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Sample records for acoustic shock wave

  1. Chromospheric heating by acoustic shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Stuart D.

    1993-01-01

    Work by Anderson & Athay (1989) suggests that the mechanical energy required to heat the quiet solar chromosphere might be due to the dissipation of weak acoustic shocks. The calculations reported here demonstrate that a simple picture of chromospheric shock heating by acoustic waves propagating upward through a model solar atmosphere, free of both magnetic fields and local inhomogeneities, cannot reproduce their chromospheric model. The primary reason is the tendency for vertically propagating acoustic waves in the range of allowed periods to dissipate too low in the atmosphere, providing insufficient residual energy for the middle chromosphere. The effect of diverging magnetic fields and the corresponding expanding acoustic wavefronts on the mechanical dissipation length is then discussed as a means of preserving a quasi-acoustic heating hypothesis. It is argued that this effect, in a canopy that overlies the low chromosphere, might preserve the acoustic shock hypothesis consistent with the chromospheric radiation losses computed by Anderson & Athay.

  2. Irregular Reflection of Acoustical Shock Waves and von Neumann Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskar, S.; Coulouvrat, F.; Marchiano, R.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate the reflection of weak acoustical shock waves grazing over a rigid surface. We define a critical parameter and examine the different types of reflection structure depending on this parameter. The study of the step shock is then extended to both N-waves and periodic saw-tooth waves, which are more realistic from an acoustical point of view. The numerical simulations reveal new reflection structures for these two waves which are not observed for step shocks. The results of the model are finally compared for periodic saw-tooth waves to ultrasonic experiments.

  3. Dust acoustic shock waves in two temperatures charged dusty grains

    SciTech Connect

    El-Shewy, E. K.; Abdelwahed, H. G.; Elmessary, M. A.

    2011-11-15

    The reductive perturbation method has been used to derive the Korteweg-de Vries-Burger equation and modified Korteweg-de Vries-Burger for dust acoustic shock waves in a homogeneous unmagnetized plasma having electrons, singly charged ions, hot and cold dust species with Boltzmann distributions for electrons and ions in the presence of the cold (hot) dust viscosity coefficients. The behavior of the shock waves in the dusty plasma has been investigated.

  4. Ion acoustic shock wave in collisional equal mass plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Adak, Ashish; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2015-10-15

    The effect of ion-ion collision on the dynamics of nonlinear ion acoustic wave in an unmagnetized pair-ion plasma has been investigated. The two-fluid model has been used to describe the dynamics of both positive and negative ions with equal masses. It is well known that in the dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave, the viscosity mediates wave dissipation in presence of weak nonlinearity and dispersion. This dissipation is responsible for the shock structures in pair-ion plasma. Here, it has been shown that the ion-ion collision in presence of collective phenomena mediated by the plasma current is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation. The analytical and numerical investigations revealed that the ion acoustic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the frequency of ion-ion collision parameter. The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  5. Ion acoustic shock wave in collisional equal mass plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Ashish; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2015-10-01

    The effect of ion-ion collision on the dynamics of nonlinear ion acoustic wave in an unmagnetized pair-ion plasma has been investigated. The two-fluid model has been used to describe the dynamics of both positive and negative ions with equal masses. It is well known that in the dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave, the viscosity mediates wave dissipation in presence of weak nonlinearity and dispersion. This dissipation is responsible for the shock structures in pair-ion plasma. Here, it has been shown that the ion-ion collision in presence of collective phenomena mediated by the plasma current is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation. The analytical and numerical investigations revealed that the ion acoustic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the frequency of ion-ion collision parameter. The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  6. Acoustic and Cavitation Fields of Shock Wave Therapy Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2006-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is considered a viable treatment modality for orthopedic ailments. Despite increasing clinical use, the mechanisms by which ESWT devices generate a therapeutic effect are not yet understood. The mechanistic differences in various devices and their efficacies might be dependent on their acoustic and cavitation outputs. We report acoustic and cavitation measurements of a number of different shock wave therapy devices. Two devices were electrohydraulic: one had a large reflector (HMT Ossatron) and the other was a hand-held source (HMT Evotron); the other device was a pneumatically driven device (EMS Swiss DolorClast Vet). Acoustic measurements were made using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone and a PVDF hydrophone. A dual passive cavitation detection system was used to monitor cavitation activity. Qualitative differences between these devices were also highlighted using a high-speed camera. We found that the Ossatron generated focused shock waves with a peak positive pressure around 40 MPa. The Evotron produced peak positive pressure around 20 MPa, however, its acoustic output appeared to be independent of the power setting of the device. The peak positive pressure from the DolorClast was about 5 MPa without a clear shock front. The DolorClast did not generate a focused acoustic field. Shadowgraph images show that the wave propagating from the DolorClast is planar and not focused in the vicinity of the hand-piece. All three devices produced measurable cavitation with a characteristic time (cavitation inception to bubble collapse) that varied between 95 and 209 μs for the Ossatron, between 59 and 283 μs for the Evotron, and between 195 and 431 μs for the DolorClast. The high-speed camera images show that the cavitation activity for the DolorClast is primarily restricted to the contact surface of the hand-piece. These data indicate that the devices studied here vary in acoustic and cavitation output, which may imply that the

  7. Flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Surabhi; Bandyopadhyay, Pintu; Sen, Abhijit

    2015-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of particle flow induced large amplitude shock waves in a dusty plasma. These dust acoustic shocks (DAS) are observed for strongly supersonic flows and have been studied in a U-shaped Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device for charged kaolin dust in a background of Argon plasma. The strong flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change of the dust density near the potential hill is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks. The dynamics of the shocks are captured by fast video pictures of the structures that are illuminated by a laser sheet beam. The physical characteristics of the shock are delineated from a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of plasma parameters and flow speeds. Details of these observations and a physical explanation based on model calculations will be presented.

  8. Ion acoustic shock waves in weakly relativistic multicomponent quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, T. S.; Bains, A. S.; Bedi, C.

    2010-02-01

    Ion acoustic Shock waves (IASWs) are studied in an collisionless unmagnetized relativistic quantum electron-positron-ion(e-p-i) plasma employing the quantum hydro -dynamic(QHD) model. Korteweg-deVries- Burger equation(KdVB) is derived using small amplitude perturbation expansion method to study the nonlinear propagation of the quantum IASWs. It is found that the coefficients of the KdVB equation are significantely modified by the positron density p, relativistic factor(Ur), temperatures σ, kinematic viscosity η and quantum factor(H).

  9. Nonlinear focusing of acoustic shock waves at a caustic cusp.

    PubMed

    Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François; Thomas, Jean-Louis

    2005-02-01

    The present study investigates the focusing of acoustical weak shock waves incoming on a cusped caustic. The theoretical model is based on the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya equation and its specific boundary conditions. Based on the so-called Guiraud's similitude law for a step shock, a new explanation about the wavefront unfolding due to nonlinear self-refraction is proposed. This effect is shown to be associated not only to nonlinearities, as expected by previous authors, but also to the nonlocal geometry of the wavefront. Numerical simulations confirm the sensitivity of the process to wavefront geometry. Theoretical modeling and numerical simulations are substantiated by an original experiment. This one is carried out in two steps. First, the canonical Pearcey function is synthesized in linear regime by the inverse filter technique. In the second step, the same wavefront is emitted but with a high amplitude to generate shock waves during the propagation. The experimental results are compared with remarkable agreement to the numerical ones. Finally, applications to sonic boom are briefly discussed. PMID:15759678

  10. Time fractional effect on ion acoustic shock waves in ion-pair plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelwahed, H. G.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Mahmoud, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The nonlinear properties of ion acoustic shock waves are studied. The Burgers equation is derived and converted into the time fractional Burgers equation by Agrawal's method. Using the Adomian decomposition method, shock wave solutions of the time fractional Burgers equation are constructed. The effect of the time fractional parameter on the shock wave properties in ion-pair plasma is investigated. The results obtained may be important in investigating the broadband electrostatic shock noise in D- and F-regions of Earth's ionosphere.

  11. Effect of nonadiabaticity of dust charge variation on dust acoustic waves: generation of dust acoustic shock waves.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M R; Sarkar, S; Ghosh, S; Debnath, M; Khan, M

    2001-04-01

    The effect of nonadiabaticity of dust charge variation arising due to small nonzero values of tau(ch)/tau(d) has been studied where tau(ch) and tau(d) are the dust charging and dust hydrodynamical time scales on the nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves. Analytical investigation shows that the propagation of a small amplitude wave is governed by a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) Burger equation. Notwithstanding the soliton decay, the "soliton mass" is conserved, but the dissipative term leads to the development of a noise tail. Nonadiabaticity generated dissipative effect causes the generation of a dust acoustic shock wave having oscillatory behavior on the downstream side. Numerical investigations reveal that the propagation of a large amplitude dust acoustic shock wave with dust density enhancement may occur only for Mach numbers lying between a minimum and a maximum value whose dependence on the dusty plasma parameters is presented. PMID:11308955

  12. Sources and propagation of atmospherical acoustic shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulouvrat, François

    2012-09-01

    Sources of aerial shock waves are numerous and produce acoustical signals that propagate in the atmosphere over long ranges, with a wide frequency spectrum ranging from infrasonic to audible, and with a complex human response. They can be of natural origin, like meteors, lightning or volcanoes, or human-made as for explosions, so-called "buzz-saw noise" (BSN) from aircraft engines or sonic booms. Their description, modeling and data analysis within the viewpoint of nonlinear acoustics will be the topic of the present lecture, with focus on two main points: the challenges of the source description, and the main features of nonlinear atmospheric propagation. Inter-disciplinary aspects, with links to atmospheric and geo-sciences will be outlined. Detailed description of the source is very dependent on its nature. Mobile supersonic sources can be rotating (fan blades of aircraft engines) or in translation (meteors, sonic boom). Mach numbers range from transonic to hypersonic. Detailed knowledge of geometry is critical for the processes of boom minimization and audible frequency spectrum of BSN. Sources of geophysical nature are poorly known, and various mechanisms for explaining infrasound recorded from meteors or thunderstorms have been proposed. Comparison between recorded data and modeling may be one way to discriminate between them. Moreover, the nearfield of these sources is frequently beyond the limits of acoustical approximation, or too complex for simple modeling. A proper numerical description hence requires specific matching procedures between nearfield behavior and farfield propagation. Nonlinear propagation in the atmosphere is dominated by temperature and wind stratification. Ray theory is an efficient way to analyze observations, but is invalid in various situations. Nonlinear effects are enhanced locally at caustics, or in case of grazing propagation over a rigid surface. Absorption, which controls mostly the high frequency part of the spectrum contained

  13. Observation of dust acoustic shock wave in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumita K.; Boruah, A.; Nakamura, Y.; Bailung, H.

    2016-05-01

    Dust acoustic shock wave is observed in a strongly coupled laboratory dusty plasma. A supersonic flow of charged microparticles is allowed to perturb a stationary dust fluid to excite dust acoustic shock wave. The evolution process beginning with steepening of initial wave front and then formation of a stable shock structure is similar to the numerical results of the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equation. The measured Mach number of the observed shock wave agrees with the theoretical results. Reduction of shock amplitude at large distances is also observed due to the dust neutral collision and viscosity effects. The dispersion relation and the spatial damping of a linear dust acoustic wave are also measured and compared with the relevant theory.

  14. Dust-acoustic shock waves in an electron depleted nonextensive dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdousi, M.; Miah, M. R.; Sultana, S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    A theoretical study of dust-acoustic (DA) shock waves has been carried out in an unmagnetized electron depleted dusty plasma containing inertial negatively charged dust grains and nonextensive positively charged ions. The normal mode analysis is used to examine the linear properties of DA waves. The reductive perturbation technique is employed in order to derive the nonlinear Burgers equation. The basic features (viz. polarity, amplitude, width, etc.) of the DA shock waves are investigated. Both polarity (positive and negative potential) shock waves are found to exists in the plasma under consideration in this manuscript. The findings of this investigation may be used in understanding the wave propagation in laboratory and space plasmas.

  15. Planar and nonplanar ion acoustic shock waves in relativistic degenerate astrophysical electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ata-ur-Rahman, Ali, S.; Mirza, Arshad M.; Qamar, A.

    2013-04-01

    We have studied the propagation of ion acoustic shock waves involving planar and non-planar geometries in an unmagnetized plasma, whose constituents are non-degenerate ultra-cold ions, relativistically degenerate electrons, and positrons. By using the reductive perturbation technique, Korteweg-deVries Burger and modified Korteweg-deVries Burger equations are derived. It is shown that only compressive shock waves can propagate in such a plasma system. The effects of geometry, the ion kinematic viscosity, and the positron concentration are examined on the ion acoustic shock potential and electric field profiles. It is found that the properties of ion acoustic shock waves in a non-planar geometry significantly differ from those in planar geometry. The present study has relevance to the dense plasmas, produced in laboratory (e.g., super-intense laser-dense matter experiments) and in dense astrophysical objects.

  16. Planar and nonplanar ion acoustic shock waves in relativistic degenerate astrophysical electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ata-ur-Rahman,; Qamar, A.; Ali, S.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2013-04-15

    We have studied the propagation of ion acoustic shock waves involving planar and non-planar geometries in an unmagnetized plasma, whose constituents are non-degenerate ultra-cold ions, relativistically degenerate electrons, and positrons. By using the reductive perturbation technique, Korteweg-deVries Burger and modified Korteweg-deVries Burger equations are derived. It is shown that only compressive shock waves can propagate in such a plasma system. The effects of geometry, the ion kinematic viscosity, and the positron concentration are examined on the ion acoustic shock potential and electric field profiles. It is found that the properties of ion acoustic shock waves in a non-planar geometry significantly differ from those in planar geometry. The present study has relevance to the dense plasmas, produced in laboratory (e.g., super-intense laser-dense matter experiments) and in dense astrophysical objects.

  17. Charging-delay induced dust acoustic collisionless shock wave: Roles of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Samiran; Bharuthram, R.; Khan, Manoranjan; Gupta, M. R.

    2006-11-15

    The effects of charging-delay and negative ions on nonlinear dust acoustic waves are investigated. It has been found that the charging-delay induced anomalous dissipation causes generation of dust acoustic collisionless shock waves in an electronegative dusty plasma. The small but finite amplitude wave is governed by a Korteweg-de Vries Burger equation in which the Burger term arises due to the charging-delay. Numerical investigations reveal that the charging-delay induced dissipation and shock strength decreases (increases) with the increase of negative ion concentration (temperature)

  18. Weakly nonlinear dust ion-acoustic shock waves in a dusty plasma with nonthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Berbri, Abderrezak; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2009-05-15

    Weakly nonlinear dust ion-acoustic (DIA) shock waves are investigated in a dusty plasma with nonthermal electrons. A modified Korteweg-de Vries equation with a cubic nonlinearity is derived. Due to the net negative dust charge {mu}Z{sub d} and electron nonthermality, the present plasma model can admit compressive and rarefactive weak DIA shock waves. The effect of increasing {mu}Z{sub d} is to lower the critical nonthermal parameter {beta}{sub c} above which only rarefactive DIA shock waves are admitted. Our investigation may help to understand the nonlinear structures observed in the auroral acceleration regions.

  19. A Shock-Refracted Acoustic Wave Model for Screech Amplitude in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2007-01-01

    A physical model is proposed for the estimation of the screech amplitude in underexpanded supersonic jets. The model is based on the hypothesis that the interaction of a plane acoustic wave with stationary shock waves provides amplification of the transmitted acoustic wave upon traversing the shock. Powell's discrete source model for screech incorporating a stationary array of acoustic monopoles is extended to accommodate variable source strength. The proposed model reveals that the acoustic sources are of increasing strength with downstream distance. It is shown that the screech amplitude increases with the fully expanded jet Mach number. Comparisons of predicted screech amplitude with available test data show satisfactory agreement. The effect of variable source strength on the directivity of the fundamental (first harmonic, lowest frequency mode) and the second harmonic (overtone) is found to be unimportant with regard to the principal lobe (main or major lobe) of considerable relative strength, and is appreciable only in the secondary or minor lobes (of relatively weaker strength).

  20. A Shock-Refracted Acoustic Wave Model for the Prediction of Screech Amplitude in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2007-01-01

    A physical model is proposed for the estimation of the screech amplitude in underexpanded supersonic jets. The model is based on the hypothesis that the interaction of a plane acoustic wave with stationary shock waves provides amplification of the transmitted acoustic wave upon traversing the shock. Powell's discrete source model for screech incorporating a stationary array of acoustic monopoles is extended to accommodate variable source strength. The proposed model reveals that the acoustic sources are of increasing strength with downstream distance. It is shown that the screech amplitude increases with the fuiiy expanded jet Mach number. Comparisons of predicted screech amplitude with available test data show satisfactory agreement. The effect of variable source strength on directivity of the fundamental (first harmonic, lowest frequency mode) and the second harmonic (overtone) is found to be unimportant with regard to the principal lobe (main or major lobe) of considerable relative strength, and is appreciable only in the secondary or minor lobes (of relatively weaker strength

  1. Acoustical model of small calibre ballistic shock waves in air for automatic sniper localization applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Juan R.; Salinas, Renato A.; Abidi, Mongi A.

    2007-04-01

    The phenomenon of ballistic shock wave emission by a small calibre projectile at supersonic speed is quite relevant in automatic sniper localization applications. When available, ballistic shock wave analysis makes possible the estimation of the main ballistic features of a gunfire event. The propagation of ballistic shock waves in air is a process which mainly involves nonlinear distortion, or steepening, and atmospheric absorption. Current ballistic shock waves propagation models used in automatic sniper localization systems only consider nonlinear distortion effects. This means that only the rates of change of shock peak pressure and the N-wave duration with distance are considered in the determination of the miss distance. In the present paper we present an improved acoustical model of small calibre ballistic shock wave propagation in air, intended to be used in acoustics-based automatic sniper localization applications. In our approach, we have considered nonlinear distortion, but additionally we have also introduced the effects of atmospheric sound absorption. Atmospheric absorption is implemented in the time domain in order to get faster calculation times than those computed in frequency domain. Furthermore, we take advantage of the fact that atmospheric absorption plays a fundamental role in the rise times of the shocks, and introduce the rate of change of the rise time with distance as a third parameter to be used in the determination of the miss distance. This lead us to a more accurate and robust estimation of the miss distance, and consequently of the projectile trajectory, and the spatial coordinates of the gunshot origin.

  2. Drift ion acoustic shock waves in an inhomogeneous two-dimensional quantum magnetoplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Karim, S.; Shah, H. A.; Siddiq, M.

    2009-04-01

    Linear and nonlinear propagation characteristics of drift ion acoustic waves are investigated in an inhomogeneous quantum plasma with neutrals in the background employing the quantum hydrodynamics (QHD) model. In this regard, a quantum Kadomtsev-Petviashvili-Burgers (KPB) equation is derived for the first time. It is shown that the ion acoustic wave couples with the drift wave if the parallel motion of ions is taken into account. Discrepancies in the earlier works on drift solitons and shocks in inhomogeneous plasmas are also pointed out and a correct theoretical framework is presented to study the one-dimensional as well as the two-dimensional propagation of shock waves in an inhomogeneous quantum plasma. Furthermore, the solution of KPB equation is presented using the tangent hyperbolic (tanh) method. The variation of the shock profile with the quantum Bohm potential, collision frequency, and ratio of drift to shock velocity in the comoving frame, v∗/u, are also investigated. It is found that increasing the number density and collision frequency enhances the strength of the shock. It is also shown that the fast drift shock (i.e., v∗/u>0) increases, whereas the slow drift shock (i.e., v∗/u<0) decreases the strength of the shock. The relevance of the present investigation with regard to dense astrophysical environments is also pointed out.

  3. Heating of Sunspot Chromospheres by Slow-mode Acoustic Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Yun, Hong Sik

    1985-06-01

    Making use of the arbitrary shock theory developed by Ulmschneider (1967, 1971) and Ulmscneider and Kalkofen (1978), we have calculated the dissipation rates of upward-traveling slow-mode acoustic shock waves in umbral chromospheres for two umbral chromosphere models, a plateau model by Avrett (1981) and a gradient model by Yun and Beebe (1984). The computed shock dissipation rates are compared with the radiative cooling rate given by Avrett(1981). The results show that the slow-mode acoustic shock waves with a period of about 20 seconds can heat the low umbral chromospheres traveling with a mechanical energy flux of 2.6*10^6 erg/cm^2s at a height of 300-400 km above the temperature minimum region.

  4. Propagation of acoustic shock waves between parallel rigid boundaries and into shadow zones

    SciTech Connect

    Desjouy, C. Ollivier, S.; Dragna, D.; Blanc-Benon, P.; Marsden, O.

    2015-10-28

    The study of acoustic shock propagation in complex environments is of great interest for urban acoustics, but also for source localization, an underlying problematic in military applications. To give a better understanding of the phenomenon taking place during the propagation of acoustic shocks, laboratory-scale experiments and numerical simulations were performed to study the propagation of weak shock waves between parallel rigid boundaries, and into shadow zones created by corners. In particular, this work focuses on the study of the local interactions taking place between incident, reflected, and diffracted waves according to the geometry in both regular or irregular – also called Von Neumann – regimes of reflection. In this latter case, an irregular reflection can lead to the formation of a Mach stem that can modify the spatial distribution of the acoustic pressure. Short duration acoustic shock waves were produced by a 20 kilovolts electric spark source and a schlieren optical method was used to visualize the incident shockfront and the reflection/diffraction patterns. Experimental results are compared to numerical simulations based on the high-order finite difference solution of the two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations.

  5. Ion acoustic shock waves in electron-positron-ion quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Mirza, Arshad M.; Hanif, M.

    2008-07-01

    Ion acoustic shock waves (IASWs) are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma consisting of electrons, positrons, and ions employing the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model. Nonlinear quantum IASWs are investigated by deriving the Korteweg-deVries-Burger equation under the small amplitude perturbation expansion method. The dissipation is introduced by taking into account the kinematic viscosity among the plasma constituents. It is found that the strength of the ion acoustic shock wave is maximum for spherical, intermediate for cylindrical, and minimum for planar geometry. The temporal evolution of the shock for a quantum e-p-i plasma in a spherical geometry is also investigated. It is found that the strength and the steepness of the quantum ion acoustic shock wave increases with decreasing stretched time coordinate (representing slow time scale) |τ|. It is also found that an increase in the quantum Bohm potential decreases the strength as well as the steepness of the shock. The temporal evolution of the quantum ion acoustic solitons in an e-p-i plasma for cylindrical and spherical geometries is also explored by substituting the dissipative coefficient C equal to zero. The relevance of the present study with regard to the dense astrophysical environments is also pointed out.

  6. Ion acoustic shock waves in electron-positron-ion quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Mirza, Arshad M.; Hanif, M.

    2008-07-15

    Ion acoustic shock waves (IASWs) are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma consisting of electrons, positrons, and ions employing the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model. Nonlinear quantum IASWs are investigated by deriving the Korteweg-deVries-Burger equation under the small amplitude perturbation expansion method. The dissipation is introduced by taking into account the kinematic viscosity among the plasma constituents. It is found that the strength of the ion acoustic shock wave is maximum for spherical, intermediate for cylindrical, and minimum for planar geometry. The temporal evolution of the shock for a quantum e-p-i plasma in a spherical geometry is also investigated. It is found that the strength and the steepness of the quantum ion acoustic shock wave increases with decreasing stretched time coordinate (representing slow time scale) |{tau}|. It is also found that an increase in the quantum Bohm potential decreases the strength as well as the steepness of the shock. The temporal evolution of the quantum ion acoustic solitons in an e-p-i plasma for cylindrical and spherical geometries is also explored by substituting the dissipative coefficient C equal to zero. The relevance of the present study with regard to the dense astrophysical environments is also pointed out.

  7. Head-on collision of dust-acoustic shock waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    EL-Shamy, E. F.; Al-Asbali, A. M.

    2014-09-15

    A theoretical investigation is carried out to study the propagation and the head-on collision of dust-acoustic (DA) shock waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma consisting of negative dust fluid, Maxwellian distributed electrons and ions. Applying the extended Poincaré–Lighthill–Kuo method, a couple of Korteweg–deVries–Burgers equations for describing DA shock waves are derived. This study is a first attempt to deduce the analytical phase shifts of DA shock waves after collision. The impacts of physical parameters such as the kinematic viscosity, the unperturbed electron-to-dust density ratio, parameter determining the effect of polarization force, the ion-to-electron temperature ratio, and the effective dust temperature-to-ion temperature ratio on the structure and the collision of DA shock waves are examined. In addition, the results reveal the increase of the strength and the steepness of DA shock waves as the above mentioned parameters increase, which in turn leads to the increase of the phase shifts of DA shock waves after collision. The present model may be useful to describe the structure and the collision of DA shock waves in space and laboratory dusty plasmas.

  8. Head-on collision of dust-acoustic shock waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL-Shamy, E. F.; Al-Asbali, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical investigation is carried out to study the propagation and the head-on collision of dust-acoustic (DA) shock waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma consisting of negative dust fluid, Maxwellian distributed electrons and ions. Applying the extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo method, a couple of Korteweg-deVries-Burgers equations for describing DA shock waves are derived. This study is a first attempt to deduce the analytical phase shifts of DA shock waves after collision. The impacts of physical parameters such as the kinematic viscosity, the unperturbed electron-to-dust density ratio, parameter determining the effect of polarization force, the ion-to-electron temperature ratio, and the effective dust temperature-to-ion temperature ratio on the structure and the collision of DA shock waves are examined. In addition, the results reveal the increase of the strength and the steepness of DA shock waves as the above mentioned parameters increase, which in turn leads to the increase of the phase shifts of DA shock waves after collision. The present model may be useful to describe the structure and the collision of DA shock waves in space and laboratory dusty plasmas.

  9. Nonlinear features of ion acoustic shock waves in dissipative magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Biswajit; Sinha, Anjana; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2014-10-15

    The nonlinear propagation of small as well as arbitrary amplitude shocks is investigated in a magnetized dusty plasma consisting of inertia-less Boltzmann distributed electrons, inertial viscous cold ions, and stationary dust grains without dust-charge fluctuations. The effects of dissipation due to viscosity of ions and external magnetic field, on the properties of ion acoustic shock structure, are investigated. It is found that for small amplitude waves, the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) equation, derived using Reductive Perturbation Method, gives a qualitative behaviour of the transition from oscillatory wave to shock structure. The exact numerical solution for arbitrary amplitude wave differs somehow in the details from the results obtained from KdVB equation. However, the qualitative nature of the two solutions is similar in the sense that a gradual transition from KdV oscillation to shock structure is observed with the increase of the dissipative parameter.

  10. Planar and non-planar ion acoustic shock waves in electron positron ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, Waqas; Jehan, Nusrat; Mirza, Arshad M.; Sakanaka, P. H.

    2008-06-01

    Ion acoustic shock waves (IASW's) are studied in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of electrons, positrons and adiabatically hot positive ions. This is done by deriving the Kortweg-deVries-Burger (KdVB) equation under the small amplitude perturbation expansion method. The dissipation is introduced by taking into account the kinematic viscosity among the plasma constituents. It is found that the strength of ion acoustic shock wave is maximum for spherical, intermediate for cylindrical, and minimum for planar geometry. It is observed that the positron concentration, ratio of ion to electron temperature, and the plasma kinematic viscosity significantly modifies the shock structure. Finally, it is found that the temporal evolution of the non-planar IASW's is quite different by comparison with the planar geometry. The relevance of the present study with regard to the dense astrophysical environments is also pointed out.

  11. Effect of ion viscosity on dust ion-acoustic shock waves in a nonextensive magnetoplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Tantawy, S. A.

    2016-08-01

    The nonlinear features of dust ion-acoustic shock waves (DIASWs) in a magnetoplasma containing cold positive ions, nonextensive electrons, and immobile negatively charged dust grains taking into account the cold ion kinematic viscosity are investigated. The reductive perturbation technique is used to derive a Zakharov-Kuznetsov-Burgers (ZK-Burgers). It is found that the fundamental properties of the DIASWs are significantly modified by the different system parameters such as the nonextensive parameter, the ion gyrofrequency, the dust concentration, the viscosity parameter, and the direction cosines. Also, the polarities (positive and negative shocks) of the potential are found to exist in the plasma under consideration. The implications of our results may be used in understanding the acoustic shock waves propagation in laboratory and space plasmas.

  12. Electrostatic shocks as nonlinear ion acoustic waves. [in auroral zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, E.; Hudson, M.

    1976-01-01

    A cold fluid approach is presented which yields exact double-layer solutions that can be used to model electrostatic S-type shocks. Solutions derived from the two-temperature electron model are presented in order to show the range of amplitudes and scale lengths possible for this plasma model and to examine how shock properties depend on orientation of the shock. The dependence of various double-layer quantities on plasma composition is then considered for the cold electron beam model. Double-layer solutions pertinent to describing electrostatic shocks are pointed out.

  13. Dust acoustic shock wave in electronegative dusty plasma: Roles of weak magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Samiran; Ehsan, Z.; Murtaza, G.

    2008-02-15

    The effects of nonsteady dust charge variations and weak magnetic field on small but finite amplitude nonlinear dust acoustic wave in electronegative dusty plasma are investigated. The dynamics of the nonlinear wave are governed by a Korteweg-de Vries Burger equation that possesses dispersive shock wave. The weak magnetic field is responsible for the dispersive term, whereas nonsteady dust charge variation is responsible for dissipative term, i.e., the Burger term. The coefficient of dissipative term depends only on the obliqueness of the magnetic field. It is found that for parallel propagation the dynamics of the nonlinear wave are governed by the Burger equation that possesses monotonic shock wave. The relevances of the findings to cometary dusty plasma, e.g., Comet Halley are briefly discussed.

  14. Numerical study of ion acoustic shock waves in dense quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hanif, M.; Mirza, Arshad M.; Ali, S.; Mukhtar, Q.

    2014-03-15

    Two fluid quantum hydrodynamic equations are solved numerically to investigate the propagation characteristics of ion acoustic shock waves in an unmagnetized dense quantum plasma, whose constituents are the electrons and ions. For this purpose, we employ the standard finite difference Lax Wendroff and relaxation methods, to examine the quantum effects on the profiles of shock potential, the electron/ion number densities, and velocity even for quantum parameter at H = 2. The effects of the latter vanish in a weakly non-linear limit while obeying the KdV theory. It is shown that the evolution of the wave depends sensitively on the plasma density and the quantum parameter. Numerical results reveal that the kinks or oscillations are pronounced for large values of quantum parameter, especially at H = 2. Our results should be important to understand the shock wave excitations in dense quantum plasmas, white dwarfs, neutron stars, etc.

  15. Acoustic shock wave propagation in a heterogeneous medium: a numerical simulation beyond the parabolic approximation.

    PubMed

    Dagrau, Franck; Rénier, Mathieu; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2011-07-01

    Numerical simulation of nonlinear acoustics and shock waves in a weakly heterogeneous and lossless medium is considered. The wave equation is formulated so as to separate homogeneous diffraction, heterogeneous effects, and nonlinearities. A numerical method called heterogeneous one-way approximation for resolution of diffraction (HOWARD) is developed, that solves the homogeneous part of the equation in the spectral domain (both in time and space) through a one-way approximation neglecting backscattering. A second-order parabolic approximation is performed but only on the small, heterogeneous part. So the resulting equation is more precise than the usual standard or wide-angle parabolic approximation. It has the same dispersion equation as the exact wave equation for all forward propagating waves, including evanescent waves. Finally, nonlinear terms are treated through an analytical, shock-fitting method. Several validation tests are performed through comparisons with analytical solutions in the linear case and outputs of the standard or wide-angle parabolic approximation in the nonlinear case. Numerical convergence tests and physical analysis are finally performed in the fully heterogeneous and nonlinear case of shock wave focusing through an acoustical lens.

  16. Cylindrical and Spherical Ion-Acoustic Shock Waves in a Relativistic Degenerate Multi-Ion Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, M. R.; Nahar, L.; Mamun, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    A rigorous theoretical investigation has been made to study the existence and basic features of the ion-acoustic (IA) shock structures in an unmagnetized, collisionless multi-ion plasma system (containing degenerate electron fluids, inertial positively as well as negatively charged ions, and arbitrarily charged static heavy ions). This investigation is valid for both non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic limits. The reductive perturbation technique has been employed to derive the modified Burgers equation. The solution of this equation has been numerically examined to study the basic properties of shock structures. The basic features (speed, amplitude, width, etc.) of these electrostatic shock structures have been briefly discussed. The basic properties of the IA shock waves are found to be significantly modified by the effects of arbitrarily charged static heavy ions and the plasma particle number densities. The implications of our results in space and interstellar compact objects like white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes, and so on have been briefly discussed.

  17. Ion acoustic shock waves in plasmas with warm ions and kappa distributed electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S.; Hafeez Ur-Rehman

    2013-06-15

    The monotonic and oscillatory ion acoustic shock waves are investigated in electron-positron-ion plasmas (e-p-i) with warm ions (adiabatically heated) and nonthermal kappa distributed electrons and positrons. The dissipation effects are included in the model due to kinematic viscosity of the ions. Using reductive perturbation technique, the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili-Burgers (KPB) equation is derived containing dispersion, dissipation, and diffraction effects (due to perturbation in the transverse direction) in e-p-i plasmas. The analytical solution of KPB equation is obtained by employing tangent hyperbolic (Tanh) method. The analytical condition for the propagation of oscillatory and monotonic shock structures are also discussed in detail. The numerical results of two dimensional monotonic shock structures are obtained for graphical representation. The dependence of shock structures on positron equilibrium density, ion temperature, nonthermal spectral index kappa, and the kinematic viscosity of ions are also discussed.

  18. Experimental investigation of flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-08-01

    We report on experimental observations of flow induced large amplitude dust-acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma. The experiments have been carried out in a Π shaped direct current glow discharge experimental device using kaolin particles as the dust component in a background of Argon plasma. A strong supersonic flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change in the gas flow rate is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks whose dynamics are captured by fast video pictures of the evolving structures. The physical characteristics of these shocks are delineated through a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of flow speeds and potential hill heights. The observed evolution of the shock waves and their propagation characteristics are found to compare well with model numerical results based on a modified Korteweg-de-Vries-Burgers type equation.

  19. Acoustic field characterization of the Duolith: measurements and modeling of a clinical shock wave therapy device.

    PubMed

    Perez, Camilo; Chen, Hong; Matula, Thomas J; Karzova, Maria; Khokhlova, Vera A

    2013-08-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) uses acoustic pulses to treat certain musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper the acoustic field of a clinical portable ESWT device (Duolith SD1) was characterized. Field mapping was performed in water for two different standoffs of the electromagnetic head (15 or 30 mm) using a fiber optic probe hydrophone. Peak positive pressures at the focus ranged from 2 to 45 MPa, while peak negative pressures ranged from -2 to -11 MPa. Pulse rise times ranged from 8 to 500 ns; shock formation did not occur for any machine settings. The maximum standard deviation in peak pressure at the focus was 1.2%, indicating that the Duolith SD1 generates stable pulses. The results compare qualitatively, but not quantitatively with manufacturer specifications. Simulations were carried out for the short standoff by matching a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetzov equation to the measured field at a plane near the source, and then propagating the wave outward. The results of modeling agree well with experimental data. The model was used to analyze the spatial structure of the peak pressures. Predictions from the model suggest that a true shock wave could be obtained in water if the initial pressure output of the device were doubled.

  20. Acoustic field characterization of the Duolith: Measurements and modeling of a clinical shock wave therapy device

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Camilo; Chen, Hong; Matula, Thomas J.; Karzova, Maria; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) uses acoustic pulses to treat certain musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper the acoustic field of a clinical portable ESWT device (Duolith SD1) was characterized. Field mapping was performed in water for two different standoffs of the electromagnetic head (15 or 30 mm) using a fiber optic probe hydrophone. Peak positive pressures at the focus ranged from 2 to 45 MPa, while peak negative pressures ranged from −2 to −11 MPa. Pulse rise times ranged from 8 to 500 ns; shock formation did not occur for any machine settings. The maximum standard deviation in peak pressure at the focus was 1.2%, indicating that the Duolith SD1 generates stable pulses. The results compare qualitatively, but not quantitatively with manufacturer specifications. Simulations were carried out for the short standoff by matching a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetzov equation to the measured field at a plane near the source, and then propagating the wave outward. The results of modeling agree well with experimental data. The model was used to analyze the spatial structure of the peak pressures. Predictions from the model suggest that a true shock wave could be obtained in water if the initial pressure output of the device were doubled. PMID:23927207

  1. Heavy-Ion-Acoustic Solitary and Shock Waves in an Adiabatic Multi-Ion Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, M. A.; Rahman, M. M.; Hossen, M. R.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    The standard reductive perturbation method has been employed to derive the Korteweg-deVries (K-dV) and Burgers (BG) equations to investigate the basic properties of heavy-ion-acoustic (HIA) waves in a plasma system which is supposed to be composed of nonthermal electrons, Boltzmann distributed light ions, and adiabatic positively charged inertial heavy ions. The HIA solitary and shock structures are found to exist with either positive or negative potential. It is found that the effects of adiabaticity of inertial heavy ions, nonthermality of electrons, and number densities of plasma components significantly modify the basic properties of the HIA solitary and shock waves. The implications of our results may be helpful in understanding the electrostatic perturbations in various laboratory and astrophysical plasma environments.

  2. Propagation and stability of quantum dust-ion-acoustic shock waves in planar and nonplanar geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Siddiq, M.; Nargis, Shahida; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2009-01-01

    Dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) shock waves are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma consisting of electrons, ions, and dust by employing the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model. In this context, a Korteweg-deVries-Burger (KdVB) equation is derived by employing the small amplitude perturbation expansion method. The dissipation is introduced by taking into account the kinematic viscosity among the plasma constituents. It is found that the strength of the quantum DIA shock wave is maximum for spherical, intermediate for cylindrical, and minimum for the planar geometry. The effects of quantum Bohm potential, dust concentration, and kinematic viscosity on the quantum DIA shock structure are also investigated. The temporal evolution of DIA KdV solitons and Burger shocks are also studied by putting the dissipative and dispersive coefficients equal to zero, respectively. The effects of the quantum Bohm potential on the stability of the DIA shock is also investigated. The present investigation may be beneficial to understand the dissipative and dispersive processes that may occur in the quantum dusty plasmas found in microelectronic devices as well as in astrophysical plasmas.

  3. Propagation and stability of quantum dust-ion-acoustic shock waves in planar and nonplanar geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Siddiq, M.; Nargis, Shahida; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2009-01-15

    Dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) shock waves are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma consisting of electrons, ions, and dust by employing the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model. In this context, a Korteweg-deVries-Burger (KdVB) equation is derived by employing the small amplitude perturbation expansion method. The dissipation is introduced by taking into account the kinematic viscosity among the plasma constituents. It is found that the strength of the quantum DIA shock wave is maximum for spherical, intermediate for cylindrical, and minimum for the planar geometry. The effects of quantum Bohm potential, dust concentration, and kinematic viscosity on the quantum DIA shock structure are also investigated. The temporal evolution of DIA KdV solitons and Burger shocks are also studied by putting the dissipative and dispersive coefficients equal to zero, respectively. The effects of the quantum Bohm potential on the stability of the DIA shock is also investigated. The present investigation may be beneficial to understand the dissipative and dispersive processes that may occur in the quantum dusty plasmas found in microelectronic devices as well as in astrophysical plasmas.

  4. Dust-acoustic shock waves in a charge varying electronegative magnetized dusty plasma with suprathermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Bacha, Mustapha

    2012-12-15

    The combined effects of an oblique magnetic field and electron suprathermality on weak dust-acoustic (DA) waves in a charge varying electronegative dusty plasmas with application to the Halley Comet are investigated. The correct suprathermal electron charging current is derived based on the orbit-motion limited approach. A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to derive a Korteweg-de Vries-Burger equation. The electron suprathermality, the obliqueness, and magnitude of the magnetic field are found to modify the dispersive properties of the DA shock structure. Our results may aid to explain and interpret the nonlinear oscillations that may occur in the Halley Comet plasma.

  5. Electromagnetic acoustic source (EMAS) for generating shock waves and cavitation in mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi

    In the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory a vessel of liquid mercury is subjected to a proton beam. The resulting nuclear interaction produces neutrons that can be used for materials research, among other things, but also launches acoustic waves with pressures in excess of 10 MPa. The acoustic waves have high enough tensile stress to generate cavitation in the mercury which results in erosion to the steel walls of the vessel. In order to study the cavitation erosion and develop mitigation schemes it would be convenient to have a way of generating similar pressures and cavitation in mercury, without the radiation concerns associated with a proton beam. Here an electromagnetic acoustic source (EMAS) has been developed which consisted of a coil placed close to a metal plate which is in turn is in contact with a fluid. The source is driven by discharging a capacitor through the coil and results in a repulsive force on the plate launching acoustic waves in the fluid. A theoretical model is presented to predict the acoustic field from the EMAS and compares favorably with measurements made in water. The pressure from the EMAS was reported as a function of capacitance, charging voltage, number of coils, mylar thickness, and properties of the plates. The properties that resulted in the highest pressure were employed for experiments in mercury and a maximum pressure recorded was 7.1 MPa. Cavitation was assessed in water and mercury by high speed camera and by detecting acoustic emissions. Bubble clouds with lifetimes on the order of 100 µs were observed in water and on the order of 600 µs in mercury. Based on acoustic emissions the bubble radius in mercury was estimated to be 0.98 mm. Experiments to produce damage to a stainless steel plate in mercury resulted in a minimal effect after 2000 shock waves at a rate of 0.33 Hz - likely because the pressure amplitude was not high enough. In order to replicate the conditions in the SNS it is

  6. Inertial cavitation and associated acoustic emission produced during electrohydraulic shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, P; Cioanta, I; Cocks, F H; Preminger, G M

    1997-05-01

    The inertial cavitation and associated acoustic emission generated during electrohydraulic shock wave lithotripsy were studied using high-speed photography and acoustic pressure measurements. The dynamics of cavitation bubble clusters, induced in vitro by an experimental laboratory lithotripter, were recorded using a high-speed rotating drum camera at 20,000 frames/s. The acoustic emission, generated by the rapid initial expansion and subsequent violent collapse of the cavitation bubbles, was measured simultaneously using a 1-MHz focused hydrophone, The expansion duration of the cavitation bubble cluster was found to correlate closely with the time delay between the first two groups of pressure spikes in the acoustic emission signal. This correlation provides an essential physical basis to assess the inertial cavitation produced by a clinical Dornier HM-3 shock wave lithotripter, both in water and in renal parenchyma of a swine model. In the clinical output voltage range (16-24 kV), the expansion duration of the primary cavitation bubble cluster generated by the HM-3 lithotripter in water increases from 158 to 254 microseconds, whereas the corresponding values in renal parenchyma are much smaller and remain almost unchanged (from 71 to 72 microseconds). In contrast, subsequent oscillation of the bubble following its primary collapse is significantly prolonged (from 158-235 microseconds in water to 1364-1373 microseconds in renal parenchyma). These distinctive differences between lithotripsy-induced inertial cavitation in vitro and that in vivo are presumably due to the constraining effect of renal tissue on bubble expansion. PMID:9165740

  7. Attosecond shock waves.

    PubMed

    Zhokhov, P A; Zheltikov, A M

    2013-05-01

    Shock-wave formation is a generic scenario of wave dynamics known in nonlinear acoustics, fluid dynamics, astrophysics, seismology, and detonation physics. Here, we show that, in nonlinear optics, remarkably short, attosecond shock transients can be generated through a strongly coupled spatial and temporal dynamics of ultrashort light pulses, suggesting a pulse self-compression scenario whereby multigigawatt attosecond optical waveforms can be synthesized. PMID:23683197

  8. Finite element modeling of acoustic wave propagation and energy deposition in bone during extracorporeal shock wave treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Matula, Thomas J.; Ma, Yong; Liu, Zheng; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong

    2013-06-01

    It is well known that extracorporeal shock wave treatment is capable of providing a non-surgical and relatively pain free alternative treatment modality for patients suffering from musculoskeletal disorders but do not respond well to conservative treatments. The major objective of current work is to investigate how the shock wave (SW) field would change if a bony structure exists in the path of the acoustic wave. Here, a model of finite element method (FEM) was developed based on linear elasticity and acoustic propagation equations to examine SW propagation and deflection near a mimic musculoskeletal bone. High-speed photography experiments were performed to record cavitation bubbles generated in SW field with the presence of mimic bone. By comparing experimental and simulated results, the effectiveness of FEM model could be verified and strain energy distributions in the bone were also predicted according to numerical simulations. The results show that (1) the SW field will be deflected with the presence of bony structure and varying deflection angles can be observed as the bone shifted up in the z-direction relative to SW geometric focus (F2 focus); (2) SW deflection angels predicted by the FEM model agree well with experimental results obtained from high-speed photographs; and (3) temporal evolutions of strain energy distribution in the bone can also be evaluated based on FEM model, with varied vertical distance between F2 focus and intended target point on the bone surface. The present studies indicate that, by combining MRI/CT scans and FEM modeling work, it is possible to better understand SW propagation characteristics and energy deposition in musculoskeletal structure during extracorporeal shock wave treatment, which is important for standardizing the treatment dosage, optimizing treatment protocols, and even providing patient-specific treatment guidance in clinic.

  9. The role of energy density and acoustic cavitation in shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Loske, Achim M

    2010-02-01

    Today a high percentage of urinary stones are successfully treated by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL); however, misconceptions regarding fragmentation mechanisms, as well as treatment parameters like dose, applied energy and focal area are still common. A main stone comminution mechanism during SWL is acoustic cavitation. The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of cavitation and energy density on stone fragmentation. A research lithotripter was used to expose a large set of artificial kidney stones to shock waves varying different parameters. Hundreds of pressure records were used to calculate the energy density of the lithotripter at different settings. Results indicate that energy density is a crucial parameter and that better SWL treatment outcomes could be obtained placing the calculus at a prefocal position.

  10. Ion-Acoustic Shock Waves in Nonextensive Multi-Ion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannat, N.; Ferdousi, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    The nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic (IA) shock waves (SHWs) in a nonextensive multi-ion plasma system (consisting of inertial positive light ions as well as negative heavy ions, noninertial nonextensive electrons and positrons) has been studied. The reductive perturbation technique has been employed to derive the Burgers equation. The basic properties (polarity, amplitude, width, etc.) of the IA SHWs are found to be significantly modified by the effects of nonextensivity of electrons and positrons, ion kinematic viscosity, temperature ratio of electrons and positrons, etc. It has been observed that SHWs with positive and negative potential are formed depending on the plasma parameters. The findings of our results obtained from this theoretical investigation may be useful in understanding the characteristics of IA SHWs both in laboratory and space plasmas.

  11. Shock wave interaction with interfaces between materials having different acoustic impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, H.; Moosavi-Nejad, S.; Akiyama, H.; Menezes, V.

    2014-03-01

    We experimentally examined interaction of blast waves with water-air/air-water interfaces through high-speed-real-time visualization and measurement of pressure across the waves. The underwater shock wave, which was expected to reflect totally at the water-air interface, was observed transmitting a shock front to air. Transmission of a blast wave from air to water was also visualized and evaluated. Underwater shock waves are used in several medical/biological procedures, where such unforeseen transmissions can result in detriments. The details provide a guideline to evaluate blast wave transmissions, which can induce tissue and brain injuries. The results explain mechanisms behind blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

  12. Study of nonlinear electron-acoustic solitary and shock waves in a dissipative, nonplanar space plasma with superthermal hot electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jiu-Ning He, Yong-Lin; Luo, Jun-Hua; Nan, Ya-Gong; Han, Zhen-Hai; Dong, Guang-Xing; Duan, Wen-Shan; Li, Jun-Xiu

    2014-01-15

    With the consideration of the superthermal electron distribution, we present a theoretical investigation about the nonlinear propagation of electron-acoustic solitary and shock waves in a dissipative, nonplanar non-Maxwellian plasma comprised of cold electrons, superthermal hot electrons, and stationary ions. The reductive perturbation technique is used to obtain a modified Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation for nonlinear waves in this plasma. We discuss the effects of various plasma parameters on the time evolution of nonplanar solitary waves, the profile of shock waves, and the nonlinear structure induced by the collision between planar solitary waves. It is found that these parameters have significant effects on the properties of nonlinear waves and collision-induced nonlinear structure.

  13. The effect of trapped electrons on the three-dimensional ion-acoustic shock wave in magnetized ionic-pair plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shimin; Mei, Liquan; He, Ya-Ling; Guo, Huaqi; Zhao, Yanjun

    2016-04-01

    The effect of trapped electrons featuring vortex-like distribution on the nonlinear behavior of a three-dimensional ion-acoustic shock wave is investigated in a magnetized ionic-pair plasma. In the long-wave approximation, the dynamics of the shock wave is governed by the (3{+}1) -dimensional Schamel-Zakharov-Kuznetsov-Burgers' equation due to the presence of trapped electrons and ion kinematic viscosity. By using the homogeneous balance principle and tanh function method, we obtain a novel exact shock wave solution of the equation. It is found for the first time that the trapped electrons can support a shock wave with only positive polarity.

  14. The nonadiabatic dust charge variation on dust acoustic solitary and shock waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunliang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Lu, Yanzhen; Wang, Xiaodan

    2016-01-01

    The combined effects of nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and strongly coupled dust particles on the nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic (DA) waves in dusty plasma consisting of nonthermal electrons and trapped ions with vortex-like distribution are presented here. We use generalized viscoelastic hydrodynamic model for dust particles. In the weak nonlinearity limit, a modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with a damping term and a KdV-Burger equation have been derived in the kinetic regime and hydrodynamic regime, respectively. The approximate analytical solitary solution of modified KdV equation is derived in the weak nonadiabatic dust charge variation limit, which shows that the amplitude of DA solitary waves decreases with time. The presence of viscosity due to strong coupling stands for the formation of DA shock waves in the hydrodynamic regime. The results show that the DA shock waves will be oscillating one for weak viscosity and will become monotonic ones for large viscosity.

  15. Oblique propagation of ion acoustic shock waves in weakly and highly relativistic plasmas with nonthermal electrons and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, M. G.; Roy, N. C.; Talukder, M. R.; Hossain Ali, M.

    2016-09-01

    This work investigates the oblique nonlinear propagation of ion acoustic (IA) shock waves for both weakly and highly relativistic plasmas composed of nonthermal electrons and positrons with relativistic thermal ions. The KdVB-like equation, involving dispersive, weakly transverse dispersive, nonlinearity and dissipative coefficients, is derived employing the well known reductive perturbation method. The integration of this equation is carried out by the {tanh} method taking the stable shock formation condition into account. The effects of nonthermal electrons and positrons, nonthermal electrons with isothermal positrons, isothermal electrons with nonthermal positrons, and isothermal electrons and positrons on oblique propagation of IA shock waves in weakly relativistic regime are described. Furthermore, the effects of plasma parameters on oblique propagation of IA shock waves in highly relativistic regime are discussed and compared with weakly relativistic case. It is seen that the plasma parameters within certain limits significantly modify the structures of the IA shock waves in both cases. The results may be useful for better understanding of the interactions of charged particles with extra-galactic jets as well as astrophysical compact objects.

  16. Multiple-pass laser beam deflection probe for detection of acoustic and weak shock waves in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaci, Janez; Možina, Janez

    1995-09-01

    We examine a novel laser beam deflection arrangement for detection of acoustic and weak shock waves in fluids. Novelty of the arrangement is folding of the probe beam by two parallel plane mirrors in such a way that the probe beam passes the wave propagation region several times before it reaches the deflection-detecting photodetector. In this way the probed wave interacts with several segments of the probing beam in sequence. A single oscilloscope trace of the photodetector output thus gives us the possibility to study the evolution of the probed wave at several distances from the source. To demonstrate the potentials of the arrangement we present wave forms of spherical blast waves detected in air during laser ablation of solid samples. We also discuss a simple theoretical model that qualitatively explains the most characteristic features of this arrangement.

  17. Effects of an acoustic diode on the pressure waveform and cavitation bubble dynamics produced by a piezoelectric shock wave generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Songlin; Zhong, Pei

    2003-10-01

    High-speed schlieren imaging, combined with fiber optical probe hydrophone (FOPH) and passive cavitation detection (PCD) were used to access the effects of an acoustic diode (AD) on the pressure waveform and associated cavitation activities produced by a piezoelectric shock wave (PSW) generator. Without the AD, a typical pressure waveform at the focus of the PSW generator consists of a leading shock wave, followed by a tensile wave and several oscillation waves (OWs) of gradually reduced amplitudes. When the AD was placed 30 mm in front of the focus, the amplitude of the tensile wave was reduced and the subsequent OWs were removed. The pulse intensity integral of the tensile wave was reduced by 58%, and subsequently, PSW-induced bubble dynamics were altered significantly. Based on PCD data, the collapse time of cavitation bubble(s) was reduced by about 11%. Although intensive collapse of microbubbles was observed in about 10 μs following the shock front of the original PSW, the forced collapse of microbubbles was not observed when the AD was used, presumably due to the removal of the OWs. Theoretical calculation based on the Gilmore model confirmed these experimental observations. [Work supported by the Whitaker Foundation and NIH.

  18. Localization of small arms fire using acoustic measurements of muzzle blast and/or ballistic shock wave arrivals.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kam W; Ferguson, Brian G

    2012-11-01

    The accurate localization of small arms fire using fixed acoustic sensors is considered. First, the conventional wavefront-curvature passive ranging method, which requires only differential time-of-arrival (DTOA) measurements of the muzzle blast wave to estimate the source position, is modified to account for sensor positions that are not strictly collinear (bowed array). Second, an existing single-sensor-node ballistic model-based localization method, which requires both DTOA and differential angle-of-arrival (DAOA) measurements of the muzzle blast wave and ballistic shock wave, is improved by replacing the basic external ballistics model (which describes the bullet's deceleration along its trajectory) with a more rigorous model and replacing the look-up table ranging procedure with a nonlinear (or polynomial) equation-based ranging procedure. Third, a new multiple-sensor-node ballistic model-based localization method, which requires only DTOA measurements of the ballistic shock wave to localize the point of fire, is formulated. The first method is applicable to situations when only the muzzle blast wave is received, whereas the third method applies when only the ballistic shock wave is received. The effectiveness of each of these methods is verified using an extensive set of real data recorded during a 7 day field experiment. PMID:23145587

  19. Localization of small arms fire using acoustic measurements of muzzle blast and/or ballistic shock wave arrivals.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kam W; Ferguson, Brian G

    2012-11-01

    The accurate localization of small arms fire using fixed acoustic sensors is considered. First, the conventional wavefront-curvature passive ranging method, which requires only differential time-of-arrival (DTOA) measurements of the muzzle blast wave to estimate the source position, is modified to account for sensor positions that are not strictly collinear (bowed array). Second, an existing single-sensor-node ballistic model-based localization method, which requires both DTOA and differential angle-of-arrival (DAOA) measurements of the muzzle blast wave and ballistic shock wave, is improved by replacing the basic external ballistics model (which describes the bullet's deceleration along its trajectory) with a more rigorous model and replacing the look-up table ranging procedure with a nonlinear (or polynomial) equation-based ranging procedure. Third, a new multiple-sensor-node ballistic model-based localization method, which requires only DTOA measurements of the ballistic shock wave to localize the point of fire, is formulated. The first method is applicable to situations when only the muzzle blast wave is received, whereas the third method applies when only the ballistic shock wave is received. The effectiveness of each of these methods is verified using an extensive set of real data recorded during a 7 day field experiment.

  20. Low intensity dust ion-acoustic shock waves due to dust charge fluctuation in a nonextensive dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Alinejad, H.; Shahmansory, M.

    2012-08-15

    The properties of low intensity dust ion acoustic shock waves are studied in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonextensive electrons. Owing to the departure from the Maxwellian electron distribution to a nonextensive one, the modified electrostatic charging of a spherical dust particle in plasma with ion streaming speed is considered. Based on the weakly nonlinear analysis, a new relationship between the low intensity localized disturbances and nonextensive electrons is derived. It is found that both strength and steepness of shock structures arise as the electrons evolve far from their thermodynamic equilibrium in such plasma with parameter ranges corresponding to Saturn's rings. It is also shown that the ion temperature and population of electrons reduce the possibility of the formation of the shock profile.

  1. Dust ion-acoustic shock waves in charge varying dusty plasmas with electrons having vortexlike velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Alinejad, H.; Tribeche, M.

    2010-12-15

    A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to investigate the properties of dust ion-acoustic shock waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with vortexlike electron distribution. We use the ionization model, hot ions with equilibrium streaming speed and a trapped electron charging current derived from the well-known orbit limited motion theory. A new modified Burger equation is derived. Besides nonlinear trapping, this equation involves two kinds of dissipation (the anomalous one inherent to nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and the one due to the particle loss and ionization). These two kinds of dissipation can act concurrently. The traveling wave solution has been acquired by employing the modified extended tanh-function method. The shocklike solution is numerically analyzed based on the typical numerical data from laboratory dusty plasma devices. It is found that ion temperature, trapped particles, and weak dissipations significantly modify the shock structures.

  2. Traveling waves in Hall-magnetohydrodynamics and the ion-acoustic shock structure

    SciTech Connect

    Hagstrom, George I.; Hameiri, Eliezer

    2014-02-15

    Hall-magnetohydrodynamics (HMHD) is a mixed hyperbolic-parabolic partial differential equation that describes the dynamics of an ideal two fluid plasma with massless electrons. We study the only shock wave family that exists in this system (the other discontinuities being contact discontinuities and not shocks). We study planar traveling wave solutions and we find solutions with discontinuities in the hydrodynamic variables, which arise due to the presence of real characteristics in Hall-MHD. We introduce a small viscosity into the equations and use the method of matched asymptotic expansions to show that solutions with a discontinuity satisfying the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions and also an entropy condition have continuous shock structures. The lowest order inner equations reduce to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, plus an equation which implies the constancy of the magnetic field inside the shock structure. We are able to show that the current is discontinuous across the shock, even as the magnetic field is continuous, and that the lowest order outer equations, which are the equations for traveling waves in inviscid Hall-MHD, are exactly integrable. We show that the inner and outer solutions match, which allows us to construct a family of uniformly valid continuous composite solutions that become discontinuous when the diffusivity vanishes.

  3. Turbulence in electrostatic ion acoustic shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Means, R. W.; Coroniti, F. V.; Wong, A. Y.; White, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Three types of collisionless electrostatic ion acoustic shocks are investigated using a double plasma (DP) device: (1) laminar shocks; (2) small amplitude turbulent shocks in which the turbulence is confined to be upstream of the shock potential jump; and (3) large amplitude turbulent shocks in which the wave turbulence occurs throughout the shock transition. The wave turbulence is generated by ions which are reflected from the shock potential; linear theory spatial growth increments agree with experimental values. The experimental relationship between the shock Mach number and the shock potential is shown to be inconsistent with theoretical shock models which assume that the electrons are isothermal. Theoretical calculations which assume a trapped electron equation of a state and a turbulently flattened velocity distrubution function for the reflected ions yields a Mach number vs potential relationship in agreement with experiment.

  4. Direct Numerical Simulation of Acoustic Waves Interacting with a Shock Wave in a Quasi-1D Convergent-Divergent Nozzle Using an Unstructured Finite Volume Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulation of a very small amplitude acoustic wave interacting with a shock wave in a quasi-1D convergent-divergent nozzle is performed using an unstructured finite volume algorithm with a piece-wise linear, least square reconstruction, Roe flux difference splitting, and second-order MacCormack time marching. First, the spatial accuracy of the algorithm is evaluated for steady flows with and without the normal shock by running the simulation with a sequence of successively finer meshes. Then the accuracy of the Roe flux difference splitting near the sonic transition point is examined for different reconstruction schemes. Finally, the unsteady numerical solutions with the acoustic perturbation are presented and compared with linear theory results.

  5. Modulation instability and dissipative ion-acoustic structures in collisional nonthermal electron-positron-ion plasma: solitary and shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shimin; Mei, Liquan; He, Ya-Ling; Ma, Chenchen; Sun, Youfa

    2016-10-01

    The nonlinear behavior of an ion-acoustic wave packet is investigated in a three-component plasma consisting of warm ions, nonthermal electrons and positrons. The nonthermal components are assumed to be inertialess and hot where they are modeled by the kappa distribution. The relevant processes, including the kinematic viscosity amongst the plasma constituents and the collision between ions and neutrals, are taken into consideration. It is shown that the dynamics of the modulated ion-acoustic wave is governed by the generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with a linear dissipative term. The dispersion relation and modulation instability criterion for the generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation are investigated numerically. In the general dissipation regime, the effect of the plasma parameters on the dissipative solitary (dissipative soliton) and shock waves is also discussed in detail. The project is supported by NSF of China (11501441, 11371289, 11371288), National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1261112), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2014M560756), and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (xjj2015067).

  6. 3D numerical simulation of the long range propagation of acoustical shock waves through a heterogeneous and moving medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2015-10-01

    Many situations involve the propagation of acoustical shock waves through flows. Natural sources such as lightning, volcano explosions, or meteoroid atmospheric entries, emit loud, low frequency, and impulsive sound that is influenced by atmospheric wind and turbulence. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft and explosion noises are examples of intense anthropogenic sources in the atmosphere. The Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades rotating at supersonic speed also propagates in a fast flow within the engine nacelle. Simulating these situations is challenging, given the 3D nature of the problem, the long range propagation distances relative to the central wavelength, the strongly nonlinear behavior of shocks associated to a wide-band spectrum, and finally the key role of the flow motion. With this in view, the so-called FLHOWARD (acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction) method is presented with three-dimensional applications. A scalar nonlinear wave equation is established in the framework of atmospheric applications, assuming weak heterogeneities and a slow wind. It takes into account diffraction, absorption and relaxation properties of the atmosphere, quadratic nonlinearities including weak shock waves, heterogeneities of the medium in sound speed and density, and presence of a flow (assuming a mean stratified wind and 3D turbulent ? flow fluctuations of smaller amplitude). This equation is solved in the framework of the one-way method. A split-step technique allows the splitting of the non-linear wave equation into simpler equations, each corresponding to a physical effect. Each sub-equation is solved using an analytical method if possible, and finite-differences otherwise. Nonlinear effects are solved in the time domain, and others in the frequency domain. Homogeneous diffraction is handled by means of the angular spectrum method. Ground is assumed perfectly flat and rigid. Due to the 3D

  7. 3D numerical simulation of the long range propagation of acoustical shock waves through a heterogeneous and moving medium

    SciTech Connect

    Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2015-10-28

    Many situations involve the propagation of acoustical shock waves through flows. Natural sources such as lightning, volcano explosions, or meteoroid atmospheric entries, emit loud, low frequency, and impulsive sound that is influenced by atmospheric wind and turbulence. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft and explosion noises are examples of intense anthropogenic sources in the atmosphere. The Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades rotating at supersonic speed also propagates in a fast flow within the engine nacelle. Simulating these situations is challenging, given the 3D nature of the problem, the long range propagation distances relative to the central wavelength, the strongly nonlinear behavior of shocks associated to a wide-band spectrum, and finally the key role of the flow motion. With this in view, the so-called FLHOWARD (acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction) method is presented with three-dimensional applications. A scalar nonlinear wave equation is established in the framework of atmospheric applications, assuming weak heterogeneities and a slow wind. It takes into account diffraction, absorption and relaxation properties of the atmosphere, quadratic nonlinearities including weak shock waves, heterogeneities of the medium in sound speed and density, and presence of a flow (assuming a mean stratified wind and 3D turbulent ? flow fluctuations of smaller amplitude). This equation is solved in the framework of the one-way method. A split-step technique allows the splitting of the non-linear wave equation into simpler equations, each corresponding to a physical effect. Each sub-equation is solved using an analytical method if possible, and finite-differences otherwise. Nonlinear effects are solved in the time domain, and others in the frequency domain. Homogeneous diffraction is handled by means of the angular spectrum method. Ground is assumed perfectly flat and rigid. Due to the 3D

  8. Positron-acoustic shock waves associated with cold viscous positron fluid in superthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, M. J. Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-06-15

    A theoretical investigation is made on the positron-acoustic (PA) shock waves (SHWs) in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma containing immobile positive ions, cold mobile positrons, and hot positrons and electrons following the kappa (κ) distribution. The cold positron kinematic viscosity is taken into account, and the reductive perturbation method is used to derive the Burgers equation. It is found that the viscous force acting on cold mobile positron fluid is a source of dissipation and is responsible for the formation of the PA SHWs. It is also observed that the fundamental properties of the PA SHWs are significantly modified by the effects of different parameters associated with superthermal (κ distributed) hot positrons and electrons.

  9. Dissipative dust-acoustic shock waves in a varying charge electronegative magnetized dusty plasma with trapped electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacha, Mustapha; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2016-08-01

    The combined effects of an oblique magnetic field and electron trapping on dissipative dust-acoustic waves are examined in varying charge electronegative dusty plasmas with application to the Halley Comet plasma (˜104 km from the nucleus). A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to derive a modified Korteweg-de Vries-Burger-like equation. Making use of the equilibrium current balance equation, the physically admissible values of the electron trapping parameter are first constrained. We then show that the Burger dissipative term is solely due to the dust charge variation process. It is found that an increase of the magnetic field obliqueness or a decrease of its magnitude renders the shock structure more dispersive.

  10. Positron-acoustic shock waves associated with cold viscous positron fluid in superthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, M. J.; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    A theoretical investigation is made on the positron-acoustic (PA) shock waves (SHWs) in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma containing immobile positive ions, cold mobile positrons, and hot positrons and electrons following the kappa (κ) distribution. The cold positron kinematic viscosity is taken into account, and the reductive perturbation method is used to derive the Burgers equation. It is found that the viscous force acting on cold mobile positron fluid is a source of dissipation and is responsible for the formation of the PA SHWs. It is also observed that the fundamental properties of the PA SHWs are significantly modified by the effects of different parameters associated with superthermal (κ distributed) hot positrons and electrons.

  11. The existence of electron-acoustic shock waves and their interactions in a non-Maxwellian plasma with q-nonextensive distributed electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jiu-Ning; He, Yong-Lin; Han, Zhen-Hai; Dong, Guang-Xing; Nan, Ya-Gong; Li, Jun-Xiu

    2013-07-15

    We present a theoretical investigation for the nonlinear interaction between electron-acoustic shock waves in a nonextensive two-electron plasma. The interaction is governed by a pair of Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equations. We focus on studying the colliding effects on the propagation of shock waves, more specifically, we have studied the effects of plasma parameters, i.e., the nonextensive parameter q, the “hot” to “cold” electron number density ratio α, and the normalized electron kinematic viscosity η{sub 0} on the trajectory changes (phase shifts) of shock waves. It is found that there are trajectory changes (phase shifts) for both colliding shock waves in the present plasma system. We also noted that the nonlinearity has no decisive effect on the trajectory changes, the occurrence of trajectory changes may be due to the combined role played by the dispersion and dissipation of the nonlinear structure. Our theoretical study may be beneficial to understand the propagation and interaction of nonlinear electrostatic waves and may brings a possibility to develop the nonlinear theory of electron-acoustic waves in astrophysical plasma systems.

  12. Imploding conical shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paton, R. T.; Skews, B. W.; Rubidge, S.; Snow, J.

    2013-07-01

    The behaviour of conical shock waves imploding axisymmetrically was first studied numerically by Hornung (J Fluid Mech 409:1-12, 2000) and this prompted a limited experimental investigation into these complex flow patterns by Skews et al. (Shock Waves 11:323-326, 2002). Modification of the simulation boundary conditions, resulting in the loss of self-similarity, was necessary to image the flow experimentally. The current tests examine the temporal evolution of these flows utilising a converging conical gap of fixed width fed by a shock wave impinging at its entrance, supported by CFD simulations. The effects of gap thickness, angle and incident shock strength were investigated. The wave initially diffracts around the outer lip of the gap shedding a vortex which, for strong incident shock cases, can contain embedded shocks. The converging shock at exit reflects on the axis of symmetry with the reflected wave propagating outwards resulting in a triple point developing on the incident wave together with the associated shear layer. This axisymmetric shear layer rolls up into a mushroom-shaped toroidal vortex ring and forward-facing jet. For strong shocks, this deforms the Mach disk to the extent of forming a second triple point with the primary shock exhibiting a double bulge. Separate features resembling the Richtmeyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities were noted in some tests. Aside from the incident wave curvature, the reflection patterns demonstrated correspond well with the V- and DV-types identified by Hornung although type S was not clearly seen, possibly due to the occlusion of the reflection region by the outer diffraction vortex at these early times. Some additional computational work explicitly exploring the limits of the parameter space for such systems has demonstrated the existence of a possible further reflection type, called vN-type, which is similar to the von Neumann reflection for plane waves. It is recommended that the parameter space be

  13. Acoustic regulation of extracorporeal shock wave (ESW) therapy devices in the U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruvada, Subha; Harris, Gerald R.

    2005-04-01

    The focused, large amplitude pressure fields produced by ESW lithotripsy devices were shown in the early 1980s to provide an efficient means for fragmenting urinary tract calculi. More recently, orthopedic applications of intense pressure pulses for pain relief and fracture healing have been developed. Under the US Medical Device Amendments of 1976, ESW therapy devices were deemed Class III, meaning that a pre-market application typically would be supported by both pre-clinical and clinical studies. This classification still applies, except for ESW lithotripters indicated for fragmenting kidney and ureteral calculi. These devices were reclassified to Class II in 2000, resulting in a simpler path to market in which a demonstration of substantial equivalence to a currently marketed device is sufficient. As part of its regulatory responsibility to address the safety and effectiveness of these devices, particularly with regard to acoustic output, the US Food and Drug Administration has recognized two International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards for ESW lithotripters, one covering field measurements (IEC 61846) and the other dealing with labeling and other safety aspects (IEC 60601-2-36). Although these standards were designed primarily for lithotripsy, the FDA has used them where applicable in the regulatory analysis of other ESW therapy devices.

  14. When shock waves collide

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez, D.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Foster, J.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; et al

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed tomore » quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. Furthermore, the experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.« less

  15. When Shock Waves Collide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  16. Nonplanar Shock Waves in Dusty Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamun, A. A.; Shukla, P. K.

    2011-11-01

    Nonplanar (viz. cylindrical and spherical) electro-acoustic [dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) and dust-acoustic (DA)] shock waves have been investigated by employing the reductive perturbation method. The dust charge fluctuation (strong correlation among highly charged dust) is the source of dissipation, and is responsible for the formation of the DIA (DA) shock structures. The effects of cylindrical and spherical geometries on the time evolution of DIA and DA shock structures are examined and identified. The combined effects of vortex-like electron distribution and dust charge fluctuation (dust-correlation and effective dust-temperature) on the basic features of nonplanar DIA (DA) shock waves are pinpointed. The implications of our results in laboratory dusty plasma experiments are briefly discussed.

  17. Dust-acoustic shock waves in a charge varying electronegative magnetized dusty plasma with nonthermal ions: Application to Halley Comet plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Bacha, Mustapha

    2013-10-15

    Weak dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) are addressed in a nonthermal charge varying electronegative magnetized dusty plasmas with application to the Halley Comet. A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to derive a Korteweg-de Vries-Burger equation. The positive ion nonthermality, the obliqueness, and magnitude of the magnetic field are found to modify the dispersive and dissipative properties of the DA shock structure. Our results may aid to explain and interpret the nonlinear oscillations that may occur in the Halley Comet Plasma.

  18. Shock wave treatment in medicine.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, S K; Kailash

    2005-03-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in orthopedics and traumatology is still a young therapy method. Since the last few years the development of shock wave therapy has progressed rapidly. Shock waves have changed the treatment of urolithiasis substantially. Today shock waves are the first choice to treat kidney and urethral stones. Urology has long been the only medical field for shock waves in medicine. Meanwhile shock waves have been used in orthopedics and traumatology to treat insertion tendinitis, avascular necrosis of the head of femur and other necrotic bone alterations. Another field of shock wave application is the treatment of tendons, ligaments and bones on horses in veterinary medicine. In the present paper we discuss the basic theory and application of shock waves and its history in medicine. The idea behind using shock wave therapy for orthopedic diseases is the stimulation of healing in tendons, surrounding tissue and bones. PMID:15933416

  19. TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES

    DOEpatents

    Tuck, J.L.

    1955-03-01

    This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

  20. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamics of shock waves in weakly ionized argon plasmas has been performed using a pressure ruptured shock tube. The velocity of the shock is observed to increase when the shock traverses the plasma. The observed increases cannot be accounted for by thermal effects alone. Possible mechanisms that could explain the anomalous behavior include a vibrational/translational relaxation in the nonequilibrium plasma, electron diffusion across the shock front resulting from high electron mobility, and the propagation of ion-acoustic waves generated at the shock front. Using a turbulence model based on reduced kinetic theory, analysis of the observed results suggest a role for turbulence in anomalous shock dynamics in weakly ionized media and plasma-induced hypersonic drag reduction.

  1. Surface Acoustic Wave Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid manipulations at the microscale and beyond are powerfully enabled through the use of 10-1,000-MHz acoustic waves. A superior alternative in many cases to other microfluidic actuation techniques, such high-frequency acoustics is almost universally produced by surface acoustic wave devices that employ electromechanical transduction in wafer-scale or thin-film piezoelectric media to generate the kinetic energy needed to transport and manipulate fluids placed in adjacent microfluidic structures. These waves are responsible for a diverse range of complex fluid transport phenomena - from interfacial fluid vibration and drop and confined fluid transport to jetting and atomization - underlying a flourishing research literature spanning fundamental fluid physics to chip-scale engineering applications. We highlight some of this literature to provide the reader with a historical basis, routes for more detailed study, and an impression of the field's future directions.

  2. Computing unsteady shock waves for aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Kristine R.; Caughey, David A.; Casper, Jay

    1994-01-01

    The computation of unsteady shock waves, which contribute significantly to noise generation in supersonic jet flows, is investigated. The paper focuses on the difficulties of computing slowly moving shock waves. Numerical error is found to manifest itself principally as a spurious entropy wave. Calculations presented are performed using a third-order essentially nonoscillatory scheme. The effect of stencil biasing parameters and of two versions of numerical flux formulas on the magnitude of spurious entropy are investigated. The level of numerical error introduced in the calculation is quantified as a function of shock pressure ratio, shock speed, Courant number, and mesh density. The spurious entropy relative to the entropy jump across a static shock decreases with increasing shock strength and shock velocity relative to the grid, but is insensitive to Courant number. The structure of the spurious entropy wave is affected by the choice of flux formulas and algorithm biasing parameters. The effect of the spurious numerical waves on the calculation of sound amplification by a shock wave is investigated. For this class of problem, the acoustic pressure waves are relatively unaffected by the spurious numerical phenomena.

  3. Computing unsteady shock waves for aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows,, Kristine r.; Caughey, David A.; Casper, Jay

    1994-01-01

    The computation of unsteady shock waves, which contribute significantly to noise generation in supersonic jet flows, is investigated. This paper focuses on the difficulties of computing slowly moving shock waves. Numerical error is found to manifest itself principally as a spurious entropy wave. Calculations presented are performed using a third order essentially nonoscillatory scheme. The effect of stencil biasing parameters and of two versions of numerical flux formulas on the magnitude of spurious entropy are investigated. The level of numerical error introduced in the calculation in quantified as a function of shock pressure ratio, shock speed, Courant number, and mesh density. The spurious entropy relative to the entropy jump across a static shock decreases with increasing shock strength and shock velocity relative to the grid, but is insensitive to Courant number. The structure of the spurious entropy wave is affected by the choice of flux formulas and algorithm biasing parameters. The effect of the spurious numerical waves on the calculation of sound amplification by a shock wave is investigated. For this class of problem, the acoustic pressure waves are relatively unaffected by the spurious numerical phenomena.

  4. Dust-acoustic shocks in strongly coupled dusty plasmas.

    PubMed

    Cousens, S E; Yaroshenko, V V; Sultana, S; Hellberg, M A; Verheest, F; Kourakis, I

    2014-04-01

    Electrostatic dust-acoustic shock waves are investigated in a viscous, complex plasma consisting of dust particles, electrons, and ions. The system is modelled using the generalized hydrodynamic equations, with strong coupling between the dust particles being accounted for by employing the effective electrostatic temperature approach. Using a reductive perturbation method, it is demonstrated that this model predicts the existence of weakly nonlinear dust-acoustic shock waves, arising as solutions to Burgers's equation, in which the nonlinear forces are balanced by dissipative forces, in this case, associated with viscosity. The evolution and stability of dust-acoustic shocks is investigated via a series of numerical simulations, which confirms our analytical predictions on the shock characteristics. PMID:24827351

  5. Shock Wave Application to Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Holfeld, Johannes; Tepeköylü, Can; Kozaryn, Radoslaw; Mathes, Wolfgang; Grimm, Michael; Paulus, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Shock waves nowadays are well known for their regenerative effects. Basic research findings showed that shock waves do cause a biological stimulus to target cells or tissue without any subsequent damage. Therefore, in vitro experiments are of increasing interest. Various methods of applying shock waves onto cell cultures have been described. In general, all existing models focus on how to best apply shock waves onto cells. However, this question remains: What happens to the waves after passing the cell culture? The difference of the acoustic impedance of the cell culture medium and the ambient air is that high, that more than 99% of shock waves get reflected! We therefore developed a model that mainly consists of a Plexiglas built container that allows the waves to propagate in water after passing the cell culture. This avoids cavitation effects as well as reflection of the waves that would otherwise disturb upcoming ones. With this model we are able to mimic in vivo conditions and thereby gain more and more knowledge about how the physical stimulus of shock waves gets translated into a biological cell signal (“mechanotransduction"). PMID:24747842

  6. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.; Lee, D. L.; Leja, I.

    1979-01-01

    Four areas of surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were investigated and a number of 401.2 MHz oscillators were constructed that showed improved performance. Aging studies on SAW devices packaged in HC36/U cold weld enclosures produced frequency drifts as low as 0.4 ppm in 35 weeks and drift rates well under 0.5 ppm/year. Temperature compensation circuits have substantially improved oscillator temperature stability, with a deviation of + or - 4 ppm observed over the range -45 C to + 40 C. High efficiency amplifiers were constructed for SAW oscillators and a dc to RF efficiency of 44 percent was obtained for an RF output of 25 mW. Shock and vibration tests were made on four oscillators and all survived 500 G shock pulses unchanged. Only when white noise vibration (20 Hz to 2000 Hz) levels of 20 G's rms were applied did some of the devices fail.

  7. Turbulent water coupling in shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Lautz, Jaclyn; Sankin, Georgy; Zhong, Pei

    2013-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that stone comminution decreases with increased pulse repetition frequency as a result of bubble proliferation in the cavitation field of a shock wave lithotripter (Pishchalnikov et al 2011 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 130 EL87-93). If cavitation nuclei remain in the propagation path of successive lithotripter pulses, especially in the acoustic coupling cushion of the shock wave source, they will consume part of the incident wave energy, leading to reduced tensile pressure in the focal region and thus lower stone comminution efficiency. We introduce a method to remove cavitation nuclei from the coupling cushion between successive shock exposures using a jet of degassed water. As a result, pre-focal bubble nuclei lifetime quantified by B-mode ultrasound imaging was reduced from 7 to 0.3 s by a jet with an exit velocity of 62 cm s(-1). Stone fragmentation (percent mass <2 mm) after 250 shocks delivered at 1 Hz was enhanced from 22 ± 6% to 33 ± 5% (p = 0.007) in water without interposing tissue mimicking materials. Stone fragmentation after 500 shocks delivered at 2 Hz was increased from 18 ± 6% to 28 ± 8% (p = 0.04) with an interposing tissue phantom of 8 cm thick. These results demonstrate the critical influence of cavitation bubbles in the coupling cushion on stone comminution and suggest a potential strategy to improve the efficacy of contemporary shock wave lithotripters.

  8. Quantum positron acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Metref, Hassina; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear quantum positron-acoustic (QPA) waves are investigated for the first time, within the theoretical framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model. In the small but finite amplitude limit, both deformed Korteweg-de Vries and generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations governing, respectively, the dynamics of QPA solitary waves and double-layers are derived. Moreover, a full finite amplitude analysis is undertaken, and a numerical integration of the obtained highly nonlinear equations is carried out. The results complement our previously published results on this problem.

  9. Acoustic field distribution of sawtooth wave with nonlinear SBE model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaozhou Zhang, Lue; Wang, Xiangda; Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    For precise prediction of the acoustic field distribution of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with an ellipsoid transducer, the nonlinear spheroidal beam equations (SBE) are employed to model acoustic wave propagation in medium. To solve the SBE model with frequency domain algorithm, boundary conditions are obtained for monochromatic and sawtooth waves based on the phase compensation. In numerical analysis, the influence of sinusoidal wave and sawtooth wave on axial pressure distributions are investigated.

  10. Laboratory Observations of Self-Excited Dust Acoustic Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, J.; Kim, S.-H.; Merlino, R. L.

    2009-09-11

    Repeated, self-excited dust acoustic shock waves (DASWs) have been observed in a dc glow discharge dusty plasma using high-speed video imaging. Two major observations are reported: (1) The self-steepening of a nonlinear dust acoustic wave (DAW) into a saw-tooth wave with sharp gradient in dust density, very similar to those found in numerical solutions of the fully nonlinear fluid equations for a nondispersive DAW [B. Eliasson and P. K. Shukla, Phys. Rev. E 69, 067401 (2004)], and (2) the collision and confluence of two DASWs.

  11. Radiative Shock Waves In Emerging Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul; Doss, F.; Visco, A.

    2011-05-01

    In laboratory experiments we produce radiative shock waves having dense, thin shells. These shocks are similar to shocks emerging from optically thick environments in astrophysics in that they are strongly radiative with optically thick shocked layers and optically thin or intermediate downstream layers through which radiation readily escapes. Examples include shocks breaking out of a Type II supernova (SN) and the radiative reverse shock during the early phases of the SN remnant produced by a red supergiant star. We produce these shocks by driving a low-Z plasma piston (Be) at > 100 km/s into Xe gas at 1.1 atm. pressure. The shocked Xe collapses to > 20 times its initial density. Measurements of structure by radiography and temperature by several methods confirm that the shock wave is strongly radiative. We observe small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces. We describe a variation of the Vishniac instability theory of decelerating shocks and an analysis of associated scaling relations to account for the growth of these perturbations, identify how they scale to astrophysical systems such as SN 1993J, and consider possible future experiments. Collaborators in this work have included H.F. Robey, J.P. Hughes, C.C. Kuranz, C.M. Huntington, S.H. Glenzer, T. Doeppner, D.H. Froula, M.J. Grosskopf, and D.C. Marion ________________________________ * Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  12. Shock wave reflections in a liquid filled thin tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shota; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Kameda, Masaharu

    2013-11-01

    We investigate a behavior of an underwater shock wave in a thin glass tube using an ultra high-speed camera up to 107 frames per second. We here focus on the pressure of the reflected shock wave at interfaces (water-glass wall / water-air). A shock wave is visualized using the Background Oriented Schlieren (BOS) technique. We measure the time evolution of the shock front position and estimate the shock velocity, pressure, and internal energy as a function of the distance from the shock center. At the water-wall interface the reflected shock pressure is lower than the incident shock pressure, which agrees well with the theoretical estimation for an acoustic pressure wave. The reflected pressure at the air-water interface is much lower than the incident shock, indicating that the shape of the air-water interface may affect this reduction of the reflected pressure.

  13. Shock waves data for minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Johnson, Mary L.

    1994-01-01

    Shock compression of the materials of planetary interiors yields data which upon comparison with density-pressure and density-sound velocity profiles constrain internal composition and temperature. Other important applications of shock wave data and related properties are found in the impact mechanics of terrestrial planets and solid satellites. Shock wave equation of state, shock-induced dynamic yielding and phase transitions, and shock temperature are discussed. In regions where a substantial phase change in the material does not occur, the relationship between the particle velocity, U(sub p), and the shock velocity, U(sub s), is given by U(sub s) = C(sub 0) + S U(sub p), where C(sub 0) is the shock velocity at infinitesimally small particle velocity, or the ambient pressure bulk sound velocity. Numerical values for the shock wave equation of state for minerals and related materials of the solar system are provided.

  14. Shock Waves in Dispersive Eulerian Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefer, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Shock waves in dispersive media with negligible dissipation are studied in the context of the compressible Euler equations with weak dispersion. Example fluids of this type include superfluids, shallow water flows, and ion-acoustic plasma. A characterization of one-dimensional dispersive shock waves (DSWs) will be presented. DSWs are sharply distinct from classical, dissipatively regularized shock waves both in terms of physical significance and mathematical description. Drawing on terminology from classical gas dynamics, jump conditions (shock loci and speeds) and admissibility criteria for the long time evolution of step-like initial data will be presented utilizing a nonlinear wave averaging technique. While entropy conditions determine admissible, dissipatively regularized shock waves, conservative, dispersive systems are time reversible and can exhibit positive or negative dispersion. The universal structure of weak shocks will be shown to depend solely upon the dispersion sign and pressure law. Large amplitude DSWs can exhibit novel effects such as cavitation and ``implosion'' yielding internal, multi-phase dynamics. Support from NSF DMS-1008973.

  15. Ion acoustic traveling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; Burrows, R. H.; Ao, X.; Zank, G. P.; Zank

    2014-04-01

    Models for traveling waves in multi-fluid plasmas give essential insight into fully nonlinear wave structures in plasmas, not readily available from either numerical simulations or from weakly nonlinear wave theories. We illustrate these ideas using one of the simplest models of an electron-proton multi-fluid plasma for the case where there is no magnetic field or a constant normal magnetic field present. We show that the traveling waves can be reduced to a single first-order differential equation governing the dynamics. We also show that the equations admit a multi-symplectic Hamiltonian formulation in which both the space and time variables can act as the evolution variable. An integral equation useful for calculating adiabatic, electrostatic solitary wave signatures for multi-fluid plasmas with arbitrary mass ratios is presented. The integral equation arises naturally from a fluid dynamics approach for a two fluid plasma, with a given mass ratio of the two species (e.g. the plasma could be an electron-proton or an electron-positron plasma). Besides its intrinsic interest, the integral equation solution provides a useful analytical test for numerical codes that include a proton-electron mass ratio as a fundamental constant, such as for particle in cell (PIC) codes. The integral equation is used to delineate the physical characteristics of ion acoustic traveling waves consisting of hot electron and cold proton fluids.

  16. Does an infrasonic acoustic shock wave resonance of the manganese 3+ loaded/copper depleted prion protein initiate the pathogenesis of TSE?

    PubMed

    Purdey, Mark

    2003-06-01

    Intensive exposures to natural and artificial sources of infrasonic acoustic shock (tectonic disturbances, supersonic aeroplanes, etc.) have been observed in ecosystems supporting mammalian populations that are blighted by clusters of traditional and new variant strains of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). But TSEs will only emerge in those 'infrasound-rich' environments which are simultaneously influenced by eco-factors that induce a high manganese (Mn)/low copper (Cu)-zinc (Zn) ratio in brains of local mammalian populations. Since cellular prion protein (PrPc) is a cupro-protein expressed throughout the circadian mediated pathways of the body, it is proposed that PrP's Cu component performs a role in the conduction and distribution of endogenous electromagnetic energy; energy that has been transduced from incoming ultraviolet, acoustic, geomagnetic radiations. TSE pathogenesis is initiated once Mn substitutes at the vacant Cu domain on PrPc and forms a nonpathogenic, protease resistant, 'sleeping' prion. A second stage of pathogenesis comes into play once a low frequency wave of infrasonic shock metamorphoses the piezoelectric atomic structure of the Mn 3+ component of the prion, thereby 'priming' the sleeping prion into its fully fledged, pathogenic TSE isoform - where the paramagnetic status of the Mn 3+ atom is transformed into a stable ferrimagnetic lattice work, due to the strong electron-phonon coupling resulting from the dynamic 'Jahn-Teller' type distortions of the oxygen octahedra specific to the trivalent Mn species. The so called 'infectivity' of the prion is a misnomer and should be correctly defined as the contagious field inducing capacity of the ferrimagnetic Mn 3+ component of the prion; which remains pathogenic at all temperatures below the 'curie point'. A progressive domino-like 'metal to ligand to metal' ferrimagnetic corruption of the conduits of electromagnetic superexchange is initiated. The TSE diseased brain can be likened to

  17. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  18. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Merlino, Robert L.

    2009-11-10

    A historical overview of some of the early theoretical and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some of the theoretical refinements that have been made, including the effects of collisions, plasma absorption, dust charge fluctuations, particle drifts and strong coupling effects are discussed. Some recent experimental findings and outstanding problems are also presented.

  19. Imaging Supersonic Aircraft Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.; Stacy, Kathryn; Vieira, Gerald J.; Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Bowers, Albion H.

    1997-01-01

    A schlieren imaging system that uses the sun as a light source was developed it) obtain direct flow-field images of shock waves of aircraft in flight. This system was used to study how shock waves evolve to form sonic booms. The image quality obtained was limited by several optical and mechanical factors. Converting the photographs to digital images and applying digital image-processing techniques greatly improved the final quality of the images and more clearly showed the shock structures.

  20. Weak-wave analysis of shock interaction with a slipstream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, Raymond L.

    1988-01-01

    A weak wave analysis of shock interaction with a slipstream is presented. The theory is compared to that for the acoustic case and to the exact nonlinear analysis. Sample calculations indicate that the weak wave theory yields a good approximation to the exact solution when the shock waves are sufficiently weak that the associated entropy increase is negligible. A qualitative discussion of the case of counterflowing streams is also included.

  1. Damage mechanisms in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhandwalla, Murtuza

    Shock wave lithotripsy is a 'non-invasive' therapy for treating kidney stones. Focused shock waves fragment stones to a size that can be passed naturally. There is, however, considerable tissue injury, and the mechanisms of stone fragmentation and tissue injury are not well understood. This work investigates potential tissue damage mechanisms, with an aim towards enhancing stone fragmentation and minimizing tissue damage. Lysis of red blood cells (RBC's) due to in vitro exposure to shock waves was investigated. Fluid flow-fields induced by a non-uniform shock wave, as well as radial expansion/implosion of a bubble was hypothesized to cause cell lysis. Both the above flow-fields constitute an unsteady extensional flow, exerting inertial as well as viscous forces on the RBC membrane. The resultant membrane tension and the membrane areal strain due to the above flow-fields were estimated. Both were found to exert a significantly higher inertial force (50--100 mN/m) than the critical membrane tension (10 mN/m). Bubble-induced flow-field was estimated to last for a longer duration (˜1 microsec) compared to the shock-induced flow (˜1 ns) and hence, was predicted to be lytically more effective, in typical in vitro experimental conditions. However, in vivo conditions severely constrain bubble growth, and cell lysis due to shock-induced shear could be dominant. Hemolysis due to shock-induced shear, in absence of cavitation, was experimentally investigated. The lithotripter-generated shock wave was refocused by a parabolic reflector. This refocused wave-field had a tighter focus (smaller beam-width and a higher amplitude) than the lithotripter wave-field. Cavitation was eliminated by applying overpressure to the fluid. Acoustic emissions due to bubble activity were monitored by a novel passive cavitation detector (HP-PCD). Aluminum foils were also used to differentiate cavitational from non-cavitational mode of damage. RBC's were exposed to the reflected wave-field from

  2. A collisionless shock wave experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Jones, M.E.; Sgro, A.G.; Thomas, V.A.

    1995-04-01

    Collisionless shock waves are a very important heating mechanism for plasmas and are commonly found in space and astrophysical environments. Collisionless shocks were studied in the laboratory more than 20 years ago, and more recently in space via in situ satellite measurements. The authors propose a new laboratory shock wave experiment to address unresolved issues related to the differences in the partition of plasma heating between electrons and ions in space and laboratory plasmas, which can have important implications for a number of physical systems.

  3. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S.; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting, and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next. PMID:23900527

  4. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-09-21

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next.

  5. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  6. Optical distortion in the field of a lithotripter shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnell, M. T.; Emmony, D. C.

    1995-10-01

    The schlieren observation of cavitation phenomena produced in the tail of a lithotripter shock wave has indicated the presence of some interesting features. The images produced appear to indicate that cavitation transients in the field of a shock wave propagate nonsymmetrically; this is not the case. The apparent lack of symmetry exhibited by the primary cavitation transients is due to a complex optical lensing effect, which is brought about by the change in refractive index associated with the pressure profile of the shock wave. Objects seen through or immersed in the shock-wave field of an electromagnetic acoustic transducer, such as cavitation, appear highly distorted because of the strong positive and negative lensing effects of the compression and rarefaction cycles of the shock wave. A modification of the schlieren technique called the scale method has been used to model the distortion introduced by the shock wave and consequently explain the cavitation distortion. The technique has also been used to quantitatively analyze and partially reconstruct the lithotripter shock wave. The combination of schlieren and scale imaging gives more information about the refractive index field and therefore the shock-wave structure itself.

  7. Shock wave interaction with turbulence: Pseudospectral simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1986-12-30

    Shock waves amplify pre-existing turbulence. Shock tube and shock wave boundary layer interaction experiments provide qualitative confirmation. However, shock pressure, temperature, and rapid transit complicate direct measurement. Computational simulations supplement the experimental data base and help isolate the mechanisms responsible. Simulations and experiments, particularly under reflected shock wave conditions, significantly influence material mixing. In these pseudospectral Navier-Stokes simulations the shock wave is treated as either a moving (tracked or fitted) domain boundary. The simulations assist development of code mix models. Shock Mach number and pre-existing turbulence intensity initially emerge as key parameters. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Dust-acoustic shock formation in dusty plasmas with non-thermal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.

    2013-01-15

    In this study, the nonlinear Burgers equation in the presence of the dust charge fluctuation is derived and the shock-like solution is determined. It is well known that in order to have a monotonic or oscillatory shock wave, a source of dissipation is needed. By using the experimental data reported in the laboratory observation of self-excited dust-acoustic shock waves [Heinrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 115002 (2009)], it is shown that dust charge fluctuation can be considered as a candidate for the source of dissipation needed for the dust-acoustic shock formation. By examining the effects of non-thermal ions on dust-acoustic shock's characteristics, a possible theoretical explanation for the discrepancies observed between theory and experiment is proposed.

  9. Multi-reflective acoustic wave device

    DOEpatents

    Andle, Jeffrey C.

    2006-02-21

    An acoustic wave device, which utilizes multiple localized reflections of acoustic wave for achieving an infinite impulse response while maintaining high tolerance for dampening effects, is disclosed. The device utilized a plurality of electromechanically significant electrodes disposed on most of the active surface. A plurality of sensors utilizing the disclosed acoustic wave mode device are also described.

  10. Model for shock wave chaos.

    PubMed

    Kasimov, Aslan R; Faria, Luiz M; Rosales, Rodolfo R

    2013-03-01

    We propose the following model equation, u(t) + 1/2(u(2)-uu(s))x = f(x,u(s)) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting mixtures. The equation is given on the half line, x<0, and the shock is located at x = 0 for any t ≥ 0. Here, u(s)(t) is the shock state and the source term f is taken to mimic the chemical energy release in detonations. This equation retains the essential physics needed to reproduce many properties of detonations in gaseous reactive mixtures: steady traveling wave solutions, instability of such solutions, and the onset of chaos. Our model is the first (to our knowledge) to describe chaos in shock waves by a scalar first-order partial differential equation. The chaos arises in the equation thanks to an interplay between the nonlinearity of the inviscid Burgers equation and a novel forcing term that is nonlocal in nature and has deep physical roots in reactive Euler equations. PMID:23521260

  11. Model for shock wave chaos.

    PubMed

    Kasimov, Aslan R; Faria, Luiz M; Rosales, Rodolfo R

    2013-03-01

    We propose the following model equation, u(t) + 1/2(u(2)-uu(s))x = f(x,u(s)) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting mixtures. The equation is given on the half line, x<0, and the shock is located at x = 0 for any t ≥ 0. Here, u(s)(t) is the shock state and the source term f is taken to mimic the chemical energy release in detonations. This equation retains the essential physics needed to reproduce many properties of detonations in gaseous reactive mixtures: steady traveling wave solutions, instability of such solutions, and the onset of chaos. Our model is the first (to our knowledge) to describe chaos in shock waves by a scalar first-order partial differential equation. The chaos arises in the equation thanks to an interplay between the nonlinearity of the inviscid Burgers equation and a novel forcing term that is nonlocal in nature and has deep physical roots in reactive Euler equations.

  12. Tracking kidney stones with sound during shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracht, Jonathan M.

    The prevalence of kidney stones has increased significantly over the past decades. One of the primary treatments for kidney stones is shock wave lithotripsy which focuses acoustic shock waves onto the stone in order to fragment it into pieces that are small enough to pass naturally. This typically requires a few thousand shock waves delivered at a rate of about 2 Hz. Although lithotripsy is the only non-invasive treatment option for kidney stories, both acute and chronic complications have been identified which could be reduced if fewer shock waves were used. One factor that could be used to reduce the number of shock waves is accounting for the motion of the stone which causes a portion of the delivered shock waves to miss the stone, yielding no therapeutic benefit. Therefore identifying when the stone is not in focus would allow tissue to be spared without affecting fragmentation. The goal of this thesis is to investigate acoustic methods to track the stone in real-time during lithotripsy in order to minimize poorly-targeted shock waves. A relatively small number of low frequency ultrasound transducers were used in pulse-echo mode and a novel optimization routine based on time-of-flight triangulation is used to determine stone location. It was shown that the accuracy of the localization may be estimated without knowing the true stone location. This method performed well in preliminary experiments but the inclusion of tissue-like aberrating layers reduced the accuracy of the localization. Therefore a hybrid imaging technique employing DORT (Decomposition of the Time Reversal Operator) and the MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) algorithm was developed. This method was able to localize kidney stories to within a few millimeters even in the presence of an aberrating layer. This would be sufficient accuracy for targeting lithotripter shock waves. The conclusion of this work is that tracking kidney stones with low frequency ultrasound should be effective clinically.

  13. In vivo transfection of melanoma cells by lithotripter shock waves.

    PubMed

    Bao, S; Thrall, B D; Gies, R A; Miller, D L

    1998-01-15

    The potential for gene transfection during shock wave tumor therapy was evaluated by searching for shock wave-induced DNA transfer in mouse tumor cells. B16 mouse melanoma cells were cultured by standard methods and implanted s.c. in female C57BL/6 mice 10-14 days before treatment. A luciferase reporter vector was used as the DNA plasmid for intratumoral injection at 0.2 mg/ml tumor. Air at 10% of tumor volume was injected after the DNA in some tumors to enhance acoustic cavitation activity. The shock wave generation system was similar to a Dornier HM-3 lithotripter with pressure amplitudes of 24.4 MPa peak positive and 5.2 MPa peak negative. Luciferase production in isolated tumor cells was measured with a luminometer 1 day after treatment to assess gene transfer and expression. Exposure to 800 shock waves, followed by immediate isolation and culture of tumor cells for 1 day, yielded 1.1 (0.43 SE) pg/10(6) cells for plasmid injection only and 7.5 (2.5 SE) pg/10(6) cells for plasmid plus air injection. Significantly increased luciferase production, relative to shams, occurred for 200-, 400-, 800-, and 1200-shock wave treatments with plasmid and air injection. Exposure with the isolation of tumor cells delayed for a day to allow gene expression within the growing tumors gave increased luciferase production for 100- and 400-shock wave exposures without and with air injection. Gene transfer therefore can be induced during lithotripter shock wave treatment in vivo, particularly with enhanced acoustic cavitation, which supports the concept that gene and shock wave therapy might be advantageously merged. PMID:9443395

  14. Radial Shock Wave Devices Generate Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Császár, Nikolaus B. M.; Angstman, Nicholas B.; Milz, Stefan; Sprecher, Christoph M.; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed; Furia, John P.; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background Conflicting reports in the literature have raised the question whether radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) devices and vibrating massage devices have similar energy signatures and, hence, cause similar bioeffects in treated tissues. Methods and Findings We used laser fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) measurements, high-speed imaging and x-ray film analysis to compare fundamental elements of the energy signatures of two rESWT devices (Swiss DolorClast; Electro Medical Systems, Nyon, Switzerland; D-Actor 200; Storz Medical, Tägerwillen, Switzerland) and a vibrating massage device (Vibracare; G5/General Physiotherapy, Inc., Earth City, MO, USA). To assert potential bioeffects of these treatment modalities we investigated the influence of rESWT and vibrating massage devices on locomotion ability of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) worms. Results FOPH measurements demonstrated that both rESWT devices generated acoustic waves with comparable pressure and energy flux density. Furthermore, both rESWT devices generated cavitation as evidenced by high-speed imaging and caused mechanical damage on the surface of x-ray film. The vibrating massage device did not show any of these characteristics. Moreover, locomotion ability of C. elegans was statistically significantly impaired after exposure to radial extracorporeal shock waves but was unaffected after exposure of worms to the vibrating massage device. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that both energy signature and bioeffects of rESWT devices are fundamentally different from those of vibrating massage devices. Clinical Relevance Prior ESWT studies have shown that tissues treated with sufficient quantities of acoustic sound waves undergo cavitation build-up, mechanotransduction, and ultimately, a biological alteration that “kick-starts” the healing response. Due to their different treatment indications and contra-indications rESWT devices cannot be equated to vibrating

  15. Effects of tandem shock waves combined with photosan and cytostatics on the growth of tumours.

    PubMed

    Beneš, J; Poučková, P; Zeman, J; Zadinová, M; Sunka, P; Lukeš, P; Kolářová, H

    2011-01-01

    Shock waves, pressure waves manifested as a sharp increase in positive pressure followed by a decrease and the negative part of the wave, are not only used to treat concrements in medicine. Recently, research has been focused on the possibility of their use for damaging the tumour tissue. In contrast to concrements, which are different from the surrounding tissue by their acoustic impedance, the tumour tissue has the same acoustic impedance as the surrounding soft tissue. Therefore, we have developed a new source of shock waves, which is based on the principle of multichannel discharge. This new source generates two successive shock waves (tandem shock waves). The first shock creates acoustic non-homogeneity and cavitations in the tissue, and the second shock is damped in it. In this work we demonstrated the effect of tandem shock waves on the muscle tissue in depth. The damage is shown on the images from the magnetic resonance imaging and histological sections. In the further part of the experiment, we investigated the in vivo effects of tandem shock waves in combination with Photosan and cisplatin on the tumour tissue. The application of tandem shock waves resulted in the inhibition of tumour growth, compared with controls, in both parts of the experiment. The largest inhibition effect was observed in the groups of tandem shock waves combined with Photosan and in the second part with cisplatin.

  16. High-frequency electrostatic waves near earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onsager, T. G.; Holzworth, R. H.; Koons, H. C.; Bauer, O. H.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Electrostatic wave measurements from the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorer Ion Release Module have been used to investigate the wave modes and their possible generation mechanisms in the earth's bow shock and magnetosheath. It is demonstrated that electrostatic waves are present in the bow shock and magnetosheath with frequencies above the maximum frequency for Doppler-shifted ion acoustic waves, yet below the plasma frequency. Waves in this frequency range are tentatively identified as electron beam mode waves. Data from 45 bow shock crossings are then used to investigate possible correlations between the electrostatic wave properties and the near-shock plasma parameters. The most significant relationships found are anticorrelations with Alfven Mach number and electron beta. Mechanisms which might produce electron beams in the shock and magnetosheath are discussed in terms of the correlation study results. These mechanisms include acceleration by the cross-shock electric field and by lower hybrid frequency waves. A magnetosheath 'time of flight' mechanism, in analogy to the electron foreshock region, is introduced as another possible beam generation mechanism.

  17. Bow shock and magnetosheath waves at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Behannon, K. W.

    1975-01-01

    Mariner 10 measurements at the Mercury bow shock provide examples where the magnetic field is approximately parallel or perpendicular to the bow shock normal. Upstream of a broad irregular parallel shock, left hand circularly polarized waves are observed which cut off very sharply at approximately 4 Hz. Upstream of a perpendicular shock, right hand circularly polarized waves are observed which persist up to the Nyquist frequency of 12 Ha. Determination of the wave propagation vector as a function of frequency helps conclusively identify the waves as whistler mode waves propagating from the shock. The magnetosheath downstream of the parallel shock is disturbed more than that downstream of the perpendicular shock particularly below 1 Hz. In the latter case regular left hand polarized waves observed slightly above the proton gyrofrequency are identified as ion cyclotron waves with wavelength approximately 300 km which are Doppler shifted up to their observed frequency.

  18. Corrugation of Relativistic Magnetized Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Martin; Ramos, Oscar; Gremillet, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    As a shock front interacts with turbulence it develops corrugation, which induces outgoing wave modes in the downstream plasma. For a fast shock wave, the incoming wave modes can either be fast magnetosonic waves originating downstream, outrunning the shock, or eigenmodes of the upstream plasma drifting through the shock. Using linear perturbation theory in relativistic MHD, this paper provides a general analysis of the corrugation of relativistic magnetized fast shock waves resulting from their interaction with small amplitude disturbances. Transfer functions characterizing the linear response for each of the outgoing modes are calculated as a function of the magnetization of the upstream medium and as a function of the nature of the incoming wave. Interestingly, if the latter is an eigenmode of the upstream plasma, we find that there exists a resonance at which the (linear) response of the shock becomes large or even diverges. This result may have profound consequences on the phenomenology of astrophysical relativistic magnetized shock waves.

  19. Millimeter Waves: Acoustic and Electromagnetic

    PubMed Central

    Ziskin, Marvin C.

    2012-01-01

    This article is the presentation I gave at the D'Arsonval Award Ceremony on June 14, 2011 at the Bioelectromagnetics Society Annual Meeting in Halifax, Nova Scotia. It summarizes my research activities in acoustic and electromagnetic millimeter waves over the past 47 years. My earliest research involved acoustic millimeter waves, with a special interest in diagnostic ultrasound imaging and its safety. For the last 21 years my research expanded to include electromagnetic millimeter waves, with a special interest in the mechanisms underlying millimeter wave therapy. Millimeter wave therapy has been widely used in the former Soviet Union with great reported success for many diseases, but is virtually unknown to Western physicians. I and the very capable members of my laboratory were able to demonstrate that the local exposure of skin to low intensity millimeter waves caused the release of endogenous opioids, and the transport of these agents by blood flow to all parts of the body resulted in pain relief and other beneficial effects. PMID:22926874

  20. Millimeter waves: acoustic and electromagnetic.

    PubMed

    Ziskin, Marvin C

    2013-01-01

    This article is the presentation I gave at the D'Arsonval Award Ceremony on June 14, 2011 at the Bioelectromagnetics Society Annual Meeting in Halifax, Nova Scotia. It summarizes my research activities in acoustic and electromagnetic millimeter waves over the past 47 years. My earliest research involved acoustic millimeter waves, with a special interest in diagnostic ultrasound imaging and its safety. For the last 21 years my research expanded to include electromagnetic millimeter waves, with a special interest in the mechanisms underlying millimeter wave therapy. Millimeter wave therapy has been widely used in the former Soviet Union with great reported success for many diseases, but is virtually unknown to Western physicians. I and the very capable members of my laboratory were able to demonstrate that the local exposure of skin to low intensity millimeter waves caused the release of endogenous opioids, and the transport of these agents by blood flow to all parts of the body resulted in pain relief and other beneficial effects.

  1. Calculating Flows With Interfering Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.

    1993-01-01

    Equilibrium Air Shock Interference, EASI, program takes account of dissociation of air molecules. Revives and updates older computational methods for calculating inviscid flow field and maximum heating from interference of shock waves. Expands methods to solve problems involving six shock-wave interference patterns on two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge with equilibrium, chemically-reacting gas mixture. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  2. Surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collman, James P.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Zhang, Xumu; Herrmann, Paul C.

    1994-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) device that responds to oxygen pressure was developed by coating a 158 MHz quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) device with an oxygen binding agent. Two types of coatings were used. One type was prepared by dissolving an oxygen binding agent in a toluene solution of a copolymer containing the axial ligand. A second type was prepared with an oxygen binding porphyrin solution containing excess axial ligand without a polymer matrix. In the polymer based coatings, the copolymer served to provide the axial ligand to the oxygen binding agent and as a coating matrix on the surface of the SAW device. The oxygen sensing SAW device has been shown to bind oxygen following a Langmuir isotherm and may be used to measure the equilibrium constant of the oxygen binding compound in the coating matrix.

  3. Nonlinear positron acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Aoutou, Kamel; Younsi, Smain; Amour, Rabia

    2009-07-15

    The problem of nonlinear positron acoustic solitary waves involving the dynamics of mobile cold positrons is addressed. A theoretical work is presented to show their existence and possible realization in a simple four-component plasma model. The results should be useful for the understanding of the localized structures that may occur in space and laboratory plasmas as new sources of cold positrons are now well developed.

  4. Stationary one-dimensional dispersive shock waves.

    PubMed

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Kamchatnov, Anatoly M

    2012-02-01

    We address shock waves generated upon the interaction of tilted plane waves with negative refractive index defects in defocusing media with linear gain and two-photon absorption. We found that, in contrast to conservative media where one-dimensional dispersive shock waves usually exist only as nonstationary objects expanding away from a defect or generating beam, the competition between gain and two-photon absorption in a dissipative medium results in the formation of localized stationary dispersive shock waves, whose transverse extent may considerably exceed that of the refractive index defect. One-dimensional dispersive shock waves are stable if the defect strength does not exceed a certain critical value.

  5. Ulysses observations of wave activity at interplanetary shocks and implications for type II radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel-Frey, D. |; Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.J.; Stone, R.G.; Phillips, J.L. |

    1997-02-01

    We present the first quantitative investigation of interplanetary type II radio emission in which in situ waves measured at interplanetary shocks are used to compute radio wave intensities for comparison with type II observations. This study is based on in situ measurements of 42 in-ecliptic forward shocks as well as 10 intervals of type II emission observed by the Ulysses spacecraft between 1 AU and 5 AU. The analysis involves comparisons of statistical properties of type II bursts and in situ waves. Most of the 42 shocks are associated with the occurrence of electrostatic waves near the time of shock passage at Ulysses. These waves, which are identified as electron plasma waves and ion acoustic-like waves, are typically most intense several minutes before shock passage. This suggests that wave-wave interactions might be of importance in electromagnetic wave generation and that type II source regions are located immediately upstream of the shocks. We use the in situ wave measurements to compute type II brightness temperatures, assuming that emission at the fundamental of the electron plasma frequency is generated by the merging of electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves or the decay of electron plasma waves into ion acoustic and transverse waves. Second harmonic emission is assumed to be produced by the merging of electron plasma waves. The latter mechanism requires that a portion of the electron plasma wave distribution is backscattered, presumably by density inhomogeneities in regions of observed ion acoustic wave activity. The computed type II brightness temperatures are found to be consistent with observed values for both fundamental and second harmonic emission, assuming that strong ({approx_equal}10{sup {minus}4}V/m) electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves are coincident and that the electron plasma waves have phase velocities less than about 10 times the electron thermal velocity. (Abstract Truncated)

  6. Pseudo-continuous-wave acoustic instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.; Stone, F. D.

    1978-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive, and portable ultrasonic device accurately measures acoustic properties of liquids, gases, and solids, using pseudo-continuous wave responses from samples to measure change in resonant frequency or amplitude in acoustic signal.

  7. Shock wave lithotripsy: advances in technology and technique

    PubMed Central

    Lingeman, James E.; McAteer, James A.; Gnessin, Ehud; Evan, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is the only noninvasive method for stone removal. Once considered as a primary option for the treatment of virtually all stones, SWL is now recognized to have important limitations that restrict its use. In particular, the effectiveness of SWL is severely limited by stone burden, and treatment with shock waves carries the risk of acute injury with the potential for long-term adverse effects. Research aiming to characterize the renal response to shock waves and to determine the mechanisms of shock wave action in stone breakage and renal injury has begun to suggest new treatment strategies to improve success rates and safety. Urologists can achieve better outcomes by treating at slower shock wave rate using a step-wise protocol. The aim is to achieve stone comminution using as few shock waves and at as low a power level as possible. Important challenges remain, including the need to improve acoustic coupling, enhance stone targeting, better determine when stone breakage is complete, and minimize the occurrence of residual stone fragments. New technologies have begun to address many of these issues, and hold considerable promise for the future. PMID:19956196

  8. Plasma wave phenomena at interplanetary shocks observed by the Ulysses URAP experiment. [Unified Radio and Plasma Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lengyel-Frey, D.; Macdowall, R. J.; Stone, R. G.; Hoang, S.; Pantellini, F.; Harvey, C.; Mangeney, A.; Kellogg, P.; Thiessen, J.; Canu, P.

    1992-01-01

    We present Ulysses URAP observations of plasma waves at seven interplanetary shocks detected between approximately 1 and 3 AU. The URAP data allows ready correlation of wave phenomena from .1 Hz to 1 MHz. Wave phenomena observed in the shock vicinity include abrupt changes in the quasi-thermal noise continuum, Langmuir wave activity, ion acoustic noise, whistler waves and low frequency electrostatic waves. We focus on the forward/reverse shock pair of May 27, 1991 to demonstrate the characteristics of the URAP data.

  9. Electron physics in shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The non-relativistic shocks that we find in the solar wind (no matter if driven by CMEs or encounters with planets) are dominated by ion dynamics. Therefore a detailed treatment of electrons is often neglegted to gain significant reductions in computational effort. With recent super computers and massively parallel codes it is possible to perform self-consistent kinetic simulations using particle in cell code. This allows to study the heating of the electrons as well as the acceleration to superthermal energies. These energetic electrons are interesting for couple of reasons. e.g. as an influence on plasma instabilities or for the generation of plasma waves.

  10. Interplanetary shock waves associated with solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. K.; Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of the earth's magnetic field with the solar wind is discussed with emphasis on the influence of solar flares. The geomagnetic storms are considerered to be the result of the arrival of shock wave generated by solar flares in interplanetary space. Basic processes in the solar atmosphere and interplanetary space, and hydromagnetic disturbances associated with the solar flares are discussed along with observational and theoretical problems of interplanetary shock waves. The origin of interplanetary shock waves is also discussed.

  11. On the generation of dispersive shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Peter D.

    2016-10-01

    We review various methods for the analysis of initial-value problems for integrable dispersive equations in the weak-dispersion or semiclassical regime. Some methods are sufficiently powerful to rigorously explain the generation of modulated wavetrains, so-called dispersive shock waves, as the result of shock formation in a limiting dispersionless system. They also provide a detailed description of the solution near caustic curves that delimit dispersive shock waves, revealing fascinating universal wave patterns.

  12. Acoustic Waves in Medical Imaging and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Sarvazyan, Armen P.; Urban, Matthew W.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Up until about two decades ago acoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging were synonymous. The term “ultrasonography,” or its abbreviated version “sonography” meant an imaging modality based on the use of ultrasonic compressional bulk waves. Since the 1990s numerous acoustic imaging modalities started to emerge based on the use of a different mode of acoustic wave: shear waves. It was demonstrated that imaging with these waves can provide very useful and very different information about the biological tissue being examined. We will discuss physical basis for the differences between these two basic modes of acoustic waves used in medical imaging and analyze the advantages associated with shear acoustic imaging. A comprehensive analysis of the range of acoustic wavelengths, velocities, and frequencies that have been used in different imaging applications will be presented. We will discuss the potential for future shear wave imaging applications. PMID:23643056

  13. Acoustic waves in medical imaging and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, Armen P; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F

    2013-07-01

    Up until about two decades ago acoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging were synonymous. The term ultrasonography, or its abbreviated version sonography, meant an imaging modality based on the use of ultrasonic compressional bulk waves. Beginning in the 1990s, there started to emerge numerous acoustic imaging modalities based on the use of a different mode of acoustic wave: shear waves. Imaging with these waves was shown to provide very useful and very different information about the biological tissue being examined. We discuss the physical basis for the differences between these two basic modes of acoustic waves used in medical imaging and analyze the advantages associated with shear acoustic imaging. A comprehensive analysis of the range of acoustic wavelengths, velocities and frequencies that have been used in different imaging applications is presented. We discuss the potential for future shear wave imaging applications.

  14. Ion-acoustic shocks with reflected ions: modelling and particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liseykina, T. V.; Dudnikova, G. I.; Vshivkov, V. A.; Malkov, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    > Non-relativistic collisionless shock waves are widespread in space and astrophysical plasmas and are known as efficient particle accelerators. However, our understanding of collisionless shocks, including their structure and the mechanisms whereby they accelerate particles, remains incomplete. We present here the results of numerical modelling of an ion-acoustic collisionless shock based on the one-dimensional kinetic approximation for both electrons and ions with a real mass ratio. Special emphasis is paid to the shock-reflected ions as the main driver of shock dissipation. The reflection efficiency, the velocity distribution of reflected particles and the shock electrostatic structure are studied in terms of the shock parameters. Applications to particle acceleration in geophysical and astrophysical shocks are discussed.

  15. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Mei, Jun; Aljahdali, Rasha

    We design a type of acoustic metasurface, which is composed of carefully designed slits in a rigid thin plate. The effective refractive indices of different slits are different but the impedances are kept the same as that of the host medium. Numerical simulations show that such a metasurface can redirect or reflect a normally incident wave at different frequencies, even though it is impedance matched to the host medium. We show that the underlying mechanisms can be understood by using the generalized Snell's law, and a unified analytic model based on mode-coupling theory. We demonstrate some simple realization of such acoustic metasurface with real materials. The principle is also extended to the design of planar acoustic lens which can focus acoustic waves. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces.

  16. Nonlinear ion acoustic dissipative shock structure with exchange-correlation effects in quantum semiconductor plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, S.; Akhtar, N.

    2016-09-01

    Ion acoustic shocks in the electron-hole-ion semiconductor plasmas have been studied. The quantum recoil effects, exchange-correlation effects and degenerate pressure of electrons and holes are included. The ion species are considered classical and their dissipation is taken into account via the dynamic viscosity. The Korteweg de Vries Burgers equation is derived by using reductive perturbation approach. The excitation of shock waves in different semiconductor plasmas is pointed out. For numerical analyses, the plasma parameters of different semiconductors are considered. The impact of variation of the plasma parameters on the strength of the shock wave in the semiconductor plasmas is discussed.

  17. On the interaction between the shock wave attached to a wedge and freestream disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.; Lasseigne, D. Glenn; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the interaction of small amplitude, unsteady, freestream disturbances with a shock wave induced by a wedge in supersonic flow is presented. These disturbances may be acoustic waves, vorticity waves, or entropy waves (or indeed a combination of all three). Their interactions then generate behind the shock disturbances of all three classes, an aspect that is investigated in some detail, our motivation being to investigate possible mechanisms for boundary-layer receptivity, caused through the amplification and modification of freestream turbulence through the shock-body coupling. Also, the possibility of enhanced mixing owing to additional vorticity produced by the shock-body coupling is investigated.

  18. Gigabar shock wave in a laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of research on generating a powerful shock wave with a pressure of up to several gigabars in a laboratory experiment is reviewed. The focus is on results which give a possibility of shock-wave experiments to study an equation of state of matter (EOS) at the level of gigabar pressure. The proposals are discussed to achieve a plane record-pressure shock wave driven by laser-accelerated fast electrons with respect to EOS-experiment as well as to prospective method of inertial fusion target (ICF) ignition as shock ignition.

  19. Biological Effects of Shock Waves on Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Janardhanraj, S.; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Gopalan, Jagadeesh

    Shock waves have been successfully used for disintegrating kidney stones[1], noninvasive angiogenic approach[2] and for the treatment of osteoporosis[3]. Recently shock waves have been used to treat different medical conditions including intestinal anastomosis[4], wound healing[5], Kienböck's disease[6] and articular cartilage defects[7].

  20. A computational study on the interaction between a vortex and a shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Kristine R.; Kumar, Ajay; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1989-01-01

    A computational study of two-dimensional shock vortex interaction is discussed in this paper. A second order upwind finite volume method is used to solve the Euler equations in conservation form. In this method, the shock wave is captured rather than fitted so that the cases where shock vortex interaction may cause secondary shocks can also be investigated. The effects of vortex strength on the computed flow and acoustic field generated by the interaction are qualitatively evaluated.

  1. Raman spectroscopy of hypersonic shock waves

    PubMed

    Ramos; Mate; Tejeda; Fernandez; Montero

    2000-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy is shown to be an efficient diagnostic methodology for the study of hypersonic shock waves. As a test, absolute density and rotational population profiles have been measured across five representative normal shock waves of N2 generated in a free jet, spanning the Mach number range 7.7shock waves shows a largely bimodal rotational distribution function with additional contribution of scattered molecules, in close analogy with the velocity distribution function known from helium shock waves [G. Pham-Van-Diep et al., Science 245, 624 (1989)]. Quantitative data on invariance trends of density profiles and properties of the wake beyond the shock waves are reported.

  2. Shock waves in the solar system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the role of gasdynamic processes involving shock waves in the transfer of solar material and energy to the earth and elsewhere in the solar system. The role of shock waves in maintaining the high temperature of the solar corona and in establishing the steady-state solar wind is discussed. An approximate hydromagnetic theory is developed to explain the flow of a supersonic solar wind past planets and the moon. Data concerning the passage of interplanetary shock waves and the ability of a solar flare to produce such a wave are reviewed, and some terrestrial consequences of solar activity are cited.

  3. 24. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ENTRANCE TO ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE. SHOCK ISOLATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ENTRANCE TO ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE. SHOCK ISOLATOR AT FAR LEFT. VIEW TO NORTH. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  4. Whistler Waves Associated with Weak Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velez, J. C. Ramirez; Blanco-Cano, X.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Kajdic, P.; Jian,, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of 98 weak interplanetary shocks measured by the dual STEREO spacecraft over approximately 3 years during the past solar minimum. We study the occurrence of whistler waves associated with these shocks, which on average are high beta shocks (0.2 < Beta < 10). We have compared the waves properties upstream and downstream of the shocks. In the upstream region the waves are mainly circularly polarized, and in most of the cases (approx. 75%) they propagate almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field (<30 deg.). In contrast, the propagation angle with respect to the shock normal varies in a broad range of values (20 deg. to 90 deg.), suggesting that they are not phase standing. We find that the whistler waves can extend up to 100,000 km in the upstream region but in most cases (88%) are contained in a distance within 30,000 km from the shock. This corresponds to a larger region with upstream whistlers associated with IP shocks than previously reported in the literature. The maximum amplitudes of the waves are observed next to the shock interface, and they decrease as the distance to the shock increases. In most cases the wave propagation direction becomes more aligned with the magnetic field as the distance to the shock increases. These two facts suggest that most of the waves in the upstream region are Landau damping as they move away from the shock. From the analysis we also conclude that it is likely that the generation mechanism of the upstream whistler waves is taking place at the shock interface. In the downstream region, the waves are irregularly polarized, and the fluctuations are very compressive; that is, the compressive component of the wave clearly dominates over the transverse one. The majority of waves in the downstream region (95%) propagate at oblique angles with respect to the ambient magnetic field (>60 deg.). The wave propagation with respect to the shock-normal direction has no preferred direction and varies similarly to

  5. Probing Acoustic Nonlinearity by Mixing Surface Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, David Howard; Telschow, Kenneth Louis

    2000-07-01

    Measurement methods aimed at determining material properties through nonlinear wave propagation are sensitive to artifacts caused by background nonlinearities inherent in the ultrasonic generation and detection methods. The focus of this paper is to describe our investigation of nonlinear mixing of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) as a means to decrease sensitivity to background nonlinearity and increase spatial sensitivity to acoustic nonlinearity induced by material microstructure.

  6. Bubbles with shock waves and ultrasound: a review.

    PubMed

    Ohl, Siew-Wan; Klaseboer, Evert; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2015-10-01

    The study of the interaction of bubbles with shock waves and ultrasound is sometimes termed 'acoustic cavitation'. It is of importance in many biomedical applications where sound waves are applied. The use of shock waves and ultrasound in medical treatments is appealing because of their non-invasiveness. In this review, we present a variety of acoustics-bubble interactions, with a focus on shock wave-bubble interaction and bubble cloud phenomena. The dynamics of a single spherically oscillating bubble is rather well understood. However, when there is a nearby surface, the bubble often collapses non-spherically with a high-speed jet. The direction of the jet depends on the 'resistance' of the boundary: the bubble jets towards a rigid boundary, splits up near an elastic boundary, and jets away from a free surface. The presence of a shock wave complicates the bubble dynamics further. We shall discuss both experimental studies using high-speed photography and numerical simulations involving shock wave-bubble interaction. In biomedical applications, instead of a single bubble, often clouds of bubbles appear (consisting of many individual bubbles). The dynamics of such a bubble cloud is even more complex. We shall show some of the phenomena observed in a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) field. The nonlinear nature of the sound field and the complex inter-bubble interaction in a cloud present challenges to a comprehensive understanding of the physics of the bubble cloud in HIFU. We conclude the article with some comments on the challenges ahead.

  7. Instability of spherically imploding shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Hilko, B.; Zhang, L.; Panarella, E.

    1995-12-31

    The importance of spherically imploding shock waves has increased recently due to their particular applications in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the Spherical Pinch (SP). In particular, the stability of spherically imploding shock waves plays a critical role in the ultimate success of ICF and SP. The instability of spherically imploding shock waves is now systematically investigated. The basic state is Guderley and Landau`s unsteady self-similar solution of the implosion of a spherical shock wave. The stability analysis is conducted by combining Chandresakhar`s approach to the stability of spherical flames together. The governing equations for disturbances are derived and they use the condition that perturbed gas flow is potential. The three dimensional perturbation velocity profile and a shock front perturbation are solved by using the kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions in the shock front. The time-dependent amplitudes of the perturbations are obtained by solving the system of ordinary differential equations. This enables them to study the time history of the spherically imploding shock wave subject to perturbations. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations decides the stability/instability of the spherical imploding shock waves. Preliminary results are presented.

  8. Stability of imploding spherical shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. B.; Zhang, L.; Panarella, E.

    1995-12-01

    The stability of spherically imploding shock waves is systematically investigated in this letter. The basic state is Guderley and Landau's unsteady self-similar solution of the implosion of a spherical shock wave. The stability analysis is conducted by combining Chandrasekhar's approach to the stability of a viscous liquid drop with Zel'dovich's approach to the stability of spherical flames. The time-dependent amplitudes of the perturbations are obtained analytically by using perturbation method. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations decides the stability/instability of the spherical imploding shock waves. It is found that the growth rate of perturbations is not in exponential form and near the collapse phase of the shocks, the spherically imploding shock waves are relatively stable.

  9. Stability of imploding spherical shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.B.; Zhang, L.; Panarella, E.

    1995-12-01

    The stability of spherically imploding shock waves is systematically investigated in this letter. The basic state is Guderley and Landau`s unsteady self-similar solution of the implosion of a spherical shock wave. The stability analysis is conducted by combining Chandrasekhar`s approach to the stability of a viscous liquid drop with Zel`dovich`s approach to the stability of spherical flames. The time-dependent amplitudes of the perturbations are obtained analytically by using perturbation method. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations are obtained analytically by using perturbation method. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations decides the stability/instability of the spherical imploding shock waves. It is found that the growth rate of perturbations is not in exponential form and near the collapse phase of the shocks, the spherically imploding shock waves are relatively stable. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Swimming using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Microactuation of free standing objects in fluids is currently dominated by the rotary propeller, giving rise to a range of potential applications in the military, aeronautic and biomedical fields. Previously, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have been shown to be of increasing interest in the field of microfluidics, where the refraction of a SAW into a drop of fluid creates a convective flow, a phenomenon generally known as SAW streaming. We now show how SAWs, generated at microelectronic devices, can be used as an efficient method of propulsion actuated by localised fluid streaming. The direction of the force arising from such streaming is optimal when the devices are maintained at the Rayleigh angle. The technique provides propulsion without any moving parts, and, due to the inherent design of the SAW transducer, enables simple control of the direction of travel. PMID:23431358

  11. Swimming using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Microactuation of free standing objects in fluids is currently dominated by the rotary propeller, giving rise to a range of potential applications in the military, aeronautic and biomedical fields. Previously, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have been shown to be of increasing interest in the field of microfluidics, where the refraction of a SAW into a drop of fluid creates a convective flow, a phenomenon generally known as SAW streaming. We now show how SAWs, generated at microelectronic devices, can be used as an efficient method of propulsion actuated by localised fluid streaming. The direction of the force arising from such streaming is optimal when the devices are maintained at the Rayleigh angle. The technique provides propulsion without any moving parts, and, due to the inherent design of the SAW transducer, enables simple control of the direction of travel.

  12. Swimming Using Surface Acoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Microactuation of free standing objects in fluids is currently dominated by the rotary propeller, giving rise to a range of potential applications in the military, aeronautic and biomedical fields. Previously, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have been shown to be of increasing interest in the field of microfluidics, where the refraction of a SAW into a drop of fluid creates a convective flow, a phenomenon generally known as SAW streaming. We now show how SAWs, generated at microelectronic devices, can be used as an efficient method of propulsion actuated by localised fluid streaming. The direction of the force arising from such streaming is optimal when the devices are maintained at the Rayleigh angle. The technique provides propulsion without any moving parts, and, due to the inherent design of the SAW transducer, enables simple control of the direction of travel. PMID:23431358

  13. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.

    1978-01-01

    A number of 401.2 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were built and tested. The performance of these oscillators was evaluated for possible use as stable oscillators in communication systems. A short term frequency stability of better than 1 x 10 to the minus 9th power for one second was measured for the SAW oscillators. Long term frequency drift was measured and was found to be dependent on SAW design and packaging. Drift rates ranging from 15 ppm in twenty weeks to 2.5 ppm in twenty weeks were observed. Some further improvement was required. The temperature dependence of the saw oscillators was evaluated and it was concluded that some form of temperature compensation will be necessary to meet the requirements of some communication systems.

  14. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights.

  15. Stability of shock waves in high temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Madhusmita; Bhattacharya, Chandrani; Menon, S. V. G.

    2011-10-15

    The Dyakov-Kontorovich criteria for spontaneous emission of acoustic waves behind shock fronts are investigated for high temperature aluminum and beryllium plasmas. To this end, the Dyakov and critical stability parameters are calculated from Rankine-Hugoniot curves using a more realistic equation of state (EOS). The cold and ionic contributions to the EOS are obtained via scaled binding energy and mean field theory, respectively. A screened hydrogenic model, including l-splitting, is used to calculate the bound electron contribution to the electronic EOS. The free electron EOS is obtained from Fermi-Dirac statistics. Predictions of the model for ionization curves and shock Hugoniot are found to be in excellent agreement with available experimental and theoretical data. It is observed that the electronic EOS has significant effect on the stability of the planar shock front. While the shock is stable for low temperatures and pressures, instability sets in as temperature rises. The basic reason is ionization of electronic shells and consequent increase in electronic specific heat. The temperatures and densities of the unstable region correspond to those where electronic shells get ionized. With the correct modeling of bound electrons, we find that shock instability for Al occurs at a compression ratio {approx}5.4, contrary to the value {approx}3 reported in the literature. Free electrons generated in the ionization process carry energy from the shock front, thereby giving rise to spontaneously emitted waves, which decay the shock front.

  16. Application of shock waves in medicine.

    PubMed

    Thiel, M

    2001-06-01

    Extracorporeal-generated shock waves were introduced approximately 20 years ago to disintegrate kidney stones. This treatment method substantially changed the treatment of urolithiasis. Shock waves have become the treatment of choice for kidney and ureteral stones. Urology, however, is not the only medical field for the potential use of shock waves for problems. Shock waves subsequently have been used in orthopaedics and traumatology to treat various insertional tendinopathies (enthesiopathies) and delayed unions and nonunions of fracture. Shock wave application also has been used in the treatment of tendinopathies in veterinary conditions (race horses). The concept of orthopaedic disorders is that shock waves stimulate or reactivate healing processes in tendons, surrounding tissue and bones, probably through microdisruption of avascular or minimally vascular tissues to encourage revascularization, release of local growth factors, and the recruitment of appropriate stem cells conducive to more normal tissue healing. The current author will give an overview of history and basic research of the application of shock waves in medicine. PMID:11400881

  17. Overview of shock waves in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Robin O.

    2003-10-01

    A brief overview of three applications of shock waves is presented. Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) has been in clinical use for more than 20 years. In the United States it is used to treat more than 80% of kidney stone cases and has wide acceptance with patients because it is a noninvasive procedure. Despite SWLs enormous success there is no agreement on how shock waves comminute stones. There is also a general acceptance that shock waves lead to trauma to the soft tissue of the kidney. Yet there has been little forward progress in developing lithotripters which provide comminution with less side-effects, indeed the original machine is still considered the gold standard. The last decade has seen the advent of new shock wave devices for treating principally musculoskeletal indications, such as plantar fasciitis, tennis elbow, and bone fractures that do not heal. This is referred to as shock wave therapy (SWT). The mechanisms by which SWT works are even less well understood than SWL and the consequences of bioeffects have also not been studied in detail. Shock waves have also been shown to be effective at enhancing drug delivery into cells and assisting with gene transfection. [Work partially supported by NIH.

  18. Temperature-controlled acoustic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cselyuszka, Norbert; Sečujski, Milan; Engheta, Nader; Crnojević-Bengin, Vesna

    2016-10-01

    Conventional approaches to the control of acoustic waves propagating along boundaries between fluids and hard grooved surfaces are limited to the manipulation of surface geometry. Here we demonstrate for the first time, through theoretical analysis, numerical simulation as well as experimentally, that the velocity of acoustic surface waves, and consequently the direction of their propagation as well as the shape of their wave fronts, can be controlled by varying the temperature distribution over the surface. This significantly increases the versatility of applications such as sound trapping, acoustic spectral analysis and acoustic focusing, by providing a simple mechanism for modifying their behavior without any change in the geometry of the system. We further discuss that the dependence between the behavior of acoustic surface waves and the temperature of the fluid can be exploited conversely as well, which opens a way for potential application in the domain of temperature sensing.

  19. Rarefaction shock waves in shock-compressed diamond <110> crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perriot, Romain; Lin, You; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; White, Carter; Oleynik, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    Piston-driven shock compression of diamond <110> crystal was simulated by molecular dynamics using the REBO potential. At piston velocities between 2 and 5 km/s and corresponding pressures 117 GPA < P < 278 GPa, diamond sample undergoes a polymorphic phase transition, characterized by the coexistence of two elastically compressed phases, low-pressure phase A and high-pressure phase B. This phase transition results in the splitting of the shock wave into two elastic shock waves, composed of pure phase A and a mixture of phases A and B. Upon removal of the piston, a release wave is observed at the rear of the sample, turning into a rarefaction shock wave where the material undergoes the reverse phase transition from coexisting phases to the original low-pressure phase. For strong plastic waves induced by larger piston velocities the release wave propagates as a rarefaction wave without any phase transition corresponding to the adiabatic expansion along the plastic branch of the Hugoniot.

  20. Shock wave in magnetized dusty plasmas with dust charging and nonthermal ion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Liping; Xue Jukui

    2005-04-15

    The effects of the external magnetized field, nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation, and nonthermally distributed ions on three-dimensional dust acoustic shock wave in dusty plasmas have been investigated. By using the reductive perturbation method, a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) Burger equation governing the dust acoustic shock wave is derived. The results of numerical integrations of KdV Burger equation show that the external magnetized field, nonthermally distributed ions, and nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation have strong influence on the shock structures.

  1. Shock waves in strongly coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Khlebnikov, Sergei; Kruczenski, Martin; Michalogiorgakis, Georgios

    2010-12-15

    Shock waves are supersonic disturbances propagating in a fluid and giving rise to dissipation and drag. Weak shocks, i.e., those of small amplitude, can be well described within the hydrodynamic approximation. On the other hand, strong shocks are discontinuous within hydrodynamics and therefore probe the microscopics of the theory. In this paper, we consider the case of the strongly coupled N=4 plasma whose microscopic description, applicable for scales smaller than the inverse temperature, is given in terms of gravity in an asymptotically AdS{sub 5} space. In the gravity approximation, weak and strong shocks should be described by smooth metrics with no discontinuities. For weak shocks, we find the dual metric in a derivative expansion, and for strong shocks we use linearized gravity to find the exponential tail that determines the width of the shock. In particular, we find that, when the velocity of the fluid relative to the shock approaches the speed of light v{yields}1 the penetration depth l scales as l{approx}(1-v{sup 2}){sup 1/4}. We compare the results with second-order hydrodynamics and the Israel-Stewart approximation. Although they all agree in the hydrodynamic regime of weak shocks, we show that there is not even qualitative agreement for strong shocks. For the gravity side, the existence of shock waves implies that there are disturbances of constant shape propagating on the horizon of the dual black holes.

  2. Surface acoustic wave dust deposition monitor

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1988-02-12

    A system is disclosed for using the attenuation of surface acoustic waves to monitor real time dust deposition rates on surfaces. The system includes a signal generator, a tone-burst generator/amplifier connected to a transmitting transducer for converting electrical signals into acoustic waves. These waves are transmitted through a path defining means adjacent to a layer of dust and then, in turn, transmitted to a receiving transducer for changing the attenuated acoustic wave to electrical signals. The signals representing the attenuated acoustic waves may be amplified and used in a means for analyzing the output signals to produce an output indicative of the dust deposition rates and/or values of dust in the layer. 8 figs.

  3. Shock wave control using liquid curtains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvert, Brendan; Tao, Xingtian; Eliasson, Veronica

    2014-11-01

    The effectiveness of a planar wall of liquid as a blast mitigation device is examined using a shock tube and a custom-designed and -built shock test chamber. Experimental data collection methods being used include high-speed schlieren photography and high-frequency pressure sensors. During the relevant shock interaction time periods, the liquid-gas interface is examined to determine its effect on shock waves. The characteristic quantities that reflect these effects include reflected-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted and reflected impulse, and peak pressure reduction. These parameters are examined for correlations to incident wave speed, liquid mass, liquid density, and liquid viscosity. Initial results have been obtained that show a correlation between fluid mass and peak pressure reduction. More experiments are being performed to further explore this relationship as well as examine the effects of altering the other parameters such as liquid-gas interface geometry and using dilatant fluids.

  4. Limiting Temperatures of Spherical Shock Wave Implosion.

    PubMed

    Liverts, Michael; Apazidis, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Spherical shock wave implosion in argon is studied both theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that as the strength of the converging shock increases the nonideal gas effects become dominant and govern the evolution of thermal and transport gas properties limiting the shock acceleration, lowering the gas adiabatic index and the achievable energy density at the focus. Accounting for multiple-level ionization, excitation, Coulomb interaction and radiation effects, the limiting equilibrium temperatures to be achieved during the shock implosion are estimated. Focal temperatures of the order of 30 000 K are measured in experiments where converging spherical shock waves are created using a conventional gas-dynamic shock tube facility. PMID:26799021

  5. Ion acoustic shocks in magneto rotating Lorentzian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S.; Akhtar, N.; Hasnain, H.

    2014-12-15

    Ion acoustic shock structures in magnetized homogeneous dissipative Lorentzian plasma under the effects of Coriolis force are investigated. The dissipation in the plasma system is introduced via dynamic viscosity of inertial ions. The electrons are following the kappa distribution function. Korteweg-de Vries Burger (KdVB) equation is derived by using reductive perturbation technique. It is shown that spectral index, magnetic field, kinematic viscosity of ions, rotational frequency, and effective frequency have significant impact on the propagation characteristic of ion acoustic shocks in such plasma system. The numerical solution of KdVB equation is also discussed and transition from oscillatory profile to monotonic shock for different plasma parameters is investigated.

  6. Density wave theory. [interstellar gas dynamics and galactic shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The prospect that density waves and galactic shock waves are present on the large scale in disk shaped galaxies has received support in recent years from both theoretical and observational studies. Large-scale galactic shock waves in the interstellar gas are suggested to play an important governing role in star formation, molecule formation, and the degree of development of spiral structure. Through the dynamics of the interstellar gas and the galactic shock-wave phenomenon, a new insight into the physical basis underlying the morphological classification system of galaxies is suggested.

  7. Ion heating via turbulent ion acoustic waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. J.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1972-01-01

    The ion acoustic turbulence in the turbulent-heating experiment reported is excited by the ion-ion beam instability. Graphs are presented, showing the spatial evolution of the parallel ion beam energy and the spatial evolution of the ion acoustic turbulent wave spectrum. The observed characteristics of test waves in a turbulent beam-plasma imply that wave saturation is a dynamic balance between the emission of waves by the beam and the destruction or damping of wave coherence by the turbulent diffusion of particle orbits.

  8. Shock waves on complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Mones, Enys; Araújo, Nuno A. M.; Vicsek, Tamás; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2014-01-01

    Power grids, road maps, and river streams are examples of infrastructural networks which are highly vulnerable to external perturbations. An abrupt local change of load (voltage, traffic density, or water level) might propagate in a cascading way and affect a significant fraction of the network. Almost discontinuous perturbations can be modeled by shock waves which can eventually interfere constructively and endanger the normal functionality of the infrastructure. We study their dynamics by solving the Burgers equation under random perturbations on several real and artificial directed graphs. Even for graphs with a narrow distribution of node properties (e.g., degree or betweenness), a steady state is reached exhibiting a heterogeneous load distribution, having a difference of one order of magnitude between the highest and average loads. Unexpectedly we find for the European power grid and for finite Watts-Strogatz networks a broad pronounced bimodal distribution for the loads. To identify the most vulnerable nodes, we introduce the concept of node-basin size, a purely topological property which we show to be strongly correlated to the average load of a node. PMID:24821422

  9. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcowith, A.; Bret, A.; Bykov, A.; Dieckman, M. E.; O'C Drury, L.; Lembège, B.; Lemoine, M.; Morlino, G.; Murphy, G.; Pelletier, G.; Plotnikov, I.; Reville, B.; Riquelme, M.; Sironi, L.; Stockem Novo, A.

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics.

  10. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves.

    PubMed

    Marcowith, A; Bret, A; Bykov, A; Dieckman, M E; Drury, L O'C; Lembège, B; Lemoine, M; Morlino, G; Murphy, G; Pelletier, G; Plotnikov, I; Reville, B; Riquelme, M; Sironi, L; Novo, A Stockem

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics. PMID:27007555

  11. The behavior of acoustic waves in the lakes bottom sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, Pavel; Nourgaliev, Danis; Yasonov, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Seismic studies are used for various tasks, such as the study of the bottom sediments properties, finding sunken objects, reconstruction the reservoir history, etc. Multiple acoustic waves are an enormous obstacle in obtaining full seismic record. Multiples from the bottom of a body of water (the surface of the base of water and the rock or sediment beneath it) and the air-water surface are common in lake seismic data. Multiple reflections on the seismic cross-sections are usually located on the double distance from the air/water surface. However, sometime multiple reflections from liquid deposits cannot be generated or they reflected from the deeper horizons. It is observed the phenomenon of changes in reflectance of the water/weakly consolidated sediments acoustic boundary under the influence of the acoustic wave. This phenomenon lies in the fact that after the first acoustic impact and reflection of acoustic wave for some time the reflectance of this boundary remains close to 0. This event on a cross-section can explain by the short-term changes in the properties of bottom sediments under the influence of shock? acoustic wave, with a further reduction of these properties to the next wave generation (generation period of 2 seconds). Perhaps in these deposits occurs thixotropic process. The paper presents the seismic acoustic cross-sections of Lake Balkhash (Kazakhstan), Turgoyak (Russia). The work was carried out according to the Russia Government's Program of Competitive Growth of Kazan Federal University, supported by the grant provided to the Kazan State University for performing the state program in the field of scientific research, and partially supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic research (grants № 14-05-00785, 16-35-00452).

  12. Dispersive shock waves with nonlocal nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Barsi, Christopher; Wan, Wenjie; Sun, Can; Fleischer, Jason W

    2007-10-15

    We consider dispersive optical shock waves in nonlocal nonlinear media. Experiments are performed using spatial beams in a thermal liquid cell, and results agree with a hydrodynamic theory of propagation.

  13. Shock waves in a dilute granular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. H. Lakshminarayana; Ansumali, Santosh; Alam, Meheboob

    2014-12-01

    We study the evolution of shock waves in a dilute granular gas which is modelled using three variants of hydrodynamic equations: Euler, 10-moment and 14-moment models. The one-dimensional shock-wave problem is formulated and the resulting equations are solved numerically using a relaxation-type scheme. Focusing on the specific case of blast waves, the results on the density, the granular temperature, the skew temperature, the heat flux and the fourth moment are compared among three models. We find that the shock profiles are smoother for the 14-moment model compared to those predicted by the standard Euler equations. A shock-splitting phenomenon is observed in the skew granular temperature profiles for a blast wave.

  14. Shock waves: The Maxwell-Cattaneo case.

    PubMed

    Uribe, F J

    2016-03-01

    Several continuum theories for shock waves give rise to a set of differential equations in which the analysis of the underlying vector field can be done using the tools of the theory of dynamical systems. We illustrate the importance of the divergences associated with the vector field by considering the ideas by Maxwell and Cattaneo and apply them to study shock waves in dilute gases. By comparing the predictions of the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations with shock wave experiments we are lead to the following conclusions: (a) For low compressions (low Mach numbers: M) the results from the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations provide profiles that are in fair agreement with the experiments, (b) as the Mach number is increased we find a range of Mach numbers (1.27 ≈ M(1) < M < M(2) ≈ 1.90) such that numerical shock wave solutions to the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations cannot be found, and

  15. Shock waves: The Maxwell-Cattaneo case.

    PubMed

    Uribe, F J

    2016-03-01

    Several continuum theories for shock waves give rise to a set of differential equations in which the analysis of the underlying vector field can be done using the tools of the theory of dynamical systems. We illustrate the importance of the divergences associated with the vector field by considering the ideas by Maxwell and Cattaneo and apply them to study shock waves in dilute gases. By comparing the predictions of the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations with shock wave experiments we are lead to the following conclusions: (a) For low compressions (low Mach numbers: M) the results from the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations provide profiles that are in fair agreement with the experiments, (b) as the Mach number is increased we find a range of Mach numbers (1.27 ≈ M(1) < M < M(2) ≈ 1.90) such that numerical shock wave solutions to the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations cannot be found, and PMID:27078450

  16. Existence Regions of Shock Wave Triple Configurations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Chernyshev, Mikhail V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research is to create the classification for shock wave triple configurations and their existence regions of various types: type 1, type 2, type 3. Analytical solutions for limit Mach numbers and passing shock intensity that define existence region of every type of triple configuration have been acquired. The ratios that conjugate…

  17. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, legal representative, Carol

    2010-11-23

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  18. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, Carol

    2010-06-08

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  19. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  20. Possible generation mechanisms of low-frequency waves /less than about 50 Hz/ with application to the bow shock plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, N.

    1979-01-01

    Generation mechanisms of waves observed at the earth's bow shock or in its vicinity within the frequency range extending up to about 50 Hz are reviewed. Observations and theories regarding waves in the solar wind upstream of the bow shock (both low-frequency 0.01-0.05 Hz and high-frequency 0.5-4 Hz waves), waves in the bow shock itself and magnetosheath waves arising from processes of generation or amplification in the bow shock are considered. Hydromagnetic, ion-acoustic and whistler type waves are discussed.

  1. Dynamics of coupled light waves and electron-acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Shukla, P K; Stenflo, L; Hellberg, M

    2002-08-01

    The nonlinear interaction between coherent light waves and electron-acoustic waves in a two-electron plasma is considered. The interaction is governed by a pair of equations comprising a Schrödinger-like equation for the light wave envelope and a driven (by the light pressure) electron-acoustic wave equation. The newly derived nonlinear equations are used to study the formation and dynamics of envelope light wave solitons and light wave collapse. The implications of our investigation to space and laser-produced plasmas are pointed out.

  2. Observation of cavitation during shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Evan, Andrew P.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2005-04-01

    A system was built to detect cavitation in pig kidney during shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) with a Dornier HM3 lithotripter. Active detection, using echo on B-mode ultrasound, and passive cavitation detection (PCD), using coincident signals on confocal, orthogonal receivers, were equally sensitive and were used to interrogate the renal collecting system (urine) and the kidney parenchyma (tissue). Cavitation was detected in urine immediately upon SW administration in urine or urine plus X-ray contrast agent, but in tissue, cavitation required hundreds of SWs to initiate. Localization of cavitation was confirmed by fluoroscopy, sonography, and by thermally marking the kidney using the PCD receivers as high intensity focused ultrasound sources. Cavitation collapse times in tissue and native urine were about the same but less than in urine after injection of X-ray contrast agent. Cavitation, especially in the urine space, was observed to evolve from a sparse field to a dense field with strong acoustic collapse emissions to a very dense field that no longer produced detectable collapse. The finding that cavitation occurs in kidney tissue is a critical step toward determining the mechanisms of tissue injury in SWL. [Work sup ported by NIH (DK43881, DK55674, FIRCA), ONRIFO, CRDF and NSBRI SMS00203.

  3. Determination of hydrocarbon levels in water via laser-induced acoustics wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidin, Noriah; Hossenian, Raheleh; Duralim, Maisarah; Krishnan, Ganesan; Marsin, Faridah Mohd; Nughro, Waskito; Zainal, Jasman

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination in water is a major environmental concern in terms of foreseen collapse of the natural ecosystem. Hydrocarbon level in water was determined by generating acoustic wave via an innovative laser-induced breakdown in conjunction with high-speed photographic coupling with piezoelectric transducer to trace acoustic wave propagation. A Q-switched Nd:YAG (40 mJ) was focused in cuvette-filled hydrocarbon solution at various concentrations (0-2000 ppm) to induce optical breakdown, shock wave generation and later acoustic wave propagation. A nitro-dye (ND) laser (10 mJ) was used as a flash to illuminate and frozen the acoustic wave propagation. Lasers were synchronised using a digital delay generator. The image of acoustic waves was grabbed and recorded via charged couple device (CCD) video camera at the speed of 30 frames/second with the aid of Matrox software version 9. The optical delay (0.8-10.0 μs) between the acoustic wave formation and its frozen time is recorded through photodetectors. A piezo-electric transducer (PZT) was used to trace the acoustic wave (sound signal), which cascades to a digital oscilloscope. The acoustic speed is calculated from the ratio of acoustic wave radius (1-8 mm) and optical time delay. Acoustic wave speed is found to linearly increase with hydrocarbon concentrations. The acoustic signal generation at higher hydrocarbon levels in water is attributed to supplementary mass transfer and impact on the probe. Integrated high-speed photography with transducer detection system authenticated that the signals indeed emerged from the laser-induced acoustic wave instead of photothermal processes. It is established that the acoustic wave speed in water is used as a fingerprint to detect the hydrocarbon levels.

  4. Finite Mach number spherical shock wave, application to shock ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet, A.; Ribeyre, X.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2013-08-01

    A converging and diverging spherical shock wave with a finite initial Mach number Ms0 is described by using a perturbative approach over a small parameter Ms-2. The zeroth order solution is the Guderley's self-similar solution. The first order correction to this solution accounts for the effects of the shock strength. Whereas it was constant in the Guderley's asymptotic solution, the amplification factor of the finite amplitude shock Λ(t)∝dUs/dRs now varies in time. The coefficients present in its series form are iteratively calculated so that the solution does not undergo any singular behavior apart from the position of the shock. The analytical form of the corrected solution in the vicinity of singular points provides a better physical understanding of the finite shock Mach number effects. The correction affects mainly the flow density and the pressure after the shock rebound. In application to the shock ignition scheme, it is shown that the ignition criterion is modified by more than 20% if the fuel pressure prior to the final shock is taken into account. A good agreement is obtained with hydrodynamic simulations using a Lagrangian code.

  5. Finite Mach number spherical shock wave, application to shock ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Vallet, A.; Ribeyre, X.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2013-08-15

    A converging and diverging spherical shock wave with a finite initial Mach number M{sub s0} is described by using a perturbative approach over a small parameter M{sub s}{sup −2}. The zeroth order solution is the Guderley's self-similar solution. The first order correction to this solution accounts for the effects of the shock strength. Whereas it was constant in the Guderley's asymptotic solution, the amplification factor of the finite amplitude shock Λ(t)∝dU{sub s}/dR{sub s} now varies in time. The coefficients present in its series form are iteratively calculated so that the solution does not undergo any singular behavior apart from the position of the shock. The analytical form of the corrected solution in the vicinity of singular points provides a better physical understanding of the finite shock Mach number effects. The correction affects mainly the flow density and the pressure after the shock rebound. In application to the shock ignition scheme, it is shown that the ignition criterion is modified by more than 20% if the fuel pressure prior to the final shock is taken into account. A good agreement is obtained with hydrodynamic simulations using a Lagrangian code.

  6. Optically triggered solid state driver for shock wave therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2012-10-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) represents one of several first-line therapies for the treatment of stones located in the kidneys and ureters. Additional applications for shock wave therapy are also under exploration, including non-urinary calculi, orthopedics, and neovascularization. Except for the elimination of a large water bath in which the treatment is performed, current procedures remain largely unchanged, with one of the original commercial devices (the Dornier HM3) still considered a gold standard for comparison. To accelerate research in this area, Coleman, et al. published an experimental electrohydraulic shock wave generator capable of simulating the acoustic field generated by the HM3. We propose a further update of this system, replacing the triggered spark gap with an optically triggered solid state switch. The new system has better reliability, a wider operating range, and reduced timing jitter allowing synchronization with additional acoustic sources under exploration for improving efficacy and reducing injury. Originally designed for exciting electrohydraulic spark electrodes, the system can also be adapted for driving piezoelectric and electromagnetic sources.

  7. Weak shock wave reflection from concave surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Sebastien; Skews, Beric

    2013-07-01

    The reflection of very weak shock waves from concave curved surfaces has not been well documented in the past, and recent studies have shown the possible existence of a variation in the accepted reflection configuration evolution as a shock wave encounters an increasing gradient on the reflecting surface. The current study set out to investigate this anomaly using high-resolution photography. Shock tube tests were done on various concave circular and parabolic geometries, all with zero initial ramp angle. Although the results have limitations due to the achievable image resolution, the results indicate that for very weak Mach numbers, M S < 1.1, there may be a region in which the reflection configuration resembles that of a regular reflection, unlike for the stronger shock wave case. This region exists after the triple point of the Mach reflection meets the reflecting surface and prior to the formation of the additional shock structures that represent a transitioned regular reflection. The Mach and transitioned regular reflections at 1.03 < M s < 1.05 also exhibit no signs of a visible shear layer, or a clear discontinuity at the triple point, and are thus also apparently different in the weak shock regime than what has been described for stronger shocks, similar to what has been shown for weak shocks reflecting off a plane wedge.

  8. Turbulence in argon shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; Santiago, J. P.; I, L.

    1981-01-01

    Irregular density fluctuations with turbulent-like behaviors are found in ionizing shock fronts produced by an arc-driven shock tube. Electric probes are used as the primary diagnostic. Spectral analyses show statistical patterns which seem frozen-in and characterizable by a dominant mode and its harmonics.

  9. Tandem shock waves in medicine and biology: a review of potential applications and successes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukes, P.; Fernández, F.; Gutiérrez-Aceves, J.; Fernández, E.; Alvarez, U. M.; Sunka, P.; Loske, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Shock waves have been established as a safe and effective treatment for a wide range of diseases. Research groups worldwide are working on improving shock wave technology and developing new applications of shock waves to medicine and biology. The passage of a shock wave through soft tissue, fluids, and suspensions containing cells may result in acoustic cavitation i.e., the expansion and violent collapse of microbubbles, which generates secondary shock waves and the emission of microjets of fluid. Cavitation has been recognized as a significant phenomenon that produces both desirable and undesirable biomedical effects. Several studies have shown that cavitation can be controlled by emitting two shock waves that can be delayed by tenths or hundreds of microseconds. These dual-pulse pressure pulses, which are known as tandem shock waves, have been shown to enhance in vitro and in vivo urinary stone fragmentation, cause significant cytotoxic effects in tumor cells, delay tumor growth, enhance the bactericidal effect of shock waves and significantly increase the efficiency of genetic transformations in bacteria and fungi. This article provides an overview of the basic physical principles, methodologies, achievements and potential uses of tandem shock waves to improve biomedical applications.

  10. Whistler waves observed upstream from collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Waves in the frequency range 0.5 - 4 Hz were studied in the region upstream of the earth's bow shock using data from the fluxgate magnetic field experiment on IMP-6. Analysis of 150 examples of these waves during a three month interval indicates that amplitudes are generally less than 1 or 2 gammas and propagation directions generally make angles of between 20 and 40 degrees with the field direction. The waves as measured in the spacecraft frame of reference are either left or right hand polarized with respect to the average field direction. It is concluded that the observed waves are right handed waves in the plasma frame of reference with wavelengths of approximately 100 km propagating upstream in the whistler mode. Doppler shifting reduces the observed frequencies in the spacecraft frame and reverses the observed polarization for those waves propagating more directly upstream. Similar waves are seen ahead of most interplanetary shocks.

  11. Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Nannan, N. R.; Guardone, A.; Colonna, P.

    2014-02-15

    From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

  12. Writing magnetic patterns with surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weiyang; Buford, Benjamin; Jander, Albrecht; Dhagat, Pallavi

    2014-05-07

    A novel patterning technique that creates magnetization patterns in a continuous magnetostrictive film with surface acoustic waves is demonstrated. Patterns of 10 μm wide stripes of alternating magnetization and a 3 μm dot of reversed magnetization are written using standing and focusing acoustic waves, respectively. The magnetization pattern is size-tunable, erasable, and rewritable by changing the magnetic field and acoustic power. This versatility, along with its solid-state implementation (no moving parts) and electronic control, renders it as a promising technique for application in magnetic recording, magnonic signal processing, magnetic particle manipulation, and spatial magneto-optical modulation.

  13. Exhaust Nozzle Plume and Shock Wave Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the exhaust plume. Both the nozzle exhaust plume shape and the tail shock shape may be affected by an interaction that may alter the vehicle sonic boom signature. The plume and shock interaction was studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation on two types of convergent-divergent nozzles and a simple wedge shock generator. The nozzle plume effects on the lower wedge compression region are evaluated for two- and three-dimensional nozzle plumes. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the deflected lower plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the wedge is modified by the presence of the plume, and the computational predictions show significant (8 to 15 percent) changes in shock amplitude.

  14. Stishovite: Synthesis by shock wave

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Carli, P. S.; Milton, D.J.

    1965-01-01

    Small amounts of stishovite were separated from specimens of explosively shocked sandstones, novaculite, and single-crystal quartz. Estimated peak pressures for the syntheses ranged from 150 to 280 kilobars, and shock temperatures were from 150?? to 900??C. No coesite was detected in any sample. It is suggested that quartz can invert during shock to a short-range-order phase, with sixfold coordination. A small portion of this phase may develop the long-range order of stishovite, and, during the more protracted decrease of the pressure pulse through the stability field of coesite accompanying meteorite crater formation, a portion may invert to coesite.

  15. Transmission of light waves through normal shocks.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, S I; Johnson, D K

    1995-11-20

    We seek to characterize light waves transmitted through normal shock waves. The investigation is motivated by the need for a theory to support a shadowgraph experiment for flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle. In this experiment light beams are passed through the nozzle transverse to the direction of the flow in which a shock has formed in the vicinity of the throat. We present a formulation and an approximation that yield calculations of the intensity of transmitted waves. We also present experimental results to support the theory. The patterns predicted by the theory compare well with the patterns observed in experiments.

  16. RADIATIVE HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF ACOUSTIC WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, S.; Carlsson, M.

    2010-10-10

    We investigate the formation and evolution of the Ca II H line in a sunspot. The aim of our study is to establish the mechanisms underlying the formation of the frequently observed brightenings of small regions of sunspot umbrae known as 'umbral flashes'. We perform fully consistent NLTE radiation hydrodynamic simulations of the propagation of acoustic waves in sunspot umbrae and conclude that umbral flashes result from increased emission of the local solar material during the passage of acoustic waves originating in the photosphere and steepening to shock in the chromosphere. To quantify the significance of possible physical mechanisms that contribute to the formation of umbral flashes, we perform a set of simulations on a grid formed by different wave power spectra, different inbound coronal radiation, and different parameterized chromospheric heating. Our simulations show that the waves with frequencies in the range 4.5-7.0 mHz are critical to the formation of the observed blueshifts of umbral flashes while waves with frequencies below 4.5 mHz do not play a role despite their dominance in the photosphere. The observed emission in the Ca II H core between flashes only occurs in the simulations that include significant inbound coronal radiation and/or extra non-radiative chromospheric heating in addition to shock dissipation.

  17. Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, S.C.

    1982-10-21

    A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180/sup 0/ intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

  18. Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Samuel C.

    1984-01-01

    A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180.degree. intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

  19. Holographic interferometric observation of shock wave focusing to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Obara, Tetsuro; Onodera, Osamu

    1991-04-01

    Underwater shock wave focusing is successfully applied to disintegrate and remove kidney stones or gallbladder stones without using surgical operations. This treatment is one of the most peaceful applications ofshock waves and is named as the Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy. Ajoint research project is going on between the Institute ofFluid Science, Tohoku University and the School ofMedicine, Tohoku University. The paper describes a result of the fundamental research on the underwater shock wave focusing applied to the ESWL. Quantitatively to visualize the underwater shock waves, various optical flow visualization techniques were successfully used such as holographic interferometry, and shadowgraphs combined with Ima-Con high speed camera. Double exposure holographic interferometric observation revealed the mechanism of generation, propagation and focusing of underwater shock waves. The result of the present research was already used to manufacture a prototype machine and it has already been applied successfully to ESWL crinical treatments. However, despite of success in the clinical treatments, important fundamental questions still remain unsolved, i.e., effects of underwater shock wave focusing on tissue damage during the treatment. Model experiments were conducted to clarify mechanism of the tissue damage associated with the ESWL. Shock-bubble interactions were found responsible to the tissue damage during the ESWL treatment. In order to interprete experimental findings and to predict shock wave behavior and high pressures, a numerical simulation was carried. The numerical results agreed with the experiments.

  20. Dust acoustic solitary and shock excitations in a Thomas-Fermi magnetoplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahim, Z.; Ali, S.; Qamar, A.

    2014-07-01

    The linear and nonlinear properties of dust-acoustic waves are investigated in a collisionless Thomas-Fermi magnetoplasma, whose constituents are electrons, ions, and negatively charged dust particles. At dust time scale, the electron and ion number densities follow the Thomas-Fermi distribution, whereas the dust component is described by the classical fluid equations. A linear dispersion relation is analyzed to show that the wave frequencies associated with the upper and lower modes are enhanced with the variation of dust concentration. The effect of the latter is seen more strongly on the upper mode as compared to the lower mode. For nonlinear analysis, we obtain magnetized Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equations involving the dust-acoustic solitary waves in the framework of reductive perturbation technique. Furthermore, the shock wave excitations are also studied by allowing dissipation effects in the model, leading to the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) and ZKB equations. The analysis reveals that the dust-acoustic solitary and shock excitations in a Thomas-Fermi plasma are strongly influenced by the plasma parameters, e.g., dust concentration, dust temperature, obliqueness, magnetic field strength, and dust fluid viscosity. The present results should be important for understanding the solitary and shock excitations in the environments of white dwarfs or supernova, where dust particles can exist.

  1. Dust acoustic solitary and shock excitations in a Thomas-Fermi magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rahim, Z.; Qamar, A.; Ali, S.

    2014-07-15

    The linear and nonlinear properties of dust-acoustic waves are investigated in a collisionless Thomas-Fermi magnetoplasma, whose constituents are electrons, ions, and negatively charged dust particles. At dust time scale, the electron and ion number densities follow the Thomas-Fermi distribution, whereas the dust component is described by the classical fluid equations. A linear dispersion relation is analyzed to show that the wave frequencies associated with the upper and lower modes are enhanced with the variation of dust concentration. The effect of the latter is seen more strongly on the upper mode as compared to the lower mode. For nonlinear analysis, we obtain magnetized Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equations involving the dust-acoustic solitary waves in the framework of reductive perturbation technique. Furthermore, the shock wave excitations are also studied by allowing dissipation effects in the model, leading to the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) and ZKB equations. The analysis reveals that the dust-acoustic solitary and shock excitations in a Thomas-Fermi plasma are strongly influenced by the plasma parameters, e.g., dust concentration, dust temperature, obliqueness, magnetic field strength, and dust fluid viscosity. The present results should be important for understanding the solitary and shock excitations in the environments of white dwarfs or supernova, where dust particles can exist.

  2. Application of Underwater Shock Wave Focusing to the Development of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    1993-05-01

    This paper describes a summary of a research project for the development of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), which has been carried out, under close collaboration between the Shock Wave Research Center of Tohoku University and the School of Medicine, Tohoku University. The ESWL is a noninvasive clinical treatment of disintegrating human calculi and one of the most peaceful applications of shock waves. Underwater spherical shock waves were generated by explosion of microexplosives. Characteristics of the underwater shock waves and of ultrasound focusing were studied by means of holographic interferometric flow visualization and polyvinyliden-difluoride (PVDF) pressure transducers. These focused pressures, when applied to clinical treatments, could effectively and noninvasively disintegrate urinary tract stones or gallbladder stones. However, despite clincal success, tissue damage occurs during ESWL treatments, and the possible mechanism of tissue damage is briefly described.

  3. Ion Acoustic Waves in Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.; McQuillen, P.; Killian, T. C.

    2010-08-06

    We photoionize laser-cooled atoms with a laser beam possessing spatially periodic intensity modulations to create ultracold neutral plasmas with controlled density perturbations. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging reveals that the density perturbations oscillate in space and time, and the dispersion relation of the oscillations matches that of ion acoustic waves, which are long-wavelength, electrostatic, density waves.

  4. Classical acoustic waves in damped media.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, E L; Mauriz, P W

    2003-05-01

    A Green function technique is employed to investigate the propagation of classical damped acoustic waves in complex media. The calculations are based on the linear response function approach, which is very convenient to deal with this kind of problem. Both the displacement and the gradient displacement Green functions are determined. All deformations in the media are supposed to be negligible, so the motions considered here are purely acoustic waves. The damping term gamma is included in a phenomenological way into the wave vector expression. By using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, the power spectrum of the acoustic waves is also derived and has interesting properties, the most important of them being a possible relation with the analysis of seismic reflection data.

  5. Shock Wave Structure in Particulate Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauls, Michael; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2015-06-01

    Shock wave experiments are conducted on a particulate composite consisting of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix reinforced by glass beads. Such a composite with an impedance mismatch of 4.3 closely mimics heterogeneous solids of interest such as concrete and energetic materials. The composite samples are prepared using a compression molding process. The structure and particle velocity rise times of the shocks are examined using forward ballistic experiments. Reverse ballistic experiments are used to track how the interface density influences velocity overshoot above the steady state particle velocity. The effects of particle size (0.1 to 1 mm) and volume fraction of glass beads (30-40%) on the structure of the leading shock wave are investigated. It is observed that the rise time increases with increasing particle size and scales linearly for the range of particle sizes considered here. Results from numerical simulations using CTH are compared with experimental results to gain insights into wave propagation in heterogeneous particulate composites.

  6. Magnetoacoustic shock waves in dissipative degenerate plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S.

    2011-11-15

    Quantum magnetoacoustic shock waves are studied in homogenous, magnetized, dissipative dense electron-ion plasma by using two fluid quantum magneto-hydrodynamic (QMHD) model. The weak dissipation effects in the system are taken into account through kinematic viscosity of the ions. The reductive perturbation method is employed to derive Korteweg-de Vries Burgers (KdVB) equation for magnetoacoustic wave propagating in the perpendicular direction to the external magnetic field in dense plasmas. The strength of magnetoacoustic shock is investigated with the variations in plasma density, magnetic field intensity, and ion kinematic viscosity of dense plasma system. The necessary condition for the existence of monotonic and oscillatory shock waves is also discussed. The numerical results are presented for illustration by using the data of astrophysical dense plasma situations such as neutron stars exist in the literature.

  7. Laser Light Scattering by Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Adamovsky, G.

    1995-01-01

    Scattering of coherent light as it propagates parallel to a shock wave, formed in front of a bluff cylindrical body placed in a supersonic stream, is studied experimentally and numerically. Two incident optical fields are considered. First, a large diameter collimated beam is allowed to pass through the shock containing flow. The light intensity distribution in the resultant shadowgraph image, measured by a low light CCD camera, shows well-defined fringes upstream and downstream of the shadow cast by the shock. In the second situation, a narrow laser beam is brought to a grazing incidence on the shock and the scattered light, which appears as a diverging sheet from the point of interaction, is visualized and measured on a screen placed normal to the laser path. Experiments are conducted on shocks formed at various free-stream Mach numbers, M, and total pressures, P(sub 0). It is found that the widths of the shock shadows in a shadowgraph image become independent of M and P(sub 0) when plotted against the jump in the refractive index, (Delta)n, created across the shock. The total scattered light measured from the narrow laser beam and shock interaction also follows the same trend. In the numerical part of the study, the shock is assumed to be a 'phase object', which introduces phase difference between the upstream and downstream propagating parts of the light disturbances. For a given shape and (Delta)n of the bow shock the phase and amplitude modulations are first calculated by ray tracing. The wave front is then propagated to the screen using the Fresnet diffraction equation. The calculated intensity distribution, for both of the incident optical fields, shows good agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Modeling Nonlinear Acoustic Standing Waves in Resonators: Theory and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Li, Xiaofan; Finkbeiner, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    The overall goal of the cooperative research with NASA Glenn is to fundamentally understand, computationally model, and experimentally validate non-linear acoustic waves in enclosures with the ultimate goal of developing a non-contact acoustic seal. The longer term goal is to transition the Glenn acoustic seal innovation to a prototype sealing device. Lucas and coworkers are credited with pioneering work in Resonant Macrosonic Synthesis (RMS). Several Patents and publications have successfully illustrated the concept of Resonant Macrosonic Synthesis. To utilize this concept in practical application one needs to have an understanding of the details of the phenomenon and a predictive tool that can examine the waveforms produced within resonators of complex shapes. With appropriately shaped resonators one can produce un-shocked waveforms of high amplitude that would result in very high pressures in certain regions. Our goal is to control the waveforms and exploit the high pressures to produce an acoustic seal. Note that shock formation critically limits peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes and also causes excessive energy dissipation. Proper shaping of the resonator is thus critical to the use of this innovation.

  9. Exciton transport by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, J.; Hey, R.; Santos, P. V.

    2007-05-01

    Long-range acoustic transport of excitons in GaAs quantum wells (QWs) is demonstrated. The mobile strain field of a surface acoustic wave creates a dynamic lateral type I modulation of the conduction and valence bands in a double-quantum-well (DQW) structure. This mobile potential modulation transports long-living indirect excitons in the DQW over several hundreds of μm.

  10. PVDF Shock Compression Sensors in Shock Wave Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, F.

    2004-07-01

    Early works have shown that highly reproducible piezoelectric film PVDF (Poly(vinylidene fluoride)) can be reliably used in a wide range of precise stress and stress-rate measurements. The direct stress-derivative or stress-rate PVDF signals have nanosecond resolution and higher operating stress limits than any other technique. PVDF stress gauges have been used in many fields of shock wave physics. The present paper summarizes some of original applications of the PVDF gauges. Blast and shock in air measurements will be presented. Pressure responses of inert materials and polymer-materials will be recalled. Furthermore, example of pressure and particle velocity histories using PVDF and laser interferometry (VISAR) will be presented. Simultaneous measurements using VISAR and PVDF gauge will be discussed. The question of the validity of shock pressure profiles obtained with "in situ" PVDF gauges in one High Explosive in a detonation regime will be discussed.

  11. [Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy for children].

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, A; Matsuda, H; Uemura, T; Kohri, K; Kurita, T; Kanbara, N; Tamura, M

    1988-06-01

    We performed extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) on a 5-year-old and 8-year-old. Ureteral calculi in both patients were disintegrated, and all fragments were passable spontaneously. The 5-year-old girl was the youngest of the cases of ESWL reported in Japan. As this patient was 107 cm in height, we put a styrofoam layer on the back of this patient. This protected her lung from the shock wave, and the height limit was released from the ESWL treatment. These cases and the peculiarities and devices for ESWL in the pediatric field are discussed. PMID:3223460

  12. Scattering of ultrasonic shock waves in suspensions of silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Baudoin, Michael; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Coulouvrat, François; Chanéac, Corinne

    2011-03-01

    Experiments are carried out to assess, for the first time, the validity of a generalized Burgers' equation, introduced first by Davidson [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 54, 1331-1342 (1973)] to compute the nonlinear propagation of finite amplitude acoustical waves in suspensions of "rigid" particles. Silica nanoparticles of two sizes (33 and 69 nm) have been synthesized in a water-ethanol mixture and precisely characterized via electron microscopy. An acoustical beam of high amplitude is generated at 1 MHz inside a water tank, leading to the formation of acoustical shock waves through nonlinear steepening. The signal is then measured after propagation in a cylinder containing either a reference solution or suspensions of nanoparticles. In this way, a "nonlinear attenuation" is obtained and compared to the numerical solution of a generalized Burgers' equation adapted to the case of hydrosols. An excellent agreement (corresponding to an error on the particles size estimation of 3 nm) is achieved in the frequency range from 1 to 40 MHz. Both visco-inertial and thermal scattering are significant in the present case, whereas thermal effects can generally be neglected for most hydrosols. This is due to the value of the specific heat ratio of water-ethanol mixture which significantly differs from unity.

  13. Bubbles with shock waves and ultrasound: a review

    PubMed Central

    Ohl, Siew-Wan; Klaseboer, Evert; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2015-01-01

    The study of the interaction of bubbles with shock waves and ultrasound is sometimes termed ‘acoustic cavitation'. It is of importance in many biomedical applications where sound waves are applied. The use of shock waves and ultrasound in medical treatments is appealing because of their non-invasiveness. In this review, we present a variety of acoustics–bubble interactions, with a focus on shock wave–bubble interaction and bubble cloud phenomena. The dynamics of a single spherically oscillating bubble is rather well understood. However, when there is a nearby surface, the bubble often collapses non-spherically with a high-speed jet. The direction of the jet depends on the ‘resistance' of the boundary: the bubble jets towards a rigid boundary, splits up near an elastic boundary, and jets away from a free surface. The presence of a shock wave complicates the bubble dynamics further. We shall discuss both experimental studies using high-speed photography and numerical simulations involving shock wave–bubble interaction. In biomedical applications, instead of a single bubble, often clouds of bubbles appear (consisting of many individual bubbles). The dynamics of such a bubble cloud is even more complex. We shall show some of the phenomena observed in a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) field. The nonlinear nature of the sound field and the complex inter-bubble interaction in a cloud present challenges to a comprehensive understanding of the physics of the bubble cloud in HIFU. We conclude the article with some comments on the challenges ahead. PMID:26442143

  14. Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2003-08-01

    There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

  15. Topological charge pump by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zheng; Shi-Ping, Feng; Shi-Jie, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Quantized electron pumping by the surface acoustic wave across barriers created by a sequence of split metal gates is interpreted from the viewpoint of topology. The surface acoustic wave serves as a one-dimensional periodical potential whose energy spectrum possesses the Bloch band structure. The time-dependent phase plays the role of an adiabatic parameter of the Hamiltonian which induces a geometrical phase. The pumping currents are related to the Chern numbers of the filled bands below the Fermi energy. Based on this understanding, we predict a novel effect of quantized but non-monotonous current plateaus simultaneously pumped by two homodromous surface acoustic waves. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374036) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB821403).

  16. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    SciTech Connect

    Branch; Darren W. , Meyer; Grant D. , Craighead; Harold G.

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  17. In situ wave phenomena in the upstream and downstream regions of interplanetary shocks: Implications for type 2 burst theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Vinas, A. F.

    1997-01-01

    The results are presented of in situ waves observed by the Ulyssess unified radio and plasma wave experiment (URAP) in the upstream and downstream regions of a large number of interplanetary shocks. The Langmuir waves which are the most essential ingredients for the type 2 radio emission are observed only in the upstream regions of a limited number of shocks. On the other hand, the ion-acoustic-like waves (0.5 to 5 kHz) are observed near most of the interplanetary shocks. Implications of observations made for the electron acceleration mechanisms at the collisionless shocks and for type 2 burst theories are presented.

  18. Oblique shock waves in a two electron temperature superthermally magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bains, A. S.; Panwar, A.; Ryu, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    A study is presented for the oblique propagation of low-frequency ion acoustic ( IA) shock waves in a magnetized plasma consisting of cold ions and two temperature superthermally distributed electrons. A nonlinear Korteweg de-Vries-Burger ( KdV-Burger) equation is obtained by using the reductive perturbation method (RPM) which governs the dynamics of the IA shock wave. Using the solution of KdV-Burger equation, the characteristics of the IA shock wave have been studied for various plasma parameters. The combined effects of the cold to hot electron temperature ratio (σ), the density ratio of hot electrons to ions (f), the superthermality of cold and hot electrons (κc, κh), the strength of the magnetic field (ω_{ci}), and the obliqueness (θ), significantly influence the profile of the shock wave. The findings in the present study could be important for the electrostatic wave structures in the Saturn's magnetosphere, where two temperature electrons exist with a kappa distribution.

  19. Combined short and long-delay tandem shock waves to improve shock wave lithotripsy according to the Gilmore-Akulichev theory.

    PubMed

    de Icaza-Herrera, Miguel; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M

    2015-04-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is a common non-invasive treatment for urinary stones whose fragmentation is achieved mainly by acoustic cavitation and mechanical stress. A few years ago, in vitro and in vivo experimentation demonstrated that such fragmentation can be improved, without increasing tissue damage, by sending a second shock wave hundreds of microseconds after the previous wave. Later, numerical simulations revealed that if the second pulse had a longer full width at half maximum than a standard shock wave, cavitation could be enhanced significantly. On the other side, a theoretical study showed that stress inside the stone can be increased if two lithotripter shock waves hit the stone with a delay of only 20 μs. We used the Gilmore-Akulichev formulation to show that, in principle, both effects can be combined, that is, stress and cavitation could be increased using a pressure pulse with long full width at half maximum, which reaches the stone within hundreds of microseconds after two 20 μs-delayed initial shock waves. Implementing the suggested pressure profile into clinical devices could be feasible, especially with piezoelectric shock wave sources. PMID:25553714

  20. Combined short and long-delay tandem shock waves to improve shock wave lithotripsy according to the Gilmore-Akulichev theory.

    PubMed

    de Icaza-Herrera, Miguel; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M

    2015-04-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is a common non-invasive treatment for urinary stones whose fragmentation is achieved mainly by acoustic cavitation and mechanical stress. A few years ago, in vitro and in vivo experimentation demonstrated that such fragmentation can be improved, without increasing tissue damage, by sending a second shock wave hundreds of microseconds after the previous wave. Later, numerical simulations revealed that if the second pulse had a longer full width at half maximum than a standard shock wave, cavitation could be enhanced significantly. On the other side, a theoretical study showed that stress inside the stone can be increased if two lithotripter shock waves hit the stone with a delay of only 20 μs. We used the Gilmore-Akulichev formulation to show that, in principle, both effects can be combined, that is, stress and cavitation could be increased using a pressure pulse with long full width at half maximum, which reaches the stone within hundreds of microseconds after two 20 μs-delayed initial shock waves. Implementing the suggested pressure profile into clinical devices could be feasible, especially with piezoelectric shock wave sources.

  1. Magnetically accelerated foils for shock wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Stephan; Ford, Jessica; Martinez, David; Plechaty, Christopher; Wright, Sandra; Presura, Radu

    2008-04-01

    The interaction of shock waves with inhomogeneous media is important in many astrophysical problems, e.g. the role of shock compression in star formation. Using scaled experiments with inhomogeneous foam targets makes it possible to study relevant physics in the laboratory, to better understand the mechanisms of shock compression and to benchmark astrophysical simulation codes. Experiments with flyer-generated shock waves have been performed on the Z machine in Sandia. The Zebra accelerator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) allows for complementary experiments with high repetition rate. First experiments on Zebra demonstrated flyer acceleration to sufficiently high velocities (around 2 km/s) and that laser shadowgraphy can image sound fronts in transparent targets. Based on this, we designed an optimized setup to improve the flyer parameters (higher speed and mass) to create shock waves in transparent media. Once x-ray backlighting with the Leopard laser at NTF is operational, we will switch to foam targets with parameters relevant for laboratory astrophysics.

  2. Plasma waves downstream of weak collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.; Greenstadt, E. W.; Moses, S. L.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    In September 1983 the International Sun Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE 3) International Cometary Explorer (ICE) spacecraft made a long traversal of the distant dawnside flank region of the Earth's magnetosphere and had many encounters with the low Mach number bow shock. These weak shocks excite plasma wave electric field turbulence with amplitudes comparable to those detected in the much stronger bow shock near the nose region. Downstream of quasi-perpendicular (quasi-parallel) shocks, the E field spectra exhibit a strong peak (plateau) at midfrequencies (1 - 3 kHz); the plateau shape is produced by a low-frequency (100 - 300 Hz) emission which is more intense behind downstream of two quasi-perpendicular shocks show that the low frequency signals are polarized parallel to the magnetic field, whereas the midfrequency emissions are unpolarized or only weakly polarized. A new high frequency (10 - 30 kHz) emission which is above the maximum Doppler shift exhibit a distinct peak at high frequencies; this peak is often blurred by the large amplitude fluctuations of the midfrequency waves. The high-frequency component is strongly polarized along the magnetic field and varies independently of the lower-frequency waves.

  3. A heuristic model of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nathan B; Zhong, Pei

    2013-08-01

    A heuristic model is presented to describe the overall progression of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), accounting for the effects of shock wave dose and the average peak pressure, P+(avg), incident on the stone during the treatment. The model is developed through adaptation of the Weibull theory for brittle fracture, incorporating threshold values in dose and P+(avg) that are required to initiate fragmentation. The model is validated against experimental data of stone comminution from two stone types (hard and soft BegoStone) obtained at various positions in lithotripter fields produced by two shock wave sources of different beam width and pulse profile both in water and in 1,3-butanediol (which suppresses cavitation). Subsequently, the model is used to assess the performance of a newly developed acoustic lens for electromagnetic lithotripters in comparison with its original counterpart both under static and simulated respiratory motion. The results have demonstrated the predictive value of this heuristic model in elucidating the physical basis for improved performance of the new lens. The model also provides a rationale for the selection of SWL treatment protocols to achieve effective stone comminution without elevating the risk of tissue injury.

  4. A heuristic model of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nathan B.; Zhong, Pei

    2013-01-01

    A heuristic model is presented to describe the overall progression of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), accounting for the effects of shock wave dose and the average peak pressure, P+(avg), incident on the stone during the treatment. The model is developed through adaptation of the Weibull theory for brittle fracture, incorporating threshold values in dose and P+(avg) that are required to initiate fragmentation. The model is validated against experimental data of stone comminution from two stone types (hard and soft BegoStone) obtained at various positions in lithotripter fields produced by two shock wave sources of different beam width and pulse profile both in water and in 1,3-butanediol (which suppresses cavitation). Subsequently, the model is used to assess the performance of a newly developed acoustic lens for electromagnetic lithotripters in comparison with its original counterpart both under static and simulated respiratory motion. The results have demonstrated the predictive value of this heuristic model in elucidating the physical basis for improved performance of the new lens. The model also provides a rationale for the selection of SWL treatment protocols to achieve effective stone comminution without elevating the risk of tissue injury. PMID:23927195

  5. Magnetically accelerated foils for shock wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, S.; Ford, J.; Wright, S.; Martinez, D.; Plechaty, C.; Presura, R.

    2009-08-01

    Many astrophysical phenomena involve the interaction of a shock wave with an inhomogeneous background medium. Using scaled experiments with inhomogeneous foam targets makes it possible to study relevant physics in the laboratory to better understand the mechanisms of shock compression and to benchmark astrophysical simulation codes. First experiments on Zebra at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) have demonstrated flyer acceleration to sufficiently high velocities (up to 5 km/s) and that laser shadowgraphy can image sound fronts in transparent targets. Based on this, we designed an optimized setup to improve the flyer parameters (higher speed and mass) to create shock waves in transparent media. Once x-ray backlighting with the Leopard laser at NTF is operational, we will switch to foam targets with parameters relevant for laboratory astrophysics.

  6. International Shock-Wave Database: Current Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levashov, Pavel

    2013-06-01

    Shock-wave and related dynamic material response data serve for calibrating, validating, and improving material models over very broad regions of the pressure-temperature-density phase space. Since the middle of the 20th century vast amount of shock-wave experimental information has been obtained. To systemize it a number of compendiums of shock-wave data has been issued by LLNL, LANL (USA), CEA (France), IPCP and VNIIEF (Russia). In mid-90th the drawbacks of the paper handbooks became obvious, so the first version of the online shock-wave database appeared in 1997 (http://www.ficp.ac.ru/rusbank). It includes approximately 20000 experimental points on shock compression, adiabatic expansion, measurements of sound velocity behind the shock front and free-surface-velocity for more than 650 substances. This is still a useful tool for the shock-wave community, but it has a number of serious disadvantages which can't be easily eliminated: (i) very simple data format for points and references; (ii) minimalistic user interface for data addition; (iii) absence of history of changes; (iv) bad feedback from users. The new International Shock-Wave database (ISWdb) is intended to solve these and some other problems. The ISWdb project objectives are: (i) to develop a database on thermodynamic and mechanical properties of materials under conditions of shock-wave and other dynamic loadings, selected related quantities of interest, and the meta-data that describes the provenance of the measurements and material models; and (ii) to make this database available internationally through the Internet, in an interactive form. The development and operation of the ISWdb is guided by an advisory committee. The database will be installed on two mirrored web-servers, one in Russia and the other in USA (currently only one server is available). The database provides access to original experimental data on shock compression, non-shock dynamic loadings, isentropic expansion, measurements of sound

  7. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1998-01-01

    We have begun a comprehensive series of analyses and experiments to study the basic problem of shock wave dynamics in ionized media. Our objective is to isolate the mechanisms that are responsible for the decrease in the shock amplitude and also to determine the relevant plasma parameters that will be required for a drag reduction scheme in an actual high altitude hypersonic flight. Specifically, we have initiated a program of analyses and measurements with the objective of (i) fully characterizing the propagation dynamics in plasmas formed in gases of aerodynamic interest, (ii) isolating the mechanisms responsible for the decreased shock strength and increased shock velocity, (iii) extrapolating the laboratory observations to the technology of supersonic flight.

  8. 21 CFR 876.5990 - Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... focuses ultrasonic shock waves into the body to noninvasively fragment urinary calculi within the kidney... Notifications (510(k)'s) for Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripters Indicated for the Fragmentation of...

  9. 21 CFR 876.5990 - Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... focuses ultrasonic shock waves into the body to noninvasively fragment urinary calculi within the kidney... Notifications (510(k)'s) for Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripters Indicated for the Fragmentation of...

  10. 21 CFR 876.5990 - Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... focuses ultrasonic shock waves into the body to noninvasively fragment urinary calculi within the kidney... Notifications (510(k)'s) for Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripters Indicated for the Fragmentation of...

  11. The Interaction of Turbulence with Shock Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G. P.; Kryukov, I. A.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Shaikh, D.

    2010-03-25

    The heliosheath was expected to be turbulent, the result of upstream turbulence and disturbances (shock waves, pressure and density enhancements, structures, etc.) being transmitted across and interacting with the heliospheric termination shock (HTS). A turbulent heliosheath has indeed been observed downstream of the HTS, but the character of the turbulence is significantly different from that of the solar wind. Here, we discuss the transmission of waves and turbulence across the HTS, both analytically and numerically, in the large plasma beta approximation, and we investigate both small amplitude and large-amplitude cases. We find that the linear theory is a reasonable approximation for small amplitude waves incident on the shock. In the case of large amplitude entropy fluctuations incident on the shock, the downstream state is initially one of coherent wave forms, but this rapidly devolves to a highly disturbed state that evolves eventually to a state dominated by vortical structures. Of particular importance, we find that the HTS generates significant levels of downstream compressible turbulence, even in their absence upstream.

  12. Shock wave absorber having a deformable liner

    DOEpatents

    Youngdahl, C.K.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    This invention discloses a shock wave absorber for a piping system carrying liquid. The absorber has a plastically deformable liner defining the normal flow boundary for an axial segment of the piping system, and a nondeformable housing is spaced outwardly from the liner so as to define a gas-tight space therebetween. The flow capacity of the liner generally corresponds to the flow capacity of the piping system line, but the liner has a noncircular cross section and extends axially of the piping system line a distance between one and twenty times the diameter thereof. Gas pressurizes the gas-tight space equal to the normal liquid pressure in the piping system. The liner has sufficient structural capacity to withstand between one and one-half and two times this normal liquid pressures; but at greater pressures it begins to plastically deform initially with respect to shape to a more circular cross section, and then with respect to material extension by circumferentially stretching the wall of the liner. A high energy shock wave passing through the liner thus plastically deforms the liner radially into the gas space and progressively also as needed in the axial direction of the shock wave to minimize transmission of the shock wave beyond the absorber.

  13. Density Shock Waves in Confined Microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Motile and driven particles confined in microfluidic channels exhibit interesting emergent behavior, from propagating density bands to density shock waves. A deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for these emergent structures is relevant to a number of physical and biomedical applications. Here, we study the formation of density shock waves in the context of an idealized model of microswimmers confined in a narrow channel and subject to a uniform external flow. Interestingly, these density shock waves exhibit a transition from "subsonic" with compression at the back to "supersonic" with compression at the front of the population as the intensity of the external flow increases. This behavior is the result of a nontrivial interplay between hydrodynamic interactions and geometric confinement, and it is confirmed by a novel quasilinear wave model that properly captures the dependence of the shock formation on the external flow. These findings can be used to guide the development of novel mechanisms for controlling the emergent density distribution and the average population speed, with potentially profound implications on various processes in industry and biotechnology, such as the transport and sorting of cells in flow channels.

  14. Numerical study of heterogeneous mean temperature and shock wave in a resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Takeru

    2015-10-28

    When a frequency of gas oscillation in an acoustic resonator is sufficiently close to one of resonant frequencies of the resonator, the amplitude of gas oscillation becomes large and hence the nonlinear effect manifests itself. Then, if the dissipation effects due to viscosity and thermal conductivity of the gas are sufficiently small, the gas oscillation may evolve into the acoustic shock wave, in the so-called consonant resonators. At the shock front, the kinetic energy of gas oscillation is converted into heat by the dissipation process inside the shock layer, and therefore the temperature of the gas in the resonator rises. Since the acoustic shock wave travels in the resonator repeatedly over and over again, the temperature rise becomes noticeable in due course of time even if the shock wave is weak. We numerically study the gas oscillation with shock wave in a resonator of square cross section by solving the initial and boundary value problem of the system of three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with a finite difference method. In this case, the heat conduction across the boundary layer on the wall of resonator causes a spatially heterogeneous distribution of mean (time-averaged) gas temperature.

  15. On the fully nonlinear acoustic waves in a plasma with positrons beam impact and superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Shan, S.; El-Tantawy, S. A.; Moslem, W. M.

    2013-08-15

    Arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of cold positive ions, superthermal electrons, and positrons beam are reported. The basic set of fluid equations is reduced to an energy-balance like equation. The latter is numerically analyzed to examine the existence regions for solitary and shock waves. It is found that only solitary waves can propagate, however, the model cannot support shocks. The effects of superthermality and beam parameters (via, positrons concentration and streaming velocity) on the existence region, as well as solitary wave profile have been discussed.

  16. Linear and nonlinear coupled drift and ion acoustic waves in collisional pair ion-electron magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mushtaq, A.; Saeed, R.; Haque, Q.

    2011-04-15

    Linear and nonlinear coupled electrostatic drift and ion acoustic waves are studied in inhomogeneous, collisional pair ion-electron plasma. The Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) equation for a medium where both dispersion and dissipation are present is derived. An attempt is made to obtain exact solution of KdVB equation by using modified tanh-coth method for arbitrary velocity of nonlinear drift wave. Another exact solution for KdVB is obtained, which gives a structure of shock wave. Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and Burgers equations are derived in limiting cases with solitary and monotonic shock solutions, respectively. Effects of species density, magnetic field, obliqueness, and the acoustic to drift velocity ratio on the solitary and shock solutions are investigated. The results discussed are useful in understanding of low frequency electrostatic waves at laboratory pair ion plasmas.

  17. Broadband acoustic cloak for ultrasound waves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Xia, Chunguang; Fang, Nicholas

    2011-01-14

    Invisibility devices based on coordinate transformation have opened up a new field of considerable interest. We present here the first practical realization of a low-loss and broadband acoustic cloak for underwater ultrasound. This metamaterial cloak is constructed with a network of acoustic circuit elements, namely, serial inductors and shunt capacitors. Our experiment clearly shows that the acoustic cloak can effectively bend the ultrasound waves around the hidden object, with reduced scattering and shadow. Because of the nonresonant nature of the building elements, this low-loss (∼6  dB/m) cylindrical cloak exhibits invisibility over a broad frequency range from 52 to 64 kHz. Furthermore, our experimental study indicates that this design approach should be scalable to different acoustic frequencies and offers the possibility for a variety of devices based on coordinate transformation.

  18. Acoustic wave levitation: Handling of components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandaele, Vincent; Delchambre, Alain; Lambert, Pierre

    2011-06-01

    Apart from contact micromanipulation, there exists a large variety of levitation techniques among which standing wave levitation will be proposed as a way to handle (sub)millimetric components. This paper will compare analytical formulas to calculate the order of magnitude of the levitation force. It will then describe digital simulation and experimental levitation setup. Stable levitation of various components (cardboard, steel washer, ball, ceramic capacity, water droplet) was shown along 5 degrees of freedom: The only degree of freedom that could not be mastered was the rotation about the symmetry axis of the acoustic field. More importantly, the present work will show the modification of the orientation of the radial force component in the presence of an object disturbing the acoustic field. This property can be used as a new feeding strategy as it means that levitating components are spontaneously pushed toward grippers in an acoustic plane standing wave.

  19. Shock waves and double layers in electron degenerate dense plasma with viscous ion fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, A. A.; Zobaer, M. S.

    2014-02-15

    The properties of ion-acoustic shock waves and double layers propagating in a viscous degenerate dense plasma (containing inertial viscous ion fluid, non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate electron fluid, and negatively charged stationary heavy element) is investigated. A new nonlinear equation (viz. Gardner equation with additional dissipative term) is derived by the reductive perturbation method. The properties of the ion-acoustic shock waves and double layers are examined by the analysis of the shock and double layer solutions of this new equation (we would like to call it “M-Z equation”). It is found that the properties of these shock and double layer structures obtained from this analysis are significantly different from those obtained from the analysis of standard Gardner or Burgers’ equation. The implications of our results to dense plasmas in astrophysical objects (e.g., non-rotating white dwarf stars) are briefly discussed.

  20. Shock wave structure in heterogeneous reactive media

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.

    1997-06-01

    Continuum mixture theory and mesoscale modeling are applied to describe the behavior of shock-loaded heterogeneous media. One-dimensional simulations of gas-gun experiments demonstrate that the wave features are well described by mixture theory, including reflected wave behavior and conditions where significant reaction is initiated. Detailed wave fields are resolved in numerical simulations of impact on a lattice of discrete explosive {open_quotes}crystals{close_quotes}. It is shown that rapid distortion first occurs at material contact points; the nature of the dispersive fields includes large amplitude fluctuations of stress over several particle pathlengths. Localization of energy causes {open_quotes}hot-spots{close_quotes} due to shock focusing and plastic work as material flows into interstitial regions.

  1. Acoustic-Gravity Waves from Bolide Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revelle, Douglas O.

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a new approach to modeling the acoustic-gravity wave (AGW) radiation from bolide sources. This first effort involves entry modeling of bolide sources that have available satellite data through procedures developed in ReVelle (Earth Moon Planets 95, 441-476, 2004a; in: A. Milani, G. Valsecchi, D. Vokrouhlicky (eds) NEO Fireball Diversity: Energetics-based Entry Modeling and Analysis Techniques, Near-earth Objects: Our Celestial Neighbors (IAU S236), 2007b). Results from the entry modeling are directly coupled to AGW production through line source blast wave theory for the initial wave amplitude and period at x=10 (at 10 blast wave radii and perpendicular to the trajectory). The second effort involves the prediction of the formation and or dominance of the propagation of the atmospheric Lamb, edge-wave composite mode in a viscous fluid (Pierce, J. Acoust. Soc. Amer. 35, 1798-1807, 1963) as a function of the source energy, horizontal range and source altitude using the Lamb wave frequency that was deduced directly during the entry modeling and that is used as a surrogate for the source energy. We have also determined that Lamb wave production by bolides at close range decreases dramatically as either the source energy decreases or the source altitude increases. Finally using procedures in Gill ( Atmospheric-Ocean Dynamics, 1982) and in Tolstoy ( Wave Propagation, 1973), we have analyzed two simple dispersion relationships and have calculated the expected dispersion for the Lamb edge-wave mode and for the excited, propagating internal acoustic waves. Finally, we have used the above formalism to fully evaluate these techniques for four large bolides, namely: the Tunguska bolide of June 30, 1908; the Revelstoke bolide of March 31, 1965; the Crete bolide of June 6, 2002 and the Antarctic bolide of September 3, 2004. Due to page limitations, we will only present results in detail for the Revelstoke bolide.

  2. Periodic shock-emission from acoustically driven cavitation clouds: a source of the subharmonic signal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Keith; Tapia-Siles, Cecilia; Gerold, Bjoern; Postema, Michiel; Cochran, Sandy; Cuschieri, Alfred; Prentice, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Single clouds of cavitation bubbles, driven by 254kHz focused ultrasound at pressure amplitudes in the range of 0.48-1.22MPa, have been observed via high-speed shadowgraphic imaging at 1×10(6) frames per second. Clouds underwent repetitive growth, oscillation and collapse (GOC) cycles, with shock-waves emitted periodically at the instant of collapse during each cycle. The frequency of cloud collapse, and coincident shock-emission, was primarily dependent on the intensity of the focused ultrasound driving the activity. The lowest peak-to-peak pressure amplitude of 0.48MPa generated shock-waves with an average period of 7.9±0.5μs, corresponding to a frequency of f0/2, half-harmonic to the fundamental driving. Increasing the intensity gave rise to GOC cycles and shock-emission periods of 11.8±0.3, 15.8±0.3, 19.8±0.2μs, at pressure amplitudes of 0.64, 0.92 and 1.22MPa, corresponding to the higher-order subharmonics of f0/3, f0/4 and f0/5, respectively. Parallel passive acoustic detection, filtered for the fundamental driving, revealed features that correlated temporally to the shock-emissions observed via high-speed imaging, p(two-tailed) < 0.01 (r=0.996, taken over all data). Subtracting the isolated acoustic shock profiles from the raw signal collected from the detector, demonstrated the removal of subharmonic spectral peaks, in the frequency domain. The larger cavitation clouds (>200μm diameter, at maximum inflation), that developed under insonations of peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes >1.0MPa, emitted shock-waves with two or more fronts suggesting non-uniform collapse of the cloud. The observations indicate that periodic shock-emissions from acoustically driven cavitation clouds provide a source for the cavitation subharmonic signal, and that shock structure may be used to study intra-cloud dynamics at sub-microsecond timescales.

  3. Application Of Holographic Interferometry To Shock Wave Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, K.

    1983-10-01

    Paper reports a successful application of holographic interferometry to the shock wave research. Four topics are discussed; i) transonic flow over an aerofoil, ii) shock wave propagation and diffraction past a circular cross-sectional 90° bend and two-dimensional straight or curved wedges, iii) stability of converging cylindrical shock waves and iv) propagation and focusing of underwater shock waves. Experiments were conducted on shock tubes equipped with a double exposure holographic interferometer. In each case isopycnics around shock waves were determined and three-dimensional shock wave interactions were also observed. Results are not only bringing forth new interesting findings to the shock wave research but also showing a further potentiality of holographic interferometry to the high speed gasdynamic study.

  4. Marble Ageing Characterization by Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudani, Mohamed El; Wilkie-Chancellier, Nicolas; Martinez, Loïc; Hébert, Ronan; Rolland, Olivier; Forst, Sébastien; Vergès-Belmin, Véronique; Serfaty, Stéphane

    In cultural heritage, statue marble characterization by acoustic waves is a well-known non-destructive method. Such investigations through the statues by time of flight method (TOF) point out sound speeds decrease with ageing. However for outdoor stored statues as the ones in the gardens of Chateau de Versailles, ageing affects mainly the surface of the Carrara marble. The present paper proposes an experimental study of the marble acoustic properties variations during accelerated laboratory ageing. The surface degradation of the marble is reproduced in laboratory for 29 mm thick marble samples by using heating/cooling thermal cycles on one face of a marble plate. Acoustic waves are generated by 1 MHz central frequency contact transducers excited by a voltage pulse placed on both sides of the plate. During the ageing and by using ad hoc transducers, the marble samples are characterized in transmission, along their volume by shear, compressional TOF measurements and along their surface by Rayleigh waves measurements. For Rayleigh waves, both TOF by transducers and laser vibrometry methods are used to detect the Rayleigh wave. The transmission measurements point out a deep decrease of the waves speeds in conjunction with a dramatic decrease of the maximum frequency transmitted. The marble acts as a low pass filter whose characteristic frequency cut decreases with ageing. This pattern occurs also for the Rayleigh wave surface measurements. The speed change in conjunction with the bandwidth translation is shown to be correlated to the material de-structuration during ageing. With a similar behavior but reversed in time, the same king of phenomena have been observed trough sol-gel materials during their structuration from liquid to solid state (Martinez, L. et all (2004). "Chirp-Z analysis for sol-gel transition monitoring". Ultrasonics, 42(1), 507-510.). A model is proposed to interpret the acoustical measurements

  5. A note on weak shock wave reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, D. P.; Susin, F. M.; Defina, A.

    2013-09-01

    This work discusses the possibility of reconstructing, both numerically and experimentally, the steady state flow field and shock reflection pattern close to the triple point of von Neumann, Guderley and Vasilev reflections. First, a criterion for the orientation of shock wave fronts, even in the case of subcritical/subsonic flow downstream the front, is introduced and formalized. Then, a technique for obtaining a close view of the above reflection patterns centered about the triple point is described and a numerical example, within the framework of shallow water flow, is presented and discussed.

  6. Measuring Acoustic Nonlinearity by Collinear Mixing Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Tang, G.; Jacobs, L. J.; Qu, J.

    2011-06-01

    It is well known that the acoustic nonlinearity parameter β is correlated to fatigue damage in metallic materials. Various methods have been developed to measure β. One of the most often used methods is the harmonic generation technique, in which β is obtained by measuring the magnitude of the second order harmonic waves. An inherent weakness of this method is the difficulty in distinguishing material nonlinearity from the nonlinearity of the measurement system. In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility of using collinear mixing waves to measure β. The wave mixing method is based on the interaction between two incident waves in a nonlinear medium. Under certain conditions, such interactions generate a third wave of different frequency. This generated third wave is also called resonant wave, because its amplitude is unbounded if the medium has no attenuation. Such resonant waves are less sensitive to the nonlinearity of the measurement system, and have the potential to identify the source location of the nonlinearity. In this work, we used a longitudinal wave and a shear wave as the incident waves. The resonant shear wave is measured experimentally on samples made of aluminum and steel, respectively. Numerical simulations of the tests were also performed using a finite difference method.

  7. Shock wave interactions between slender bodies - Some aspects of three-dimensional shock wave diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooseria, S. J.; Skews, B. W.

    2016-04-01

    A complex interference flowfield consisting of multiple shocks and expansion waves is produced when high-speed slender bodies are placed in close proximity. The disturbances originating from a generator body impinge onto the adjacent receiver body, modifying the local flow conditions over the receiver. This paper aims to uncover the basic gas dynamics produced by two closely spaced slender bodies in a supersonic freestream. Experiments and numerical simulations were used to interpret the flowfield, where good agreement between the predictions and measurements was observed. The numerical data were then used to characterise the attenuation associated with shock wave diffraction, which was found to be interdependent with the bow shock contact perimeter over the receiver bodies. Shock-induced boundary layer separation was observed over the conical and hemispherical receiver bodies. These strong viscous-shock interactions result in double-reflected, as well as double-diffracted shock wave geometries in the interference region, and the diffracting waves progress over the conical and hemispherical receivers' surfaces in "lambda" type configurations. This gives evidence that viscous effects can have a substantial influence on the local bow shock structure surrounding high-speed slender bodies in close proximity.

  8. Acoustic wave-equation-based earthquake location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ping; Yang, Dinghui; Liu, Qinya; Yang, Xu; Harris, Jerry

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel earthquake location method using acoustic wave-equation-based traveltime inversion. The linear relationship between the location perturbation (δt0, δxs) and the resulting traveltime residual δt of a particular seismic phase, represented by the traveltime sensitivity kernel K(t0, xs) with respect to the earthquake location (t0, xs), is theoretically derived based on the adjoint method. Traveltime sensitivity kernel K(t0, xs) is formulated as a convolution between the forward and adjoint wavefields, which are calculated by numerically solving two acoustic wave equations. The advantage of this newly derived traveltime kernel is that it not only takes into account the earthquake-receiver geometry but also accurately honours the complexity of the velocity model. The earthquake location is obtained by solving a regularized least-squares problem. In 3-D realistic applications, it is computationally expensive to conduct full wave simulations. Therefore, we propose a 2.5-D approach which assumes the forward and adjoint wave simulations within a 2-D vertical plane passing through the earthquake and receiver. Various synthetic examples show the accuracy of this acoustic wave-equation-based earthquake location method. The accuracy and efficiency of the 2.5-D approach for 3-D earthquake location are further verified by its application to the 2004 Big Bear earthquake in Southern California.

  9. Extraordinary transmission of gigahertz surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Mezil, Sylvain; Chonan, Kazuki; Otsuka, Paul H; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu; Lee, Sam H; Wright, Oliver B

    2016-09-19

    Extraordinary transmission of waves, i.e. a transmission superior to the amount predicted by geometrical considerations of the aperture alone, has to date only been studied in the bulk. Here we present a new class of extraordinary transmission for waves confined in two dimensions to a flat surface. By means of acoustic numerical simulations in the gigahertz range, corresponding to acoustic wavelengths λ ~ 3-50 μm, we track the transmission of plane surface acoustic wave fronts between two silicon blocks joined by a deeply subwavelength bridge of variable length with or without an attached cavity. Several resonant modes of the structure, both one- and two-dimensional in nature, lead to extraordinary acoustic transmission, in this case with transmission efficiencies, i.e. intensity enhancements, up to ~23 and ~8 in the two respective cases. We show how the cavity shape and bridge size influence the extraordinary transmission efficiency. Applications include new metamaterials and subwavelength imaging.

  10. Extraordinary transmission of gigahertz surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezil, Sylvain; Chonan, Kazuki; Otsuka, Paul H.; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu; Lee, Sam H.; Wright, Oliver B.

    2016-09-01

    Extraordinary transmission of waves, i.e. a transmission superior to the amount predicted by geometrical considerations of the aperture alone, has to date only been studied in the bulk. Here we present a new class of extraordinary transmission for waves confined in two dimensions to a flat surface. By means of acoustic numerical simulations in the gigahertz range, corresponding to acoustic wavelengths λ ~ 3–50 μm, we track the transmission of plane surface acoustic wave fronts between two silicon blocks joined by a deeply subwavelength bridge of variable length with or without an attached cavity. Several resonant modes of the structure, both one- and two-dimensional in nature, lead to extraordinary acoustic transmission, in this case with transmission efficiencies, i.e. intensity enhancements, up to ~23 and ~8 in the two respective cases. We show how the cavity shape and bridge size influence the extraordinary transmission efficiency. Applications include new metamaterials and subwavelength imaging.

  11. Extraordinary transmission of gigahertz surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Mezil, Sylvain; Chonan, Kazuki; Otsuka, Paul H; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu; Lee, Sam H; Wright, Oliver B

    2016-01-01

    Extraordinary transmission of waves, i.e. a transmission superior to the amount predicted by geometrical considerations of the aperture alone, has to date only been studied in the bulk. Here we present a new class of extraordinary transmission for waves confined in two dimensions to a flat surface. By means of acoustic numerical simulations in the gigahertz range, corresponding to acoustic wavelengths λ ~ 3-50 μm, we track the transmission of plane surface acoustic wave fronts between two silicon blocks joined by a deeply subwavelength bridge of variable length with or without an attached cavity. Several resonant modes of the structure, both one- and two-dimensional in nature, lead to extraordinary acoustic transmission, in this case with transmission efficiencies, i.e. intensity enhancements, up to ~23 and ~8 in the two respective cases. We show how the cavity shape and bridge size influence the extraordinary transmission efficiency. Applications include new metamaterials and subwavelength imaging. PMID:27640998

  12. Extraordinary transmission of gigahertz surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Mezil, Sylvain; Chonan, Kazuki; Otsuka, Paul H.; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu; Lee, Sam H.; Wright, Oliver B.

    2016-01-01

    Extraordinary transmission of waves, i.e. a transmission superior to the amount predicted by geometrical considerations of the aperture alone, has to date only been studied in the bulk. Here we present a new class of extraordinary transmission for waves confined in two dimensions to a flat surface. By means of acoustic numerical simulations in the gigahertz range, corresponding to acoustic wavelengths λ ~ 3–50 μm, we track the transmission of plane surface acoustic wave fronts between two silicon blocks joined by a deeply subwavelength bridge of variable length with or without an attached cavity. Several resonant modes of the structure, both one- and two-dimensional in nature, lead to extraordinary acoustic transmission, in this case with transmission efficiencies, i.e. intensity enhancements, up to ~23 and ~8 in the two respective cases. We show how the cavity shape and bridge size influence the extraordinary transmission efficiency. Applications include new metamaterials and subwavelength imaging. PMID:27640998

  13. Acoustic spin pumping in magnetoelectric bulk acoustic wave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzikova, N. I.; Alekseev, S. G.; Pyataikin, I. I.; Kotelyanskii, I. M.; Luzanov, V. A.; Orlov, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    We present the generation and detection of spin currents by using magnetoelastic resonance excitation in a magnetoelectric composite high overtone bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonator (HBAR) formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-GGG-YIG-Pt structure. Transversal BAW drives magnetization oscillations in YIG film at a given resonant magnetic field, and the resonant magneto-elastic coupling establishes the spin-current generation at the Pt/YIG interface. Due to the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) this BAW-driven spin current is converted to a dc voltage in the Pt layer. The dependence of the measured voltage both on magnetic field and frequency has a resonant character. The voltage is determined by the acoustic power in HBAR and changes its sign upon magnetic field reversal. We compare the experimentally observed amplitudes of the ISHE electrical field achieved by our method and other approaches to spin current generation that use surface acoustic waves and microwave resonators for ferromagnetic resonance excitation, with the theoretically expected values.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Passive Shock Wave Mitigation using Obstacle Arrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Monica; Wan, Qian; Eliasson, Veronica

    2014-11-01

    With its vast range in applications, especially in the defense industry, shock wave mitigation is an ongoing research area of interest to the shock dynamics community. Passive shock wave mitigation methods range from forcing the shock wave to abruptly change its direction to introducing barriers or obstacles of various shapes and materials in the path of the shock wave. Obstacles provide attenuation through complicated shock wave interactions and reflections. In this work, we have performed shock tube experiments to investigate shock wave mitigation due to solid obstacles placed along the curve of a logarithmic spiral. Different shapes (cylindrical and square) of obstacles with different materials (solid and foam) have been used. High-speed schlieren optics and background-oriented schlieren techniques have been used together with pressure measurements to quantify the effects of mitigation. Results have also been compared to numerical simulations and show good agreement.

  15. Acoustic-gravity waves, theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadri, Usama; Farrell, William E.; Munk, Walter

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) propagate in the ocean under the influence of both the compressibility of sea water and the restoring force of gravity. The gravity dependence vanishes if the wave vector is normal to the ocean surface, but becomes increasingly important as the wave vector acquires a horizontal tilt. They are excited by many sources, including non-linear surface wave interactions, disturbances of the ocean bottom (submarine earthquakes and landslides) and underwater explosions. In this introductory lecture on acoustic-gravity waves, we describe their properties, and their relation to organ pipe modes, to microseisms, and to deep ocean signatures by short surface waves. We discuss the generation of AGW by underwater earthquakes; knowledge of their behaviour with water depth can be applied for the early detection of tsunamis. We also discuss their generation by the non-linear interaction of surface gravity waves, which explains the major role they play in transforming energy from the ocean surface to the crust, as part of the microseisms phenomenon. Finally, they contribute to horizontal water transport at depth, which might affect benthic life.

  16. Nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    A model problem that simulates an atmospheric acoustic wave propagation situation that is nonlinear is considered. The model is derived from the basic Euler equations for the atmospheric flow and from the regular perturbations for the acoustic part. The nonlinear effects are studied by obtaining two successive linear problems in which the second one involves the solution of the first problem. Well posedness of these problems is discussed and approximations of the radiation boundary conditions that can be used in numerical simulations are presented.

  17. Nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper a model problem is considered that simulates an atmospheric acoustic wave propagation situation that is nonlinear. The model is derived from the basic Euler equations for the atmospheric flow and from the regular perturbations for the acoustic part. The nonlinear effects are studied by obtaining two successive linear problems in which the second one involves the solution of the first problem. Well-posedness of these problems is discussed and approximations of the radiation boundary conditions that can be used in numerical simulations are presented.

  18. Generation mechanism for electron acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kakad, A. P.; Singh, S. V.; Reddy, R. V.; Lakhina, G. S.; Tagare, S. G.; Verheest, F.

    2007-05-15

    Nonlinear electron acoustic solitary waves (EASWs) are studied in a collisionless and unmagnetized plasma consisting of cold background electrons, cold beam electrons, and two different temperature ion species. Using pseudopotential analysis, the properties of arbitrary amplitude EASWs are investigated. The present model supports compressive as well as rarefactive electron acoustic solitary structures. Furthermore, there is an interesting possibility of the coexistence of compressive and rarefactive solitary structures in a specific plasma parameter range. The application of our results in interpreting the salient features of the broadband electrostatic noise in the plasma sheet boundary layer is discussed.

  19. Models and Observations of Shock Wave Propagation in Volcanic Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J.; Johnson, J. B.; Ruiz, M. C.; Steele, A.

    2013-12-01

    High-amplitude air waves (shock waves) propagate nonlinearly; although this strongly affects recorded signals, it is not commonly modeled in studies of volcanic explosions. Failure to account for the shock wave component of air waves can lead to underestimation of source power and inaccurate source times. Additionally, propagation effects can significantly alter waveforms from the original source signals. In order to permit more accurate studies of shock wave sources, we examine modeling techniques and observations of shock waves. Shock wave signals begin with strong, abrupt compressions that, compared to typical sound waves, propagate and decay more quickly. Because of the high-amplitude discontinuities, numerical methods that are commonly used to study linear sound waves become unstable and inaccurate when applied to shock waves. We discuss the use of other techniques that are capable of modeling shock wave propagation. Equations relating wave speed to the difference of various physical quantities across the shock (such as pressure, density, and particle velocity) are useful for modeling these waves. Addressing the shock explicitly as such, in conjunction with use of traditional numerical methods for the remainder of the signal, permits modeling of full shock waveforms. Additionally, we present examples of recorded volcanic signals that propagate nonlinearly and demonstrate propagation effects on amplitude, waveform, and spectrum.

  20. Uniform shock waves in disordered granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Leopoldo R.; Turner, Ari M.; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-10-01

    The confining pressure P is perhaps the most important parameter controlling the properties of granular matter. Strongly compressed granular media are, in many respects, simple solids in which elastic perturbations travel as ordinary phonons. However, the speed of sound in granular aggregates continuously decreases as the confining pressure decreases, completely vanishing at the jamming-unjamming transition. This anomalous behavior suggests that the transport of energy at low pressures should not be dominated by phonons. In this work we use simulations and theory to show how the response of granular systems becomes increasingly nonlinear as pressure decreases. In the low-pressure regime the elastic energy is found to be mainly transported through nonlinear waves and shocks. We numerically characterize the propagation speed, shape, and stability of these shocks and model the dependence of the shock speed on pressure and impact intensity by a simple analytical approach.

  1. Mach stem formation in outdoor measurements of acoustic shocks.

    PubMed

    Leete, Kevin M; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Truscott, Tadd T

    2015-12-01

    Mach stem formation during outdoor acoustic shock propagation is investigated using spherical oxyacetylene balloons exploded above pavement. The location of the transition point from regular to irregular reflection and the path of the triple point are experimentally resolved using microphone arrays and a high-speed camera. The transition point falls between recent analytical work for weak irregular reflections and an empirical relationship derived from large explosions. PMID:26723361

  2. Holographic flow visualization of time-varying shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Rapid-double-exposure, diffuse-illumination holography is evaluated analytically and experimentally as a flow visualization method for time-varying shock waves. Conditions are determined that minimize the distance (localization error) between the surface or curve of interference-fringe localization and the shock surface. Treated specifically are the cases of shock waves in a transonic compressor rotor for which there is laser anemometer data for comparison and shock waves in a flutter cascade.

  3. Stability of spherical converging shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, M.; Sanz, J.; Iwamoto, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Based on Guderley's self-similar solution, stability of spherical converging shock wave is studied. A rigorous linear perturbation theory is developed, in which the growth rate of perturbation is given as a function of the spherical harmonic number ℓ and the specific heats ratio γ. Numerical calculation reveals the existence of a γ-dependent cut-off mode number ℓc, such that all the eigenmode perturbations for ℓ > ℓc are smeared out as the shock wave converges at the center. The analysis is applied to partially spherical geometries to give significant implication for different ignition schemes of inertial confinement fusion. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are performed to verify the theory.

  4. Stability of spherical converging shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Sanz, J.; Iwamoto, Y.

    2015-07-15

    Based on Guderley's self-similar solution, stability of spherical converging shock wave is studied. A rigorous linear perturbation theory is developed, in which the growth rate of perturbation is given as a function of the spherical harmonic number ℓ and the specific heats ratio γ. Numerical calculation reveals the existence of a γ-dependent cut-off mode number ℓ{sub c}, such that all the eigenmode perturbations for ℓ > ℓ{sub c} are smeared out as the shock wave converges at the center. The analysis is applied to partially spherical geometries to give significant implication for different ignition schemes of inertial confinement fusion. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are performed to verify the theory.

  5. Acoustic Remote Sensing of Rogue Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Wade; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    We propose an early warning system for approaching rogue waves using the remote sensing of acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) - progressive sound waves that propagate at the speed of sound in the ocean. It is believed that AGWs are generated during the formation of rogue waves, carrying information on the rogue waves at near the speed of sound, i.e. much faster than the rogue wave. The capability of identifying those special sound waves would enable detecting rogue waves most efficiently. A lot of promising work has been reported on AGWs in the last few years, part of which in the context of remote sensing as an early detection of tsunami. However, to our knowledge none of the work addresses the problem of rogue waves directly. Although there remains some uncertainty as to the proper definition of a rogue wave, there is little doubt that they exist and no one can dispute the potential destructive power of rogue waves. An early warning system for such extreme waves would become a demanding safety technology. A closed form expression was developed for the pressure induced by an impulsive source at the free surface (the Green's function) from which the solution for more general sources can be developed. In particular, we used the model of the Draupner Wave of January 1st, 1995 as a source and calculated the induced AGW signature. In particular we studied the AGW signature associated with a special feature of this wave, and characteristic of rogue waves, of the absence of any local set-down beneath the main crest and the presence of a large local set-up.

  6. Extra-corporeal shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed Central

    Pemberton, J.

    1987-01-01

    Extra-corporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has proved to be a revolutionary advance in the treatment of renal stone disease. It, itself, is non-invasive but may necessitate or be used as an adjunct to more invasive auxiliary procedures. The basic principles of lithotripsy, the clinical experience thus far and probable future applications are discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:3330235

  7. An Investigation of Acoustic Wave Propagation in Mach 2 Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieberding, Zachary J.

    Hypersonic technology is the next advancement to enter the aerospace community; it is defined as the study of flight at speeds Mach 5 and higher where intense aerodynamic heating is prevalent. Hypersonic flight is achieved through use of scramjet engines, which intake air and compress it by means of shock waves and geometry design. The airflow is then directed through an isolator where it is further compressed, it is then delivered to the combustor at supersonic speeds. The combusted airflow and fuel mixture is then accelerated through a nozzle to achieve the hypersonic speeds. Unfortunately, scramjet engines can experience a phenomenon known as an inlet unstart, where the combustor produces pressures large enough to force the incoming airflow out of the inlet of the engine, resulting in a loss of acceleration and power. There have been several government-funded programs that look to prove the concept of the scramjet engine and also tackle this inlet unstart issue. The research conducted in this thesis is a fundamental approach towards controlling the unstart problem: it looks at the basic concept of sending a signal upstream through the boundary layer of a supersonic flow and being able to detect a characterizeable signal. Since conditions within and near the combustor are very harsh, hardware is unable to be installed in that area, so this testing will determine if a signal can be sent and if so, how far upstream can the signal be detected. This experimental approach utilizes several acoustic and mass injection sources to be evaluated over three test series in a Mach 2 continuous flow wind tunnel that will determine the success of the objective. The test series vary in that the conditions of the flow and the test objectives change. The research shows that a characterizeable signal can be transmitted upstream roughly 12 inches through the subsonic boundary layer of a supersonic cross flow. It is also shown that the signal attenuates as the distance between the

  8. Ionospheric shock waves triggered by rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. H.; Lin, J. T.; Chen, C. H.; Liu, J. Y.; Sun, Y. Y.; Kakinami, Y.; Matsumura, M.; Chen, W. H.; Liu, H.; Rau, R. J.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional structure of the shock wave signatures in ionospheric electron density resulting from a rocket transit using the rate of change of the total electron content (TEC) derived from ground-based GPS receivers around Japan and Taiwan for the first time. From the TEC maps constructed for the 2009 North Korea (NK) Taepodong-2 and 2013 South Korea (SK) Korea Space Launch Vehicle-II (KSLV-II) rocket launches, features of the V-shaped shock wave fronts in TEC perturbations are prominently seen. These fronts, with periods of 100-600 s, produced by the propulsive blasts of the rockets appear immediately and then propagate perpendicularly outward from the rocket trajectory with supersonic velocities between 800-1200 m s-1 for both events. Additionally, clear rocket exhaust depletions of TECs are seen along the trajectory and are deflected by the background thermospheric neutral wind. Twenty minutes after the rocket transits, delayed electron density perturbation waves propagating along the bow wave direction appear with phase velocities of 800-1200 m s-1. According to their propagation character, these delayed waves may be generated by rocket exhaust plumes at earlier rocket locations at lower altitudes.

  9. Shock Waves and Commutation Speed of Memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shao; Tesler, Federico; Marlasca, Fernando Gomez; Levy, Pablo; Dobrosavljević, V.; Rozenberg, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Progress of silicon-based technology is nearing its physical limit, as the minimum feature size of components is reaching a mere 10 nm. The resistive switching behavior of transition metal oxides and the associated memristor device is emerging as a competitive technology for next-generation electronics. Significant progress has already been made in the past decade, and devices are beginning to hit the market; however, this progress has mainly been the result of empirical trial and error. Hence, gaining theoretical insight is of the essence. In the present work, we report the striking result of a connection between the resistive switching and shock-wave formation, a classic topic of nonlinear dynamics. We argue that the profile of oxygen vacancies that migrate during the commutation forms a shock wave that propagates through a highly resistive region of the device. We validate the scenario by means of model simulations and experiments in a manganese-oxide-based memristor device, and we extend our theory to the case of binary oxides. The shock-wave scenario brings unprecedented physical insight and enables us to rationalize the process of oxygen-vacancy-driven resistive change with direct implications for a key technological aspect—the commutation speed.

  10. Arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic waves in a multicomponent plasma with superthermal species

    SciTech Connect

    El-Tantawy, S. A.; Moslem, W. M.

    2011-11-15

    Properties of fully nonlinear ion-acoustic waves in a multicomponent plasma consisting of warm positive ions, superthermal electrons, as well as positrons, and dust impurities have been investigated. By using the hydrodynamic model for ions and superthermal electron/positron distribution, a Sagdeev potential has been derived. Existence conditions for large amplitude solitary and shock waves are presented. In order to show that the characteristics of the solitary and shock waves are influenced by the plasma parameters, the relevant numerical analysis of the Sagdeev potential is presented. The nonlinear structures, as predicted here, may be associated with the electrostatic perturbations in interstellar medium.

  11. On Reflection of Shock Waves from Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liepmann, H W; Roshko, A; Dhawan, S

    1952-01-01

    Measurements are presented at Mach numbers from about 1.3 to 1.5 of reflection characteristics and the relative upstream influence of shock waves impinging on a flat surface with both laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The difference between impulse and step waves is discussed and their interaction with the boundary layer is compared. General considerations on the experimental production of shock waves from wedges and cones and examples of reflection of shock waves from supersonic shear layers are also presented.

  12. Support minimized inversion of acoustic and elastic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Safaeinili, A.

    1994-04-24

    This report discusses the following topics on support minimized inversion of acoustic and elastic wave scattering: Minimum support inversion; forward modelling of elastodynamic wave scattering; minimum support linearized acoustic inversion; support minimized nonlinear acoustic inversion without absolute phase; and support minimized nonlinear elastic inversion.

  13. Wireless Multiplexed Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Sensor is a new technology for obtaining multiple, real-time measurements under extreme environmental conditions. This project plans to develop a wireless multiplexed sensor system that uses SAW sensors, with no batteries or semiconductors, that are passive and rugged, can operate down to cryogenic temperatures and up to hundreds of degrees C, and can be used to sense a wide variety of parameters over reasonable distances (meters).

  14. The Foley Acoustic Wave Front Slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2004-04-01

    In 1912 Arthur L. Foley of Indiana University published an article in Physical Review about his technique for photographing acoustic wave fronts. Subsequently, the Central Scientific Company published a series of glass lantern slides of his illustrations. These have been unavailable for about 60 years. Here I discuss how Foley made his slides and give examples of use to the present-day physics teacher.

  15. Radio wave propagation and acoustic sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, S. P.

    Radio wave propagation of the decimetric and centimetric waves depends to a large extent on the boundary layer meteorological conditions which give rise to severe fadings, very often due to multipath propagation. Sodar is one of the inexpensive remote sensing techniques which can be employed to probe the boundary layer structure. In the paper a historical perspective has been given of the simultaneously conducted studies on radio waves and sodar at various places. The radio meteorological information needed for propagation studies has been clearly spelt out and conditions of a ray path especially in the presence of a ducting layer have been defined as giving rise to fading or signal enhancement conditions. Finally the potential of the sodar studies to obtain information about the boundary layer phenomena has been stressed, clearly spelling out the use of acoustic sounding in radio wave propagation studies.

  16. Nonlinear ion acoustic waves scattered by vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Yuji; Yoshida, Zensho

    2016-09-01

    The Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy is the archetype of infinite-dimensional integrable systems, which describes nonlinear ion acoustic waves in two-dimensional space. This remarkably ordered system resides on a singular submanifold (leaf) embedded in a larger phase space of more general ion acoustic waves (low-frequency electrostatic perturbations). The KP hierarchy is characterized not only by small amplitudes but also by irrotational (zero-vorticity) velocity fields. In fact, the KP equation is derived by eliminating vorticity at every order of the reductive perturbation. Here, we modify the scaling of the velocity field so as to introduce a vortex term. The newly derived system of equations consists of a generalized three-dimensional KP equation and a two-dimensional vortex equation. The former describes 'scattering' of vortex-free waves by ambient vortexes that are determined by the latter. We say that the vortexes are 'ambient' because they do not receive reciprocal reactions from the waves (i.e., the vortex equation is independent of the wave fields). This model describes a minimal departure from the integrable KP system. By the Painlevé test, we delineate how the vorticity term violates integrability, bringing about an essential three-dimensionality to the solutions. By numerical simulation, we show how the solitons are scattered by vortexes and become chaotic.

  17. Mechanochemistry for Shock Wave Energy Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, William; Ren, Yi; Su, Zhi; Moore, Jeffrey; Suslick, Kenneth; Dlott, Dana

    2015-06-01

    Using our laser-driven flyer-plate apparatus we have developed a technique for detecting mechanically driven chemical reactions that attenuate shock waves. In these experiments 75 μm laser-driven flyer-plates travel at speeds of up to 2.8 km/s. Photonic Doppler velocimetry is used to monitor both the flight speed and the motions of an embedded mirror behind the sample on the supporting substrate. Since the Hugoniot of the substrate is known, mirror motions can be converted into the transmitted shock wave flux and fluence through a sample. Flux shows the shock profile whereas fluence represents the total energy transferred per unit area, and both are measured as a function of sample thickness. Targets materials are micrograms of carefully engineered organic and inorganic compounds selected for their potential to undergo negative volume, endothermic reactions. In situ fluorescence measurements and a suite of post mortem analytical methods are used to detect molecular chemical reactions that occur due to impact.

  18. Modeling Propagation of Shock Waves in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; Molitoris, J D

    2005-08-19

    We present modeling results for the propagation of strong shock waves in metals. In particular, we use an arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE3D) code to model the propagation of strong pressure waves (P {approx} 300 to 400 kbars) generated with high explosives in contact with aluminum cylinders. The aluminum cylinders are assumed to be both flat-topped and have large-amplitude curved surfaces. We use 3D Lagrange mechanics. For the aluminum we use a rate-independent Steinberg-Guinan model, where the yield strength and shear modulus depend on pressure, density and temperature. The calculation of the melt temperature is based on the Lindermann law. At melt the yield strength and shear modulus is set to zero. The pressure is represented as a seven-term polynomial as a function of density. For the HMX-based high explosive, we use a JWL, with a program burn model that give the correct detonation velocity and C-J pressure (P {approx} 390 kbars). For the case of the large-amplitude curved surface, we discuss the evolving shock structure in terms of the early shock propagation experiments by Sakharov.

  19. Shock wave-bubble interaction near soft and rigid boundaries during lithotripsy: numerical analysis by the improved ghost fluid method.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazumichi; Kodama, Tetsuya; Takahira, Hiroyuki

    2011-10-01

    In the case of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), a shock wave-bubble interaction inevitably occurs near the focusing point of stones, resulting in stone fragmentation and subsequent tissue damage. Because shock wave-bubble interactions are high-speed phenomena occurring in tissue consisting of various media with different acoustic impedance values, numerical analysis is an effective method for elucidating the mechanism of these interactions. However, the mechanism has not been examined in detail because, at present, numerical simulations capable of incorporating the acoustic impedance of various tissues do not exist. Here, we show that the improved ghost fluid method (IGFM) can treat shock wave-bubble interactions in various media. Nonspherical bubble collapse near a rigid or soft tissue boundary (stone, liver, gelatin and fat) was analyzed. The reflection wave of an incident shock wave at a tissue boundary was the primary cause for the acceleration or deceleration of bubble collapse. The impulse that was obtained from the temporal evolution of pressure created by the bubble collapse increased the downward velocity of the boundary and caused subsequent boundary deformation. Results of this study showed that the IGFM is a useful method for analyzing the shock wave-bubble interaction near various tissues with different acoustic impedance. PMID:21918295

  20. Shock wave-bubble interaction near soft and rigid boundaries during lithotripsy: numerical analysis by the improved ghost fluid method.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazumichi; Kodama, Tetsuya; Takahira, Hiroyuki

    2011-10-01

    In the case of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), a shock wave-bubble interaction inevitably occurs near the focusing point of stones, resulting in stone fragmentation and subsequent tissue damage. Because shock wave-bubble interactions are high-speed phenomena occurring in tissue consisting of various media with different acoustic impedance values, numerical analysis is an effective method for elucidating the mechanism of these interactions. However, the mechanism has not been examined in detail because, at present, numerical simulations capable of incorporating the acoustic impedance of various tissues do not exist. Here, we show that the improved ghost fluid method (IGFM) can treat shock wave-bubble interactions in various media. Nonspherical bubble collapse near a rigid or soft tissue boundary (stone, liver, gelatin and fat) was analyzed. The reflection wave of an incident shock wave at a tissue boundary was the primary cause for the acceleration or deceleration of bubble collapse. The impulse that was obtained from the temporal evolution of pressure created by the bubble collapse increased the downward velocity of the boundary and caused subsequent boundary deformation. Results of this study showed that the IGFM is a useful method for analyzing the shock wave-bubble interaction near various tissues with different acoustic impedance.

  1. Direct Visualization of Shock Waves in Supersonic Space Shuttle Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OFarrell, J. M.; Rieckhoff, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    Direct observation of shock boundaries is rare. This Technical Memorandum describes direct observation of shock waves produced by the space shuttle vehicle during STS-114 and STS-110 in imagery provided by NASA s tracking cameras.

  2. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SHOCK WAVE DYNAMICS IN MAGNETIZED PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Nirmol K. Podder

    2009-03-17

    In this four-year project (including one-year extension), the project director and his research team built a shock-wave-plasma apparatus to study shock wave dynamics in glow discharge plasmas in nitrogen and argon at medium pressure (1–20 Torr), carried out various plasma and shock diagnostics and measurements that lead to increased understanding of the shock wave acceleration phenomena in plasmas. The measurements clearly show that in the steady-state dc glow discharge plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave velocity increases, its amplitude decreases, and the shock wave disperses non-linearly as a function of the plasma current. In the pulsed discharge plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave dispersion width and velocity increase as a function of the delay between the switch-on of the plasma and shock-launch. In the afterglow plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave dispersion width and velocity decrease as a function of the delay between the plasma switch-off and shock-launch. These changes are found to be opposite and reversing towards the room temperature value which is the initial condition for plasma ignition case. The observed shock wave properties in both igniting and afterglow plasmas correlate well with the inferred temperature changes in the two plasmas.

  3. Propagation characteristics of acoustic waves in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Achille; Kapil, Jagdish Chandra; Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg; Or, Dani

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic emission analysis is a promising technique for monitoring snow slope stability with potential for application in early warning systems for avalanches. Current research efforts focus on identification and localization of acoustic emission features preceding snow failure and avalanches. However, our knowledge of sound propagation characteristics in snow is still limited. A review of previous studies showed that significant gaps exist and that the results of the various studies are partly contradictory. Furthermore, sound velocity and attenuation have been determined for the frequency range below 10 kHz, while recent snow failure experiments suggest that the peak frequency is in the ultrasound range between 30 kHz to 500 kHz. We therefore studied the propagation of pencil lead fracture (PLF) signals through snow in the ultrasound frequency range. This was achieved by performing laboratory experiments with columns of artificially produced snow of varying density and temperature. The attenuation constant was obtained by varying the size of the columns to eliminate possible influences of the snow-sensor coupling. The attenuation constant was measured for the entire PLF burst signal and for single frequency components. The propagation velocity was calculated from the arrival time of the acoustic signal. We then modelled the sound propagation for our experimental setup using Biot's model for wave propagation in porous media. The Model results were in good agreement with our experimental results. For the studied samples, the acoustic signals propagated as fast and slow longitudinal waves, but the main part of the energy was carried by the slow waves. The Young's modulus of our snow samples was determined from the sound velocity. This is highly relevant, as the elastic properties of snow are not well known.

  4. The Structure of Weak Shock Waves in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baty, Roy; Tucker, Don; Hagelberg, Carl

    2010-11-01

    This talk presents solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations that model weak shock waves in water. One-dimensional jump functions are computed to describe the viscous microstructure of hydrodynamic shocks, which are approximately isentropic. The Tate and Grueneisen equations of state are applied separately with the conservation laws to derive the flow microstructure for shock compressions and pressures up to 1.3 and 20.0 kbars, respectively. The Navier-Stokes equations are integrated along characteristic lines to compute the shock wave thickness. On characteristic lines, the shock wave jump functions reduce to integral equations. The Tate and Grueneisen equations of state yield similar, strictly monotonically increasing, shock wave microstructures. Moreover, the non-dimensional shock wave thicknesses predicted by these equations of state as a function of compression are very similar.

  5. Underwater Shock Wave Research Applied to Therapeutic Device Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Shimokawa, H.

    2013-07-01

    The chronological development of underwater shock wave research performed at the Shock Wave Research Center of the Institute of Fluid Science at the Tohoku University is presented. Firstly, the generation of planar underwater shock waves in shock tubes and their visualization by using the conventional shadowgraph and schlieren methods are described. Secondly, the generation of spherical underwater shock waves by exploding lead azide pellets weighing from several tens of micrograms to 100 mg, that were ignited by irradiating with a Q-switched laser beam, and their visualization by using double exposure holographic interferometry are presented. The initiation, propagation, reflection, focusing of underwater shock waves, and their interaction with various interfaces, in particular, with air bubbles, are visualized quantitatively. Based on such a fundamental underwater shock wave research, collaboration with the School of Medicine at the Tohoku University was started for developing a shock wave assisted therapeutic device, which was named an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter (ESWL). Miniature shock waves created by irradiation with Q-switched HO:YAG laser beams are studied, as applied to damaged dysfunctional nerve cells in the myocardium in a precisely controlled manner, and are effectively used to design a catheter for treating arrhythmia.

  6. Nonequilibrium ionization phenomena behind shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Panesi, Marco; Magin, Thierry; Huo, Winifred

    2011-05-20

    An accurate investigation of the behavior of electronically excited states of atoms and molecules in the post shock relaxation zone of a trajectory point of the FIRE II flight experiment is carried out by means of a one-dimensional flow solver coupled to a collisional-radiative model. In the rapidly ionizing regime behind a strong shock wave, the high lying bound electronic states of atoms are depleted. This leads the electronic energy level populations of atoms to depart from Boltzmann distributions which strongly affects the non-equilibrium ionization process as well as the radiative signature. The importance of correct modeling of the interaction of radiation and matter is discussed showing a strong influence on the physico-chemical properties of the gas. The paper clearly puts forward the shortcomings of the simplified approach often used in literature which strongly relies on the escape factors to characterize the optical thickness of the gas.

  7. Shock wave absorber having apertured plate

    DOEpatents

    Shin, Y.W.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

  8. Shock wave absorber having apertured plate

    DOEpatents

    Shin, Yong W.; Wiedermann, Arne H.; Ockert, Carl E.

    1985-01-01

    The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

  9. Wave and particle evolution downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckean, M. E.; Omidi, N.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Karimabadi, H.

    1995-01-01

    Distributions of ions heated in quasi-perpendicular bow shocks have large perpendicular temperature anisotropies that provide free energy for the growth of Alfven ion cyclotron (AIC) and mirror waves. These modes are often obsreved in the Earth's magnetosheath. Using two-dimensional hybrid simulations, we show that these waves are produced near the shock front and convected downstream rather than being produced locally downstream. The wave activity reduces the proton anisotropy to magnetosheath levels within a few tens of gyroradii of the shock but takes significantly longer to reduce the anisotropy of He(++) ions. The waves are primarily driven by proton anisotropy and the dynamics of the helium ions is controlled by the proton waves. Downstream of high Mach number shocks, mirror waves compete effectively with AIC waves. Downstream of low Mach number shocks, AIC waves dominate.

  10. Twisted electron-acoustic waves in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman-ur-Rehman, Ali, S.; Khan, S. A.; Shahzad, K.

    2016-08-01

    In the paraxial limit, a twisted electron-acoustic (EA) wave is studied in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma, whose constituents are the dynamical cold electrons and Boltzmannian hot electrons in the background of static positive ions. The analytical and numerical solutions of the plasma kinetic equation suggest that EA waves with finite amount of orbital angular momentum exhibit a twist in its behavior. The twisted wave particle resonance is also taken into consideration that has been appeared through the effective wave number qeff accounting for Laguerre-Gaussian mode profiles attributed to helical phase structures. Consequently, the dispersion relation and the damping rate of the EA waves are significantly modified with the twisted parameter η, and for η → ∞, the results coincide with the straight propagating plane EA waves. Numerically, new features of twisted EA waves are identified by considering various regimes of wavelength and the results might be useful for transport and trapping of plasma particles in a two-electron component plasma.

  11. Doppler effect for an optical discharge source of shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tishchenko, V N

    2005-11-30

    The Doppler effect for a moving pulsating optical discharge producing periodic shock waves is considered. The manifestations of the effect are limited by the wave merging mechanism. The validity conditions were found for the effect in the case of a pulsating source of shock waves. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  12. Supersonic shock wave/vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Settles, G. S.; Cattafesta, L.

    1993-01-01

    Although shock wave/vortex interaction is a basic and important fluid dynamics problem, very little research has been conducted on this topic. Therefore, a detailed experimental study of the interaction between a supersonic streamwise turbulent vortex and a shock wave was carried out at the Penn State Gas Dynamics Laboratory. A vortex is produced by replaceable swirl vanes located upstream of the throat of various converging-diverging nozzles. The supersonic vortex is then injected into either a coflowing supersonic stream or ambient air. The structure of the isolated vortex is investigated in a supersonic wind tunnel using miniature, fast-response, five-hole and total temperature probes and in a free jet using laser Doppler velocimetry. The cases tested have unit Reynolds numbers in excess of 25 million per meter, axial Mach numbers ranging from 2.5 to 4.0, and peak tangential Mach numbers from 0 (i.e., a pure jet) to about 0.7. The results show that the typical supersonic wake-like vortex consists of a non-isentropic, rotational core, where the reduced circulation distribution is self similar, and an outer isentropic, irrotational region. The vortex core is also a region of significant turbulent fluctuations. Radial profiles of turbulent kinetic energy and axial-tangential Reynolds stress are presented. The interactions between the vortex and both oblique and normal shock waves are investigated using nonintrusive optical diagnostics (i.e. schlieren, planar laser scattering, and laser Doppler velocimetry). Of the various types, two Mach 2.5 overexpanded-nozzle Mach disc interactions are examined in detail. Below a certain vortex strength, a 'weak' interaction exists in which the normal shock is perturbed locally into an unsteady 'bubble' shock near the vortex axis, but vortex breakdown (i.e., a stagnation point) does not occur. For stronger vortices, a random unsteady 'strong' interaction results that causes vortex breakdown. The vortex core reforms downstream of

  13. Electrostatic waves in the bow shock at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, S. L.; Coroniti, F. V.; Kennel, C. F.; Bagenal, F.; Lepping, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    Electrostatic emissions measured by the Voyager 2 plasma wave detector (PWS) during the inbound crossing of the Uranian bow shock are shown to differ in some aspects from the waves measured during bow shock crossings at Jupiter and Saturn. The wave amplitudes in the foot of the bow shock at Uranus are in general much lower than those detected at the other outer planets due to the unusually enhanced solar wind ion temperature during the crossing. This reduces the effectiveness of wave-particle interactions in heating the incoming electrons. Strong wave emissions are observed in the shock ramp that possibly arise from currents producing a Buneman mode instability. Plasma instrument (PLS) and magnetometer (MAG) measurements reveal a complicated shock structure reminiscent of computer simulations of high-Mach number shocks when the effects of anomalous resistivity are reduced, and are consistent with high ion temperatures restricting the growth of electrostatic waves.

  14. Electrostatic waves in the bow shock at Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, S.L.; Coroniti, F.V.; Kennel, C.F.; Scarf, F.L. ); Bagenal, F. ); Lepping, R.P. ); Quest, K.B. ); Kurth, W.S. )

    1989-10-01

    Electrostatic emissions measured by the Voyager 2 plasma wave detector (PWS) during the inbound crossing of the Uranian bow shock are shown to differ in some aspects from the waves measured during bow shock crossings at Jupiter and Saturn. The wave amplitudes in the foot of the bow shock at Uranus are in general much lower than those detected at the other out planets due to the unusually enhanced solar wind ion temperature during the crossing. This reduces the effectiveness of wave-particle interactions in heating the incoming electrons. Strong wave emissions are observed in the shock ramp that possibly arise from currents producing a Buneman mode instability. Plasma instrument (PLS) and magnetometer (MAG) measurements reveal a complicated shock structure reminiscent of computer simulations of high-Mach number shocks when the effects of anomalous resistivity are reduced, and are consistent with high ion temperatures restricting the growth of electrostatic waves.

  15. Local stability analysis for a planar shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure to study the local stability of planar shock waves is presented. The procedure is applied to a Rankine-Hugoniot shock in a divergent/convergent nozzle, to an isentropic shock in a divergent/convergent nozzle, and to Rankine-Hugoniot shocks attached to wedges and cones. It is shown that for each case, the equation governing the shock motion is equivalent to the damped harmonic oscillator equation.

  16. Internal energy relaxation in shock wave structure

    SciTech Connect

    Josyula, Eswar Suchyta, Casimir J.; Boyd, Iain D.; Vedula, Prakash

    2013-12-15

    The Wang Chang-Uhlenbeck (WCU) equation is numerically integrated to characterize the internal structure of Mach 3 and Mach 5 shock waves in a gas with excitation in the internal energy states for the treatment of inelastic collisions. Elastic collisions are modeled with the hard sphere collision model and the transition rates for the inelastic collisions modified appropriately using probabilities based on relative velocities of the colliding particles. The collision integral is evaluated by the conservative discrete ordinate method [F. Tcheremissine, “Solution of the Boltzmann kinetic equation for high-speed flows,” Comput. Math. Math. Phys. 46, 315–329 (2006); F. Cheremisin, “Solution of the Wang Chang-Uhlenbeck equation,” Dokl. Phys. 47, 487–490 (2002)] developed for the Boltzmann equation. For the treatment of the diatomic molecules, the internal energy modes in the Boltzmann equation are described quantum mechanically given by the WCU equation. As a first step in the treatment of the inelastic collisions by the WCU equation, a two- and three-quantum system is considered to study the effect of the varying of (1) the inelastic cross section and (2) the energy gap between the quantum energy states. An alternative method, the direct simulation Monte Carlo method, is used for the Mach 3 shock wave to ensure the consistency of implementation in the two methods and there is an excellent agreement between the two methods. The results from the WCU implementation showed consistent trends for the Mach 3 and Mach5 standing shock waves simulations. Inelastic contributions change the downstream equilibrium state and allow the flow to transition to the equilibrium state further upstream.

  17. [Physical parameters of extracorporeal shock waves].

    PubMed

    Maier, M; Ueberle, F; Rupprecht, G

    1998-10-01

    Prerequisites for the successful investigation of the mechanism of action of ESWT (extracorporeal shockwave therapy) and the establishment of treatment standards, are the ability to measure, and a knowledge of, the physical parameters involved. The most accurate measurements are obtained with laser hydrophones. Various parameters (amplitude, rise time, pulse width, pressure pulse decay, rarification phase) of a typical shock wave can thus be determined. These can then be used to calculate energy flux density, focal extent, focal volume and as well as focal energy, effective energy in a defined area, and effective biological energy. These parameters can be utilized to work out a theoretical treatment protocol.

  18. Nonequilibrium processes in a shock wave profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashlykov, A. M.; Velikodnyi, V. Iu.

    1989-03-01

    A modified Tamm-Mott-Smith approach is used to study the distribution of heat fluxes in a shock wave profile and their relationship with the distribution of partial temperature in gas mixtures. Results are presented on changes of partial and mean temperature, and heat fluxes in an He-Xe mixture at a Mach number of 4.4 and in an He-Ar mixture at a Mach number of 1.58. Conditions are established under which the heat flux of the heavy component of the mixture has the same sign as the gradient of its partial temperature.

  19. Current topics in shock waves; Proceedings of the International Symposium on Shock Waves and Shock Tubes, 17th, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, July 17-21, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.W.

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on shock waves are presented. The general topics addressed include: shock formation, focusing, and implosion; shock reflection and diffraction; turbulence; laser-produced plasmas and waves; ionization and shock-plasma interaction; chemical kinetics, pyrolysis, and soot formation; experimental facilities, techniques, and applications; ignition of detonation and combustion; particle entrainment and shock propagation through particle suspension; boundary layers and blast simulation; computational methods and numerical simulation.

  20. Solitary versus shock wave acceleration in laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Andrea; Nindrayog, Amritpal Singh; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2012-04-01

    The excitation of nonlinear electrostatic waves, such as shock and solitons, by ultraintense laser interaction with overdense plasmas and related ion acceleration are investigated by numerical simulations. Stability of solitons and formation of shock waves is strongly dependent on the velocity distribution of ions. Monoenergetic components in ion spectra are produced by "pulsed" reflection from solitary waves. Possible relevance to recent experiments on "shock acceleration" is discussed. PMID:22680581

  1. Shock waves and nucleosynthesis in type II supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aufderheide, M. B.; Baron, E.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    1991-01-01

    In the study of nucleosynthesis in type II SN, shock waves are initiated artificially, since collapse calculations do not, as yet, give self-consistent shock waves strong enough to produce the SN explosion. The two initiation methods currently used by light-curve modelers are studied, with a focus on the peak temperatures and the nucleosynthetic yields in each method. The various parameters involved in artificially initiating a shock wave and the effects of varying these parameters are discussed.

  2. Electron Acoustic Waves in Pure Ion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderegg, F.; Affolter, M.; Driscoll, C. F.; O'Neil, T. M.; Valentini, F.

    2012-10-01

    Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) are the low-frequency branch of near-linear Langmuir (plasma) waves: the frequency is such that the complex dielectric function (Dr, Di) has Dr= 0; and ``flattening'' of f(v) near the wave phase velocity vph gives Di=0 and eliminates Landau damping. Here, we observe standing axisymmetric EAWs in a pure ion column.footnotetextF. Anderegg, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 095001 (2009). At low excitation amplitudes, the EAWs have vph˜1.4 v, in close agreement with near-linear theory. At moderate excitation strengths, EAW waves are observed over a range of frequencies, with 1.3 v < vph< 2.1 v. Here, the final wave frequency may differ from the excitation frequency since the excitation modifies f (v); and recent theory analyzes frequency shifts from ``corners'' of a plateau at vph.footnotetextF. Valentini et al., arXiv:1206.3500v1. Large amplitude EAWs have strong phase-locked harmonic content, and experiments will be compared to same-geometry simulations, and to simulations of KEENfootnotetextB. Afeyan et al., Proc. Inertial Fusion Sci. and Applications 2003, A.N.S. Monterey (2004), p. 213. waves in HEDLP geometries.

  3. Biodamage via shock waves initiated by irradiation with ions.

    PubMed

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Yakubovich, Alexander V; Solov'yov, Andrey V

    2013-01-01

    Radiation damage following the ionising radiation of tissue has different scenarios and mechanisms depending on the projectiles or radiation modality. We investigate the radiation damage effects due to shock waves produced by ions. We analyse the strength of the shock wave capable of directly producing DNA strand breaks and, depending on the ion's linear energy transfer, estimate the radius from the ion's path, within which DNA damage by the shock wave mechanism is dominant. At much smaller values of linear energy transfer, the shock waves turn out to be instrumental in propagating reactive species formed close to the ion's path to large distances, successfully competing with diffusion.

  4. Shock wave processes in collisional gas particle mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmel, T. A.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Structures and propagation of shock waves in high density particle suspensions in gas are investigated theoretically and numerically. A physical and mathematical model which takes into account integral collisions between the particles on the basis of molecular-kinetic approaches of theory of granular materials is applied. The possibility of different types of shock waves, including double front structures is revealed. The role of particle collisions in the dynamics of particle dense layer expansion under an influence of divergent shock wave and in processes of shock wave diffraction past a backward-facing step is analyzed.

  5. Magnetosonic shock wave in collisional pair-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Ashish; Sikdar, Arnab; Ghosh, Samiran; Khan, Manoranjan

    2016-06-01

    Nonlinear propagation of magnetosonic shock wave has been studied in collisional magnetized pair-ion plasma. The masses of both ions are same but the temperatures are slightly different. Two fluid model has been taken to describe the model. Two different modes of the magnetosonic wave have been obtained. The dynamics of the nonlinear magnetosonic wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers' equation. It has been shown that the ion-ion collision is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The numerical investigations reveal that the magnetosonic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the strength of the dissipation. The nonlinear wave exhibited the oscillatory shock wave for strong magnetic field (weak dissipation) and monotonic shock wave for weak magnetic field (strong dissipation). The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  6. Augmented Shock Wave Severance of Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Schimmel, Morry L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach for severing or weakening a variety of materials. The technique employs embedding explosive cords into parallel grooves that are cut into a surface of a material. The cords are initiated simultaneously to produce shock waves that progress toward the centerline between the cords and the lower surface of the material. Intersecting incident and reflected waves augment at the centerline to fail or weaken the material in tension. No harmful debris is produced on the opposite side of the material from the explosive cords. The primary focus of the effort described in this paper was to fracture the F-16 aircraft trilaminate canopy. Also, complete severance was achieved in 2024-T4 aluminum plate stock. Possible applications are through canopy egress and crew module severance from military aircraft and separation of rocket vehicle stages and payloads. This approach offers important advantages over explosive methods currently in use.

  7. Brane-induced-gravity shock waves.

    PubMed

    Kaloper, Nemanja

    2005-05-13

    We construct exact gravitational field solutions for a relativistic particle localized on a tensional brane in brane-induced gravity. They are a generalization of gravitational shock waves in 4D de Sitter space. We provide the metrics for both the normal branch and the self-inflating branch Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati brane worlds, and compare them to the 4D Einstein gravity solution and to the case when gravity resides only in the 5D bulk, without any brane-localized curvature terms. At short distances the wave profile looks the same as in four dimensions. The corrections appear only far from the source, where they differ from the long distance corrections in 4D de Sitter space. We also discover a new nonperturbative channel for energy emission into the bulk from the self-inflating [corrected] branch, when gravity is modified at the de Sitter radius.

  8. Acoustic clouds: Standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benone, Carolina L.; Crispino, Luís C. B.; Herdeiro, Carlos; Radu, Eugen

    2015-05-01

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  9. Developments in strong shock wave position tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, Philip; Glover, Brain; Perry, Lee; WX-6; WX-7 Team

    2011-06-01

    This poster will highlight several modified techniques to allow the position vs. time to be tracked in strong shock situations (such as detonation). Each is a modification or improvement of existing ideas either making use of advances in specialist materials availability or recent advances in electronics.) Shorting embedded mini-coaxial cable with a standing microwave pattern. This technique is a modified version of an old LANL method of shock position tracking making use of a traveling short imposed in an embedded coaxial cable. A high frequency standing wave (3-8GHz) is present in the cable and the moving short position can be tracked by monitoring the output voltage envelope as a function of time. A diode detector is used to allow the envelope voltage to be monitored on a regular low frequency digitizer significantly reducing the cost. The small and cheap high frequency voltage generators now available allow much greater spatial resolution than possible previously. 2) Very thin shorting resistance track gauges. Parallel tracks of constantan resistance material are etched on a thin dielectric substrate. The gauges are less than 0.2 mm thick. The ionized gas present in a detonation front sweeps up the tracks lowering the measured resistance. A potential divider circuit allows the shock position vs. time to be monitored on a regular digitizer after easy calibration. The novel feature is the thin section of the gauge producing minimal perturbation in the detonation front.

  10. Particle Acceleration in SN1006 Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Raymond, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The FUSE data have been reduced, and a paper on the results is in progress. The main results have been presented in a poster at the January 2004 AAS meeting and an ApJ paper in press. The primary result is that the widths of the 0 VI lines in the NW filament are a bit less than the width expected if the oxygen kinetic temperature is 16 times the proton temperature (mass proportional heating). This is at variance with measurements of shocks in the heliosphere, where preferential heating of oxygen and other heavy species is observed. The paper discusses the theoretical implications for collisionless shock wave physics. A secondary result is that no O VI emission was observed from the NE filament. While the very different particle distribution in that region can partially account for the weakness of the O VI lines, the simplest interpretation is that the pre-shock density in the NE is less than 0.22 times the density in the NW.

  11. PARTICLE ENERGY SPECTRA AT TRAVELING INTERPLANETARY SHOCK WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Reames, Donald V.

    2012-09-20

    We have searched for evidence of significant shock acceleration of He ions of {approx}1-10 MeV amu{sup -1} in situ at 258 interplanetary traveling shock waves observed by the Wind spacecraft. We find that the probability of observing significant acceleration, and the particle intensity observed, depends strongly upon the shock speed and less strongly upon the shock compression ratio. For most of the 39 fast shocks with significant acceleration, the observed spectral index agrees with either that calculated from the shock compression ratio or with the spectral index of the upstream background, when the latter spectrum is harder, as expected from diffusive shock theory. In many events the spectra are observed to roll downward at higher energies, as expected from Ellison-Ramaty and from Lee shock-acceleration theories. The dearth of acceleration at {approx}85% of the shocks is explained by (1) a low shock speed, (2) a low shock compression ratio, and (3) a low value of the shock-normal angle with the magnetic field, which may cause the energy spectra that roll downward at energies below our observational threshold. Quasi-parallel shock waves are rarely able to produce measurable acceleration at 1 AU. The dependence of intensity on shock speed, seen here at local shocks, mirrors the dependence found previously for the peak intensities in large solar energetic-particle events upon speeds of the associated coronal mass ejections which drive the shocks.

  12. Dual-mode acoustic wave biosensors microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auner, Gregory W.; Shreve, Gina; Ying, Hao; Newaz, Golam; Hughes, Chantelle; Xu, Jianzeng

    2003-04-01

    We have develop highly sensitive and selective acoustic wave biosensor arrays with signal analysis systems to provide a fingerprint for the real-time identification and quantification of a wide array of bacterial pathogens and environmental health hazards. We have developed an unique highly sensitive dual mode acoustic wave platform prototype that, when combined with phage based selective detection elements, form a durable bacteria sensor. Arrays of these new real-time biosensors are integrated to form a biosensor array on a chip. This research and development program optimizes advanced piezoelectric aluminum nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, novel micromachining processes, advanced device structures, selective phage displays development and immobilization techniques, and system integration and signal analysis technology to develop the biosensor arrays. The dual sensor platform can be programmed to sense in a gas, vapor or liquid environment by switching between acoustic wave resonate modes. Such a dual mode sensor has tremendous implications for applications involving monitoring of pathogenic microorganisms in the clinical setting due to their ability to detect airborne pathogens. This provides a number of applications including hospital settings such as intensive care or other in-patient wards for the reduction of nosocomial infections and maintenance of sterile environments in surgical suites. Monitoring for airborn pathogen transmission in public transportation areas such as airplanes may be useful for implementation of strategies for redution of airborn transmission routes. The ability to use the same sensor in the liquid sensing mode is important for tracing the source of airborn pathogens to local liquid sources. Sensing of pathogens in saliva will be useful for sensing oral pathogens and support of decision-making strategies regarding prevention of transmission and support of treatment strategies.

  13. Development and performance evaluation of an electromagnetic-type shock wave generator for lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, S M; Chang, M H; Yang, Z Y

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at the design and development of electromagnetic-type intermittent shock wave generation in a liquid. The shock wave generated is focused at a focal point through an acoustic lens. This hardware device mainly consists of a full-wave bridge rectifier, 6 capacitors, a spark gap, and a flat coil. A metal disk is mounted in a liquid-filled tube and is placed in close proximity to the flat coil. Due to the repulsive force existing between the coil and disk shock waves are generated, while an eddy current is induced in the metal disk. Some components and materials associated with the device are also described. By increasing the capacitance content to enhance electric energy level, a highly focused pressure can be achieved at the focal point through an acoustic lens in order to lyse fat tissue. Focused pressures were measured at the focal point and its vicinity for different operation voltages. The designed shock wave generator with an energy intensity of 0.0016 mJ/mm(2) (at 4 kV) and 2000 firings or higher energy intensities with 1000 firings is found to be able to disrupt pig fat tissue.

  14. Development and performance evaluation of an electromagnetic-type shock wave generator for lipolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, S. M. Yang, Z. Y.; Chang, M. H.

    2014-01-15

    This study aims at the design and development of electromagnetic-type intermittent shock wave generation in a liquid. The shock wave generated is focused at a focal point through an acoustic lens. This hardware device mainly consists of a full-wave bridge rectifier, 6 capacitors, a spark gap, and a flat coil. A metal disk is mounted in a liquid-filled tube and is placed in close proximity to the flat coil. Due to the repulsive force existing between the coil and disk shock waves are generated, while an eddy current is induced in the metal disk. Some components and materials associated with the device are also described. By increasing the capacitance content to enhance electric energy level, a highly focused pressure can be achieved at the focal point through an acoustic lens in order to lyse fat tissue. Focused pressures were measured at the focal point and its vicinity for different operation voltages. The designed shock wave generator with an energy intensity of 0.0016 mJ/mm{sup 2} (at 4 kV) and 2000 firings or higher energy intensities with 1000 firings is found to be able to disrupt pig fat tissue.

  15. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    SciTech Connect

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Irzhak, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Zizak, Ivo; Erko, Alexei; Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Insepov, Zinetula

    2015-09-14

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals.

  16. Nonextensive dust-acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, M.; Merriche, A.

    2011-03-15

    The seminal paper of Mamun et al. [Phys. Plasmas 3, 702 (1996)] is revisited within the theoretical framework of the Tsallis statistical mechanics. The nonextensivity may originate from the correlation or long-range interactions in the dusty plasma. It is found that depending on whether the nonextensive parameter q is positive or negative, the dust-acoustic (DA) soliton exhibits compression for q<0 and rarefaction for q>0. The lower limit of the Mach number for the existence of DA solitary waves is greater (smaller) than its Maxwellian counterpart in the case of superextensivity (subextensivity).

  17. Twisted dust acoustic waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P. K.

    2012-08-15

    We examine linear dust acoustic waves (DAWs) in a dusty plasma with strongly correlated dust grains, and discuss possibility of a twisted DA vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). For our purposes, we use the Boltzmann distributed electron and ion density perturbations, the dust continuity and generalized viscoelastic dust momentum equations, and Poisson's equation to obtain a dispersion relation for the modified DAWs. The effects of the polarization force, strong dust couplings, and dust charge fluctuations on the DAW spectrum are examined. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the DAW can propagate as a twisted vortex beam carrying OAM. A twisted DA vortex structure can trap and transport dust particles in dusty plasmas.

  18. Schlieren imaging of loud sounds and weak shock waves in air near the limit of visibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargather, Michael John; Settles, Gary S.; Madalis, Matthew J.

    2010-02-01

    A large schlieren system with exceptional sensitivity and a high-speed digital camera are used to visualize loud sounds and a variety of common phenomena that produce weak shock waves in the atmosphere. Frame rates varied from 10,000 to 30,000 frames/s with microsecond frame exposures. Sound waves become visible to this instrumentation at frequencies above 10 kHz and sound pressure levels in the 110 dB (6.3 Pa) range and above. The density gradient produced by a weak shock wave is examined and found to depend upon the profile and thickness of the shock as well as the density difference across it. Schlieren visualizations of weak shock waves from common phenomena include loud trumpet notes, various impact phenomena that compress a bubble of air, bursting a toy balloon, popping a champagne cork, snapping a wooden stick, and snapping a wet towel. The balloon burst, snapping a ruler on a table, and snapping the towel and a leather belt all produced readily visible shock-wave phenomena. In contrast, clapping the hands, snapping the stick, and the champagne cork all produced wave trains that were near the weak limit of visibility. Overall, with sensitive optics and a modern high-speed camera, many nonlinear acoustic phenomena in the air can be observed and studied.

  19. [Research on Energy Distribution During Osteoarthritis Treatment Using Shock Wave Lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shinian; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave treatment is capable of providing a non-surgical and effective treatment modality for patients suffering from osteoarthritis. The major objective of current works is to investigate how the shock wave (SW) field would change if a bony structure exists in the path of the acoustic wave. Firstly, a model of finite element method (FEM) was developed based on Comsol software in the present study. Then, high-speed photography experiments were performed to record cavitation bubbles with the presence of mimic bone. On the basis of comparing experimental with simulated results, the effectiveness of FEM model could be verified. Finally, the energy distribution during extracorporeal shock wave treatment was predicted. The results showed that the shock wave field was deflected with the presence of bony structure and varying deflection angles could be observed as the bone shifted up in the z-direction relative to shock wave geometric focus. Combining MRI/CT scans to FEM modeling is helpful for better standardizing the treatment dosage and optimizing treatment protocols in the clinic. PMID:26211244

  20. [Research on Energy Distribution During Osteoarthritis Treatment Using Shock Wave Lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shinian; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave treatment is capable of providing a non-surgical and effective treatment modality for patients suffering from osteoarthritis. The major objective of current works is to investigate how the shock wave (SW) field would change if a bony structure exists in the path of the acoustic wave. Firstly, a model of finite element method (FEM) was developed based on Comsol software in the present study. Then, high-speed photography experiments were performed to record cavitation bubbles with the presence of mimic bone. On the basis of comparing experimental with simulated results, the effectiveness of FEM model could be verified. Finally, the energy distribution during extracorporeal shock wave treatment was predicted. The results showed that the shock wave field was deflected with the presence of bony structure and varying deflection angles could be observed as the bone shifted up in the z-direction relative to shock wave geometric focus. Combining MRI/CT scans to FEM modeling is helpful for better standardizing the treatment dosage and optimizing treatment protocols in the clinic.

  1. Planar shock wave sliding over a water layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, V.; Jourdan, G.; Marty, A.; Allou, A.; Parisse, J.-D.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we conduct experiments to study the interaction between a horizontal free water layer and a planar shock wave that is sliding over it. Experiments are performed at atmospheric pressure in a shock tube with a square cross section (200× 200 mm^2) for depths of 10, 20, and 30 mm; a 1500-mm-long water layer; and two incident planar shock waves having Mach numbers of 1.11 and 1.43. We record the pressure histories and high-speed visualizations to study the flow patterns, surface waves, and spray layers behind the shock wave. We observe two different flow patterns with ripples formed at the air-water interface for the weaker shock wave and the dispersion of a droplet mist for the stronger shock wave. From the pressure signals, we extract the delay time between the arrival of the compression wave into water and the shock wave in air at the same location. We show that the delay time evolves with the distance traveled over the water layer, the depth of the water layer, and the Mach number of the shock wave.

  2. Simulating acoustic waves in spotted stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papini, Emanuele; Birch, Aaron C.; Gizon, Laurent; Hanasoge, Shravan M.

    2015-05-01

    Acoustic modes of oscillation are affected by stellar activity, however it is unclear how starspots contribute to these changes. Here we investigate the nonmagnetic effects of starspots on global modes with angular degree ℓ ≤ 2 in highly active stars, and characterize the spot seismic signature on synthetic light curves. We perform 3D time-domain simulations of linear acoustic waves to study their interaction with a model starspot. We model the spot as a 3D change in the sound speed stratification with respect to a convectively stable stellar background, built from solar Model S. We perform a parametric study by considering different depths and perturbation amplitudes. Exact numerical simulations allow the investigation of the wavefield-spot interaction beyond first order perturbation theory. The interaction of the axisymmetric modes with the starspot is strongly nonlinear. As mode frequency increases, the frequency shifts for radial modes exceed the value predicted by linear theory, while the shifts for the ℓ = 2,m = 0 modes are smaller than predicted by linear theory, with avoided-crossing-like patterns forming between the m = 0 and m = 1 mode frequencies. The nonlinear behavior increases with increasing spot amplitude and/or decreasing depth. Linear theory still reproduces the correct shifts for nonaxisymmetric modes. In the nonlinear regime the mode eigenfunctions are not pure spherical harmonics, but rather a mixture of different spherical harmonics. This mode mixing, together with the frequency changes, may lead to misidentification of the modes in the observed acoustic power spectra.

  3. Microfluidic plug steering using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Sesen, Muhsincan; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    2015-07-21

    Digital microfluidic systems, in which isolated droplets are dispersed in a carrier medium, offer a method to study biological assays and chemical reactions highly efficiently. However, it's challenging to manipulate these droplets in closed microchannel devices. Here, we present a method to selectively steer plugs (droplets with diameters larger than the channel's width) at a specially designed Y-junction within a microfluidic chip. The method makes use of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) impinging on a multiphase interface in which an acoustic contrast is present. As a result, the liquid-liquid interface is subjected to acoustic radiation forces. These forces are exploited to steer plugs into selected branches of the Y-junction. Furthermore, the input power can be finely tuned to split a plug into two uneven plugs. The steering of plugs as a whole, based on plug volume and velocity is thoroughly characterized. The results indicate that there is a threshold plug volume after which the steering requires elevated electrical energy input. This plug steering method can easily be integrated to existing lab-on-a-chip devices and it offers a robust and active plug manipulation technique in closed microchannels.

  4. Microfluidic plug steering using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Sesen, Muhsincan; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    2015-07-21

    Digital microfluidic systems, in which isolated droplets are dispersed in a carrier medium, offer a method to study biological assays and chemical reactions highly efficiently. However, it's challenging to manipulate these droplets in closed microchannel devices. Here, we present a method to selectively steer plugs (droplets with diameters larger than the channel's width) at a specially designed Y-junction within a microfluidic chip. The method makes use of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) impinging on a multiphase interface in which an acoustic contrast is present. As a result, the liquid-liquid interface is subjected to acoustic radiation forces. These forces are exploited to steer plugs into selected branches of the Y-junction. Furthermore, the input power can be finely tuned to split a plug into two uneven plugs. The steering of plugs as a whole, based on plug volume and velocity is thoroughly characterized. The results indicate that there is a threshold plug volume after which the steering requires elevated electrical energy input. This plug steering method can easily be integrated to existing lab-on-a-chip devices and it offers a robust and active plug manipulation technique in closed microchannels. PMID:26079216

  5. Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms.

    PubMed

    Maestas, Joseph T; Taylor, Larissa F; Collis, Jon M

    2014-12-01

    The nonlinear progressive wave equation (NPE) is a time-domain model used to calculate long-range shock propagation using a wave-following computational domain. Current models are capable of treating smoothly spatially varying medium properties, and fluid-fluid interfaces that align horizontally with a computational grid that can be handled by enforcing appropriate interface conditions. However, sloping interfaces that do not align with a horizontal grid present a computational challenge as application of interface conditions to vertical contacts is non-trivial. In this work, range-dependent environments, characterized by sloping bathymetry, are treated using a rotated coordinate system approach where the irregular interface is aligned with the coordinate axes. The coordinate rotation does not change the governing equation due to the narrow-angle assumption adopted in its derivation, but care is taken with applying initial, interface, and boundary conditions. Additionally, sound pressure level influences on nonlinear steepening for range-independent and range-dependent domains are used to quantify the pressures for which linear acoustic models suffice. A study is also performed to investigate the effects of thin sediment layers on the propagation of blast waves generated by explosives buried beneath mud line.

  6. Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms.

    PubMed

    Maestas, Joseph T; Taylor, Larissa F; Collis, Jon M

    2014-12-01

    The nonlinear progressive wave equation (NPE) is a time-domain model used to calculate long-range shock propagation using a wave-following computational domain. Current models are capable of treating smoothly spatially varying medium properties, and fluid-fluid interfaces that align horizontally with a computational grid that can be handled by enforcing appropriate interface conditions. However, sloping interfaces that do not align with a horizontal grid present a computational challenge as application of interface conditions to vertical contacts is non-trivial. In this work, range-dependent environments, characterized by sloping bathymetry, are treated using a rotated coordinate system approach where the irregular interface is aligned with the coordinate axes. The coordinate rotation does not change the governing equation due to the narrow-angle assumption adopted in its derivation, but care is taken with applying initial, interface, and boundary conditions. Additionally, sound pressure level influences on nonlinear steepening for range-independent and range-dependent domains are used to quantify the pressures for which linear acoustic models suffice. A study is also performed to investigate the effects of thin sediment layers on the propagation of blast waves generated by explosives buried beneath mud line. PMID:25480048

  7. Porous silicon bulk acoustic wave resonator with integrated transducer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report that porous silicon acoustic Bragg reflectors and AlN-based transducers can be successfully combined and processed in a commercial solidly mounted resonator production line. The resulting device takes advantage of the unique acoustic properties of porous silicon in order to form a monolithically integrated bulk acoustic wave resonator. PMID:22776697

  8. Interplanetary shock waves and the structure of solar wind disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hundhausen, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Observations and theoretical models of interplanetary shock waves are reviewed, with emphasis on the large-scale characteristics of the associated solar wind disturbances and on the relationship of these disturbances to solar activity. The sum of observational knowledge indicates that shock waves propagate through the solar wind along a broad, roughly spherical front, ahead of plasma and magnetic field ejected from solar flares. Typically, the shock front reaches 1 AU about two days after its flare origin, and is of intermediate strength. Not all large flares produce observable interplanetary shock waves; the best indicator of shock production appears to be the generation of both type 2 and type 4 radio bursts by a flare. Theoretical models of shock propagation in the solar wind can account for the typically observed shock strength, transit time, and shape.

  9. A numerical scheme for ionizing shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Aslan, Necdet . E-mail: naslan@yeditepe.edu.tr; Mond, Michael

    2005-12-10

    A two-dimensional (2D) visual computer code to solve the steady state (SS) or transient shock problems including partially ionizing plasma is presented. Since the flows considered are hypersonic and the resulting temperatures are high, the plasma is partially ionized. Hence the plasma constituents are electrons, ions and neutral atoms. It is assumed that all the above species are in thermal equilibrium, namely, that they all have the same temperature. The ionization degree is calculated from Saha equation as a function of electron density and pressure by means of a nonlinear Newton type root finding algorithms. The code utilizes a wave model and numerical fluctuation distribution (FD) scheme that runs on structured or unstructured triangular meshes. This scheme is based on evaluating the mesh averaged fluctuations arising from a number of waves and distributing them to the nodes of these meshes in an upwind manner. The physical properties (directions, strengths, etc.) of these wave patterns are obtained by a new wave model: ION-A developed from the eigen-system of the flux Jacobian matrices. Since the equation of state (EOS) which is used to close up the conservation laws includes electronic effects, it is a nonlinear function and it must be inverted by iterations to determine the ionization degree as a function of density and temperature. For the time advancement, the scheme utilizes a multi-stage Runge-Kutta (RK) algorithm with time steps carefully evaluated from the maximum possible propagation speed in the solution domain. The code runs interactively with the user and allows to create different meshes to use different initial and boundary conditions and to see changes of desired physical quantities in the form of color and vector graphics. The details of the visual properties of the code has been published before (see [N. Aslan, A visual fluctuation splitting scheme for magneto-hydrodynamics with a new sonic fix and Euler limit, J. Comput. Phys. 197 (2004) 1

  10. IPShocks: Database of Interplanetary Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isavnin, Alexey; Lumme, Erkka; Kilpua, Emilia; Lotti, Mikko; Andreeova, Katerina; Koskinen, Hannu; Nikbakhsh, Shabnam

    2016-04-01

    Fast collisionless shocks are one of the key interplanetary structures, which have also paramount role for solar-terrestrial physics. In particular, coronal mass ejection driven shocks accelerate particles to high energies and turbulent post-shock flows may drive intense geomagnetic storms. We present comprehensive Heliospheric Shock Database (ipshocks.fi) developed and hosted at University of Helsinki. The database contains currently over 2000 fast forward and fast reverse shocks observed by Wind, ACE, STEREO, Helios, Ulysses and Cluster spacecraft. In addition, the database has search and sort tools based on the spacecraft, time range, and several key shock parameters (e.g., shock type, shock strength, shock angle), data plots for each shock and data download options. These features allow easy access to shocks and quick statistical analyses. All current shocks are identified visually and analysed using the same procedure.

  11. Quantified Energy Dissipation Rates in the Terrestrial Bow Shock. 2; Waves and Dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Sibeck, D. G.; Breneman, A. W.; Le Contel, O.; Cully, C.; Turner, D. L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Malaspina, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first quantified measure of the energy dissipation rates, due to wave-particle interactions, in the transition region of the Earth's collision-less bow shock using data from the Time History of Events and Macro-Scale Interactions during Sub-Storms spacecraft. Our results show that wave-particle interactions can regulate the global structure and dominate the energy dissipation of collision-less shocks. In every bow shock crossing examined, we observed both low-frequency (less than 10 hertz) and high-frequency (approximately or greater than10 hertz) electromagnetic waves throughout the entire transition region and into the magnetosheath. The low-frequency waves were consistent with magnetosonic-whistler waves. The high-frequency waves were combinations of ion-acoustic waves, electron cyclotron drift instability driven waves, electrostatic solitary waves, and whistler mode waves. The high-frequency waves had the following: (1) peak amplitudes exceeding delta B approximately equal to 10 nanoteslas and delta E approximately equal to 300 millivolts per meter, though more typical values were delta B approximately equal to 0.1-1.0 nanoteslas and delta E approximately equal to 10-50 millivolts per meter (2) Poynting fluxes in excess of 2000 microWm(sup -2) (micro-waves per square meter) (typical values were approximately 1-10 microWm(sup -2) (micro-waves per square meter); (3) resistivities greater than 9000 omega meters; and (4) associated energy dissipation rates greater than 10 microWm(sup -3) (micro-waves per cubic meter). The dissipation rates due to wave-particle interactions exceeded rates necessary to explain the increase in entropy across the shock ramps for approximately 90 percent of the wave burst durations. For approximately 22 percent of these times, the wave-particle interactions needed to only be less than or equal to 0.1 percent efficient to balance the nonlinear wave steepening that produced the shock waves. These results show that wave

  12. The mechanism of shock wave treatment in bone healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Jen

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological mechanism of shock wave treatment in bone healing in rabbits. A closed fracture of the right femur was created with a three-point bend method and the fracture was stabilized with an intra-medullary pin. Shock waves were applied one week after the fracture. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group 1 (the control) received no shock waves; group 2 received low-energy and group 3 high-energy shock waves. The animals were sacrificed at 24 weeks, and a 5-cm segment of the femur bone including the callus was harvested. The specimens were studied with histomorphological examination, biomechanical analysis and immunohistochemical stains. The results showed that high-energy shock waves improved bone healing with significant increases in cortical bone formation and the number neovascularization in histomorphology, better bone strength and bone mass in biomechanics, and increased expressions of angiogenic growth markers including BMP-2, eNOS, VEGF and PCNA than the control and low-energy shock wave groups. The effect of shock wave treatment appears to be dose-dependent. In conclusion, high-energy shock waves promote bone healing associated with ingrowth of neovascularization and increased expressions of angiogenic growth factors.

  13. Shock Waves for Possible Application in Regenerative Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S. H. R.; Nejad, S. Moosavi; Akiyama, H.

    The paper reports experimental study of underwater shock waves effects in modification and possible control of embryonic stem cell differentiation and proliferation. The study is motivated by its application in regenerativemedicine. Underwater shock waves have been of interest for various scientific, industrial, and medical applications.

  14. Dispersive shock waves in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Noel F.

    2016-10-01

    The propagation of coherent light with an initial step intensity profile in a nematic liquid crystal is studied using modulation theory. The propagation of light in a nematic liquid crystal is governed by a coupled system consisting of a nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the light beam and an elliptic equation for the medium response. In general, the intensity step breaks up into a dispersive shock wave, or undular bore, and an expansion fan. In the experimental parameter regime for which the nematic response is highly nonlocal, this nematic bore is found to differ substantially from the standard defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation structure due to the effect of the nonlocality of the nematic medium. It is found that the undular bore is of Korteweg-de Vries equation-type, consisting of bright waves, rather than of nonlinear Schrödinger equation-type, consisting of dark waves. In addition, ahead of this Korteweg-de Vries bore there can be a uniform wavetrain with a short front which brings the solution down to the initial level ahead. It is found that this uniform wavetrain does not exist if the initial jump is below a critical value. Analytical solutions for the various parts of the nematic bore are found, with emphasis on the role of the nonlocality of the nematic medium in shaping this structure. Excellent agreement between full numerical solutions of the governing nematicon equations and these analytical solutions is found.

  15. A conductive liquid-based surface acoustic wave device.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jeonghun; Lim, Chae Seung

    2016-10-01

    Surface acoustic wave-based microfluidic devices are popular for fluid and particle manipulation because of their noninvasiveness, low energy consumption, and easy integration with other systems. However, they have been limited by the use of patterned metal electrodes on a piezoelectric substrate, which requires expensive and complicated fabrication processes. Herein, we show a simpler and more cost-effective method for generating surface acoustic waves using eutectic gallium indium as a conductive liquid which can replace conventional patterned metal electrodes. We also demonstrate the comparable performance for acoustic streaming and mixing using conductive liquid-based surface acoustic wave devices. PMID:27528442

  16. A conductive liquid-based surface acoustic wave device.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jeonghun; Lim, Chae Seung

    2016-10-01

    Surface acoustic wave-based microfluidic devices are popular for fluid and particle manipulation because of their noninvasiveness, low energy consumption, and easy integration with other systems. However, they have been limited by the use of patterned metal electrodes on a piezoelectric substrate, which requires expensive and complicated fabrication processes. Herein, we show a simpler and more cost-effective method for generating surface acoustic waves using eutectic gallium indium as a conductive liquid which can replace conventional patterned metal electrodes. We also demonstrate the comparable performance for acoustic streaming and mixing using conductive liquid-based surface acoustic wave devices.

  17. Wave envelopes method for description of nonlinear acoustic wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, J; Nowicki, A; Lewin, P A; Bloomfield, P E; Kujawska, T; Filipczyński, L

    2006-07-01

    A novel, free from paraxial approximation and computationally efficient numerical algorithm capable of predicting 4D acoustic fields in lossy and nonlinear media from arbitrary shaped sources (relevant to probes used in medical ultrasonic imaging and therapeutic systems) is described. The new WE (wave envelopes) approach to nonlinear propagation modeling is based on the solution of the second order nonlinear differential wave equation reported in [J. Wójcik, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 104 (1998) 2654-2663; V.P. Kuznetsov, Akust. Zh. 16 (1970) 548-553]. An incremental stepping scheme allows for forward wave propagation. The operator-splitting method accounts independently for the effects of full diffraction, absorption and nonlinear interactions of harmonics. The WE method represents the propagating pulsed acoustic wave as a superposition of wavelet-like sinusoidal pulses with carrier frequencies being the harmonics of the boundary tone burst disturbance. The model is valid for lossy media, arbitrarily shaped plane and focused sources, accounts for the effects of diffraction and can be applied to continuous as well as to pulsed waves. Depending on the source geometry, level of nonlinearity and frequency bandwidth, in comparison with the conventional approach the Time-Averaged Wave Envelopes (TAWE) method shortens computational time of the full 4D nonlinear field calculation by at least an order of magnitude; thus, predictions of nonlinear beam propagation from complex sources (such as phased arrays) can be available within 30-60 min using only a standard PC. The approximate ratio between the computational time costs obtained by using the TAWE method and the conventional approach in calculations of the nonlinear interactions is proportional to 1/N2, and in memory consumption to 1/N where N is the average bandwidth of the individual wavelets. Numerical computations comparing the spatial field distributions obtained by using both the TAWE method and the conventional approach

  18. Wave envelopes method for description of nonlinear acoustic wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, J; Nowicki, A; Lewin, P A; Bloomfield, P E; Kujawska, T; Filipczyński, L

    2006-07-01

    A novel, free from paraxial approximation and computationally efficient numerical algorithm capable of predicting 4D acoustic fields in lossy and nonlinear media from arbitrary shaped sources (relevant to probes used in medical ultrasonic imaging and therapeutic systems) is described. The new WE (wave envelopes) approach to nonlinear propagation modeling is based on the solution of the second order nonlinear differential wave equation reported in [J. Wójcik, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 104 (1998) 2654-2663; V.P. Kuznetsov, Akust. Zh. 16 (1970) 548-553]. An incremental stepping scheme allows for forward wave propagation. The operator-splitting method accounts independently for the effects of full diffraction, absorption and nonlinear interactions of harmonics. The WE method represents the propagating pulsed acoustic wave as a superposition of wavelet-like sinusoidal pulses with carrier frequencies being the harmonics of the boundary tone burst disturbance. The model is valid for lossy media, arbitrarily shaped plane and focused sources, accounts for the effects of diffraction and can be applied to continuous as well as to pulsed waves. Depending on the source geometry, level of nonlinearity and frequency bandwidth, in comparison with the conventional approach the Time-Averaged Wave Envelopes (TAWE) method shortens computational time of the full 4D nonlinear field calculation by at least an order of magnitude; thus, predictions of nonlinear beam propagation from complex sources (such as phased arrays) can be available within 30-60 min using only a standard PC. The approximate ratio between the computational time costs obtained by using the TAWE method and the conventional approach in calculations of the nonlinear interactions is proportional to 1/N2, and in memory consumption to 1/N where N is the average bandwidth of the individual wavelets. Numerical computations comparing the spatial field distributions obtained by using both the TAWE method and the conventional approach

  19. Optical observation of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in high intensity laser-induced shock processes

    SciTech Connect

    Marti-Lopez, L.; Ocana, R.; Porro, J. A.; Morales, M.; Ocana, J. L.

    2009-07-01

    We report an experimental study of the temporal and spatial dynamics of shock waves, cavitation bubbles, and sound waves generated in water during laser shock processing by single Nd:YAG laser pulses of nanosecond duration. A fast ICCD camera (2 ns gate time) was employed to record false schlieren photographs, schlieren photographs, and Mach-Zehnder interferograms of the zone surrounding the laser spot site on the target, an aluminum alloy sample. We recorded hemispherical shock fronts, cylindrical shock fronts, plane shock fronts, cavitation bubbles, and phase disturbance tracks.

  20. On cylindrically converging shock waves shaped by obstacles

    SciTech Connect

    Eliasson, V; Henshaw, W D; Appelo, D

    2007-07-16

    Motivated by recent experiments, numerical simulations were performed of cylindrically converging shock waves. The converging shocks impinged upon a set of zero to sixteen regularly space obstacles. For more than two obstacles the resulting diffracted shock fronts formed polygonal shaped patterns near the point of focus. The maximum pressure and temperature as a function of number of obstacles were studied. The self-similar behavior of cylindrical, triangular and square-shaped shocks were also investigated.

  1. Optical beam distortions induced by a shock wave.

    PubMed

    Banakh, V A; Sukharev, A A; Falits, A V

    2015-03-10

    The mean intensity and the displacement from the initially given propagation direction of the optical beam passed through the shock wave have been calculated. It has been shown that the spatial inhomogeneity of the refractive index of air caused by the shock wave arising in supersonic flow flowing a conical body can cause the focusing of the beam and strong anisotropic distortions of the intensity distribution in its cross section. The angular displacement of the optical beam from the initially given propagation direction owing to the shock wave depends only on the height above the Earth's surface at which the shock wave is formed. As the height increases, the influence of the shock wave on the optical beam propagating through it decreases.

  2. Shock wave convergence in water with parabolic wall boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Yanuka, D.; Shafer, D.; Krasik, Ya.

    2015-04-28

    The convergence of shock waves in water, where the cross section of the boundaries between which the shock wave propagates is either straight or parabolic, was studied. The shock wave was generated by underwater electrical explosions of planar Cu wire arrays using a high-current generator with a peak output current of ∼45 kA and rise time of ∼80 ns. The boundaries of the walls between which the shock wave propagates were symmetric along the z axis, which is defined by the direction of the exploding wires. It was shown that with walls having a parabolic cross section, the shock waves converge faster and the pressure in the vicinity of the line of convergence, calculated by two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations coupled with the equations of state of water and copper, is also larger.

  3. SHOCK-WAVE THERAPY APPLICATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE (REVIEW).

    PubMed

    Sheveleva, N; Minbayeva, L; Belyayeva, Y

    2016-03-01

    The article presents literature review on the use of extracorporeal shock-wave therapy in physiotherapeutic practice. The basic mechanisms of shock waves influence on the organism are spotlighted. Studies proving high efficacy of the method in treatment of wide variety of inflammatory diseases and traumatic genesis are presented. The data on comparative assessment of shock-wave therapy efficacy, and results of researches on possibility of extracorporeal shock-wave therapy effect potentiating in combination with other therapeutic methods are reflected. Recent years, the range of indications for shock-wave therapy application had been significantly widened. However, further study of the method is still relevant because mechanisms of action of the factor are studied insufficiently; methods of therapy parameters selection (energy flux density, number of pulses per treatment, duration of a course) are either advisory or empirical.

  4. Shock-wave properties of soda-lime glass

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1996-11-01

    Planar impact experiments and wave profile measurements provided single and double shock equation of state data to 30 GPa. Both compression wave wave profile structure and release wave data were used to infer time-dependent strength and equation of state properties for soda-lime glass.

  5. Shock wave relations in lunar ash flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.; Hsieh, T.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed analysis of steady normal shock waves in a layer of lunar ash by the theory of two phase flow of a mixture of a gas and small solid particles is presented. New terms of pressure gradient and virtual mass forces in the particle momentum equation and the particle kinetic energy and work done in the particle energy equation are included in the fundamental equations and their influences are investigated. The flow variables as functions of the free stream Mach number, initial particle volume fraction and the density ratio G are presented. The thickness of the relaxation zone is found to increase with decreasing initial particle volume fraction and almost independent of G for any given values of free stream Mach number. A new empirical relation of the drag coefficient for the spherical particles in the mixture is proposed to fit experimental data.

  6. Dispersive shock wave interactions and asymptotics.

    PubMed

    Ablowitz, Mark J; Baldwin, Douglas E

    2013-02-01

    Dispersive shock waves (DSWs) are physically important phenomena that occur in systems dominated by weak dispersion and weak nonlinearity. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is the universal model for systems with weak dispersion and weak, quadratic nonlinearity. Here we show that the long-time-asymptotic solution of the KdV equation for general, steplike data is a single-phase DSW; this DSW is the "largest" possible DSW based on the boundary data. We find this asymptotic solution using the inverse scattering transform and matched-asymptotic expansions. So while multistep data evolve to have multiphase dynamics at intermediate times, these interacting DSWs eventually merge to form a single-phase DSW at large time. PMID:23496590

  7. Shock wave compacted, melt infiltrated ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Stuivinga, M.; Carton, E. P.

    1998-07-10

    Using shock wave compaction followed by melt infiltration with aluminum, B{sub 4}C-Al and TiB{sub 2}-Al composites have been fabricated. The composites are fully dense and crack-free. They have a high (80-85 vol.%) ceramic content, which gives them good mechanical properties. Due to the infiltration with aluminum, they also have rather good conductive properties. This makes it possible to machine them using spark erosion, in order to obtain complex articles such as nozzles and dies. They are lightweight, an advantage for application in armor and fast turning spindles. In the present article, scanning electron micrographs of the fracture surfaces will be shown and some material properties will be presented.

  8. Extracorporeal shock waves modulate myofibroblast differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rinella, Letizia; Marano, Francesca; Berta, Laura; Bosco, Ornella; Fraccalvieri, Marco; Fortunati, Nicoletta; Frairia, Roberto; Catalano, Maria Graziella

    2016-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are precursors of myofibroblasts, cells deeply involved in promoting tissue repair and regeneration. However, since myofibroblast persistence is associated with the development of tissue fibrosis, the use of tools that can modulate stem cell differentiation toward myofibroblasts is central. Extracorporeal shock waves are transient short-term acoustic pulses first employed to treat urinary stones. They are a leading choice in the treatment of several orthopedic diseases and, notably, they have been reported as an effective treatment for patients with fibrotic sequels from burn scars. Based on these considerations, the aim of this study is to define the role of shock waves in modulating the differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells toward myofibroblasts. Shock waves inhibit the development of a myofibroblast phenotype; they down-regulate the expression of the myofibroblast marker alpha smooth muscle actin and the extracellular matrix protein type I collagen. Functionally, stem cells acquire a more fibroblast-like profile characterized by a low contractility and a high migratory ability. Shock wave treatment reduces the expression of integrin alpha 11, a major collagen receptor in fibroblastic cells, involved in myofibroblast differentiation. Mechanistically, the resistance of integrin alpha 11-overexpressing cells to shock waves in terms of alpha smooth muscle actin expression and cell migration and contraction suggests also a role of this integrin in the translation of shock wave signal into stem cell responses. In conclusion, this in vitro study shows that stem cell differentiation toward myofibroblasts can be controlled by shock waves and, consequently, sustains their use as a therapeutic approach in reducing the risk of skin and tissue fibrosis. PMID:26808471

  9. Augmented shock wave fracture/severance of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmel, Morry L. (Inventor); Bement, Laurence J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention related generally to severing materials, and more particularly to severing or weakening materials through explosively induced, augmented shock waves. Explosive cords are placed in grooves on the upper surface of the material to be severed or weakened. The explosive cords are initiated simultaneously to introduce explosive shock waves into the material. These shock waves progress toward the centerline between the explosive cords and the lower surface of the material. Intersecting and reflected waves produce a rarefaction zone on the centerline to fail the material in tension. A groove may also be cut in the lower surface of the material to aid in severing or weakening the material.

  10. Laser-induced shock waves effects in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.; Shafer, B.P.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the effects of pressure pulses on materials is presented with an orientation toward laser-induced shock wave effects in biological tissue. The behavior is first discussed for small amplitudes, namely sound waves, since many important features in this region are also applicable at large amplitudes. The generation of pressure pulses by lasers is discussed along with amplitudes. The origin and characteristic properties of shock waves are discussed along with the different types of effects they can produce. The hydrodynamic code techniques required for shock wave calculations are discussed along with the necessary empirical data base and methods for generating that data base. 7 refs., 15 figs.

  11. A new shock wave assisted sandalwood oil extraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunkumar, A. N.; Srinivasa, Y. B.; Ravikumar, G.; Shankaranarayana, K. H.; Rao, K. S.; Jagadeesh, G.

    A new shock wave assisted oil extraction technique from sandalwood has been developed in the Shock Waves Lab, IISc, Bangalore. The fragrant oil extracted from sandalwood finds variety of applications in medicine and perfumery industries. In the present method sandal wood specimens (2.5mm diameter and 25mm in length)are subjected to shock wave loading (over pressure 15 bar)in a constant area shock tube, before extracting the sandal oil using non-destructive oil extraction technique. The results from the study indicates that both the rate of extraction as well as the quantity of oil obtained from sandal wood samples exposed to shock waves are higher (15-40 percent) compared to non-destructive oil extraction technique. The compressive squeezing of the interior oil pockets in the sandalwood specimen due to shock wave loading appears to be the main reason for enhancement in the oil extraction rate. This is confirmed by the presence of warty structures in the cross-section and micro-fissures in the radial direction of the wood samples exposed to shock waves in the scanning electron microscopic investigation. In addition the gas chromatographic studies do not show any change in the q uality of sandal oil extracted from samples exposed to shock waves.

  12. Observation of self-excited acoustic vortices in defect-mediated dust acoustic wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ya-Yi; I, Lin

    2014-07-01

    Using the self-excited dust acoustic wave as a platform, we demonstrate experimental observation of self-excited fluctuating acoustic vortex pairs with ± 1 topological charges through spontaneous waveform undulation in defect-mediated turbulence for three-dimensional traveling nonlinear longitudinal waves. The acoustic vortex pair has helical waveforms with opposite chirality around the low-density hole filament pair in xyt space (the xy plane is the plane normal to the wave propagation direction). It is generated through ruptures of sequential crest surfaces and reconnections with their trailing ruptured crest surfaces. The initial rupture is originated from the amplitude reduction induced by the formation of the kinked wave crest strip with strong stretching through the undulation instability. Increasing rupture causes the separation of the acoustic vortex pair after generation. A similar reverse process is followed for the acoustic vortex annihilating with the opposite-charged acoustic vortex from the same or another pair generation.

  13. Shock waves and double layers in a quantum electron-positron-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dip, P. R.; Hossen, M. A.; Salahuddin, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    The ion-acoustic (IA) shock waves and double layers (DLs) in an unmagnetized, dissipative, quantum electron-positron-ion (EPI) plasma (composed of a viscous heavy ion fluid, Fermi electrons and positrons) have been theoretically investigated. The higher-order Burgers and Gardner equations are derived by employing the reductive perturbation method. The basic features of the IA shock waves and the DLs are identified by analyzing the solutions of both the higher-order Burgers and Gardner equations. The ratio of the Fermi temperature of the positron to that of the electron, the Fermi pressure of electrons and positrons, the viscous force, the plasma particle number densities, etc. are found to change remarkably the basic features (viz. amplitude, width, phase speed, etc.) of the IA waves. The results of our investigation may be helpful in understanding the nonlinear features of localized IA waves propagating in quantum EPI plasmas which are ubiquitous in astrophysical, as well as laboratory, environments.

  14. The influence of incident shock Mach number on radial incident shock wave focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Tan, Sheng; He, Liming; Rong, Kang; Zhang, Qiang; Zhu, Xiaobin

    2016-04-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations were carried out to investigate radial incident shock focusing on a test section where the planar incident shock wave was divided into two identical ones. A conventional shock tube was used to generate the planar shock. Incident shock Mach number of 1.51, 1.84 and 2.18 were tested. CCD camera was used to obtain the schlieren photos of the flow field. Third-order, three step strong-stability-preserving (SSP) Runge-Kutta method, third-order weighed essential non-oscillation (WENO) scheme and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm were adopted to simulate the complicated flow fields characterized by shock wave interaction. Good agreement between experimental and numerical results was observed. Complex shock wave configurations and interactions (such as shock reflection, shock-vortex interaction and shock focusing) were observed in both the experiments and numerical results. Some new features were observed and discussed. The differences of structure of flow field and the variation trends of pressure were compared and analyzed under the condition of different Mach numbers while shock wave focusing.

  15. Cytoplasmic molecular delivery with shock waves: importance of impulse.

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, T; Hamblin, M R; Doukas, A G

    2000-01-01

    Cell permeabilization using shock waves may be a way of introducing macromolecules and small polar molecules into the cytoplasm, and may have applications in gene therapy and anticancer drug delivery. The pressure profile of a shock wave indicates its energy content, and shock-wave propagation in tissue is associated with cellular displacement, leading to the development of cell deformation. In the present study, three different shock-wave sources were investigated; argon fluoride excimer laser, ruby laser, and shock tube. The duration of the pressure pulse of the shock tube was 100 times longer than the lasers. The uptake of two fluorophores, calcein (molecular weight: 622) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (molecular weight: 71,600), into HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells was investigated. The intracellular fluorescence was measured by a spectrofluorometer, and the cells were examined by confocal fluorescence microscopy. A single shock wave generated by the shock tube delivered both fluorophores into approximately 50% of the cells (p < 0.01), whereas shock waves from the lasers did not. The cell survival fraction was >0.95. Confocal microscopy showed that, in the case of calcein, there was a uniform fluorescence throughout the cell, whereas, in the case of FITC-dextran, the fluorescence was sometimes in the nucleus and at other times not. We conclude that the impulse of the shock wave (i.e., the pressure integrated over time), rather than the peak pressure, was a dominant factor for causing fluorophore uptake into living cells, and that shock waves might have changed the permeability of the nuclear membrane and transferred molecules directly into the nucleus. PMID:11023888

  16. Wave-wave interactions and deep ocean acoustics.

    PubMed

    Guralnik, Z; Bourdelais, J; Zabalgogeazcoa, X; Farrell, W E

    2013-10-01

    Deep ocean acoustics, in the absence of shipping and wildlife, is driven by surface processes. Best understood is the signal generated by non-linear surface wave interactions, the Longuet-Higgins mechanism, which dominates from 0.1 to 10 Hz, and may be significant for another octave. For this source, the spectral matrix of pressure and vector velocity is derived for points near the bottom of a deep ocean resting on an elastic half-space. In the absence of a bottom, the ratios of matrix elements are universal constants. Bottom effects vitiate the usual "standing wave approximation," but a weaker form of the approximation is shown to hold, and this is used for numerical calculations. In the weak standing wave approximation, the ratios of matrix elements are independent of the surface wave spectrum, but depend on frequency and the propagation environment. Data from the Hawaii-2 Observatory are in excellent accord with the theory for frequencies between 0.1 and 1 Hz, less so at higher frequencies. Insensitivity of the spectral ratios to wind, and presumably waves, is indeed observed in the data.

  17. Acoustic wave characterization of silicon phononic crystal plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Duan; Jiang, Wanli; Xu, Dehui; Xiong, Bin; Wang, Yuelin

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, characterization of megahertz Lamb waves in a silicon phononic crystal based asymmetry filter by laser Doppler vibrometer is demonstrated. The acoustic power from a piezoelectric substrate was transmitted into the silicon superstrate by fluid coupling method, and measured results show that the displacement amplitude of the acoustic wave in the superstrate was approximately one fifth of that in the piezoelectric substrate. Effect of the phononic bandgap on the propagation of Lamb wave in the silicon superstrate is also measured, and the result shows that the phononic crystal structure could reflect part of the acoustic waves back.

  18. Review of methods to attenuate shock/blast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igra, O.; Falcovitz, J.; Houas, L.; Jourdan, G.

    2013-04-01

    Quick and reliable shock wave attenuation is the goal of every protection facility and therefore it is not surprising that achieving this has drawn much attention during the past hundred years. Different options have been suggested; their usefulness varying from a reasonable protection to the opposite, a shock enhancement. An example for a suggestion for shock mitigation that turned out to be an enhancement of the impinging shock wave was the idea to cover a protected object with a foam layer. While the pressure behind the reflected shock wave from the foam frontal surface was smaller than that recorded in a similar reflection from a rigid wall [25], the pressure on the “protected” surface, attached to the foam's rear-surface, was significantly higher than that recorded in a similar reflection from a bare, rigid wall [11]. In protecting humans and installations from destructive shock and/or blast waves the prime goal is to reduce the wave amplitude and the rate of pressure increase across the wave front. Both measures result in reducing the wave harmful effects. During the past six decades several approaches for achieving the desired protection have been offered in the open literature. We point out in this review that while some of the suggestions offered are practical, others are impractical. In our discussion we focus on recent schemes for shock/blast wave attenuation, characterized by the availability of reliable measurements (notably pressure and optical diagnostics) as well as high-resolution numerical simulations.

  19. August Toepler — The first who visualized shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehl, P.; Engemann, S.

    1995-06-01

    The scientific investigation of the nature of shock waves started 130 years ago with the advent of the schlieren method which was developed in the period 1859 1864 by August Toepler. At the very beginning applied to the visualization of heat and flow phenomena, he immediately turned to air shock waves generated by electric sparks, and subjectively studied the propagation, reflection and refraction of shock waves. His new delay circuit in the microsecond time regime for the first time made it possible to vary electrically the delay time between a spark generating a shock wave and a second spark acting as a flash light source in his chlieren setup. In 1870 Toepler, together with Boltzmann, applied Jamin's interferometric refractometer and extended the visualization to very weak sound waves at the threshold of hearing. Toepler's pioneering schlieren method stimulated Ernst Mach and his team to objectively investigate the nature of shock waves: they improved Toepler's time delay circuit; continued the study on the reflection of shock waves; introduced shadowgraphy as a modification of the schlieren method; photographed the propagation of shock waves generated by an electric spark and by supersonic projectiles, and improved interferometry. Based on a large number of original documents the paper illuminates the concomitant circumstances of the invention of the schlieren method and its first applications by others.

  20. Experimentally validated multiphysics computational model of focusing and shock wave formation in an electromagnetic lithotripter.

    PubMed

    Fovargue, Daniel E; Mitran, Sorin; Smith, Nathan B; Sankin, Georgy N; Simmons, Walter N; Zhong, Pei

    2013-08-01

    A multiphysics computational model of the focusing of an acoustic pulse and subsequent shock wave formation that occurs during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is presented. In the electromagnetic lithotripter modeled in this work the focusing is achieved via a polystyrene acoustic lens. The transition of the acoustic pulse through the solid lens is modeled by the linear elasticity equations and the subsequent shock wave formation in water is modeled by the Euler equations with a Tait equation of state. Both sets of equations are solved simultaneously in subsets of a single computational domain within the BEARCLAW framework which uses a finite-volume Riemann solver approach. This model is first validated against experimental measurements with a standard (or original) lens design. The model is then used to successfully predict the effects of a lens modification in the form of an annular ring cut. A second model which includes a kidney stone simulant in the domain is also presented. Within the stone the linear elasticity equations incorporate a simple damage model.

  1. Experimentally validated multiphysics computational model of focusing and shock wave formation in an electromagnetic lithotripter

    PubMed Central

    Fovargue, Daniel E.; Mitran, Sorin; Smith, Nathan B.; Sankin, Georgy N.; Simmons, Walter N.; Zhong, Pei

    2013-01-01

    A multiphysics computational model of the focusing of an acoustic pulse and subsequent shock wave formation that occurs during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is presented. In the electromagnetic lithotripter modeled in this work the focusing is achieved via a polystyrene acoustic lens. The transition of the acoustic pulse through the solid lens is modeled by the linear elasticity equations and the subsequent shock wave formation in water is modeled by the Euler equations with a Tait equation of state. Both sets of equations are solved simultaneously in subsets of a single computational domain within the BEARCLAW framework which uses a finite-volume Riemann solver approach. This model is first validated against experimental measurements with a standard (or original) lens design. The model is then used to successfully predict the effects of a lens modification in the form of an annular ring cut. A second model which includes a kidney stone simulant in the domain is also presented. Within the stone the linear elasticity equations incorporate a simple damage model. PMID:23927200

  2. Experimentally validated multiphysics computational model of focusing and shock wave formation in an electromagnetic lithotripter.

    PubMed

    Fovargue, Daniel E; Mitran, Sorin; Smith, Nathan B; Sankin, Georgy N; Simmons, Walter N; Zhong, Pei

    2013-08-01

    A multiphysics computational model of the focusing of an acoustic pulse and subsequent shock wave formation that occurs during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is presented. In the electromagnetic lithotripter modeled in this work the focusing is achieved via a polystyrene acoustic lens. The transition of the acoustic pulse through the solid lens is modeled by the linear elasticity equations and the subsequent shock wave formation in water is modeled by the Euler equations with a Tait equation of state. Both sets of equations are solved simultaneously in subsets of a single computational domain within the BEARCLAW framework which uses a finite-volume Riemann solver approach. This model is first validated against experimental measurements with a standard (or original) lens design. The model is then used to successfully predict the effects of a lens modification in the form of an annular ring cut. A second model which includes a kidney stone simulant in the domain is also presented. Within the stone the linear elasticity equations incorporate a simple damage model. PMID:23927200

  3. Properties of cylindrical and spherical heavy ion-acoustic solitary and shock structures in a multispecies plasma with superthermal electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, M. G.; Rahman, M. M.; Hossen, M. R.; Mamun, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical investigation on heavy ion-acoustic (HIA) solitary and shock structures has been accomplished in an unmagnetized multispecies plasma consisting of inertialess kappa-distributed superthermal electrons, Boltzmann light ions, and adiabatic positively charged inertial heavy ions. Using the reductive perturbation technique, the nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) Kortewg-de Vries (KdV) and Burgers equations have been derived. The solitary and shock wave solutions of the KdV and Burgers equations, respectively, have been numerically analyzed. The effects of superthermality of electrons, adiabaticity of heavy ions, and nonplanar geometry, which noticeably modify the basic features (viz. polarity, amplitude, phase speed, etc.) of small but finite amplitude HIA solitary and shock structures, have been carefully investigated. The HIA solitary and shock structures in nonplanar geometry have been found to distinctly differ from those in planar geometry. Novel features of our present attempt may contribute to the physics of nonlinear electrostatic perturbation in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  4. Theoretical study of plasma effect on a conical shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, S.P.; Kuo, Steven S.

    2006-03-15

    Experiments conducted previously in a Mach 2.5 wind tunnel showed that localized plasma generated by an on-board 60 Hz electric discharge in front of a 60 deg. cone-shaped model considerably increases the shock angle of the attached shock generated by the cone model. Based on the measured power and cycle energy of the electric discharge, the estimated peak and average temperature enhancements were too low to justify the heating effect as a possible cause of the observed shock wave modification. In this work, a theory also using a cone model as the shock wave generator is presented to explain the observed plasma effect on the shock wave. Through electron-neutral elastic collisions and ion-neutral charge transfer collisions, plasma generated in front of the baseline shock front can deflect the incoming flow before it reaches the cone model; such a flow deflection modifies the structure of the shock wave generated by the cone model from a conic shape to a slightly curved one. The shock remains to be attached to the tip of the cone; however, the shock front moves upstream to increase the shock angle, consistent with the experimental results.

  5. Interaction of Ion-Concentration Shock Waves in Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahga, Supreet S.; Chambers, Robert D.; Santiago, Juan G.

    2011-11-01

    Electrophoresis based separation techniques, such as capillary electrophoresis and isotachophoresis (ITP), are routinely used in microfluidics to separate ionic species from complex mixtures. Nonlinearities in these electrophoretic processes can result in formation of shock and rarefaction waves. We here focus on shock waves which form in ITP between regions of high and low mobility ions. Depending on the charge of ions, these shocks can propagate either towards anode or cathode, and may interact with each other. We here demonstrate simultaneous anionic and cationic ITP process, in which shock waves approach each other and then interact. Using simulations and experimental visualizations, we show that the interaction of these shock waves can modify the electrophoretic conditions and result in formation of new shock and rarefaction waves. We show two applications where we use shock interaction to couple different electrophoretic processes: (i) where we first preconcentrate DNA fragments in anionic ITP and then use shock interaction to initiate DNA separation, and (ii) where we use shock interaction to elongate ITP zones for higher sensitivity.

  6. Shock waves in the large scale structure of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Dongsu

    Cosmological shock waves result from the supersonic flow motions induced by hierarchical formation of nonlinear structures in the universe. Like most astrophysical shocks, they are collisionless shocks which form in the tenuous intergalactic plasma via collective electromagnetic interactions between particles and electromagnetic fields. The gravitational energy released during the structure formation is transferred by these shocks to the intergalactic gas in several different forms. In addition to the gas entropy, cosmic rays are produced via diffusive shock acceleration, magnetic fields are generated via the Biermann battery mechanism and Weibel instability as well as the Bell-Lucek mechanism, and vorticity is generated at curved shocks. Here we review the properties, roles, and consequences of the shock waves in the context of the large scale structure of the universe.

  7. Shock Waves in the Large Scale Structure of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Dongsu

    2008-04-01

    Cosmological shock waves result from the supersonic flow motions induced by hierarchical formation of nonlinear structures in the universe. Like most astrophysical shocks, they are collisionless shocks which form in the tenuous intergalactic plasma via collective electromagnetic interactions between particles and electromagnetic fields. The gravitational energy released during the structure formation is transferred by these shocks to the intergalactic gas in several different forms: in addition to the gas entropy, cosmic rays are produced via diffusive shock acceleration, magnetic fields are generated via the Biermann battery mechanism and Weibel instability, and vorticity is generated at curved shocks. Here I review the properties, roles, and consequences of the shock waves in the context of the large scale structure of the universe.

  8. Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in a quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.; Haas, F.

    2014-10-15

    Nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Using the reductive perturbation method, a Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for appropriate boundary conditions and nonlinear periodic wave solutions are obtained. The corresponding analytical solution and numerical plots of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves and solitons in the phase plane are presented using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential approach. The variations in the nonlinear potential of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves are studied at different values of quantum parameter H{sub e} which is the ratio of electron plasmon energy to electron Fermi energy defined for degenerate electrons. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are formed depending on the value of the quantum parameter. The dependence of the wavelength and frequency on nonlinear wave amplitude is also presented.

  9. Effect of Forcing Function on Nonlinear Acoustic Standing Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkheiner, Joshua R.; Li, Xiao-Fan; Raman, Ganesh; Daniels, Chris; Steinetz, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear acoustic standing waves of high amplitude have been demonstrated by utilizing the effects of resonator shape to prevent the pressure waves from entering saturation. Experimentally, nonlinear acoustic standing waves have been generated by shaking an entire resonating cavity. While this promotes more efficient energy transfer than a piston-driven resonator, it also introduces complicated structural dynamics into the system. Experiments have shown that these dynamics result in resonator forcing functions comprised of a sum of several Fourier modes. However, previous numerical studies of the acoustics generated within the resonator assumed simple sinusoidal waves as the driving force. Using a previously developed numerical code, this paper demonstrates the effects of using a forcing function constructed with a series of harmonic sinusoidal waves on resonating cavities. From these results, a method will be demonstrated which allows the direct numerical analysis of experimentally generated nonlinear acoustic waves in resonators driven by harmonic forcing functions.

  10. Raising Photoemission Efficiency with Surface Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    A. Afanasev, F. Hassani, C.E. Korman, V.G. Dudnikov, R.P. Johnson, M. Poelker, K.E.L. Surles-Law

    2012-07-01

    We are developing a novel technique that may help increase the efficiency and reduce costs of photoelectron sources used at electron accelerators. The technique is based on the use of Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW) in piezoelectric materials, such as GaAs, that are commonly used as photocathodes. Piezoelectric fields produced by the traveling SAW spatially separate electrons and holes, reducing their probability of recombination, thereby enhancing the photoemission quantum efficiency of the photocathode. Additional advantages could be increased polarization provided by the enhanced mobility of charge carriers that can be controlled by the SAW and the ionization of optically-generated excitons resulting in the creation of additional electron-hole pairs. It is expected that these novel features will reduce the cost of accelerator operation. A theoretical model for photoemission in the presence of SAW has been developed, and experimental tests of the technique are underway.

  11. Medical applications and bioeffects of extracorporeal shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delius, M.

    1994-09-01

    Lithotripter shock waves are pressure pulses of microsecond duration with peak pressures of 35 120 MPa followed by a tensile wave. They are an established treatment modality for kidney and gallstone disease. Further applications are pancreatic and salivary stones, as well as delayed fracture healing. The latter are either on their way to become established treatments or are currently under investigation. Shock waves generate tissue damage as a side effect which has been extensively investigated in the kidney, the liver, and the gallbladder. The primary adverse effects are local destruction of blood vessels, bleedings, and formation of blood clots in vessels. Investigations on the mechanism of shock wave action revealed that lithotripters generate cavitation both in vitro and in vivo. An increase in tissue damage at higher pulse administration rates, and also at shock wave application with concomitant gas bubble injection suggested that cavitation is a major mechanism of tissue damage. Disturbances of the heart rhythm and excitation of nerves are further biological effects of shock waves; both are probably also mediated by cavitation. On the cellular level, shock waves induce damage to cell organelles; its extent is related to their energy density. They also cause a transient increase in membrane permeability which does not lead to cell death. Administered either alone or in combination with drugs, shock waves have been shown to delay the growth of small animal tumors and even induce tumor remissions. While the role of cavitation in biological effects is widely accepted, the mechanism of stone fragmentation by shock waves is still controversial. Cavitation is detected around the stone and hyperbaric pressure suppresses fragmentation; yet major cracks are formed early before cavitation bubble collapse is observed. The latter has been regarded as evidence for a direct shock wave effect.

  12. The physical nature of weak shock wave reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skews, Beric W.; Ashworth, Jason T.

    2005-10-01

    For weak shock waves and small wedge angles the application of three-shock (von Neumann) theory gives no physically realistic solutions and yet experiments clearly show a pattern of reflection of three shocks meeting at a triple point. This disagreement is referred to as the von Neumann paradox, and the reflection pattern as von Neumann reflection (vNR). Some recent numerical computations have indicated the existence of an expansion wave immediately behind the reflected wave as originally suggested by Guderley over fifty years ago. Furthermore, a recent solution of the inviscid transonic equations has indicated the possible existence of a very small, multi-wave structure immediately behind the three-shock confluence. A special shock tube has been constructed which allows Mach stem lengths to be obtained which are more than an order of magnitude larger than those obtainable in conventional shock tubes. Schlieren photographs do indeed show a structure consisting of an expansion wave followed by a small shock situated behind the confluence point, with some indication of smaller scale structures in some tests. This indicates that some of the earlier models of vNR, in the parameter space tested, are incorrect. The size of the region influenced by this small wave system is about 2% of the Mach stem length and it is therefore not surprising that it has not been detected before in conventional shock tube facilities.

  13. The Observational Consequences of Proton-Generated Waves at Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2000-01-01

    In the largest solar energetic particle (SEP) events, acceleration takes place at shock waves driven out from the Sun by fast coronal mass ejections. Protons streaming away from strong shocks generate Alfven waves that trap particles in the acceleration region, limiting outflowing intensities but increasing the efficiency of acceleration to higher energies. Early in the events, with the shock still near the Sun, intensities at 1 AU are bounded and spectra are flattened at low energies. Elements with different charge-to-mass ratios, Q/A, differentially probe the wave spectra near shocks, producing abundance ratios that vary in space and time. An initial rise in He/H, while Fe/O declines, is a typical symptom of the non-Kolmogorov wave spectra in the largest events. Strong wave generation can cause cross-field scattering near the shock and unusually rapid reduction in anisotropies even far from the shock. At the highest energies, shock spectra steepen to form a "knee." For protons, this spectral knee can vary from approx. 10 MeV to approx. 1 GeV depending on shock conditions for wave growth. In one case, the location of the knee scales approximately as Q/A in the energy/nucleon spectra of other species.

  14. Dynamics of concerted bubble cluster collapse in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Colonius, Tim; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2003-10-01

    Cavitation bubble cluster collapse at the surface of artificial kidney stones during shock wave lithotripsy was investigated in vitro by means of multiframe high-speed photography, passive cavitation detection (PCD), and pressure waveform measurements using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone (FOPH). It was observed that after the passage of the lithotripter shock pulse the stone was covered by numerous individual bubbles. During their growth phase the bubbles coalesced into bubble clusters, with the biggest cluster at the proximal face of the stone. High-speed camera images suggested that cluster collapse started at the periphery and ended with a violent collapse in a small region in the center of the surface of the stone. Shadowgraphy resolved numerous secondary shock waves emitted during this focused collapse. Shock wave emission during cluster collapse was confirmed by PCD. Measurement with the FOPH showed that these shock waves were typically of short duration (0.2 μs). The majority of the shock waves emanating from cluster collapse were low amplitude but some shock waves registered amplitudes on the order of the incident shock pulse (tens of MPa). [Work supported by NIH DK43881, DK55674.

  15. Fiber optic techniques for measuring various properties of shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinse, Wim C.; van Esveld, Rene; Oostdam, Rene; van Rooijen, Murk; Bouma, Richard

    1999-06-01

    For the past years we have developed several optical techniques to measure properties of shock waves. The fiber optic probe (FOP) is developed to measure the shock-wave velocity and/or the detonation velocity inside an explosive. The space resolution can be as small as 0.5 mm. Single fibers are used as velocity pins, and as devices to measure the flatness of flyers. Arrays of fibers are used to measure the curvature of a shock or detonation front. Also a Fabry-Perot velocity Interferometer System is constructed to measure the velocity of the flyer of an electric gun and the particle velocity in a shock wave. It is possible to combine these two measurements to determine simultaneously the flyer velocity that induces a shock wave in sample and the particle velocity in a window material at the back in a single streak record.

  16. Effects of lithotripter-generated high energy shock waves of mammalian cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kaver, I; Koontz, W W; Wilson, J D; Guice, J M; Smith, M J

    1992-01-01

    The effects of high energy shock waves on an established human prostatic carcinoma cell line (PC-3) were investigated. HESW were administered to PC-3 cell suspensions using an electrohydraulic lithotripter (Dornier HM3). Experimental variables included the number of shocks to which the cells were exposed, spark generator potential, and the position of the cell sample in the acoustic field. Two types of cellular damage were observed: immediate cell destruction (lysis) as measured by electronic particle counting and the loss of reproductive capacity (viability) among the remaining cells as determined by colony formation assay. Over the range of the experimental variables studied, cell lysis was dependent to a greater extent on the number of shocks administered than the generator potential. Viability was affected less but was also dependent on both the generator potential and shock number. Cell lysis was strongly dependent on the position of the sample in the acoustic field with the extent of damage increasing as the sample was moved along the central axis of the shock wave from the f2 focus towards the electrodes. Possible mechanisms of damage and the relationship of the in vitro effects to the damage observed in normal tissues of patients undergoing extracorporeal lithotripsy for kidney stone disease are discussed.

  17. Ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves associated with midlatitude thunderstorms

    SciTech Connect

    Lay, Erin H.; Shao, Xuan -Min; Kendrick, Alexander K.; Carrano, Charles S.

    2015-07-30

    Acoustic waves with periods of 2–4 min and gravity waves with periods of 6–16 min have been detected at ionospheric heights (25–350 km) using GPS total electron content measurements. The area disturbed by these waves and the wave amplitudes have been associated with underlying thunderstorm activity. A statistical study comparing Next Generation Weather Radar thunderstorm measurements with ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves in the midlatitude U.S. Great Plains region was performed for the time period of May–July 2005. An increase of ionospheric acoustic wave disturbed area and amplitude is primarily associated with large thunderstorms (mesoscale convective systems). Ionospheric gravity wave disturbed area and amplitude scale with thunderstorm activity, with even small storms (i.e., individual storm cells) producing an increase of gravity waves.

  18. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  19. Evolution of nonlinear dust-ion-acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, De-long; Ma, J. X.; Li, Yang-fang; Xia, Yinhua; Yu, M. Y.

    2006-05-01

    The propagation of nonlinear dust-ion-acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous dusty plasma is studied. At small but finite amplitudes, the wave evolution is governed by a modified Korteweg-deVries Burgers equation, whose coefficients are space dependent. The properties of the evolution equation are analyzed and the behavior of the corresponding shock and soliton solutions is numerically studied. If dust-charge perturbation is neglected, there exists a zero-nonlinearity point where the coefficient of the nonlinear term changes from negative to positive. At that point the nonlinear wave also undergoes structural deformation. If the dust-charge perturbation is taken into account, the zero-nonlinearity point may not appear and the soliton or shock wave will retain its form during the propagation.

  20. Evolution of nonlinear dust-ion-acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Delong; Ma, J.X.; Li Yangfang; Xia Yinhua; Yu, M.Y.

    2006-05-15

    The propagation of nonlinear dust-ion-acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous dusty plasma is studied. At small but finite amplitudes, the wave evolution is governed by a modified Korteweg-deVries Burgers equation, whose coefficients are space dependent. The properties of the evolution equation are analyzed and the behavior of the corresponding shock and soliton solutions is numerically studied. If dust-charge perturbation is neglected, there exists a zero-nonlinearity point where the coefficient of the nonlinear term changes from negative to positive. At that point the nonlinear wave also undergoes structural deformation. If the dust-charge perturbation is taken into account, the zero-nonlinearity point may not appear and the soliton or shock wave will retain its form during the propagation.

  1. Development of laser-induced grating spectroscopy for underwater temperature measurement in shock wave focusing regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gojani, Ardian B.; Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.; Saito, Tsutomu; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2004-02-01

    In Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) underwater shock wave focusing generates high pressures at very short duration of time inside human body. However, it is not yet clear how high temperatures are enhanced at the spot where a shock wave is focused. The estimation of such dynamic temperature enhancements is critical for the evaluation of tissue damages upon shock loading. For this purpose in the Interdisciplinary Shock Wave Research Center a technique is developed which employs laser induced thermal acoustics or Laser Induced Grating Spectroscopy. Unlike most of gas-dynamic methods of measuring physical quantities this provides a non-invasive one having spatial and temporal resolutions of the order of magnitude of 1.0 mm 3 and 400 ns, respectively. Preliminary experiments in still water demonstrated that this method detected sound speed and hence temperature in water ranging 283 K to 333 K with errors of 0.5%. These results are used to empirically establish the equation of states of water, gelatin or agar cell which will work as alternatives of human tissues.

  2. Development of Laser-induced Grating Spectroscopy for Underwater Temperature Measurement in Shock Wave Focusing Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gojani, Ardian B.; Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.; Saito, Tsutomu; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2003-01-01

    In Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) underwater shock wave focusing generates high pressures at very short duration of time inside human body. However, it is not yet clear how high temperatures are enhanced at the spot where a shock wave is focused. The estimation of such dynamic temperature enhancements is critical for the evaluation of tissue damages upon shock loading. For this purpose in the Interdisciplinary Shock Wave Research Center a technique is developed which employs laser induced thermal acoustics or Laser Induced Grating Spectroscopy. Unlike most of gasdynamic methods of measuring physical quantities this provides a non-invasive one having spatial and temporal resolutions of the order of magnitude of 1.0 mm3 and 400 ns, respectively. Preliminary experiments in still water demonstrated that this method detected sound speed and hence temperature in water ranging 283 K to 333 K with errors of 0.5%. These results may be used to empirically establish the equation of states of water, gelatin or agar cells which will work as alternatives of human tissues.

  3. Numerical simulation of MHD shock waves in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.; Dryer, M.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of the interplanetary magnetic field on the propagation speed of shock waves through an ambient solar wind are examined by numerical solutions of the time-dependent nonlinear equations of motion. The magnetic field always increases the velocity of strong shocks. Although the field may temporarily slow down weak shocks inside 1 AU, it eventually also causes weak shocks to travel faster than they would without the magnetic field at larger distances. Consistent with the increase in the shock velocity, the gas pressure ratio across a shock is reduced considerably in the presence of the magnetic field. The numerical method is used to simulate (starting at 0.3 AU) the large deceleration of a shock observed in the lower corona by ground-based radio instrumentation and the more gradual deceleration of the shock in the solar wind observed by the Pioneer 9 and Pioneer 10 spacecraft.

  4. What is a Shock Wave to an Explosive Molecule?

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2001-06-12

    An explosive molecule is a metastable chemical species that reacts exothermically given the correct stimulus. Impacting an explosive with a shock wave is a ''wake-up call'' or ''trigger'' which compresses and heats the molecule. The energy deposited by the shock wave must be distributed to the vibrational modes of the explosive molecule before chemical reaction can occur. If the shock pressure and temperature are high enough and last long enough, exothermic chemical decomposition can lead to the formation of a detonation wave. For gaseous, liquid, and perfect single crystal solid explosives, after an induction time, chemical reaction begins at or near the rear boundary of the charge. This induction time can be calculated by high pressure, high temperature transition state theory. A ''superdetonation'' wave travels through the preshocked explosive until it overtakes the initial shock wave and then slows to the steady state Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) velocity. In heterogeneous solid explosives, initiation of reaction occurs at ''hot spots'' created by shock compression. If there is a sufficient number of large and hot enough ''hot spots,'' these ignition sites grow creating a pressure pulse that overtakes the leading shock front causing detonation. Since the chemical energy is released well behind the leading shock front of a detonation wave, a mechanism is required for this energy to reinforce the leading shock front and maintain its overall constant velocity. This mechanism is the amplification of pressure wavelets in the reaction zone by the process of de-excitation of the initially highly vibrationally excited reaction product molecules. This process leads to the development of the three-dimensional structure of detonation waves observed for all explosives. In a detonation wave, the leading shock wave front becomes a ''burden'' for the explosive molecule to sustain by its chemical energy release.

  5. Development and Realization of a Shock Wave Test on Expert Flap Qualification Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Fruytier, C.; Dell'Orco, F.; Ullio, R.; Gomiero, F.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the methodology and the results of the shock test campaign conducted by TAS-I and TAS ETCA to qualify the EXPERT Flap in regards of shock wave and acoustic load generated by pyrocord detonation at stages 2/3 separation phase of the EXPERT vehicle. The design concept of the open flap (manufactured by MT AEROSPACE) is a fully integral manufactured, four sided control surface, with an additional stiffening rib and flanges to meet the first eigenfrequency and the allowable deformation requirement with a minimum necessary mass. The objectives were to reproduce equivalent loading at test article level in terms of pulse duration, front pressure, front velocity and acoustic emission. The Thales Alenia Space ETCA pyrotechnic shock test device is usually used to produce high level shocks by performing a shock on a test fixture supporting the unit under test. In this case, the facility has been used to produce a shock wave, with different requested physical characteristics, directed to the unit under test. Different configurations have been tried on a dummy of the unit to test, following an empirical process. This unusual work has lead to the definition of a nominal set- up meeting the requested physical parameters. Two blast sensors have been placed to acquire the pressure around the flap. The distance between the two sensors has allowed estimating the front pressure velocity. Then, several locations have been selected to acquire the acceleration responses on the unit when it was submitted to this environment. Additionally, a “standard” shock test has been performed on this model. The qualification of the flap, in regards of shock environment, has been successfully conducted.

  6. Shock wave formation in the collapse of a vapor nanobubble.

    PubMed

    Magaletti, F; Marino, L; Casciola, C M

    2015-02-13

    In this Letter, the dynamics of a collapsing vapor bubble is addressed by means of a diffuse-interface formulation. The model cleanly captures, through a unified approach, all the critical features of the process, such as phase change, transition to supercritical conditions, thermal conduction, compressibility effects, and shock wave formation and propagation. Rather unexpectedly for pure vapor bubbles, the numerical experiments show that the process consists in the oscillation of the bubble associated with the emission of shock waves in the liquid, and with the periodic disappearance and reappearance of the liquid-vapor interface due to transition to super- or subcritical conditions. The results identify the mechanism of shock wave formation as strongly related to the transition of the vapor to the supercritical state, with a progressive steepening of a focused compression wave evolving into a shock which is eventually reflected as an outward propagating wave in the liquid. PMID:25723223

  7. Shock Formation of Slow Magnetosonic Waves in Coronal Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Suess, Steven T.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the height of shock formation in coroner plumes for slow magnetosonic waves. The models take into account plume geometric spreading, heat conduction and radiative damping. The wave parameters as well as the spreading functions of the plumes and the base magnetic field strengths are given by empirical constraints mostly from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (SOHO/UVCS). Our models show that shock formation occurs at low coronal heights, i.e., within 1.3 solar radius, depending on the model parameters. The shock formation is calculated using the well-established wave breaking condition given by the intersection of C+ characteristics in the space-time plane. Our models show that shock heating by slow magnetosonic waves is expected to be relevant at most heights in solar coronal plumes, although slow magnetosonic waves are most likely not a solely operating energy supply mechanism.

  8. Shock Formation of Slow Magnetosonic Waves in Coronal Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Suess, Steve; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the height of shock formation in coronal plumes for slow magnetosonic waves. The models take into account plume geometric spreading, heat conduction, and radiative damping. The wave parameters as well as the spreading functions of the plumes and the base magnetic field strengths are given by empirical constraints mostly from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Ultraviolet Coronograph Spectrometer (UVCS), Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI), and Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO). Our models show that shock formation occurs at relatively low coronal heights, typically within 1.2 RsuN, depending on the model parameters. The shock formation is calculated using the well-established wave breaking criterion given by the intersection of C+ characteristics in the space-time plane. Our models show that shock heating by slow magnetosonic waves is expected to be relevant at most heights in solar coronal plumes, although such waves are probably not the main energy supply mechanism.

  9. Shock Waves in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulikov, Igor; Zak, Michail

    2005-01-01

    A paper presents a theoretical study of shock waves in a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The mathematical model of the BEC in this study is a nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE) in which (1) the role of the wave function of a single particle in the traditional Schroedinger equation is played by a space- and time-dependent complex order parameter (x,t) proportional to the square root of the density of atoms and (2) the atoms engage in a repulsive interaction characterized by a potential proportional to | (x,t)|2. Equations that describe macroscopic perturbations of the BEC at zero temperature are derived from the NLSE and simplifying assumptions are made, leading to equations for the propagation of sound waves and the transformation of sound waves into shock waves. Equations for the speeds of shock waves and the relationships between jumps of velocity and density across shock fronts are derived. Similarities and differences between this theory and the classical theory of sound waves and shocks in ordinary gases are noted. The present theory is illustrated by solving the equations for the example of a shock wave propagating in a cigar-shaped BEC.

  10. Shock waves in water at low energy pulsed electric discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinchuk, M. E.; Kolikov, V. A.; Rutberg, Ph G.; Leks, A. G.; Dolinovskaya, R. V.; Snetov, V. N.; Stogov, A. Yu

    2012-12-01

    Experimental results of shock wave formation and propagation in water at low energy pulsed electric discharges are presented. To study the hydrodynamic structure of the shock waves, the direct shadow optical diagnostic device with time resolution of 5 ns and spatial resolution of 0.1 mm was designed and developed. Synchronization of the diagnostic and electrodischarge units by the fast optocouplers was carried out. The dependences of shock wave velocities after breakdown of interelectrode gap for various energy inputs (at range of <=1 J) into discharge were obtained. Based on the experimental results the recommendations for the adjustment parameters of the power supply and load were suggested.

  11. Constant Density Approximations for the Flow Behind Axisymmetric Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, Albert G.

    1961-01-01

    The incompressible rotational flow equations are used to obtain solutions for the flow behind axisymmetric shock waves with conic longitudinal sections. The nonlinear part of the term due to rotation is retained in the analysis. Numerical results for standoff distance and stagnation point velocity gradient are presented for the case in which the shock wave is a paraboloid, a sphere, or an oblate or prolate ellipsoid. A similarity parameter is proposed which correlates approximately the flow behind geometrically similar shock waves at different free-stream conditions.

  12. Entropy jump across an inviscid shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, Manuel D.; Iollo, Angelo

    1995-01-01

    The shock jump conditions for the Euler equations in their primitive form are derived by using generalized functions. The shock profiles for specific volume, speed, and pressure are shown to be the same, however density has a different shock profile. Careful study of the equations that govern the entropy shows that the inviscid entropy profile has a local maximum within the shock layer. We demonstrate that because of this phenomenon, the entropy, propagation equation cannot be used as a conservation law.

  13. Radiative Amplification of Acoustic Waves in Hot Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, B. E.

    1985-01-01

    The discovery of broad P Cygni profiles in early type stars and the detection of X-rays emitted from the envelopes of these stars made it clear, that a considerable amount of mechanical energy has to be present in massive stars. An attack on the problem, which has proven successful when applied to late type stars is proposed. It is possible that acoustic waves form out of random fluctuations, amplify by absorbing momentum from stellar radiation field, steepen into shock waves and dissipate. A stellar atmosphere was constructed, and sinusoidal small amplitude perturbations of specified Mach number and period at the inner boundary was introduced. The partial differential equations of hydrodynamics and the equations of radiation transfer for grey matter were solved numerically. The equation of motion was augmented by a term which describes the absorption of momentum from the radiation field in the continuum and in lines, including the Doppler effect and allows for the treatment of a large number of lines in the radiative acceleration term.

  14. Electromagnetic shock wave in nonlinear vacuum: exact solution.

    PubMed

    Kovachev, Lubomir M; Georgieva, Daniela A; Kovachev, Kamen L

    2012-10-01

    An analytical approach to the theory of electromagnetic waves in nonlinear vacuum is developed. The evolution of the pulse is governed by a system of nonlinear wave vector equations. An exact solution with its own angular momentum in the form of a shock wave is obtained.

  15. Shock-wave behavior in explosive monocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, J.J.

    1994-09-09

    The shock response of explosive monocrystals is strongly anisotropic. Shock initiation sensitivity depends strongly on crystal orientation in PETN. This can be understood in terms of steric hindrance to shear during the shock-induced deformation of the molecular crystal. This initiation mechanism appears to be tribochemical rather than thermal.

  16. Ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves associated with midlatitude thunderstorms

    DOE PAGES

    Lay, Erin H.; Shao, Xuan -Min; Kendrick, Alexander K.; Carrano, Charles S.

    2015-07-30

    Acoustic waves with periods of 2–4 min and gravity waves with periods of 6–16 min have been detected at ionospheric heights (25–350 km) using GPS total electron content measurements. The area disturbed by these waves and the wave amplitudes have been associated with underlying thunderstorm activity. A statistical study comparing Next Generation Weather Radar thunderstorm measurements with ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves in the midlatitude U.S. Great Plains region was performed for the time period of May–July 2005. An increase of ionospheric acoustic wave disturbed area and amplitude is primarily associated with large thunderstorms (mesoscale convective systems). Ionospheric gravity wavemore » disturbed area and amplitude scale with thunderstorm activity, with even small storms (i.e., individual storm cells) producing an increase of gravity waves.« less

  17. Modification of the formation of high-Mach number electrostatic shock-like structures by the ion acoustic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckmann, M. E.; Sarri, G.; Doria, D.; Borghesi, M.; Pohl, M.

    2013-10-15

    The formation of unmagnetized electrostatic shock-like structures with a high Mach number is examined with one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The structures are generated through the collision of two identical plasma clouds, which consist of equally hot electrons and ions with a mass ratio of 250. The Mach number of the collision speed with respect to the initial ion acoustic speed of the plasma is set to 4.6. This high Mach number delays the formation of such structures by tens of inverse ion plasma frequencies. A pair of stable shock-like structures is observed after this time in the 1D simulation, which gradually evolves into electrostatic shocks. The ion acoustic instability, which can develop in the 2D simulation but not in the 1D one, competes with the nonlinear process that gives rise to these structures. The oblique ion acoustic waves fragment their electric field. The transition layer, across which the bulk of the ions change their speed, widens and their speed change is reduced. Double layer-shock hybrid structures develop.

  18. Modification of the formation of high-Mach number electrostatic shock-like structures by the ion acoustic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, M. E.; Sarri, G.; Doria, D.; Pohl, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2013-10-01

    The formation of unmagnetized electrostatic shock-like structures with a high Mach number is examined with one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The structures are generated through the collision of two identical plasma clouds, which consist of equally hot electrons and ions with a mass ratio of 250. The Mach number of the collision speed with respect to the initial ion acoustic speed of the plasma is set to 4.6. This high Mach number delays the formation of such structures by tens of inverse ion plasma frequencies. A pair of stable shock-like structures is observed after this time in the 1D simulation, which gradually evolves into electrostatic shocks. The ion acoustic instability, which can develop in the 2D simulation but not in the 1D one, competes with the nonlinear process that gives rise to these structures. The oblique ion acoustic waves fragment their electric field. The transition layer, across which the bulk of the ions change their speed, widens and their speed change is reduced. Double layer-shock hybrid structures develop.

  19. Photoacoustic shock wave emission and cavitation from structured optical fiber tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadzadeh, Milad; Gonzalez Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Wan, Yin Chi; Wang, Xincai; Zheng, Hongyu; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-11-01

    Fiber optics are used in medicine to deliver laser pulses for microsurgery. Upon absorption of a high-power laser pulse, a thermoelastic wave is emitted from the fiber tip. If a flat cleaved fiber is used, the photoacoustic field comprises a planar compressive shock wave and a tensile diffraction wave from the tip edge. Here we demonstrate that by modifying the geometry of a fiber tip, multiple shock waves can be generated from a single laser pulse. Flat cleaved fibers generate tension only along the fiber axis and with one compression-tension cycle from a laser pulse; however, structured fiber tips cause significant tension both along and off-axis, and generate multiple pressure cycles from a single laser pulse. Fast flash photography reveals that diffraction waves from the edges of the tip structures overlap and generate enough tension to form cavitation clouds. We numerically solve the linear wave equation to model the acoustic transients of structured fiber tips and achieve good agreement with pressure measurements from a fiber optic hydrophone. Multiple shock wave emission from a single laser pulse introduces structured fiber tips as a candidate to deliver histotripsy effects via a surgical catheter for micro-scale ablation of soft tissue.

  20. Creating and studying ion acoustic waves in ultracold neutral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Killian, T. C.; Castro, J.; McQuillen, P.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2012-05-15

    We excite ion acoustic waves in ultracold neutral plasmas by imprinting density modulations during plasma creation. Laser-induced fluorescence is used to observe the density and velocity perturbations created by the waves. The effect of expansion of the plasma on the evolution of the wave amplitude is described by treating the wave action as an adiabatic invariant. After accounting for this effect, we determine that the waves are weakly damped, but the damping is significantly faster than expected for Landau damping.

  1. Low Frequency Waves at and Upstream of Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L. B.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter focuses on the range of low frequency electromagnetic modes observed at and upstream of collisionless shocks in the heliosphere. It discusses a specific class of whistler mode wave observed immediately upstream of collisionless shock ramps, called a whistler precursor. Though these modes have been (and are often) observed upstream of quasi-parallel shocks, the authors limit their discussion to those observed upstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. The chapter discusses the various ion velocity distributions observed at and upstream of collisionless shocks. It also introduces some terminology and relevant instabilities for ion foreshock waves. The chapter discusses the most common ultra-low frequency (ULF) wave types, their properties, and their free energy sources. It discusses modes that are mostly Alfvénic (i.e., mostly transverse but can be compressive) in nature.

  2. Ultrafast microfluidics using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that surface acoustic waves (SAWs), nanometer amplitude Rayleigh waves driven at megahertz order frequencies propagating on the surface of a piezoelectric substrate, offer a powerful method for driving a host of extremely fast microfluidic actuation and micro∕bioparticle manipulation schemes. We show that sessile drops can be translated rapidly on planar substrates or fluid can be pumped through microchannels at 1–10 cm∕s velocities, which are typically one to two orders quicker than that afforded by current microfluidic technologies. Through symmetry-breaking, azimuthal recirculation can be induced within the drop to drive strong inertial microcentrifugation for micromixing and particle concentration or separation. Similar micromixing strategies can be induced in the same microchannel in which fluid is pumped with the SAW by merely changing the SAW frequency to rapidly switch the uniform through-flow into a chaotic oscillatory flow by exploiting superpositioning of the irradiated sound waves from the sidewalls of the microchannel. If the flow is sufficiently quiescent, the nodes of the transverse standing wave that arises across the microchannel also allow for particle aggregation, and hence, sorting on nodal lines. In addition, the SAW also facilitates other microfluidic capabilities. For example, capillary waves excited at the free surface of a sessile drop by the SAW underneath it can be exploited for micro∕nanoparticle collection and sorting at nodal points or lines at low powers. At higher powers, the large accelerations off the substrate surface as the SAW propagates across drives rapid destabilization of the drop free surface giving rise to inertial liquid jets that persist over 1–2 cm in length or atomization of the entire drop to produce 1–10 μm monodispersed aerosol droplets, which can be exploited for ink-jet printing, mass spectrometry interfacing, or pulmonary drug delivery. The atomization of polymer∕protein solutions

  3. Shock wave amplification by fabric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thom, C. G.; Cronin, D. S.

    2009-04-01

    It has been shown that, when exposed to air shock waves, soft materials such as fabrics can lead to amplification of the peak pressure measured on a reflecting surface behind the fabric. This occurs for a wide range of fabric configurations, including those used in soft-ballistic protection. The goal of this study was to validate a numerical model to develop an improved understanding of this phenomenon and investigate different fabric parameters, including density, permeability and standoff, and their influence on blast amplification. The investigation of fabric parameters was carried out using numerical simulations in an explicit finite element code with coupled fluid-structure interaction. The benefit of this method was the ability to isolate individual parameters. The model predicted similar trends to existing experimental data, though the numerically predicted peak pressures were consistently higher than the experimental values. The parametric study showed that low permeability fabrics result in the highest pressure amplifications. At areal densities on the order 100 g/m2, typical of single layer fabrics, amplification also increased with areal density for low permeability materials.

  4. Shock wave perturbation decay in granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vogler, Tracy J.

    2015-11-05

    A technique in which the evolution of a perturbation in a shock wave front is monitored as it travels through a sample is applied to granular materials. Although the approach was originally conceived as a way to measure the viscosity of the sample, here it is utilized as a means to probe the deviatoric strength of the material. Initial results for a tungsten carbide powder are presented that demonstrate the approach is viable. Simulations of the experiments using continuum and mesoscale modeling approaches are used to better understand the experiments. The best agreement with the limited experimental data is obtained for the mesoscale model, which has previously been shown to give good agreement with planar impact results. The continuum simulations indicate that the decay of the perturbation is controlled by material strength but is insensitive to the compaction response. Other sensitivities are assessed using the two modeling approaches. The simulations indicate that the configuration used in the preliminary experiments suffers from certain artifacts and should be modified to remove them. As a result, the limitations of the current instrumentation are discussed, and possible approaches to improve it are suggested.

  5. Shock wave perturbation decay in granular materials

    DOE PAGES

    Vogler, Tracy J.

    2015-11-05

    A technique in which the evolution of a perturbation in a shock wave front is monitored as it travels through a sample is applied to granular materials. Although the approach was originally conceived as a way to measure the viscosity of the sample, here it is utilized as a means to probe the deviatoric strength of the material. Initial results for a tungsten carbide powder are presented that demonstrate the approach is viable. Simulations of the experiments using continuum and mesoscale modeling approaches are used to better understand the experiments. The best agreement with the limited experimental data is obtainedmore » for the mesoscale model, which has previously been shown to give good agreement with planar impact results. The continuum simulations indicate that the decay of the perturbation is controlled by material strength but is insensitive to the compaction response. Other sensitivities are assessed using the two modeling approaches. The simulations indicate that the configuration used in the preliminary experiments suffers from certain artifacts and should be modified to remove them. As a result, the limitations of the current instrumentation are discussed, and possible approaches to improve it are suggested.« less

  6. Shock wave driven microparticles for pharmaceutical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, V.; Takayama, K.; Gojani, A.; Hosseini, S. H. R.

    2008-10-01

    Ablation created by a Q-switched Nd:Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser beam focusing on a thin aluminum foil surface spontaneously generates a shock wave that propagates through the foil and deforms it at a high speed. This high-speed foil deformation can project dry micro- particles deposited on the anterior surface of the foil at high speeds such that the particles have sufficient momentum to penetrate soft targets. We used this method of particle acceleration to develop a drug delivery device to deliver DNA/drug coated microparticles into soft human-body targets for pharmaceutical applications. The device physics has been studied by observing the process of particle acceleration using a high-speed video camera in a shadowgraph system. Though the initial rate of foil deformation is over 5 km/s, the observed particle velocities are in the range of 900-400 m/s over a distance of 1.5-10 mm from the launch pad. The device has been tested by delivering microparticles into liver tissues of experimental rats and artificial soft human-body targets, modeled using gelatin. The penetration depths observed in the experimental targets are quite encouraging to develop a future clinical therapeutic device for treatments such as gene therapy, treatment of cancer and tumor cells, epidermal and mucosal immunizations etc.

  7. Dispersive shock waves and modulation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El, G. A.; Hoefer, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    There is growing physical and mathematical interest in the hydrodynamics of dissipationless/dispersive media. Since G.B. Whitham's seminal publication fifty years ago that ushered in the mathematical study of dispersive hydrodynamics, there has been a significant body of work in this area. However, there has been no comprehensive survey of the field of dispersive hydrodynamics. Utilizing Whitham's averaging theory as the primary mathematical tool, we review the rich mathematical developments over the past fifty years with an emphasis on physical applications. The fundamental, large scale, coherent excitation in dispersive hydrodynamic systems is an expanding, oscillatory dispersive shock wave or DSW. Both the macroscopic and microscopic properties of DSWs are analyzed in detail within the context of the universal, integrable, and foundational models for uni-directional (Korteweg-de Vries equation) and bi-directional (Nonlinear Schrödinger equation) dispersive hydrodynamics. A DSW fitting procedure that does not rely upon integrable structure yet reveals important macroscopic DSW properties is described. DSW theory is then applied to a number of physical applications: superfluids, nonlinear optics, geophysics, and fluid dynamics. Finally, we survey some of the more recent developments including non-classical DSWs, DSW interactions, DSWs in perturbed and inhomogeneous environments, and two-dimensional, oblique DSWs.

  8. Waveform inversion of acoustic waves for explosion yield estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rodgers, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new waveform inversion technique to estimate the energy of near-surface explosions using atmospheric acoustic waves. Conventional methods often employ air blast models based on a homogeneous atmosphere, where the acoustic wave propagation effects (e.g., refraction and diffraction) are not taken into account, and therefore, their accuracy decreases with increasing source-receiver distance. In this study, three-dimensional acoustic simulations are performed with a finite difference method in realistic atmospheres and topography, and the modeled acoustic Green's functions are incorporated into the waveform inversion for the acoustic source time functions. The strength of the acoustic source is related to explosion yield based on a standard air blast model. The technique was applied to local explosions (<10 km) and provided reasonable yield estimates (<˜30% error) in the presence of realistic topography and atmospheric structure. The presented method can be extended to explosions recorded at far distance provided proper meteorological specifications.

  9. False Paradoxes of Superposition in Electric and Acoustic Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Richard C.

    1980-01-01

    Corrected are several misconceptions concerning the apparently "missing" energy that results when acoustic or electromagnetic waves cancel by destructive interference and the wave impedance reflected to the sources of the wave energy changes so that the input power is reduced. (Author/CS)

  10. Numerical simulation of shock wave propagation in flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rénier, Mathieu; Marchiano, Régis; Gaudard, Eric; Gallin, Louis-Jonardan; Coulouvrat, François

    2012-09-01

    Acoustical shock waves propagate through flows in many situations. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft influenced by winds, or the so-called Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades when rotating at supersonic speeds, are two examples of such a phenomenon. In this work, an original method called FLHOWARD, acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction, is presented. It relies on a scalar nonlinear wave equation, which takes into account propagation in a privileged direction (one-way approach), with diffraction, flow, heterogeneous and nonlinear effects. Theoretical comparison of the dispersion relations between that equation and parabolic equations (standard or wide angle) shows that this approach is more precise than the parabolic approach because there are no restrictions about the angle of propagation. A numerical procedure based on the standard split-step technique is used. It consists in splitting the nonlinear wave equation into simpler equations. Each of these equations is solved thanks to an analytical solution when it is possible, and a finite differences scheme in other cases. The advancement along the propagation direction is done with an implicit scheme. The validity of that numerical procedure is assessed by comparisons with analytical solutions of the Lilley's equation in waveguides for uniform or shear flows in linear regime. Attention is paid to the advantages and drawbacks of that method. Finally, the numerical code is used to simulate the propagation of sonic boom through a piece of atmosphere with flows and heterogeneities. The effects of the various parameters are analysed.

  11. Whistler wave bursts upstream of the Uranian bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Wong, Hung K.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of magnetic field wave bursts upstream of the Uranian bow shock are reported which were recorded prior to the inbound shock crossing. Three wave types are identified. One exhibits a broad spectral enhancement from a few millihertz to about 50 mHz and is seen from 17 to 10 hr prior to the inbound shock crossing. It is argued that these waves are whistler waves that have propagated upstream from the shock. A second wave type has a spacecraft frame frequency between 20 and 40 mHz, is seen only within or immediately upstream of the shock pedestal, is right-hand polarized in the spacecraft frame, and has a typical burst duration of 90 s. The third wave type has a spacecraft frame frequency of about 0.15 Hz, is seen exclusively within the shock pedestal, is left-hand polarized in the spacecraft frame, and has a burst duration lasting up to 4 min. It is argued that the low-frequency bursts are whistler waves with phase speed comparable to, but in excess of, the solar wind speed.

  12. Joint interpretation of infrasound, acoustic, and seismic waves from meteorites: Chelyabinsk bolide and other events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitov, Ivan; Rozhkov, Mikhail; Bobrov, Dmitry; Ovtchinnikov, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Meteorites are always the events that testing the capability of the International Monitoring System to measure and the International Data Centre to analyze sources similar to nuclear explosions. Monitoring of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty suggests the possibility to detect infrasound (acoustic) and seismic signals from atmospheric and underground events and to locate their sources. Chelyabinsk meteor was one of the best exemplar in a row of other atmospheric events exposing the ability of IDC and IMS to handle the atmospheric explosions. The uniqueness of this event is that the generated seismic, acousto-seismic and infrasound wave fields were recorded by considerable number of IMS stations of different technologies at wide distance range. The shock waves from the Chelyabinsk meteor generated an I-phase recorded by IMS infrasound stations and a series of seismic phases. The Pn-waves were observed by five near-regional seismic stations together with Sn- and Lg-waves. They are most likely associated with the impact of the meteor debris and the location associated with their source differs by tens of kilometers from that obtained by Rayleigh and Love waves. The latter were generated by acoustic (low-amplitude shock) waves hitting the ground beneath the trajectory of the meteor. Surprisingly, these surface waves associated with the meteor and observed at least at distances of 45º were not associated with the event in the Reviewed Event Bulletin. This implies a conceptual gap in the IDC processing and fusion of acoustic and seismic waves. The trajectory of the meteorite built with the epicenters of seismic, acousto-seismic and infrasound events is in good compliance with the trajectories built by different scientific institutions including NASA. We present an approximate distribution of energy release along the trajectory and thus the amplitude of the generated shock wave. It allows interpreting the period and amplitude dependence of the LR and LQ waves on

  13. Temperature and velocity determination of shock-heated flows with non-resonant heterodyne laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, F. J.; Baab, S.; Lamanna, G.; Weigand, B.

    2015-12-01

    Non-resonant laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA), a four-wave mixing technique, was applied to post-shock flows within a shock tube. Simultaneous single-shot determination of temperature, speed of sound and flow velocity behind incident and reflected shock waves at different pressure and temperature levels are presented. Measurements were performed non-intrusively and without any seeding. The paper describes the technique and outlines its advantages compared to more established laser-based methods with respect to the challenges of shock tube experiments. The experiments include argon and nitrogen as test gas at temperatures of up to 1000 K and pressures of up to 43 bar. The experimental data are compared to calculated values based on inviscid one-dimensional shock wave theory. The single-shot uncertainty of the technique is investigated for worst-case test conditions resulting in relative standard deviations of 1, 1.7 and 3.4 % for Mach number, speed of sound and temperature, respectively. For all further experimental conditions, calculated values stay well within the 95 % confidence intervals of the LITA measurement.

  14. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius.

  15. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius. PMID:26558995

  16. Nonstandard jump functions for radially symmetric shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, Roy S.; Tucker, Don H.; Stanescu, Dan

    2008-10-01

    Nonstandard analysis is applied to derive generalized jump functions for radially symmetric, one-dimensional, magnetogasdynamic shock waves. It is assumed that the shock wave jumps occur on infinitesimal intervals, and the jump functions for the physical parameters occur smoothly across these intervals. Locally integrable predistributions of the Heaviside function are used to model the flow variables across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the physical parameters for two families of self-similar flows. It is shown that the microstructures for these families of radially symmetric, magnetogasdynamic shock waves coincide in a nonstandard sense for a specified density jump function

  17. Nonstandard jump functions for radically symmetric shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, Roy S; Tucker, Don H; Stanescu, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Nonstandard analysis is applied to derive generalized jump functions for radially symmetric, one-dimensional, magnetogasdynamic shock waves. It is assumed that the shock wave jumps occur on infinitesimal intervals and the jump functions for the physical parameters occur smoothly across these intervals. Locally integrable predistributions of the Heaviside function are used to model the flow variables across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the physical parameters for two families of self-similar flows. It is shown that the microstructures for these families of radially symmetric, magnetogasdynamic shock waves coincide in a nonstandard sense for a specified density jump function.

  18. Density inhomogeneity driven electrostatic shock waves in planetary rings

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Siddiq, M.; Rizvi, H.; Haque, Q.; Hasnain, H.

    2011-05-15

    Dust inertia and background density driven dust drift shock waves are theoretically studied in a rotating planetary environment and are subsequently applied to the planetary rings where the collisional effects are pronounced. It has been found that the system under consideration admits significant shock formation if the collision frequency is of the order of or less than the rotational frequency of the Saturn's rings.

  19. Anisotropic Swirling Surface Acoustic Waves from Inverse Filtering for On-Chip Generation of Acoustic Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaud, Antoine; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Charron, Eric; Bussonnière, Adrien; Bou Matar, Olivier; Baudoin, Michael

    2015-09-01

    From radio-electronics signal analysis to biological sample actuation, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are involved in a multitude of modern devices. However, only the most simple standing or progressive waves such as plane and focused waves have been explored so far. In this paper, we expand the SAW toolbox with a wave family named "swirling surface acoustic waves" which are the 2D anisotropic analogue of bulk acoustic vortices. Similarly to their 3D counterpart, they appear as concentric structures of bright rings with a phase singularity in their center resulting in a central dark spot. After the rigorous mathematical definition of these waves, we synthesize them experimentally through the inverse filtering technique revisited for surface waves. For this purpose, we design a setup combining arrays of interdigitated transducers and a multichannel electronic that enables one to synthesize any prescribed wave field compatible with the anisotropy of the substrate in a region called the "acoustic scene." This work opens prospects for the design of integrated acoustic vortex generators for on-chip selective acoustic tweezing.

  20. Shock wave emission from laser-induced cavitation bubbles in polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Brujan, Emil-Alexandru

    2008-09-01

    The role of extensional viscosity on the acoustic emission from laser-induced cavitation bubbles in polymer solutions and near a rigid boundary is investigated by acoustic measurements. The polymer solutions consist of a 0.5% polyacrylamide (PAM) aqueous solution with a strong elastic component and a 0.5% carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) aqueous solution with a weak elastic component. A reduction of the maximum amplitude of the shock wave pressure and a prolongation of the oscillation period of the bubble were found in the elastic PAM solution. It might be caused by an increased resistance to extensional flow which is conferred upon the liquid by the polymer additive. In both polymer solutions, however, the shock pressure decays proportionally to r(-1) with increasing distance r from the emission centre.

  1. High-temperature bulk acoustic wave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritze, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Piezoelectric crystals like langasite (La3Ga5SiO14, LGS) and gallium orthophosphate (GaPO4) exhibit piezoelectrically excited bulk acoustic waves at temperatures of up to at least 1450 °C and 900 °C, respectively. Consequently, resonant sensors based on those materials enable new sensing approaches. Thereby, resonant high-temperature microbalances are of particular interest. They correlate very small mass changes during film deposition onto resonators or gas composition-dependent stoichiometry changes of thin films already deposited onto the resonators with the resonance frequency shift of such devices. Consequently, the objective of the work is to review the high-temperature properties, the operation limits and the measurement principles of such resonators. The electromechanical properties of high-temperature bulk acoustic wave resonators such as mechanical stiffness, piezoelectric and dielectric constant, effective viscosity and electrical conductivity are described using a one-dimensional physical model and determined accurately up to temperatures as close as possible to their ultimate limit. Insights from defect chemical models are correlated with the electromechanical properties of the resonators. Thereby, crucial properties for stable operation as a sensor under harsh conditions are identified to be the formation of oxygen vacancies and the bulk conductivity. Operation limits concerning temperature, oxygen partial pressure and water vapor pressure are given. Further, application-relevant aspects such as temperature coefficients, temperature compensation and mass sensitivity are evaluated. In addition, approximations are introduced which make the exact model handy for routine data evaluation. An equivalent electrical circuit for high-temperature resonator devices is derived based on the one-dimensional physical model. Low- and high-temperature approximations are introduced. Thereby, the structure of the equivalent circuit corresponds to the Butterworth

  2. Grain destruction in a supernova remnant shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, John C.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2013-12-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants (SNRs), gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV λ1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 μm and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus, these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the C IV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared with the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction, and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  3. Grain Destruction in a Supernova Remnant Shock Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants, gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV (lambda)1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 micron and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the CIV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared to the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre- shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  4. Shock waves in luminous early-type stars

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J.I.

    1986-07-01

    Shock waves that occur in stellar atmospheres have their origin in some hydrodynamic instability of the atmosphere itself or of the stellar interior. In luminous early-type stars these two possibilities are represented by shocks due to an unstable radiatively-accelerated wind, and to shocks generated by the non-radial pulsations known to be present in many or most OB stars. This review is concerned with the structure and development of the shocks in these two cases, and especially with the mass loss that may be due specifically to the shocks. Pulsation-produced shocks are found to be very unfavorable for causing mass loss, owing to the great radiation efficiency that allows them to remain isothermal. The situation regarding radiatively-driven shocks remains unclear, awaiting detailed hydrodynamics calculations. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  5. A geometric singular perturbation approach for planar stationary shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuopu; Zhang, Jiazhong; Ren, Junheng; Aslam, Muhammad Nauman

    2015-08-01

    The non-linear non-equilibrium nature of shock waves in gas dynamics is investigated for the planar case. Along each streamline, the Euler equations with non-equilibrium pressure are reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations defining a slow-fast system, and geometric singular perturbation theory is applied. The proposed theory shows that an orbit on the slow manifold corresponds to the smooth part of the solution to the Euler equation, where non-equilibrium effects are negligible; and a relaxation motion from the unsteady to the steady branch of the slow manifold corresponds to a shock wave, where the flow relaxes from non-equilibrium to equilibrium. Recognizing the shock wave as a fast motion is found to be especially useful for shock wave detection when post-processing experimental measured or numerical calculated flow fields. Various existing shock detection methods can be derived from the proposed theory in a rigorous mathematical manner. The proposed theory provides a new shock detection method based on its non-linear non-equilibrium nature, and may also serve as the theoretical foundation for many popular shock wave detection techniques.

  6. Plasma mitigation of shock wave: experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2007-12-01

    Two types of plasma spikes, generated by on-board 60 Hz periodic and pulsed dc electric discharges in front of two slightly different wind tunnel models, were used to demonstrate the non-thermal plasma techniques for shock wave mitigation. The experiments were conducted in a Mach 2.5 wind tunnel. (1) In the periodic discharge case, the results show a transformation of the shock from a well-defined attached shock into a highly curved shock structure, which has increased shock angle and also appears in diffused form. As shown in a sequence with increasing discharge intensity, the shock in front of the model moves upstream to become detached with increasing standoff distance from the model and is eliminated near the peak of the discharge. The power measurements exclude the heating effect as a possible cause of the observed shock wave modification. A theory using a cone model as the shock wave generator is presented to explain the observed plasma effect on shock wave. The analysis shows that the plasma generated in front of the model can effectively deflect the incoming flow; such a flow deflection modifies the structure of the shock wave generated by the cone model, as shown by the numerical results, from a conic shape to a curved one. The shock front moves upstream with a larger shock angle, matching well with that observed in the experiment. (2) In the pulsed dc discharge case, hollow cone-shaped plasma that envelops the physical spike of a truncated cone model is produced in the discharge; consequently, the original bow shock is modified to a conical shock, equivalent to reinstating the model into a perfect cone and to increase the body aspect ratio by 70%. A significant wave drag reduction in each discharge is inferred from the pressure measurements; at the discharge maximum, the pressure on the frontal surface of the body decreases by more than 30%, the pressure on the cone surface increases by about 5%, whereas the pressure on the cylinder surface remains

  7. Diffusion-flame ignition by shock-wave impingement on a supersonic mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Antonio L.; Huete, Cesar; Williams, Forman A.; Urzay, Javier

    2015-11-01

    Ignition in a supersonic mixing layer interacting with an oblique shock wave is investigated analytically and numerically under conditions such that the post-shock flow remains supersonic. The study requires consideration of the structure of the post-shock ignition kernel that is found to exist around the point of maximum temperature, which may be located either near the edge of the mixing layer or in its interior. The ignition kernel displays a balance between the rates of chemical reaction and of post-shock flow expansion, including the acoustic interactions of the chemical heat release with the shock wave, leading to increased front curvature. The analysis, which adopts a one-step chemistry model with large activation energy, indicates that ignition develops as a fold bifurcation, the turning point in the diagram of the peak perturbation induced by the chemical reaction as a function of the Damköhler number providing the critical conditions for ignition. Subsequent to ignition the lead shock will rapidly be transformed into a thin detonation on the fuel side of the ignition kernel, and, under suitable conditions, a deflagration may extend far downstream, along with the diffusion flame that must separate the rich and lean reaction products.

  8. Ultrasonography and biliary extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Jakobeit, C; Greiner, L

    1993-05-01

    The results of shock-wave treatment of gallbladder stones depend to a very high degree on the quality and expertise of ultrasonography applied before, during, and after shock-wave disintegration of the stones. Ultrasonography is decisive in evaluating the inclusion criteria; it is the method of choice for directing the shockwave energy at the stones and monitoring the disintegration process. It is the only diagnostic modality to really demonstrate the gallbladder being free from stones.

  9. Interaction of turbulent plasma flow with a hypersonic shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Belay, K.; Valentine, J.M.; Williams, R.L.; Johnson, J.A. III

    1997-02-01

    A transient increase is observed in both the spectral energy decay rate and the degree of chaotic complexity at the interface of a shock wave and a turbulent ionized gas. Even though the gas is apparently brought to rest by the shock wave, no evidence is found either of prompt relaminarization or of any systematic influence of end-wall material thermal conductivities on the turbulence parameters. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Shock wave interaction with an abrupt area change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, Manuel D.

    1991-01-01

    The wave patterns that occur when a shock wave interacts with an abrupt area changed are analyzed in terms of the incident shock wave Mach number and area-jump ratio. The solutions predicted by a semi-similar models are in good agreement with those obtained numerically from the quasi-one-dimensional time-dependent Euler equations. The entropy production for the wave system is defined and the principle of minimum entropy production is used to resolve a nonuniqueness problem of the self-similar model.

  11. Particle Acceleration by Cme-driven Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1999-01-01

    In the largest solar energetic particle (SEP) events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Peak particle intensities are a strong function of CME speed, although the intensities, spectra, and angular distributions of particles escaping the shock are highly modified by scattering on Alfven waves produced by the streaming particles themselves. Element abundances vary in complex ways because ions with different values of Q/A resonate with different parts of the wave spectrum, which varies with space and time. Just recently, we have begun to model these systematic variations theoretically and to explore other consequences of proton-generated waves.

  12. Nonlinear propagation and control of acoustic waves in phononic superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Noé; Mehrem, Ahmed; Picó, Rubén; García-Raffi, Lluís M.; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor J.

    2016-05-01

    The propagation of intense acoustic waves in a one-dimensional phononic crystal is studied. The medium consists in a structured fluid, formed by a periodic array of fluid layers with alternating linear acoustic properties and quadratic nonlinearity coefficient. The spacing between layers is of the order of the wavelength, therefore Bragg effects such as band gaps appear. We show that the interplay between strong dispersion and nonlinearity leads to new scenarios of wave propagation. The classical waveform distortion process typical of intense acoustic waves in homogeneous media can be strongly altered when nonlinearly generated harmonics lie inside or close to band gaps. This allows the possibility of engineer a medium in order to get a particular waveform. Examples of this include the design of media with effective (e.g., cubic) nonlinearities, or extremely linear media (where distortion can be canceled). The presented ideas open a way towards the control of acoustic wave propagation in nonlinear regime. xml:lang="fr"

  13. Energetic Particle Abundances as Probes of an Interplanetary Shock Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Tylka, A. J.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We examine the unique abundance variations of Fe/O and He/H in solar energetic particles from a W09 event of 2001 April 10, that have leaked through the flank of an interplanetary shock launched from W04 on April 9. Shock waves from both events reach the Wind spacecraft on April 11. During the second event, both Fe/O and He/H begin at low values and rise to maxima near the time of passage of the shock waves, indicating greater scattering for the species with the highest rigidity at a given velocity. Strong modulation of Fe/O suggests preferential scattering and trapping of Fe by the wave spectrum near and behind the intermediate shock. A significant factor may be the residual proton-generated waves from the very hard proton spectrum accelerated by the early shock wave prior to the onset of the second event. Thus, ion abundances from the later event probe the residual wave spectrum at the earlier shock.

  14. Belt-snap and towel-snap shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settles, Gary; Hargather, Michael; Lawson, Michael; Bigger, Rory

    2007-11-01

    Traditional simple means of generating shock waves are examined by high-speed imaging. A leather belt is folded upon itself at mid-length and the ends are grasped firmly in each hand. When pushed together a loop forms, and when quickly pulled apart the loop closes rapidly, producing a sharp ``crack'' similar to the cracking of a whip (Shock Waves 8(1), 1998). The towel-snap mimics whip cracking by causing the towel end to rotate supersonically. We investigated these phenomena using a high-speed digital camera (10k and 30k frames/sec, 4 microsec exposure) and a sensitive schlieren optical system of 1m aperture. Results show that compression of the air between the two rapidly-approaching leather belt bands first causes a spherical shock wave to form near one hand. The compression then runs along the belt length toward the other hand at supersonic speed, producing an oblique shock wave that is responsible for the audible crack. In the towel-snap, shock waves are visible from tip motion in open air as well as from the compression due to snapping the towel against a surface. There are no known useful applications of these simple phenomena, but they do address how weak shock waves can be generated by muscle power alone. Several other related examples are also mentioned.

  15. Computation of Thermally Perfect Properties of Oblique Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatum, Kenneth E.

    1996-01-01

    A set of compressible flow relations describing flow properties across oblique shock waves, derived for a thermally perfect, calorically imperfect gas, is applied within the existing thermally perfect gas (TPG) computer code. The relations are based upon a value of cp expressed as a polynomial function of temperature. The updated code produces tables of compressible flow properties of oblique shock waves, as well as the original properties of normal shock waves and basic isentropic flow, in a format similar to the tables for normal shock waves found in NACA Rep. 1135. The code results are validated in both the calorically perfect and the calorically imperfect, thermally perfect temperature regimes through comparisons with the theoretical methods of NACA Rep. 1135, and with a state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics code. The advantages of the TPG code for oblique shock wave calculations, as well as for the properties of isentropic flow and normal shock waves, are its ease of use, and its applicability to any type of gas (monatomic, diatomic, triatomic, polyatomic, or any specified mixture thereof).

  16. Computation of Thermally Perfect Oblique Shock Wave Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatum, Kenneth E.

    1997-01-01

    A set of compressible flow relations describing flow properties across oblique shock waves, derived for a thermally perfect, calorically imperfect gas, is applied within the existing thermally perfect gas (TPG) computer code. The relations are based upon the specific heat expressed as a polynomial function of temperature. The updated code produces tables of compressible flow properties of oblique shock waves, as well as the original properties of normal shock waves and basic isentropic flow, in a format similar to the tables for normal shock waves found in NACA Rep. 1135. The code results are validated in both the calorically perfect and the calorically imperfect, thermally perfect temperature regimes through comparisons with the theoretical methods of NACA Rep. 1135. The advantages of the TPG code for oblique shock wave calculations, as well as for the properties of isentropic flow and normal shock waves, are its ease of use and its applicability to any type of gas (monatomic, diatomic, triatomic, polyatomic, or any specified mixture thereof).

  17. Turbulent Magnetic Field Amplification behind Strong Shock Waves in GRB and SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2012-09-01

    Using three-dimensional (special relativistic) magnetohydrodynamics simulations, the amplification of magnetic field behind strong shock wave is studied. In supernova remnants and gamma-ray bursts, strong shock waves propagate through an inhomogeneous density field. When the shock wave hit a density bump or density dent, the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is induced that cause a deformation of the shock front. The deformed shock leaves vorticity behind the shock wave that amplifies the magnetic field due to the stretching of field lines.

  18. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  19. ULF waves upstream of the Venus bow shock - Properties of one-hertz waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlowski, D. S.; Russell, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    Pioneer Venus Orbiter data are used here to study the properties of a class of ULF upstream waves with relatively high observed frequencies. These waves show significant similarity to 'one-Hz' waves identified at earth in the ISEE 1 and 2 observations and the whistler waves identified earlier by IMP 6 observations. The waves appear almost immediately after the spacecraft crosses the magnetic field tangent line to the bow shock surface into the region of connected field lines. The wave amplitude decreases with distance from the shock measured along the magnetic field line. Group velocities calculated using the cold plasma dispersion relation indicate that the waves have sufficient upstream velocities to propagate form the shock into the solar wind. The totality of observations seem best explained by a source of right-handed whistler mode waves at the bow shock.

  20. Shock-resolving direct numerical simulations of strong turbulence interacting with a normal shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chang-Hsin; Donzis, Diego

    2015-11-01

    In many natural and engineering systems, turbulence is found to interact with shock waves. Thus, canonical interactions between isotropic turbulence and a normal shock have been studied extensively, theoretically and numerically, though theories assume the shock to be a discontinuity and most simulations have used shock-capturing schemes which may miss details of the structure of the shock, especially for weak shocks in relatively strong turbulence. We present results on this regime from shock-resolving direct numerical simulations at a range of Reynolds and Mach numbers. Our focus is on the shock structure and the effect on turbulence downstream of the shock. We study the distribution of velocity gradients, in particular dilatation across the shock and compare with theory available. We characterize turbulent shock jumps which are found to depart from the laminar theory as they depend not only on the mean Mach number but also on the Reynolds and turbulent Mach number. Changes experienced by thermodynamic variables across the shock will also be discussed. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of AFOSR.

  1. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors.

    PubMed

    Filipiak, Jerzy; Solarz, Lech; Steczko, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit.

  2. Surface acoustic wave devices for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Liu; Xiao, Chen; Hualin, Cai; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Xiangguang, Tian; Luqi, Tao; Yi, Yang; Tianling, Ren

    2016-02-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have been widely used in different fields and will continue to be of great importance in the foreseeable future. These devices are compact, cost efficient, easy to fabricate, and have a high performance, among other advantages. SAW devices can work as filters, signal processing units, sensors and actuators. They can even work without batteries and operate under harsh environments. In this review, the operating principles of SAW sensors, including temperature sensors, pressure sensors, humidity sensors and biosensors, will be discussed. Several examples and related issues will be presented. Technological trends and future developments will also be discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 60936002, 61025021, 61434001, 61574083), the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2015CB352100), the National Key Project of Science and Technology (No. 2011ZX02403-002) and the Special Fund for Agroscientific Research in the Public Interest of China (No. 201303107). M.A.M is additionally supported by the Postdoctoral Fellowship (PDF) program of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (CPSF).

  3. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors.

    PubMed

    Filipiak, Jerzy; Solarz, Lech; Steczko, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit. PMID:22247694

  4. Fractionated Repetitive Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy: A New Standard in Shock Wave Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Kisch, Tobias; Sorg, Heiko; Forstmeier, Vinzent; Mailaender, Peter; Kraemer, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background. ESWT has proven clinical benefit in dermatology and plastic surgery. It promotes wound healing and improves tissue regeneration, connective tissue disorders, and inflammatory skin diseases. However, a single treatment session or long intervals between sessions may reduce the therapeutic effect. The present study investigated the effects of fractionated repetitive treatment in skin microcirculation. Methods. 32 rats were randomly assigned to two groups and received either fractionated repetitive high-energy ESWT every ten minutes or placebo shock wave treatment, applied to the dorsal lower leg. Microcirculatory effects were continuously assessed by combined laser Doppler imaging and photospectrometry. Results. In experimental group, cutaneous tissue oxygen saturation was increased 1 minute after the first application and until the end of the measuring period at 80 minutes after the second treatment (P < 0.05). The third ESWT application boosted the effect to its highest extent. Cutaneous capillary blood flow showed a significant increase after the second application which was sustained for 20 minutes after the third application (P < 0.05). Placebo group showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusions. Fractionated repetitive extracorporeal shock wave therapy (frESWT) boosts and prolongs the effects on cutaneous hemodynamics. The results indicate that frESWT may provide greater benefits in the treatment of distinct soft tissue disorders compared with single-session ESWT. PMID:26273619

  5. Nanoliter-droplet acoustic streaming via ultra high frequency surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Richie J; Travagliati, Marco; Beltram, Fabio; Cecchini, Marco

    2014-08-01

    The relevant length scales in sub-nanometer amplitude surface acoustic wave-driven acoustic streaming are demonstrated. We demonstrate the absence of any physical limitations preventing the downscaling of SAW-driven internal streaming to nanoliter microreactors and beyond by extending SAW microfluidics up to operating frequencies in the GHz range. This method is applied to nanoliter scale fluid mixing.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Low-Density Shock-Wave Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.

    1999-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations of low-density shock-wave interactions for an incident shock impinging on a cylinder have been performed. Flow-field density gradient and surface pressure and heating define the type of interference pattern and corresponding perturbations. The maximum pressure and heat transfer level and location for various interaction types (i.e., shock-wave incidence with respect to the cylinder) are presented. A time-accurate solution of the Type IV interference is employed to demonstrate the establishment and the steadiness of the low-density flow interaction.

  7. Nonstandard Analysis and Jump Conditions for Converging Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baty, Roy S.; Farassat, Fereidoun; Tucker, Don H.

    2008-01-01

    Nonstandard analysis is an area of modern mathematics which studies abstract number systems containing both infinitesimal and infinite numbers. This article applies nonstandard analysis to derive jump conditions for one-dimensional, converging shock waves in a compressible, inviscid, perfect gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. Predistributions of the Heaviside function and the Dirac delta measure are introduced to model the flow parameters across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters.

  8. Development of an Explosively Driven Sustained Shock Generator for Shock Wave Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P.; Cook, I. T.; Salisbury, D. A.

    2004-07-01

    Investigation of explosive initiation phenomena close to the initiation threshold with explosively driven shock waves is difficult due to the attenuative nature of the pressure input. The design and experimental testing of a sustained shock wave generator based on an explosive plane wave lens and impedance mismatched low density foam and high impedance layers is described. Calibration experiments to develop a 1-D calculational model for the plane wave lens and booster charge were performed. A calculational study was undertaken to determine the sensitivity of the output pulse to plate and foam thicknesses and foam density. A geometry which generates a 24kb almost flat topped shock wave with a duration of over 4μs into the HMX based plastic explosive EDC37 was defined and tested. Experimental shock profile data is compared with pre-shot predictions from the PETRA Eulerian hydrocode incorporating a "snowplough" or simple locking model for the foam. A reasonable match to the observed magnitude and profile of the initial shock is achieved, although the timing of subsequent shock waves is less well matched.

  9. Shock Waves Impacting Composite Material Plates: The Mutual Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2013-02-01

    High-performance, fiber-reinforced polymer composites have been extensively used in structural applications in the last 30 years because of their light weight combined with high specific stiffness and strength at a rather low cost. The automotive industry has adopted these materials in new designs of lightweight vehicles. The mechanical response and characterization of such materials under transient dynamic loading caused with shock impact induced by blast is not well understood. Air blast is associated with a fast traveling shock front with high pressure across followed by a decrease in pressure behind due to expansion waves. The time scales associated with the shock front are typically 103 faster than those involved in the expansion waves. Impingement of blast waves on structures can cause a reflection of the wave off the surface of the structure followed by a substantial transient aerodynamic load, which can cause significant deformation and damage of the structure. These can alter the overpressure, which is built behind the reflected shock. In addition, a complex aeroelastic interaction between the blast wave and the structure develops that can induce reverberation within an enclosure, which can cause substantial overpressure through multiple reflections of the wave. Numerical simulations of such interactions are quite challenging. They usually require coupled solvers for the flow and the structure. The present contribution provides a physics-based analysis of the phenomena involved, a critical review of existing computational techniques together with some recent results involving face-on impact of shock waves on thin composite plates.

  10. Plasma wave turbulence associated with an interplanetary shock. [wave in solar wind upstream of magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Neubauer, F. M.; Schwenn, R.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with interplanetary shocks, detected and analyzed to date, from the Helios 1 and 2 spacecraft in eccentric solar orbits. The plasma wave turbulence associated with the shock observed on March 30, 1976 is studied in detail. This event is of particular interest because it represents a clearly defined burst of turbulence against a quiet solar wind background both upstream and downstream of the shock. The shock itself is an oblique shock with upstream parameters characterized by a low Mach number, a low beta, and an abnormally large electron to ion temperature ratio. The types of plasma wave detected are discussed.

  11. Growth and decay of weak shock waves in magnetogasdynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, L. P.; Singh, D. B.; Ram, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the problem of the propagation of weak shock waves in an inviscid, electrically conducting fluid under the influence of a magnetic field. The analysis assumes the following two cases: (1) a planar flow with a uniform transverse magnetic field and (2) cylindrically symmetric flow with a uniform axial or varying azimuthal magnetic field. A system of two coupled nonlinear transport equations, governing the strength of a shock wave and the first-order discontinuity induced behind it, are derived that admit a solution that agrees with the classical decay laws for a weak shock. An analytic expression for the determination of the shock formation distance is obtained. How the magnetic field strength, whether axial or azimuthal, influences the shock formation is also assessed.

  12. Radiative transfer effects on reflected shock waves. II - Absorbing gas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, F. Y.; Olfe, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    Radiative cooling effects behind a reflected shock wave are calculated for an absorbing-emitting gas by means of an expansion procedure in the small density ratio across the shock front. For a gray gas shock layer with an optical thickness of order unity or less the absorption integral is simplified by use of the local temperature approximation, whereas for larger optical thicknesses a Rosseland diffusion type of solution is matched with the local temperature approximation solution. The calculations show that the shock wave will attenuate at first and then accelerate to a constant velocity. Under appropriate conditions the gas enthalpy near the wall may increase at intermediate times before ultimately decreasing to zero. A two-band absorption model yields end-wall radiant-heat fluxes which agree well with available shock-tube measurements.

  13. The effect of refraction on acoustic wave-angle emission from free jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S.-L.

    Good quality optical photographs of supersonic helium free jets show three principal types of acoustic waves: (1) nozzle centered radiation in the form of high-frequency, closely-spaced waves which steepen with distance away from the jet; (2) wider-spaced high-frequency waves emanating from the first six diameters from the exit and inclined at approximately the same angle as the initial nozzle-centered waves, but with little steepening; and (3) low-angled low-frequency waves which originate from the end of the potential jet core and are cut off at the end of the sonic core. A theoretical method developed for ideally-expanded air jets has been modified for refraction and convection effects due to significantly different density and sound-speed jets exhausting into the quiescent atmosphere. The predicted acoustic wave angles are within 3 deg of the measured angles for six correctly-expanded air and helium jets; the additional shock noise contribution for 13 helium and air jets operating in the 50-150% expansion range are underestimated by 4-8 deg. The predicted angle for the low-frequency radiation is within 3 deg of the cone-of-silence angle in the 15 cases where the acoustic cut-off is within the optical field of view.

  14. Acoustic waves in gases with strong pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, William E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of strong pressure gradients on the acoustic modes (standing waves) of a rectangular cavity is investigated analytically. When the cavity response is represented by a sum of modes, each mode is found to have two resonant frequencies. The lower frequency is near the Viaesaela-Brundt frequency, which characterizes the buoyant effect, and the higher frequency is above the ordinary acoustic resonance frequency. This finding shows that the propagation velocity of the acoustic waves is increased due to the pressure gradient effect.

  15. Flow profiling of a surface-acoustic-wave nanopump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttenberg, Z.; Rathgeber, A.; Keller, S.; Rädler, J. O.; Wixforth, A.; Kostur, M.; Schindler, M.; Talkner, P.

    2004-11-01

    The flow profile in a capillary gap and the pumping efficiency of an acoustic micropump employing surface acoustic waves is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Ultrasonic surface waves on a piezoelectric substrate strongly couple to a thin liquid layer and generate a quadrupolar streaming pattern within the fluid. We use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy as complementary tools to investigate the resulting flow profile. The velocity was found to depend on the applied power approximately linearly and to decrease with the inverse third power of the distance from the ultrasound generator on the chip. The found properties reveal acoustic streaming as a promising tool for the controlled agitation during microarray hybridization.

  16. Reflection of cylindrical converging shock wave over a plane wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fu; Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Luo, Xisheng; Yang, Jiming; Lu, Xiyun

    2016-08-01

    The cylindrical converging shock reflection over a plane wedge is investigated experimentally and numerically in a specially designed shock tube which converts a planar shock into a cylindrical one. When the converging shock is moving along the wedge, both the shock strength and the incident angle are changing, which provides the possibility for the wave transition. The results show that both regular reflection (RR) and Mach reflection (MR) are found on the wedge with different initial incident angles. The wave transitions from direct Mach reflection (DiMR) to inverse Mach reflection (InMR) and further to transitioned regular reflection (TRR) are observed with appropriate initial incident angles. The instability development in the shear layer and strong vortices formation near the wall are evident, which are ascribed not only to the interaction of two shear layers but also to the shock impact and the shock converging effect. Because of the flow unsteadiness after the converging shock, the detachment criterion provides a good estimation for the RR → MR transition, but fails to predict the DiMR → InMR transition, and MR is found to persist slightly below the mechanical equilibrium condition. A hysteresis process is found in the MR → TRR transition and becomes more apparent as the increase of the initial incident angle due to the shock converging effect.

  17. Schlieren imaging of shock waves radiated by a trumpet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendon, Pablo L.; Velasco-Segura, Roberto; Echeverria, Carlos; Porta, David; Vazquez, Teo; Perez-Lopez, Antonio; Stern, Catalina

    2014-11-01

    The flaring bell section of modern trumpets is known to be critical in determining a wide variety of properties associated with the sound radiated by these instruments. We are particularly interested in the shape of the radiated wavefront, which clearly depends on the bell profile. A horn loudspeaker is used to drive high-intensity sound at different frequencies through a B-flat concert trumpet. The sound intensity is high enough to produce shock waves inside the instrument resonator, and the radiated shocks are then visualised using Schlieren imaging. Through these images we are able to study the geometry of the shock waves radiated by the instrument bell, and also to calculate their propagation speed. The results show that propagation outside the bell is very nearly spherical, and that, as expected, the frequency of the driving signal affects the point at which the shock waves separate from the instrument. We acknowledge financial support from PAPIIT IN109214 and PAPIIT IN117712.

  18. Development of a Novel Shock Wave Catheter Ablation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, H.; Hasebe, Yuhi; Kondo, Masateru; Fukuda, Koji; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    Although radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is quite effective for the treatment tachyarrhythmias, it possesses two fundamental limitations, including limited efficacy for the treatment of ventricular tachyarrhythmias of epicardial origin and the risk of thromboembolism. Consequently, new method is required, which can eradicate arrhythmia source in deep part of cardiac muscle without heating. On the other hand, for a medical application of shock waves, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter (ESWL) has been established [1]. It was demonstrated that the underwater shock focusing is one of most efficient method to generate a controlled high pressure in a small region [2]. In order to overcome limitations of existing methods, we aimed to develop a new catheter ablation system with underwater shock waves that can treat myocardium at arbitrary depth without causing heat.

  19. The role of shock waves in expansion tube accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, G.; Peterson, Richard; Pulford, B.; Seaberg, M.; Stein, K.; Stelter, C.; Weber, R.

    2006-12-01

    Simulations are combined with laboratory measurements to show the important role of shock waves in a popular physics demonstration, the "ping pong cannon." The simulation and measurements confirm a developing shock wave that reflects from the end of the closed tube and approaching ball and the eventual formation of a transient localized pressure build-up near the exit tape barrier. This 2atm burst of pressure peaks within a few microseconds of the ball's arrival, resulting from the combination of near ambient gas density and shock heating to about 1200K. Pulsed schlieren images beyond the exit confirm the sequence of internally reflected shock waves and the intense, hot air pressure pulse that explosively removes the exit tape just prior to the ball arrival.

  20. Mesoscale variations in acoustic signals induced by atmospheric gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Chunchuzov, Igor; Kulichkov, Sergey; Perepelkin, Vitaly; Ziemann, Astrid; Arnold, Klaus; Kniffka, Anke

    2009-02-01

    The results of acoustic tomographic monitoring of the coherent structures in the lower atmosphere and the effects of these structures on acoustic signal parameters are analyzed in the present study. From the measurements of acoustic travel time fluctuations (periods 1 min-1 h) with distant receivers, the temporal fluctuations of the effective sound speed and wind speed are retrieved along different ray paths connecting an acoustic pulse source and several receivers. By using a coherence analysis of the fluctuations near spatially distanced ray turning points, the internal wave-associated fluctuations are filtered and their spatial characteristics (coherences, horizontal phase velocities, and spatial scales) are estimated. The capability of acoustic tomography in estimating wind shear near ground is shown. A possible mechanism describing the temporal modulation of the near-ground wind field by ducted internal waves in the troposphere is proposed.

  1. Attenuation of shock waves in copper and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, W.B.

    1986-06-01

    By using shock pins, data were gathered on the trajectories of shock waves in stainless steel (SS-304L) and oxygen-free-high-conductivity copper (OFHC-Cu). Shock pressures were generated in these materials by impacting the appropriate target with thin (approx.1.5 mm) flying plates. The flying plates in these experiments were accelerated to high velocities (approx.4 km/s) by high explosives. Six experiments were conducted, three using SS-304L as the target material and three experiments using OFHC-Cu as the target material. Peak shock pressures generated in the steel experiments were approximately 109, 130, and 147 GPa and in the copper experiments, the peak shock pressures were approximately 111, 132, and 143 GPa. In each experiment, an attenuation of the shock wave by a following release wave was clearly observed. An extensive effort using two characteristic codes (described in this work) to theoretically calculate the attenuation of the shock waves was made. The efficacy of several different constitutive equations to successfully model the experiments was studied by comparing the calculated shock trajectories to the experimental data. Based on such comparisons, the conclusion can be drawn that OFHC-Cu enters a melt phase at about 130 GPa on the principal Hugoniot. There was no sign of phase changes in the stainless-steel experiments. In order to match the observed attenuation of the shock waves in the SS-304L experiments, it was necessary to include strength effects in the calculations. It was found that the values for the parameters in the strength equations were dependent on the equation of state used in the modeling of the experiments. 66 refs., 194 figs., 77 tabs.

  2. The anatomy of floating shock fitting. [shock waves computation for flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    The floating shock fitting technique is examined. Second-order difference formulas are developed for the computation of discontinuities. A procedure is developed to compute mesh points that are crossed by discontinuities. The technique is applied to the calculation of internal two-dimensional flows with arbitrary number of shock waves and contact surfaces. A new procedure, based on the coalescence of characteristics, is developed to detect the formation of shock waves. Results are presented to validate and demonstrate the versatility of the technique.

  3. Dispersive nature of high mach number collisionless plasma shocks: Poynting flux of oblique whistler waves.

    PubMed

    Sundkvist, David; Krasnoselskikh, V; Bale, S D; Schwartz, S J; Soucek, J; Mozer, F

    2012-01-13

    Whistler wave trains are observed in the foot region of high Mach number quasiperpendicular shocks. The waves are oblique with respect to the ambient magnetic field as well as the shock normal. The Poynting flux of the waves is directed upstream in the shock normal frame starting from the ramp of the shock. This suggests that the waves are an integral part of the shock structure with the dispersive shock as the source of the waves. These observations lead to the conclusion that the shock ramp structure of supercritical high Mach number shocks is formed as a balance of dispersion and nonlinearity.

  4. Shock waves and DNA-cationic lipid assemblies: a synergistic approach to express exogenous genes in human cells.

    PubMed

    Millán-Chiu, Blanca; Camacho, Giselle; Varela-Echavarría, Alfredo; Tamariz, Elisa; Fernández, Francisco; López-Marín, Luz M; Loske, Achim M

    2014-07-01

    Cationic lipid/DNA complexes (lipoplexes) represent a powerful tool for cell transfection; however, their use is still limited by important concerns, including toxicity and poor internalization into deep tissues. In this work, we investigated the use of shock wave-induced acoustic cavitation in vitro for the transfection of lipoplexes in human embryo kidney 293 cells. We selected shock waves with the ability to internalize 10-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran into cells while maintaining survival rates above 50%. Cell transfection was tested using the green fluorescent protein-encoding plasmid pCX::GFPGPI2. Confocal microscopy and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting analyses revealed successful transfection after treatments ranging from 1 to 3 min using 60 to 180 shock waves at peak amplitudes of 12.3 ± 1.5 MPa. Interestingly, the combination of shock waves and lipoplexes induced a 3.1- and 3.8-fold increase in the expression of the reporter gene compared with the use of lipoplexes or shock waves alone, respectively. These results indicate that cationic DNA assembly and shock waves act in a synergistic manner to promote transfection of human cells, revealing a potential approach for non-invasive site-specific gene therapy.

  5. Shock-wave studies of anomalous compressibility of glassy carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodets, A. M.; Golyshev, A. A.; Savinykh, A. S.; Kim, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    The physico-mechanical properties of amorphous glassy carbon are investigated under shock compression up to 10 GPa. Experiments are carried out on the continuous recording of the mass velocity of compression pulses propagating in glassy carbon samples with initial densities of 1.502(5) g/cm3 and 1.55(2) g/cm3. It is shown that, in both cases, a compression wave in glassy carbon contains a leading precursor with amplitude of 0.135(5) GPa. It is established that, in the range of pressures up to 2 GPa, a shock discontinuity in glassy carbon is transformed into a broadened compression wave, and shock waves are formed in the release wave, which generally means the anomalous compressibility of the material in both the compression and release waves. It is shown that, at pressure higher than 3 GPa, anomalous behavior turns into normal behavior, accompanied by the formation of a shock compression wave. In the investigated area of pressure, possible structural changes in glassy carbon under shock compression have a reversible character. A physico-mechanical model of glassy carbon is proposed that involves the equation of state and a constitutive relation for Poisson's ratio and allows the numerical simulation of physico-mechanical and thermophysical properties of glassy carbon of different densities in the region of its anomalous compressibility.

  6. Dynamics of shock waves in a superfluid unitary Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Wen; Shui, Tiankun; Shan, Yafei; Zhu, Changping

    2015-09-01

    We study the formation and dynamics of shock waves initiated by a repulsive potential in a superfluid unitary Fermi gas by using the order-parameter equation. In the theoretical framework, the regularization process of shock waves mediated by the quantum pressure term is purely dispersive. Our results show good agreement with the experiment of Joseph et al (2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 150401). We reveal that the boxlike-shaped density peak observed in the experiment consists of many vortex rings due to the transverse instability of the dispersive shock wave. In addition, we study the transition from a sound wave to subsonic shock waves as the strength of the repulsive potential increases and show a strong qualitative change in the propagation speed of the wavefronts. For a relatively small strength of the repulsive potential, the propagation speed decreases below the sound speed with the increase of the strength as a scaling behavior. For a large strength where the shock waves are formed by colliding two spatially separated clouds, the speed is still smaller than the sound speed, but remains almost unchanged as the strength increases, which can be interpreted as the same expansion speed of the proliferation of the vortex rings originated from the transverse instability.

  7. Nonlinear propagation of spark-generated N-waves in air: modeling and measurements using acoustical and optical methods.

    PubMed

    Yuldashev, Petr; Ollivier, Sébastien; Averiyanov, Mikhail; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Khokhlova, Vera; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2010-12-01

    The propagation of nonlinear spherically diverging N-waves in homogeneous air is studied experimentally and theoretically. A spark source is used to generate high amplitude (1.4 kPa) short duration (40 μs) N-waves; acoustic measurements are performed using microphones (3 mm diameter, 150 kHz bandwidth). Numerical modeling with the generalized Burgers equation is used to reveal the relative effects of acoustic nonlinearity, thermoviscous absorption, and oxygen and nitrogen relaxation on the wave propagation. The results of modeling are in a good agreement with the measurements in respect to the wave amplitude and duration. However, the measured rise time of the front shock is ten times longer than the calculated one, which is attributed to the limited bandwidth of the microphone. To better resolve the shock thickness, a focused shadowgraphy technique is used. The recorded optical shadowgrams are compared with shadow patterns predicted by geometrical optics and scalar diffraction model of light propagation. It is shown that the geometrical optics approximation results in overestimation of the shock rise time, while the diffraction model allows to correctly resolve the shock width. A combination of microphone measurements and focused optical shadowgraphy is therefore a reliable way of studying evolution of spark-generated shock waves in air. PMID:21218866

  8. Converging shock wave focusing and interaction with a target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitishinskiy, M.; Efimov, S.; Antonov, O.; Yanuka, D.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Bernshtam, V.; Fisher, V.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2016-04-01

    Converging shock waves in liquids can be used efficiently in the research of the extreme state of matter and in various applications. In this paper, the recent results related to the interaction of a shock wave with plasma preliminarily formed in the vicinity of the shock wave convergence are presented. The shock wave is produced by the underwater electrical explosion of a spherical wire array. The plasma is generated prior to the shock wave's arrival by a low-pressure gas discharge inside a quartz capillary placed at the equatorial plane of the array. Analysis of the Stark broadening of Hα and Hβ spectral lines and line-to-continuum ratio, combined with the ratio of the relative intensities of carbon C III/C II and silicon Si III/Si II lines, were used to determine the plasma density and temperature evolution. It was found that during the first ˜200 ns with respect to the beginning of the plasma compression by the shock wave and when the spectral lines are resolved, the plasma density increases from 2 × 1017 cm-3 to 5 × 1017 cm-3, while the temperature remains at the same value of 3-4 eV. Further, following the model of an adiabatically imploding capillary, the plasma density increases >1019 cm-3, leading to the continuum spectra obtained experimentally, and the plasma temperature >30 eV at radii of compression of ≤20 μm. The data obtained indicate that the shock wave generated by the underwater electrical explosion of a spherical wire array retains its uniformity during the main part of its convergence.

  9. Experimental simulation of supersonic superboom in a water tank: nonlinear focusing of weak shock waves at a fold caustic.

    PubMed

    Marchiano, Régis; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Coulouvrat, François

    2003-10-31

    An accelerating supersonic aircraft produces noisy superboom due to acoustical shock wave focusing at a fold caustic. This phenomenon is modeled by the mixed-type nonlinear Tricomi equation. An innovative experimental simulation in a water tank has been carried out, with perfect similitude to sonic boom in air. In the linear regime, the canonical Airy function is reproduced using the inverse filter technique. In the nonlinear regime (weak shock waves), the experiment demonstrates the key role of nonlinear effects: they limit the field amplitude, distort the sonic line, and strongly alter the phase of the signal, in agreement with numerical simulations. PMID:14611285

  10. Suppressing bubble shielding effect in shock wave lithotripsy by low intensity pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jen-Chieh; Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been used as an effective modality to fragment kidney calculi. Because of the bubble shielding effect in the pre-focal region, the acoustic energy delivered to the focus is reduced. Low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) will be applied to dissolve these bubbles for better stone comminution efficiency. In this study, low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) beam was aligned perpendicular to the axis of a shock wave (SW) lithotripter at its focus. The light transmission was used to evaluate the compressive wave and cavitation induced by SWs without or with a combination of LIPUS for continuous sonication. It is found that bubble shielding effect becomes dominated with the SW exposure and has a greater significant effect on cavitation than compressive wave. Using the combined wave scheme, the improvement began at the 5th pulse and gradually increased. Suppression effect on bubble shielding is independent on the trigger delay, but increases with the acoustic intensity and pulse duration of LIPUS. The peak negative and integral area of light transmission signal, which present the compressive wave and cavitation respectively, using our strategy at PRF of 1 Hz are comparable to those using SW alone at PRF of 0.1 Hz. In addition, high-speed photography confirmed the bubble activities in both free field and close to a stone surface. Bubble motion in response to the acoustic radiation force by LIPUS was found to be the major mechanism of suppressing bubble shielding effect. There is a 2.6-fold increase in stone fragmentation efficiency after 1000 SWs at PRF of 1 Hz in combination with LIPUS. In summary, combination of SWs and LIPUS is an effective way of suppressing bubble shielding effect and, subsequently, improving cavitation at the focus for a better outcome.

  11. Cosmological shock waves: clues to the formation history of haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planelles, Susana; Quilis, Vicent

    2013-01-01

    Shock waves developed during the formation and evolution of cosmic structures are key features encoding crucial information on the hierarchical formation of the Universe. We present the analysis of an Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamical and N-body simulation in a Λ cold dark matter cosmology especially focused on the study of cosmological shock waves. The combination of a shock-capturing algorithm together with the use of a halo finder allows us to study the morphological structures of the shock patterns, the statistical properties of shocked cells and the correlations between the cosmological shock waves appearing at different scales and the properties of the haloes harbouring them. According to their localization with respect to the population of haloes in the simulation, shocks can be split into two broad classes: internal weak shocks related with evolutionary events within haloes and external strong shocks associated with large-scale events. The shocks' segregation according to their characteristic sizes is also visible in the shock distribution function. This function contains information on the abundances and strength of the different shocks, and it can be fitted by a double power law with a break in the slope around a Mach number of 20. We introduce a generalized scaling relation that correlates the average Mach numbers within the virial radius of haloes and their virial masses. In this plane, Mach number-virial mass, two well-differentiated regimes appear. Haloes occupy different areas of such plane according to their early evolutionary histories: those haloes with a relatively quiet evolution have an almost constant Mach number independently of their masses, whereas haloes undergoing significant merger events very early in their evolution show a linear dependence on their masses. At high redshift, the distribution of haloes in this plane forms an L-like pattern that evolves with time, bending the vertical branch towards the horizontal one. We

  12. Hybrid Simulation of the Shock Wave Trailing the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelevich, P.; Ofman, Leon

    2012-01-01

    A standing shock wave behind the Moon was predicted by Michel (1967) but never observed nor simulated. We use 1D hybrid code in order to simulate the collapse of the plasma-free cavity behind the Moon and for the first time to model the formation of this shock. Starting immediately downstream of the obstacle we consider the evolution of plasma expansion into the cavity in the frame of reference moving along with the solar wind. Well-known effects as electric charging of the cavity affecting the plasma flow and counterstreaming ion beams in the wake are reproduced. Near the apex of the inner Mach cone where the plasma flows from the opposite sides of the obstacle meet, a shock wave arises. We expect the shock to be produced at periods of high electron temperature solar wind streams (T(sub i) much less than T(sub e) approximately 100 eV). The shock is produced by the interaction of oppositely directed proton beams in the plane containing solar wind velocity and interplanetary magnetic field vectors. In the direction across the magnetic field and the solar wind velocity, the shock results from the interaction of the plasma flow with the region of the enhanced magnetic field inside the cavity that plays the role of the magnetic barrier. The appearance of the standing shock wave is expected at the distance of approximately 7R(sub M) downstream of the Moon.

  13. Plane shock wave interaction with a cylindrical water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sembian, S.; Liverts, M.; Tillmark, N.; Apazidis, N.

    2016-05-01

    A complex system of waves propagating inside a water column due to the impact of plane shock wave is investigated both experimentally and numerically. Flow features, such as, focusing of expansion waves generating large negative pressure, nucleation of cavitation bubbles, and a re-circulation zone are observed and discussed qualitatively and quantitatively. Experiments are conducted on a 22 mm diametrical water column hit by shock waves with Mach numbers 1.75 and 2.4 in a newly constructed exploding wire facility. A new technique to create a properly shaped, repeatable, large diameter water column with straight walls is presented. Qualitative features of the flow are captured using the shadowgraph technique. With the aid of numerical simulations the wave motions inside the column are analyzed; the spatial location of the expansion wave focusing point and the corresponding negative peak pressures is estimated.

  14. Application of surface acoustic wave devices to radio telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strasilla, U.

    1983-01-01

    Three experimental Surface Acoustic Wave Resonators (SAWR) are developed and evaluated. A desired center frequency is obtained by correct spacing of the Inter-Digital Transducers (IDT). Transmitting and receiving IDT's must be close for adequate coupling and a sufficient number of reflectors are required to create a high quality standing wave. A review of oscillator theory is given and current technology evaluated.

  15. Quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2015-05-15

    The low-frequency electrostatic waves in metallic nanowires are studied using the quantum hydrodynamic model, in which the electron and ion components of the system are regarded as a two-species quantum plasma system. The Poisson equation as well as appropriate quantum boundary conditions give the analytical expressions of dispersion relations of the surface and bulk quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations.

  16. Surface wave patterns on acoustically levitated viscous liquid alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Z. Y.; Yan, N.; Geng, D. L.; Wei, B.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate two different kinds of surface wave patterns on viscous liquid alloys, which are melted and solidified under acoustic levitation condition. These patterns are consistent with the morphologies of standing capillary waves and ensembles of oscillons, respectively. The rapid solidification of two-dimensional liquid alloy surfaces may hold them down.

  17. Shock waves as turbulent mix amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1988-06-09

    In our initial studies of the shockwave-turbulence interaction process we emphasized the apparent enhancement a pre-existing turbulent field induced by shock passage. The present investigations are concerned with the possibly significant changes induced in shock-front structure during interactions with turbulence. The shock front may be diffracted; its initially planar surface may deform into a wrinkled or corrugated pattern; or it may break up into a succession of wavelets. A crucial question is whether or not the shockwave remains a sharp discontinuity albeit randomly wrinkled or corrugated by interaction with random perturbations in density, velocity, and/or pressure associated with the downstream turbulence. An additional question concerns the time of influence exerted by the shockwave in redistribution of turbulence. At some point, the apparent enhancement ceases and the turbulence decays to pre-existing levels. Geometrical distortions at the front alter the mean flow strain pattern influencing the persistence of duration of this shock interaction/turbulent enhancement process after passage of the shock front well downstream of the interaction region. Examination and description of the influence of these alterations to shockwave structure during shock-turbulence interaction are the basic themes of this work. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  18. International Shock-Wave Database: Systematization of Experimental Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levashov, Pavel R.; Khishchenko, Konstantin V.; Lomonosov, Igor V.; Minakov, Dmitry V.; Zakharenkov, Alexey S.

    2011-06-01

    In this work, we announce the creation of the International Shock-Wave Database (ISWDB). Shock-wave and related dynamic material response data serve for calibrating, validating, and improving material models over very broad regions of the pressure-temperature-density phase space. Our objectives are (i) to develop a database on thermodynamic and mechanical properties of materials under conditions of shock wave and other dynamic loadings, selected related quantities of interest, and the meta-data that describes the provenance of the measurements and material models, and (ii) to make this database available internationally thru the Internet, in an interactive form. The development and operation of the ISWDB will be guided by input from a steering committee. The database will be installed on two mirrored web-servers, one in Russia and the other in USA. The database will provide access to original experimental data on shock compression, non-shock dynamic loadings, isentropic expansion, measurements of sound speed in the Hugoniot state, and time-dependent free-surface or window-interface velocity profiles. We believe that the ISWDB will be a useful tool for the shock-wave community.

  19. Nonlinear scattering of acoustic waves by vibrating obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquette, J. C.

    1983-06-01

    The problem of the generation of sum- and difference-frequency waves produced via the scattering of an acoustic wave by an obstacle whose surface vibrates harmonically was studied both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical approach involved solving the nonlinear wave equation, subject to appropriate boundary conditions, by the use of a perturbation expansion of the fields and a Green's function method. In addition to ordinary rigid-body scattering, Censor predicted nongrowing waves at frequencies equal to the sum and to the difference of the frequencies of the primary waves. The solution to the nonlinear wave equation also yields scattered waves at the sum and difference frequencies. However, the nonlinearity of the medium causes these waves to grow with increasing distance from the scatter's surface and, after a very small distance, dominate those predicted by Censor. The simple-source formulation of the second-order nonlinear wave equation for a lossless fluid medium has been derived for arbitrary primary wave fields. This equation was used to solve the problem of nonlinear scattering of acoustic waves by a vibrating obstacle for three geometries: (1) a plane-wave scattering by a vibrating plane, (2) cylindrical-wave scattering by a vibrating cylinder, and (3) plane-wave scattering by a vibrating cylinder. Successful experimental validation of the theory was inhibited by previously unexpected levels of nonlinearity in the hydrophones used. Such high levels of hydrophone nonlinearity appeared in hydrophones that, by their geometry of construction, were expected to be fairly linear.

  20. INTERFERENCE FRINGES OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES AROUND SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Zhao Hui; Yang, Ming-Hsu; Liang, Zhi-Chao

    2012-10-20

    Solar acoustic waves are scattered by a sunspot due to the interaction between the acoustic waves and the sunspot. The sunspot, excited by the incident wave, generates the scattered wave. The scattered wave is added to the incident wave to form the total wave around the sunspot. The interference fringes between the scattered wave and the incident wave are visible in the intensity of the total wave because the coherent time of the incident wave is of the order of a wave period. The strength of the interference fringes anti-correlates with the width of temporal spectra of the incident wave. The separation between neighboring fringes increases with the incident wavelength and the sunspot size. The strength of the fringes increases with the radial order n of the incident wave from n = 0 to n = 2, and then decreases from n = 2 to n = 5. The interference fringes play a role analogous to holograms in optics. This study suggests the feasibility of using the interference fringes to reconstruct the scattered wavefields of the sunspot, although the quality of the reconstructed wavefields is sensitive to the noise and errors in the interference fringes.

  1. STEREO and Wind Observations of Intense Cyclotron Harmonic Waves at the Earth's Bow Shock and Inside the Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, A. W.; Cattell, C.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first observations of electron cyclotron harmonic waves at the Earth's bow shock from STEREO and Wind burst waveform captures. These waves are observed at magnetic field gradients at a variety of shock geometries ranging from quasi-parallel to nearly perpendicular along with whistler mode waves, ion acoustic waves, and electrostatic solitary waves. Large amplitude cyclotron harmonic waveforms are also observed in the magnetosheath in association with magnetic field gradients convected past the bow shock. Amplitudes of the cyclotron harmonic waves range from a few tens to more than 500 millivolts/meter peak-peak. A comparison between the short (15 meters) and long (100 meters) Wind spin plane antennas shows a similar response at low harmonics and a stronger response on the short antenna at higher harmonics. This indicates that wavelengths are not significantly larger than 100 meters, consistent with the electron cyclotron radius. Waveforms are broadband and polarizations are distinctively comma-shaped with significant power both perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field. Harmonics tend to be more prominent in the perpendicular directions. These observations indicate that the waves consist of a combination of perpendicular Bernstein waves and field-aligned waves without harmonics. A likely source is the electron cyclotron drift instability which is a coupling between Bernstein and ion acoustic waves. These waves are the most common type of high-frequency wave seen by STEREO during bow shock crossings and magnetosheath traversals and our observations suggest that they are an important component of the high-frequency turbulent spectrum in these regions.

  2. Linear and nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Yu, Ping

    1988-01-01

    The investigation of the acoustic wave propagation theory and numerical implementation for the situation of an isothermal atmosphere is described. A one-dimensional model to validate an asymptotic theory and a 3-D situation to relate to a realistic situation are considered. In addition, nonlinear wave propagation and the numerical treatment are included. It is known that the gravitational effects play a crucial role in the low frequency acoustic wave propagation. They propagate large distances and, as such, the numerical treatment of those problems become difficult in terms of posing boundary conditions which are valid for all frequencies.

  3. Thermo-acoustic engineering of silicon microresonators via evanescent waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tabrizian, R.; Ayazi, F.

    2015-06-29

    A temperature-compensated silicon micromechanical resonator with a quadratic temperature characteristic is realized by acoustic engineering. Energy-trapped resonance modes are synthesized by acoustic coupling of propagating and evanescent extensional waves in waveguides with rectangular cross section. Highly different temperature sensitivity of propagating and evanescent waves is used to engineer the linear temperature coefficient of frequency. The resulted quadratic temperature characteristic has a well-defined turn-over temperature that can be tailored by relative energy distribution between propagating and evanescent acoustic fields. A 76 MHz prototype is implemented in single crystal silicon. Two high quality factor and closely spaced resonance modes, created from efficient energy trapping of extensional waves, are excited through thin aluminum nitride film. Having different evanescent wave constituents and energy distribution across the device, these modes show different turn over points of 67 °C and 87 °C for their quadratic temperature characteristic.

  4. Standing wave pressure fields generated in an acoustic levitation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Andrew; Allen, John S.; Kruse, Dustin E.; Dayton, Paul A.; Kargel, Christian M.; Insana, Michael F.

    2001-05-01

    We are developing an acoustic levitation chamber for measuring adhesion force strengths among biological cells. Our research has four phases. Phase I, presented here, is concerned with the design and construction of a chamber for trapping cell-sized microbubbles with known properties in acoustic standing waves, and examines the theory that describes the standing wave field. A cylindrical chamber has been developed to generate a stable acoustic standing wave field. The pressure field was mapped using a 0.4-mm needle hydrophone, and experiments were performed using 100 micron diameter unencapsulated air bubbles, 9 micron diameter isobutane-filled microbubbles, and 3 micron diameter decafluorobutane (C4F10)-filled microbubbles, confirming that the net radiation force from the standing wave pressure field tends to band the microbubbles at pressure antinodes, in accordance with theory.

  5. Thermo-acoustic engineering of silicon microresonators via evanescent waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabrizian, R.; Ayazi, F.

    2015-06-01

    A temperature-compensated silicon micromechanical resonator with a quadratic temperature characteristic is realized by acoustic engineering. Energy-trapped resonance modes are synthesized by acoustic coupling of propagating and evanescent extensional waves in waveguides with rectangular cross section. Highly different temperature sensitivity of propagating and evanescent waves is used to engineer the linear temperature coefficient of frequency. The resulted quadratic temperature characteristic has a well-defined turn-over temperature that can be tailored by relative energy distribution between propagating and evanescent acoustic fields. A 76 MHz prototype is implemented in single crystal silicon. Two high quality factor and closely spaced resonance modes, created from efficient energy trapping of extensional waves, are excited through thin aluminum nitride film. Having different evanescent wave constituents and energy distribution across the device, these modes show different turn over points of 67 °C and 87 °C for their quadratic temperature characteristic.

  6. Acoustic waves in random ensembles of magnetic fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutova, M.P.

    1995-10-10

    To analyze the observational data and provide the appropriate diagnostic procedure for photospheric manifestation of solar oscillations it is necessary to take into account strong inhomogeneity of solar atmosphere with respect to distribution of magnetic fields. We study the collective phenomena in the propagation of acoustic waves and unsteady wave-packets through quite regions, sunspots and plages, including time-dependent response of these regions to solar oscillations, the energy transfer mechanisms, frequency shift effects and reradiation of the acoustic waves in higher layers of atmosphere. We show that the dynamics of differently magnetized regions, their dispersion properties, and their response to the propagation of acoustic waves are completely different. We describe the effects caused by the specific distribution and randomness of magnetic flux tubes, which can be observed and which can provide the tools for diagnostic goals.

  7. Separation of acoustic waves in isentropic flow perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Henke, Christian

    2015-04-15

    The present contribution investigates the mechanisms of sound generation and propagation in the case of highly-unsteady flows. Based on the linearisation of the isentropic Navier–Stokes equation around a new pathline-averaged base flow, it is demonstrated for the first time that flow perturbations of a non-uniform flow can be split into acoustic and vorticity modes, with the acoustic modes being independent of the vorticity modes. Therefore, we can propose this acoustic perturbation as a general definition of sound. As a consequence of the splitting result, we conclude that the present acoustic perturbation is propagated by the convective wave equation and fulfils Lighthill’s acoustic analogy. Moreover, we can define the deviations of the Navier–Stokes equation from the convective wave equation as “true” sound sources. In contrast to other authors, no assumptions on a slowly varying or irrotational flow are necessary. Using a symmetry argument for the conservation laws, an energy conservation result and a generalisation of the sound intensity are provided. - Highlights: • First splitting of non-uniform flows in acoustic and non-acoustic components. • These result leads to a generalisation of sound which is compatible with Lighthill’s acoustic analogy. • A closed equation for the generation and propagation of sound is given.

  8. Broadband enhanced transmission of acoustic waves through serrated metal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dong-Xiang; Fan, Ren-Hao; Deng, Yu-Qiang; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu; Jiangnan University Collaboration

    In this talk, we present our studies on broadband properties of acoustic waves through metal gratings. We have demonstrated that serrated metal gratings, which introduce gradient coatings, can give rise to broadband transmission enhancement of acoustic waves. Here, we have experimentally and theoretically studied the acoustic transmission properties of metal gratings with or without serrated boundaries. The average transmission is obviously enhanced for serrated metal gratings within a wide frequency range, while the Fabry-Perot resonance is significantly suppressed. An effective medium hypothesis with varying acoustic impedance is proposed to analyze the mechanism, which was verified through comparison with finite-element simulation. The serrated boundary supplies gradient mass distribution and gradient normal acoustic impedance, which could efficiently reduce the boundary reflection. Further, by increasing the region of the serrated boundary, we present a broadband high-transmission grating for wide range of incident angle. Our results may have potential applications to broadband acoustic imaging, acoustic sensing and new acoustic devices. References: [1] Dong-Xiang Qi, Yu-Qiang Deng, Di-Hu Xu, Ren-Hao Fan, Ru-Wen Peng, Ze-Guo Chen, Ming-Hui Lu, X. R. Huang and Mu Wang, Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 011906 (2015); [2] Dong-Xiang Qi, Ren-Hao Fan, Ru-Wen Peng, Xian-Rong Huang, Ming-Hui Lu, Xu Ni, Qing Hu, and Mu Wang, Applied Physics Letters 101, 061912 (2012).

  9. Improving the lens design and performance of a contemporary electromagnetic shock wave lithotripter.

    PubMed

    Neisius, Andreas; Smith, Nathan B; Sankin, Georgy; Kuntz, Nicholas John; Madden, John Francis; Fovargue, Daniel E; Mitran, Sorin; Lipkin, Michael Eric; Simmons, Walter Neal; Preminger, Glenn M; Zhong, Pei

    2014-04-01

    The efficiency of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), a noninvasive first-line therapy for millions of nephrolithiasis patients, has not improved substantially in the past two decades, especially in regard to stone clearance. Here, we report a new acoustic lens design for a contemporary electromagnetic (EM) shock wave lithotripter, based on recently acquired knowledge of the key lithotripter field characteristics that correlate with efficient and safe SWL. The new lens design addresses concomitantly three fundamental drawbacks in EM lithotripters, namely, narrow focal width, nonidealized pulse profile, and significant misalignment in acoustic focus and cavitation activities with the target stone at high output settings. Key design features and performance of the new lens were evaluated using model calculations and experimental measurements against the original lens under comparable acoustic pulse energy (E+) of 40 mJ. The -6-dB focal width of the new lens was enhanced from 7.4 to 11 mm at this energy level, and peak pressure (41 MPa) and maximum cavitation activity were both realigned to be within 5 mm of the lithotripter focus. Stone comminution produced by the new lens was either statistically improved or similar to that of the original lens under various in vitro test conditions and was significantly improved in vivo in a swine model (89% vs. 54%, P = 0.01), and tissue injury was minimal using a clinical treatment protocol. The general principle and associated techniques described in this work can be applied to design improvement of all EM lithotripters.

  10. Shock-wave cosmology inside a black hole

    PubMed Central

    Smoller, Joel; Temple, Blake

    2003-01-01

    We construct a class of global exact solutions of the Einstein equations that extend the Oppeheimer–Snyder model to the case of nonzero pressure, inside the black hole, by incorporating a shock wave at the leading edge of the expansion of the galaxies, arbitrarily far beyond the Hubble length in the Friedmann–Robertson–Walker (FRW) spacetime. Here the expanding FRW universe emerges be-hind a subluminous blast wave that explodes outward from the FRW center at the instant of the big bang. The total mass behind the shock decreases as the shock wave expands, and the entropy condition implies that the shock wave must weaken to the point where it settles down to an Oppenheimer–Snyder interface, (bounding a finite total mass), that eventually emerges from the white hole event horizon of an ambient Schwarzschild spacetime. The entropy condition breaks the time symmetry of the Einstein equations, selecting the explosion over the implosion. These shock-wave solutions indicate a cosmological model in which the big bang arises from a localized explosion occurring inside the black hole of an asymptotically flat Schwarzschild spacetime. PMID:12972640

  11. Cylindrical sound wave generated by shock-vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    The passage of a columnar vortex broadside through a shock is investigated. This has been suggested as a crude, but deterministic, model of the generation of 'shock noise' by the turbulence in supersonic jets. The vortex is decomposed by Fourier transform into plane sinusoidal shear waves disposed with radial symmetry. The plane sound waves produced by each shear wave/shock interaction are recombined in the Fourier integral. The waves possess an envelope that is essentially a growing cylindrical sound wave centered at the transmitted vortex. The pressure jump across the nominal radius R = ct attenuates with time as 1/(square root of R) and varies around the arc in an antisymmetric fashion resembling a quadrupole field. Very good agreement, except near the shock, is found with the antisymmetric component of reported interferometric measurements in a shock tube. Beyond the front r approximately equals R is a precursor of opposite sign, that decays like 1/R, generated by the 1/r potential flow around the vortex core. The present work is essentially an extension and update of an early approximate study at M = 1.25. It covers the range (R/core radius) = 10, 100, 1000, and 10,000 for M = 1.25 and (in part) for M = 1.29 and, for fixed (R/core radius) = 1000, the range M = 1.01 to infinity.

  12. Effects of low-dose extracorporeal shock waves on microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, Walaa; Goertz, Ole; Lauer, Henrik; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Hauser, Jörg

    2012-11-01

    The extended wounds of burn patients remain a challenge due to wound infection and following septicemia. The aim of this study was to analyze microcirculation, angiogenesis and leukocyte endothelium interaction after burn injury with and without extracorporeal shock wave application (ESWA). A novel shockwave system was developed based on a commercially available device for orthopedics (Dornier Aries®) that was equipped with a newly developed applicator. This system is based on the electromagnetic shock wave emitter (EMSE) technology and was introduced to accomplish a localized treatment for wound healing. The system includes a novel field of focus for new applications, with high precision and ease of use. In the animal study, full-thickness burns were inflicted on to the ears of hairless mice (n=51). Intravital fluorescent microscopy was used to assess microcirculatory parameters, angiogenesis and leukocyte behavior. ESWA was performed on day 1, 3 and 7. Values were obtained immediately after burn, as well as at days 1, 3, 7, and 12 post burn. All shockwave treated groups showed an accelerated angiogenesis with a less non-perfused area and an improved blood flow after burn injury compared to the placebo control group. After three treatments, the shock waves increased the number of rolling leukocytes significantly compared to the non-treated animals. Shock waves seem to have a positive effect on several parameters of wound healing after burn injury. However, further investigations are necessary to detect positive influence of shock waves on microcirculation after burn injuries.

  13. Treatment of nonunions of long bone fractures with shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Jen

    2003-10-01

    A prospective clinical study investigated the effectiveness of shock waves in the treatment of 72 patients with 72 nonunions of long bone fractures (41 femurs, 19 tibias, 7 humeri, 1 radius, 3 ulnas and 1 metatarsal). The doses of shock waves were 6000 impulses at 28 kV for the femur and tibia, 3000 impulses at 28 kV for the humerus, 2000 impulses at 24 kV for the radius and ulna, and 1000 impulses at 20 kV for the metatarsal. The results of treatment were assessed clinically, and fracture healing was assessed with plain x-rays and tomography. The rate of bony union was 40% at 3 months, 60.9% at 6 months and 80% at 12 months followup. Shock wave treatment was most successful in hypertrophic nonunions and nonunions with a defect and was least effective in atrophic nonunions. There were no systemic complications or device-related problems. Local complications included petechiae and hematoma formation that resolved spontaneously. In the author's experience, the results of the shock wave treatment were similar to the results of surgical treatment for chronic nonunions with no surgical risks. Shock wave treatment is a safe and effective alternative method in the treatment of chronic nonunions of long bones.

  14. Numerical investigations of shock wave propagation in polymethylmethacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, T. V.; Mayer, A. E.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2015-11-01

    Using the Maxwell model of viscoelastic medium, we numerically investigate the influence of the viscoelastic properties of polymethylmethacrylate on the variation of the shock wave amplitude with depth. Parameters of the Maxwell model are chosen by comparison with experimental data on the high-speed impact of plates in order to fit the modeling results with the experimentally measured profiles of the free-surface velocity. A caloric equation of state is used to calculate the pressure from density and internal energy. It is shown that at the limit of weak shock waves, the accounting of the viscoelastic properties allows one to achieve a better agreement between calculated and experimental data for the magnitude of the shock wave velocity in comparison with the case of hydrodynamic calculations. Using the viscoelastic and hydrodynamic approaches, we investigated the dynamics of shock waves in polymethylmethacrylate initiated by micro-, nano- and picosecond pulses of pressure on the sample surface. The calculation results show that the changes in the shock wave amplitude with depth are approximately identical in the hydrodynamic and viscoelastic cases.

  15. Regulatory standards and calibration procedures for shock wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Mark E.

    2003-10-01

    In order to bring any shock wave device into commercial use, i.e., clinical practice, it must receive regulatory approval from either the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or the appropriate national agency. A key part of this process involves the complete temporal and spatial description of the shock wave field. This device characterization presents a number of formidable measurement challenges, principally due to the destructive effects of shock waves on the measurement sensor, and shock wave variability (especially for electrohydraulic systems). This presentation reviews the measurement and regulatory approaches used for characterizing shock wave devices, including FDA and international measurement standards. The current approach is a compromise between the desire for a complete characterization of all possible parameters, and the realities of making the measurements. The complete measurement process will be described, including equipment, procedures and pitfalls. Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) membrane hydrophones have been the key enabling technology, providing sufficient temporal bandwidth and minimal effective sensor area, all at reasonable cost. Other types of sensors, both good and bad, have been used for these measurements. The talk will also present case studies of measurements of several lithotripters measured over the last 15 years.

  16. Radial extracorporeal shock wave treatment harms developing chicken embryos.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Maren C; Milz, Stefan; Frank, Hans-Georg; Korbel, Rüdiger; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-02-06

    Radial extracorporeal shock wave treatment (rESWT) has became one of the best investigated treatment modalities for cellulite, including the abdomen as a treatment site. Notably, pregnancy is considered a contraindication for rESWT, and concerns have been raised about possible harm to the embryo when a woman treated with rESWT for cellulite is not aware of her pregnancy. Here we tested the hypothesis that rESWT may cause serious physical harm to embryos. To this end, chicken embryos were exposed in ovo to various doses of radial shock waves on either day 3 or day 4 of development, resembling the developmental stage of four- to six-week-old human embryos. We found a dose-dependent increase in the number of embryos that died after radial shock wave exposure on either day 3 or day 4 of development. Among the embryos that survived the shock wave exposure a few showed severe congenital defects such as missing eyes. Evidently, our data cannot directly be used to draw conclusions about potential harm to the embryo of a pregnant woman treated for cellulite with rESWT. However, to avoid any risks we strongly recommend applying radial shock waves in the treatment of cellulite only if a pregnancy is ruled out.

  17. A study of slipstreams in triple shock wave configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdeva, L.; Gavrenkov, S.; Nesterov, A.

    2015-05-01

    A shock wave appearing in supersonic gas flow reflects in different ways depending on flow conditions. It can take the form of regular or irregular reflection. For the irregular reflection configuration of three shock waves and a slipstream arises. Mathematical investigations of the development of parameters across slipstream in triple shock configuration have been made with variation of the angle of incidence of the shock wave, the shock wave Mach number and the adiabatic index of the gas. It has been shown that the characteristic mixing parameters of the slipstream increase with the increase of Mach number of the flow and the decrease of the heat capacity ratio. This leads to an increase of vortex formation and an increase of the angular spread of the slipstream. It also has been shown that the angle between the reflected wave and the slipstream diminishes with the decrease in heat capacity ratio so that the value may become of the same order as the spread angle. This may lead to quantitative changes in the whole reflection pattern near the triple point. The evident dependence of slipstream instability magnitude on the physical and chemical transformation intensity in the fluid was previously experimentally observed. The results of an analytical investigation appeared to be in good agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Radial extracorporeal shock wave treatment harms developing chicken embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Maren C.; Milz, Stefan; Frank, Hans-Georg; Korbel, Rüdiger; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Radial extracorporeal shock wave treatment (rESWT) has became one of the best investigated treatment modalities for cellulite, including the abdomen as a treatment site. Notably, pregnancy is considered a contraindication for rESWT, and concerns have been raised about possible harm to the embryo when a woman treated with rESWT for cellulite is not aware of her pregnancy. Here we tested the hypothesis that rESWT may cause serious physical harm to embryos. To this end, chicken embryos were exposed in ovo to various doses of radial shock waves on either day 3 or day 4 of development, resembling the developmental stage of four- to six-week-old human embryos. We found a dose-dependent increase in the number of embryos that died after radial shock wave exposure on either day 3 or day 4 of development. Among the embryos that survived the shock wave exposure a few showed severe congenital defects such as missing eyes. Evidently, our data cannot directly be used to draw conclusions about potential harm to the embryo of a pregnant woman treated for cellulite with rESWT. However, to avoid any risks we strongly recommend applying radial shock waves in the treatment of cellulite only if a pregnancy is ruled out. PMID:25655309

  19. Linear and nonlinear heavy ion-acoustic waves in a strongly coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, S. A. Mamun, A. A.; Hossen, M. R.

    2015-09-15

    A theoretical study on the propagation of linear and nonlinear heavy ion-acoustic (HIA) waves in an unmagnetized, collisionless, strongly coupled plasma system has been carried out. The plasma system is assumed to contain adiabatic positively charged inertial heavy ion fluids, nonextensive distributed electrons, and Maxwellian light ions. The normal mode analysis is used to study the linear behaviour. On the other hand, the well-known reductive perturbation technique is used to derive the nonlinear dynamical equations, namely, Burgers equation and Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) equation. They are also numerically analyzed in order to investigate the basic features of shock and solitary waves. The adiabatic effects on the HIA shock and solitary waves propagating in such a strongly coupled plasma are taken into account. It has been observed that the roles of the adiabatic positively charged heavy ions, nonextensivity of electrons, and other plasma parameters arised in this investigation have significantly modified the basic features (viz., polarity, amplitude, width, etc.) of the HIA solitary/shock waves. The findings of our results obtained from this theoretical investigation may be useful in understanding the linear as well as nonlinear phenomena associated with the HIA waves both in space and laboratory plasmas.

  20. Linear and nonlinear heavy ion-acoustic waves in a strongly coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ema, S. A.; Hossen, M. R.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    A theoretical study on the propagation of linear and nonlinear heavy ion-acoustic (HIA) waves in an unmagnetized, collisionless, strongly coupled plasma system has been carried out. The plasma system is assumed to contain adiabatic positively charged inertial heavy ion fluids, nonextensive distributed electrons, and Maxwellian light ions. The normal mode analysis is used to study the linear behaviour. On the other hand, the well-known reductive perturbation technique is used to derive the nonlinear dynamical equations, namely, Burgers equation and Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) equation. They are also numerically analyzed in order to investigate the basic features of shock and solitary waves. The adiabatic effects on the HIA shock and solitary waves propagating in such a strongly coupled plasma are taken into account. It has been observed that the roles of the adiabatic positively charged heavy ions, nonextensivity of electrons, and other plasma parameters arised in this investigation have significantly modified the basic features (viz., polarity, amplitude, width, etc.) of the HIA solitary/shock waves. The findings of our results obtained from this theoretical investigation may be useful in understanding the linear as well as nonlinear phenomena associated with the HIA waves both in space and laboratory plasmas.