phantom patient created scatter in an interventional suite while the dosimeter was placed at the level of the crowns of different operators' heads. Many different configurations were tested to determine which ones would provide effective shielding. The results confirmed that the top of the shield may reside several centimeters below the vertical height of the dosimeter (operator's crown), allowing line of sight to monitor above the shield, and still provide effective shielding equivalent to when the dosimeter is positioned directly behind the center of the shield. The image receptor functioned as an effective shield against scatter. Factors increasing the minimum height of effective shielding included shorter operator, opposite oblique projection of image receptor, and shield closer to the face (in horizontal direction). PMID:21968819

  18. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  19. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  20. A Launch Requirements Trade Study for Active Space Radiation Shielding for Long Duration Human Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Bollweg, Ken; Martin, Trent; Westover, Shayne; Battiston, Roberto; Burger, William J.; Meinke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    A trade study for an active shielding concept based on magnetic fields in a solenoid configuration versus mass based shielding was developed. Monte Carlo simulations were used to estimate the radiation exposure for two values of the magnetic field strength and the mass of the magnetic shield configuration. For each field strength, results were reported for the magnetic region shielding (end caps ignored) and total region shielding (end caps included but no magnetic field protection) configurations. A value of 15 cSv was chosen to be the maximum exposure for an astronaut. The radiation dose estimate over the total shield region configuration cannot be used at this time without a better understanding of the material and mass present in the end cap regions through a detailed vehicle design. The magnetic shield region configuration, assuming the end cap regions contribute zero exposure, can be launched on a single Space Launch System rocket and up to a two year mission can be supported. The magnetic shield region configuration results in two versus nine launches for a comparable mass based shielding configuration. The active shielding approach is clearly more mass efficient because of the reduced number of launches than the mass based shielding for long duration missions.

  1. Pivotably mounted reactor shroud shield and shielding method

    SciTech Connect

    Hankinson, M.F.

    1987-03-31

    A method is described for shielding persons working around a nuclear reactor having a reactor head an a shroud extending upward from the reactor head, comprising: (a) mounting a plurality of swingout arms around the shroud, each swingout arm being pivotable about a respective axis that is substantially vertical and that is fixed with respect to the shroud; (b) positioning a shielding member adjacent a swingout arm with a hoist; (c) pivoting the swingout arm horizontally away from the shroud and toward the hoist; (d) transferring the shielding member from the hoist to the swingout arm so that the swingout arm supports the shielding member; (e) pivoting the swingout arm horizontally back toward the shroud; and (f) repeating steps (b) through (c) until the shroud is substantially surrounded by shielding members.

  2. High Bypass Ratio Jet Noise Reduction and Installation Effects Including Shielding Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Czech, Michael J.; Doty, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    overall nozzle configuration design was selected for application to the N2A Hybrid Wing Body concept that will be the subject of the NASA Langley 14 by 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel high fidelity aeroacoustic characterization experiment. The best overall nozzle selected includes T-fan type chevrons, uniform chevrons on the core nozzle, and no additional pylon of the type that created a strong acoustic effect at lower bypass ratios. The T-fan chevrons are oriented azimuthally away from the ground observer locations. This best overall nozzle compared to the baseline nozzle was assessed, at equal thrust, to produce sufficient installed noise reduction of the jet noise component to enable the N2A HWB to meet NASA s noise goal of 42 dB cumulative below Stage 4.

  3. Shielding design at Fermilab: Calculations and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1986-11-01

    The development of the Fermilab accelerator complex during the past two decades from its concept as the ''200 BeV accelerator'' to that of the present tevatron, designed to operate at energies as high as 1 TeV, has required a coincidental refinement and development in methods of shielding design. In this paper I describe these methods as used by the radiation protection staff of Fermilab. This description will review experimental measurements which substantiate these techniques in realistic situations. Along the way, observations will be stated which likely are applicable to other protron accelerators in the multi-hundred GeV energy region, including larger ones yet to be constructed.

  4. Longwall shield design: is bigger better?

    SciTech Connect

    Barczak, T.M.; Tadolini, S.C.

    2008-05-15

    This article evaluates the bigger is better design philosophy for longwall shields. The conventional support design approach based on simplistic models of supporting the full dead weight detached rock masses is replaced by a ground reaction design approach. Here, the goal is to match the support characteristics to the ground response, and not to try and overpower the ground forces with some massive support capability. The ground reaction concept embodies both the force and displacement controlled loading aspects, and therefore provides a more accurate representation of the support loading requirements. 7 figs.

  5. Prediction of jet noise shielding with forward flight effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayoral, Salvador

    Aircraft noise continues to be a major concern among airport-neighboring communities. A strong component of aircraft noise is the jet noise that is generated from the turbulent mixing between the jet exhaust and ambient medium. The hybrid wing body aircraft suppresses jet noise by mounting the engines over-the-wing so that the airframe may shield ground observers from jet noise sources. Subscale jet noise shielding measurements of a scaled-down turbofan nozzle and a model of the hybrid wing body planform are taken with two 12-microphone polar arrays. Chevrons and wedge-type fan flow deflectors are integrated into the baseline bypass ratio 10 (BPR10) nozzle to modify the mean flow and alter the noise source behavior. Acoustic results indicate that the baseline BPR10 nozzle produces a long noise source region that the airframe has difficulty shielding, even when the nozzle is translated two fan diameters upstream of its nominal position. The integration of either chevrons or fan flow deflectors into the nozzle is essential for jet noise shielding because they translate peak intensities upstream, closer to the fan exit plane. The numerical counterpart of this study transforms the system of equations governing the acoustic diffraction with forward flight into the wave equation. Two forward flight formulations are considered: uniform flow over slender body; and non-uniform potential flow at low Mach number. The wave equation is solved numerically in the frequency domain using the boundary element method. The equivalent jet noise source is modeled using the combination of a wavepacket and a monopole. The wavepacket is parameterized using the experimental far-field acoustic autospectra of the BPR10 jets and knowledge of their peak noise locations. It is shown that the noise source compacts with increasing Mach number and consequently there is an increase in shielding. An assessment of the error associated with the non-uniform formulation for forward flight shows that the

  6. Reflective Shields for Artificial Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    Report proposes reflective shield that protects spacecraft from radiant energy. Also gives some protection against particle beams and cosmic rays. Conceptual shield essentially advanced version of decorative multifaceted mirror balls often hung over dance floors. Mirror facets disperse radiant energy in many directions.

  7. Radiation Shielding Optimization on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Mertens, Chris J.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions to Mars will require radiation shielding to be optimized for deep space transit and an extended stay on the surface. In deep space, increased shielding levels and material optimization will reduce the exposure from most solar particle events (SPE) but are less effective at shielding against galactic cosmic rays (GCR). On the surface, the shielding provided by the Martian atmosphere greatly reduces the exposure from most SPE, and long-term GCR exposure is a primary concern. Previous work has shown that in deep space, additional shielding of common materials such as aluminum or polyethylene does not significantly reduce the GCR exposure. In this work, it is shown that on the Martian surface, almost any amount of aluminum shielding increases exposure levels for humans. The increased exposure levels are attributed to neutron production in the shield and Martian regolith as well as the electromagnetic cascade induced in the Martian atmosphere. This result is significant for optimization of vehicle and shield designs intended for the surface of Mars.

  8. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  9. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Preliminary Development of a Multifunctional Hot Structure Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra P.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Armand, Sasan C.; Perino, Scott V

    2014-01-01

    Development of a Multifunctional Hot Structure Heat Shield concept has initiated with the goal to provide advanced technology with significant benefits compared to the current state of the art heat shield technology. The concept is unique in integrating the function of the thermal protection system with the primary load carrying structural component. An advanced carbon-carbon material system has been evaluated for the load carrying structure, which will be utilized on the outer surface of the heat shield, and thus will operate as a hot structure exposed to the severe aerodynamic heating associated with planetary entry. Flexible, highly efficient blanket insulation has been sized for use underneath the hot structure to maintain desired internal temperatures. The approach was to develop a preliminary design to demonstrate feasibility of the concept. The preliminary results indicate that the concept has the potential to save both mass and volume with significantly less recession compared to traditional heat shield designs, and thus provide potential to enable new planetary missions.

  11. Shielded Canister Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Eidem, G.G. Jr.; Fages, R.

    1993-08-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) will produce canisters filled with high-level radioactive waste immobilized in borosilicate glass. This report discusses a Shielded Canister Transporter (SCT) which will provide the means for safe transportation and handling of the canisters from the Vitrification Building to the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The stainless steel canisters are 0.61 meters in diameter, 3.0 meters tall, and weigh approximately 2,135 kilograms, with a maximum exterior surface dose rate of 90,000 R/hr. The canisters are placed into storage tubes to a maximum of three tall (two for overpack canisters) with an impact limiter placed at the tube bottom and between each canister. A floor plug seals the top of the storage tube at the operating floor level of the CSB.

  12. NEUTRON SHIELDING STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Mattingly, J.T.

    1962-09-25

    A lightweight neutron shielding structure comprises a honeycomb core which is filled with a neutron absorbing powder. The honeycomb core is faced with parallel planar facing sheets to form a lightweight rigid unit. Suitable absorber powders are selected from among the following: B, B/sub 4/C, B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, CaB/sub 6/, Li/sub 2/CO3, LiOH, LiBO/sub 2/, Li/s ub 2/O. The facing sheets are constructed of a neutron moderating material, so that fast neutrons will be moderated while traversing the facing sheets, and ultimately be absorbed by the absorber powder in the honeycomb. Beryllium is a preferred moderator material for use in the facing sheets. The advantage of the structure is that it combines the rigidity and light weight of a honeycomb construction with the neutron absorption properties of boron and lithium. (AEC)

  13. Shielding and fragmentation studies.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, C; Guetersloh, S; Heilbronn, L; Miller, J

    2005-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry for manned spaced missions depends on the ability to adequately describe the process of high-energy ion transport through many materials. Since the types of possible nuclear interactions are many and complex, transport models are used which depend upon a reliable source of experimental data. To expand the heavy ion database used in the models we have been measuring charge-changing cross sections and fragment production cross sections from heavy-ion interactions in various elementa targets. These include materials flown on space missions such as carbon and aluminium, as well as those important in radiation dosimetry such as hydrogen, nitrogen and water. Measuring heavy-ion fragmentation through these targets also gives us the ability to determine the effectiveness of new materials proposed for shielding such as graphite composites and polyethylene hybrids. Measurement without a target present gives an indication of the level of contamination of the primary beam, which is also important in radiobiology experiments. PMID:16604611

  14. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    DOEpatents

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  15. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Shawn; Lipinksi, Ronald; McAlpine, William

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear reactor system could provide power to support a long term human exploration to the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor (GCR) system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency (Wright, 2003). The goals of the shielding studies were to provide optimal material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX code, a Monte Carlo transport code.

  16. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2007-05-22

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  17. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2011-03-15

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

  18. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler,; Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2010-10-26

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  19. Acoustic characteristics of a large scale wind-tunnel model of a jet flap aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falarski, M. D.; Aiken, T. N.; Aoyagi, K.

    1975-01-01

    The expanding-duct jet flap (EJF) concept is studied to determine STOL performance in turbofan-powered aircraft. The EJF is used to solve the problem of ducting the required volume of air into the wing by providing an expanding cavity between the upper and lower surfaces of the flap. The results are presented of an investigation of the acoustic characteristics of the EJF concept on a large-scale aircraft model powered by JT15D engines. The noise of the EJF is generated by acoustic dipoles as shown by the sixth power dependence of the noise on jet velocity. These sources result from the interaction of the flow turbulence with flap of internal and external surfaces and the trailing edges. Increasing the trailing edge jet from 70 percent span to 100 percent span increased the noise 2 db for the equivalent nozzle area. Blowing at the knee of the flap rather than the trailing edge reduced the noise 5 to 10 db by displacing the jet from the trailing edge and providing shielding from high-frequency noise. Deflecting the flap and varying the angle of attack modified the directivity of the underwing noise but did not affect the peak noise. A forward speed of 33.5 m/sec (110 ft/sec) reduced the dipole noise less than 1 db.

  20. Performance of solar shields. [Skylab 1 micrometeoroid shield difficulties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The loss of the micrometeoroid shield from the Orbital Workshop section of Skylab 1 about 63 seconds after lift-off, was the catalyst for a prodigious effort to develop a substitute for the passive portion of the thermal control system. An intensive effort is described in which numerous potential thermal shield materials were assessed, and during which period ten specific shield designs were developed and carried through various stages of development and test. Thermal shield materials data are discussed, including optical, strength, fatigue, outgassing, tackiness, ultraviolet radiation, and material memory properties. Specifically addressed are thermal shield materials selection criteria and the design, development, and test requirements associated with the successful development of Skylab thermal shields, and specifically the two thermal shields subsequently deployed over the exposed gold foil skin of the Orbital Workshop. Also considered are the general performance and thermal improvements provided by both the parasol design deployed by the Skylab 1 crew, and the sail design deployed by the Skylab 2 crew.

  1. Investigation of LANDSAT imagery on correlations between ore deposits and major shield structures in Finland. [Baltic Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuominen, H. V. (Principal Investigator); Kuosmanen, V.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. On the central Baltic Shield, the concept of drainage patterns can be extended to smaller scales in which case many cultural features become involved to the spatial patterns influenced by bedrock structure. Features resulting from agriculture activity and timbering often exaggerate the influence of the bedrock on the image texture.

  2. Shielding distribution for anisotropic radiation in low earth orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, M.W.

    1986-02-01

    The highly directional nature of radiation encountered in low earth orbit (LEO) can be a basis for distributing mass for spacecraft radiation shielding. Trapped (Van Allen) radiation at low altitudes is concentrated within a plane perpendicular to the local geometric field lines. Trapped high-energy protons (which penetrate the relatively thin shielding required for electrons) have a pronounced east-west asymmetry at low altitudes, with the flux from the west much higher than that from the east. By distributing radition shielding mass in response to these anisotropies, spacecraft mass can be reduced, the altitude limits of LEO extended, and the exposure of men and sensitive materials decreased. Geophysical behavior of trapped radiation is reviewed with particular emphasis on the factors responsible for radiation anisotropy. Shielding distribution in response to anisotropic radiation is then explored for consistently oriented spherical and cylindrical spacecraft. The 28.5-deg orbital inclination is considered in detail, with a brief extension of the concepts to other inclinations. These radiation shielding concepts may find near-term application in Space Station design. 21 references.

  3. Series-capacitor compensated shield scheme for enhanced mitigation of transmission line magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Walling, R.A.; Paserba, J.J. ); Burns, C.W. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a new magnetic field mitigation concept involving a series-compensated shield circuit paralleling a transmission line between the line and the right-of-way edge. An evaluation methodology is proposed which is valid for analyzing magnetic field mitigation concepts in general. The research discussed in this paper identifies the shield circuit and compensation requirements and shows the effectiveness of the scheme. Practical implementation considerations are included.

  4. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  5. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Shawn; McAlpine, William; Lipinski, Ronald

    2006-01-20

    A nuclear reactor system could provide power to support long term human exploration of the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency. The goals of the shielding studies were to determine a material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo transport code. Lithium hydride must be kept between 600 K and 700 K to prevent excessive swelling from large amounts of gamma or neutron irradiation. The issue is that radiation damage causes separation of the lithium and the hydrogen, resulting in lithium metal and hydrogen gas. The proposed design uses a layer of B4C to reduce the combined neutron and gamma dose to below 0.5Grads before the LiH is introduced. Below 0.5Grads the swelling in LiH is small (less than about 1%) for all temperatures. This approach causes the shield to be heavier than if the B4C were replaced by LiH, but it makes the shield much more robust and reliable.

  6. Fluid shielding of high-velocity jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental noise data for a nozzle exhaust system incorporating a thermal acoustic shield (TAS) are presented to show the effect of changes in geometric and flow parameters on attenuation of high-velocity jet exhaust noise in the flyover plane. The results are presented for a 10.00-cm-diameter primary conical nozzle with a TAS configuration consisting of a 2.59- or 5.07-cm-wide annular gap. Shield-stream exhaust velocity was varied from 157 to 248 m/sec to investigate the effect of velocity ratio. The results showed that increasing the annular gap width increases attenuation of high-frequency noise when comparisons are made on the same ideal thrust basis. Varying the velocity ratio had a minor effect on the noise characteristics of the nozzles investigated.

  7. NEUTRON ABSORPTION AND SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-06-21

    A neutron absorption and shielding device is described which is adapted for mounting in a radiation shielding wall surrounding a radioactive area through which instrumentation leads and the like may safely pass without permitting gamma or neutron radiation to pass to the exterior. The shielding device comprises a container having at least one nonrectilinear tube or passageway means extending therethrough, which is adapted to contain instrumentation leads or the like, a layer of a substance capable of absorbing gamma rays, and a solid resinous composition adapted to attenuate fast-moving neutrons and capture slow- moving or thermal neutrons.

  8. New Materials for EMI Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Graphite fibers intercalated with bromine or similar mixed halogen compounds have substantially lower resistivity than their pristine counterparts, and thus should exhibit higher shielding effectiveness against electromagnetic interference. The mechanical and thermal properties are nearly unaffected, and the shielding of high energy x-rays and gamma rays is substantially increased. Characterization of the resistivity of the composite materials is subtle, but it is clear that the composite resistivity is substantially lowered. Shielding effectiveness calculations utilizing a simple rule of mixtures model yields results that are consistent with available data on these materials.

  9. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-08-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  10. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  11. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  12. Designing single-beam multitrapping acoustical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Silva, Glauber T; Baggio, André L

    2015-02-01

    The concept of a single-beam acoustical tweezer device which can simultaneously trap microparticles at different points is proposed and demonstrated through computational simulations. The device employs an ultrasound beam produced by a circular focused transducer operating at 1 MHz in water medium. The ultrasound beam exerts a radiation force that may tweeze suspended microparticles in the medium. Simulations show that the acoustical tweezer can simultaneously trap microparticles in the pre-focal zone along the beam axis, i.e. between the transducer surface and its geometric focus. As acoustical tweezers are fast becoming a key instrument in microparticle handling, the development of acoustic multitrapping concept may turn into a useful tool in engineering these devices. PMID:25304994

  13. Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, M. S.

    1998-08-01

    Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions addresses an increasingly important branch of fluid mechanics--the absorption of noise and vibration by fluid flow. This subject, which offers numerous challenges to conventional areas of acoustics, is of growing concern in places where the environment is adversely affected by sound. Howe presents useful background material on fluid mechanics and the elementary concepts of classical acoustics and structural vibrations. Using examples, many of which include complete worked solutions, he vividly illustrates the theoretical concepts involved. He provides the basis for all calculations necessary for the determination of sound generation by aircraft, ships, general ventilation and combustion systems, as well as musical instruments. Both a graduate textbook and a reference for researchers, Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions is an important synthesis of information in this field. It will also aid engineers in the theory and practice of noise control.

  14. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions.

  15. Composite Aerogel Multifoil Protective Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies are needed to survive the temperatures, radiation, and hypervelocity particles that exploration spacecraft encounter. Multilayer insulations (MLIs) have been used on many spacecraft as thermal insulation. Other materials and composites have been used as micrometeorite shielding or radiation shielding. However, no material composite has been developed and employed as a combined thermal insulation, micrometeorite, and radiation shielding. By replacing the scrims that have been used to separate the foil layers in MLIs with various aerogels, and by using a variety of different metal foils, the overall protective performance of MLIs can be greatly expanded to act as thermal insulation, radiation shielding, and hypervelocity particle shielding. Aerogels are highly porous, low-density solids that are produced by the gelation of metal alkoxides and supercritical drying. Aerogels have been flown in NASA missions as a hypervelocity particle capture medium (Stardust) and as thermal insulation (2003 MER). Composite aerogel multifoil protective shielding would be used to provide thermal insulation, while also shielding spacecraft or components from radiation and hypervelocity particle impacts. Multiple layers of foil separated by aerogel would act as a thermal barrier by preventing the transport of heat energy through the composite. The silica aerogel would act as a convective and conductive thermal barrier, while the titania powder and metal foils would absorb and reflect the radiative heat. It would also capture small hypervelocity particles, such as micrometeorites, since it would be a stuffed, multi-shock Whipple shield. The metal foil layers would slow and break up the impacting particles, while the aerogel layers would convert the kinetic energy of the particles to thermal and mechanical energy and stop the particles.

  16. Magnetic Shield for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso C.; Haddad, Nicolas E.

    2013-01-01

    A new method was developed for creating a less expensive shield for ADRs using 1018 carbon steel. This shield has been designed to have similar performance to the expensive vanadium permendur shields, but the cost is 30 to 50% less. Also, these shields can be stocked in a variety of sizes, eliminating the need for special forgings, which also greatly reduces cost.

  17. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, Bert Clayton; Brindza, Paul Daniel

    2014-03-04

    A thermal neutron shield comprising boron shielding panels with a high percentage of the element Boron. The panel is least 46% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of boron shielding panels which includes enriching the pre-cursor mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  18. Transient heat flux shielding using thermal metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana, Supradeep; Savo, Salvatore; Sato, Yuki

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a heat shield based on a metamaterial engineering approach to shield a region from transient diffusive heat flow. The shield is designed with a multilayered structure to prescribe the appropriate spatial profile for heat capacity, density, and thermal conductivity of the effective medium. The heat shield was experimentally compared to other isotropic materials.

  19. Acoustically conceal an object with hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Huang, J. P.

    2009-11-01

    Following the concept of remote circular electromagnetic cloaks [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 093901 (2009)], here we exploit theoretically a class of rectangular cloaks that can acoustically cloak an object outside the cloaking shell. The cloaked object is no longer deafened by the cloaking shell, which is distinctly different from the existing acoustic cloaks. The function of such cloaks is justified by full wave simulations based on the finite element method. This work makes it possible to propose some applications like the stealth of submarines, which receive any incoming acoustic waves while keeping themselves undetectable to enemy's sonar devices. in here

  20. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, Paul E.

    1976-06-15

    1. The combination with a plurality of parallel horizontal members arranged in horizontal and vertical rows, the spacing of the members in all horizontal rows being equal throughout, the spacing of the members in all vertical rows being equal throughout; of a shield for a nuclear reactor comprising two layers of rectangular blocks through which the members pass generally perpendicularly to the layers, each block in each layer having for one of the members an opening equally spaced from vertical sides of the block and located closer to the top of the block than the bottom thereof, whereby gravity tends to make each block rotate about the associated member to a position in which the vertical sides of the block are truly vertical, the openings in all the blocks of one layer having one equal spacing from the tops of the blocks, the openings in all the blocks of the other layer having one equal spacing from the tops of the blocks, which spacing is different from the corresponding spacing in the said one layer, all the blocks of both layers having the same vertical dimension or length, the blocks of both layers consisting of relatively wide blocks and relatively narrow blocks, all the narrow blocks having the same horizontal dimension or width which is less than the horizontal dimension or width of the wide blocks, which is the same throughout, each layer consisting of vertical rows of narrow blocks and wide blocks alternating with one another, each vertical row of narrow blocks of each layer being covered by a vertical row of wide blocks of the other layer which wide blocks receive the same vertical row of members as the said each vertical row of narrow blocks, whereby the rectangular perimeters of each block of each layer is completely out of register with that of each block in the other layer.

  1. Status of reactor shielding research in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Bartine, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    Shielding research in the United States continues to place emphasis on: (1) the development and refinement of shielding design calculational methods and nuclear data; and (2) the performance of confirmation experiments, both to evaluate specific design concepts and to verify specific calculational techniques and input data. The successful prediction of the radiation levels observed within the now-operating Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has demonstrated the validity of this two-pronged approach, which has since been applied to US fast breeder reactor programs and is now being used to determine radiation levels and possible further shielding needs at operating light water reactors, especially under accident conditions. A similar approach is being applied to the back end of the fission fuel cycle to verify that radiation doses at fuel element storage and transportation facilities and within fuel reprocessing plants are kept at acceptable levels without undue economic penalties.

  2. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  3. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  4. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, L.; Andrew, M.; Bailey, M.; Beach, K.; Brayman, A.; Curra, F.; Kaczkowski, P.; Kargl, S.; Martin, R.; Vaezy, S.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past several years, the Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound (CIMU) at the Applied Physics Laboratory in the University of Washington has undertaken a broad research program in the general area of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Our principal emphasis has been on the use of HIFU to induce hemostasis; in particular, CIMU has sought to develop a small, lightweight, portable device that would use ultrasound for both imaging and therapy. Such a technology is needed because nearly 50% of combat casualty mortality results from exsanguinations, or uncontrolled bleeding. A similar percentage occurs for civilian death due to trauma. In this general review, a presentation of the general problem will be given, as well as our recent approaches to the development of an image-guided, transcutaneous, acoustic hemostasis device. [Work supported in part by the USAMRMC, ONR and the NIH.

  5. Radiation Exposure Analyses Supporting the Development of Solar Particle Event Shielding Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Steven A.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Abston, H. Lee; Simon, Hatthew A.; Gallegos, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA has plans for long duration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Outside of LEO, large solar particle events (SPEs), which occur sporadically, can deliver a very large dose in a short amount of time. The relatively low proton energies make SPE shielding practical, and the possibility of the occurrence of a large event drives the need for SPE shielding for all deep space missions. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) RadWorks Storm Shelter Team was charged with developing minimal mass SPE storm shelter concepts for missions beyond LEO. The concepts developed included "wearable" shields, shelters that could be deployed at the onset of an event, and augmentations to the crew quarters. The radiation transport codes, human body models, and vehicle geometry tools contained in the On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation In Space (OLTARIS) were used to evaluate the protection provided by each concept within a realistic space habitat and provide the concept designers with shield thickness requirements. Several different SPE models were utilized to examine the dependence of the shield requirements on the event spectrum. This paper describes the radiation analysis methods and the results of these analyses for several of the shielding concepts.

  6. Evaluation of approximate methods for the prediction of noise shielding by airframe components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahtye, W. F.; Mcculley, G.

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation of some approximate methods for the prediction of shielding of monochromatic sound and broadband noise by aircraft components is reported. Anechoic-chamber measurements of the shielding of a point source by various simple geometric shapes were made and the measured values compared with those calculated by the superposition of asymptotic closed-form solutions for the shielding by a semi-infinite plane barrier. The shields used in the measurements consisted of rectangular plates, a circular cylinder, and a rectangular plate attached to the cylinder to simulate a wing-body combination. The normalized frequency, defined as a product of the acoustic wave number and either the plate width or cylinder diameter, ranged from 4.6 to 114. Microphone traverses in front of the rectangular plates and cylinders generally showed a series of diffraction bands that matched those predicted by the approximate methods, except for differences in the magnitudes of the attenuation minima which can be attributed to experimental inaccuracies. The shielding of wing-body combinations was predicted by modifications of the approximations used for rectangular and cylindrical shielding. Although the approximations failed to predict diffraction patterns in certain regions, they did predict the average level of wing-body shielding with an average deviation of less than 3 dB.

  7. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  8. Development of combined Opto-Acoustical sensor Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enzenhöfer, A.; Anton, G.; Graf, K.; Hößl, J.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R.; Neff, M.; Richardt, C.

    2012-01-01

    The faint fluxes of cosmic neutrinos expected at very high energies require large instrumented detector volumes. The necessary volumes in combination with a sufficient shielding against background constitute forbidding and complex environments (e.g. the deep sea) as sites for neutrino telescopes. To withstand these environments and to assure the data quality, the sensors have to be reliable and their operation has to be as simple as possible. A compact sensor module design including all necessary components for data acquisition and module calibration would simplify the detector mechanics and ensures the long term operability of the detector. The compact design discussed here combines optical and acoustical sensors inside one module, therefore reducing electronics and additional external instruments for calibration purposes. In this design the acoustical sensor is primary used for acoustic positioning of the module. The module may also be used for acoustic particle detection and marine science if an appropriate acoustical sensor is chosen.First tests of this design are promising concerning the task of calibration. To expand the field of application also towards acoustic particle detection further improvements concerning electromagnetic shielding and adaptation of the single components are necessary.

  9. Water and Regolith Shielding for Surface Reactor Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, David I.; Sadasivan, Pratap; Dixon, David D.; Ade, Brian J.; Leichliter, Katrina J.

    2006-01-20

    This paper investigates potential shielding options for surface power fission reactors. The majority of work is focused on a lunar shield that uses a combination of water in stainless-steel cans and lunar regolith. The major advantage of a water-based shield is that development, testing, and deployment should be relatively inexpensive. This shielding approach is used for three surface reactor concepts: (1) a moderated spectrum, NaK cooled, Hastalloy/UZrH reactor, (2) a fast-spectrum, NaK-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor, and (3) a fast-spectrum, K-heat-pipe-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor. For this study, each of these reactors is coupled to a 25-kWt Stirling power system, designed for 5 year life. The shields are designed to limit the dose both to the Stirling alternators and potential astronauts on the surface. The general configuration used is to bury the reactor, but several other options exist as well. Dose calculations are presented as a function of distance from reactor, depth of buried hole, water boron concentration (if any), and regolith repacked density.

  10. Acoustic particle acceleration sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, J.B.; Barry, P.J.

    1996-04-01

    A crossed dipole array provides a directional receiving capability in a relatively small sensor package and is therefore very attractive for many applications in acoustics. Particle velocity measurements on two axes perpendicular to each other are required to provide the dipole signals. These can be obtained directly using particle velocity sensors or via simple transfer functions using acceleration and displacement sensors. Also, the derivative of the acoustic pressure with respect to space provides a signal proportional to the particle acceleration and gives rise to the pressure gradient sensor. Each of these sensors has strengths and drawbacks depending on the frequency regime of interest, the noise background, and whether a point or a line configuration of dipole sensors is desired. In this paper, the performance of acceleration sensors is addressed using a sensor concept developed at DREA. These sensors exploit bending stresses in a cantilever beam of piezoelectric material to obtain wide bandwidth and high sensitivity. Models which predict the acceleration sensitivity, pressure sensitivity, and natural frequency for this type of sensor are described. Experimental results obtained using several different versions of these sensors are presented and compared with theory. The predicted performance of acceleration sensors are compared with that of pressure gradient arrays and particle velocity sensors. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Acoustic emission analysis as a non-destructive test procedure for fiber compound structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, J.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of acoustic emission analysis is explained in scientific terms. The detection of acoustic events, their localization, damage discrimination, and event summation curves are discussed. A block diagram of the concept of damage-free testing of fiber-reinforced synthetic materials is depicted. Prospects for application of the concept are assessed.

  12. Design and Fabrication of a Tank-Applied Broad Area Cooling Shield Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. J.; Middlemas, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    The small-scale broad area cooling (BAC) shield test panel represents a section of the cryogenic propellant storage and transfer ground test article, a flight-like cryogenic propellant storage tank. The test panel design includes an aluminum tank shell, primer, spray-on foam insulation, multilayer insulation (MLI), and BAC shield hardware. This assembly was sized to accurately represent the character of the MLI/BAC shield system, be quickly and inexpensively assembled, and be tested in the Marshall Space Flight Center Acoustic Test Facility. Investigating the BAC shield response to a worst-case launch dynamic load was the key purpose for developing the test article and performing the test. A preliminary method for structurally supporting the BAC shield using low-conductivity standoffs was designed, manufactured, and evaluated as part of the test. The BAC tube-standoff interface and unsupported BAC tube lengths were key parameters for evaluation. No noticeable damage to any system hardware element was observed after acoustic testing.

  13. Noise reduction in a Mach 5 wind tunnel with a rectangular rod-wall sound shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, T. R., Jr.; Keyes, J. W.; Beckwith, I. E.

    1980-01-01

    A rod wall sound shield was tested over a range of Reynolds numbers of 0.5 x 10 to the 7th power to 8.0 x 10 to the 7th power per meter. The model consisted of a rectangular array of longitudinal rods with boundary-layer suction through gaps between the rods. Suitable measurement techniques were used to determine properties of the flow and acoustic disturbance in the shield and transition in the rod boundary layers. Measurements indicated that for a Reynolds number of 1.5 x 10 to the 9th power the noise in the shielded region was significantly reduced, but only when the flow is mostly laminar on the rods. Actual nozzle input noise measured on the nozzle centerline before reflection at the shield walls was attenuated only slightly even when the rod boundary layer were laminar. At a lower Reynolds number, nozzle input noise at noise levels in the shield were still too high for application to a quiet tunnel. At Reynolds numbers above 2.0 x 10 the the 7th power per meter, measured noise levels were generally higher than nozzle input levels, probably due to transition in the rod boundary layers. The small attenuation of nozzle input noise at intermediate Reynolds numbers for laminar rod layers at the acoustic origins is apparently due to high frequencies of noise.

  14. Acoustics of Jet Surface Interaction-Scrubbing Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Concepts envisioned for the future of civil air transport consist of unconventional propulsion systems in the close proximity of the structure or embedded in the airframe. While such integrated systems are intended to shield noise from community, they also introduce new sources of sound. Sound generation due to interaction of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated here using the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore-Brown equation. The propagation Greens function is solved numerically for a high aspect-ratio rectangular jet starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. It is shown the magnitude of the Greens function decreases with increasing source frequency andor jet temperature. The phase remains constant for a rigid surface, but varies with source location when subject to an impedance type boundary condition. The Greens function in the absence of the surface, and flight effect are also investigated.

  15. Acoustic behaviors of unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Soils are unconsolidated granular materials, consisting of solid particles, water and air. Their mechanical and dynamic behaviors are determined by the discrete nature of the media as well as external and inter-particle forces. For unsaturated soils, two factors significantly affect soils acoustic/seismic responses: external pressure and internal water potential/matric suction. In triaxial cell tests, unsaturated soils were subjected to predefined stress paths to undergo stages of normal consolidation, unload-reload cycles, and failure. The stress deformation curve and stress-P-wave velocity were measured and compared. The study revealed that soil's dynamic response to external pressure are similar to those of the load-deformation behaviors and demonstrated that acoustic velocity can be used to monitor the state of stress of soils. In a long term field soil survey, the P-wave velocities were found to be correlated with water potential as expressed as a power-law relationship. The above phenomena can be understood by using the Terzaghi' s the principle of effective stress. The measured results were in good agreement with Brutsaert theory. The effective stress concept can also be applied to explain the observations in a soil pipe flow study in which soil internal erosion processes were monitored and interpreted by the temporal evolution of the P-wave velocity. In addition to above linear acoustic behaviors, soils, like other earth materials, exhibit astonishing non-classical nonlinear behaviors such as end-point memory, hysteresis, strain -dependent shear modulus, resonant frequency shift, and phase shift, harmonics generation, etc. A nonlinear acoustic study of a soil as a function of water content showed that the nonlinear acoustic parameter are much sensitive to the variations of soil water content than that of the acoustic velocity.

  16. Twin jet shielding. [for aircraft noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cuffel, R. F.; Massier, P. F.

    1979-01-01

    For an over-the-wing/under-the-wing engine configuration on an airplane, the noise produced by the upper jet flow is partially reflected by the lower jet. An analysis has been performed which can be used to predict the distribution of perceived noise levels along the ground plane at take-off for an airplane which is designed to take advantage of the over/under shielding concept. Typical contours of PNL, the shielding benefit in the shadow zone, and the EPNL values at 3.5 nautical miles from brake release as well as EPNL values at sideline at 0.35 nautical miles have been calculated. This has been done for a range of flow parameters characteristic of engines producing inverted velocity profile jets suitable for use in a supersonic cruise vehicle. Reductions up to 6.0 EPNdB in community noise levels can be realized when the over engines are operated at higher thrust and the lower engines simultaneously operated with reduced thrust keeping the total thrust constant.

  17. Trailer shield assembly for a welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates generally to trailer shields for gas shielded arc welding torches, and more particularly to a trailer shield assembly provided with a shield gas manifold for providing an even dispersion of shield gas to the interior of the shield assembly, which generally encloses a joint being welded and a welding trailing portion of hot welded metal. The novelty of the invention lies in providing trailer shield with a manifold tube having a plurality of openings from which shield gas is distributed. A gas manifold region ahead of the torch is also provided with shield gas from a tube to protect metal preheated by the torch. Further novelty lies in constructing portions of sides and housing and portions of side walls of the guide of stainless steel screen having a tight mesh.

  18. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  19. Carbon microfiber material for electromagnetic (shielding) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Nadeem

    Electromagnetic shielding is becoming more and more important with the abundance of wireless devices. Therefore a need has arisen for more versatile, flexible and low-cost solutions for shielding. For these requirements, carbon microfiber material has been proposed for electromagnetic shielding applications. For this purpose its shielding effectiveness has been measured and modeled in a simulation environment. A parametric simulation was conducted for the material property 'conductivity' and the results were compared to measured ones. These simulation results were also verified by the analytical solution for the shielding effectiveness and the agreement between the simulated values and analytical results demonstrated that the carbon microfiber material, though having less conductivity than the traditional metallic shields is a good candidate for electromagnetic shielding applications. Carbon microfiber not only provides comparable shielding effectiveness to a metallic shield but it can be advantageous because of its light weight, corrosion resistance and flexibility. Also, its porous nature can help with cooling of enclosed electronic circuits.

  20. Radiation shielding materials and containers incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound ("PYRUC") shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  1. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence; Beach, Kirk; Carter, Stephen; Chandler, Wayne; Curra, Francesco; Kaczkowski, Peter; Keilman, George; Khokhlova, Vera; Martin, Roy; Mourad, Pierre; Vaezy, Shahram

    2000-07-01

    In cases of severe injury, physicians speak of a "golden hour"—a brief grace period in which quickly applied, proper therapy can save the life of the patient. Much of this mortality results from exsanguination, i.e., bleeding to death—often from internal hemorrhage. The inability of a paramedic to treat breaches in the vascular system deep within the body or to stem the loss of blood from internal organs is a major reason for the high level of mortality associated with blunt trauma. We have undertaken an extensive research program to treat the problem of internal bleeding. Our approach is as follows: (a) We use scanning ultrasound to identify internal bleeding and hemorrhage, (b) we use ultrasound imaging to locate specific breaches in the vascular system, both from damaged vessels and gross damage to the capillary bed, and (c) we use High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to treat the damaged region and to induce hemostasis. We present a general review of this research with some emphasis on the role of nonlinear acoustics.

  2. Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Quentin E. Xu, Jinghzu; Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Li, Xing; Rockey, William R.; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Enger, Shirin A.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a novel needle, catheter, and radiation source system for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) of the prostate. I-RSBT is a promising technique for reducing urethra, rectum, and bladder dose relative to conventional interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Methods: A wire-mounted 62 GBq{sup 153}Gd source is proposed with an encapsulated diameter of 0.59 mm, active diameter of 0.44 mm, and active length of 10 mm. A concept model I-RSBT needle/catheter pair was constructed using concentric 50 and 75 μm thick nickel-titanium alloy (nitinol) tubes. The needle is 16-gauge (1.651 mm) in outer diameter and the catheter contains a 535 μm thick platinum shield. I-RSBT and conventional HDR-BT treatment plans for a prostate cancer patient were generated based on Monte Carlo dose calculations. In order to minimize urethral dose, urethral dose gradient volumes within 0–5 mm of the urethra surface were allowed to receive doses less than the prescribed dose of 100%. Results: The platinum shield reduced the dose rate on the shielded side of the source at 1 cm off-axis to 6.4% of the dose rate on the unshielded side. For the case considered, for the same minimum dose to the hottest 98% of the clinical target volume (D{sub 98%}), I-RSBT reduced urethral D{sub 0.1cc} below that of conventional HDR-BT by 29%, 33%, 38%, and 44% for urethral dose gradient volumes within 0, 1, 3, and 5 mm of the urethra surface, respectively. Percentages are expressed relative to the prescription dose of 100%. For the case considered, for the same urethral dose gradient volumes, rectum D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 7%, 6%, 6%, and 6%, respectively, and bladder D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 4%, 5%, 5%, and 6%, respectively. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with I-RSBT was 154 min with ten 62 GBq {sup 153}Gd sources. Conclusions: For the case considered, the proposed{sup 153}Gd-based I-RSBT system has the potential to lower the urethral dose relative to HDR-BT by 29

  3. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Paul J.; Johansen, Michael R.; Olsen, Robert C.; Raines, Matthew G.; Phillips, James R., III; Cox, Rachel E.; Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.; Pollard, Jacob R. S.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) has chosen dust mitigation technology as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. NASA has also included Particulate Contamination Prevention and Mitigation as a cross-cutting technology to be developed for contamination prevention, cleaning and protection. This technology has been highlighted due to the detrimental effect of dust on both human and robotic missions. During manned Apollo missions, dust caused issues with both equipment and crew. Contamination of equipment caused many issues including incorrect instrument readings and increased temperatures due to masking of thermal radiators. The astronauts were directly affected by dust that covered space suits, obscured face shields and later propagated to the cabin and into the crew's eyes and lungs. Robotic missions on Mars were affected when solar panels were obscured by dust thereby reducing the effectiveness of the solar panels. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has been developing an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. This technology has been tested in lab environments and has evolved over several years. Tests of the technology include reduced gravity flights (6g) in which Apollo Lunar dust samples were successfully removed from glass shields while under vacuum (1 millipascal). Further development of the technology is underway to reduce the size of the EDS as well as to perform material and component testing outside of the International Space Station (ISS) on the Materials on International Space Station Experiment X (MISSE-X). This experiment is designed to verify that the EDS can withstand the harsh environment of space and will look to closely replicate the solar environment experienced on the moon

  4. Helicopter Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Exterior and interior noise problems are addressed both from the physics and engineering as well as the human factors point of view. The role of technology in closing the gap between what the customers and regulating agencies would like to have and what is available is explored. Noise regulation concepts, design, operations and testing for noise control, helicopter noise prediction, and research tools and measurements are among the topics covered.

  5. Stiffness characteristics of longwall shields

    SciTech Connect

    Bayczak, T.M.; Schwemmer, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The stiffness characteristics of longwall shields have been investigated the this study. Since longwall strata activity is characterized by roof-to-floor and face-to-waste displacements, a model with two degrees of freedom is used to describe the load-displacement relationship of the shield structure. The model considers the support as an elastic body and relates horizontal and vertical resultant forces acting on the support to associated displacements as a function of the stiffness of the support structure. Stiffness coefficients under full canopy and base contact configurations have been determined.

  6. Design, fabrication and test of Load Bearing multilayer insulation to support a broad area cooled shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dye, S. A.; Johnson, W. L.; Plachta, D. W.; Mills, G. L.; Buchanan, L.; Kopelove, A. B.

    2014-11-01

    Improvements in cryogenic propellant storage are needed to achieve reduced or Zero Boil Off of cryopropellants, critical for long duration missions. Techniques for reducing heat leak into cryotanks include using passive multi-layer insulation (MLI) and vapor cooled or actively cooled thermal shields. Large scale shields cannot be supported by tank structural supports without heat leak through the supports. Traditional MLI also cannot support shield structural loads, and separate shield support mechanisms add significant heat leak. Quest Thermal Group and Ball Aerospace, with NASA SBIR support, have developed a novel Load Bearing multi-layer insulation (LBMLI) capable of self-supporting thermal shields and providing high thermal performance. We report on the development of LBMLI, including design, modeling and analysis, structural testing via vibe and acoustic loading, calorimeter thermal testing, and Reduced Boil-Off (RBO) testing on NASA large scale cryotanks. LBMLI uses the strength of discrete polymer spacers to control interlayer spacing and support the external load of an actively cooled shield and external MLI. Structural testing at NASA Marshall was performed to beyond maximum launch profiles without failure. LBMLI coupons were thermally tested on calorimeters, with superior performance to traditional MLI on a per layer basis. Thermal and structural tests were performed with LBMLI supporting an actively cooled shield, and comparisons are made to the performance of traditional MLI and thermal shield supports. LBMLI provided a 51% reduction in heat leak per layer over a previously tested traditional MLI with tank standoffs, a 38% reduction in mass, and was advanced to TRL5. Active thermal control using LBMLI and a broad area cooled shield offers significant advantages in total system heat flux, mass and structural robustness for future Reduced Boil-Off and Zero Boil-Off cryogenic missions with durations over a few weeks.

  7. Interpreting Underwater Acoustic Images of the Upper Ocean Boundary Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulloa, Marco J.

    2007-01-01

    A challenging task in physical studies of the upper ocean using underwater sound is the interpretation of high-resolution acoustic images. This paper covers a number of basic concepts necessary for undergraduate and postgraduate students to identify the most distinctive features of the images, providing a link with the acoustic signatures of…

  8. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  9. Acoustic Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    One of the subtle problems that make noise control difficult for engineers is the invisibility of noise or sound. A visual image of noise often helps to determine an appropriate means for noise control. There have been many attempts to fulfill this rather challenging objective. Theoretical (or numerical) means for visualizing the sound field have been attempted, and as a result, a great deal of progress has been made. However, most of these numerical methods are not quite ready for practical applications to noise control problems. In the meantime, rapid progress with instrumentation has made it possible to use multiple microphones and fast signal-processing systems. Although these systems are not perfect, they are useful. A state-of-the-art system has recently become available, but it still has many problematic issues; for example, how can one implement the visualized noise field. The constructed noise or sound picture always consists of bias and random errors, and consequently, it is often difficult to determine the origin of the noise and the spatial distribution of the noise field. Section 26.2 of this chapter introduces a brief history, which is associated with sound visualization, acoustic source identification methods and what has been accomplished with a line or surface array. Section 26.2.3 introduces difficulties and recent studies, including de-Dopplerization and de-re verberation methods, both essential for visualizing a moving noise source, such as occurs for cars or trains. This section also addresses what produces ambiguity in realizing real sound sources in a room or closed space. Another major issue associated with sound/noise visualization is whether or not we can distinguish between mutual dependencies of noise in space (Sect. 26.2.4); for example, we are asked to answer the question, Can we see two birds singing or one bird with two beaks?

  10. Acoustic Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    One of the subtle problems that make noise control difficult for engineers is the invisibility of noise or sound. A visual image of noise often helps to determine an appropriate means for noise control. There have been many attempts to fulfill this rather challenging objective. Theoretical (or numerical) means for visualizing the sound field have been attempted, and as a result, a great deal of progress has been made. However, most of these numerical methods are not quite ready for practical applications to noise control problems. In the meantime, rapid progress with instrumentation has made it possible to use multiple microphones and fast signal-processing systems. Although these systems are not perfect, they are useful. A state-of-the-art system has recently become available, but it still has many problematic issues; for example, how can one implement the visualized noise field. The constructed noise or sound picture always consists of bias and random errors, and consequently, it is often difficult to determine the origin of the noise and the spatial distribution of the noise field. Section 26.2 of this chapter introduces a brief history, which is associated with "sound visualization," acoustic source identification methods and what has been accomplished with a line or surface array. Section 26.2.3 introduces difficulties and recent studies, including de-Dopplerization and de-reverberation methods, both essentialfor visualizing a moving noise source, such as occurs for cars or trains. This section also addresses what produces ambiguity in realizing real sound sources in a room or closed space. Another major issue associated with sound/noise visualization is whether or not we can distinguish between mutual dependencies of noise in space (Sect. 26.2.4); for example, we are asked to answer the question, "Can we see two birds singing or one bird with two beaks?"

  11. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular schwannoma, is a rare benign tumor of the ... Acoustic Neuroma? An acoustic neuroma, known as a vestibular schwannoma, is a benign (non-cancerous) growth that ...

  12. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  13. Acoustical case studies of three green buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebein, Gary; Lilkendey, Robert; Skorski, Stephen

    2005-04-01

    Case studies of 3 green buildings with LEED certifications that required extensive acoustical retrofit work to become satisfactory work environments for their intended user groups will be used to define areas where green building design concepts and acoustical design concepts require reconciliation. Case study 1 is an office and conference center for a city environmental education agency. Large open spaces intended to collect daylight through clerestory windows provided large, reverberant volumes with few acoustic finishes that rendered them unsuitable as open office space and a conference room/auditorium. Case Study 2 describes one of the first gold LEED buildings in the southeast whose primary design concepts were so narrowly focused on thermal and lighting issues that they often worked directly against basic acoustical requirements resulting in sound levels of NC 50-55 in classrooms and faculty offices, crosstalk between classrooms and poor room acoustics. Case study 3 is an environmental education and conference center with open public areas, very high ceilings, and all reflective surfaces made from wood and other environmentally friendly materials that result in excessive loudness when the building is used by the numbers of people which it was intended to serve.

  14. Pulsed EMAT (Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer) acoustic measurements on a horizontal continuous caster for internal temperature determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Donald M.

    1989-10-01

    Development of a Pulsed Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer (EMAT) through transmission system for acoustic measurements on steel billets up to 1300 C was completed. Laboratory measurements of acoustic velocity were made, and used to determine the average internal temperature of hot stainless and carbon steel billets. Following the success of the laboratory system development, the laboratory EMAT system was subsequently tested successfully at the Baltimore Specialty Steel Co. on a horizontal continuous caster. Details of the sensor system development and the steel plant demonstration results are presented. Future directions for the high temperature pulsed EMAT internal temperature concept are discussed for potential material processing applications.

  15. Parametric acoustic arrays: A state of the art review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenlon, F. H.

    1976-01-01

    Following a brief introduction to the concept of parametric acoustic interactions, the basic properties of parametric transmitting and receiving arrays are considered in the light of conceptual advances resulting from experimental and theoretical investigations that have taken place since 1963.

  16. Material Effectiveness for Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Materials with a smaller mean atomic mass, such as lithium (Li) hydride and polyethylene, make the best radiation shields for astronauts. The materials have a higher density of nuclei and are better able to block incoming radiation. Also, they tend to produce fewer and less dangerous secondary particles after impact with incoming radiation.

  17. ADVANTG Shielding Analysis for Closure Operations in an Open-Mode Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Bevill, Aaron M; Radulescu, Georgeta; Scaglione, John M; Howard, Rob L

    2013-01-01

    en-mode repository concepts could require worker entry into access drifts after placement of fuel casks in order to perform activities related to backfill, plug emplacement, routine maintenance, or performance confirmation. An ideal emplacement-drift shielding configuration would minimize dose to workers while maximizing airflow through the emplacement drifts. This paper presents a preliminary investigation of the feasibility and effectiveness of radiation shielding concepts that could be employed to facilitate worker operations in an open-mode repository. The repository model for this study includes pressurized-water reactor fuel assemblies (60 GWd/MTU burnup, 40 year post-irradiation cooldown) in packages of 32 assemblies. The closest fuel packages are 5 meters from dosimetry voxels in the access drift. The unshielded dose to workers in the access drift is 73.7 rem/hour. Prior work suggests that open-mode repository concepts similar to this one would require 15 m3/s of ventilation airflow. Shielding concepts considered here include partial concrete plugs, labyrinthine shields, and stainless steel photon attenuator grids. Maximum dose to workers in the access drift was estimated for each shielding concept using MCNP5 with variance reduction parameters generated by ADVANTG. Because airflow through the shielding is important for open-mode repositories, a semi-empirical estimate of the head loss due to each shielding configuration was also calculated. Airflow and shielding performance vary widely among the proposed shielding configurations. Although the partial plug configuration had the best airflow performance, it allowed dose rates 1500 greater than the specified target. Labyrinthine shielding concepts yield doses on the order of 1 mrem/hour with configurations that impose 3 to 11 J/kg head loss. Adding 1 cm lead lining to the airflow channels of labyrinthine designs further reduces the worker dose by 65% to 95%. Photon-attenuator concepts may reduce worker dose

  18. Predictions for Radiation Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) is a serious hazard to humans and electronic instruments during space travel, particularly on prolonged missions outside the Earth s magnetic fields. Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is composed of approx. 98% nucleons and approx. 2% electrons and positrons. Although cosmic ray heavy ions are 1-2% of the fluence, these energetic heavy nuclei (HZE) contribute 50% of the long-term dose. These unusually high specific ionizations pose a significant health hazard acting as carcinogens and also causing microelectronics damage inside spacecraft and high-flying aircraft. These HZE ions are of concern for radiation protection and radiation shielding technology, because gross rearrangements and mutations and deletions in DNA are expected. Calculations have shown that HZE particles have a strong preference for interaction with light nuclei. The best shield for this radiation would be liquid hydrogen, which is totally impractical. For this reason, hydrogen-containing polymers make the most effective practical shields. Shielding is required during missions in Earth orbit and possibly for frequent flying at high altitude because of the broad GCR spectrum and during a passage into deep space and LunarMars habitation because of the protracted exposure encountered on a long space mission. An additional hazard comes from solar particle events (SPEs) which are mostly energetic protons that can produce heavy ion secondaries as well as neutrons in materials. These events occur at unpredictable times and can deliver a potentially lethal dose within several hours to an unshielded human. Radiation protection for humans requires safety in short-term missions and maintaining career exposure limits within acceptable levels on future long-term exploration missions. The selection of shield materials can alter the protection of humans by an order of magnitude. If improperly selected, shielding materials can actually

  19. Preliminary Evaluation of Convective Heat Transfer in a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson J. Boise; Reid, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Vision for Space Exploration, the end of the next decade will bring man back to the surface of the moon. A crucial issue for the establishment of human presence on the moon will be the availability of compact power sources. This presence could require greater than 10's of kWt's in follow on years. Nuclear reactors are well suited to meet the needs for power generation on the lunar or Martian surface. Radiation shielding is a key component of any surface power reactor system. Several competing concepts exist for lightweight, safe, robust shielding systems such as a water shield, lithium hydride (LiH), and boron carbide. Water offers several potential advantages, including reduced cost, reduced technical risk, and reduced mass. Water has not typically been considered for space reactor applications because of the need for gravity to fix the location of any vapor that could form radiation streaming paths. The water shield concept relies on the predictions of passive circulation of the shield water by natural convection to adequately cool the shield. This prediction needs to be experimentally evaluated, especially for shields with complex geometries. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has developed the experience and facilities necessary to do this evaluation in its Early Flight Fission - Test Facility (EFF-TF).

  20. Reliability-Based Electronics Shielding Design Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; O'Neill, P. J.; Zang, T. A.; Pandolf, J. E.; Tripathi, R. K.; Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, P.; Reddell, B.; Pankop, C.

    2007-01-01

    Shielding design on large human-rated systems allows minimization of radiation impact on electronic systems. Shielding design tools require adequate methods for evaluation of design layouts, guiding qualification testing, and adequate follow-up on final design evaluation.

  1. Improved Connector Shell for Cable Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, A. L.; Rotta, J. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Cable connector shell improves electrostatic and electromagnetic shielding by electrically connecting cable braid around entire circumference. Connector cable braid is slipped over ferrule and sleeve is slipped over braid, clamping it tightly to shell. Connector shell completely shields cable conductors.

  2. Process Optimization through Adaptation of Shielding Gas Selection and Feeding during Laser Beam Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patschger, Andreas; Sahib, Christoffer; Bergmann, Jean Pierre; Bastick, André

    For this paper the influence of the shielding gas itself as well as the feeding method on austenitic welding joints was examined with thin sheets frequently used in the household appliance industry. The composition of the shielding gas mixture with active and/or inert gases was varied in the examination, and the effect on the weld seam could be made clear. By comparing different shielding gas feeding concepts, the process was optimized with regard to seam formation. Moreover, the influence of oxygen on the seam shape was examined in the deep welding regime on a specific example.

  3. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  4. Thermal, Radiation and Impact Protective Shields (TRIPS) for Robotic and Human Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, M. P.; Arnold, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    New concepts for protective shields for NASA s Crew Exploration Vehicles (CEVs) and planetary probes offer improved mission safety and affordability. Hazards include radiation from cosmic rays and solar particle events, hypervelocity impacts from orbital debris/ micrometeorites, and the extreme heating environment experienced during entry into planetary atmospheres. The traditional approach for the design of protection systems for these hazards has been to create single-function shields, i.e. ablative and blanket-based heat shields for thermal protection systems (TPS), polymer or other low-molecular-weight materials for radiation shields, and multilayer, Whipple-type shields for protection from hypervelocity impacts. This paper introduces an approach for the development of a single, multifunctional protective shield, employing nanotechnology- based materials, to serve simultaneously as a TPS, an impact shield and as the first line of defense against radiation. The approach is first to choose low molecular weight ablative TPS materials, (existing and planned for development) and add functionalized carbon nanotubes. Together they provide both thermal and radiation (TR) shielding. Next, impact protection (IP) is furnished through a tough skin, consisting of hard, ceramic outer layers (to fracture the impactor) and sublayers of tough, nanostructured fabrics to contain the debris cloud from the impactor before it can penetrate the spacecraft s interior.

  5. Debris shield survivability and lifetimes for NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S; Duewer, T; Eder, D; Ertel, J; Horton, R; Latkowski, Brereton, S; MacGowan, B; Thomas, I; Tobin, M; Zaka, F

    1999-09-01

    The survivability and performance of the NIF debris shields on the National Ignition Facility are a key factor for the successful conduct and affordable operation of the facility. Estimates of debris shield lifetime in the presence of target emissions indicate severely shortened lifetimes. We have tested a new coating design that improves debris shield cleaning. A combination of modeling and continuous data collection on NIF is described/recommended to allow cost effective debris shield operation.

  6. ERA's Open Rotor Studies Including Shielding for Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zante, Dale; Thomas, Russell

    2012-01-01

    The Open Rotor is a modern version of the UnDucted Fan (UDF) that was flight tested in the late 1980's through a partnership between NASA and General Electric (GE). Tests were conducted in the 9' x 15' Low Speed Wind Tunnel and the 8' x 6' Supersonic Wind Tunnel starting in late 2009 and completed in early 2012. Aerodynamic and acoustic data were obtained for takeoff, approach and cruise simulations. GE was the primary partner, but other organizations were involved such as Boeing and Airbus who provided additional hardware for fuselage simulations. This test campaign provided the acoustic and performance characteristics for modern open rotor blades designs." NASA and GE conducted joint systems analysis to evaluate how well new blade designs would perform on a B737 class aircraft, and compared the results to an advanced higher bypass ratio turbofan." Acoustic shielding experiments were performed at NASA GRC and Boeing LSAF facilities to provide data for noise estimates of unconventional aircraft configurations with Open Rotor propulsion systems." The work was sponsored by NASA's aeronautics programs, including the Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) and the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) projects."

  7. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  8. GCFR shielding design and supporting experimental programs

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.G.; Hamilton, C.J.; Bartine, D.

    1980-05-01

    The shielding for the conceptual design of the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) is described, and the component exposure design criteria which determine the shield design are presented. The experimental programs for validating the GCFR shielding design methods and data (which have been in existence since 1976) are also discussed.

  9. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  10. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  11. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  12. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  13. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  14. Acoustics, Noise, and Buildings. Revised Edition 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkin, P. H.; Humphreys, H. R.

    The fundamental physical concepts needed in any appreciation of acoustical problems are discussed by a scientist and an architect. The major areas of interest are--(1) the nature of sound, (2) the behavior of sound in rooms, (3) the design of rooms for speech, (4) the design of rooms for music, (5) the design of studios, (6) the design of high…

  15. Gamma-ray shielding and structural properties of barium-bismuth-borosilicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bootjomchai, Cherdsak; Laopaiboon, Jintana; Yenchai, Chadet; Laopaiboon, Raewat

    2012-07-01

    The attenuation coefficients of barium-bismuth-borosilicate glasses have been measured for gamma-ray photon energies of 662, 1173 and 1332 keV using a narrow beam transmission geometry. These coefficients were then used to obtain the values of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number, effective electron density and mean free path. Good agreement has been observed between experimental and theoretical values of these parameters. From the obtained results it is reported here that from the barium-bismuth-borosilicate glasses are better shields to gamma-radiations in comparison to the standard radiation shielding concretes from the shielding point of view. The molar volume, FTIR and acoustic investigations have been used to study the structural properties of the prepared glass system. The obtained results reveal that the formation of non-bridging oxygens occurs at higher concentration of Bi2O3.

  16. Lift-Off Acoustics Prediction of Clustered Rocket Engines in the Near Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce; Plotkin, Ken

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation presents a method of predicting acoustics during lift-off of the clustered rocket engines in the near field. Included is a definition of the near field, and the use of deflectors and shielding. There is discussion about the use of PAD, a software system designed to calculate the acoustic levels from the lift of of clustered rocket enginee, including updates to extend the calculation to directivity, water suppression, and clustered nozzles.

  17. Development of rotorcraft interior noise control concepts. Phase 3: Development of noise control concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoerkie, Charles A.; Gintoli, P. J.; Ingraham, S. T.; Moore, J. A.

    1986-07-01

    The goal of this research is the understanding of helicopter internal noise mechanisms and the development, design, and testing of noise control concepts which will produce significant reductions in the acoustic environment to which passengers are exposed. The Phase 3 effort involved the identification and evaluation of current and advanced treatment concepts, including isolation of structure-borne paths. In addition, a plan was devised for the full-scale evaluation of an isolation concept. Specific objectives were as follows: (1) identification and characterization of various noise control concepts; (2) implementation of noise control concepts within the S-76 SEA (statistical energy analysis) model; (3) definition and evaluation of a preliminary acoustic isolation design to reduce structure-borne transmission of acoustic frequency main gearbox gear clash vibrations into the airframe; (4) formulation of a plan for the full-scale validation of the isolation concept; and (5) prediction of the cabin noise environment with various noise control concepts installed.

  18. Development of rotorcraft interior noise control concepts. Phase 3: Development of noise control concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoerkie, Charles A.; Gintoli, P. J.; Ingraham, S. T.; Moore, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this research is the understanding of helicopter internal noise mechanisms and the development, design, and testing of noise control concepts which will produce significant reductions in the acoustic environment to which passengers are exposed. The Phase 3 effort involved the identification and evaluation of current and advanced treatment concepts, including isolation of structure-borne paths. In addition, a plan was devised for the full-scale evaluation of an isolation concept. Specific objectives were as follows: (1) identification and characterization of various noise control concepts; (2) implementation of noise control concepts within the S-76 SEA (statistical energy analysis) model; (3) definition and evaluation of a preliminary acoustic isolation design to reduce structure-borne transmission of acoustic frequency main gearbox gear clash vibrations into the airframe; (4) formulation of a plan for the full-scale validation of the isolation concept; and (5) prediction of the cabin noise environment with various noise control concepts installed.

  19. New facility shield design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, W.P.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of the criteria presented here is to provide standard guidance for the design of nuclear radiation shields thoughout new facilities. These criteria are required to assure a consistent and integrated design that can be operated safely and economically within the DOE standards. The scope of this report is confined to the consideration of radiation shielding for contained sources. The whole body dose limit established by the DOE applies to all doses which are generally distributed throughout the trunk of the body. Therefore, where the whole body is the critical organ for an internally deposited radionuclide, the whole body dose limit applies to the sum of doses received must assure control of the concentration of radionuclides in the building atmosphere and thereby limit the dose from internal sources.

  20. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  1. Radiation shielding for diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Colin J

    2015-07-01

    Scattered radiation makes up the majority of the stray radiation field around an X-ray unit. The scatter is linked to the amount of radiation incident on the patient. It can be estimated from quantities used to assess patient dose such as the kerma-area product, and factors have been established linking this to levels of scattered radiation for radiography and fluoroscopy. In radiography shielding against primary radiation is also needed, but in other modalities this is negligible, as the beam is intercepted by the image receptor. In the same way scatter from CT can be quantified in terms of dose-length product, but because of higher radiation levels, exposure to tertiary scatter from ceilings needs to be considered. Transmission requirements are determined from comparisons between calculated radiation levels and agreed dose criteria, taking into account the occupancy of adjacent areas. Thicknesses of shielding material required can then be calculated from simple equations. PMID:25813477

  2. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  3. S8DR shield examination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, D. G.; Mccurnin, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    The SNAP 8 developmental reactor lithium hydride shield was examined after being irradiated for over 7000 hours at relatively low temperature. A crack was located in the seam weld of the containment vessel, probably the result of hot short cracking under thermal stress. The LiH was visually examined at two locations and its appearance was typical of low temperature irradiated LiH. The adherence of the chrome oxide emittance coating was found to be excellent.

  4. Light shield for solar concentrators

    DOEpatents

    Plesniak, Adam P.; Martins, Guy L.

    2014-08-26

    A solar receiver unit including a housing defining a recess, a cell assembly received in the recess, the cell assembly including a solar cell, and a light shield received in the recess and including a body and at least two tabs, the body defining a window therein, the tabs extending outward from the body and being engaged with the recess, wherein the window is aligned with the solar cell.

  5. SETTABLE NEUTRON RADIATION SHIELDING MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-11-22

    A settable, viscous, putty-like shielding composition is described. It consists of an intimate admixture of a major proportion of a compound having a ratio of hydrogen atoms to all other atoms therein within the range of from 0.5: 1 to 2:l. from 0.5 to 10% by weight of boron, and a fluid resinous carrier This composition when cured is adapted to attenuate fast moving neutrons and capture slow moving neutrons.

  6. Thermally isolated deployable shield for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr. (Inventor); Miller, Andre E. (Inventor); Lawson, Bobby E. (Inventor); Cobb, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A thermally isolated deployable shield for spacecraft is provided utilizing a plurality of lattice panels stowable generally against the craft and deployable to some fixed distance from the craft. The lattice panels are formed from replaceable shield panels affixed to lattice structures. The lattice panels generally encircle the craft providing 360 degree coverage therearound. Actuation means are provided from translating the shield radially outward from the craft and thermally isolating the shield from the craft. The lattice panels are relatively flexible, allowing the shield to deploy to variable diameters while retaining uniform curvature thereof. Restraining means are provided for holding the shield relatively tight in its stowed configuration. Close-out assemblies provide light sealing and protection of the annular spaces between the deployed shield and the crafts end structure.

  7. Reactor vessel head permanent shield

    SciTech Connect

    Hankinson, M.F.; Leduc, R.J.; Richard, J.W.; Malandra, L.J.

    1989-05-09

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising: a nuclear reactor pressure vessel closure head; control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) disposed within the closure head so as to project vertically above the closure head; cooling air baffle means surrounding the control rod drive mechanisms for defining cooling air paths relative to the control rod drive mechanisms; means defined within the periphery of the closure head for accommodating fastening means for securing the closure head to its associated pressure vessel; lifting lugs fixedly secured to the closure head for facilitating lifting and lowering movements of the closure head relative to the pressure vessel; lift rods respectively operatively associated with the plurality of lifting lugs for transmitting load forces, developed during the lifting and lowering movements of the closure head, to the lifting lugs; upstanding radiation shield means interposed between the cooling air baffle means and the periphery of the enclosure head of shielding maintenance personnel operatively working upon the closure head fastening means from the effects of radiation which may emanate from the control rod drive mechanisms and the cooling air baffle means; and connecting systems respectively associated with each one of the lifting lugs and each one of the lifting rods for connecting each one of the lifting rods to a respective one of each one of the lifting lugs, and for simultaneously connecting a lower end portion of the upstanding radiation shield means to each one of the respective lifting lugs.

  8. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) Shielding Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2007-01-01

    Photonic Bandgap (PBG) shielding technology is a new approach to designing electromagnetic shielding materials for mitigating Electromagnetic Interference (EM!) with small, light-weight shielding materials. It focuses on ground planes of printed wiring boards (PWBs), rather than on components. Modem PSG materials also are emerging based on planar materials, in place of earlier, bulkier, 3-dimensional PBG structures. Planar PBG designs especially show great promise in mitigating and suppressing EMI and crosstalk for aerospace designs, such as needed for NASA's Constellation Program, for returning humans to the moon and for use by our first human visitors traveling to and from Mars. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) materials are also known as artificial dielectrics, meta-materials, and photonic crystals. General PBG materials are fundamentally periodic slow-wave structures in I, 2, or 3 dimensions. By adjusting the choice of structure periodicities in terms of size and recurring structure spacings, multiple scatterings of surface waves can be created that act as a forbidden energy gap (i.e., a range of frequencies) over which nominally-conductive metallic conductors cease to be a conductor and become dielectrics. Equivalently, PBG materials can be regarded as giving rise to forbidden energy gaps in metals without chemical doping, analogous to electron bandgap properties that previously gave rise to the modem semiconductor industry 60 years ago. Electromagnetic waves cannot propagate over bandgap regions that are created with PBG materials, that is, over frequencies for which a bandgap is artificially created through introducing periodic defects

  9. Virtual reflections in electronic acoustic architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Munster, Bjorn

    2005-09-01

    In the era of the ancient Greeks and Byzantines, the first attempts for increasing reverberation time are noted. In the 1950s, the Ambiophonic system accomplished this by means of an electronic device, for the first time. The early systems only increased the reverberation time by delaying the picked-up reverberation. With the introduction of multichannel feedback-based systems, the reverberation level also could be increased. Later, it was understood that it was important to also fill in the missing reflections, address reflection density, frequency dependence, etc. This resulted in the development of the SIAP concept. Current DSP technology led to the development of a processor whereby density, length, level, and the frequency content can be controlled for different areas in the same room or different rooms, leading to the concept of the acoustic server. electronic acoustic architecture has become the current state-of-the-art approach for solving acoustic deficiencies in, among others, rehearsal rooms, theaters, churches, and multipurpose venues. Incorporation of complementary passive acoustic solutions provides an optimum solution for all room problems. This paper discusses the utilization of virtual reflections in the new approach of electronic acoustic architecture for different environments. Measurements performed in the Sejong Performing Arts Centre, Seoul, South Korea, show the power of this approach.

  10. Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Acoustic Test Preparations and Facility Upgrades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Stephanie L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Doty, Michael J.; Haskin, Henry H.; Spalt, Taylor B.; Bahr, Christopher J.; Burley, Casey L.; Bartram, Scott M.; Humphreys, William M.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Popenack, Thomas G.; Colbert, Scott E.; Hoad, Danny; Becker, Lawrence; Stead, Dan; Kuchta, Dennis; Yeh, Les

    2013-01-01

    NASA is investigating the potential of acoustic shielding as a means to reduce the noise footprint at airport communities. A subsonic transport aircraft and Langley's 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel were chosen to test the proposed "low noise" technology. The present experiment studies the basic components of propulsion-airframe shielding in a representative flow regime. To this end, a 5.8-percent scale hybrid wing body model was built with dual state-of-the-art engine noise simulators. The results will provide benchmark shielding data and key hybrid wing body aircraft noise data. The test matrix for the experiment contains both aerodynamic and acoustic test configurations, broadband turbomachinery and hot jet engine noise simulators, and various airframe configurations which include landing gear, cruise and drooped wing leading edges, trailing edge elevons and vertical tail options. To aid in this study, two major facility upgrades have occurred. First, a propane delivery system has been installed to provide the acoustic characteristics with realistic temperature conditions for a hot gas engine; and second, a traversing microphone array and side towers have been added to gain full spectral and directivity noise characteristics.

  11. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  12. Acoustic tweezers via sub–time-of-flight regime surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Collins, David J.; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Ma, Zhichao; Ng, Jia Wei; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Micrometer-scale acoustic waves are highly useful for refined optomechanical and acoustofluidic manipulation, where these fields are spatially localized along the transducer aperture but not along the acoustic propagation direction. In the case of acoustic tweezers, such a conventional acoustic standing wave results in particle and cell patterning across the entire width of a microfluidic channel, preventing selective trapping. We demonstrate the use of nanosecond-scale pulsed surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with a pulse period that is less than the time of flight between opposing transducers to generate localized time-averaged patterning regions while using conventional electrode structures. These nodal positions can be readily and arbitrarily positioned in two dimensions and within the patterning region itself through the imposition of pulse delays, frequency modulation, and phase shifts. This straightforward concept adds new spatial dimensions to which acoustic fields can be localized in SAW applications in a manner analogous to optical tweezers, including spatially selective acoustic tweezers and optical waveguides. PMID:27453940

  13. Origami acoustics: using principles of folding structural acoustics for simple and large focusing of sound energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harne, Ryan L.; Lynd, Danielle T.

    2016-08-01

    Fixed in spatial distribution, arrays of planar, electromechanical acoustic transducers cannot adapt their wave energy focusing abilities unless each transducer is externally controlled, creating challenges for the implementation and portability of such beamforming systems. Recently, planar, origami-based structural tessellations are found to facilitate great versatility in system function and properties through kinematic folding. In this research we bridge the physics of acoustics and origami-based design to discover that the simple topological reconfigurations of a Miura-ori-based acoustic array yield many orders of magnitude worth of reversible change in wave energy focusing: a potential for acoustic field morphing easily obtained through deployable, tessellated architectures. Our experimental and theoretical studies directly translate the roles of folding the tessellated array to the adaptations in spectral and spatial wave propagation sensitivities for far field energy transmission. It is shown that kinematic folding rules and flat-foldable tessellated arrays collectively provide novel solutions to the long-standing challenges of conventional, electronically-steered acoustic beamformers. While our examples consider sound radiation from the foldable array in air, linear acoustic reciprocity dictates that the findings may inspire new innovations for acoustic receivers, e.g. adaptive sound absorbers and microphone arrays, as well as concepts that include water-borne waves.

  14. Acoustic tweezers via sub-time-of-flight regime surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Ma, Zhichao; Ng, Jia Wei; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-07-01

    Micrometer-scale acoustic waves are highly useful for refined optomechanical and acoustofluidic manipulation, where these fields are spatially localized along the transducer aperture but not along the acoustic propagation direction. In the case of acoustic tweezers, such a conventional acoustic standing wave results in particle and cell patterning across the entire width of a microfluidic channel, preventing selective trapping. We demonstrate the use of nanosecond-scale pulsed surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with a pulse period that is less than the time of flight between opposing transducers to generate localized time-averaged patterning regions while using conventional electrode structures. These nodal positions can be readily and arbitrarily positioned in two dimensions and within the patterning region itself through the imposition of pulse delays, frequency modulation, and phase shifts. This straightforward concept adds new spatial dimensions to which acoustic fields can be localized in SAW applications in a manner analogous to optical tweezers, including spatially selective acoustic tweezers and optical waveguides. PMID:27453940

  15. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  16. Feasibility of a phased acoustic array for monitoring acoustic signatures from meshing gear teeth.

    PubMed

    Hood, Adrian A; Pines, Darryll J

    2002-12-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of sensing damage emanating from rotating drivetrain elements such as bearings, gear teeth, and drive shafts via airborne paths. A planar phased acoustic array is evaluated as a potential fault detection scheme for detecting spatially filtered acoustic signatures radiating from gearbox components. Specifically, the use of beam focusing and steering to monitor individual tooth mesh dynamics is analyzed taking into consideration the constraints of the array/gearbox geometry and the spectral content of typical gear noise. Experimental results for a linear array are presented to illustrate the concepts of adaptive beam steering and spatial acoustic filtering. This feasibility study indicates that the planar array can be used to track the acoustic signatures at higher harmonics of the gear mesh frequency. PMID:12509006

  17. EMI Shields made from intercalated graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Terry, Jennifer

    1995-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding typically makes up about twenty percent of the mass of a spacecraft power system. Graphite fiber/polymer composites have significantly lower densities and higher strengths than aluminum, the present material of choice for EMI shields, but they lack the electrical conductivity that enables acceptable shielding effectiveness. Bromine intercalated pitch-based graphite/epoxy composites have conductivities fifty times higher than conventional structural graphite fibers. Calculations are presented which indicate that EMI shields made from such composites can have sufficient shielding at less than 20% of the mass of conventional aluminum shields. EMI shields provide many functions other than EMI shielding including physical protection, thermal management, and shielding from ionizing radiation. Intercalated graphite composites perform well in these areas also. Mechanically, they have much higher specific strength and modulus than aluminum. They also have shorter half thicknesses for x-rays and gamma radiation than aluminum. Thermally, they distribute infra-red radiation by absorbing and re-radiating it rather than concentrating it by reflection as aluminum does. The prospects for intercalated graphite fiber/polymer composites for EMI shielding are encouraging.

  18. Heat-shield design for glovebox applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Frigo, A. A.

    1998-07-10

    Heat shields can often be used in place of insulation materials as an effective means of insulating glovebox furnace vessels. If used properly, shields can accomplish two important objectives: thermal insulation of the vessel to maintain a desired process temperature and protection of the glovebox, equipment, and user. A heat-shield assembly can be described as an arrangement of thin, properly-spaced, metal sheets that reduce radiation heat transfer. The main problem encountered in the design of a heat shield assembly is choosing the number of shields. In determining the heat transfer characteristics of a heat-shield assembly, a number of factors must be taken into consideration. The glovebox or outside environment, material properties, geometry, and operating temperature all have varying effects on the expected results. A simple method, for planar-horizontal and cylindrical-vertical shields, allowing the approximation of the outermost shield temperature, the practical number of shields, and the net heat-transfer rate will be presented. Methods used in the fabrication of heat-shield assemblies will also be discussed.

  19. Nanowave devices for terahertz acoustic phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzillotti-Kimura, N. D.; Fainstein, A.; Lemaître, A.; Jusserand, B.

    2006-02-01

    The emergence of the area of nanophononics requires the development of terahertz (THz) acoustic devices with tailored properties. We describe nonperiodic planar nanostructures with specific THz phononic response and superior performance. We show that improved devices based on GaAs and AlAs layers can be designed using an optimization Nelder-Mead simplex method, and grown with state-of-the-art molecular beam epitaxy. We also demonstrate that high-resolution Raman scattering provides a powerful tool to characterize these devices. We illustrate the concept with results on acoustic THz edge and color filters.

  20. The Feasibility of Multipole Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Although passive shielding appears to be the only workable solution for galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), active shielding may play an important augmenting role to control the dose from solar particle events (SPEs). It has been noted that, to meet the guidelines of NCRP Report No. 98 through the six SPEs of 1989, a crew member would need roughly double the passive shielding that is necessary to control the GCR dose . This would dramatically increase spacecraft mass, and so it has been proposed that a small but more heavily shielded storm shelter may be used to protect the crew during SPEs. Since a gradual SPE may last 5 or more days, staying in a storm shelter may be psychologically and physiologically distressing to the crew. Storm shelters do not provide shielding for the spacecraft itself against the SPE radiation, and radiation damage to critical electronics may result in loss of mission and life. Single-event effects during the radiation storm may require quick crew response to maintain the integrity of the spacecraft, and confining the crew to a storm shelter prohibits their attending to the spacecraft at the precise time when that attention is needed the most. Active shielding cannot protect against GCR because the particle energies are too high. Although lower energy particles are easier to stop in a passive shield, such shielding is more satisfactory against GCR than against SPE radiation because of the tremendous difference in their initial fluences. Even a small fraction of the SPE fluence penetrating the passive shielding may result in an unacceptably high dose. Active shielding is more effective than passive shielding against SPE radiation because it offers 100% shielding effectiveness up to the cutoff energy, and significant shielding effectiveness beyond the cutoff as well.

  1. Experimental Evaluation of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Reid, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    As part of the Vision for Space Exploration the end of the next decade will bring man back to the surface of the moon. One of the most critical issues for the establishment of human presence on the moon will be the availability of compact power sources. The establishment of man on the moon will require power from greater than 10's of kWt's in follow on years. Nuclear reactors are extremely we11 suited to meet the needs for power generation on the lunar or Martian surface. reactor system. Several competing concepts exist for lightweight, safe, robust shielding systems such as a water shield, lithium hydride (LiH), Boron Carbide, and others. Water offers several potential advantages, including reduced cost, reduced technical risk, and reduced mass. Water has not typically been considered for space reactor applications because of the need for gravity to remove the potential for radiation streaming paths. The water shield concept relies on predictions of passive circulation of the shield water by natural convection to adequately cool the shield. This prediction needs to be experimentally evaluated, especially for shields with complex geometries. MSFC has developed the experience and fac necessary to do this evaluation in the Early Flight Fission - Test Facility (EFF-TF).

  2. Nonlinear Acoustics in Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterborn, Werner; Kurz, Thomas; Akhatov, Iskander

    At high sound intensities or long propagation distances at in fluids sufficiently low damping acoustic phenomena become nonlinear. This chapter focuses on nonlinear acoustic wave properties in gases and liquids. The origin of nonlinearity, equations of state, simple nonlinear waves, nonlinear acoustic wave equations, shock-wave formation, and interaction of waves are presented and discussed. Tables are given for the nonlinearity parameter B/A for water and a range of organic liquids, liquid metals and gases. Acoustic cavitation with its nonlinear bubble oscillations, pattern formation and sonoluminescence (light from sound) are modern examples of nonlinear acoustics. The language of nonlinear dynamics needed for understanding chaotic dynamics and acoustic chaotic systems is introduced.

  3. Two-dimensional acoustic metamaterial structure for potential image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongwei; Han, Yu; Li, Ying; Pai, Frank

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents modeling, analysis techniques and experiment of for two-Dimensional Acoustic metamaterial Structure for filtering acoustic waves. For a unit cell of an infinite two-Dimensional Acoustic metamaterial Structure, governing equations are derived using the extended Hamilton principle. The concepts of negative effective mass and stiffness and how the spring-mass-damper subsystems create a stopband are explained in detail. Numerical simulations reveal that the actual working mechanism of the proposed acoustic metamaterial structure is based on the concept of conventional mechanical vibration absorbers. It uses the incoming wave in the structure to resonate the integrated membrane-mass-damper absorbers to vibrate in their optical mode at frequencies close to but above their local resonance frequencies to create shear forces and bending moments to straighten the panel and stop the wave propagation. Moreover, a two-dimension acoustic metamaterial structure consisting of lumped mass and elastic membrane is fabricated in the lab. We do experiments on the model and The results validate the concept and show that, for two-dimension acoustic metamaterial structure do exist two vibration modes. For the wave absorption, the mass of each cell should be considered in the design. With appropriate design calculations, the proposed two-dimension acoustic metamaterial structure can be used for absorption of low-frequency waves. Hence this special structure can be used in filtering the waves, and the potential using can increase the ultrasonic imaging quality.

  4. Influence of surface acoustic waves induced acoustic streaming on the kinetics of electrochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietze, Sabrina; Schlemmer, Josefine; Lindner, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    The kinetics of electrochemical reactions is controlled by diffusion processes of charge carriers across a boundary layer between the electrode and the electrolyte, which result in a shielding of the electric field inside the electrolyte and a concentration gradient across this boundary layer. In accumulators the diffusion rate determines the rather long time needed for charging, which is a major drawback for electric mobility. This diffusion boundary can be removed by acoustic streaming in the electrolyte induced by surface acoustic waves propagating of the electrode, which results in an increase of the charging current and thus in a reduction of the time needed for charging. For a quantitative study of the influence of acoustic streaming on the charge transport an electropolishing cell with vertically oriented copper electrodes and diluted H3PO4-Propanol electrolytes were used. Lamb waves with various excitation frequencies were exited on the anode with different piezoelectric transducers, which induced acoustic streaming in the overlaying electrolytic liquid. An increase of the polishing current of up to approximately 100 % has been obtained with such a set-up.

  5. Switchable Faraday shielding with application to reducing the pain of internal cardiac defibrillation while permitting external defibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kolandaivelu, Aravindan; Jayanti, Venku; Halperin, Henry R; Berger, Ronald D

    2012-02-01

    Switchable Faraday shielding is desirable in situations where electric field shielding is required at certain times and undesirable at other times. In this study, electrostatic finite element modeling was used to assess the effect of different shield geometries on the leakage of an internally applied field and penetration of an externally applied field. "Switching OFF" the shield by electrically disconnecting shield faces from each other was shown to significantly increase external field penetration. Applying this model to defibrillation, we looked at the effect of spacing and size of shield panels to maximize the ability to deliver an external defibrillation shock to the heart when shield panels are disconnected while providing acceptably low leakage of internal defibrillation shocks to avoid painful skeletal muscle capture when shield panels are connected. This analysis may be useful for designing internal defibrillator electrodes that preserve the efficacy of internal and external defibrillation while avoiding the significant morbidity associated with painful defibrillator shocks. Similar analysis could also guide optimizing the switchable Faraday shielding concept for other applications. PMID:22042127

  6. Advanced Turbofan Duct Liner Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielak, Gerald W.; Premo, John W.; Hersh, Alan S.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program goal is to reduce aircraft noise by 10 EPNdB by the year 2000 relative, to 1992 technology. The improvement goal for nacelle attenuation is 25% relative to 1992 technology by 1997 and 50% by 2000. The Advanced Turbofan Duct Liner Concepts Task work by Boeing presented in this document was in support of these goals. The basis for the technical approach was a Boeing study conducted in 1993-94 under NASA/FAA contract NAS1-19349, Task 6, investigating broadband acoustic liner concepts. As a result of this work, it was recommended that linear double layer, linear and perforate triple layer, parallel element, and bulk absorber liners be further investigated to improve nacelle attenuations. NASA LaRC also suggested that "adaptive" liner concepts that would allow "in-situ" acoustic impedance control also be considered. As a result, bias flow and high-temperature liner concepts were also added to the investigation. The major conclusion from the above studies is that improvements in nacelle liner average acoustic impedance characteristics alone will not result in 25% increased nacelle noise reduction relative to 1992 technology. Nacelle design advancements currently being developed by Boeing are expected to add 20-40% more acoustic lining to hardwall regions in current inlets, which is predicted to result in and additional 40-80% attenuation improvement. Similar advancements are expected to allow 10-30% more acoustic lining in current fan ducts with 10-30% more attenuation expected. In addition, Boeing is currently developing a scarf inlet concept which is expected to give an additional 40-80% attenuation improvement for equivalent lining areas.

  7. Optimation of cooled shields in insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, J. C.; Khodadadi, J. M.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.

    1984-01-01

    A method to optimize the location, temperature, and heat dissipation rate of each cooled shield inside an insulation layer was developed. The method is based on the minimization of the entropy production rate which is proportional to the heat leak across the insulation. It is shown that the maximum number of shields to be used in most practical applications is three. However, cooled shields are useful only at low values of the overall, cold wall to hot wall absolute temperature ratio. The performance of the insulation system is relatively insensitive to deviations from the optimum values of the temperature and location of the cooling shields. Design curves for rapid estimates of the locations and temperatures of cooling shields in various types of insulations, and an equation for calculating the cooling loads for the shields are presented.

  8. Heat flow from the West African shield

    SciTech Connect

    Brigaud, F.; Lucazeau, F.; Ly, S.; Sauvage, J.F.

    1985-09-01

    The heat flow over Precambrian shields is generally lower than over other continental provinces. Previous observations at 9 sites of the West African shield have shown that heat flow ranges from 20 mW m/sup -2/ in Niger to 38-42 mW m/sup -2/ in Liberia, Ghana and Nigeria. Since some of these values are lower than expected for Precambrian shields, it is important to find out whether or not they are representative of the entire shield before trying to derive its thermal structure. In this paper, we present new heat flow determinations from seven sites of the West African shield. These indicate that the surface heat flow is comparable with that of other Precambrian shields in the world.

  9. VAPOR SHIELD FOR INDUCTION FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Reese, S.L.; Samoriga, S.A.

    1958-03-11

    This patent relates to a water-cooled vapor shield for an inductlon furnace that will condense metallic vapors arising from the crucible and thus prevent their condensation on or near the induction coils, thereby eliminating possible corrosion or shorting out of the coils. This is accomplished by placing, about the top, of the crucible a disk, apron, and cooling jacket that separates the area of the coils from the interior of the cruclbIe and provides a cooled surface upon whlch the vapors may condense.

  10. Studying the Heat Shield's Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity highlights the seal on the rover's protective heat shield. Engineers evaluated the performance of the protective shell's seal during a 36-sol investigation.

    After viewing these images, engineers were pleased with how the seal performed.

    This is an approximately true-color rendering of the scene acquired around 1:07 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 339 (Jan. 6, 2005) in an image mosaic using panoramic camera filters at wavelengths of 750, 530, and 430 nanometers.

  11. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  12. Shielding of Turbomachinery Broadband Noise from a Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Burley, Casey L.; Bahr, Christopher J.; Stead, Daniel J.; Pope, D. Stuart

    2014-01-01

    The results of an experimental study on the effects of engine placement and vertical tail configuration on shielding of exhaust broadband noise radiation are presented. This study is part of the high fidelity aeroacoustic test of a 5.8% scale Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft configuration performed in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. Broadband Engine Noise Simulators (BENS) were used to determine insertion loss due to shielding by the HWB airframe of the broadband component of turbomachinery noise for different airframe configurations and flight conditions. Acoustics data were obtained from flyover and sideline microphones traversed to predefined streamwise stations. Noise measurements performed for different engine locations clearly show the noise benefit associated with positioning the engine nacelles further upstream on the HWB centerbody. Positioning the engine exhaust 2.5 nozzle diameters upstream (compared to 0.5 nozzle diameters downstream) of the HWB trailing edge was found of particular benefit in this study. Analysis of the shielding performance obtained with and without tunnel flow show that the effectiveness of the fuselage shielding of the exhaust noise, although still significant, is greatly reduced by the presence of the free stream flow compared to static conditions. This loss of shielding is due to the turbulence in the model near-wake/boundary layer flow. A comparison of shielding obtained with alternate vertical tail configurations shows limited differences in level; nevertheless, overall trends regarding the effect of cant angle and vertical location are revealed. Finally, it is shown that the vertical tails provide a clear shielding benefit towards the sideline while causing a slight increase in noise below the aircraft.

  13. Design and analysis of electromagnetic interference filters and shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Andrew Joel

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) is a problem of rising prevalence as electronic devices become increasingly ubiquitous. EMI filters are low pass filters intended to prevent the conducted electric currents and radiated electromagnetic fields of a device from interfering with the proper operation of other devices. Shielding is a method, often complementary to filtering, that typically involves enclosing a device in a conducting box in order to prevent radiated EMI. This dissertation includes three chapters related to the use of filtering and shielding for preventing electromagnetic interference. The first chapter deals with improving the high frequency EMI filtering performance of surface mount capacitors on printed circuit boards (PCBs). At high frequencies, the impedance of a capacitor is dominated by a parasitic inductance, thus leading to poor high frequency filtering performance. Other researchers have introduced the concept of parasitic inductance cancellation and have applied this concept to improving the filtering performance of volumetrically large capacitors at frequencies up to 100 MHz. The work in this chapter applies the concept of parasitic inductance cancellation to much smaller surface mount capacitors at frequencies up to several gigahertz. The second chapter introduces a much more compact design for applying parasitic inductance cancellation to surface mount capacitors that uses inductive coupling between via pairs as well as coplanar traces. This new design is suited for PCBs having three or more layers including solid ground and/or power plane(s). This design is demonstrated to be considerably more effective in filtering high frequency noise due to crosstalk than a comparable conventional shunt capacitor filter configuration. Finally, chapter 3 presents a detailed analysis of the methods that are used to decompose the measure of plane wave shielding effectiveness into measures of absorption and reflection. Textbooks on electromagnetic

  14. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  15. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  16. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  17. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD AND SPACER CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the heterogeneous, graphite moderated, fluid cooled type and shielding and spacing plugs for the coolant channels thereof are reported. In this design, the coolant passages extend horizontally through the moderator structure, accommodating the fuel elements in abutting end-to-end relationship, and have access openings through the outer shield at one face of the reactor to facilitate loading of the fuel elements. In the outer ends of the channels which extend through the shields are provided spacers and shielding plugs designed to offer minimal reslstance to coolant fluid flow while preventing emanation of harmful radiation through the access openings when closed between loadings.

  19. Nipple Shields: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    McKechnie, Anne Chevalier

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Nipple shields have become commonplace in the United States for a wide range of breastfeeding problems. This article is a summary of the current literature describing the evidence for nipple shield use. The authors reviewed all available articles on nipple shields and selected 13 studies for inclusion. The studies were organized into three categories: physiologic responses, premature infants, and mothers' experiences. This review concludes that current published research does not provide evidence for safety or effectiveness of contemporary nipple shield use. PMID:20807104

  20. Hot Cell Window Shielding Analysis Using MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Chad L. Pope; Wade W. Scates; J. Todd Taylor

    2009-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex nuclear facilities are undergoing a documented safety analysis upgrade. In conjunction with the upgrade effort, shielding analysis of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) hot cell windows has been conducted. This paper describes the shielding analysis methodology. Each 4-ft thick window uses nine glass slabs, an oil film between the slabs, numerous steel plates, and packed lead wool. Operations in the hot cell center on used nuclear fuel (UNF) processing. Prior to the shielding analysis, shield testing with a gamma ray source was conducted, and the windows were found to be very effective gamma shields. Despite these results, because the glass contained significant amounts of lead and little neutron absorbing material, some doubt lingered regarding the effectiveness of the windows in neutron shielding situations, such as during an accidental criticality. MCNP was selected as an analysis tool because it could model complicated geometry, and it could track gamma and neutron radiation. A bounding criticality source was developed based on the composition of the UNF. Additionally, a bounding gamma source was developed based on the fission product content of the UNF. Modeling the windows required field inspections and detailed examination of drawings and material specifications. Consistent with the shield testing results, MCNP results demonstrated that the shielding was very effective with respect to gamma radiation, and in addition, the analysis demonstrated that the shielding was also very effective during an accidental criticality.

  1. The ORNL-SNAP shielding program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mynatt, F. R.; Clifford, C. E.; Muckenthaler, F. J.; Gritzner, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    The effort in the ORNL-SNAP shielding program is directed toward the development and verification of computer codes using numerical solutions to the transport equation for the design of optimized radiation shields for SNAP power systems. A brief discussion is given for the major areas of the SNAP shielding program, which are cross-section development, transport code development, and integral experiments. Detailed results are presented for the integral experiments utilizing the TSF-SNAP reactor. Calculated results are compared with experiments for neutron and gamma-ray spectra from the bare reactor and as transmitted through slab shields.

  2. Accelerator magnet designs using superconducting magnetic shields

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.C.

    1990-10-01

    Superconducting dipoles and quadrupoles for existing accelerators have a coil surrounded by an iron shield. The shield limits the fringe field of the magnet while having minimal effect on the field shape and providing a small enhancement of the field strength. Shields using superconducting materials can be thinner and lighter and will not experience the potential of a large de-centering force. Boundary conditions for these materials, material properties, mechanical force considerations, cryostat considerations and some possible geometrical configurations for superconducting shields will be described. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Shield topology in lightning transient control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vance, E. F.; Tesche, F. M.

    1980-01-01

    A formalism in which the interaction of a system with an electromagnetic source is described by sets of scattering, penetrations, and propagation functions is reviewed and interpreted in the context of the lightning interaction problem. In this formalism, the system is decomposed into simple volumes separated by closed shield surfaces. These surfaces are nested and interconnected to produce higher levels of shielding and subvolumes within a given level. The interaction analysis uses scattering theory to define current and charge densities on the shield surface in conjunction with the diffusion, apertures, and transmission line analysis to define penetration through shield imperfections and propagation within the protected volume.

  4. THEMIS discovers holes in Earth's solar shield

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the latest findings from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission. Earth's magnetic field; which shields our planet from severe ...

  5. Potential wells for classical acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shi; Lin, ShuYu; Mo, RunYang; Fu, ZhiQiang

    2014-01-01

    The acceleration theorem of Bloch waves is utilized to construct random potential wells for classical acoustic waves in systems composed of alternating `cavities' and `couplers'. One prominent advantage of this method is these `cavities' and `couplers' are all monolayer structures. It allows forming more compact classical potential wells, which leads to the miniaturization of acoustic devices. We systematically investigate properties of harmonic, tangent, hyperbolic function, and square classical potential wells in quasi-periodic superlattices. Results show these classical potential wells are analogues of quantum potential wells. Thus some technologies and concepts in quantum potential well fields may be generalized to classical acoustic wave fields. In addition, some abnormal cases regarding forming classical potential wells are also found.

  6. Resonant Faraday shield ICRH antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattanei, G.; W7-AS Team

    2002-05-01

    ICRH has proved to be an efficient method of heating the plasma in toroidal devices. The high voltages needed at the coupling structure are, however, a severe handicap of this method. The possibility is investigated of having the highest voltages between the bars of the Faraday shield (FS), where they are both necessary and easier to maintain. For this purpose a resonant Faraday shield (RFS) antenna where the first and last bars of the FS are connected by an inductive strip is proposed. In front of this strip there is a second strip, fed, as in a conventional antenna, by an RF generator. It is shown that if the toroidal length of the FS is larger than λ/2 the strip connecting the bars of the FS acts as the secondary coil of a tuned transformer, the strip fed by the generator being the primary. It is therefore possible, by varying the frequency and the distance between the two strips, i.e. the coupling coefficient, to match the impedance of the primary to that of the generator.

  7. SP-100 reactor and shield design update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deane, Nelson A.; Stewart, Samuel L.; Marcille, Thomas F.; Newkirk, Douglas W.

    1992-01-01

    The SP-100 technical specification for the generic flight system has been updated to eliminate design specific and unnecessarily restrictive requirements. Relaxation of these requirements allows considerably more flexibility to the reactor and shield designer to minimize the mass of the system. Ground Engineering System (GES) Program test results are also beginning to become available to the designer. Some of these test results in combination with the design requirement changes have lead to design changes in 1) the fuel pin to include an aft axial reflector, 2) the reflector control mechanism concept from a hinged to an aft sliding system, 3) the number of safety rods from seven to three, and 4) the use of Be and B4C instead of LiH in the forward neutron field section. These changes have been developed to minimize the mass of the total system. Generic Flight System Design Option/Update Studies are ongoing activities with mass reduction as the primary objective to assure that the Flight System Qualification Program adequately defines and achieves the development needs.

  8. Magnetic shielding of interplanetary spacecraft against solar flare radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocks, Franklin H.; Watkins, Seth

    1993-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this work is to design, build, and fly a dual-purpose, piggyback payload whose function is to produce a large volume, low intensity magnetic field and to test the concept of using such a magnetic field (1) to protect spacecraft against solar flare protons, (2) to produce a thrust of sufficient magnitude to stabilize low satellite orbits against orbital decay from atmospheric drag, and (3) to test the magsail concept. These all appear to be capable of being tested using the same deployed high temperature superconducting coil. In certain orbits, high temperature superconducting wire, which has now been developed to the point where silver-sheathed high T sub c wires one mm in diameter are commercially available, can be used to produce the magnetic moments required for shielding without requiring any mechanical cooling system. The potential benefits of this concept apply directly to both earth-orbital and interplanetary missions. The usefulness of a protective shield for manned missions needs scarcely to be emphasized. Similarly, the usefulness of increasing orbit perigee without expenditure of propellant is obvious. This payload would be a first step in assessing the true potential of large volume magnetic fields in the US space program. The objective of this design research is to develop an innovative, prototype deployed high temperature superconducting coil (DHTSC) system.

  9. Refraction and Shielding of Noise in Non-Axisymmetric Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines the shielding effect of the mean flow and refraction of sound in non-axisymmetric jets. A general three-dimensional ray-acoustic approach is applied. The methodology is independent of the exit geometry and may account for jet spreading and transverse as well as streamwise flow gradients. We assume that noise is dominated by small-scale turbulence. The source correlation terms, as described by the acoustic analogy approach, are simplified and a model is proposed that relates the source strength to 7/2 power of turbulence kinetic energy. Local characteristics of the source such as its strength, time- or length-scale, convection velocity and characteristic frequency are inferred from the mean flow considerations. Compressible Navier Stokes equations are solved with a k-e turbulence model. Numerical predictions are presented for a Mach 1.5, aspect ratio 2:1 elliptic jet. The predicted sound pressure level directivity demonstrates favorable agreement with reported data, indicating a relative quiet zone on the side of the major axis of the elliptic jet.

  10. Concept Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaidya, Narendera

    This document, published in India by the Regional College of Education, deals with 13 subjects: the tough context (thinking), definitions of concept, functions of concept, the process of concept formation, discriminant learning, mediation process, second signalling system, factors affecting concept formation, studies in concept formation, the…

  11. Radiation environment and shielding for early manned Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Stephen B.; Mccann, Michael E.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of shielding a crew during early manned Mars missions is discussed. Requirements for shielding are presented in the context of current astronaut exposure limits, natural ionizing radiation sources, and shielding inherent in a particular Mars vehicle configuration. An estimated range for shielding weight is presented based on the worst solar flare dose, mission duration, and inherent vehicle shielding.

  12. Acoustic metamaterial design and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu

    The explosion of interest in metamaterials is due to the dramatically increased manipulation ability over light as well as sound waves. This material research was stimulated by the opportunity to develop an artificial media with negative refractive index and the application in superlens which allows super-resolution imaging. High-resolution acoustic imaging techniques are the essential tools for nondestructive testing and medical screening. However, the spatial resolution of the conventional acoustic imaging methods is restricted by the incident wavelength of ultrasound. This is due to the quickly fading evanescent fields which carry the subwavelength features of objects. By focusing the propagating wave and recovering the evanescent field, a flat lens with negative-index can potentially overcome the diffraction limit. We present the first experimental demonstration of focusing ultrasound waves through a flat acoustic metamaterial lens composed of a planar network of subwavelength Helmholtz resonators. We observed a tight focus of half-wavelength in width at 60.5 KHz by imaging a point source. This result is in excellent agreement with the numerical simulation by transmission line model in which we derived the effective mass density and compressibility. This metamaterial lens also displays variable focal length at different frequencies. Our experiment shows the promise of designing compact and light-weight ultrasound imaging elements. Moreover, the concept of metamaterial extends far beyond negative refraction, rather giving enormous choice of material parameters for different applications. One of the most interesting examples these years is the invisible cloak. Such a device is proposed to render the hidden object undetectable under the flow of light or sound, by guiding and controlling the wave path through an engineered space surrounding the object. However, the cloak designed by transformation optics usually calls for a highly anisotropic metamaterial, which

  13. Acoustics Critical Readiness Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the status of the acoustic equipment from the medical operations perspective. Included is information about the acoustic dosimeters, sound level meter, and headphones that are planned for use while on orbit. Finally there is information about on-orbit hearing assessments.

  14. The challenge of acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, P.

    1981-01-01

    The various applications of acoustics, including sonar, ultrasonic examination of unborn foetuses and architectural applications, are briefly reviewed. Problems in traffic and industrial noise, auditorium design and explosive noise are considered in more detail. The educational aspects of acoustical science and technology are briefly considered.

  15. Rapid Acoustic Survey for Biodiversity Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Sueur, Jérôme; Pavoine, Sandrine; Hamerlynck, Olivier; Duvail, Stéphanie

    2008-01-01

    Biodiversity assessment remains one of the most difficult challenges encountered by ecologists and conservation biologists. This task is becoming even more urgent with the current increase of habitat loss. Many methods–from rapid biodiversity assessments (RBA) to all-taxa biodiversity inventories (ATBI)–have been developed for decades to estimate local species richness. However, these methods are costly and invasive. Several animals–birds, mammals, amphibians, fishes and arthropods–produce sounds when moving, communicating or sensing their environment. Here we propose a new concept and method to describe biodiversity. We suggest to forego species or morphospecies identification used by ATBI and RBA respectively but rather to tackle the problem at another evolutionary unit, the community level. We also propose that a part of diversity can be estimated and compared through a rapid acoustic analysis of the sound produced by animal communities. We produced α and β diversity indexes that we first tested with 540 simulated acoustic communities. The α index, which measures acoustic entropy, shows a logarithmic correlation with the number of species within the acoustic community. The β index, which estimates both temporal and spectral dissimilarities, is linearly linked to the number of unshared species between acoustic communities. We then applied both indexes to two closely spaced Tanzanian dry lowland coastal forests. Indexes reveal for this small sample a lower acoustic diversity for the most disturbed forest and acoustic dissimilarities between the two forests suggest that degradation could have significantly decreased and modified community composition. Our results demonstrate for the first time that an indicator of biological diversity can be reliably obtained in a non-invasive way and with a limited sampling effort. This new approach may facilitate the appraisal of animal diversity at large spatial and temporal scales. PMID:19115006

  16. Synchrotron radiation shielding design and ICRP radiological protection quantities.

    PubMed

    Bassey, Bassey; Moreno, Beatriz; Chapman, Dean

    2015-06-01

    Protection and operational quantities as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) are the two sets of quantities recommended for use in radiological protection for external radiation. Since the '80s, the protection quantities have evolved from the concept of dose equivalent to effective dose equivalent to effective dose, and the associated conversion coefficients have undergone changes. In this work, the influence of three different versions of ICRP photon dose conversion coefficients in the synchrotron radiation shielding calculations of an experimental enclosure has been examined. The versions are effective dose equivalent (ICRP Publication 51), effective dose (ICRP Publication 74), and effective dose (ICRP Publication 116) conversion coefficients. The sources of the synchrotron radiation white beam into the enclosure were a bending magnet, an undulator and a wiggler. The ranges of photons energy from these sources were 10-200 keV for the bending magnet and undulator, and 10-500 keV for the wiggler. The design criterion aimed a radiation leakage less than 0.5 µSv h(-1) from the enclosure. As expected, larger conversion coefficients in ICRP Publication 51 lead to higher calculated dose rates. However, the percentage differences among the calculated dose rates get smaller once shielding is added, and the choice of conversion coefficients set did not affect the final shielding decision. PMID:25906251

  17. Highly directional acoustic receivers.

    PubMed

    Cray, Benjamin A; Evora, Victor M; Nuttall, Albert H

    2003-03-01

    The theoretical directivity of a single combined acoustic receiver, a device that can measure many quantities of an acoustic field at a collocated point, is presented here. The formulation is developed using a Taylor series expansion of acoustic pressure about the origin of a Cartesian coordinate system. For example, the quantities measured by a second-order combined receiver, denoted a dyadic sensor, are acoustic pressure, the three orthogonal components of acoustic particle velocity, and the nine spatial gradients of the velocity vector. The power series expansion, which can be of any order, is cast into an expression that defines the directivity of a single receiving element. It is shown that a single highly directional dyadic sensor can have a directivity index of up to 9.5 dB. However, there is a price to pay with highly directive sensors; these sensors can be significantly more sensitive to nonacoustic noise sources. PMID:12656387

  18. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques. PMID:16454274

  19. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  20. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  1. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  2. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  3. Testicular shielding in penile brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Arpita; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Ghadi, Yogesh; Murthy, Vedang; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Penile cancer, although rare, is one of the common genitourinary cancers in India affecting mostly aged uncircumcised males. For patients presenting with small superficial lesions < 3 cm restricted to glans, surgery, radical external radiation or brachytherapy may be offered, the latter being preferred as it allows organ and function preservation. In patients receiving brachytherapy, testicular morbidity is not commonly addressed. With an aim to minimize and document the doses to testis after adequate shielding during radical interstitial brachytherapy for penile cancers, we undertook this study in 2 patients undergoing brachytherapy and forms the basis of this report. Material and methods Two patients with early stage penile cancer limited to the glans were treated with radical high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy using interstitial implant. A total of 7-8 tubes were implanted in two planes, parallel to the penile shaft. A total dose of 44-48 Gy (55-60 Gy EQD2 doses with α/β = 10) was delivered in 11-12 fractions of 4 Gy each delivered twice daily. Lead sheets adding to 11 mm (4-5 half value layer) were interposed between the penile shaft and scrotum. The testicular dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. For each patient, dosimetry was done for 3 fractions and mean calculated. Results The cumulative testicular dose to left and right testis was 31.68 cGy and 42.79 cGy for patient A, and 21.96 cGy and 23.28 cGy for patient B. For the same patients, the mean cumulative dose measured at the posterior aspect of penile shaft was 722.15 cGy and 807.72 cGy, amounting to 16.4% and 16.8% of the prescribed dose. Hence, the application of lead shield 11 mm thick reduced testicular dose from 722-808 cGy to 21.96-42.57 cGy, an “absolute reduction” of 95.99 ± 1.5%. Conclusions With the use of a simple lead shield as described, we were able to effectively reduce testicular dose from “spermicidal” range to “oligospermic” range with possible

  4. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2013-05-28

    A thermal neutron shield comprising concrete with a high percentage of the element Boron. The concrete is least 54% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of Boron loaded concrete which includes enriching the concrete mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  5. 40 CFR 72.51 - Permit shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permit shield. 72.51 Section 72.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Contents § 72.51 Permit shield. Each affected unit operated in accordance with the Acid Rain permit that governs the...

  6. Flexible shielding system for radiation protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babin, A.

    1972-01-01

    Modular construction of low cost flexible radiation shielding panels consists of water filled steels cans, zinc bromide windows, turntable unit, master-slave manipulators, and interlocking lead bricks. Easy modifications of shielding wall thicknesses are obtained by rearranging overall geometry of portable components.

  7. Current status of methods for shielding analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    Current methods used in shielding analysis and recent improvements in those methods are discussed. The status of methods development is discussed based on needs cited at the 1977 International Conference on Reactor Shielding. Additional areas where methods development is needed are discussed.

  8. Preliminary radiation shielding design for BOOMERANG

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2002-10-23

    Preliminary radiation shielding specifications are presented here for the 3 GeV BOOMERANG Australian synchrotron light source project. At this time the bulk shield walls for the storage ring and injection system (100 MeV Linac and 3 GeV Booster) are considered for siting purposes.

  9. Shielding Strategies for Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson J. W. (Editor); Miller, J. (Editor); Konradi, A. (Editor); Cucinotta, F. A. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    A group of twenty-nine scientists and engineers convened a 'Workshop on Shielding Strategies for Human Space Exploration' at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The provision of shielding for a Mars mission or a Lunar base from the hazards of space radiations is a critical technology since astronaut radiation safety depends on it and shielding safety factors to control risk uncertainty appear to be great. The purpose of the workshop was to define requirements for the development and evaluation of high performance shield materials and designs and to develop ideas regarding approaches to radiation shielding. The workshop was organized to review the recent experience on shielding strategies gained in studies of the 'Space Exploration Initiative (SEI),' to review the current knowledge base for making shield assessment, to examine a basis for new shielding strategies, and to recommend a strategy for developing the required technologies for a return to the moon or for Mars exploration. The uniqueness of the current workshop arises from the expected long duration of the missions without the protective cover of the geomagnetic field in which the usually small and even neglected effects of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) can no longer be ignored. It is the peculiarity of these radiations for which the inter-action physics and biological action are yet to be fully understood.

  10. Calculations of nuclear electric shielding in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeretti, P.; Zanasi, R.

    1980-05-01

    The electric shielding tensor at nuclei in the molecules H 2O, NH 3, CH 4 and CO has been evaluated via coupled Hartree-Fock perturbation theory. The average trace of the shielding tensor is linearly dependent on atomic electronegativities in the isoelectronic series H 2O, NH 3, CH 4.

  11. 10 CFR 36.25 - Shielding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shielding. 36.25 Section 36.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Design and Performance Requirements for Irradiators § 36.25 Shielding. (a) The radiation dose rate in areas that are normally occupied during operation of a panoramic irradiator...

  12. Add-On Shielding for Unshielded Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, J. C.; Billitti, J. W.; Tallon, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Fabrication sequence used to produce compact shields slipped into place from free ends of wires already soldered into connectors at other ends. Single shields are formed into harnesses by connecting grounding jumpers. Technique is especially useful for small diameter wire attached to microminiature connectors.

  13. Working through the Maze of Liability Shields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Jeff; Schmiesing, Ryan

    1998-01-01

    Liability shields that can be incorporated into an Extension risk management program include permission slips, informed consent forms, waivers and releases, and indemnification agreements. Risk identification should be part of youth program planning; communication with parents is essential; the best shields are most specific; and legal counsel…

  14. Performance analysis of superconducting generator electromagnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, D.; Xia, Z.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the shielding performance of electromagnetic shielding systems is analyzed using the finite element method. Considering the non-iron-core rotor structure of superconducting generators, it is proposed that the stator alternating magnetic field generated under different operating conditions could decompose into oscillating and rotating magnetic field, so that complex issues could be greatly simplified. A 1200KW superconducting generator was analyzed. The distribution of the oscillating magnetic field and the rotating magnetic field in rotor area, which are generated by stator winding currents, and the distribution of the eddy currents in electromagnetic shielding tube, which are induced by these stator winding magnetic fields, are calculated without electromagnetic shielding system and with three different structures of electromagnetic shielding system respectively. On the basis of the results of FEM, the shielding factor of the electromagnetic shielding systems is calculated and the shielding effect of the three different structures on the oscillating magnetic field and the rotating magnetic field is compared. The method and the results in this paper can provide reference for optimal design and loss calculation of superconducting generators.

  15. Alignment modification for pencil eye shields

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.D.; Pla, M.; Podgorsak, E.B. )

    1989-01-01

    Accurate alignment of pencil beam eye shields to protect the lens of the eye may be made easier by means of a simple modification of existing apparatus. This involves drilling a small hole through the center of the shield to isolate the rayline directed to the lens and fabricating a suitable plug for this hole.

  16. Radiation Shielding Systems Using Nanotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Bin (Inventor); McKay, Christoper P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A system for shielding personnel and/or equipment from radiation particles. In one embodiment, a first substrate is connected to a first array or perpendicularly oriented metal-like fingers, and a second, electrically conducting substrate has an array of carbon nanostructure (CNS) fingers, coated with an electro-active polymer extending toward, but spaced apart from, the first substrate fingers. An electric current and electric charge discharge and dissipation system, connected to the second substrate, receives a current and/or voltage pulse initially generated when the first substrate receives incident radiation. In another embodiment, an array of CNSs is immersed in a first layer of hydrogen-rich polymers and in a second layer of metal-like material. In another embodiment, a one- or two-dimensional assembly of fibers containing CNSs embedded in a metal-like matrix serves as a radiation-protective fabric or body covering.

  17. How Concentration Shields Against Distraction

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, John E.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we outline our view of how concentration shields against distraction. We argue that higher levels of concentration make people less susceptible to distraction for two reasons. One reason is that the undesired processing of the background environment is reduced. For example, when people play a difficult video game, as opposed to an easy game, they are less likely to notice what people in the background are saying. The other reason is that the locus of attention becomes more steadfast. For example, when people are watching an entertaining episode of their favorite television series, as opposed to a less absorbing show, attention is less likely to be diverted away from the screen by a ringing telephone. The theoretical underpinnings of this perspective, and potential implications for applied settings, are addressed. PMID:26300594

  18. Spacesuit Radiation Shield Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Anderson, Brooke M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ware, J.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2006-01-01

    Meeting radiation protection requirements during EVA is predominantly an operational issue with some potential considerations for temporary shelter. The issue of spacesuit shielding is mainly guided by the potential of accidental exposure when operational and temporary shelter considerations fail to maintain exposures within operational limits. In this case, very high exposure levels are possible which could result in observable health effects and even be life threatening. Under these assumptions, potential spacesuit radiation exposures have been studied using known historical solar particle events to gain insight on the usefulness of modification of spacesuit design in which the control of skin exposure is a critical design issue and reduction of blood forming organ exposure is desirable. Transition to a new spacesuit design including soft upper-torso and reconfigured life support hardware gives an opportunity to optimize the next generation spacesuit for reduced potential health effects during an accidental exposure.

  19. Foam Core Shielding for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Marc

    2007-01-01

    A foam core shield (FCS) system is now being developed to supplant multilayer insulation (MLI) systems heretofore installed on spacecraft for thermal management and protection against meteoroid impacts. A typical FCS system consists of a core sandwiched between a face sheet and a back sheet. The core can consist of any of a variety of low-to-medium-density polymeric or inorganic foams chosen to satisfy application-specific requirements regarding heat transfer and temperature. The face sheet serves to shock and thereby shatter incident meteoroids, and is coated on its outer surface to optimize its absorptance and emittance for regulation of temperature. The back sheet can be dimpled to minimize undesired thermal contact with the underlying spacecraft component and can be metallized on the surface facing the component to optimize its absorptance and emittance. The FCS systems can perform better than do MLI systems, at lower mass and lower cost and with greater volumetric efficiency.

  20. Technique for Configuring an Actively Cooled Thermal Shield in a Flight System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkfknecht, Peter; Mustafi, Shuvo

    2011-01-01

    Broad area cooling shields are a mass-efficient alternative to conductively cooled thermal radiation shielding. The shield would actively intercept a large portion of incident thermal radiation and transport the heat away using cryogenic helium gas. The design concept consists of a conductive and conformable surface that maximizes heat transfer and formability. Broad Area Cooled (BAC) shields could potentially provide considerable mass savings for spaceflight applications by eliminating the need for a rigid thermal radiation shield for cryogen tanks. The BAC consists of a network of capillary tubes that are thermally connected to a conductive shield material. Chilled helium gas is circulated through the network and transports unwanted heat away from the cryogen tanks. The cryogenic helium gas is pumped and chilled simultaneously using a specialized pulse-tube cryocooler, which further improves the mass efficiency of the system. By reducing the thermal environment temperature from 300 to 100 K, the radiative heat load on a cryogen tank could be reduced by an order of magnitude. For a cryogenic liquid propellant scenario of oxygen and hydrogen, the boiloff of hydrogen would be significantly reduced and completely eliminated for oxygen. A major challenge in implementing this technology on large tanks is that the BAC system must be easily scalable from lab demonstrations to full-scale missions. Also, the BAC shield must be conformable to complex shapes like spheres without losing the ability to maintain constant temperature throughout. The initial design maximizes thermal conductivity between the capillary tube and the conductive radiation shielding by using thin, corrugated aluminum foil with the tube running transverse to the folds. This configuration has the added benefit of enabling the foil to stretch and contract longitudinally. This allows the BAC to conform to the complex curvature of a cryogen tank, which is key to its success. To demonstrate a BAC shield

  1. Ocean seismo-acoustics. Low-frequency underwater acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Akal, T.; berkson, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on seismo-acoustic propagation in seawater and sea beds that includes theoretical developments, modelling and experiments, and fluctuations. Boundary scatteiring, seismo-acoustic waves and seismo-acoustic noise are discussed. Technology and new approaches in seismo-acoustic measurements are presented.

  2. Shielding measurements for 230-Mev protons

    SciTech Connect

    Siebers, J.V.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W. . Dept. of Medical Physics); Coutrakon, G. . Medical Center)

    1993-09-01

    Energetic neutrons, produced as protons interact with matter, dominate the radiation shielding environment for proton accelerators. Because of the scarcity of data describing the shielding required to protect personnel from these neutrons, absorbed dose and dose-equivalent values are measured as a function of depth in a thick concrete shield at neutron emission angles of 0, 22, 45, and 90 deg for 230-MeV protons incident upon stopping-length aluminum, iron, and lead targets. Neutron attenuation lengths vary sharply with angle but are independent of the target material. Comparing results with prior shielding calculations, the High-Energy Transport Code overestimates neutron production and attenuation lengths in the forward direction. Analytical methods compare favorably in the forward direction but overestimate the production and attenuation lengths at large angles. The results presented are useful for determining the shielding requirements for proton radiotherapy facilities and as a benchmark for future calculations.

  3. A perturbation technique for shield weight minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E. )

    1993-01-01

    The radiation shield optimization code SWAN (Ref. 1) was originally developed for minimizing the thickness of a shield that will meet a given dose (or another) constraint or for extremizing a performance parameter of interest (e.g., maximizing energy multiplication or minimizing dose) while maintaining the shield volume constraint. The SWAN optimization process proved to be highly effective (e.g., see Refs. 2, 3, and 4). The purpose of this work is to investigate the applicability of the SWAN methodology to problems in which the weight rather than the volume is the relevant shield characteristic. Such problems are encountered in shield design for space nuclear power systems. The investigation is carried out using SWAN with the coupled neutron-photon cross-section library FLUNG (Ref. 5).

  4. Mars Exploration Rover Heat Shield Recontact Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Desai, Prasun N.; Michelltree, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The twin Mars Exploration Rover missions landed successfully on Mars surface in January of 2004. Both missions used a parachute system to slow the rover s descent rate from supersonic to subsonic speeds. Shortly after parachute deployment, the heat shield, which protected the rover during the hypersonic entry phase of the mission, was jettisoned using push-off springs. Mission designers were concerned about the heat shield recontacting the lander after separation, so a separation analysis was conducted to quantify risks. This analysis was used to choose a proper heat shield ballast mass to ensure successful separation with low probability of recontact. This paper presents the details of such an analysis, its assumptions, and the results. During both landings, the radar was able to lock on to the heat shield, measuring its distance, as it descended away from the lander. This data is presented and is used to validate the heat shield separation/recontact analysis.

  5. Radiation Shielding for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.

    2016-01-01

    Design and analysis of radiation shielding for nuclear thermal propulsion has continued at Marshall Space Flight Center. A set of optimization tools are in development, and strategies for shielding optimization will be discussed. Considerations for the concurrent design of internal and external shielding are likely required for a mass optimal shield design. The task of reducing radiation dose to crew from a nuclear engine is considered to be less challenging than the task of thermal mitigation for cryogenic propellant, especially considering the likely implementation of additional crew shielding for protection from solar particles and cosmic rays. Further consideration is thus made for the thermal effects of radiation absorption in cryogenic propellant. Materials challenges and possible methods of manufacturing are also discussed.

  6. Repository Waste Package Transporter Shielding Weight Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Sanders; Shiaw-Der Su

    2005-02-02

    The Yucca Mountain repository requires the use of a waste package (WP) transporter to transport a WP from a process facility on the surface to the subsurface for underground emplacement. The transporter is a part of the waste emplacement transport systems, which includes a primary locomotive at the front end and a secondary locomotive at the rear end. The overall system with a WP on board weights over 350 metric tons (MT). With the shielding mass constituting approximately one-third of the total system weight, shielding optimization for minimal weight will benefit the overall transport system with reduced axle requirements and improved maneuverability. With a high contact dose rate on the WP external surface and minimal personnel shielding afforded by the WP, the transporter provides radiation shielding to workers during waste emplacement and retrieval operations. This paper presents the design approach and optimization method used in achieving a shielding configuration with minimal weight.

  7. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of monolayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seul Ki; Kim, Ki Yeong; Kim, Taek Yong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Park, Seong Wook; Kim, Joung Ho; Cho, Byung Jin

    2012-11-16

    We report the first experimental results on the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of monolayer graphene. The monolayer CVD graphene has an average SE value of 2.27 dB, corresponding to ~40% shielding of incident waves. CVD graphene shows more than seven times (in terms of dB) greater SE than gold film. The dominant mechanism is absorption rather than reflection, and the portion of absorption decreases with an increase in the number of graphene layers. Our modeling work shows that plane-wave theory for metal shielding is also applicable to graphene. The model predicts that ideal monolayer graphene can shield as much as 97.8% of EMI. This suggests the feasibility of manufacturing an ultrathin, transparent, and flexible EMI shield by single or few-layer graphene. PMID:23085718

  8. Investigation of Twin Jet Aeroacoustic Properties in the Presence of a Hybrid Wing Body Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    In preparation for upcoming wind tunnel acoustic experiments of a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) vehicle with two jet engine simulator units, a series of twin jet aeroacoustic investigations were conducted leading to increased understanding and risk mitigation. A previously existing twin jet nozzle system and a fabricated HWB aft deck fuselage are combined for a 1.9% model scale study of jet nozzle spacing and jet cant angle effects, elevon deflection into the jet plume, and acoustic shielding by the fuselage body. Linear and phased array microphone measurements are made, and data processing includes the use of DAMAS (Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources). Closely-spaced twin jets with a 5 inward cant angle exhibit reduced noise levels compared to their parallel flow counterparts at similar and larger nozzle spacings. A 40 elevon deflection into the twin jet plume, which is required for HWB ground rotation, can significantly increase upstream noise levels (more than 5 dB OASPL) with only minimal increases in the downstream direction. Lastly, DAMAS processing can successfully measure the noise source distribution of multiple shielded jet sources.

  9. Dislocation shielding of a cohesive crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandakkar, Tanmay K.; Chng, Audrey C.; Curtin, W. A.; Gao, Huajian

    2010-04-01

    Dislocation interaction with a cohesive crack is of increasing importance to computational modelling of crack nucleation/growth and related toughening mechanisms in confined structures and under cyclic fatigue conditions. Here, dislocation shielding of a Dugdale cohesive crack described by a rectangular traction-separation law is studied. The shielding is completely characterized by three non-dimensional parameters representing the effective fracture toughness, the cohesive strength, and the distance between the dislocations and the crack tip. A closed form analytical solution shows that, while the classical singular crack model predicts that a dislocation can shield or anti-shield a crack depending on the sign of its Burgers vector, at low cohesive strengths a dislocation always shields the cohesive crack irrespective of the Burgers vector. A numerical study shows the transition in shielding from the classical solution of Lin and Thomson (1986) in the high strength limit to the solution in the low strength limit. An asymptotic analysis yields an approximate analytical model for the shielding over the full range of cohesive strengths. A discrete dislocation (DD) simulation of a large (>10 3) number of edge dislocations interacting with a cohesive crack described by a trapezoidal traction-separation law confirms the transition in shielding, showing that the cohesive crack does behave like a singular crack at very high cohesive strengths (˜7 GPa), but that significant deviations in shielding between singular and cohesive crack predictions arise at cohesive strengths around 1GPa, consistent with the analytic models. Both analytical and numerical studies indicate that an appropriate crack tip model is essential for accurately quantifying dislocation shielding for cohesive strengths in the GPa range.

  10. On the morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low angle edifices that have convex up topographic profiles and are built primarily by the accumulation of lava flows. This generic view of shields' morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galapagos). Here, the morphometry of over 150 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes, identified inthe Global Volcanism Network database, are analysed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 20 volcanoes identified as stratovolcanoes but having low slopes and being dominantly built up by accumulation of lava flows are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes range from 0.1 to >1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width ratios range from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients, elongation and summit truncation. Correlation and principal component analysis of the obtained quantitative database enables to identify 4 key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Using these descriptors through clustering analysis, a new classification scheme is proposed. It highlights the control of the magma feeding system - either central, along a linear structure, or spatially diffuse - on the resulting shield volcano morphology. Genetic relationships and evolutionary trends between contrasted morphological end-members can be highlighted within this new scheme. Additional findings are that the Galapagos-type morphology with a central deep caldera and steep upper flanks are characteristic of other shields. A series of large oceanic shields have slopes systematically much steeper than the low gradients (<4-8°) generally attributed to large Hawaiian-type shields. Finally, the continuum of morphologies from flat shields to steeper complex volcanic constructs considered as stratovolcanoes calls for a revision of this oversimplified

  11. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  12. Some Problems of modern acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan, A.

    1974-01-01

    The multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary character of acoustics is considered and its scientific, technological, economical and social implications, as well as the role of acoustics in creating new machines and equipment and improving the quality of products are outlined. Research beyond audible frequencies, as well as to extremely high acoustic intensities, which requires the development of a nonlinear acoustics is elaborated.

  13. Acoustic well cleaner

    DOEpatents

    Maki, Jr., Voldi E.; Sharma, Mukul M.

    1997-01-21

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

  14. Acoustic rotation control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Croonquist, A. P.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically controlled rotation of a levitated object, which avoids deformation of a levitated liquid object. Acoustic waves of the same wavelength are directed along perpendicular directions across the object, and with the relative phases of the acoustic waves repeatedly switched so that one wave alternately leads and lags the other by 90 deg. The amount of torque for rotating the object, and the direction of rotation, are controlled by controlling the proportion of time one wave leads the other and selecting which wave leads the other most of the time.

  15. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  16. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  17. A membrane-type acoustic metamaterial with adjustable acoustic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfeldt, F.; Riecken, J.; Gleine, W.; von Estorff, O.

    2016-07-01

    A new realization of a membrane-type acoustic metamaterial (MAM) with adjustable sound transmission properties is presented. The proposed design distinguishes itself from other realizations by a stacked arrangement of two MAMs which is inflated using pressurized air. The static pressurization leads to large nonlinear deformations and, consequently, geometrical stiffening of the MAMs which is exploited to adjust the eigenmodes and sound transmission loss of the structure. A theoretical analysis of the proposed inflatable MAM design using numerical and analytical models is performed in order to identify two important mechanisms, namely the shifting of the eigenfrequencies and modal residuals due to the pressurization, responsible for the transmission loss adjustment. Analytical formulas are provided for predicting the eigenmode shifting and normal incidence sound transmission loss of inflated single and double MAMs using the concept of effective mass. The investigations are concluded with results from a test sample measurement inside an impedance tube, which confirm the theoretical predictions.

  18. Acoustic emission characterization using AE (parameter) delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) parameter delay concept is defined as that particular measured value of a parameter at which a specified baseline level of cumulative AE activity is reached. The parameter can be from any of a broad range of elastic, plastic, viscoelastic, and fracture mechanics parameters, as well as their combinations. Such parameters include stress, load, strain, displacement, time, temperature, loading cycle, unloading stress, stress intensity factor, strain energy release rate, and crack tip plasticity zone size, while the AE activity may be AE event counts, ringdown counts, energy, event duration, etc., as well as their combinations. Attention is given to examples for the AE parameter delay concept, together with various correlations.

  19. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800[degree]C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280[degree]F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found.

  20. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800{degree}C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280{degree}F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found.

  1. Integrated Solar Concentrator and Shielded Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David Larry

    2010-01-01

    A shielded radiator is integrated within a solar concentrator for applications that require protection from high ambient temperatures with little convective heat transfer. This innovation uses a reflective surface to deflect ambient thermal radiation, shielding the radiator. The interior of the shield is also reflective to provide a view factor to deep space. A key feature of the shield is the parabolic shape that focuses incoming solar radiation to a line above the radiator along the length of the trough. This keeps the solar energy from adding to the radiator load. By placing solar cells along this focal line, the concentration of solar energy reduces the number and mass of required cells. By shielding the radiator, the effective reject temperature is much lower, allowing lower radiator temperatures. This is particularly important for lower-temperature processes, like habitat heat rejection and fuel cell operations where a high radiator temperature is not feasible. Adding the solar cells in the focal line uses the concentrating effect of the shield to advantage to accomplish two processes with a single device. This shield can be a deployable, lightweight Mylar structure for compact transport.

  2. Graphitic heat shields for solar probe missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundell, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using a graphitic heat-shield system on a solar probe going to within 4 solar radii of the center of the sun is investigated. An analysis of graphite vaporization, with commonly used vaporization coefficients, indicates that the maximum mass-loss rate from a conical shield as large as 4 m in diameter can be kept low enough to avoid interference with measurements of the solar environment. In addition to the mass-loss problem, the problem of protecting the payload from the high-temperature (up to 2300 K) primary shield must be solved. An analysis of radiation exchange between concentric disks provides a technique for designing the intermediate shielding. The technique is applied to the design of a system for the Starprobe spacecraft, and it is found that a system with 10 shields and a payload surface temperature of 600 K will have a payload diameter of 2.45 m. Since this is 61% of the 4-m diameter of the primary shield, it is concluded that a graphitic heat-shield system is feasible for the Starprobe mission.

  3. Caisson shield for arctic offshore production platform

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, J. D.; Reusswig, G. H.

    1985-03-12

    A caisson shield for the protection of an offshore production platform and, more particularly, a caisson shield for use in an arctic environment for the protection of the offshore structure in iceberg-infested waters which is capable of absorbing the destructive forces of an impact produced by a large iceberg. The caisson shield consists of an essentially annular concrete structure encircling at least the submerged support section of the offshore production platform including vertically upstanding concentrically spaced, annular side walls, a horizontal slab base resting on the marine bottom on which the side walls are supported, and a slab top supported on the side walls, and including annularly spaced internal radial partition walls whereby the entire overall caisson shield structure provides a generally toroidal configuration incorporating a plurality of closed compartments. In one embodiment of the invention, located along the outer annular wall is a plurality of arcuate wall sections forming a series of arches and enclosed compartments between each arcuate wall section and the outer annular wall, which impart a ''scallop-like'' configuration to the outer circumference of the caisson shield. The ''scallop-like'' outer walls are capable of resisting and absorbing extremely high ice loads by being adapted to progressively crush the leading edge of an impacting iceberg and to thereby minimize the crush of the iceberg against the caisson shield before coming to rest against the shield.

  4. 12 Inch Fan Acoustic Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. H.

    1997-01-01

    There were three general purposes of this research; first, to investigate fundamental fan acoustic processes, second, to produce high quality data for the validation of aeroacoustic codes and, third, to investigate candidate noise control concepts. These were all to be investigated using the NASA built and supplied 12 inch fan which is a 0.1 scale model of a modem ultra high bypass fan. NASA also supplied the test environments, wind tunnel entries in the 14 by 22 Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel and the Anechoic Noise Research Facility. To fulfill the purposes of the grant, investigations were performed in several general topics. In the area of fundamental fan studies, some of the topics involved were azimuthal directivity and tip clearance effects. In the area of high quality validation data significant parameter studies in the wind tunnel tests were performed. And in the area of noise control concepts, heated air injection was studied. The principal investigator performed the work on this grant by leading the concept development, design, planning, data analysis and reporting of the areas studied. The final report for this grant consists of a listing, which follows, of all reports, presentations, and publications that were made for the work done during the performance period.

  5. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Platinum Sponsors More from this sponsor... Platinum Sponsor Gold Sponsor University of Colorado Acoustic Neuroma Program Rocky Mountain Gamma Knife Center Gold Sponsor NYU Langone Medical Center Departments of Neurosurgery ...

  6. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  7. Acoustic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  8. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  9. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  10. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  11. Optimization design of electromagnetic shielding composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhaoming; Wang, Qingguo; Qin, Siliang; Hu, Xiaofeng

    2013-03-01

    The effective electromagnetic parameters physical model of composites and prediction formulas of composites' shielding effectiveness and reflectivity were derived based on micromechanics, variational principle and electromagnetic wave transmission theory. The multi-objective optimization design of multilayer composites was carried out using genetic algorithm. The optimized results indicate that material parameter proportioning of biggest absorption ability can be acquired under the condition of the minimum shielding effectiveness can be satisfied in certain frequency band. The validity of optimization design model was verified and the scheme has certain theoretical value and directive significance to the design of high efficiency shielding composites.

  12. Face shields for infection control: A review.

    PubMed

    Roberge, Raymond J

    2016-04-01

    Face shields are personal protective equipment devices that are used by many workers (e.g., medical, dental, veterinary) for protection of the facial area and associated mucous membranes (eyes, nose, mouth) from splashes, sprays, and spatter of body fluids. Face shields are generally not used alone, but in conjunction with other protective equipment and are therefore classified as adjunctive personal protective equipment. Although there are millions of potential users of face shields, guidelines for their use vary between governmental agencies and professional societies and little research is available regarding their efficacy. PMID:26558413

  13. Tank evaluation system shielded annular tank application

    SciTech Connect

    Freier, D.A.

    1988-10-04

    TEST (Tank Evaluation SysTem) is a research project utilizing neutron interrogation techniques to analyze the content of nuclear poisons and moderators in tank shielding. TEST experiments were performed on an experimental SAT (Shielded Annular Tank) at the Rocky Flats Plant. The purpose of these experiments was threefold: (1) to assess TEST application to SATs, (2) to determine if Nuclear Safety inspection criteria could be met, and (3) to perform a preliminary calibration of TEST for SATs. Several experiments were performed, including measurements of 11 tank shielding configurations, source-simulated holdup experiments, analysis of three detector modes, resolution studies, and TEST scanner geometry experiments. 1 ref., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Hot cell shield plug extraction apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Philip A.; Manhart, Larry K.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for moving shielding plugs into and out of holes in concrete shielding walls in hot cells for handling radioactive materials without the use of external moving equipment. The apparatus provides a means whereby a shield plug is extracted from its hole and then swung approximately 90 degrees out of the way so that the hole may be accessed. The apparatus uses hinges to slide the plug in and out and to rotate it out of the way, the hinge apparatus also supporting the weight of the plug in all positions, with the load of the plug being transferred to a vertical wall by means of a bolting arrangement.

  15. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  16. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications. PMID:25418084

  17. An intrinsically safe facility for forefront research and training on nuclear technologies — ADS shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasciello, O.; Ciotti, M.

    2014-04-01

    A detailed study of a very simple Accelerator-Driven System (ADS) shielding concept is carried out by means of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The design of a multilayer shielding scheme, together with an underground reactor host room sketch, is shown to be very effective for the exposure levels to ionizing radiations, in the upside experimental building and in the ground all around the reactor host room, being fully negligible. Transient heat is also estimated, founding that no residual radiation leaks out through ADS structures in the host room after shutdown.

  18. Acoustic communication by ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickling, Robert

    2002-05-01

    Many ant species communicate acoustically by stridulating, i.e., running a scraper over a washboard-like set of ridges. Ants appear to be insensitive to airborne sound. Consequently, myrmecologists have concluded that the stridulatory signals are transmitted through the substrate. This has tended to diminish the importance of acoustic communication, and it is currently believed that ant communication is based almost exclusively on pheromones, with acoustic communication assigned an almost nonexistent role. However, it can be shown that acoustic communication between ants is effective only if the medium is air and not the substrate. How, then, is it possible for ants to appear deaf to airborne sound and yet communicate through the air? An explanation is provided in a paper [R. Hickling and R. L. Brown, ``Analysis of acoustic communication by ants,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1920-1929 (2000)]. Ants are small relative to the wavelengths they generate. Hence, they create a near field, which is characterized by a major increase in sound velocity (particle velocity of sound) in the vicinity of the source. Hair sensilla on the ants' antennae respond to sound velocity. Thus, ants are able to detect near-field sound from other ants and to exclude extraneous airborne sound.

  19. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (<2000 Hz) acoustic methods for medical diagnosis. Several candidate methods of pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (p<0.0001). The ratio of acoustic energy between low (<220 Hz) and mid (550-770 Hz) frequency bands was significantly different in the control (healthy) and pneumothorax states (p<0.0001). The second approach measured breath sounds in the absence of an external acoustic input. Pneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (p<0.01 for each). Finally, chest percussion was implemented. Pneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  20. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  1. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  2. Acoustic calibration apparatus for calibrating plethysmographic acoustic pressure sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Davis, David C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for calibrating an acoustic sensor is described. The apparatus includes a transmission material having an acoustic impedance approximately matching the acoustic impedance of the actual acoustic medium existing when the acoustic sensor is applied in actual in-service conditions. An elastic container holds the transmission material. A first sensor is coupled to the container at a first location on the container and a second sensor coupled to the container at a second location on the container, the second location being different from the first location. A sound producing device is coupled to the container and transmits acoustic signals inside the container.

  3. Study of critical defects in ablative heat shield systems for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. C.; Rummel, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for a program conducted to determine the effects of fabrication-induced defects on the performance of an ablative heat shield material. Exposures representing a variety of space shuttle orbiter mission environments-humidity acoustics, hot vacuum and cold vacuum-culuminating in entry heating and transonic acoustics, were simulated on large panels containing intentional defects. Nondestructive methods for detecting the defects, were investigated. The baseline materials were two honeycomb-reinforced low density, silicone ablators, MG-36 and SS-41. Principal manufacturing-induced defects displaying a critical potential included: off-curing of the ablator, extreme low density, undercut (or crushed) honeycomb reinforcements, and poor wet-coating of honeycomb.

  4. The design of reactive shielded magnet clutches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertsov, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    The design of reactive shielded magnet clutches is considered along with their schematics, design formulas and characteristics of clutches in general. The design method suggested makes it possible to reduce calculation errors to 10%.

  5. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boonstra, R.H. )

    1990-03-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing, These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environmental prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase showed that all three materials are thermally acceptable.

  6. Projectile Density Effects on Shield Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Lear, Dana; Lyons, Frankel; Davis, Alan

    2009-01-01

    In the past, the orbital debris environment was modeled as consisting entirely of aluminum particles. As a consequence, most of the impact test database on spacecraft micro-meteoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shields, and the resulting ballistic limit equations used to predict shielding performance, has been based on using aluminum projectiles. Recently, data has been collected from returned spacecraft materials and other sources that indicate higher and lower density components of orbital debris also exist. New orbital debris environment models such as ORDEM2008 provide predictions of the fraction of orbital debris in various density bins (high = 7.9 g/cu cm, medium = 2.8 g/cu cm, and low = 0.9-1.1 g/cu cm). This paper describes impact tests to assess the effects of projectile density on the performance capabilities of typical MMOD shields. Updates to shield ballistic limit equations are provided based on results of tests and analysis.

  7. Resonance self-shielding methodology in MPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Collins, B.; Kochunas, B.; Martin, W.; Kim, K. S.; Williams, M.

    2013-07-01

    The resonance self-shielding methods of the neutron transport code Michigan Parallel Characteristics based Transport (MPACT) are described in this paper. Two resonance-integral table based methods are utilized to resolve the resonance self-shielding effect. The subgroup method is a mature approach used in MPACT as the basic functionality for the resonance calculation. Another new iterative method, named the embedded self-shielding method is also implemented in MPACT. Comparisons of the two methods as well as their numerical verifications are presented. The results show that MPACT is capable of modeling the resonance self-shielding in a variety of PWR benchmarking cases, including difficult fuel lattice cases with poison, control rods or mixed gadolinia fuel rods. (authors)

  8. Heat shielding for Venus entry probes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. L.; Nicolet, W. E.

    1973-01-01

    Two contrasted approaches to ablative thermal protection of Venus entry probes are presented - a typical carbonaceous charring ablator and a dielectric reflective ablator. The interesting observation in this study is that mass loss is not the controlling variable in heat-shield sizing. A heat-soak problem determines the carbon phenolic sizing. For Teflon, the material thickness required to accomplish reflection is the sizing factor. The total heat-shield weight required to handle either steep or shallow entry is computed to be 13% less for a Teflon shield (if at least 3.2 mm are required for reflection) than for a charring ablator shield. If an efficient reflective backing is used with Teflon, the thickness can be reduced 1.0 mm and the computed weight is 31% less for Teflon than for the charring ablator. Such weight reductions may significantly increase the science payload weight of the miniprobes.

  9. Curiosity Bids Goodbye to Heat Shield

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video of thumbnail images from the Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) on NASA's Curiosity rover shows the heat shield dropping away from the rover on Aug. 5 PDT (Aug. 6 EDT). It covers the first 25 s...

  10. Bone strength: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Turner, Charles H

    2006-04-01

    Bones serve several mechanical functions, including acoustic amplification in the middle ear, shielding vital organs from trauma, and serving as levers for muscles to contract against. Bone is a multiphase material made up of a tough collagenous matrix intermingled with rigid mineral crystals. The mineral gives bone its stiffness. Without sufficient mineralization, bones will plastically deform under load. Collagen provides toughness to bone making it less brittle so that it better resists fracture. Bone adapts to mechanical stresses largely by changing its size and shape, which are major determinants of its resistance to fracture. Tissue is added in regions of high mechanical stress providing an efficient means for improving bone strength. Experiments have shown that small additions of bone mineral density (BMD) (5-8%) caused by mechanical loading can improve bone strength by over 60% and extend bone fatigue life by 100-fold. Consequently, it is clear that bone tissue possesses a mechanosensing apparatus that directs osteogenesis to where it is most needed for improving bone strength. The biological processes involved in bone mechanotransduction are poorly understood and further investigation of the molecular mechanisms involved might uncover drug targets for osteoporosis. Several pathways are emerging from current research, including membrane ion channels, ATP signaling, second messengers, such as prostaglandins and nitric oxide, insulin-like growth factors, and Wnt signaling. PMID:16831941

  11. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    DOEpatents

    Rouse, Carl A.; Simnad, Massoud T.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

  12. Undulator Beam Pipe Magnetic Shielding Effect Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Andrew; Wolf, Zachary; ,

    2010-11-23

    The proposed stainless steel beampipe for the LCLS undulator has a measurable shielding effect on the magnetic field of the LCLS undulators. This note describes the tests used to determine the magnitude of the shielding effect, as well as deviations in the shielding effect caused by placing different phase shims in the undulator gap. The effect of the proposed Steel strongback which will be used to support the beam pipe, was also studied. A hall probe on a 3 axis movement system was set up to measure the main component of the magnetic field in the Prototype Undulator. To account for temperature variations of the magnetic field of the undulator for successive tests, a correction is applied which is described in this technical note. Using this method, we found the shielding effect, the amount which the field inside the gap was reduced due to the placement of the beampipe, to be {approx}10 Gauss. A series of tests was also performed to determine the effect of phase shims and X and Y correction shims on the shielding. The largest effect on shielding was found for the .3 mm phase shims. The effect of the .3 mm phase shims was to increase the shielding effect {approx}4 Gauss. The tolerance for the shielding effect of the phase shims is less than 1 gauss. The effect of the strongback was seen in its permanent magnetic field. It introduced a dipole field across the measured section of the undulator of {approx}3 gauss. This note documents the tests performed to determine these effects, as well as the results of those tests.

  13. Shielded beam delivery apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Montano, Rory Dominick

    2006-07-11

    An apparatus includes a plasma generator aligned with a beam generator for producing a plasma to shield an energized beam. An electrode is coaxially aligned with the plasma generator and followed in turn by a vortex generator coaxially aligned with the electrode. A target is spaced from the vortex generator inside a fluid environment. The electrode is electrically biased relative to the electrically grounded target for driving the plasma toward the target inside a vortex shield.

  14. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1994-01-01

    A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

  15. The effect of small variations in the magnetization curves of shielding material upon shielded fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kost, A.; Jacobs, R. T.; Hahn, A.

    2007-08-01

    The shielding of strong electromagnetic fields at power frequency, performed by ferromagnetic plates, is often successfully modelled by the effective reluctivity. This method delivers good results for the RMSvalue of the shielded field. The following paper shows that a small variation of the magnetization curve (e.g.by taking another material charge) can strongly influence the shielded field. The field calculation is performed by the Finite Element Method (FEM), where for the interior plate region a)finite elements and b)non-linear Impedance Boundary Conditions (IBC) are used which circumvents the need to discretize the shielding plate.

  16. Non-Riemannian geometry of vortex acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Andrade, L.C.

    2004-09-15

    The concept of acoustic torsion is introduced by making use of the scalar wave equation in Riemann-Cartan spacetime. Acoustic torsion extends the acoustic metric previously given by Unruh (PRL-1981). The wave equation describes irrotational perturbations in rotational nonrelativistic fluids. This physical motivation allows us to show that the acoustic line element can be conformally mapped to the line element of a stationary torsion loop in non-Riemannian gravity. Two examples of such sonic analogues are given. The first is the stationary torsion loop in teleparallel gravity. In the far from the vortex approximation, the Cartan torsion vector is shown to be proportional to the quantum vortex number of the superfluid. The torsion vector is also shown to be proportional to the superfluid vorticity in the presence of vortices. The formation of superfluid vortices is shown not to be favored by torsion loops in Riemann-Cartan spacetime, as long as this model is concerned. It is suggested that the teleparallel model may help to find a model for superfluid neutron stars vortices based on non-Riemannian gravity.

  17. The Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig: an Acoustic and Aerodynamic Free-jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    1994-01-01

    The nozzle acoustic test rig (NATR) was built at NASA Lewis Research Center to support the High Speed Research Program. The facility is capable of measuring the acoustic and aerodynamic performance of aircraft engine nozzle concepts. Trade-off studies are conducted to compare performance and noise during simulated low-speed flight and takeoff. Located inside an acoustically treated dome with a 62-ft radius, the NATR is a free-jet that has a 53-in. diameter and is driven by an air ejector. This ejector is operated with 125 lb/s of compressed air, at 125 psig, to achieve 375 lb/s at Mach 0.3. Acoustic and aerodynamic data are collected from test nozzles mounted in the free-jet flow. The dome serves to protect the surrounding community from high noise levels generated by the nozzles, and to provide an anechoic environment for acoustic measurements. Information presented in this report summarizes free-jet performance, fluid support systems, and data acquisition capabilities of the NATR.

  18. Teaching Acoustic Properties of Materials in Secondary School: Testing Sound Insulators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, M. I.; Couso, D.; Pinto, R.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching the acoustic properties of materials is a good way to teach physics concepts, extending them into the technological arena related to materials science. This article describes an innovative approach for teaching sound and acoustics in combination with sound insulating materials in secondary school (15-16-year-old students). Concerning the…

  19. Innovative technologies for Faraday shield cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, J.H.; Lindemuth, J.E.; North, M.T.; Goulding, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    Alternative advanced technologies are being evaluated for use in cooling the Faraday shields used for protection of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICR) antennae in Tokamaks. Two approaches currently under evaluation include heat pipe cooling and gas cooling. A Monel/water heat pipe cooled Faraday shield has been successfully demonstrated. Heat pipe cooling offers the advantage of reducing the amount of water discharged into the Tokamak in the event of a tube weld failure. The device was recently tested on an antenna at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The heat pipe design uses inclined water heat pipes with warm water condensers located outside of the plasma chamber. This approach can passively remove absorbed heat fluxes in excess of 200 W/cm{sup 2};. Helium-cooled Faraday shields are also being evaluated. This approach offers the advantage of no liquid discharge into the Tokamak in the event of a tube failure. Innovative internal cooling structures based on porous metal cooling are being used to develop a helium-cooled Faraday shield structure. This approach can dissipate the high heat fluxes typical of Faraday shield applications while minimizing the required helium blower power. Preliminary analysis shows that nominal helium flow and pressure drop can sufficiently cool a Faraday shield in typical applications. Plans are in progress to fabricate and test prototype hardware based on this approach.

  20. Reliability Methods for Shield Design Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    Providing protection against the hazards of space radiation is a major challenge to the exploration and development of space. The great cost of added radiation shielding is a potential limiting factor in deep space operations. In this enabling technology, we have developed methods for optimized shield design over multi-segmented missions involving multiple work and living areas in the transport and duty phase of space missions. The total shield mass over all pieces of equipment and habitats is optimized subject to career dose and dose rate constraints. An important component of this technology is the estimation of two most commonly identified uncertainties in radiation shield design, the shielding properties of materials used and the understanding of the biological response of the astronaut to the radiation leaking through the materials into the living space. The largest uncertainty, of course, is in the biological response to especially high charge and energy (HZE) ions of the galactic cosmic rays. These uncertainties are blended with the optimization design procedure to formulate reliability-based methods for shield design processes. The details of the methods will be discussed.

  1. Collagen shield delivery of amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, S D; Harrison, S A; Engstrom, R E; Bawdon, R E; Lee, D A; Mondino, B J

    1990-06-15

    By using a high-pressure liquid chromatography assay, we investigated the ability of collagen shield therapeutic contact lenses to release amphotericin B and deliver it to the anterior segment of rabbit eyes. In vitro studies showed that presoaked collagen shields released most of the amphotericin B within the first hour of elution. We compared the corneal and aqueous humor amphotericin B levels produced by collagen shields soaked in amphotericin B and frequent-drop therapy at four time points over a six-hour period. The collagen shields soaked in amphotericin B produced corneal levels that were higher than those produced by frequent-drop therapy at one hour, equivalent to drop therapy at two and three hours, and lower than drop therapy at six hours. There were no differences in amphotericin B levels in aqueous humor at any time point between rabbits treated with collagen shield delivery and rabbits treated with frequent-drop delivery. The results of this study suggest that amphotericin B delivery to the cornea by collagen shields is comparable to frequent-drop delivery but has the potential benefit of added convenience and compliance. PMID:2346199

  2. Measuring acoustic habitats

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies. PMID:25954500

  3. Magnet Architectures and Active Radiation Shielding Study - SR2S Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westover, Shane; Meinke, Rainer; Burger, William; Ilin, Andrew; Nerolich, Shaun; Washburn, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Analyze new coil configurations with maturing superconductor technology -Develop vehicle-level concept solutions and identify engineering challenges and risks -Shielding performance analysis Recent advances in superconducting magnet technology and manufacturing have opened the door for re-evaluating active shielding solutions as an alternative to mass prohibitive passive shielding.Publications on static magnetic field environments and its bio-effects were reviewed. Short-term exposure information is available suggesting long term exposure may be okay. Further research likely needed. center dotMagnetic field safety requirements exist for controlled work environments. The following effects have been noted with little noted adverse effects -Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects on ionized fluids (e.g. blood) creating an aortic voltage change -MHD interaction elevates blood pressure (BP) center dot5 Tesla equates to 5% BP elevation -Prosthetic devises and pacemakers are an issue (access limit of 5 gauss).

  4. Multiwall TPS: An emerging concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shideler, J. L.; Kelly, H. N.; Avery, D. E.; Blosser, M. L.; Adelman, H. M.

    1981-01-01

    The transformation of a titanium multiwall thermal protection system from a conceptual design to a working reality is described. The thermal and structural performance of the basic multiwall concept is analyzed. Radiant heat, wind tunnel, vibration, acoustic, and lightning strike tests are used to verify the performance of multiwall tiles under representative operating conditions. Flat, all titanium multiwall configurations limited to temperature below 810 K are discussed. Curved surface, higher temperature versions of the multiwall are considered. Preliminary mass estimates for advanced multiwall concepts are presented.

  5. NEUTRON REACTOR HAVING A Xe$sup 135$ SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Stanton, H.E.

    1957-10-29

    Shielding for reactors of the type in which the fuel is a chain reacting liquid composition comprised essentially of a slurry of fissionable and fertile material suspended in a liquid moderator is discussed. The neutron reflector comprises a tank containing heavy water surrounding the reactor, a shield tank surrounding the reflector, a gamma ray shield surrounding said shield tank, and a means for conveying gaseous fission products, particularly Xe/sup 135/, from the reactor chamber to the shield tank, thereby serving as a neutron shield by capturing the thermalized neutrons that leak outwardly from the shield tank.

  6. The acoustic communities: Definition, description and ecological role.

    PubMed

    Farina, Almo; James, Philip

    2016-09-01

    An acoustic community is defined as an aggregation of species that produces sound by using internal or extra-body sound-producing tools. Such communities occur in aquatic (freshwater and marine) and terrestrial environments. An acoustic community is the biophonic component of a soundtope and is characterized by its acoustic signature, which results from the distribution of sonic information associated with signal amplitude and frequency. Distinct acoustic communities can be described according to habitat, the frequency range of the acoustic signals, and the time of day or the season. Near and far fields can be identified empirically, thus the acoustic community can be used as a proxy for biodiversity richness. The importance of ecoacoustic research is rapidly growing due to the increasing awareness of the intrusion of anthropogenic sounds (technophonies) into natural and human-modified ecosystems and the urgent need to adopt more efficient predictive tools to compensate for the effects of climate change. The concept of an acoustic community provides an operational scale for a non-intrusive biodiversity survey and analysis that can be carried out using new passive audio recording technology, coupled with methods of vast data processing and storage. PMID:27262416

  7. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  8. Scanning Tomographic Acoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, G.; Meyyappan, A.

    1988-07-01

    The technology for "seeing" with sound has an important and interesting history. Some of nature's creatures have been using sound waves for many millenia to image otherwise unobservable objects. The human species, lacking this natural ability, have overcome this deficiency by developing several different ultrasonic imaging techniques. acoustic microscopy is one such technique, which produces high resolution images of detailed structure of small objects in a non-destructive fashion. Two types of acoustic microscopes have evolved for industrial exploitation. They are the scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM) and the scanning acoustic microscope (SAM). In this paper, we review the principles of SLAM and describe how we use elements of SLAM to realize the scanning tomographic acoustic microscope (STAM). We describe the data acquisition process and the image reconstruction procedure. We also describe techniques to obtain projection data from different angles of wave incidence enabling us to reconstruct different planes of a complex specimen tomo-graphically. Our experimental results show that STAM is capable of producing high-quality high-resolution subsurface images.

  9. Acoustical power amplification and damping by temperature gradients.

    PubMed

    Biwa, Tetsushi; Komatsu, Ryo; Yazaki, Taichi

    2011-01-01

    Ceperley proposed a concept of a traveling wave heat engine ["A pistonless Stirling engine-The traveling wave heat engine," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66, 1508-1513 (1979).] that provided a starting point of thermoacoustics today. This paper verifies experimentally his idea through observation of amplification and strong damping of a plane acoustic traveling wave as it passes through axial temperature gradients. The acoustic power gain is shown to obey a universal curve specified by a dimensionless parameter ωτα; ω is the angular frequency and τα is the relaxation time for the gas to thermally equilibrate with channel walls. As an application of his idea, a three-stage acoustic power amplifier is developed, which attains the gain up to 10 with a moderate temperature ratio of 2.3. PMID:21302995

  10. Acoustic beamforming through a thin plate using vibration measurements.

    PubMed

    Leclère, Quentin; Picard, Christophe

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a methodology to localize acoustic sources from the measurement of airborne induced vibrations of a thin structure. Targeted applications are the identification of acoustic sources through a thin wall, with a potential filtration of the incident field, which may be of practical interest, for instance, when identifying exterior acoustic sources from the inside of a moving vehicle. Two methods are coupled here to achieve this purpose: the Force Analysis Technique (FAT), used to identify the parietal pressure field exciting the thin structure from vibration measurements, and beamforming, used for the localization of acoustic sources from the (FAT-)identified parietal pressure. The coupling of the two methods is studied first from a theoretical point of view, and an experimental proof of concept is then presented, showing the feasibility and relevance of the proposed approach. PMID:26093428

  11. Shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.; Santoro, R. T.; Barish, J.; Claiborne, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    The available information on the shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles is summarized. The emphasis is placed on shielding against Van Allen belt protons and against solar-flare protons and alpha particles, but information on shielding against galactic cosmic rays is also presented. The approximation methods for use by nonexperts in the space shielding field are those that are standard in the space shielding literature.

  12. A low-relief shield volcano origin for the South Kaua`i Swell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Garrett; Garcia, Michael O.; Smith, John R.; Taylor, Brian; Flinders, Ashton; Jicha, Brian; Yamasaki, Seiko; Weis, Dominique; Swinnard, Lisa; Blay, Chuck

    2013-07-01

    The South Kaua`i Swell (SKS) is a 110 km x 80 km ovoid bathymetric feature that stands >2 km high and abuts the southern flank of the island of Kaua`i. The origin of the SKS was investigated using multibeam bathymetry and acoustic backscatter, gravity data, radiometric ages, and geochemistry of rock samples. Most of the SKS rock samples are tholeiitic in composition with ages of 3.9-5.4 Ma indicating they were derived from shield volcanism. The ages and compositions of the SKS rocks partially overlap with those of the nearby Ni`ihau, Kaua`i and West Ka`ena volcano complexes. The SKS was originally described as a landslide; however, this interpretation is problematic given the ovoid shape of SKS, its relatively smooth, flat-to-convex surface, and the lack of an obvious source region that could accommodate what would be one of Earth's most voluminous (6 x 103 km3) landslides. The morphology, size, and the surrounding gravity anomaly are more consistent with the SKS being a low-relief shield volcano, which was partially covered with a small volume of landside debris from south Kaua`i and later with some secondary volcanic seamounts. A shield origin would imply that Hawaiian and possibly other hotspot shield volcanoes can take on a wider variety of forms than is commonly thought, ranging from tall island-building shields, to smaller edifices such as Ka`ena Ridge and Mahukona, to even lower-relief volcanoes represented by the SKS and possibly the South West O`ahu Volcanic Field.

  13. ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOELLE, LESLIE L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

  14. Retro Rocket Motor Self-Penetrating Scheme for Heat Shield Exhaust Ports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrese-Reading, Colleen; St.Vaughn, Josh; Zell, Peter; Hamm, Ken; Corliss, Jim; Gayle, Steve; Pain, Rob; Rooney, Dan; Ramos, Amadi; Lewis, Doug; Shepherd, Joe; Inaba, Kazuaki

    2009-01-01

    A preliminary scheme was developed for base-mounted solid-propellant retro rocket motors to self-penetrate the Orion Crew Module heat shield for configurations with the heat shield retained during landings on Earth. In this system the motors propel impactors into structural push plates, which in turn push through the heat shield ablator material. The push plates are sized such that the remaining port in the ablator material is large enough to provide adequate flow area for the motor exhaust plume. The push plate thickness is sized to assure structural integrity behind the ablative thermal protection material. The concept feasibility was demonstrated and the performance was characterized using a gas gun to launch representative impactors into heat shield targets with push plates. The tests were conducted using targets equipped with Fiberform(R) and PICA as the heat shield ablator material layer. The PICA penetration event times were estimated to be under 30 ms from the start of motor ignition. The mass of the system (not including motors) was estimated to be less than 2.3 kg (5 lbs) per motor. The configuration and demonstrations are discussed.

  15. Acoustic energy shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A suspended mass is shaped by melting all or a selected portion of the mass and applying acoustic energy in varying amounts to different portions of the mass. In one technique for forming an optical waveguide slug, a mass of oval section is suspended and only a portion along the middle of the cross-section is heated to a largely fluid consistency. Acoustic energy is applied to opposite edges of the oval mass to press the unheated opposite edge portions together so as to form bulges at the middle of the mass. In another technique for forming a ribbon of silicon for constructing solar cells, a cylindrical thread of silicon is drawn from a molten mass of silicon, and acoustic energy is applied to opposite sides of the molten thread to flatten it into a ribbon.

  16. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  17. Surface Acoustic Wave Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid manipulations at the microscale and beyond are powerfully enabled through the use of 10-1,000-MHz acoustic waves. A superior alternative in many cases to other microfluidic actuation techniques, such high-frequency acoustics is almost universally produced by surface acoustic wave devices that employ electromechanical transduction in wafer-scale or thin-film piezoelectric media to generate the kinetic energy needed to transport and manipulate fluids placed in adjacent microfluidic structures. These waves are responsible for a diverse range of complex fluid transport phenomena - from interfacial fluid vibration and drop and confined fluid transport to jetting and atomization - underlying a flourishing research literature spanning fundamental fluid physics to chip-scale engineering applications. We highlight some of this literature to provide the reader with a historical basis, routes for more detailed study, and an impression of the field's future directions.

  18. Latticed pentamode acoustic cloak

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    We report in this work a practical design of pentamode acoustic cloak with microstructure. The proposed cloak is assembled by pentamode lattice made of a single-phase solid material. The function of rerouting acoustic wave round an obstacle has been demonstrated numerically. It is also revealed that shear related resonance due to weak shear resistance in practical pentamode lattices punctures broadband feature predicted based on ideal pentamode cloak. As a consequence, the latticed pentamode cloak can only conceal the obstacle in segmented frequency ranges. We have also shown that the shear resonance can be largely reduced by introducing material damping, and an improved broadband performance can be achieved. These works pave the way for experimental demonstration of pentamode acoustic cloak. PMID:26503821

  19. Seamount acoustic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehlert, George W.

    The cover of the March 1 issue of Eos showed a time series of acoustic scattering above Southeast Hancock Seamount (29°48‧N, 178°05‧E) on July 17-18, 1984. In a comment on that cover Martin Hovland (Eos, August 2, p. 760) argued that gas or “other far reaching causes” may be involved in the observed acoustic signals. He favors a hypothesis that acoustic scattering observed above a seeping pockmark in the North Sea is a combination of bubbles, stable microbubbles, and pelagic organisms and infers that this may be a more general phenomenon and indeed plays a role in the attraction of organisms to seamounts

  20. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  1. LPT. Shield test facility (TAN645 and 646). Calibration lab shield ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. Shield test facility (TAN-645 and -646). Calibration lab shield door. Ralph M. Parsons 1229-17 ANP/GE-6-645-MS-1. April 1957. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 037-0645-40-693-107369 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. From acoustic observatories to robust passive sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggeroer, Arthur B.

    2003-04-01

    The evolution of the DARPA Robust Passive Sonar (RPS) as well as the ONR Shallow Water Acoustic Testbed (SWAT) programs can be traced from concept of an acoustic observatory posed by Munk in 1980 through several assessment and feasibility studies to their current implementations. During this, the thinking on several key hypotheses matured. (i) Are noise fields directional enough to sustain high array gains? (ii) What are the tradeoffs among nonstationarity caused by ship motion, array configuration (geometry and the number of sensors), and ``snapshots'' needed for stable adaptive processing? (iii) What is the interaction between gains from vertical and horizontal apertures? (iv) How much signal gain degradation is acceptable? (v) What methods of post-processing can be done for normalization, tracking, and 3-D localization? This presentation will give a brief summary of the history of RPS and SWAT and pose the question of how well we can answer some of hypotheses which motivated them.

  3. Acoustical properties of highly porous fibrous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Highly porous, fibrous bulk sound absorbing materials are studied with a view toward understanding their acoustical properties and performance in a wide variety of applications including liners of flow ducts. The basis and criteria for decoupling of acoustic waves in the pores of the frame and compressional waves in the frame structure are established. The equations of motion are recast in a form that elucidates the coupling mechanisms. The normal incidence surface impedance and absorption coefficient of two types of Kevlar 29 and an open celled foam material are studied. Experimental values and theoretical results are brought into agreement when the structure factor is selected to provide a fit to the experimental data. A parametric procedure for achieving that fit is established. Both a bulk material quality factor and a high frequency impedance level are required to characterize the real and imaginary part of the surface impedance and absorption coefficient. A derivation of the concepts of equivalent density and dynamic resistance is presented.

  4. Methods And Apparatus For Acoustic Fiber Fractionation

    DOEpatents

    Brodeur, Pierre

    1999-11-09

    Methods and apparatus for acoustic fiber fractionation using a plane ultrasonic wave field interacting with water suspended fibers circulating in a channel flow using acoustic radiation forces to separate fibers into two or more fractions based on fiber radius, with applications of the separation concept in the pulp and paper industry. The continuous process relies on the use of a wall-mounted, rectangular cross-section piezoelectric ceramic transducer to selectively deflect flowing fibers as they penetrate the ultrasonic field. The described embodiment uses a transducer frequency of approximately 150 kHz. Depending upon the amount of dissolved gas in water, separation is obtained using a standing or a traveling wave field.

  5. Densitometry By Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    "Static" and "dynamic" methods developed for measuring mass density of acoustically levitated solid particle or liquid drop. "Static" method, unknown density of sample found by comparison with another sample of known density. "Dynamic" method practiced with or without gravitational field. Advantages over conventional density-measuring techniques: sample does not have to make contact with container or other solid surface, size and shape of samples do not affect measurement significantly, sound field does not have to be know in detail, and sample can be smaller than microliter. Detailed knowledge of acoustic field not necessary.

  6. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  7. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  8. Strong acoustic wave action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhberg, M. B.

    1983-07-01

    Experiments devoted to acoustic action on the atmosphere-magnetosphere-ionosphere system using ground based strong explosions are reviewed. The propagation of acoustic waves was observed by ground observations over 2000 km in horizontal direction and to an altitude of 200 km. Magnetic variations up to 100 nT were detected by ARIEL-3 satellite near the epicenter of the explosion connected with the formation of strong field aligned currents in the magnetosphere. The enhancement of VLF emission at 800 km altitude is observed.

  9. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  10. Acoustic and electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Douglas Samuel

    Theoretical models of EM and acoustic wave propagation are presented in an introductory text intended for intermediate-level science and engineering students. Chapters are devoted to the mathematical representation of acoustic and EM fields, the special theory of relativity, radiation, resonators, waveguide theory, refraction, surface waves, scattering by smooth objects, diffraction by edges, and transient waves. The mathematical tools required for the analysis (Bessel, Legendre, Mathieu, parabolic-cylinder, and spheroidal functions; tensor calculus; and the asymptotic evaluation of integrals) are covered in appendices.

  11. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  12. Electromechanical acoustic liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Cattafesta, III, Louis N. (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikazu (Inventor); Horowitz, Stephen Brian (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A multi-resonator-based system responsive to acoustic waves includes at least two resonators, each including a bottom plate, side walls secured to the bottom plate, and a top plate disposed on top of the side walls. The top plate includes an orifice so that a portion of an incident acoustical wave compresses gas in the resonators. The bottom plate or the side walls include at least one compliant portion. A reciprocal electromechanical transducer coupled to the compliant portion of each of the resonators forms a first and second transducer/compliant composite. An electrical network is disposed between the reciprocal electromechanical transducer of the first and second resonator.

  13. Theory for a gas composition sensor based on acoustic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Scott; Dain, Yefim; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2003-01-01

    Sound travelling through a gas propagates at different speeds and its intensity attenuates to different degrees depending upon the composition of the gas. Theoretically, a real-time gaseous composition sensor could be based on measuring the sound speed and the acoustic attenuation. To this end, the speed of sound was modelled using standard relations, and the acoustic attenuation was modelled using the theory for vibrational relaxation of gas molecules. The concept for a gas composition sensor is demonstrated theoretically for nitrogen-methane-water and hydrogen-oxygen-water mixtures. For a three-component gas mixture, the measured sound speed and acoustic attenuation each define separate lines in the composition plane of two of the gases. The intersection of the two lines defines the gas composition. It should also be possible to use the concept for mixtures of more than three components, if the nature of the gas composition is known to some extent.

  14. Theory for a gas composition sensor based on acoustic properties.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Scott; Dain, Yefim; Lueptow, Richard M

    2003-01-01

    Sound travelling through a gas propagates at different speeds and its intensity attenuates to different degrees depending upon the composition of the gas. Theoretically, a real-time gaseous composition sensor could be based on measuring the sound speed and the acoustic attenuation. To this end, the speed of sound was modelled using standard relations, and the acoustic attenuation was modelled using the theory for vibrational relaxation of gas molecules. The concept for a gas composition sensor is demonstrated theoretically for nitrogen-methane-water and hydrogen-oxygen-water mixtures. For a three-component gas mixture, the measured sound speed and acoustic attenuation each define separate lines in the composition plane of two of the gases. The intersection of the two lines defines the gas composition. It should also be possible to use the concept for mixtures of more than three components, if the nature of the gas composition is known to some extent. PMID:14552356

  15. Teaching room acoustics as a product sound quality issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiner, Mendel; Vastfjall, Daniel

    2003-04-01

    The department of Applied Acoustics teaches engineering and architect students at Chalmers University of Technology. The teaching of room acoustics to architectural students has been under constant development under several years and is now based on the study of room acoustics as a product sound quality issue. Various listening sessions using binaural sound recording and reproduction is used to focus students' learning on simple, easy to remember concepts. Computer modeling using ray tracing software and auralization is also used extensively as a tool to demonstrate concepts in addition to other software for simple sound generation and manipulation. Sound in general is the focus of an interdisciplinary course for students from Chalmers as well as from a school of art, a school of design, and a school of music which offers particular challenges and which is almost all listening based.

  16. INSTRUMENTATION FOR SURVEYING ACOUSTIC SIGNALS IN NATURAL GAS TRANSMISSION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-09-01

    In the U.S. natural gas is distributed through more than one million miles of high-pressure transmission pipelines. If all leaks and infringements could be detected quickly, it would enhance safety and U.S. energy security. Only low frequency acoustic waves appear to be detectable over distances up to 60 km where pipeline shut-off valves provide access to the inside of the pipeline. This paper describes a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) developed to record and identify acoustic signals characteristic of: leaks, pump noise, valve and flow metering noise, third party infringement, manual pipeline water and gas blow-off, etc. This PAMP consists of a stainless steel 1/2 inch NPT plumbing tree rated for use on 1000 psi pipelines. Its instrumentation is designed to measure acoustic waves over the entire frequency range from zero to 16,000 Hz by means of four instruments: (1) microphone, (2) 3-inch water full range differential pressure transducer with 0.1% of range sensitivity, (3) a novel 3 inch to 100 inch water range amplifier, using an accumulator with needle valve and (4) a line-pressure transducer. The weight of the PAMP complete with all accessories is 36 pounds. This includes a remote control battery/switch box assembly on a 25-foot extension chord, a laptop data acquisition computer on a field table and a sun shield.

  17. Acoustic loading in straight pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.

    1980-01-01

    Based on linear one-dimensional acoustics, a geometrically perfect elastic waveguide would respond to an oscillatory internal pressure only in the presence of path deflectors (elbows and branches). In practice, a significant elasto-acoustic interaction results even in straight conduits as a result of manufacturing tolerances. A theoretical model of the linear acoustic loading in straight pipes is developed that considers the acoustic wave distortion due to perimeter, axial, and wall thickness nonuniformities.

  18. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher; Chu, S. Reynold

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles to ensure compliance with acoustic requirements and thus provide a safe and habitable acoustic environment for the crews, and to validate developed models via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements.

  19. An acoustic dual filter in the audio frequencies with two local resonant systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhao-qun; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Shu-yi; Fan, Li

    2014-08-01

    We report an acoustic dual filter to realize the sound regulation in the audio frequency range, in which resonant vibrations of two membrane-air and metal-elastomer systems generate two sound transmission peaks and a sound blocking below 3000 Hz. The local vibrational profiles manifest that the transmission peak at lower frequency is mainly dependent on the resonant vibration of the membrane-air system, and the coupling vibrations of two systems generate the blocking frequency and transmission peak at higher frequency. Importantly, two transmission peaks can be controlled independently. It is feasible to realize the acoustic device in sound shield and dual filters.

  20. Vector Acoustic Sensors for Marine Seismic Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindwall, D.

    2005-12-01

    Using vector acoustic sensors for marine seismic and geo-acoustic surveys instead of the usual scalar hydrophones allows for acquiring a 3-D survey with the instrumentation and logistics similar to current 2-D surveys. Vector acoustic sensors measure the wave direction directly without the large and cumbersome arrays that hydrophones require. This concept was tested by a scaled experiment in an acoustic water tank that has a well controlled environment with a few targets. The experiment was scaled to the size of the available water tank and the frequency limits of the sensor. The sensor consists of a three-axis accelerometer as well as a hydrophone. The sound source was a standard hydrophone driven by a short 8 kHz pulse. The sensor was suspended in a fixed location and the hydrophone was moved about the tank by a robotic arm to insonify the tank from many locations. During part of the experiment, several floats (acoustic targets) were placed in the tank at diagonal ranges of approximately one meter. The accelerometer data show the direct source wave as well as the target scattered waves and reflections from the nearby water surface, tank bottom and sides. Vector data from single shots show that the wave motion direction can be readily determined for both direct waves and scattered waves. Without resorting to the usual methods of seismic imaging, which in this case would have only been two dimensional and relied entirely on the use of a synthetic source aperture, the three-dimensional volume of the tank environment was imaged. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research, program element 61153N.