Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic signature

  1. Methods and apparatus for multi-parameter acoustic signature inspection

    DOEpatents

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Samuel, Todd J.; Valencia, Juan D.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Tucker, Brian J.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Skorpik, James R.; Reid, Larry D.; Munley, John T.; Pappas, Richard A.; Wright, Bob W.; Panetta, Paul D.; Thompson, Jason S.

    2007-07-24

    A multiparameter acoustic signature inspection device and method are described for non-invasive inspection of containers. Dual acoustic signatures discriminate between various fluids and materials for identification of the same.

  2. Acoustic Signature of Evaporation from Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grapsas, N. K.; Shokri, N.

    2012-12-01

    During evaporation from saturated porous media, rapid interfacial jumps at the pore scale, known as Haines jumps, occur as air invades the pore network and displaces the evaporating fluid. This process produces crackling noises that can be detected using an acoustic emission (AE) machine. In this study, we investigated the acoustic signature of evaporation from porous media using Hele-Shaw cells packed with seven types of sand and glass beads differing in particle size distribution and surface roughness. Each sample was saturated with dyed water, left to evaporate under constant atmospheric conditions on a digital balance in an environmental chamber, and digitally imaged every 20 minutes to quantify phase distribution. An AE sensor was fixed to each column to record the features of observed AE events (hits) such as amplitude, absolute energy, and duration. Results indicate that the cumulative number of hits is strongly related to evaporative mass loss through time in all configurations. Additionally, the cumulative number of hits shares an inverse relationship with particle size and roughness. Finally, image analysis of the liquid phase distribution during evaporation reveals a strong correlation between the area invaded by air and the cumulative AE hits detected in each column. This confirms that AEs are generated by receding liquid menisci and the propagation of drying fronts in porous media. These results suggest that AE techniques may potentially be used to non-invasively analyze the drying of porous media.

  3. Event identification by acoustic signature recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.; Kercel, S.W.

    1995-07-01

    Many events of interest to the security commnnity produce acoustic emissions that are, in principle, identifiable as to cause. Some obvious examples are gunshots, breaking glass, takeoffs and landings of small aircraft, vehicular engine noises, footsteps (high frequencies when on gravel, very low frequencies. when on soil), and voices (whispers to shouts). We are investigating wavelet-based methods to extract unique features of such events for classification and identification. We also discuss methods of classification and pattern recognition specifically tailored for acoustic signatures obtained by wavelet analysis. The paper is divided into three parts: completed work, work in progress, and future applications. The completed phase has led to the successful recognition of aircraft types on landing and takeoff. Both small aircraft (twin-engine turboprop) and large (commercial airliners) were included in the study. The project considered the design of a small, field-deployable, inexpensive device. The techniques developed during the aircraft identification phase were then adapted to a multispectral electromagnetic interference monitoring device now deployed in a nuclear power plant. This is a general-purpose wavelet analysis engine, spanning 14 octaves, and can be adapted for other specific tasks. Work in progress is focused on applying the methods previously developed to speaker identification. Some of the problems to be overcome include recognition of sounds as voice patterns and as distinct from possible background noises (e.g., music), as well as identification of the speaker from a short-duration voice sample. A generalization of the completed work and the work in progress is a device capable of classifying any number of acoustic events-particularly quasi-stationary events such as engine noises and voices and singular events such as gunshots and breaking glass. We will show examples of both kinds of events and discuss their recognition likelihood.

  4. Modeling ground vehicle acoustic signatures for analysis and synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, G.; Stanfield, R.

    1995-07-01

    Security and weapon systems use acoustic sensor signals to classify and identify moving ground vehicles. Developing robust signal processing algorithms for this is expensive, particularly in presence of acoustic clutter or countermeasures. This paper proposes a parametric ground vehicle acoustic signature model to aid the system designer in understanding which signature features are important, developing corresponding feature extraction algorithms and generating low-cost, high-fidelity synthetic signatures for testing. The authors have proposed computer-generated acoustic signatures of armored, tracked ground vehicles to deceive acoustic-sensored smart munitions. They have developed quantitative measures of how accurately a synthetic acoustic signature matches those produced by actual vehicles. This paper describes parameters of the model used to generate these synthetic signatures and suggests methods for extracting these parameters from signatures of valid vehicle encounters. The model incorporates wide-bandwidth and narrow- bandwidth components that are modulated in a pseudo-random fashion to mimic the time dynamics of valid vehicle signatures. Narrow- bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate frequency, amplitude and phase information contained in a single set of narrow frequency- band harmonics. Wide-bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate parameters of a correlated-noise-floor model. Finally, the authors propose a method of modeling the time dynamics of the harmonic amplitudes as a means adding necessary time-varying features to the narrow-bandwidth signal components. The authors present results of applying this modeling technique to acoustic signatures recorded during encounters with one armored, tracked vehicle. Similar modeling techniques can be applied to security systems.

  5. Gunshot acoustic signature specific features and false alarms reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzier, Alain; Millet, Joel

    2005-05-01

    This paper provides a detailed analysis of the most specific parameters of gunshot signatures through models as well as through real data. The models for the different contributions to gunshot typical signature (shock and muzzle blast) are presented and used to discuss the variation of measured signatures over the different environmental conditions and shot configurations. The analysis is followed by a description of the performance requirements for gunshot detection systems, from sniper detection that was the main concern 10 years ago, to the new and more challenging conditions faced in today operations. The work presented examines the process of how systems are deployed and used as well as how the operational environment has changed. The main sources of false alarms and new threats such as RPGs and mortars that acoustic gunshot detection systems have to face today are also defined and discussed. Finally, different strategies for reducing false alarms are proposed based on the acoustic signatures. Different strategies are presented through various examples of specific missions ranging from vehicle protection to area protection. These strategies not only include recommendation on how to handle acoustic information for the best efficiency of the acoustic detector but also recommends some add-on sensors to enhance system overall performance.

  6. Feasibility of a phased acoustic array for monitoring acoustic signatures from meshing gear teeth.

    PubMed

    Hood, Adrian A; Pines, Darryll J

    2002-12-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of sensing damage emanating from rotating drivetrain elements such as bearings, gear teeth, and drive shafts via airborne paths. A planar phased acoustic array is evaluated as a potential fault detection scheme for detecting spatially filtered acoustic signatures radiating from gearbox components. Specifically, the use of beam focusing and steering to monitor individual tooth mesh dynamics is analyzed taking into consideration the constraints of the array/gearbox geometry and the spectral content of typical gear noise. Experimental results for a linear array are presented to illustrate the concepts of adaptive beam steering and spatial acoustic filtering. This feasibility study indicates that the planar array can be used to track the acoustic signatures at higher harmonics of the gear mesh frequency.

  7. Acoustic ship signature measurements by cross-correlation method.

    PubMed

    Fillinger, Laurent; Sutin, Alexander; Sedunov, Alexander

    2011-02-01

    Cross-correlation methods were applied for the estimation of the power spectral density and modulation spectrum of underwater noise generated by moving vessels. The cross-correlation of the signal from two hydrophones allows the separation of vessel acoustic signatures in a busy estuary. Experimental data recorded in the Hudson River are used for demonstration that cross-correlation method measured the same ship noise and ship noise modulation spectra as conventional methods. The cross-correlation method was then applied for the separation of the acoustic signatures of two ships present simultaneously. Presented methods can be useful for ship traffic monitoring and small ship classification, even in noisy harbor environments. PMID:21361436

  8. The acoustic signature of decaying resonant phospholipid microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. H.; Butler, M.; Pelekasis, N.; Anderson, T.; Stride, E.; Sboros, V.

    2013-02-01

    Sub-capillary sized microbubbles offer improved techniques for diagnosis and therapy of vascular related disease using ultrasound. Their physical interaction with ultrasound remains an active research field that aims to optimize techniques. The aim of this study is to investigate whether controlled microbubble disruption upon exposure to consecutive ultrasound exposures can be achieved. Single lipid-shelled microbubble scattered echoes have been measured in response to two consecutive imaging pulses, using a calibrated micro-acoustic system. The nonlinear evolution of microbubble echoes provides an exact signature above and below primary and secondary resonance, which has been identified using theoretical results based on the Mooney-Rivlin strain softening shell model. Decaying microbubbles follow an irreversible trajectory through the resonance peak, causing the evolution of specific microbubble spectral signatures. The characteristics of the microbubble motion causes varying amounts of shell material to be lost during microbubble decay. Incident ultrasound field parameters can thus accurately manipulate the regulated shedding of shell material, which has applications for both imaging applications and localized drug delivery strategies.

  9. Acoustic signatures of sound source-tract coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, Ezequiel M.; Perl, Yonatan Sanz; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2011-04-01

    Birdsong is a complex behavior, which results from the interaction between a nervous system and a biomechanical peripheral device. While much has been learned about how complex sounds are generated in the vocal organ, little has been learned about the signature on the vocalizations of the nonlinear effects introduced by the acoustic interactions between a sound source and the vocal tract. The variety of morphologies among bird species makes birdsong a most suitable model to study phenomena associated to the production of complex vocalizations. Inspired by the sound production mechanisms of songbirds, in this work we study a mathematical model of a vocal organ, in which a simple sound source interacts with a tract, leading to a delay differential equation. We explore the system numerically, and by taking it to the weakly nonlinear limit, we are able to examine its periodic solutions analytically. By these means we are able to explore the dynamics of oscillatory solutions of a sound source-tract coupled system, which are qualitatively different from those of a sound source-filter model of a vocal organ. Nonlinear features of the solutions are proposed as the underlying mechanisms of observed phenomena in birdsong, such as unilaterally produced “frequency jumps,” enhancement of resonances, and the shift of the fundamental frequency observed in heliox experiments.

  10. Acoustic signatures of sound source-tract coupling.

    PubMed

    Arneodo, Ezequiel M; Perl, Yonatan Sanz; Mindlin, Gabriel B

    2011-04-01

    Birdsong is a complex behavior, which results from the interaction between a nervous system and a biomechanical peripheral device. While much has been learned about how complex sounds are generated in the vocal organ, little has been learned about the signature on the vocalizations of the nonlinear effects introduced by the acoustic interactions between a sound source and the vocal tract. The variety of morphologies among bird species makes birdsong a most suitable model to study phenomena associated to the production of complex vocalizations. Inspired by the sound production mechanisms of songbirds, in this work we study a mathematical model of a vocal organ, in which a simple sound source interacts with a tract, leading to a delay differential equation. We explore the system numerically, and by taking it to the weakly nonlinear limit, we are able to examine its periodic solutions analytically. By these means we are able to explore the dynamics of oscillatory solutions of a sound source-tract coupled system, which are qualitatively different from those of a sound source-filter model of a vocal organ. Nonlinear features of the solutions are proposed as the underlying mechanisms of observed phenomena in birdsong, such as unilaterally produced "frequency jumps," enhancement of resonances, and the shift of the fundamental frequency observed in heliox experiments.

  11. Acoustic signature of violins based on bridge transfer mobility measurements.

    PubMed

    Elie, Benjamin; Gautier, François; David, Bertrand

    2014-09-01

    This paper is an attempt to solve two problems related to musical acoustics. The first one consists in defining a signature of an instrument, namely, summarizing its vibroacoustical behavior. The second one deals with the existing relationship between the musical sound and the vibroacoustic properties of the instrument body. The violin is the application of this paper. A proposed solution for the first problem consists in an estimation of the bridge transfer mobility and the mean-value of the lateral bridge transfer mobility. The second problem is studied via the comparison between the amplitudes of harmonics, extracted from a glissando audio signal, and the lateral bridge transfer mobility: Both curves exhibit similar features. This is the main result of the paper. This is evidenced by studying the effect of a violin mute on both the lateral bridge transfer mobility and the produced sound. Finally, this is evidenced by successfully identifying which violin is played in an audio recording, using the computation of the Pearson distance between the distribution of the amplitude of harmonics and a database of measured mobilities. PMID:25190411

  12. A survey on acoustic signature recognition and classification techniques for persistent surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirkhodaie, Amir; Alkilani, Amjad

    2012-06-01

    Application of acoustic sensors in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS) has received considerable attention over the last two decades because they can be rapidly deployed and have low cost. Conventional utilization of acoustic sensors in PSS spans a wide range of applications including: vehicle classification, target tracking, activity understanding, speech recognition, shooter detection, etc. This paper presents a current survey of physics-based acoustic signature classification techniques for outdoor sounds recognition and understanding. Particularly, this paper focuses on taxonomy and ontology of acoustic signatures resulted from group activities. The taxonomy and supportive ontology considered include: humanvehicle, human-objects, and human-human interactions. This paper, in particular, exploits applicability of several spectral analysis techniques as a means to maximize likelihood of correct acoustic source detection, recognition, and discrimination. Spectral analysis techniques based on Fast Fourier Transform, Discrete Wavelet Transform, and Short Time Fourier Transform are considered for extraction of features from acoustic sources. In addition, comprehensive overviews of most current research activities related to scope of this work are presented with their applications. Furthermore, future potential direction of research in this area is discussed for improvement of acoustic signature recognition and classification technology suitable for PSS applications.

  13. The acoustic signature of bubbles fragmenting in sheared flow.

    PubMed

    Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of the sound of bubbles fragmenting in fluid shear are presented and analyzed. The frequency, amplitude, and decay rate of the acoustic emissions from 1.8-mm-radius bubbles fragmenting between opposed fluid jets have been determined. A broad band of frequencies (1.8 to 30 kHz) is observed with peak pressure amplitudes in the range of 0.03 to 2 Pa. While the peak pressure amplitudes show no significant scaling with frequency, the frequency dependence of the decay rates is consistent with the sum of thermal and acoustic radiation losses.

  14. Acoustic emission signatures of damage modes in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggelis, D. G.; Mpalaskas, A. C.; Matikas, T. E.; Van Hemelrijck, D.

    2014-03-01

    The characterization of the dominant fracture mode may assist in the prediction of the remaining life of a concrete structure due to the sequence between successive tensile and shear mechanisms. Acoustic emission sensors record the elastic responses after any fracture event converting them into electric waveforms. The characteristics of the waveforms vary according to the movement of the crack tips, enabling characterization of the original mode. In this study fracture experiments on concrete beams are conducted. The aim is to examine the typical acoustic signals emitted by different fracture modes (namely tension due to bending and shear) in a concrete matrix. This is an advancement of a recent study focusing on smaller scale mortar and marble specimens. The dominant stress field and ultimate fracture mode is controlled by modification of the four-point bending setup while acoustic emission is monitored by six sensors at fixed locations. Conclusions about how to distinguish the sources based on waveform parameters of time domain (duration, rise time) and frequency are drawn. Specifically, emissions during the shear loading exhibit lower frequencies and longer duration than tensile. Results show that, combination of AE features may help to characterize the shift between dominant fracture modes and contribute to the structural health monitoring of concrete. This offers the basis for in-situ application provided that the distortion of the signal due to heterogeneous wave path is accounted for.

  15. Signature analysis of acoustic emission from graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. S.; Henneke, E. G., II

    1977-01-01

    Acoustic emissions were monitored for crack extension across and parallel to the fibers in a single ply and multiply laminates of graphite epoxy composites. Spectrum analysis was performed on the transient signal to ascertain if the fracture mode can be characterized by a particular spectral pattern. The specimens were loaded to failure quasistatically in a tensile machine. Visual observations were made via either an optical microscope or a television camera. The results indicate that several types of characteristics in the time and frequency domain correspond to different types of failure.

  16. Development of a Transient Acoustic Boundary Element Method to Predict the Noise Signature of Swimming Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenhoffer, Nathan; Moored, Keith; Jaworski, Justin

    2015-11-01

    Animals have evolved flexible wings and fins to efficiently and quietly propel themselves through the air and water. The design of quiet and efficient bio-inspired propulsive concepts requires a rapid, unified computational framework that integrates three essential features: the fluid mechanics, the elastic structural response, and the noise generation. This study focuses on the development, validation, and demonstration of a transient, two-dimensional acoustic boundary element solver accelerated by a fast multipole algorithm. The resulting acoustic solver is used to characterize the acoustic signature produced by a vortex street advecting over a NACA 0012 airfoil, which is representative of vortex-body interactions that occur in schools of swimming fish. Both 2S and 2P canonical vortex streets generated by fish are investigated over the range of Strouhal number 0 . 2 < St < 0 . 4 , and the acoustic signature of the airfoil is quantified. This study provides the first estimate of the noise signature of a school of swimming fish. Lehigh University CORE Grant.

  17. FY-93 noncontacting acoustic ultrasonic signature analysis development

    SciTech Connect

    Tow, D.M.; Rodriguez, J.G.; Williamson, R.L.; Blackwood, L.G.

    1994-04-01

    A noncontacting, long-standoff inspection system with proven capabilities in container fill identification has been under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The system detects subtle change in container vibration characteristics caused by differences in the physical properties of the fill materials. A container is inspected by acoustically inducting it to vibrate and sensing the vibrational response with a laser vibrometer. A standoff distance of several meters is feasible. In previous work the system proved to be a reliable means of distinguishing between munitions with a variety of chemical fills. During FY-93, the system was modified to improve performance and simplify operation. Other FY-93 accomplishments include progress in modeling the vibrational characteristics of containers and refinements to the statistical classification algorithms. Progress was also made in identifying other applications for this technology.

  18. Identification of cavitation signatures using both optical and PZT acoustic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidakovic, M.; Armakolas, I.; Sun, T.; Carlton, J.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the results obtained from monitoring a simulated material cavitation process using both a fibre Bragg grating (FBG)-based acoustic sensor system developed at City University London and a commercial PZT (Piezoelectric Transducer) acoustic sensor, with an aim to identify the cavitation signatures. In the experiment, a sample metal plate with its back surface being instrumented with both sensors is positioned very close to an excitation sonotrode with a standard frequency of 19.5kHz. The data obtained from both sensors are recorded and analyzed, showing a very good agreement.

  19. Mechanical and Acoustic Signature of Slow Earthquakes on Laboratory Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, Marco Maria; Marone, Chris; Tinti, Elisa; Scognamiglio, Laura; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Collettini, Cristiano

    2015-04-01

    Recent seismic and geodetic observations show that fault slip occurs via a spectrum of behaviors that range from seismic (fast dynamic) to aseismic (creep). Indeed faults can slip via a variety of quasi-dynamic processes such as Slow-Slip, Low Frequency Earthquakes (LFE), and Tremor. These transient modes of slip represent slow, but self-propagating acceleration of slip along fault zones. These phenomena have been observed worldwide in a variety of active tectonic environments, however the physics of quasi-dynamic rupture and the underlying fault zone processes are still poorly understood. Rate- and State- frictional constitutive equations predict that fast dynamic slip will occur when the stiffness of the loading system (k) is less than a critical stiffness (kc) characterizing the fault gouge. In order to investigate quasi-dynamic transients, we performed laboratory experiments on simulated fault gouge (silica powders) in the double direct shear configuration with a compliant central block allowing boundary conditions where k≈kc. In addition, PZTs were used to measure acoustical properties of the gouge layers during shear. We document an evolution of the fault mechanical properties as the σn is increased. For σn < 10 MPa we observe a steady state frictional type of shear. When σn ≥ 15 MPa we observe emergent slow-slip events from steady state shear with accumulated shear displacement of about 10 mm. The typical values of stress drop (Δτ) vary between 0.2 and 0.8 MPa, and have typical duration from 0.5 up to 3 seconds giving the characteristics of slow stick-slip. As σn is varied we observe different characteristics of slow slip. For σn = 15MPa a repetitive double period oscillation is observed with slow slip growing until a maximum stress drop and then self attenuating. When σn is increased to 20 and 25 MPa slow slip are characterized by larger Δτ with constant τmax and τmin, however still showing a co-seismic duration of ~2 seconds. Our results

  20. Source signature and acoustic field of seismic physical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Q.; Jackson, C.; Tang, G.; Burbach, G.

    2004-12-01

    As an important tool of seismic research and exploration, seismic physical modeling simulates the real world data acquisition by scaling the model, acquisition parameters, and some features of the source generated by a transducer. Unlike the numerical simulation where a point source is easily satisfied, the transducer can't be made small enough for approximating the point source in physical modeling, therefore yield different source signature than the sources applied in the field data acquisition. To better understand the physical modeling data, characterizing the wave field generated by ultrasonic transducers is desirable and helpful. In this study, we explode several aspects of source characterization; including their radiation pattern, directivity, sensitivity and frequency response. We also try to figure out how to improve the acquired data quality, such as minimize ambient noise, use encoded chirp to prevent ringing, apply deterministic deconvolution to enhance data resolution and t-P filtering to remove linear events. We found that the transducer and their wave field, the modeling system performance, as well as material properties of the model and their coupling conditions all play roles in the physical modeling data acquisition.

  1. Hearing tongue loops: Perceptual sensitivity to acoustic signatures of articulatory dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hosung; Mooshammer, Christine; Iskarous, Khalil; Whalen, D. H.

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has shown that velar stops are produced with a forward movement during closure, forming a forward (anterior) loop for a VCV sequence, when the preceding vowels are back or mid. Are listeners aware of this aspect of articulatory dynamics? The current study used articulatory synthesis to examine how such kinematic patterns are reflected in the acoustics, and whether those acoustic patterns elicit different goodness ratings. In Experiment I, the size and direction of loops was modulated in articulatory synthesis. The resulting stimuli were presented to listeners for a naturalness judgment. Results show that listeners rate forward loops as more natural than backward loops, in agreement with typical productions. Acoustic analysis of the synthetic stimuli shows that forward loops exhibit shorter and shallower VC transitions than CV transitions. In Experiment II, three acoustic parameters were employed incorporating F3-F2 distance, transition slope, and transition length to systematically modulate the magnitude of VC and CV transitions. Listeners rated the naturalness in accord with those of Experiment I. This study reveals that there is sufficient information in the acoustic signature of “velar loops” to affect perceptual preference. Similarity to typical productions seemed to determine preferences, not acoustic distinctiveness. PMID:24180790

  2. Acoustic signature recognition technique for Human-Object Interactions (HOI) in persistent surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkilani, Amjad; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2013-05-01

    Handling, manipulation, and placement of objects, hereon called Human-Object Interaction (HOI), in the environment generate sounds. Such sounds are readily identifiable by the human hearing. However, in the presence of background environment noises, recognition of minute HOI sounds is challenging, though vital for improvement of multi-modality sensor data fusion in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS). Identification of HOI sound signatures can be used as precursors to detection of pertinent threats that otherwise other sensor modalities may miss to detect. In this paper, we present a robust method for detection and classification of HOI events via clustering of extracted features from training of HOI acoustic sound waves. In this approach, salient sound events are preliminary identified and segmented from background via a sound energy tracking method. Upon this segmentation, frequency spectral pattern of each sound event is modeled and its features are extracted to form a feature vector for training. To reduce dimensionality of training feature space, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique is employed to expedite fast classification of test feature vectors, a kd-tree and Random Forest classifiers are trained for rapid classification of training sound waves. Each classifiers employs different similarity distance matching technique for classification. Performance evaluations of classifiers are compared for classification of a batch of training HOI acoustic signatures. Furthermore, to facilitate semantic annotation of acoustic sound events, a scheme based on Transducer Mockup Language (TML) is proposed. The results demonstrate the proposed approach is both reliable and effective, and can be extended to future PSS applications.

  3. Acoustic Signatures of a Model Fan in the NASA-Lewis Anechoic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. A.; Heidmann, M. F.; Abbott, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    One-third octave band and narrowband spectra and continuous directivity patterns radiated from an inlet are presented over ranges of fan operating conditions, tunnel velocity, and angle of attack. Tunnel flow markedly reduced the unsteadiness and level of the blade passage tone, revealed the cutoff design feature of the blade passage tone, and exposed a lobular directivity pattern for the second harmonic tone. The full effects of tunnel flow are shown to be complete above a tunnel velocity of 20 meters/second. The acoustic signatures are also shown to be strongly affected by fan rotational speed, fan blade loading, and inlet angle of attack.

  4. Structural changes and imaging signatures of acoustically sensitive microcapsules under ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sridhar-Keralapura, Mallika; Thirumalai, Shruthi; Mobed-Miremadi, Maryam

    2013-07-01

    The ultrasound drug delivery field is actively designing new agents that would obviate the problems of just using microbubbles for drug delivery. Microbubbles have very short circulation time (minutes), low payload and large size (2-10μm), all of these aspects are not ideal for systemic drug delivery. However, microbubble carriers provide excellent image contrast and their use for image guidance can be exploited. In this paper, we suggest an alternative approach by developing acoustically sensitive microcapsule reservoirs that have future applications for treating large ischemic tumors through intratumoral therapy. We call these agents Acoustically Sensitized Microcapsules (ASMs) and these are not planned for the circulation. ASMs are very simple in their formulation, robust and reproducible. They have been designed to offer high payload (because of their large size), be acoustically sensitive and reactive (because of the Ultrasound Contrast Agents (UCAs) encapsulated) and mechanically robust for future injections/implantations within tumors. We describe three different aspects - (1) effect of therapeutic ultrasound; (2) mechanical properties and (3) imaging signatures of these agents. Under therapeutic ultrasound, the formation of a cavitational bubble was seen prior to rupture. The time to rupture was size dependent. Size dependency was also seen when measuring mechanical properties of these ASMs. % Alginate and permeability also affected the Young's modulus estimates. For study of imaging signatures of these agents, we show six schemes. For example, with harmonic imaging, tissue phantoms and controls did not generate higher harmonic components. Only ASM phantoms created a harmonic signal, whose sensitivity increased with applied acoustic pressure. Future work includes developing schemes combining both sonication and imaging to help detect ASMs before, during and after release of drug substance.

  5. Statistical analysis of infrasound signatures in airglow observations: Indications for acoustic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilger, Christoph; Schmidt, Carsten; Bittner, Michael

    2013-02-01

    The detection of infrasonic signals in temperature time series of the mesopause altitude region (at about 80-100 km) is performed at the German Remote Sensing Data Center of the German Aerospace Center (DLR-DFD) using GRIPS instrumentation (GRound-based Infrared P-branch Spectrometers). Mesopause temperature values with a temporal resolution of up to 10 s are derived from the observation of nocturnal airglow emissions and permit the identification of signals within the long-period infrasound range.Spectral intensities of wave signatures with periods between 2.5 and 10 min are estimated applying the wavelet analysis technique to one minute mean temperature values. Selected events as well as the statistical distribution of 40 months of observation are presented and discussed with respect to resonant modes of the atmosphere. The mechanism of acoustic resonance generated by strong infrasonic sources is a potential explanation of distinct features with periods between 3 and 5 min observed in the dataset.

  6. Sea surface signatures related to subaqueous dunes detected by acoustic and radar sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennings, Ingo; Pasenau, Horst; Werner, Friedrich

    1993-08-01

    Side-scan sonar records and radar images of the Lister Tief in the German Bight of the North Sea have been analysed. The radar data show signatures on the sea surface which are related to irregularities in the submarine seabed. Some side-scan and radar data from the test area were taken at different dates, but at the same tidal phase and under comparable weather conditions. Existing one-dimensional models of the radar imaging mechanism predict extremes in radar backscatter above maximum slope regions of subaqueous dunes. However, the acoustic data obtained during the ebb tidal phase do not always show an enhanced background noise and backscattering strength modulation directly above maximum slopes of the dunes. A large variation of the position of background noise has been observed. The experimental acoustic data contradict the results of existing radar imaging models. The sonographs showed that regions with increased background noise at close range (<5 m) are often associated with signatures of enhanced backscatter at ranges farther away (<40 m) or at lower grazing angles (<30°). We conclude that the modulation of scattering strength can be attributed to regions of air bubbles generated by turbulence and breaking water waves. Simulations of the radar cross-section modulation above the large slopes of dunes are too large to remain within the bounds of the weak hydrodynamic interaction theory in the relaxation time approximation. Therefore, this theory is not applicable in the sea area of the Lister Tief. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic mechanism of standing waves or stationary surface deformations associated with dunes is discussed.

  7. Detection of Delamination in Composite Beams Using Broadband Acoustic Emission Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okafor, A. C.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Jiang, Y. P.

    1996-01-01

    Delamination in composite structure may be caused by imperfections introduced during the manufacturing process or by impact loads by foreign objects during the operational life. There are some nondestructive evaluation methods to detect delamination in composite structures such as x-radiography, ultrasonic testing, and thermal/infrared inspection. These methods are expensive and hard to use for on line detection. Acoustic emission testing can monitor the material under test even under the presence of noise generated under load. It has been used extensively in proof-testing of fiberglass pressure vessels and beams. In the present work, experimental studies are conducted to investigate the use of broadband acoustic emission signatures to detect delaminations in composite beams. Glass/epoxy beam specimens with full width, prescribed delamination sizes of 2 inches and 4 inches are investigated. The prescribed delamination is produced by inserting Teflon film between laminae during the fabrication of composite laminate. The objectives of this research is to develop a method for predicting delamination size and location in laminated composite beams by combining smart materials concept and broadband AE analysis techniques. More specifically, a piezoceramic (PZT) patch is bonded on the surface of composite beams and used as a pulser. The piezoceramic patch simulates the AE wave source as a 3 cycles, 50KHz, burst sine wave. One broadband AE sensor is fixed near the PZT patch to measure the AE wave near the AE source. A second broadband AE sensor, which is used as a receiver, is scanned along the composite beams at 0.25 inch step to measure propagation of AE wave along the composite beams. The acquired AE waveform is digitized and processed. Signal strength, signal energy, cross-correlation of AE waveforms, and tracking of specific cycle of AE waveforms are used to detect delamination size and location.

  8. Health sensor for human body by using infrared, acoustic energy and magnetic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jerry

    2013-05-01

    There is a general chain of events that applies to infections. Human body infection could causes by many different types of bacteria and virus in different areas or organ systems. In general, doctor can't find out the right solution/treatment for infections unless some certain types of bacteria or virus are detected. These detecting processes, usually, take few days to one week to accomplish. However, some infections of the body may not be able to detect at first round and the patient may lose the timing to receive the proper treatment. In this works, we base on Chi's theory which is an invisible circulation system existed inside the body and propose a novel health sensor which summarizes human's infrared, acoustic energy and magnetic signature and find out, in minutes, the most possible area or organ system that cause the infection just like what Chi-Kung master can accomplish. Therefore, the detection process by doctor will be shortened and it raises the possibility to give the proper treatment to the patient in the earliest timing.

  9. On the acoustic signature of tandem airfoils: The sound of an elastic airfoil in the wake of a vortex generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manela, A.

    2016-07-01

    The acoustic signature of an acoustically compact tandem airfoil setup in uniform high-Reynolds number flow is investigated. The upstream airfoil is considered rigid and is actuated at its leading edge with small-amplitude harmonic pitching motion. The downstream airfoil is taken passive and elastic, with its motion forced by the vortex-street excitation of the upstream airfoil. The non-linear near-field description is obtained via potential thin-airfoil theory. It is then applied as a source term into the Powell-Howe acoustic analogy to yield the far-field dipole radiation of the system. To assess the effect of downstream-airfoil elasticity, results are compared with counterpart calculations for a non-elastic setup, where the downstream airfoil is rigid and stationary. Depending on the separation distance between airfoils, airfoil-motion and airfoil-wake dynamics shift between in-phase (synchronized) and counter-phase behaviors. Consequently, downstream airfoil elasticity may act to amplify or suppress sound through the direct contribution of elastic-airfoil motion to the total signal. Resonance-type motion of the elastic airfoil is found when the upstream airfoil is actuated at the least stable eigenfrequency of the downstream structure. This, again, results in system sound amplification or suppression, depending on the separation distance between airfoils. With increasing actuation frequency, the acoustic signal becomes dominated by the direct contribution of the upstream airfoil motion, whereas the relative contribution of the elastic airfoil to the total signature turns negligible.

  10. An energy signature scheme for steam trap assessment and flow rate estimation using pipe-induced acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olama, Mohammed M.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Kuruganti, Teja P.; Lake, Joe E.

    2012-06-01

    The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework within the steam distribution system within the ORNL campus. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by observing the state measurements of acoustic sensors mounted on the steam pipes/traps/valves. In this paper, we describe a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps health status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap health status and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate steam flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. The analysis based on estimated steam flow and steam trap status helps generate alerts that enable operators and maintenance personnel to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves.

  11. An Energy Signature Scheme for Steam Trap Assessment and Flow Rate Estimation Using Pipe-Induced Acoustic Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Olama, Mohammed M; Allgood, Glenn O; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Lake, Joe E

    2012-01-01

    The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework within the steam distribution system within the ORNL campus. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by observing the state measurements of acoustic sensors mounted on the steam pipes/traps/valves. In this paper, we describe a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps health status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap health status and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate steam flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. The analysis based on estimated steam flow and steam trap status helps generate alerts that enable operators and maintenance personnel to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves.

  12. The acoustic signatures of ground acceleration, gas expansion, and spall fallback in experimental volcanic explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Daniel C.; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Kim, Keehoon; Anderson, Jacob F.; Lees, Jonathan M.; Graettinger, Alison H.; Sonder, Ingo; Valentine, Greg A.

    2014-03-01

    Infrasound and high-speed imaging during a series of field-scale buried explosions suggest new details about the generation and radiation patterns of acoustic waves from volcanic eruptions. We recorded infrasound and high-speed video from a series of subsurface explosions with differing burial depths and charge sizes. Joint observations and modeling allow the extraction of acoustic energy related to the magnitude of initial ground deformation, the contribution of gas breakout, and the timing of the fallback of displaced material. The existence and relative acoustic amplitudes of these three phases depended on the size and depth of the explosion. The results motivate a conceptual model that relates successive contributions from ground acceleration, gas breakout, and spall fallback to the acoustic amplitude and waveform characteristics of buried explosions. We place the literature on infrasound signals at Santiaguito Volcano, Guatemala, and Sakurajima and Suwonosejima Volcanoes, Japan, in the context of this model.

  13. EFFECT OF COMBUSTOR INLET GEOMETRY ON ACOUSTIC SIGNATURE AND FLOW FIELD BEHAVIOUR OF THE LOW SWIRL INJECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Therkelsen, Peter L.; Littlejohn, David; Cheng, Robert K.; Portillo, J. Enrique; Martin, Scott M.

    2009-11-30

    Low Swirl Injector (LSI) technology is a lean premixed combustion method that is being developed for fuel-flexible gas turbines. The objective of this study is to characterize the fuel effects and influences of combustor geometry on the LSI's overall acoustic signatures and flowfields. The experiments consist of 24 flames at atmospheric condition with bulk flows ranging between 10 and 18 m/s. The flames burn CH{sub 4} (at {phi} = 0.6 & 0.7) and a blend of 90% H{sub 2} - 10% CH{sub 4} by volume (at {phi} = 0.35 & 0.4). Two combustor configurations are used, consisting of a cylindrical chamber with and without a divergent quarl at the dump plane. The data consist of pressure spectral distributions at five positions within the system and 2D flowfield information measured by Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). The results show that acoustic oscillations increase with U{sub 0} and {phi}. However, the levels in the 90% H{sub 2} flames are significantly higher than in the CH{sub 4} flames. For both fuels, the use of the quarl reduces the fluctuating pressures in the combustion chamber by up to a factor of 7. The PIV results suggest this to be a consequence of the quarl restricting the formation of large vortices in the outer shear layer. A Generalized Instability Model (GIM) was applied to analyze the acoustic response of baseline flames for each of the two fuels. The measured frequencies and the stability trends for these two cases are predicted and the triggered acoustic mode shapes identified.

  14. The Acoustic Signature of High-Temperature Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crone, T. J.; Wilcock, W. S.; Parsons, J. D.; Barclay, A. H.

    2005-12-01

    Motivated by a desire to find new measurements that might be sensitive to flow rate variations within mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems, we have conducted field studies to collect passive acoustic measurements at black smoker hydrothermal vents using two versions of a simple dual-hydrophone recording device capable of collecting continuous acoustic data for about one week at sampling rates of 1000--2000 Hz. We deployed the first-generation instrument on the Sully sulfide structure in the Main Endeavour Field of the Juan de Fuca Ridge during September of 2004. We were able to collect approximately 48 hours of data before the instrument was partially destroyed by venting fluid. We are in the process of obtaining additional measurements in the same vent field with a second-generation instrument. For the 2004 deployment, the venting fluid produced an acoustic signal that was far above the background level at all measured frequencies. The acoustic spectrum contains a broadband signal that is weighted toward the low frequencies and extends to the Nyquist frequency at 500 Hz. The spectrum also contains several sharp peaks below 150 Hz. The signal is variable in time, with the broadband and peak amplitudes fluctuating by ~20 dB, and the frequencies of the sharp spectral peaks fluctuating by ~1--3 Hz. The complex nature of the acoustic signal suggests that more than one sound production mechanism is operating within the vent. The sharp peaks suggest the presence of a resonant mechanism such as pipe resonance excited by turbulent flow. The high level of the broadband signal is not predicted by theoretical investigations of low Mach number jet acoustics. It is likely that another broadband sound source is present, which could be related to phase separation or to the mixing of different density fluids. More observations will be required to fully understand the basic mechanisms of sound production within black smoker chimneys.

  15. Acoustic Communication and Sound Degradation: How Do the Individual Signatures of Male and Female Zebra Finch Calls Transmit over Distance?

    PubMed Central

    Mouterde, Solveig C.; Theunissen, Frédéric E.; Elie, Julie E.; Vignal, Clémentine; Mathevon, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Background Assessing the active space of the various types of information encoded by songbirds' vocalizations is important to address questions related to species ecology (e.g. spacing of individuals), as well as social behavior (e.g. territorial and/or mating strategies). Up to now, most of the previous studies have investigated the degradation of species-specific related information (species identity), and there is a gap of knowledge of how finer-grained information (e.g. individual identity) can transmit through the environment. Here we studied how the individual signature coded in the zebra finch long distance contact call degrades with propagation. Methodology We performed sound transmission experiments of zebra finches' distance calls at various propagation distances. The propagated calls were analyzed using discriminant function analyses on a set of analytical parameters describing separately the spectral and temporal envelopes, as well as on a complete spectrographic representation of the signals. Results/Conclusion We found that individual signature is remarkably resistant to propagation as caller identity can be recovered even at distances greater than a hundred meters. Male calls show stronger discriminability at long distances than female calls, and this difference can be explained by the more pronounced frequency modulation found in their calls. In both sexes, individual information is carried redundantly using multiple acoustical features. Interestingly, features providing the highest discrimination at short distances are not the same ones that provide the highest discrimination at long distances. PMID:25061795

  16. Bio-inspired UAV routing, source localization, and acoustic signature classification for persistent surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burman, Jerry; Hespanha, Joao; Madhow, Upamanyu; Pham, Tien

    2011-06-01

    A team consisting of Teledyne Scientific Company, the University of California at Santa Barbara and the Army Research Laboratory* is developing technologies in support of automated data exfiltration from heterogeneous battlefield sensor networks to enhance situational awareness for dismounts and command echelons. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) provide an effective means to autonomously collect data from a sparse network of unattended ground sensors (UGSs) that cannot communicate with each other. UAVs are used to reduce the system reaction time by generating autonomous collection routes that are data-driven. Bio-inspired techniques for search provide a novel strategy to detect, capture and fuse data. A fast and accurate method has been developed to localize an event by fusing data from a sparse number of UGSs. This technique uses a bio-inspired algorithm based on chemotaxis or the motion of bacteria seeking nutrients in their environment. A unique acoustic event classification algorithm was also developed based on using swarm optimization. Additional studies addressed the problem of routing multiple UAVs, optimally placing sensors in the field and locating the source of gunfire at helicopters. A field test was conducted in November of 2009 at Camp Roberts, CA. The field test results showed that a system controlled by bio-inspired software algorithms can autonomously detect and locate the source of an acoustic event with very high accuracy and visually verify the event. In nine independent test runs of a UAV, the system autonomously located the position of an explosion nine times with an average accuracy of 3 meters. The time required to perform source localization using the UAV was on the order of a few minutes based on UAV flight times. In June 2011, additional field tests of the system will be performed and will include multiple acoustic events, optimal sensor placement based on acoustic phenomenology and the use of the International Technology Alliance (ITA

  17. Phase change events of volatile liquid perfluorocarbon contrast agents produce unique acoustic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheeran, Paul S.; Matsunaga, Terry O.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) provide a dynamic platform to approach problems in medical ultrasound (US). Upon US-mediated activation, the liquid core vaporizes and expands to produce a gas bubble ideal for US imaging and therapy. In this study, we demonstrate through high-speed video microscopy and US interrogation that PCCAs composed of highly volatile perfluorocarbons (PFCs) exhibit unique acoustic behavior that can be detected and differentiated from standard microbubble contrast agents. Experimental results show that when activated with short pulses PCCAs will over-expand and undergo unforced radial oscillation while settling to a final bubble diameter. The size-dependent oscillation phenomenon generates a unique acoustic signal that can be passively detected in both time and frequency domain using confocal piston transducers with an ‘activate high’ (8 MHz, 2 cycles), ‘listen low’ (1 MHz) scheme. Results show that the magnitude of the acoustic ‘signature’ increases as PFC boiling point decreases. By using a band-limited spectral processing technique, the droplet signals can be isolated from controls and used to build experimental relationships between concentration and vaporization pressure. The techniques shown here may be useful for physical studies as well as development of droplet-specific imaging techniques.

  18. Acoustic signatures of the phases and phase transitions in Yb2Ti2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Subhro; Erfanifam, S.; Green, E. L.; Naumann, M.; Wang, Zhaosheng; Granovsky, S.; Doerr, M.; Wosnitza, J.; Zvyagin, A. A.; Moessner, R.; Maljuk, A.; Wurmehl, S.; Büchner, B.; Zherlitsyn, S.

    2016-04-01

    We report on measurements of the sound velocity and attenuation in a single crystal of the candidate quantum-spin-ice material Yb2Ti2O7 as a function of temperature and magnetic field. The acoustic modes couple to the spins magnetoelastically and, hence, carry information about the spin correlations that sheds light on the intricate magnetic phase diagram of Yb2Ti2O7 and the nature of spin dynamics in the material. Particularly, we find a pronounced thermal hysteresis in the acoustic data with a concomitant peak in the specific heat indicating a possible first-order phase transition at about 0.17 K. At low temperatures, the acoustic response to magnetic field saturates hinting at the development of magnetic order. The experimental data are consistent with a first-order phase transition from a cooperative paramagnet to a ferromagnet below T ≈0.17 K, as shown by fitting the data with a phenomenological mean-field theory.

  19. Are you a good mimic? Neuro-acoustic signatures for speech imitation ability.

    PubMed

    Reiterer, Susanne M; Hu, Xiaochen; Sumathi, T A; Singh, Nandini C

    2013-01-01

    We investigated individual differences in speech imitation ability in late bilinguals using a neuro-acoustic approach. One hundred and thirty-eight German-English bilinguals matched on various behavioral measures were tested for "speech imitation ability" in a foreign language, Hindi, and categorized into "high" and "low ability" groups. Brain activations and speech recordings were obtained from 26 participants from the two extreme groups as they performed a functional neuroimaging experiment which required them to "imitate" sentences in three conditions: (A) German, (B) English, and (C) German with fake English accent. We used recently developed novel acoustic analysis, namely the "articulation space" as a metric to compare speech imitation abilities of the two groups. Across all three conditions, direct comparisons between the two groups, revealed brain activations (FWE corrected, p < 0.05) that were more widespread with significantly higher peak activity in the left supramarginal gyrus and postcentral areas for the low ability group. The high ability group, on the other hand showed significantly larger articulation space in all three conditions. In addition, articulation space also correlated positively with imitation ability (Pearson's r = 0.7, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that an expanded articulation space for high ability individuals allows access to a larger repertoire of sounds, thereby providing skilled imitators greater flexibility in pronunciation and language learning. PMID:24155739

  20. Are you a good mimic? Neuro-acoustic signatures for speech imitation ability

    PubMed Central

    Reiterer, Susanne M.; Hu, Xiaochen; Sumathi, T. A.; Singh, Nandini C.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated individual differences in speech imitation ability in late bilinguals using a neuro-acoustic approach. One hundred and thirty-eight German-English bilinguals matched on various behavioral measures were tested for “speech imitation ability” in a foreign language, Hindi, and categorized into “high” and “low ability” groups. Brain activations and speech recordings were obtained from 26 participants from the two extreme groups as they performed a functional neuroimaging experiment which required them to “imitate” sentences in three conditions: (A) German, (B) English, and (C) German with fake English accent. We used recently developed novel acoustic analysis, namely the “articulation space” as a metric to compare speech imitation abilities of the two groups. Across all three conditions, direct comparisons between the two groups, revealed brain activations (FWE corrected, p < 0.05) that were more widespread with significantly higher peak activity in the left supramarginal gyrus and postcentral areas for the low ability group. The high ability group, on the other hand showed significantly larger articulation space in all three conditions. In addition, articulation space also correlated positively with imitation ability (Pearson's r = 0.7, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that an expanded articulation space for high ability individuals allows access to a larger repertoire of sounds, thereby providing skilled imitators greater flexibility in pronunciation and language learning. PMID:24155739

  1. Are you a good mimic? Neuro-acoustic signatures for speech imitation ability.

    PubMed

    Reiterer, Susanne M; Hu, Xiaochen; Sumathi, T A; Singh, Nandini C

    2013-01-01

    We investigated individual differences in speech imitation ability in late bilinguals using a neuro-acoustic approach. One hundred and thirty-eight German-English bilinguals matched on various behavioral measures were tested for "speech imitation ability" in a foreign language, Hindi, and categorized into "high" and "low ability" groups. Brain activations and speech recordings were obtained from 26 participants from the two extreme groups as they performed a functional neuroimaging experiment which required them to "imitate" sentences in three conditions: (A) German, (B) English, and (C) German with fake English accent. We used recently developed novel acoustic analysis, namely the "articulation space" as a metric to compare speech imitation abilities of the two groups. Across all three conditions, direct comparisons between the two groups, revealed brain activations (FWE corrected, p < 0.05) that were more widespread with significantly higher peak activity in the left supramarginal gyrus and postcentral areas for the low ability group. The high ability group, on the other hand showed significantly larger articulation space in all three conditions. In addition, articulation space also correlated positively with imitation ability (Pearson's r = 0.7, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that an expanded articulation space for high ability individuals allows access to a larger repertoire of sounds, thereby providing skilled imitators greater flexibility in pronunciation and language learning.

  2. Signal/Image Processing of Acoustic Flaw Signatures for Detection and Localization

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Meyer, A W

    2001-06-01

    The timely, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of critical optics in high energy, pulsed laser experiments is a crucial analysis that must be performed for the experiment to be successful. Failure to detect flaws of critical sizes in vacuum-loaded optical windows can result in a catastrophic failure jeopardizing the safety of both personnel and costly equipment. We discuss the development of signal/image processing techniques to both detect critical flaws and locate their position on the window. The data measured from two Orthogonal arrays of narrow beamwidth ultrasonic transducers are preprocessed using a model-based scheme based on the Green's function of the medium providing individual channel signatures. These signatures are then transformed to the two-dimensional image space using a power-based estimator. A 2D-replicant is then constructed based on the underlying physics of the material along with the geometry of the window. Correlating the replicant with the enhanced power image leads to the optimal 2D-matched filter solution detecting and localizing the flaw. Controlled experimental results on machined flaws are discussed.

  3. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Herberg, J; Maxwell, R; Tittmann, B R; Lenahan, P M; Yerkes, S; Jayaraman, S

    2005-10-04

    This report reviews progress made on NA22 project LL251DP to develop a novel technique, Nuclear Acoustic Resonance (NAR), for remote, non-destructive, nonradiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs, including {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. We have met all milestones and deliverables for FY05, as shown in Table 1. In short, we have developed a magnetic shield chamber and magnetic field, develop a digital lock-in amplifier computer to integrate both the ultrasound radiation with the detector, developed strain measurements, and begin to perform initial measurements to obtain a NAR signal from aluminum at room temperature and near the earth's magnetic field. The results obtained in FY05 further support the feasibility of successful demonstration of an NAR experiment for remote, non-destructive, non-radiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs.

  4. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Herberg, J; Maxwell, R; Tittmann, B R; Lenahan, P M; Yerkes, S; Jayaraman, S B

    2006-11-02

    This is final report on NA-22 project LL251DP, where the goal was to develop a novel technique, Nuclear Acoustic Resonance (NAR), for remote, non-destructive, nonradiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs, including {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. In short, we have developed a magnetic shield chamber and magnetic field, develop a digital lock-in amplifier computer to integrate both the ultrasound radiation with the detector, developed strain measurements, and begun to perform initial measurements to obtain a NAR signal from aluminum at room temperature and near the earth's magnetic field. Since our funding was cut in FY06, I will discuss where this project can go in the future with this technology.

  5. HELIOSEISMIC SIGNATURE OF CHROMOSPHERIC DOWNFLOWS IN ACOUSTIC TRAVEL-TIME MEASUREMENTS FROM HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashima, Kaori; Sekii, Takashi; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Zhao Junwei; Tarbell, Theodore D.

    2009-04-01

    We report on a signature of chromospheric downflows in two emerging flux regions detected by time-distance helioseismology analysis. We use both chromospheric intensity oscillation data in the Ca II H line and photospheric Dopplergrams in the Fe I 557.6 nm line obtained by Hinode/SOT for our analyses. By cross-correlating the Ca II oscillation signals, we have detected a travel-time anomaly in the plage regions; outward travel times are shorter than inward travel times by 0.5-1 minute. However, such an anomaly is absent in the Fe I data. These results can be interpreted as evidence of downflows in the lower chromosphere. The downflow speed is estimated to be below 10 km s{sup -1}. This result demonstrates a new possibility of studying chromospheric flows by time-distance analysis.

  6. Deformation and Brittle Failure of Folded Gneiss in Triaxial Compression: Failure Modes, Acoustic Signatures and Microfabric Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, F.; Vinciguerra, S.; Dobbs, M. R.; Zanchetta, S.

    2014-12-01

    Fabric anisotropy is a key control of rock behavior in different geological settings and over different timescales. However, the effect of tectonically folded fabrics on the brittle strength and failure mode of metamorphic rocks is poorly understood. Recent data, obtained from uniaxial compression experiments on folded gneiss (Agliardi et al., 2014), demonstrated that their brittle failure modes depend upon the arrangement of two anisotropies (i.e. foliation and fold axial planes) and that rock strength correlates with failure mode. Since lithostatic pressure may significantly affect this rock behavior, we investigated its effect in triaxial compression experiments. We tested the Monte Canale Gneiss (Italian Alps), characterized by low phyllosilicate content and compositional layering folded at the cm-scale. We used a servo-controlled hydraulic loading system to test 19 air-dry cylindrical specimens (ø = 54 mm) that were characterized both in terms of fold geometry and orientation of foliation and fold axial planes to the axial load direction. The specimens were instrumented with direct contact axial and circumferential strain gauges. Acoustic emissions and P- and S-wave velocities were measured by piezoelectric transducers mounted in the compression platens. The tests were performed at confining pressures of 40 MPa and axial strain rates of 5*10-6 s-1. Post-failure study of fracture mechanisms and related microfabric controls was undertaken using X-ray CT, optical microscopy and SEM. Samples failed in three distinct brittle modes produced by different combinations of fractures parallel to foliation, fractures parallel to fold axial planes, or mm-scale shear bands. The failure modes, consistent with those described in uniaxial compression experiments, were found to be associated with distinct stress-strain and acoustic emission signatures. Failure modes involving quartz-dominated axial plane anisotropy correspond to higher peak strength and axial strain, less

  7. Acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic signature analysis of failure mechanisms in carbon fiber reinforced polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Shawn Allen

    Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials, particularly carbon (CFRPs), are being used for primary structural applications, particularly in the aerospace and naval industries. Advantages of CFRP materials, compared to traditional materials such as steel and aluminum, include: light weight, high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and long life expectancy. A concern with CFRPs is that despite quality control during fabrication, the material can contain many hidden internal flaws. These flaws in combination with unseen damage due to fatigue and low velocity impact have led to catastrophic failure of structures and components. Therefore a large amount of research has been conducted regarding nondestructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) of CFRP materials. The principal objective of this research program was to develop methods to characterize failure mechanisms in CFRP materials used by the U.S. Army using acoustic emission (AE) and/or acousto-ultrasonic (AU) data. Failure mechanisms addressed include fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination due to shear between layers. CFRP specimens were fabricated and tested in uniaxial tension to obtain AE and AU data. The specimens were designed with carbon fibers in different orientations to produce the different failure mechanisms. Some specimens were impacted with a blunt indenter prior to testing to simulate low-velocity impact. A signature analysis program was developed to characterize the AE data based on data examination using visual pattern recognition techniques. It was determined that it was important to characterize the AE event , using the location of the event as a parameter, rather than just the AE hit (signal recorded by an AE sensor). A back propagation neural network was also trained based on the results of the signature analysis program. Damage observed on the specimens visually with the aid of a scanning electron microscope agreed with the damage type assigned by the

  8. Ultrasonic thermometry simulation in a random fluctuating medium: Evidence of the acoustic signature of a one-percent temperature difference.

    PubMed

    Nagaso, M; Moysan, J; Benjeddou, S; Massacret, N; Ploix, M A; Komatitsch, D; Lhuillier, C

    2016-05-01

    We study the development potential of ultrasonic thermometry in a liquid fluctuating sodium environment similar to that present in a Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor, and thus investigate if and how ultrasonic thermometry could be used to monitor the sodium flow at the outlet of the reactor core. In particular we study if small temperature variations in the sodium flow of e.g. about 1% of the sodium temperature, i.e., about 5°C, can have a reliably-measurable acoustic signature. Since to our knowledge no experimental setups are available for such a study, and considering the practical difficulties of experimentation in sodium, we resort to a numerical technique for full wave propagation called the spectral-element method, which is a highly accurate finite-element method owing to the high-degree basis functions it uses. We obtain clear time-of-flight variations in the case of a small temperature difference of one percent in the case of a static temperature gradient as well as in the presence of a random fluctuation of the temperature field in the turbulent flow. The numerical simulations underline the potential of ultrasonic thermometry in such a context. PMID:26921558

  9. DEMON-type algorithms for determination of hydro-acoustic signatures of surface ships and of divers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamnoiu, G.; Radu, O.; Rosca, V.; Pascu, C.; Damian, R.; Surdu, G.; Curca, E.; Radulescu, A.

    2016-08-01

    With the project “System for detection, localization, tracking and identification of risk factors for strategic importance in littoral areas”, developed in the National Programme II, the members of the research consortium intend to develop a functional model for a hydroacoustic passive subsystem for determination of acoustic signatures of targets such as fast boats and autonomous divers. This paper presents some of the results obtained in the area of hydroacoustic signal processing by using DEMON-type algorithms (Detection of Envelope Modulation On Noise). For evaluation of the performance of various algorithm variations we have used both audio recordings of the underwater noise generated by ships and divers in real situations and also simulated noises. We have analysed the results of processing these signals using four DEMON algorithm structures as presented in the reference literature and a fifth DEMON algorithm structure proposed by the authors of this paper. The algorithm proposed by the authors generates similar results to those obtained by applying the traditional algorithms but requires less computing resources than those and at the same time it has proven to be more resilient to random noise influence.

  10. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  11. Acoustic signature from flames as a combustion diagnostic tool. Final technical report, 1 May 79-31 Oct 83

    SciTech Connect

    Strahle, W.C.

    1983-11-01

    A program was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using the combustion noise acoustic output as a non-intrusive diagnostic of some details of the combustion process. Investigated were an open premixed turbulent jet flame and a gas turbine combustor converted to run on propane. The analysis links the acoustic pressure fluctuations to the distribution of heat release rate fluctuations. Measurement of the sound field, yields in principle, the heat release rate fluctuation field. It was found, however, that the analytical methods for this inverse problem are too sensitive to small experimental uncertainties. Consequently, it appears that the method is not, in general feasible.

  12. Particle Mesh Simulations of the Lyα Forest and the Signature of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Martin; Pope, Adrian; Carlson, Jordan; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Fasel, Patricia; Daniel, David; Lukic, Zarija

    2010-04-01

    We present a set of ultra-large particle-mesh simulations of the Lyα forest targeted at understanding the imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations in the inter-galactic medium. We use nine dark matter only simulations which can, for the first time, simultaneously resolve the Jeans scale of the intergalactic gas while covering the large volumes required to adequately sample the acoustic feature. Mock absorption spectra are generated using the fluctuating Gunn-Peterson approximation which have approximately correct flux probability density functions and small-scale power spectra. On larger scales, there is clear evidence in the redshift-space correlation function for an acoustic feature, which matches a linear theory template with constant bias. These spectra, which we make publicly available, can be used to test pipelines, plan future experiments, and model various physical effects. As an illustration, we discuss the basic properties of the acoustic signal in the forest, the scaling of errors with noise and source number density, modified statistics to treat mean flux evolution and mis-estimation, and non-gravitational sources such as fluctuations in the photoionizing background and temperature fluctuations due to He II reionization.

  13. Latch-up signature analysis technique for plastic dual-in-line package (PDIP) devices using scanning acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahanpour, M.; Morgan, I.; Li, S.; Kaufmann, M.

    1995-12-31

    Cracks in the top surface of plastic package product (PDIP), as shown in a figure, resulting from Latch-Up (LU), DC Vcc Over-Voltage, or Reverse Insertion in the socket are usually similar in appearance. A scanning acoustic microscope can not determine the root cause of this Electrical Over-Stress (EOS) damage since all of the above show similar delamination. Even after device decapsulation, carbonized epoxy around Vcc and Vss bond wires doesn`t always indicate the exact root cause of failure. However, a nondestructive technique has been developed to distinguish (LU) from other EOS failures using a Scanning Acoustic Microscope (SAM). Finally, to verify the validity of the results, a computer analysis using a 3-Dimensional Finite Element Model (FEM) was used. The calculated stress distribution in the plastic IC package in the sustained LU condition agreed with the observations of delamination using SAM on product subjected to Transient Latch-Up (TLU) simulation on the power supply pin.

  14. Signatures support program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Chadwick T.

    2009-05-01

    The Signatures Support Program (SSP) leverages the full spectrum of signature-related activities (collections, processing, development, storage, maintenance, and dissemination) within the Department of Defense (DOD), the intelligence community (IC), other Federal agencies, and civil institutions. The Enterprise encompasses acoustic, seismic, radio frequency, infrared, radar, nuclear radiation, and electro-optical signatures. The SSP serves the war fighter, the IC, and civil institutions by supporting military operations, intelligence operations, homeland defense, disaster relief, acquisitions, and research and development. Data centers host and maintain signature holdings, collectively forming the national signatures pool. The geographically distributed organizations are the authoritative sources and repositories for signature data; the centers are responsible for data content and quality. The SSP proactively engages DOD, IC, other Federal entities, academia, and industry to locate signatures for inclusion in the distributed national signatures pool and provides world-wide 24/7 access via the SSP application.

  15. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Sánchez, Ariel G; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-29

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys. PMID:27176512

  16. Surface gravity waves and their acoustic signatures, 1-30 Hz, on the mid-Pacific sea floor.

    PubMed

    Farrell, W E; Munk, Walter

    2013-10-01

    In 1999, Duennebier et al. deployed a hydrophone and geophone below the conjugate depth in the abyssal Pacific, midway between Hawaii and California. Real time data were transmitted for 3 yr over an abandoned ATT cable. These data have been analyzed in the frequency band 1 to 30 Hz. Between 1 and 6 Hz, the bottom data are interpreted as acoustic radiation from surface gravity waves, an extension to higher frequencies of a non-linear mechanism proposed by Longuet-Higgins in 1950 to explain microseisms. The inferred surface wave spectrum for wave lengths between 6 m and 17 cm is saturated (wind-independent) and roughly consistent with the traditional Phillips κ(-4) wave number spectrum. Shorter ocean waves have a strong wind dependence and a less steep wave number dependence. Similar features are found in the bottom record between 6 and 30 Hz. But this leads to an enigma: The derived surface spectrum inferred from the Longuet-Higgins mechanism with conventional assumptions for the dispersion relation is associated with mean square slopes that greatly exceed those derived from glitter. Regardless of the generation mechanism, the measured bottom intensities between 10 and 30 Hz are well below minimum noise standards reported in the literature.

  17. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3 σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  18. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Sánchez, Ariel G; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-29

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  19. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 2: scattering signatures of Colorado River bed sediment in Marble and Grand Canyons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    In this, the second of a pair of papers on the statistical signatures of riverbed sediment in high-frequency acoustic backscatter, spatially explicit maps of the stochastic geometries (length- and amplitude-scales) of backscatter are related to patches of riverbed surfaces composed of known sediment types, as determined by geo-referenced underwater video observations. Statistics of backscatter magnitudes alone are found to be poor discriminators between sediment types. However, the variance of the power spectrum, and the intercept and slope from a power-law spectral form (termed the spectral strength and exponent, respectively) successfully discriminate between sediment types. A decision-tree approach was able to classify spatially heterogeneous patches of homogeneous sands, gravels (and sand-gravel mixtures), and cobbles/boulders with 95, 88, and 91% accuracy, respectively. Application to sites outside the calibration, and surveys made at calibration sites at different times, were plausible based on observations from underwater video. Analysis of decision trees built with different training data sets suggested that the spectral exponent was consistently the most important variable in the classification. In the absence of theory concerning how spatially variable sediment surfaces scatter high-frequency sound, the primary advantage of this data-driven approach to classify bed sediment over alternatives is that spectral methods have well understood properties and make no assumptions about the distributional form of the fluctuating component of backscatter over small spatial scales.

  20. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics: 2. Scattering signatures of Colorado River bed sediment in Marble and Grand Canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscombe, D.; Grams, P. E.; Kaplinski, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    In this, the second of a pair of papers on the statistical signatures of riverbed sediment in high-frequency acoustic backscatter, spatially explicit maps of the stochastic geometries (length and amplitude scales) of backscatter are related to patches of riverbed surfaces composed of known sediment types, as determined by georeferenced underwater video observations. Statistics of backscatter magnitudes alone are found to be poor discriminators between sediment types. However, the variance of the power spectrum and the intercept and slope from a power law spectral form (termed the spectral strength and exponent, respectively) successfully discriminate between sediment types. A decision tree approach was able to classify spatially heterogeneous patches of homogeneous sands, gravels (and sand-gravel mixtures), and cobbles/boulders with 95, 88, and 91% accuracy, respectively. Application to sites outside the calibration and surveys made at calibration sites at different times were plausible based on observations from underwater video. Analysis of decision trees built with different training data sets suggested that the spectral exponent was consistently the most important variable in the classification. In the absence of theory concerning how spatially variable sediment surfaces scatter high-frequency sound, the primary advantage of this data-driven approach to classify bed sediment over alternatives is that spectral methods have well-understood properties and make no assumptions about the distributional form of the fluctuating component of backscatter over small spatial scales.

  1. Tracking and understanding the acoustic signature of fluido-fractures: a dual optical/micro-seismic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Kvalheim Eriksen, Fredrik; Zecevic, Megan; Daniel, Guillaume; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Grude Flekkøy, Eirik

    2015-04-01

    The characterization and comprehension of irreversible rock deformation processes due to fluid flow is a challenging problem with numerous applications in many fields. This phenomenon has received an ever-increasing attention in Earth Science, Physics, with many applications in natural hazard understanding, mitigation or forecast (e.g. earthquakes, control the mechanical stability of rock and soil formations during the injection or extraction of fluids, landslides with hydrological control, volcanic eruptions), or in the industry, as CO2 sequestration. In this study, analogue models are developed (similar to the previous work of Johnsen[1] but in rectangular shape) to study the instabilities developing during motion of fluid in dense porous materials: fracturing, fingering, channelling… We study these complex fluid/solid mechanical systems using two imaging techniques: fast optical imaging and high frequency resolution of acoustic emissions. Additionally, we develop physical models rendering for the fluid mechanics (similar to the work of Niebling[2] but with injection of fluid) in the channels and the propagation of microseismic waves around the fracture. We then confront a numerical resolution of this physical system with the observed experimental system. The experimental setup consists in a rectangular Hele-Shaw cell with three closed boundaries and one semi-permeable boundary which enables the flow of the fluid but not the solid particles. During the experiments, the fluid is injected into the system with a constant injection pressure from the point opposite to the semi-permeable boundary. The fluid penetrates into the solid using the pore network. At the large enough injection pressures, the fluid also makes its way via creating channels, fractures to the semi-permeable boundary. During the experiments acoustic signals are recorded using different sensors then, those signals are compared and investigated further in both time and frequency domains

  2. Acoustic network event classification using swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burman, Jerry

    2013-05-01

    Classifying acoustic signals detected by distributed sensor networks is a difficult problem due to the wide variations that can occur in the transmission of terrestrial, subterranean, seismic and aerial events. An acoustic event classifier was developed that uses particle swarm optimization to perform a flexible time correlation of a sensed acoustic signature to reference data. In order to mitigate the effects from interference such as multipath, the classifier fuses signatures from multiple sensors to form a composite sensed acoustic signature and then automatically matches the composite signature with reference data. The approach can classify all types of acoustic events but is particularly well suited to explosive events such as gun shots, mortar blasts and improvised explosive devices that produce an acoustic signature having a shock wave component that is aperiodic and non-linear. The classifier was applied to field data and yielded excellent results in terms of reconstructing degraded acoustic signatures from multiple sensors and in classifying disparate acoustic events.

  3. Truck acoustic data analyzer system

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.; Akerman, Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2006-07-04

    A passive vehicle acoustic data analyzer system having at least one microphone disposed in the acoustic field of a moving vehicle and a computer in electronic communication the microphone(s). The computer detects and measures the frequency shift in the acoustic signature emitted by the vehicle as it approaches and passes the microphone(s). The acoustic signature of a truck driving by a microphone can provide enough information to estimate the truck speed in miles-per-hour (mph), engine speed in rotations-per-minute (RPM), turbocharger speed in RPM, and vehicle weight.

  4. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic resonant metalens

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun; Zhou, Chen; Wei, Qi; Wu, DaJian

    2013-11-25

    Early research into acoustic metamaterials has shown the possibility of achieving subwavelength near-field acoustic imaging. However, a major restriction of acoustic metamaterials is that the imaging objects must be placed in close vicinity of the devices. Here, we present an approach for acoustic imaging of subsurface objects far below the diffraction limit. An acoustic metalens made of holey-structured metamaterials is used to magnify evanescent waves, which can rebuild an image at the central plane. Without changing the physical structure of the metalens, our proposed approach can image objects located at certain distances from the input surface, which provides subsurface signatures of the objects with subwavelength spatial resolution.

  5. Acoustic sniper localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  6. Infrasound Rocket Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, J.

    2012-09-01

    This presentation reviews the work performed by our research group at the Geophysical Institute as we have applied the tools of infrasound research to rocket studies. This report represents one aspect of the effort associated with work done for the National Consortium for MASINT Research (NCMR) program operated by the National MASINT Office (NMO) of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA). Infrasound, the study of acoustic signals and their propagation in a frequency band below 15 Hz, enables an investigator to collect and diagnose acoustic signals from distant sources. Absorption of acoustic energy in the atmosphere decreases as the frequency is reduced. In the infrasound band signals can propagate hundreds and thousands of kilometers with little degradation. We will present an overview of signatures from rockets ranging from small sounding rockets such as the Black Brandt and Orion series to larger rockets such as Delta 2,4 and Atlas V. Analysis of the ignition transients provides information that can uniquely identify the motor type. After the rocket ascends infrasound signals can be used to characterize the rocket and identify the various events that take place along a trajectory such as staging and maneuvering. We have also collected information on atmospheric shocks and sonic booms from the passage of supersonic vehicles such as the shuttle. This review is intended to show the richness of the unique signal set that occurs in the low-frequency infrasound band.

  7. Acoustical standards in engineering acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhard, Mahlon D.

    2001-05-01

    The Engineering Acoustics Technical Committee is concerned with the evolution and improvement of acoustical techniques and apparatus, and with the promotion of new applications of acoustics. As cited in the Membership Directory and Handbook (2002), the interest areas include transducers and arrays; underwater acoustic systems; acoustical instrumentation and monitoring; applied sonics, promotion of useful effects, information gathering and transmission; audio engineering; acoustic holography and acoustic imaging; acoustic signal processing (equipment and techniques); and ultrasound and infrasound. Evident connections between engineering and standards are needs for calibration, consistent terminology, uniform presentation of data, reference levels, or design targets for product development. Thus for the acoustical engineer standards are both a tool for practices, for communication, and for comparison of his efforts with those of others. Development of many standards depends on knowledge of the way products are put together for the market place and acoustical engineers provide important input to the development of standards. Acoustical engineers and members of the Engineering Acoustics arm of the Society both benefit from and contribute to the Acoustical Standards of the Acoustical Society.

  8. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The tumor ... press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the symptoms ...

  9. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  10. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  11. First images of thunder: Acoustic imaging of triggered lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayeh, M. A.; Evans, N. D.; Fuselier, S. A.; Trevino, J.; Ramaekers, J.; Dwyer, J. R.; Lucia, R.; Rassoul, H. K.; Kotovsky, D. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    An acoustic camera comprising a linear microphone array is used to image the thunder signature of triggered lightning. Measurements were taken at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in Camp Blanding, FL, during the summer of 2014. The array was positioned in an end-fire orientation thus enabling the peak acoustic reception pattern to be steered vertically with a frequency-dependent spatial resolution. On 14 July 2014, a lightning event with nine return strokes was successfully triggered. We present the first acoustic images of individual return strokes at high frequencies (>1 kHz) and compare the acoustically inferred profile with optical images. We find (i) a strong correlation between the return stroke peak current and the radiated acoustic pressure and (ii) an acoustic signature from an M component current pulse with an unusual fast rise time. These results show that acoustic imaging enables clear identification and quantification of thunder sources as a function of lightning channel altitude.

  12. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  13. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  14. Acoustic micro-Doppler radar for human gait imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaonian; Pouliquen, Philippe O; Waxman, Allen; Andreou, Andreas G

    2007-03-01

    A portable acoustic micro-Doppler radar system for the acquisition of human gait signatures in indoor and outdoor environments is reported. Signals from an accelerometer attached to the leg support the identification of the components in the measured micro-Doppler signature. The acoustic micro-Doppler system described in this paper is simpler and offers advantages over the widely used electromagnetic wave micro-Doppler radars.

  15. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  16. Acoustic metafluids.

    PubMed

    Norris, Andrew N

    2009-02-01

    Acoustic metafluids are defined as the class of fluids that allow one domain of fluid to acoustically mimic another, as exemplified by acoustic cloaks. It is shown that the most general class of acoustic metafluids are materials with anisotropic inertia and the elastic properties of what are known as pentamode materials. The derivation uses the notion of finite deformation to define the transformation of one region to another. The main result is found by considering energy density in the original and transformed regions. Properties of acoustic metafluids are discussed, and general conditions are found which ensure that the mapped fluid has isotropic inertia, which potentially opens up the possibility of achieving broadband cloaking. PMID:19206861

  17. Interpreting Underwater Acoustic Images of the Upper Ocean Boundary Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulloa, Marco J.

    2007-01-01

    A challenging task in physical studies of the upper ocean using underwater sound is the interpretation of high-resolution acoustic images. This paper covers a number of basic concepts necessary for undergraduate and postgraduate students to identify the most distinctive features of the images, providing a link with the acoustic signatures of…

  18. Introducing passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring: Motor bike piston-bore fault identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, D. P.; Panigrahi, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    Requirement of designing a sophisticated digital band-pass filter in acoustic based condition monitoring has been eliminated by introducing a passive acoustic filter in the present work. So far, no one has attempted to explore the possibility of implementing passive acoustic filters in acoustic based condition monitoring as a pre-conditioner. In order to enhance the acoustic based condition monitoring, a passive acoustic band-pass filter has been designed and deployed. Towards achieving an efficient band-pass acoustic filter, a generalized design methodology has been proposed to design and optimize the desired acoustic filter using multiple filter components in series. An appropriate objective function has been identified for genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization technique with multiple design constraints. In addition, the sturdiness of the proposed method has been demonstrated in designing a band-pass filter by using an n-branch Quincke tube, a high pass filter and multiple Helmholtz resonators. The performance of the designed acoustic band-pass filter has been shown by investigating the piston-bore defect of a motor-bike using engine noise signature. On the introducing a passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring reveals the enhancement in machine learning based fault identification practice significantly. This is also a first attempt of its own kind.

  19. Acoustic trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Acoustic trauma is a common cause of sensory hearing loss . Damage to the hearing mechanisms within the inner ... Symptoms include: Partial hearing loss that most often involves ... The hearing loss may slowly get worse. Noises, ringing in ...

  20. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  1. Underwater Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creasey, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes the history of underwater acoustics and describes related research studies and teaching activities at the University of Birmingham (England). Also includes research studies on transducer design and mathematical techniques. (SK)

  2. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  3. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameter values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emission associated with (a) crack propagation, (b) ball dropping on a plate, (c) spark discharge, and (d) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train is shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  4. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis, and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameters values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emissions associated with: (1) crack propagation, (2) ball dropping on a plate, (3) spark discharge and (4) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train are shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  5. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  6. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  7. Extraction of small boat harmonic signatures from passive sonar.

    PubMed

    Ogden, George L; Zurk, Lisa M; Jones, Mark E; Peterson, Mary E

    2011-06-01

    This paper investigates the extraction of acoustic signatures from small boats using a passive sonar system. Noise radiated from a small boats consists of broadband noise and harmonically related tones that correspond to engine and propeller specifications. A signal processing method to automatically extract the harmonic structure of noise radiated from small boats is developed. The Harmonic Extraction and Analysis Tool (HEAT) estimates the instantaneous fundamental frequency of the harmonic tones, refines the fundamental frequency estimate using a Kalman filter, and automatically extracts the amplitudes of the harmonic tonals to generate a harmonic signature for the boat. Results are presented that show the HEAT algorithms ability to extract these signatures.

  8. Acoustic Transmitters for Underwater Neutrino Telescopes

    PubMed Central

    Ardid, Miguel; Martínez-Mora, Juan A.; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Larosa, Giuseppina; Adrián-Martínez, Silvia; Llorens, Carlos D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper acoustic transmitters that were developed for use in underwater neutrino telescopes are presented. Firstly, an acoustic transceiver has been developed as part of the acoustic positioning system of neutrino telescopes. These infrastructures are not completely rigid and require a positioning system in order to monitor the position of the optical sensors which move due to sea currents. To guarantee a reliable and versatile system, the transceiver has the requirements of reduced cost, low power consumption, high pressure withstanding (up to 500 bars), high intensity for emission, low intrinsic noise, arbitrary signals for emission and the capacity of acquiring and processing received signals. Secondly, a compact acoustic transmitter array has been developed for the calibration of acoustic neutrino detection systems. The array is able to mimic the signature of ultra-high-energy neutrino interaction in emission directivity and signal shape. The technique of parametric acoustic sources has been used to achieve the proposed aim. The developed compact array has practical features such as easy manageability and operation. The prototype designs and the results of different tests are described. The techniques applied for these two acoustic systems are so powerful and versatile that may be of interest in other marine applications using acoustic transmitters. PMID:22666022

  9. Acoustic transmitters for underwater neutrino telescopes.

    PubMed

    Ardid, Miguel; Martínez-Mora, Juan A; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Larosa, Giuseppina; Adrián-Martínez, Silvia; Llorens, Carlos D

    2012-01-01

    In this paper acoustic transmitters that were developed for use in underwater neutrino telescopes are presented. Firstly, an acoustic transceiver has been developed as part of the acoustic positioning system of neutrino telescopes. These infrastructures are not completely rigid and require a positioning system in order to monitor the position of the optical sensors which move due to sea currents. To guarantee a reliable and versatile system, the transceiver has the requirements of reduced cost, low power consumption, high pressure withstanding (up to 500 bars), high intensity for emission, low intrinsic noise, arbitrary signals for emission and the capacity of acquiring and processing received signals. Secondly, a compact acoustic transmitter array has been developed for the calibration of acoustic neutrino detection systems. The array is able to mimic the signature of ultra-high-energy neutrino interaction in emission directivity and signal shape. The technique of parametric acoustic sources has been used to achieve the proposed aim. The developed compact array has practical features such as easy manageability and operation. The prototype designs and the results of different tests are described. The techniques applied for these two acoustic systems are so powerful and versatile that may be of interest in other marine applications using acoustic transmitters.

  10. Tracking and Characterization of Aircraft Wakes Using Acoustic and Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Data from the 2003 Denver International Airport Wake Acoustics Test are further examined to discern spectral content of aircraft wake signatures, and to compare three dimensional wake tracking from acoustic data to wake tracking data obtained through use of continuous wave and pulsed lidar. Wake tracking data derived from acoustic array data agree well with both continuous wave and pulsed lidar in the horizontal plane, but less well with pulsed lidar in the vertical direction. Results from this study show that the spectral distribution of acoustic energy in a wake signature varies greatly with aircraft type.

  11. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  12. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  13. MMW, IR, and SAM signature collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichstetter, Fred; Ward, Mary E.

    2002-08-01

    During the development of smart weapon's seeker/sensors, it is imperative to collect high quality signatures of the targets the system is intended to engage. These signatures are used to support algorithm development so the system can find and engage the targets of interest in the specific kill area on the target. Englin AFB FL is the AF development center for munitions; and in support of the development effort, the 46th Test Wing (46 TW) has initiated significant improvements in collection capabilities for signatures in the MMW, Infrared and Seismic, Acoustic and Magnetic (SAM) spectrum. Additionally, the Joint Munitions Test and Evaluation program office maintains a fleet of foreign ground vehicle targets used for such signature collection including items such as tanks, SCUD missile launchers, air defense units such as SA-06, SA-8, SA-13, and associated ground support trucks and general purpose vehicles. The major test facility includes a 300 ft tower used for mounting the instrumentation suite that currently includes, 10, 35 and 94 GHz MMW and 2-5(mu) and 8-12(mu) IR instrumentation systems. This facility has undergone major improvements in terms of background signature reduction, construction of a high bay building to house the turntable on which the targets are mounted, and an additional in- ground stationary turntable primarily for IR signature collection. Our experience using this facility to collect signatures for the smart weapons development community has confirmed a significant improvement in quality and efficiency. The need for the stationary turntable signature collection capability was driven by the requirements of the IR community who are interested in collecting signatures in clutter. This tends to be contrary to the MMW community that desires minimum background clutter. The resulting location, adjacent to the MMW tower, allows variations in the type and amount of clutter background that could be incorporated and also provides maximum utilization of

  14. Signature-whistle production in undisturbed free-ranging bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Mandy L. H.; Sayigh, Laela S.; Blum, James E.; Wells, Randall S.

    2004-01-01

    Data from behavioural observations and acoustic recordings of free-ranging bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) were analysed to determine whether signature whistles are produced by wild undisturbed dolphins, and how whistle production varies with activity and group size. The study animals were part of a resident community of bottlenose dolphins near Sarasota, Florida, USA. This community of dolphins provides a unique opportunity for the study of signature-whistle production, since most animals have been recorded during capture-release events since 1975. Three mother-calf pairs and their associates were recorded for a total of 141.25 h between May and August of 1994 and 1995. Whistles of undisturbed dolphins were compared with those recorded from the same individuals during capture-release events. Whistles were conservatively classified into one of four categories: signature, probable signature, upsweep or other. For statistical analyses, signature and probable signature whistles were combined into a 'signature' category; upsweep and other whistles were combined into a 'non-signature' category. Both 'signature' and 'non-signature' whistle frequencies significantly increased as group size increased. There were significant differences in whistle frequencies across activity types: both 'signature' and 'non-signature' whistles were most likely to occur during socializing and least likely to occur during travelling. There were no significant interactions between group size and activity type. Signature and probable signature whistles made up ca. 52% of all whistles produced by these free-ranging bottlenose dolphins. PMID:15293858

  15. Seismic augmentation of acoustic monitoring of mortar fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Thomas S.

    2007-10-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers Research and Development Center participated in a joint ARL-NATO TG-53 field experiment and data collect at Yuma Proving Ground, AZ in early November 2005. Seismic and acoustic signatures from both muzzle blasts and impacts of small arms fire and artillery were recorded using 7 seismic arrays and 3 acoustic arrays. Arrays comprised of 12 seismic and 12 acoustic sensors each were located from 700 m to 18 km from gun positions. Preliminary analysis of signatures attributed to 60mm, 81mm, 120 mm mortars recorded at a seismic-acoustic array 1.1 km from gun position are presented. Seismic and acoustic array f-k analysis is performed to detect and characterize the source signature. Horizontal seismic data are analyzed to determine efficacy of a seismic discriminant for mortar and artillery sources. Rotation of North and East seismic components to radial and transverse components relative to the source-receiver path provide maximum surface wave amplitude on the transverse component. Angles of rotation agree well with f-k analysis of both seismic and acoustic signals. The spectral energy of the rotated transverse surface wave is observable on the all caliber of mortars at a distance of 1.1 km and is a reliable source discriminant for mortar sources at this distance. In a step towards automation, travel time stencils using local seismic and acoustic velocities are applied to seismic data for analysis and determination of source characteristics.

  16. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  17. Identification and characteristics of signature whistles in wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from Namibia.

    PubMed

    Kriesell, Hannah Joy; Elwen, Simon Harvey; Nastasi, Aurora; Gridley, Tess

    2014-01-01

    A signature whistle type is a learned, individually distinctive whistle type in a dolphin's acoustic repertoire that broadcasts the identity of the whistle owner. The acquisition and use of signature whistles indicates complex cognitive functioning that requires wider investigation in wild dolphin populations. Here we identify signature whistle types from a population of approximately 100 wild common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) inhabiting Walvis Bay, and describe signature whistle occurrence, acoustic parameters and temporal production. A catalogue of 43 repeatedly emitted whistle types (REWTs) was generated by analysing 79 hrs of acoustic recordings. From this, 28 signature whistle types were identified using a method based on the temporal patterns in whistle sequences. A visual classification task conducted by 5 naïve judges showed high levels of agreement in classification of whistles (Fleiss-Kappa statistic, κ = 0.848, Z = 55.3, P<0.001) and supported our categorisation. Signature whistle structure remained stable over time and location, with most types (82%) recorded in 2 or more years, and 4 identified at Walvis Bay and a second field site approximately 450 km away. Whistle acoustic parameters were consistent with those of signature whistles documented in Sarasota Bay (Florida, USA). We provide evidence of possible two-voice signature whistle production by a common bottlenose dolphin. Although signature whistle types have potential use as a marker for studying individual habitat use, we only identified approximately 28% of those from the Walvis Bay population, despite considerable recording effort. We found that signature whistle type diversity was higher in larger dolphin groups and groups with calves present. This is the first study describing signature whistles in a wild free-ranging T. truncatus population inhabiting African waters and it provides a baseline on which more in depth behavioural studies can be based.

  18. Identification and Characteristics of Signature Whistles in Wild Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from Namibia

    PubMed Central

    Elwen, Simon Harvey; Nastasi, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    A signature whistle type is a learned, individually distinctive whistle type in a dolphin's acoustic repertoire that broadcasts the identity of the whistle owner. The acquisition and use of signature whistles indicates complex cognitive functioning that requires wider investigation in wild dolphin populations. Here we identify signature whistle types from a population of approximately 100 wild common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) inhabiting Walvis Bay, and describe signature whistle occurrence, acoustic parameters and temporal production. A catalogue of 43 repeatedly emitted whistle types (REWTs) was generated by analysing 79 hrs of acoustic recordings. From this, 28 signature whistle types were identified using a method based on the temporal patterns in whistle sequences. A visual classification task conducted by 5 naïve judges showed high levels of agreement in classification of whistles (Fleiss-Kappa statistic, κ = 0.848, Z = 55.3, P<0.001) and supported our categorisation. Signature whistle structure remained stable over time and location, with most types (82%) recorded in 2 or more years, and 4 identified at Walvis Bay and a second field site approximately 450 km away. Whistle acoustic parameters were consistent with those of signature whistles documented in Sarasota Bay (Florida, USA). We provide evidence of possible two-voice signature whistle production by a common bottlenose dolphin. Although signature whistle types have potential use as a marker for studying individual habitat use, we only identified approximately 28% of those from the Walvis Bay population, despite considerable recording effort. We found that signature whistle type diversity was higher in larger dolphin groups and groups with calves present. This is the first study describing signature whistles in a wild free-ranging T. truncatus population inhabiting African waters and it provides a baseline on which more in depth behavioural studies can be based. PMID:25203814

  19. Digital Signature Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassler, Vesna; Biely, Helmut

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Digital Signature Project that was developed in Austria to establish an infrastructure for applying smart card-based digital signatures in banking and electronic-commerce applications. Discusses the need to conform to international standards, an international certification infrastructure, and security features for a public directory…

  20. Controlling radar signature

    SciTech Connect

    Foulke, K.W. )

    1992-08-01

    Low observable technologies for military and tactical aircraft are reviewed including signature-reduction techniques and signal detection/jamming. Among the applications considered are low-signature sensors and the reduction of radar cross section in conjunction with radar-absorbing structures and materials. Technologies for reducing radar cross section are shown to present significant technological challenges, although they afford enhanced aircraft survivability.

  1. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  2. Ultrasonic Doppler methods to extract signatures of a walking human.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Asif; Sabatier, James M; Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2012-09-01

    Extraction of Doppler signatures that characterize human motion has attracted a growing interest in recent years. These Doppler signatures are generated by various components of the human body while walking, and contain unique features that can be used for human detection and recognition. Although, a significant amount of research has been done in radio frequency regime for human Doppler signature extraction, considerably less has been done in acoustics. In this work, 40 kHz ultrasonic sonar is employed to measure the Doppler signature generated by the motion of body segments using different electronic and signal processing schemes. These schemes are based on both analog and digital demodulation with homodyne and heterodyne receiver circuitry. The results and analyses from these different schemes are presented.

  3. Ultrasonic Doppler methods to extract signatures of a walking human.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Asif; Sabatier, James M; Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2012-09-01

    Extraction of Doppler signatures that characterize human motion has attracted a growing interest in recent years. These Doppler signatures are generated by various components of the human body while walking, and contain unique features that can be used for human detection and recognition. Although, a significant amount of research has been done in radio frequency regime for human Doppler signature extraction, considerably less has been done in acoustics. In this work, 40 kHz ultrasonic sonar is employed to measure the Doppler signature generated by the motion of body segments using different electronic and signal processing schemes. These schemes are based on both analog and digital demodulation with homodyne and heterodyne receiver circuitry. The results and analyses from these different schemes are presented. PMID:22979839

  4. UV Signature Mutations †

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  5. An archaeal genomic signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, D. E.; Overbeek, R.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal "design fabric." Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org).

  6. An archaeal genomic signature.

    PubMed

    Graham, D E; Overbeek, R; Olsen, G J; Woese, C R

    2000-03-28

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal "design fabric." Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org).

  7. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  8. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  9. Are there molecular signatures?

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, W.P.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes molecular signatures and mutational spectrum analysis. The mutation spectrum is defined as the type and location of DNA base change. There are currently about five well documented cases. Mutations and radon-associated tumors are discussed.

  10. Bottlenose dolphins exchange signature whistles when meeting at sea.

    PubMed

    Quick, Nicola J; Janik, Vincent M

    2012-07-01

    The bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus, is one of very few animals that, through vocal learning, can invent novel acoustic signals and copy whistles of conspecifics. Furthermore, receivers can extract identity information from the invented part of whistles. In captivity, dolphins use such signature whistles while separated from the rest of their group. However, little is known about how they use them at sea. If signature whistles are the main vehicle to transmit identity information, then dolphins should exchange these whistles in contexts where groups or individuals join. We used passive acoustic localization during focal boat follows to observe signature whistle use in the wild. We found that stereotypic whistle exchanges occurred primarily when groups of dolphins met and joined at sea. A sequence analysis verified that most of the whistles used during joins were signature whistles. Whistle matching or copying was not observed in any of the joins. The data show that signature whistle exchanges are a significant part of a greeting sequence that allows dolphins to identify conspecifics when encountering them in the wild.

  11. Bottlenose dolphins exchange signature whistles when meeting at sea.

    PubMed

    Quick, Nicola J; Janik, Vincent M

    2012-07-01

    The bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus, is one of very few animals that, through vocal learning, can invent novel acoustic signals and copy whistles of conspecifics. Furthermore, receivers can extract identity information from the invented part of whistles. In captivity, dolphins use such signature whistles while separated from the rest of their group. However, little is known about how they use them at sea. If signature whistles are the main vehicle to transmit identity information, then dolphins should exchange these whistles in contexts where groups or individuals join. We used passive acoustic localization during focal boat follows to observe signature whistle use in the wild. We found that stereotypic whistle exchanges occurred primarily when groups of dolphins met and joined at sea. A sequence analysis verified that most of the whistles used during joins were signature whistles. Whistle matching or copying was not observed in any of the joins. The data show that signature whistle exchanges are a significant part of a greeting sequence that allows dolphins to identify conspecifics when encountering them in the wild. PMID:22378804

  12. Meteor signature interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Meteor signatures contain information about the constituents of space debris and present potential false alarms to early warnings systems. Better models could both extract the maximum scientific information possible and reduce their danger. Accurate predictions can be produced by models of modest complexity, which can be inverted to predict the sizes, compositions, and trajectories of object from their signatures for most objects of interest and concern.

  13. 3D acoustic atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Finn, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing spatially varying 3D atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based. Measurements of the acoustic signature measured onboard a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are compared to ground-based observations of the same signals. The frequency-shifted signal variations are then used to estimate the acoustic propagation delay between the UAV and the ground microphones, which are also affected by atmospheric temperature and wind speed vectors along each sound ray path. The wind and temperature profiles are modelled as the weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), which also allow local meteorological measurements made at the UAV and ground receivers to supplement any acoustic observations. Tomography is used to provide a full 3D reconstruction/visualisation of the observed atmosphere. The technique offers observational mobility under direct user control and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. This paper summarises the tomographic technique and reports on the results of simulations and initial field trials. The technique has practical applications for atmospheric research, sound propagation studies, boundary layer meteorology, air pollution measurements, analysis of wind shear, and wind farm surveys.

  14. Acoustic emission descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witos, Franciszek; Malecki, Ignacy

    The authors present selected problems associated with acoustic emission interpreted as a physical phenomenon and as a measurement technique. The authors examine point sources of acoustic emission in isotropic, homogeneous linearly elastic media of different shapes. In the case of an unbounded medium the authors give the analytical form of the stress field and the wave shift field of the acoustic emission. In the case of a medium which is unbounded plate the authors give a form for the equations which is suitable for numerical calculation of the changes over time of selected acoustic emission values. For acoustic emission as a measurement technique, the authors represent the output signal as the resultant of a mechanical input value which describes the source, the transient function of the medium, and the transient function of specific components of the measurement loop. As an effect of this notation, the authors introduce the distinction between an acoustic measurement signal and an acoustic measurement impulse. The authors define the basic parameters of an arbitrary impulse. The authors extensively discuss the signal functions of acoustic emission impulses and acoustic emission signals defined in this article as acoustic emission descriptors (or signal functions of acoustic emission impulses) and advanced acoustic emission descriptors (which are either descriptors associated with acoustic emission applications or the signal functions of acoustic emission signals). The article also contains the results of experimental research on three different problems in which acoustic emission descriptors associated with acoustic emission pulses, acoustic emission applications, and acoustic emission signals are used. These problems are respectively: a problem of the amplitude-load characteristics of acoustic emission pulses in carbon samples subjected to compound uniaxial compression, the use of acoustic emission to predict the durability characteristics of conveyor belts, and

  15. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  16. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  17. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  18. Potential Competitive Dynamics of Acoustic Ecology.

    PubMed

    Radford, C A; Montgomery, J C

    2016-01-01

    The top predators in coastal marine ecosystems, such as whales, dolphins, seabirds, and large predatory fishes (including sharks), may compete with each other to exploit food aggregations. Finding these patchy food sources and being first to a food patch could provide a significant competitive advantage. Our hypothesis is that food patches have specific sound signatures that marine predators could detect and that acoustic sources and animal sensory capabilities may contribute to competition dynamics. Preliminary analysis shows that diving gannets have a distinct spectral signature between 80 and 200 Hz, which falls within the hearing sensitivity of large pelagic fishes. Therefore, we suggest that diving birds may contribute to the sound signatures of food aggregations, linking competition dynamics both above and below the water surface.

  19. Potential Competitive Dynamics of Acoustic Ecology.

    PubMed

    Radford, C A; Montgomery, J C

    2016-01-01

    The top predators in coastal marine ecosystems, such as whales, dolphins, seabirds, and large predatory fishes (including sharks), may compete with each other to exploit food aggregations. Finding these patchy food sources and being first to a food patch could provide a significant competitive advantage. Our hypothesis is that food patches have specific sound signatures that marine predators could detect and that acoustic sources and animal sensory capabilities may contribute to competition dynamics. Preliminary analysis shows that diving gannets have a distinct spectral signature between 80 and 200 Hz, which falls within the hearing sensitivity of large pelagic fishes. Therefore, we suggest that diving birds may contribute to the sound signatures of food aggregations, linking competition dynamics both above and below the water surface. PMID:26611047

  20. Ion acoustic traveling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; Burrows, R. H.; Ao, X.; Zank, G. P.; Zank

    2014-04-01

    Models for traveling waves in multi-fluid plasmas give essential insight into fully nonlinear wave structures in plasmas, not readily available from either numerical simulations or from weakly nonlinear wave theories. We illustrate these ideas using one of the simplest models of an electron-proton multi-fluid plasma for the case where there is no magnetic field or a constant normal magnetic field present. We show that the traveling waves can be reduced to a single first-order differential equation governing the dynamics. We also show that the equations admit a multi-symplectic Hamiltonian formulation in which both the space and time variables can act as the evolution variable. An integral equation useful for calculating adiabatic, electrostatic solitary wave signatures for multi-fluid plasmas with arbitrary mass ratios is presented. The integral equation arises naturally from a fluid dynamics approach for a two fluid plasma, with a given mass ratio of the two species (e.g. the plasma could be an electron-proton or an electron-positron plasma). Besides its intrinsic interest, the integral equation solution provides a useful analytical test for numerical codes that include a proton-electron mass ratio as a fundamental constant, such as for particle in cell (PIC) codes. The integral equation is used to delineate the physical characteristics of ion acoustic traveling waves consisting of hot electron and cold proton fluids.

  1. NATO TG-53: acoustic detection of weapon firing joint field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Dale N.; Pham, Tien; Scanlon, Michael V.; Srour, Nassy; Reiff, Christian G.; Sim, Leng K.; Solomon, Latasha; Thompson, Dorothea F.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss the NATO Task Group 53 (TG-53) acoustic detection of weapon firing field joint experiment at Yuma Proving Ground during 31 October to 4 November 2005. The participating NATO countries include France, the Netherlands, UK and US. The objectives of the joint experiments are: (i) to collect acoustic signatures of direct and indirect firings from weapons such as sniper, mortar, artillery and C4 explosives and (ii) to share signatures among NATO partners from a variety of acoustic sensing platforms on the ground and in the air distributed over a wide area.

  2. Limitations on wind-tunnel pressure signature extrapolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.; Darden, Christine M.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of some recent experimental sonic boom data has revived the hypothesis that there is a closeness limit to the near-field separation distance from which measured wind tunnel pressure signatures can be extrapolated to the ground as though generated by a supersonic-cruise aircraft. Geometric acoustic theory is used to derive an estimate of this distance and the sample data is used to provide a preliminary indication of practical separation distance values.

  3. Weapon identification using hierarchical classification of acoustic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Saad; Divakaran, Ajay; Sawhney, Harpreet S.

    2009-05-01

    We apply a unique hierarchical audio classification technique to weapon identification using gunshot analysis. The Audio Classification classifies each audio segment as one of ten weapon classes (e.g., 9mm, 22, shotgun etc.) using lowcomplexity Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM). The first level of hierarchy consists of classification into broad weapons categories such as Rifle, Hand-Gun etc. and the second consists of classification into specific weapons such as 9mm, 357 etc. Our experiments have yielded over 90% classification accuracy at the coarse (rifle-handgun) level of the classification hierarchy and over 85% accuracy at the finer level (weapon category such as 9mm).

  4. Uncertainty in hydrological signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Hilary; Westerberg, Ida

    2015-04-01

    Information that summarises the hydrological behaviour or flow regime of a catchment is essential for comparing responses of different catchments to understand catchment organisation and similarity, and for many other modelling and water-management applications. Such information types derived as an index value from observed data are known as hydrological signatures, and can include descriptors of high flows (e.g. mean annual flood), low flows (e.g. mean annual low flow, recession shape), the flow variability, flow duration curve, and runoff ratio. Because the hydrological signatures are calculated from observed data such as rainfall and flow records, they are affected by uncertainty in those data. Subjective choices in the method used to calculate the signatures create a further source of uncertainty. Uncertainties in the signatures may affect our ability to compare different locations, to detect changes, or to compare future water resource management scenarios. The aim of this study was to contribute to the hydrological community's awareness and knowledge of data uncertainty in hydrological signatures, including typical sources, magnitude and methods for its assessment. We proposed a generally applicable method to calculate these uncertainties based on Monte Carlo sampling and demonstrated it for a variety of commonly used signatures. The study was made for two data rich catchments, the 50 km2 Mahurangi catchment in New Zealand and the 135 km2 Brue catchment in the UK. For rainfall data the uncertainty sources included point measurement uncertainty, the number of gauges used in calculation of the catchment spatial average, and uncertainties relating to lack of quality control. For flow data the uncertainty sources included uncertainties in stage/discharge measurement and in the approximation of the true stage-discharge relation by a rating curve. The resulting uncertainties were compared across the different signatures and catchments, to quantify uncertainty

  5. Practical quantum digital signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-03-01

    Guaranteeing nonrepudiation, unforgeability as well as transferability of a signature is one of the most vital safeguards in today's e-commerce era. Based on fundamental laws of quantum physics, quantum digital signature (QDS) aims to provide information-theoretic security for this cryptographic task. However, up to date, the previously proposed QDS protocols are impractical due to various challenging problems and most importantly, the requirement of authenticated (secure) quantum channels between participants. Here, we present the first quantum digital signature protocol that removes the assumption of authenticated quantum channels while remaining secure against the collective attacks. Besides, our QDS protocol can be practically implemented over more than 100 km under current mature technology as used in quantum key distribution.

  6. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence; Beach, Kirk; Carter, Stephen; Chandler, Wayne; Curra, Francesco; Kaczkowski, Peter; Keilman, George; Khokhlova, Vera; Martin, Roy; Mourad, Pierre; Vaezy, Shahram

    2000-07-01

    In cases of severe injury, physicians speak of a "golden hour"—a brief grace period in which quickly applied, proper therapy can save the life of the patient. Much of this mortality results from exsanguination, i.e., bleeding to death—often from internal hemorrhage. The inability of a paramedic to treat breaches in the vascular system deep within the body or to stem the loss of blood from internal organs is a major reason for the high level of mortality associated with blunt trauma. We have undertaken an extensive research program to treat the problem of internal bleeding. Our approach is as follows: (a) We use scanning ultrasound to identify internal bleeding and hemorrhage, (b) we use ultrasound imaging to locate specific breaches in the vascular system, both from damaged vessels and gross damage to the capillary bed, and (c) we use High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to treat the damaged region and to induce hemostasis. We present a general review of this research with some emphasis on the role of nonlinear acoustics.

  7. Current signature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M. (Inventor); Lucena, Angel (Inventor); Ihlefeld, Curtis (Inventor); Burns, Bradley (Inventor); Bassignani, Karin E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A solenoid health monitoring system uses a signal conditioner and controller assembly in one embodiment that includes analog circuitry and a DSP controller. The analog circuitry provides signal conditioning to the low-level raw signal coming from a signal acquisition assembly. Software running in a DSP analyzes the incoming data (recorded current signature) and determines the state of the solenoid whether it is energized, de-energized, or in a transitioning state. In one embodiment, the software identifies key features in the current signature during the transition phase and is able to determine the health of the solenoid.

  8. Factor models for cancer signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakushadze, Zura; Yu, Willie

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel method for extracting cancer signatures by applying statistical risk models (http://ssrn.com/abstract=2732453) from quantitative finance to cancer genome data. Using 1389 whole genome sequenced samples from 14 cancers, we identify an "overall" mode of somatic mutational noise. We give a prescription for factoring out this noise and source code for fixing the number of signatures. We apply nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) to genome data aggregated by cancer subtype and filtered using our method. The resultant signatures have substantially lower variability than those from unfiltered data. Also, the computational cost of signature extraction is cut by about a factor of 10. We find 3 novel cancer signatures, including a liver cancer dominant signature (96% contribution) and a renal cell carcinoma signature (70% contribution). Our method accelerates finding new cancer signatures and improves their overall stability. Reciprocally, the methods for extracting cancer signatures could have interesting applications in quantitative finance.

  9. Acoustic vs VHF Lightning Location Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arechiga, R. O.; Lapierre, J. L.; Stock, M.; Erives, H.; Edens, H. E.; Stringer, A.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    A single acoustic array can determine the 3-D location of lightning sources by using time of arrival differences arriving at the microphones and ranging techniques. The range is obtained from the time difference between the electromagnetic emission (detected by the acoustic data logger) and the acoustic signal produced by lightning. Audio frequency acoustic location systems are sensitive to the gas dynamic expansion of portions of a rapidly heating lightning channel, and so acoustic signatures are produced by a wide variety of different lightning discharge processes including: return strokes, K changes, M components, leader stepping and more. Infrasonic frequency range acoustic sensors are also sensitive to gas dynamic expansion, and in addition are also sensitive to processes which are electro-static in nature. RF location systems such as the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and the Continuous Sampling Broadband VHF Digital Interferometer (DITF) from New Mexico Tech (NMT) produce high quality maps of lightning discharges; however, they are sensitive to breakdown processes only and can not locate sources originating in already well conducting channels. During the summer of 2013 an acoustic audio-range array and an infrasound array were co-located with the NMT DITF in the Magdalena mountains of central New Mexico, where an LMA is also operating. The audio-range acoustic array consists of custom-designed GPS-synced data loggers with a 50 kHz sampling rate and audio range omnidirectional dynamic microphones. The infrasound array uses GPS time-synced data logger and custom-designed broadband microphones with flat response in the band of 0.01 to 500 Hz. The DITF uses flat plate dE/dt antennas bandpass filtered to 20 to 80 MHz, providing 2D maps of lightning emissions with very high (sub-microsecond) timing resolution. Both acoustic and interferometric arrays of antennas determine location of sources by coherently comparing the signals arriving at the antennas (or

  10. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  11. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  12. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular schwannoma, is a rare benign tumor of the ... Acoustic Neuroma? An acoustic neuroma, known as a vestibular schwannoma, is a benign (non-cancerous) growth that ...

  13. Observational Signatures of Waves and Flows in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Moortel, I.; Antolin, P.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2015-02-01

    Propagating perturbations have been observed in extended coronal loop structures for a number of years, but the interpretation in terms of slow (propagating) magneto-acoustic waves and/or as quasi-periodic upflows remains unresolved. We used forward-modelling to construct observational signatures associated with a simple slow magneto-acoustic wave or periodic flow model. Observational signatures were computed for the 171 Å Fe ix and the 193 Å Fe xii spectral lines. Although there are many differences between the flow and wave models, we did not find any clear, robust observational characteristics that can be used in isolation ( i.e. that do not rely on a comparison between the models). For the waves model, a relatively rapid change of the average line widths as a function of (shallow) line-of-sight angles was found, whereas the ratio of the line width amplitudes to the Doppler velocity amplitudes is relatively high for the flow model. The most robust observational signature found is that the ratio of the mean to the amplitudes of the Doppler velocity is always higher than one for the flow model. This ratio is substantially higher for flows than for waves, and for the flows model used in the study is exactly the same in the 171 Å Fe ix and the 193 Å Fe xii spectral lines. However, these potential observational signatures need to be treated cautiously because they are likely to be model-dependent.

  14. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio are examined in the frequency domain analysis, and pulse shape deconvolution is developed for use in the time domain analysis. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameters values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emissions associated with: (1) crack propagation, (2) ball dropping on a plate, (3) spark discharge and (4) defective and good ball bearings.

  15. A Signature Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiles, Robin V.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses Dr. Amalia Amaki and her approach to art as her signature style by turning everyday items into fine art. Amaki is an assistant professor of art, art history, and Black American studies at the University of Delaware. She loves taking unexpected an object and redefining it in the context of art--like a button, a fan, a faded…

  16. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  17. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  18. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  19. NW-MILO Acoustic Data Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Matzner, Shari; Myers, Joshua R.; Maxwell, Adam R.; Jones, Mark E.

    2010-02-17

    There is an enduring requirement to improve our ability to detect potential threats and discriminate these from the legitimate commercial and recreational activity ongoing in the nearshore/littoral portion of the maritime domain. The Northwest Maritime Information and Littoral Operations (NW-MILO) Program at PNNL’s Coastal Security Institute in Sequim, Washington is establishing a methodology to detect and classify these threats - in part through developing a better understanding of acoustic signatures in a near-shore environment. The purpose of the acoustic data collection described here is to investigate the acoustic signatures of small vessels. The data is being recorded continuously, 24 hours a day, along with radar track data and imagery. The recording began in August 2008, and to date the data contains tens of thousands of signals from small vessels recorded in a variety of environmental conditions. The quantity and variety of this data collection, with the supporting imagery and radar track data, makes it particularly useful for the development of robust acoustic signature models and advanced algorithms for signal classification and information extraction. The underwater acoustic sensing system is part of a multi-modal sensing system that is operating near the mouth of Sequim Bay. Sequim Bay opens onto the Straight of Juan de Fuca, which contains part of the border between the U.S. and Canada. Table 1 lists the specific components used for the NW-MILO system. The acoustic sensor is a hydrophone permanently deployed at a mean depth of about 3 meters. In addition to a hydrophone, the other sensors in the system are a marine radar, an electro-optical (EO) camera and an infra-red (IR) camera. The radar is integrated with a vessel tracking system (VTS) that provides position, speed and heading information. The data from all the sensors is recorded and saved to a central server. The data has been validated in terms of its usability for characterizing the

  20. Feature based passive acoustic detection of underwater threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolkin, Rustam; Sutin, Alexander; Radhakrishnan, Sreeram; Bruno, Michael; Fullerton, Brian; Ekimov, Alexander; Raftery, Michael

    2006-05-01

    Stevens Institute of Technology is performing research aimed at determining the acoustical parameters that are necessary for detecting and classifying underwater threats. This paper specifically addresses the problems of passive acoustic detection of small targets in noisy urban river and harbor environments. We describe experiments to determine the acoustic signatures of these threats and the background acoustic noise. Based on these measurements, we present an algorithm for robustly discriminating threat presence from severe acoustic background noise. Measurements of the target's acoustic radiation signal were conducted in the Hudson River. The acoustic noise in the Hudson River was also recorded for various environmental conditions. A useful discriminating feature can be extracted from the acoustic signal of the threat, calculated by detecting packets of multi-spectral high frequency sound which occur repetitively at low frequency intervals. We use experimental data to show how the feature varies with range between the sensor and the detected underwater threat. We also estimate the effective detection range by evaluating this feature for hydrophone signals, recorded in the river both with and without threat presence.

  1. Differential phase acoustic microscope for micro-NDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, David D.; Pusateri, T. L.; Huang, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    A differential phase scanning acoustic microscope (DP-SAM) was developed, fabricated, and tested in this project. This includes the acoustic lens and transducers, driving and receiving electronics, scanning stage, scanning software, and display software. This DP-SAM can produce mechanically raster-scanned acoustic microscopic images of differential phase, differential amplitude, or amplitude of the time gated returned echoes of the samples. The differential phase and differential amplitude images provide better image contrast over the conventional amplitude images. A specially designed miniature dual beam lens was used to form two foci to obtain the differential phase and amplitude information of the echoes. High image resolution (1 micron) was achieved by applying high frequency (around 1 GHz) acoustic signals to the samples and placing two foci close to each other (1 micron). Tone burst was used in this system to obtain a good estimation of the phase differences between echoes from the two adjacent foci. The system can also be used to extract the V(z) acoustic signature. Since two acoustic beams and four receiving modes are available, there are 12 possible combinations to produce an image or a V(z) scan. This provides a unique feature of this system that none of the existing acoustic microscopic systems can provide for the micro-nondestructive evaluation applications. The entire system, including the lens, electronics, and scanning control software, has made a competitive industrial product for nondestructive material inspection and evaluation and has attracted interest from existing acoustic microscope manufacturers.

  2. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  3. Comparison of the TACOM acoustic-detection-range prediction model and the UK Dstl acoustic prediction propagation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunney, Victoria; Mantey, Robert; Crile, James

    2002-08-01

    Acoustic signatures are being exploited more and more by new technology in the battlefield as a way of detecting and identifying potential targets. An understanding of the way in which the acoustic signature of a land platform propagates through the atmosphere enables one to target suppression techniques to those acoustic sources on the vehicle that will provide the greatest military benefit in terms of reducing the detection range of the platform. Dstl Chertsey (UK) and TACOM (US) have developed acoustic propagation models which can predict the far-field sound pressure levels (SPLs) and associated detection ranges of land platforms under a variety of meteorological conditions over different terrain types. The Acoustic Prediction Propagation Model (APPM), UK) and Acoustic Detection Range Prediction Model (ADRPM, US) have previously been compared and have been found to produce similar results for simple scenarios. With recent developments in both models, this comparison has been carried out again, looking at the introduction of Fast-Field Programs (FFP) to both models and, in more detail, the differences between the results at certain frequencies. This paper represents the results found from this comparison study, showing the differences, similarities and potential of these models for the future.

  4. An introduction to acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scruby, C. B.

    1987-08-01

    The technique of acoustic emission (AE) uses one or more sensors to 'listen' to a wide range of events that may take place inside a solid material. Depending on the source of this high frequency sound, there are broadly three application areas: structural testing and surveillance, process monitoring and control, and materials characterization. In the first case the source is probably a defect which radiates elastic waves as it grows. Provided these waves are detectable, AE can be used in conjunction with other NDT techniques to assess structural integrity. Advances in deterministic and statistical analysis methods now enable data to be interpreted in greater detail and with more confidence than before. In the second area the acoustic signature of processes is monitored, ranging from for instance the machining of metallic components to the mixing of foodstuffs, and changes correlated with variations in the process, with the potential for feedback and process control. In the third area, AE is used as an additional diagnostic technique for the study of, for instance, fracture, because it gives unique dynamic information on defect growth.

  5. Wake Signature Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spedding, Geoffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    An accumulated body of quantitative evidence shows that bluff-body wakes in stably stratified environments have an unusual degree of coherence and organization, so characteristic geometries such as arrays of alternating-signed vortices have very long lifetimes, as measured in units of buoyancy timescales, or in the downstream distance scaled by a body length. The combination of pattern geometry and persistence renders the detection of these wakes possible in principle. It now appears that identifiable signatures can be found from many disparate sources: Islands, fish, and plankton all have been noted to generate features that can be detected by climate modelers, hopeful navigators in open oceans, or hungry predators. The various types of wakes are reviewed with notes on why their signatures are important and to whom. A general theory of wake pattern formation is lacking and would have to span many orders of magnitude in Reynolds number.

  6. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS.

    PubMed

    Stremmel, Neil; Struck, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Neil Stremmel.Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News.This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the National Catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:27475185

  7. A synthetic aperture acoustic prototype system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, Robert H.; Bishop, Steven S.; Chan, Aaron M.; Gugino, Peter M.; Donzelli, Thomas P.; Soumekh, Mehrdad

    2015-05-01

    A novel quasi-monostatic system operating in a side-scan synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) imaging mode is presented. This research project's objectives are to explore the military utility of outdoor continuous sound imaging of roadside foliage and target detection. The acoustic imaging method has several military relevant advantages such as being immune to RF jamming, superior spatial resolution as compared to 0.8-2.4 GHz ground penetrating radar (GPR), capable of standoff side and forward-looking scanning, and relatively low cost, weight and size when compared to GPR technologies. The prototype system's broadband 2-17 kHz LFM chirp transceiver is mounted on a manned all-terrain vehicle. Targets are positioned within the acoustic main beam at slant ranges of two to seven meters and on surfaces such as dirt, grass, gravel and weathered asphalt and with an intervening metallic chain link fence. Acoustic image reconstructions and signature plots result in means for literal interpretation and quantifiable analyses.

  8. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  9. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  10. Signatures of nonthermal melting.

    PubMed

    Zier, Tobias; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S; Kalitsov, Alan; Theodonis, Ioannis; Garcia, Martin E

    2015-09-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting. PMID:26798822

  11. Signatures of nonthermal melting

    PubMed Central

    Zier, Tobias; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S.; Kalitsov, Alan; Theodonis, Ioannis; Garcia, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting. PMID:26798822

  12. The acoustic communities: Definition, description and ecological role.

    PubMed

    Farina, Almo; James, Philip

    2016-09-01

    An acoustic community is defined as an aggregation of species that produces sound by using internal or extra-body sound-producing tools. Such communities occur in aquatic (freshwater and marine) and terrestrial environments. An acoustic community is the biophonic component of a soundtope and is characterized by its acoustic signature, which results from the distribution of sonic information associated with signal amplitude and frequency. Distinct acoustic communities can be described according to habitat, the frequency range of the acoustic signals, and the time of day or the season. Near and far fields can be identified empirically, thus the acoustic community can be used as a proxy for biodiversity richness. The importance of ecoacoustic research is rapidly growing due to the increasing awareness of the intrusion of anthropogenic sounds (technophonies) into natural and human-modified ecosystems and the urgent need to adopt more efficient predictive tools to compensate for the effects of climate change. The concept of an acoustic community provides an operational scale for a non-intrusive biodiversity survey and analysis that can be carried out using new passive audio recording technology, coupled with methods of vast data processing and storage. PMID:27262416

  13. Liquid Helium Acoustic Microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Andrew Paul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. In an acoustic microscope, images are generated by monitoring the intensity of the ultrasonic reflection, or echo, from the surface of a sample. In order to achieve this a pulse of acoustic energy is produced by the excitation of a thin film transducer. The pulse thus generated propagates through a crystal and is incident upon the acoustic lens surface, which is the boundary between the crystal and an acoustic coupling liquid. The acoustic lens is a converging element, and brings the ultrasonic beam to a focus within the liquid. A sample, placed at the focus, can act as a reflector, and the returned pulse then contains information regarding the acoustic reflectivity of this specimen. Acoustic pulses are repeatedly launched and detected while the acoustic lens is scanned over the surface of the sample. In this manner an acoustic image is constructed. Acoustic losses in room temperature liquid coupling media represent a considerable source of difficulty in the recovery of acoustic echo signals. At the frequencies of operation required in a microscope which is capable of high resolution, the ultrasonic attenuation is not only large but increases with the square of frequency. In superfluid liquid helium at temperatures below 0.1 K, however, the ultrasonic attenuation becomes negligible. Furthermore, the low sound velocity in liquid helium results in an increase in resolution, since the acoustic wavelength is proportional to velocity. A liquid helium acoustic microscope has been designed and constructed. Details of the various possible detection methods are given, and comparisons are made between them. Measurements of the performance of the system that was adopted are reported. The development of a cooled preamplifier is also described. The variation of reflected signal with object distance has been measured and compared with theoretical predictions. This variation is important in the analysis of acoustic

  14. Nonlinear Acoustics in Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterborn, Werner; Kurz, Thomas; Akhatov, Iskander

    At high sound intensities or long propagation distances at in fluids sufficiently low damping acoustic phenomena become nonlinear. This chapter focuses on nonlinear acoustic wave properties in gases and liquids. The origin of nonlinearity, equations of state, simple nonlinear waves, nonlinear acoustic wave equations, shock-wave formation, and interaction of waves are presented and discussed. Tables are given for the nonlinearity parameter B/A for water and a range of organic liquids, liquid metals and gases. Acoustic cavitation with its nonlinear bubble oscillations, pattern formation and sonoluminescence (light from sound) are modern examples of nonlinear acoustics. The language of nonlinear dynamics needed for understanding chaotic dynamics and acoustic chaotic systems is introduced.

  15. Design of a broadband ultra-large area acoustic cloak based on a fluid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Chen, Tianning; Liang, Qingxuan; Wang, Xiaopeng; Jiang, Ping

    2014-10-01

    A broadband ultra-large area acoustic cloak based on fluid medium was designed and numerically implemented with homogeneous metamaterials according to the transformation acoustics. In the present work, fluid medium as the body of the inclusion could be tuned by changing the fluid to satisfy the variant acoustic parameters instead of redesign the whole cloak. The effective density and bulk modulus of the composite materials were designed to agree with the parameters calculated from the coordinate transformation methodology by using the effective medium theory. Numerical simulation results showed that the sound propagation and scattering signature could be controlled in the broadband ultra-large area acoustic invisibility cloak, and good cloaking performance has been achieved and physically realized with homogeneous materials. The broadband ultra-large area acoustic cloaking properties have demonstrated great potentials in the promotion of the practical applications of acoustic cloak.

  16. Acoustic Levitator Maintains Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Gaspar, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    Transducer loading characteristics allow resonance tracked at high temperature. Acoustic-levitation chamber length automatically adjusted to maintain resonance at constant acoustic frequency as temperature changes. Developed for containerless processing of materials at high temperatures, system does not rely on microphones as resonance sensors, since microphones are difficult to fabricate for use at temperatures above 500 degrees C. Instead, system uses acoustic transducer itself as sensor.

  17. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  18. Localized acoustic surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  19. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  20. Multimodal signature modeling of humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathcart, J. Michael; Kocher, Brian; Prussing, Keith; Lane, Sarah; Thomas, Alan

    2010-04-01

    Georgia Tech been investigating method for the detection of covert personnel in traditionally difficult environments (e.g., urban, caves). This program focuses on a detailed phenomenological analysis of human physiology and signatures with the subsequent identification and characterization of potential observables. Both aspects are needed to support the development of personnel detection and tracking algorithms. The difficult nature of these personnel-related problems dictates a multimodal sensing approach. Human signature data of sufficient and accurate quality and quantity do not exist, thus the development of an accurate signature model for a human is needed. This model should also simulate various human activities to allow motion-based observables to be exploited. This paper will describe a multimodal signature modeling approach that incorporates human physiological aspects, thermoregulation, and dynamics into the signature calculation. This approach permits both passive and active signatures to be modeled. The focus of the current effort involved the computation of signatures in urban environments. This paper will discuss the development of a human motion model for use in simulating both electro-optical signatures and radar-based signatures. Video sequences of humans in a simulated urban environment will also be presented; results using these sequences for personnel tracking will be presented.

  1. Parent-offspring communication in the Nile crocodile Crocodylus niloticus: do newborns' calls show an individual signature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, Amélie L.; Avril, Alexis; Martin, Samuel; Mathevon, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Young Nile crocodiles Crocodylus niloticus start to produce calls inside the egg and carry on emitting sounds after hatching. These vocalizations elicit maternal care and influence the behaviour of other juveniles. In order to investigate the acoustic structure of these calls, focusing on a possible individual signature, we have performed acoustic analyses on 400 calls from ten young crocodiles during the first 4 days after hatching. Calls have a complex acoustic structure and are strongly frequency modulated. We assessed the differences between the calls of the individuals. We found a weak individual signature. An individual call-based recognition of young by the mother is thus unlikely. In other respects, the call acoustic structure changes from the first to the fourth day after hatching: fundamental frequency progressively decreases. These modifications might provide important information to the mother about her offspring—age and size—allowing her to customize her protective care to best suit the needs of each individual.

  2. Acoustic Levitation With Less Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Jacobi, N.

    1983-01-01

    Certain chamber shapes require fewer than three acoustic drivers. Levitation at center of spherical chamber attained using only one acoustic driver. Exitation of lowest spherical mode produces asymmetric acoustic potential well.

  3. Signature CERN-URSS

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Le DG W.Jentschke souhaite la bienvenue à l'assemblée et aux invités pour la signature du protocole entre le Cern et l'URSS qui est un événement important. C'est en 1955 que 55 visiteurs soviétiques ont visité le Cern pour la première fois. Le premier DG au Cern, F.Bloch, et Mons.Amaldi sont aussi présents. Tandis que le discours anglais de W.Jentschke est traduit en russe, le discours russe de Mons.Morozov est traduit en anglais.

  4. Signatures of Reputation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethencourt, John; Shi, Elaine; Song, Dawn

    Reputation systems have become an increasingly important tool for highlighting quality information and filtering spam within online forums. However, the dependence of a user's reputation on their history of activities seems to preclude any possibility of anonymity. We show that useful reputation information can, in fact, coexist with strong privacy guarantees. We introduce and formalize a novel cryptographic primitive we call signatures of reputation which supports monotonic measures of reputation in a completely anonymous setting. In our system, a user can express trust in others by voting for them, collect votes to build up her own reputation, and attach a proof of her reputation to any data she publishes, all while maintaining the unlinkability of her actions.

  5. Signatures of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltz, Edward Anthony

    It is well known that most of the mass in the universe remains unobserved save for its gravitational effect on luminous matter. The nature of this ``dark matter'' remains a mystery. From measurements of the primordial deuterium abundance, the theory of big bang nucleosynthesis predicts that there are not enough baryons to account for the amount of dark matter observed, thus the missing mass must take an exotic form. Several promising candidates have been proposed. In this work I will describe my research along two main lines of inquiry into the dark matter puzzle. The first possibility is that the dark matter is exotic massive particles, such as those predicted by supersymmetric extensions to the standard model of particle physics. Such particles are generically called WIMPs, for weakly interacting massive particles. Focusing on the so-called neutralino in supersymmetric models, I discuss the possible signatures of such particles, including their direct detection via nuclear recoil experiments and their indirect detection via annihilations in the halos of galaxies, producing high energy antiprotons, positrons and gamma rays. I also discuss signatures of the possible slow decays of such particles. The second possibility is that there is a population of black holes formed in the early universe. Any dark objects in galactic halos, black holes included, are called MACHOs, for massive compact halo objects. Such objects can be detected by their gravitational microlensing effects. Several possibilities for sources of baryonic dark matter are also interesting for gravitational microlensing. These include brown dwarf stars and old, cool white dwarf stars. I discuss the theory of gravitational microlensing, focusing on the technique of pixel microlensing. I make predictions for several planned microlensing experiments with ground based and space based telescopes. Furthermore, I discuss binary lenses in the context of pixel microlensing. Finally, I develop a new technique for

  6. Multisensors signature prediction workbench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latger, Jean; Cathala, Thierry

    2015-10-01

    Guidance of weapon systems relies on sensors to analyze targets signature. Defense weapon systems also need to detect then identify threats also using sensors. The sensors performance is very dependent on conditions e.g. time of day, atmospheric propagation, background ... Visible camera are very efficient for diurnal fine weather conditions, long wave infrared sensors for night vision, radar systems very efficient for seeing through atmosphere and/or foliage ... Besides, multi sensors systems, combining several collocated sensors with associated algorithms of fusion, provide better efficiency (typically for Enhanced Vision Systems). But these sophisticated systems are all the more difficult to conceive, assess and qualify. In that frame, multi sensors simulation is highly required. This paper focuses on multi sensors simulation tools. A first part makes a state of the Art of such simulation workbenches with a special focus on SE-Workbench. SEWorkbench is described with regards to infrared/EO sensors, millimeter waves sensors, active EO sensors and GNSS sensors. Then a general overview of simulation of targets and backgrounds signature objectives is presented, depending on the type of simulation required (parametric studies, open loop simulation, closed loop simulation, hybridization of SW simulation and HW ...). After the objective review, the paper presents some basic requirements for simulation implementation such as the deterministic behavior of simulation, mandatory to repeat it many times for parametric studies... Several technical topics are then discussed, such as the rendering technique (ray tracing vs. rasterization), the implementation (CPU vs. GP GPU) and the tradeoff between physical accuracy and performance of computation. Examples of results using SE-Workbench are showed and commented.

  7. Signatures of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylezalek, D.; Zakamska, N.

    2016-06-01

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. It operates by either heating or driving the gas that would otherwise be available for star formation out of the galaxy, preventing further increase in stellar mass. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been hard to come by. We have assembled a large sample of 133 radio-quiet type-2 and red AGN at 0.1signatures are hosted in galaxies that are more `quenched' considering their stellar mass than galaxies with weaker outflow signatures. This correlation is only seen in AGN host galaxies with SFR >100 M_{⊙} yr^{-1} where presumably the coupling of the AGN-driven wind to the gas is strongest. This observation is consistent with the AGN having a net suppression, or `negative' impact, through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history.

  8. Acoustics Critical Readiness Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the status of the acoustic equipment from the medical operations perspective. Included is information about the acoustic dosimeters, sound level meter, and headphones that are planned for use while on orbit. Finally there is information about on-orbit hearing assessments.

  9. Introduction to acoustic emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Possa, G.

    1983-01-01

    Typical acoustic emission signal characteristics are described and techniques which localize the signal source by processing the acoustic delay data from multiple sensors are discussed. The instrumentation, which includes sensors, amplifiers, pulse counters, a minicomputer and output devices is examined. Applications are reviewed.

  10. Quantum Signature of Analog Hawking Radiation in Momentum Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiron, D.; Fabbri, A.; Larré, P.-É.; Pavloff, N.; Westbrook, C. I.; Ziń, P.

    2015-07-01

    We consider a sonic analog of a black hole realized in the one-dimensional flow of a Bose-Einstein condensate. Our theoretical analysis demonstrates that one- and two-body momentum distributions accessible by present-day experimental techniques provide clear direct evidence (i) of the occurrence of a sonic horizon, (ii) of the associated acoustic Hawking radiation, and (iii) of the quantum nature of the Hawking process. The signature of the quantum behavior persists even at temperatures larger than the chemical potential.

  11. New online signature acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulefki, Adel; Mostefai, Messaoud; Abbadi, Belkacem; Djebrani, Samira; Bouziane, Abderraouf; Chahir, Youssef

    2013-01-01

    We present a nonconstraining and low-cost online signature acquisition system that has been developed to enhance the performances of an existing multimodal biometric authentication system (based initially on both voice and image modalities). A laboratory prototype has been developed and validated for an online signature acquisition.

  12. XV-15 Tiltrotor Aircraft: 1997 Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Bryan D.; Conner, David A.

    2003-01-01

    XV-15 acoustic test is discussed, and measured results are presented. The test was conducted by NASA Langley and Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc., during June - July 1997, at the BHTI test site near Waxahachie, Texas. This was the second in a series of three XV-15 tests to document the acoustic signature of the XV-15 tiltrotor aircraft for a variety of flight conditions and minimize the noise signature during approach. Tradeoffs between flight procedures and the measured noise are presented to illustrate the noise abatement flight procedures. The test objectives were to: (1) support operation of future tiltrotors by further developing and demonstrating low-noise flight profiles, while maintaining acceptable handling and ride qualities, and (2) refine approach profiles, selected from previous (1995) tiltrotor testing, to incorporate Instrument Flight Rules (IFR), handling qualities constraints, operations and tradeoffs with sound. Primary emphasis was given to the approach flight conditions where blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise dominates, because this condition influences community noise impact more than any other. An understanding of this part of the noise generating process could guide the development of low noise flight operations and increase the tiltrotor's acceptance in the community.

  13. Infrared Signature Modeling and Analysis of Aircraft Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Arvind G.

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, the survivability of an aircraft has been put to task more than ever before. One of the main reasons is the increase in the usage of Infrared (IR) guided Anti-Aircraft Missiles, especially due to the availability of Man Portable Air Defence System (MANPADS) with some terrorist groups. Thus, aircraft IR signatures are gaining more importance as compared to their radar, visual, acoustic, or any other signatures. The exhaust plume ejected from the aircraft is one of the important sources of IR signature in military aircraft that use low bypass turbofan engines for propulsion. The focus of the present work is modelling of spectral IR radiation emission from the exhaust jet of a typical military aircraft and to evaluate the aircraft susceptibility in terms of the aircraft lock-on range due to its plume emission, for a simple case against a typical Surface to Air Missile (SAM). The IR signature due to the aircraft plume is examined in a holistic manner. A comprehensive methodology of computing IR signatures and its affect on aircraft lock-on range is elaborated. Commercial CFD software has been used to predict the plume thermo-physical properties and subsequently an in-house developed code was used for evaluating the IR radiation emitted by the plume. The LOWTRAN code has been used for modeling the atmospheric IR characteristics. The results obtained from these models are in reasonable agreement with some available experimental data. The analysis carried out in this paper succinctly brings out the intricacy of the radiation emitted by various gaseous species in the plume and the role of atmospheric IR transmissivity in dictating the plume IR signature as perceived by an IR guided SAM.

  14. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  15. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are presented for measuring the acoustic impedance of a surface in which the surface is used to enclose one end of the chamber of a Helmholz resonator. Acoustic waves are generated in the neck of the resonator by a piston driven by a variable speed motor through a cam assembly. The acoustic waves are measured in the chamber and the frequency of the generated acoustic waves is measured by an optical device. These measurements are used to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber and surface combined. The same procedure is followed with a calibration plate having infinite acoustic impedance enclosing the chamber of the resonator to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber alone. Then by subtracting, the compliance and conductance for the surface is obtained.

  16. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques. PMID:16454274

  17. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques.

  18. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  19. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  20. Acoustic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic levitation system is described, with single acoustic source and a small reflector to stably levitate a small object while the object is processed as by coating or heating it. The system includes a concave acoustic source which has locations on opposite sides of its axis that vibrate towards and away from a focal point to generate a converging acoustic field. A small reflector is located near the focal point, and preferably slightly beyond it, to create an intense acoustic field that stably supports a small object near the reflector. The reflector is located about one-half wavelength from the focal point and is concavely curved to a radius of curvature (L) of about one-half the wavelength, to stably support an object one-quarter wavelength (N) from the reflector.

  1. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  2. Passive acoustic monitoring of human physiology during activity indicates health and performance of soldiers and firefighters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-04-01

    The Army Research Laboratory has developed a unique gel-coupled acoustic physiological monitoring sensor that has acoustic impedance properties similar to the skin. This facilitates the transmission of body sounds into the sensor pad, yet significantly repels ambient airborne noises due to an impedance mismatch. The sensor's sensitivity and bandwidth produce excellent signatures for detection and spectral analysis of diverse physiological events. Acoustic signal processing detects heartbeats, breaths, wheezes, coughs, blood pressure, activity, motion, and voice for communication and automatic speech recognition. The health and performance of soldiers, firefighters, and other first responders in strenuous and hazardous environments can be continuously and remotely monitored with body-worn acoustic sensors. Comfortable acoustic sensors can be in a helmet or in a strap around the neck, chest, and wrist. Noise-canceling sensor arrays help remove out-of-phase motion noise and enhance covariant physiology by using two acoustic sensors on the front sides of the neck and two additional acoustic sensors on each wrist. Pulse wave transit time between neck and wrist acoustic sensors will indicate systolic blood pressure. Larger torso-sized arrays can be used to acoustically inspect the lungs and heart, or built into beds for sleep monitoring. Acoustics is an excellent input for sensor fusion.

  3. A methodology for analyzing an acoustic scene in sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Hong; Hohil, Myron E.; Desai, Sachi

    2007-10-01

    Presented here is a novel clustering method for Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and its application in acoustic scene analysis. In this method, HMMs are clustered based on a similarity measure for stochastic models defined as the generalized probability product kernel (GPPK), which can be efficiently evaluated according to a fast algorithm introduced by Chen and Man (2005) [1]. Acoustic signals from various sources are partitioned into small frames. Frequency features are extracted from each of the frames to form observation vectors. These frames are further grouped into segments, and an HMM is trained from each of such segments. An unknown segment is categorized with a known event if its HMM has the closest similarity with the HMM from the corresponding labeled segment. Experiments are conducted on an underwater acoustic dataset from Steven Maritime Security Laboratory, Data set contains a swimmer signature, a noise signature from the Hudson River, and a test sequence with a swimmer in the Hudson River. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully associate the test sequence with the swimmer signature at very high confidence, despite their different time behaviors.

  4. Simulating acoustic waves in spotted stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papini, Emanuele; Birch, Aaron C.; Gizon, Laurent; Hanasoge, Shravan M.

    2015-05-01

    Acoustic modes of oscillation are affected by stellar activity, however it is unclear how starspots contribute to these changes. Here we investigate the nonmagnetic effects of starspots on global modes with angular degree ℓ ≤ 2 in highly active stars, and characterize the spot seismic signature on synthetic light curves. We perform 3D time-domain simulations of linear acoustic waves to study their interaction with a model starspot. We model the spot as a 3D change in the sound speed stratification with respect to a convectively stable stellar background, built from solar Model S. We perform a parametric study by considering different depths and perturbation amplitudes. Exact numerical simulations allow the investigation of the wavefield-spot interaction beyond first order perturbation theory. The interaction of the axisymmetric modes with the starspot is strongly nonlinear. As mode frequency increases, the frequency shifts for radial modes exceed the value predicted by linear theory, while the shifts for the ℓ = 2,m = 0 modes are smaller than predicted by linear theory, with avoided-crossing-like patterns forming between the m = 0 and m = 1 mode frequencies. The nonlinear behavior increases with increasing spot amplitude and/or decreasing depth. Linear theory still reproduces the correct shifts for nonaxisymmetric modes. In the nonlinear regime the mode eigenfunctions are not pure spherical harmonics, but rather a mixture of different spherical harmonics. This mode mixing, together with the frequency changes, may lead to misidentification of the modes in the observed acoustic power spectra.

  5. Acoustic detection of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Semmlow, John; Rahalkar, Ketaki

    2007-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) occurs when the arteries to the heart (the coronary arteries) become blocked by deposition of plaque, depriving the heart of oxygen-bearing blood. This disease is arguably the most important fatal disease in industrialized countries, causing one-third to one-half of all deaths in persons between the ages of 35 and 64 in the United States. Despite the fact that early detection of CAD allows for successful and cost-effective treatment of the disease, only 20% of CAD cases are diagnosed prior to a heart attack. The development of a definitive, noninvasive test for detection of coronary blockages is one of the holy grails of diagnostic cardiology. One promising approach to detecting coronary blockages noninvasively is based on identifying acoustic signatures generated by turbulent blood flow through partially occluded coronary arteries. In fact, no other approach to the detection of CAD promises to be as inexpensive, simple to perform, and risk free as the acoustic-based approach. Although sounds associated with partially blocked arteries are easy to identify in more superficial vessels such as the carotids, sounds from coronary arteries are very faint and surrounded by noise such as the very loud valve sounds. To detect these very weak signals requires sophisticated signal processing techniques. This review describes the work that has been done in this area since the 1980s and discusses future directions that may fulfill the promise of the acoustic approach to detecting coronary artery disease.

  6. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  7. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  8. Statistical clumped isotope signatures.

    PubMed

    Röckmann, T; Popa, M E; Krol, M C; Hofmann, M E G

    2016-08-18

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules.

  9. Harmonic 'signatures' of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Blake-Coleman, B C; Hutchings, M J; Silley, P

    1994-01-01

    The frequency/amplitude effect of various microorganisms exposed to periodic (time varying) electric fields, when proximate to immersed electrodes, has been studied using a novel analytical instrument. The harmonic distribution, in complex signals caused by cells exposed to harmonic free waveforms and occupying part of the electrode/suspension interface volume, was shown to be almost entirely due to the change in the standing interfacial transfer function by the (dielectrically nonlinear) presence of cells. Thus, the characteristic interfacial non-linearity is viewed as variable, being uniquely modulated by the presence of particular cells in the interfacial region. Little can be attributed to bulk (far field) effects. The tendency for subtle (characteristic) signal distortion to occur as a function of particulate (cell or molecular) occupancy of the near electrode interfacial region under controlled current conditions leads to the method of sample characterisation by harmonic (Fourier) analysis. We report here, as a sequel to our original studies (Hutchings et al., 1993; Hutchings and Blake-Coleman, 1993), preliminary results of the harmonic analysis of microbial suspensions under controlled signal conditions using a three-electrode configuration. These data provide three-dimensional graphical representations producing harmonic 'surfaces' for various microorganisms. Thus, cell type differences are characterised by their 'harmonic signature'. The visual distinction provided by these 'surface' forming three-dimensional plots is striking and gives a convincing impression of the ability to identify and enumerate specific microorganisms by acquisition of cell-modulated electrode interfacial Fourier spectra. PMID:8060593

  10. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    PubMed Central

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules. PMID:27535168

  11. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-08-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules.

  12. Statistical clumped isotope signatures.

    PubMed

    Röckmann, T; Popa, M E; Krol, M C; Hofmann, M E G

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules. PMID:27535168

  13. UHECR: Signatures and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinsky, V.

    2013-06-01

    The signatures of Ultra High Energy (E ≳ 1 EeV) proton propagation through CMB radiation are pair-production dip and GZK cutoff. The visible characteristics of these two spectral features are ankle, which is intrinsic part of the dip, beginning of GZK cutoff in the differential spectrum and E1/2 in integral spectrum. Measured by HiRes and Telescope Array (TA) these characteristics agree with theoretical predictions. However, directly measured mass composition remains a puzzle. While HiRes and TA detectors observe the proton-dominated mass composition, the data of Auger detector strongly evidence for nuclei mass composition becoming progressively heavier at energy higher than 4 EeV and reaching Iron at energy about 35 EeV. The models based on the Auger and HiRes/TA data are considered independently and classified using the transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays. The ankle cannot provide this transition. since data of all three detector at energy (1-3) EeV agree with pure proton composition (or at least not heavier than Helium). If produced in Galaxy these particles result in too high anisotropy. This argument excludes or strongly disfavours all ankle models with ankle energy Ea > 3 EeV. The calculation of elongation curves, Xmax(E), for different ankle models strengthens further this conclusion. Status of other models, the dip, mixed composition and Auger based models are discussed.

  14. An acoustical bubble counter for superheated drop detectors.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Chris; Montvila, Darius; Flynn, David; Brennan, Christopher; d'Errico, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    A new bubble counter has been developed based on the well-established approach of detecting vaporization events acoustically in superheated drop detectors (SDDs). This counter is called the Framework Scientific ABC 1260, and it represents a major improvement over prior versions of this technology. By utilizing advanced acoustic pattern recognition software, the bubble formation event can be differentiated from ambient background noise, as well as from other acoustic signatures. Additional structural design enhancements include a relocation of the electronic components to the bottom of the device; thus allowing for greater stability, easier access to vial SDDs without exposure to system electronics. Upgrades in the electronics permit an increase in the speed of bubble detection by almost 50%, compared with earlier versions of the counters. By positioning the vial on top of the device, temperature and sound insulation can be accommodated for extreme environments. Lead shells can also be utilized for an enhanced response to high-energy neutrons. PMID:16891351

  15. On the acoustic radiation of a pitching airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manela, A.

    2013-07-01

    We examine the acoustic far field of a thin elastic airfoil, immersed in low-Mach non-uniform stream flow, and actuated by small-amplitude sinusoidal pitching motion. The near-field fluid-structure interaction problem is analyzed using potential thin-airfoil theory, combined with a discrete vortex model to describe the evolution of airfoil trailing edge wake. The leading order dipole-sound signature of the system is investigated using Powell-Howe acoustic analogy. Compared with a pitching rigid airfoil, the results demonstrate a two-fold effect of structure elasticity on airfoil acoustic field: at actuation frequencies close to the system least stable eigenfrequency, elasticity amplifies airfoil motion amplitude and associated sound levels; however, at frequencies distant from this eigenfrequency, structure elasticity acts to absorb system kinetic energy and reduce acoustic radiation. In the latter case, and with increasing pitching frequency ωp, a rigid-airfoil setup becomes significantly noisier than an elastic airfoil, owing to an ω _p^{5/2} increase of its direct motion noise component. Unlike rigid airfoil signature, it is shown that wake sound contribution to elastic airfoil radiation is significant for all ωp. Remarkably, this contribution contains, in addition to the fundamental pitching frequency, its odd multiple harmonics, which result from nonlinear interactions between the airfoil and the wake. The results suggest that structure elasticity may serve as a viable means for design of flapping flight noise control methodologies.

  16. Locating groundwater flow in karst by acoustic emission surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Stokowski, S.J. Jr.; Clark, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    An acoustic emission survey of Newala Fm. (primarily dolomite) karst has helped to locate subsurface water flow. This survey was performed on the Rock Quarry Dome, Sevier County, Tennessee. A Dresser RS-4 recording seismograph, adjusted to provide a gain of 1000, collected acoustic emission data using Mark Products CN368 vertical geophones with 3-inch spikes. Data was collected for 5-15 second intervals. The geophones were laid out along traverses with 10, 20, or 30-ft spacing and covered with sand bags in locations of high ambient noise. Traverses were laid out: along and across lineaments known to correspond with groundwater flow in natural subsurface channels; across and along a joint-controlled sink suspected of directing groundwater flow; and across a shallow sinkhole located tangentially to the Little Pigeon River and suspected of capturing river water for the groundwater system. Acoustic emissions of channelized flowing groundwater have a characteristic erratic spiked spectral signature. These acoustic emission signatures increase in amplitude and number in the immediate vicinity of the vertical projection of channelized groundwater flow if it occurs within approximately 30 feet of the surface. If the groundwater flow occurs at greater depths the emissions may be offset from the projection of the actual flow, due to propagation of the signal along rock pinnacles or attenuation by residual soils.

  17. A proposed neutral line signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doxas, I.; Speiser, T. W.; Dusenbery, P. B.; Horton, W.

    1992-01-01

    An identifying signature is proposed for the existence and location of the neutral line in the magnetotail. The signature, abrupt density, and temperature changes in the Earthtail direction, was first discovered in test particle simulations. Such temperature variations have been observed in ISEE data (Huang et. al. 1992), but their connection to the possible existence of a neutral line in the tail has not yet been established. The proposed signature develops earlier than the ion velocity space ridge of Martin and Speiser (1988), but can only be seen by spacecraft in the vicinity of the neutral line, while the latter can locate a neutral line remotely.

  18. Calibration of acoustic transients.

    PubMed

    Burkard, Robert

    2006-05-26

    This article reviews the appropriate stimulus parameters (click duration, toneburst envelope) that should be used when eliciting auditory brainstem responses from mice. Equipment specifications required to calibrate these acoustic transients are discussed. Several methods of calibrating the level of acoustic transients are presented, including the measurement of peak equivalent sound pressure level (peSPL) and peak sound pressure level (pSPL). It is hoped that those who collect auditory brainstem response thresholds in mice will begin to use standardized methods of acoustic calibration, so that hearing thresholds across mouse strains obtained in different laboratories can more readily be compared.

  19. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  20. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  1. Acoustic rotation control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Croonquist, A. P.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically controlled rotation of a levitated object, which avoids deformation of a levitated liquid object. Acoustic waves of the same wavelength are directed along perpendicular directions across the object, and with the relative phases of the acoustic waves repeatedly switched so that one wave alternately leads and lags the other by 90 deg. The amount of torque for rotating the object, and the direction of rotation, are controlled by controlling the proportion of time one wave leads the other and selecting which wave leads the other most of the time.

  2. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  3. Acoustic well cleaner

    DOEpatents

    Maki, Jr., Voldi E.; Sharma, Mukul M.

    1997-01-21

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

  4. Underwater acoustic omnidirectional absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naify, Christina J.; Martin, Theodore P.; Layman, Christopher N.; Nicholas, Michael; Thangawng, Abel L.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2014-02-01

    Gradient index media, which are designed by varying local element properties in given geometry, have been utilized to manipulate acoustic waves for a variety of devices. This study presents a cylindrical, two-dimensional acoustic "black hole" design that functions as an omnidirectional absorber for underwater applications. The design features a metamaterial shell that focuses acoustic energy into the shell's core. Multiple scattering theory was used to design layers of rubber cylinders with varying filling fractions to produce a linearly graded sound speed profile through the structure. Measured pressure intensity agreed with predicted results over a range of frequencies within the homogenization limit.

  5. SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURES RELATED TO A SUNQUAKE

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, S. A.; Harra, L. K.; Green, L. M.; Zharkov, S.

    2015-10-10

    The presence of flare-related acoustic emission (sunquakes (SQs)) in some flares, and only in specific locations within the flaring environment, represents a severe challenge to our current understanding of flare energy transport processes. In an attempt to contribute to understanding the origins of SQs we present a comparison of new spectral observations from Hinode’s EUV imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the chromosphere, transition region, and corona above an SQ, and compare them to the spectra observed in a part of the flaring region with no acoustic signature. Evidence for the SQ is determined using both time–distance and acoustic holography methods, and we find that unlike many previous SQ detections, the signal is rather dispersed, but that the time–distance and 6 and 7 mHz sources converge at the same spatial location. We also see some evidence for different evolution at different frequencies, with an earlier peak at 7 mHz than at 6 mHz. Using EIS and IRIS spectroscopic measurements we find that in this location, at the time of the 7 mHz peak the spectral emission is significantly more intense, shows larger velocity shifts and substantially broader profiles than in the location with no SQ, and there is a good correlation between blueshifted, hot coronal, hard X-ray (HXR), and redshifted chromospheric emission, consistent with the idea of a strong downward motion driven by rapid heating by nonthermal electrons and the formation of chromospheric shocks. Exploiting the diagnostic potential of the Mg ii triplet lines, we also find evidence for a single large temperature increase deep in the atmosphere, which is consistent with this scenario. The time of the 6 mHz and time–distance peak signal coincides with a secondary peak in the energy release process, but in this case we find no evidence of HXR emission in the quake location, instead finding very broad spectral lines, strongly shifted to the red

  6. Spectroscopic Signatures Related to a Sunquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, S. A.; Harra, L. K.; Zharkov, S.; Green, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    The presence of flare-related acoustic emission (sunquakes (SQs)) in some flares, and only in specific locations within the flaring environment, represents a severe challenge to our current understanding of flare energy transport processes. In an attempt to contribute to understanding the origins of SQs we present a comparison of new spectral observations from Hinode’s EUV imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the chromosphere, transition region, and corona above an SQ, and compare them to the spectra observed in a part of the flaring region with no acoustic signature. Evidence for the SQ is determined using both time-distance and acoustic holography methods, and we find that unlike many previous SQ detections, the signal is rather dispersed, but that the time-distance and 6 and 7 mHz sources converge at the same spatial location. We also see some evidence for different evolution at different frequencies, with an earlier peak at 7 mHz than at 6 mHz. Using EIS and IRIS spectroscopic measurements we find that in this location, at the time of the 7 mHz peak the spectral emission is significantly more intense, shows larger velocity shifts and substantially broader profiles than in the location with no SQ, and there is a good correlation between blueshifted, hot coronal, hard X-ray (HXR), and redshifted chromospheric emission, consistent with the idea of a strong downward motion driven by rapid heating by nonthermal electrons and the formation of chromospheric shocks. Exploiting the diagnostic potential of the Mg ii triplet lines, we also find evidence for a single large temperature increase deep in the atmosphere, which is consistent with this scenario. The time of the 6 mHz and time-distance peak signal coincides with a secondary peak in the energy release process, but in this case we find no evidence of HXR emission in the quake location, instead finding very broad spectral lines, strongly shifted to the red, indicating

  7. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr.; Younane Abousleiman

    2004-04-01

    The research during this project has concentrated on developing a correlation between rock deformation mechanisms and their acoustic velocity signature. This has included investigating: (1) the acoustic signature of drained and undrained unconsolidated sands, (2) the acoustic emission signature of deforming high porosity rocks (in comparison to their low porosity high strength counterparts), (3) the effects of deformation on anisotropic elastic and poroelastic moduli, and (4) the acoustic tomographic imaging of damage development in rocks. Each of these four areas involve triaxial experimental testing of weak porous rocks or unconsolidated sand and involves measuring acoustic properties. The research is directed at determining the seismic velocity signature of damaged rocks so that 3-D or 4-D seismic imaging can be utilized to image rock damage. These four areas of study are described in the report: (1) Triaxial compression experiments have been conducted on unconsolidated Oil Creek sand at high confining pressures. (2) Initial experiments on measuring the acoustic emission activity from deforming high porosity Danian chalk were accomplished and these indicate that the AE activity was of a very low amplitude. (3) A series of triaxial compression experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of induced stress on the anisotropy developed in dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters in rocks. (4) Tomographic acoustic imaging was utilized to image the internal damage in a deforming porous limestone sample. Results indicate that the deformation damage in rocks induced during laboratory experimentation can be imaged tomographically in the laboratory. By extension the results also indicate that 4-D seismic imaging of a reservoir may become a powerful tool for imaging reservoir deformation (including imaging compaction and subsidence) and for imaging zones where drilling operation may encounter hazardous shallow water flows.

  8. The role of gravity in ocean acoustics propagation and its implication to early tsunami detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Tiago; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    Oceanic low frequency sound generated by submarine earthquake travels much faster than tsunamis and leaves pressure signatures that can act as tsunami precursors. In this regard, it is anticipated that the correct measurement and analysis of low frequency acoustics would enhance current early tsunami detection systems. In this work we model the low frequency acoustics generated by the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake using the "Method of Normal Modes" and the "Acoustics-Gravity Wave" theory. Ocean acoustic theories usually neglect the effect of gravity. However, we show for rigid and elastic bottom conditions how gravity influences the acoustic normal mode propagation speed. Practically, our results can help in the real time characterization of low frequency sources in the ocean. This will enhance the robustness of early tsunami detection systems.

  9. Individual acoustic variation in Belding's ground squirrel alarm chirps in the High Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCowan, Brenda; Hooper, Stacie L.

    2002-03-01

    The acoustic structure of calls within call types can vary as function of individual identity, sex, and social group membership and is important in kin and social group recognition. Belding's ground squirrels (Spermophilus beldingi) produce alarm chirps that function in predator avoidance but little is known about the acoustic variability of these alarm chirps. The purpose of this preliminary study was to analyze the acoustic structure of alarm chirps with respect to individual differences (e.g., signature information) from eight Belding's ground squirrels from four different lakes in the High Sierra Nevada. Results demonstrate that alarm chirps are individually distinctive, and that acoustic similarity among individuals may correspond to genetic similarity and thus dispersal patterns in this species. These data suggest, on a preliminary basis, that the acoustic structure of calls might be used as a bioacoustic tool for tracking individuals, dispersal, and other population dynamics in Belding's ground squirrels, and perhaps other vocal species.

  10. Intrusion detection using secure signatures

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Trent Darnel; Haile, Jedediah

    2014-09-30

    A method and device for intrusion detection using secure signatures comprising capturing network data. A search hash value, value employing at least one one-way function, is generated from the captured network data using a first hash function. The presence of a search hash value match in a secure signature table comprising search hash values and an encrypted rule is determined. After determining a search hash value match, a decryption key is generated from the captured network data using a second hash function, a hash function different form the first hash function. One or more of the encrypted rules of the secure signatures table having a hash value equal to the generated search hash value are then decrypted using the generated decryption key. The one or more decrypted secure signature rules are then processed for a match and one or more user notifications are deployed if a match is identified.

  11. Retail applications of signature verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Thomas G.; Russell, Gregory F.; Heilper, Andre; Smith, Barton A.; Hu, Jianying; Markman, Dmitry; Graham, Jon E.; Drews, Clemens

    2004-08-01

    The dramatic rise in identity theft, the ever pressing need to provide convenience in checkout services to attract and retain loyal customers, and the growing use of multi-function signature captures devices in the retail sector provides favorable conditions for the deployment of dynamic signature verification (DSV) in retail settings. We report on the development of a DSV system to meet the needs of the retail sector. We currently have a database of approximately 10,000 signatures collected from 600 subjects and forgers. Previous work at IBM on DSV has been merged and extended to achieve robust performance on pen position data available from commercial point of sale hardware, achieving equal error rates on skilled forgeries and authentic signatures of 1.5% to 4%.

  12. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  13. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  14. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  15. Acoustic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  16. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Platinum Sponsors More from this sponsor... Platinum Sponsor Gold Sponsor University of Colorado Acoustic Neuroma Program Rocky Mountain Gamma Knife Center Gold Sponsor NYU Langone Medical Center Departments of Neurosurgery ...

  17. Acoustic-Levitation Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Uncontaminated environments for highly-pure material processing provided within completely sealed levitation chamber that suspends particles by acoustic excitation. Technique ideally suited for material processing in low gravity environment of space.

  18. Multimode Acoustic Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M.

    1985-01-01

    There is a need for high temperature containerless processing facilities that can efficiently position and manipulate molten samples in the reduced gravity environment of space. The goal of the research is to develop sophisticated high temperature manipulation capabilities such as selection of arbitrary axes rotation and rapid sample cooling. This program will investigate new classes of acoustic levitation in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical geometries. The program tasks include calculating theoretical expressions of the acoustic forces in these geometries for the excitation of up to three acoustic modes (multimodes). These calculations are used to: (1) determine those acoustic modes that produce stable levitation, (2) isolate the levitation and rotation capabilities to produce more than one axis of rotation, and (3) develop methods to translate samples down long tube cylindrical chambers. Experimental levitators will then be constructed to verify the stable levitation and rotation predictions of the models.

  19. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  20. Bearing defect signature analysis using advanced nonlinear signal analysis in a controlled environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, T.; Earhart, E.; Fiorucci, T.

    1995-01-01

    Utilizing high-frequency data from a highly instrumented rotor assembly, seeded bearing defect signatures are characterized using both conventional linear approaches, such as power spectral density analysis, and recently developed nonlinear techniques such as bicoherence analysis. Traditional low-frequency (less than 20 kHz) analysis and high-frequency envelope analysis of both accelerometer and acoustic emission data are used to recover characteristic bearing distress information buried deeply in acquired data. The successful coupling of newly developed nonlinear signal analysis with recovered wideband envelope data from accelerometers and acoustic emission sensors is the innovative focus of this research.

  1. Ballastic signature identification systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reich, A.; Hine, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results are described of an attempt to establish a uniform procedure for documenting (recording) expended bullet signatures as effortlessly as possible and to build a comprehensive library of these signatures in a form that will permit the automated comparison of a new suspect bullet with the prestored library. The ultimate objective is to achieve a standardized format that will permit nationwide interaction between police departments, crime laboratories, and other interested law enforcement agencies.

  2. Color signatures in Amorsolo paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano, Maricor N.; Palomero, Cherry May; Cruz, Larry; Yambao, Clod Marlan Krister; Dado, Julie Mae; Salvador-Campaner, Janice May

    2010-02-01

    We present the results of a two-year project aimed at capturing quantifiable color signatures of oil paintings of Fernando Amorsolo, the Philippine's first National Artists. Color signatures are found by comparing CIE xy measurements of skin color in portraits and ground, sky and foliage in landscapes. The results are compared with results of visual examination and art historical data as well as works done by Amorsolo's contemporaries and mentors.

  3. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  4. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-11-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell’s law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  5. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-11-24

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  6. Communication in bottlenose dolphins: 50 years of signature whistle research.

    PubMed

    Janik, Vincent M; Sayigh, Laela S

    2013-06-01

    Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) produce individually distinctive signature whistles that broadcast the identity of the caller. Unlike voice cues that affect all calls of an animal, signature whistles are distinct whistle types carrying identity information in their frequency modulation pattern. Signature whistle development is influenced by vocal production learning. Animals use a whistle from their environment as a model, but modify it, and thus invent a novel signal. Dolphins also copy signature whistles of others, effectively addressing the whistle owner. This copying occurs at low rates and the resulting copies are recognizable as such by parameter variations in the copy. Captive dolphins can learn to associate novel whistles with objects and use these whistles to report on the presence or absence of the object. If applied to signature whistles, this ability would make the signature whistle a rare example of a learned referential signal in animals. Here, we review the history of signature whistle research, covering definitions, acoustic features, information content, contextual use, developmental aspects, and species comparisons with mammals and birds. We show how these signals stand out amongst recognition calls in animals and how they contribute to our understanding of complexity in animal communication.

  7. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (<2000 Hz) acoustic methods for medical diagnosis. Several candidate methods of pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (p<0.0001). The ratio of acoustic energy between low (<220 Hz) and mid (550-770 Hz) frequency bands was significantly different in the control (healthy) and pneumothorax states (p<0.0001). The second approach measured breath sounds in the absence of an external acoustic input. Pneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (p<0.01 for each). Finally, chest percussion was implemented. Pneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  8. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  9. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  10. A compact acoustic recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Ronald

    1989-09-01

    The design and operation of a portable compact acoustic recorder is discussed. Designed to be used in arctic conditions for applications that require portable equipment, the device is configured to fit into a lightweight briefcase. It will operate for eight hours at -40 F with heat provided by a hot water bottle. It has proven to be an effective scientific tool in the measurement of underwater acoustic signals in arctic experiments. It has also been used successfully in warmer climates, e.g., in recording acoustic signals from small boats with no ac power. The acoustic recorder's cost is moderate since it is based on a Sony Walkman Professional (WM-D6C) tape recorder playback unit. A speaker and battery assembly and a hydrophone interface electronic assembly complete the system electronics. The interface assembly supplies a number of functions, including a calibration tone generator, an audio amplifier, and a hydrophone interface. Calibrated acoustic recordings can be made by comparing the calibration tone amplitude with the acoustic signal amplitude. The distortion of the recording is minimized by using a high quality, consumer tape recorder.

  11. Acoustic communication by ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickling, Robert

    2002-05-01

    Many ant species communicate acoustically by stridulating, i.e., running a scraper over a washboard-like set of ridges. Ants appear to be insensitive to airborne sound. Consequently, myrmecologists have concluded that the stridulatory signals are transmitted through the substrate. This has tended to diminish the importance of acoustic communication, and it is currently believed that ant communication is based almost exclusively on pheromones, with acoustic communication assigned an almost nonexistent role. However, it can be shown that acoustic communication between ants is effective only if the medium is air and not the substrate. How, then, is it possible for ants to appear deaf to airborne sound and yet communicate through the air? An explanation is provided in a paper [R. Hickling and R. L. Brown, ``Analysis of acoustic communication by ants,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1920-1929 (2000)]. Ants are small relative to the wavelengths they generate. Hence, they create a near field, which is characterized by a major increase in sound velocity (particle velocity of sound) in the vicinity of the source. Hair sensilla on the ants' antennae respond to sound velocity. Thus, ants are able to detect near-field sound from other ants and to exclude extraneous airborne sound.

  12. Heart energy signature spectrogram for cardiovascular diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kudriavtsev, Vladimir; Polyshchuk, Vladimir; Roy, Douglas L

    2007-01-01

    A new method and application is proposed to characterize intensity and pitch of human heart sounds and murmurs. Using recorded heart sounds from the library of one of the authors, a visual map of heart sound energy was established. Both normal and abnormal heart sound recordings were studied. Representation is based on Wigner-Ville joint time-frequency transformations. The proposed methodology separates acoustic contributions of cardiac events simultaneously in pitch, time and energy. The resolution accuracy is superior to any other existing spectrogram method. The characteristic energy signature of the innocent heart murmur in a child with the S3 sound is presented. It allows clear detection of S1, S2 and S3 sounds, S2 split, systolic murmur, and intensity of these components. The original signal, heart sound power change with time, time-averaged frequency, energy density spectra and instantaneous variations of power and frequency/pitch with time, are presented. These data allow full quantitative characterization of heart sounds and murmurs. High accuracy in both time and pitch resolution is demonstrated. Resulting visual images have self-referencing quality, whereby individual features and their changes become immediately obvious. PMID:17480232

  13. Parametric Quantitative Acoustic Analysis of Conversation Produced by Speakers with Dysarthria and Healthy Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Kristin M.; Kent, Raymond D.; Delaney, Amy L.; Duffy, Joseph R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study's main purpose was to (a) identify acoustic signatures of hypokinetic dysarthria (HKD) that are robust to phonetic variation in conversational speech and (b) determine specific characteristics of the variability associated with HKD. Method: Twenty healthy control (HC) participants and 20 participants with HKD associated with…

  14. Combining Passive Thermography and Acoustic Emission for Large Area Fatigue Damage Growth Assessment of a Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.Keywords: Thermal nondestructive evaluation, fatigue damage detection, aerospace composite inspection, acoustic emission, passive thermography

  15. Simulating realistic predator signatures in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Diet estimation is an important field within quantitative ecology, providing critical insights into many aspects of ecology and community dynamics. Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) is a prominent method of diet estimation, particularly for marine mammal and bird species. Investigators using QFASA commonly use computer simulation to evaluate statistical characteristics of diet estimators for the populations they study. Similar computer simulations have been used to explore and compare the performance of different variations of the original QFASA diet estimator. In both cases, computer simulations involve bootstrap sampling prey signature data to construct pseudo-predator signatures with known properties. However, bootstrap sample sizes have been selected arbitrarily and pseudo-predator signatures therefore may not have realistic properties. I develop an algorithm to objectively establish bootstrap sample sizes that generates pseudo-predator signatures with realistic properties, thereby enhancing the utility of computer simulation for assessing QFASA estimator performance. The algorithm also appears to be computationally efficient, resulting in bootstrap sample sizes that are smaller than those commonly used. I illustrate the algorithm with an example using data from Chukchi Sea polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and their marine mammal prey. The concepts underlying the approach may have value in other areas of quantitative ecology in which bootstrap samples are post-processed prior to their use.

  16. Quantum messages with signatures forgeable in arbitrated quantum signature schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewan; Choi, Jeong Woon; Jho, Nam-Su; Lee, Soojoon

    2015-02-01

    Even though a method to perfectly sign quantum messages has not been known, the arbitrated quantum signature scheme has been considered as one of the good candidates. However, its forgery problem has been an obstacle to the scheme becoming a successful method. In this paper, we consider one situation, which is slightly different from the forgery problem, that we use to check whether at least one quantum message with signature can be forged in a given scheme, although all the messages cannot be forged. If there are only a finite number of forgeable quantum messages in the scheme, then the scheme can be secured against the forgery attack by not sending forgeable quantum messages, and so our situation does not directly imply that we check whether the scheme is secure against the attack. However, if users run a given scheme without any consideration of forgeable quantum messages, then a sender might transmit such forgeable messages to a receiver and in such a case an attacker can forge the messages if the attacker knows them. Thus it is important and necessary to look into forgeable quantum messages. We show here that there always exists such a forgeable quantum message-signature pair for every known scheme with quantum encryption and rotation, and numerically show that there are no forgeable quantum message-signature pairs that exist in an arbitrated quantum signature scheme.

  17. A theoretical study of acoustic glitches in low-mass main-sequence stars

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Kuldeep; Antia, H. M.; Basu, Sarbani; Mazumdar, Anwesh E-mail: antia@tifr.res.in E-mail: anwesh@tifr.res.in

    2014-10-20

    There are regions in stars, such as ionization zones and the interface between radiative and convective regions, that cause a localized sharp variation in the sound speed. These are known as 'acoustic glitches'. Acoustic glitches leave their signatures on the oscillation frequencies of stars, and hence these signatures can be used as diagnostics of these regions. In particular, the signatures of these glitches can be used as diagnostics for the position of the second helium ionization zone and that of the base of the envelope convection zone. With the help of stellar models, we study the properties of these acoustic glitches in main-sequence stars. We find that the acoustic glitch due to the helium ionization zone does not correspond to the dip in the adiabatic index Γ{sub 1} caused by the ionization of He II, but to the peak in Γ{sub 1} between the He I and He II ionization zones. We find that it is easiest to study the acoustic glitch that is due to the helium ionization zone in stars with masses in the range 0.9-1.2 M {sub ☉}.

  18. Measuring acoustic habitats

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies. PMID:25954500

  19. Thermally induced acoustic emissions in thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Voyer, J.; Gitzhofer, F.; Boulos, M.I.; Durham, S.

    1995-12-31

    In this study, acoustic emission signals are used to monitor the degradation of plasma sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) under thermal cycling conditions. Signal analysis both in time and frequency domains is carried out in order to identify the key parameters which can be used to classify the acoustic emission signals as a function of the damage mechanisms. This classification offers a means of prediction of the long-term behavior of the thermal barrier coating based on the acoustic emission signal signature at the early stages of bench testing. The tests were carried out using an experimental rig that was developed to reproduce thermal conditions encountered inside a combustion chamber. Twelve infrared lamps, each with a power rating of 1,200 W, are used as a heat source. The samples consist of an alloy blade coated with a duplex TBC made of a 150 {micro}m thick bond coat covered with a 300 {micro}m thick partially-stabilized zirconia coating. The maximum surface temperature of the sample was measured to be around 1,000 C. Two broadband transducers are used for acquisition of acoustic emission signals. Measuring the time between signal detection by each of the two transducers provides a means of determination of the location of the source of the acoustic signals. A classification of the signals based on their energy and their maximum peak frequency is presented.

  20. Signature molecular descriptor : advanced applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.

    2010-04-01

    In this work we report on the development of the Signature Molecular Descriptor (or Signature) for use in the solution of inverse design problems as well as in highthroughput screening applications. The ultimate goal of using Signature is to identify novel and non-intuitive chemical structures with optimal predicted properties for a given application. We demonstrate this in three studies: green solvent design, glucocorticoid receptor ligand design and the design of inhibitors for Factor XIa. In many areas of engineering, compounds are designed and/or modified in incremental ways which rely upon heuristics or institutional knowledge. Often multiple experiments are performed and the optimal compound is identified in this brute-force fashion. Perhaps a traditional chemical scaffold is identified and movement of a substituent group around a ring constitutes the whole of the design process. Also notably, a chemical being evaluated in one area might demonstrate properties very attractive in another area and serendipity was the mechanism for solution. In contrast to such approaches, computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) looks to encompass both experimental and heuristic-based knowledge into a strategy that will design a molecule on a computer to meet a given target. Depending on the algorithm employed, the molecule which is designed might be quite novel (re: no CAS registration number) and/or non-intuitive relative to what is known about the problem at hand. While CAMD is a fairly recent strategy (dating to the early 1980s), it contains a variety of bottlenecks and limitations which have prevented the technique from garnering more attention in the academic, governmental and industrial institutions. A main reason for this is how the molecules are described in the computer. This step can control how models are developed for the properties of interest on a given problem as well as how to go from an output of the algorithm to an actual chemical structure. This report

  1. Acoustic Imaging in Helioseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Sun, Ming-Tsung; LaBonte, Barry; Chen, Huei-Ru; Yeh, Sheng-Jen; Team, The TON

    1999-04-01

    The time-variant acoustic signal at a point in the solar interior can be constructed from observations at the surface, based on the knowledge of how acoustic waves travel in the Sun: the time-distance relation of the p-modes. The basic principle and properties of this imaging technique are discussed in detail. The helioseismic data used in this study were taken with the Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON). The time series of observed acoustic signals on the solar surface is treated as a phased array. The time-distance relation provides the phase information among the phased array elements. The signal at any location at any time can be reconstructed by summing the observed signal at array elements in phase and with a proper normalization. The time series of the constructed acoustic signal contains information on frequency, phase, and intensity. We use the constructed intensity to obtain three-dimensional acoustic absorption images. The features in the absorption images correlate with the magnetic field in the active region. The vertical extension of absorption features in the active region is smaller in images constructed with shorter wavelengths. This indicates that the vertical resolution of the three-dimensional images depends on the range of modes used in constructing the signal. The actual depths of the absorption features in the active region may be smaller than those shown in the three-dimensional images.

  2. [Acoustic characteristics of classrooms].

    PubMed

    Koszarny, Zbigniew; Chyla, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Quality and usefulness of school rooms for transmission of verbal information depends on the two basic parameters: form and quantity of the reverberation time, and profitable line measurements of school rooms from the acoustic point of view. An analysis of the above-mentioned parameters in 48 class rooms and two gymnasiums in schools, which were built in different periods, shows that the most important problem is connected with too long reverberation time and inappropriate acoustic proportions. In schools built in the 1970s, the length of reverberation time is mostly within a low frequency band, while in schools built contemporarily, the maximum length of disappearance time takes place in a quite wide band of 250-2000 Hz. This exceeds optimal values for that kind of rooms at least twice, and five times in the newly built school. A long reverberation time is connected with a low acoustic absorption of school rooms. Moreover, school rooms are characterised by inappropriate acoustic proportions. The classrooms, in their relation to the height, are too long and too wide. It is connected with deterioration of the transmission of verbal information. The data show that this transmission is unequal. Automatically, it leads to a speech disturbance and difficulties with understanding. There is the need for adaptation of school rooms through increase of an acoustic absorption.

  3. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  4. ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOELLE, LESLIE L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

  5. Measurement of sniper infrared signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastek, M.; Dulski, R.; Trzaskawka, P.; Bieszczad, G.

    2009-09-01

    The paper presents some practical aspects of sniper IR signature measurements. Description of particular signatures for sniper and background in typical scenarios has been presented. We take into consideration sniper activities in open area as well as in urban environment. The measurements were made at field test ground. High precision laboratory measurements were also performed. Several infrared cameras were used during measurements to cover all measurement assumptions. Some of the cameras are measurement class devices with high accuracy and speed. The others are microbolometer cameras with FPA detector similar to those used in real commercial counter-sniper systems. The registration was made in SWIR and LWIR spectral bands simultaneously. An ultra fast visual camera was also used for visible spectra registration. Exemplary sniper IR signatures for typical situation were presented.

  6. Graph Analytics for Signature Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Lo, Chaomei

    2013-06-01

    Within large amounts of seemingly unstructured data it can be diffcult to find signatures of events. In our work we transform unstructured data into a graph representation. By doing this we expose underlying structure in the data and can take advantage of existing graph analytics capabilities, as well as develop new capabilities. Currently we focus on applications in cybersecurity and communication domains. Within cybersecurity we aim to find signatures for perpetrators using the pass-the-hash attack, and in communications we look for emails or phone calls going up or down a chain of command. In both of these areas, and in many others, the signature we look for is a path with certain temporal properties. In this paper we discuss our methodology for finding these temporal paths within large graphs.

  7. Materials with controllable signature properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, O.; Holmberg, B.; Karlsson, T.; Savage, S.

    1995-02-01

    We have in this report considered some types of material with potential for use in signature control of structures. The material types selected for inclusion in this study were electrically conductive polymers, fullerenes, nanostructured materials and Langmuir-Blodgett films. To control the signature of a structure in real time it must be possible to vary the material emissivity, structural transmission, and reflection or absorption of electromagnetic radiation in the relevant wavelength region. This may be achieved by changes in temperature, pressure, electrical or magnetic field or by the concentration of a chemical substance within the material. It is concluded that it is feasible to develop electrically conductive polymeric materials with controllable properties for practical signature control application within 5 to 10 years.

  8. Signature Visualization of Software Binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Panas, T

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present work on the visualization of software binaries. In particular, we utilize ROSE, an open source compiler infrastructure, to pre-process software binaries, and we apply a landscape metaphor to visualize the signature of each binary (malware). We define the signature of a binary as a metric-based layout of the functions contained in the binary. In our initial experiment, we visualize the signatures of a series of computer worms that all originate from the same line. These visualizations are useful for a number of reasons. First, the images reveal how the archetype has evolved over a series of versions of one worm. Second, one can see the distinct changes between version. This allows the viewer to form conclusions about the development cycle of a particular worm.

  9. Surface Acoustic Wave Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid manipulations at the microscale and beyond are powerfully enabled through the use of 10-1,000-MHz acoustic waves. A superior alternative in many cases to other microfluidic actuation techniques, such high-frequency acoustics is almost universally produced by surface acoustic wave devices that employ electromechanical transduction in wafer-scale or thin-film piezoelectric media to generate the kinetic energy needed to transport and manipulate fluids placed in adjacent microfluidic structures. These waves are responsible for a diverse range of complex fluid transport phenomena - from interfacial fluid vibration and drop and confined fluid transport to jetting and atomization - underlying a flourishing research literature spanning fundamental fluid physics to chip-scale engineering applications. We highlight some of this literature to provide the reader with a historical basis, routes for more detailed study, and an impression of the field's future directions.

  10. Acoustic particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Stoneburner, J. D.; Jacobi, N.; Wang, T. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method is described which uses acoustic energy to separate particles of different sizes, densities, or the like. The method includes applying acoustic energy resonant to a chamber containing a liquid of gaseous medium to set up a standing wave pattern that includes a force potential well wherein particles within the well are urged towards the center, or position of minimum force potential. A group of particles to be separated is placed in the chamber, while a non-acoustic force such as gravity is applied, so that the particles separate with the larger or denser particles moving away from the center of the well to a position near its edge and progressively smaller lighter particles moving progressively closer to the center of the well. Particles are removed from different positions within the well, so that particles are separated according to the positions they occupy in the well.

  11. Acoustic Levitation Containerless Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whymark, R. R.; Rey, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    This research program consists of the development of acoustic containerless processing systems with applications in the areas of research in material sciences, as well as the production of new materials, solid forms with novel and unusual microstructures, fusion target spheres, and improved optical fibers. Efforts have been focused on the containerless processing at high temperatures for producing new kinds of glasses. Also, some development has occurred in the areas of containerlessly supporting liquids at room temperature, with applications in studies of fluid dynamics, potential undercooling of liquids, etc. The high temperature area holds the greatest promise for producing new kinds of glasses and ceramics, new alloys, and possibly unusual structural shapes, such as very uniform hollow glass shells for fusion target applications. High temperature acoustic levitation required for containerless processing has been demonstrated in low-g environments as well as in ground-based experiments. Future activities include continued development of the signals axis acoustic levitator.

  12. Acoustic energy shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A suspended mass is shaped by melting all or a selected portion of the mass and applying acoustic energy in varying amounts to different portions of the mass. In one technique for forming an optical waveguide slug, a mass of oval section is suspended and only a portion along the middle of the cross-section is heated to a largely fluid consistency. Acoustic energy is applied to opposite edges of the oval mass to press the unheated opposite edge portions together so as to form bulges at the middle of the mass. In another technique for forming a ribbon of silicon for constructing solar cells, a cylindrical thread of silicon is drawn from a molten mass of silicon, and acoustic energy is applied to opposite sides of the molten thread to flatten it into a ribbon.

  13. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  14. Latticed pentamode acoustic cloak.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    We report in this work a practical design of pentamode acoustic cloak with microstructure. The proposed cloak is assembled by pentamode lattice made of a single-phase solid material. The function of rerouting acoustic wave round an obstacle has been demonstrated numerically. It is also revealed that shear related resonance due to weak shear resistance in practical pentamode lattices punctures broadband feature predicted based on ideal pentamode cloak. As a consequence, the latticed pentamode cloak can only conceal the obstacle in segmented frequency ranges. We have also shown that the shear resonance can be largely reduced by introducing material damping, and an improved broadband performance can be achieved. These works pave the way for experimental demonstration of pentamode acoustic cloak. PMID:26503821

  15. Latticed pentamode acoustic cloak

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    We report in this work a practical design of pentamode acoustic cloak with microstructure. The proposed cloak is assembled by pentamode lattice made of a single-phase solid material. The function of rerouting acoustic wave round an obstacle has been demonstrated numerically. It is also revealed that shear related resonance due to weak shear resistance in practical pentamode lattices punctures broadband feature predicted based on ideal pentamode cloak. As a consequence, the latticed pentamode cloak can only conceal the obstacle in segmented frequency ranges. We have also shown that the shear resonance can be largely reduced by introducing material damping, and an improved broadband performance can be achieved. These works pave the way for experimental demonstration of pentamode acoustic cloak. PMID:26503821

  16. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  17. Ballistic Signature Identification System Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The first phase of a research project directed toward development of a high speed automatic process to be used to match gun barrel signatures imparted to fired bullets was documented. An optical projection technique has been devised to produce and photograph a planar image of the entire signature, and the phototransparency produced is subjected to analysis using digital Fourier transform techniques. The success of this approach appears to be limited primarily by the accuracy of the photographic step since no significant processing limitations have been encountered.

  18. Soldier/robot team acoustic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-09-01

    The future battlefield will require an unprecedented level of automation in which soldier-operated, autonomous, and semi-autonomous ground, air, and sea platforms along with mounted and dismounted soldiers will function as a tightly coupled team. Sophisticated robotic platforms with diverse sensor suites will be an integral part of the Objective Force, and must be able to collaborate not only amongst themselves but also with their manned partners. The Army Research Laboratory has developed a robot-based acoustic detection system that will detect and localize on an impulsive noise event, such as a sniper's weapon firing. Additionally, acoustic sensor arrays worn on a soldier's helmet or equipment can enhance his situational awareness and RSTA capabilities. The Land Warrior or Objective Force Warrior body-worn computer can detect tactically significant impulsive signatures from bullets, mortars, artillery, and missiles or spectral signatures from tanks, helicopters, UAVs, and mobile robots. Time-difference-of-arrival techniques can determine a sound's direction of arrival, while head attitude sensors can instantly determine the helmet orientation at time of capture. With precision GPS location of the soldier, along with the locations of other soldiers, robots, or unattended ground sensors that heard the same event, triangulation techniques can produce an accurate location of the target. Data from C-4 explosions and 0.50-Caliber shots shows that both helmet and robot systems can localize on the same event. This provides an awesome capability - mobile robots and soldiers working together on an ever-changing battlespace to detect the enemy and improve the survivability, mobility, and lethality of our future warriors.

  19. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  20. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  1. Electromechanical acoustic liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Cattafesta, III, Louis N. (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikazu (Inventor); Horowitz, Stephen Brian (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A multi-resonator-based system responsive to acoustic waves includes at least two resonators, each including a bottom plate, side walls secured to the bottom plate, and a top plate disposed on top of the side walls. The top plate includes an orifice so that a portion of an incident acoustical wave compresses gas in the resonators. The bottom plate or the side walls include at least one compliant portion. A reciprocal electromechanical transducer coupled to the compliant portion of each of the resonators forms a first and second transducer/compliant composite. An electrical network is disposed between the reciprocal electromechanical transducer of the first and second resonator.

  2. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  3. Densitometry By Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    "Static" and "dynamic" methods developed for measuring mass density of acoustically levitated solid particle or liquid drop. "Static" method, unknown density of sample found by comparison with another sample of known density. "Dynamic" method practiced with or without gravitational field. Advantages over conventional density-measuring techniques: sample does not have to make contact with container or other solid surface, size and shape of samples do not affect measurement significantly, sound field does not have to be know in detail, and sample can be smaller than microliter. Detailed knowledge of acoustic field not necessary.

  4. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  5. Post Treatment of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Identifying an AN Symptoms Acoustic Neuroma Keywords Educational Video Pre-Treatment Treatment Options Summary Treatment Options Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions ...

  6. Variable-Position Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Stoneburner, J. D.; Jacobi, N.; Wang, T. G.

    1983-01-01

    Method of acoustic levitation supports objects at positions other than acoustic nodes. Acoustic force is varied so it balances gravitational (or other) force, thereby maintaining object at any position within equilibrium range. Levitation method applicable to containerless processing. Such objects as table-tennis balls, hollow plastic spheres, and balsa-wood spheres levitated in laboratory by new method.

  7. XV-15 Tiltrotor Aircraft: 1999 Acoustic Testing - Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Bryan D.; Conner, David A.

    2003-01-01

    An XV-15 acoustic test is discussed, and measured results are presented. The test was conducted by NASA Langley and Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc., during October 1999, at the BHTI test site near Waxahachie, Texas. As part of the NASA-sponsored Short Haul Civil Tiltrotor noise reduction initiative, this was the third in a series of three major XV-15 acoustic tests. Their purpose was to document the acoustic signature of the XV-15 tiltrotor aircraft for a variety of flight conditions and to minimize the noise signature during approach. Tradeoffs between flight procedures and the measured noise are presented to illustrate the noise abatement flight procedures. The test objectives were to support operation of future tiltrotors by further developing and demonstrating low-noise flight profiles, while maintaining acceptable handling and ride qualities, and refine approach profiles, selected from previous (1995 & 1997) tiltrotor testing, to incorporate Instrument Flight Rules (IFR), handling qualities constraints, operations and tradeoffs with sound. Primary emphasis was given to the approach flight conditions where blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise dominates, because this condition influences community noise impact more than any other. An understanding of this part of the noise generating process could guide the development of low noise flight operations and increase the tiltrotor's acceptance in the community.

  8. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  9. Topological Signatures for Population Admixture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Topological Signatures for Population AdmixtureDeniz Yorukoglu1, Filippo Utro1, David Kuhn2, Saugata Basu3 and Laxmi Parida1* Abstract Background: As populations with multi-linear transmission (i.e., mixing of genetic material from two parents, say) evolve over generations, the genetic transmission...

  10. Graph signatures for visual analytics.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pak Chung; Foote, Harlan; Chin, George; Mackey, Patrick; Perrine, Ken

    2006-01-01

    We present a visual analytics technique to explore graphs using the concept of a data signature. A data signature, in our context, is a multidimensional vector that captures the local topology information surrounding each graph node. Signature vectors extracted from a graph are projected onto a low-dimensional scatterplot through the use of scaling. The resultant scatterplot, which reflects the similarities of the vectors, allows analysts to examine the graph structures and their corresponding real-life interpretations through repeated use of brushing and linking between the two visualizations. The interpretation of the graph structures is based on the outcomes of multiple participatory analysis sessions with intelligence analysts conducted by the authors at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The paper first uses three public domain data sets with either well-known or obvious features to explain the rationale of our design and illustrate its results. More advanced examples are then used in a customized usability study to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach. The study results reveal not only the limitations and weaknesses of the traditional approach based solely on graph visualization, but also the advantages and strengths of our signature-guided approach presented in the paper.

  11. Invisibly Sanitizable Digital Signature Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Kunihiko; Hanaoka, Goichiro; Imai, Hideki

    A digital signature does not allow any alteration of the document to which it is attached. Appropriate alteration of some signed documents, however, should be allowed because there are security requirements other than the integrity of the document. In the disclosure of official information, for example, sensitive information such as personal information or national secrets is masked when an official document is sanitized so that its nonsensitive information can be disclosed when it is requested by a citizen. If this disclosure is done digitally by using the current digital signature schemes, the citizen cannot verify the disclosed information because it has been altered to prevent the leakage of sensitive information. The confidentiality of official information is thus incompatible with the integrity of that information, and this is called the digital document sanitizing problem. Conventional solutions such as content extraction signatures and digitally signed document sanitizing schemes with disclosure condition control can either let the sanitizer assign disclosure conditions or hide the number of sanitized portions. The digitally signed document sanitizing scheme we propose here is based on the aggregate signature derived from bilinear maps and can do both. Moreover, the proposed scheme can sanitize a signed document invisibly, that is, no one can distinguish whether the signed document has been sanitized or not.

  12. Acoustic-gravity waves, theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadri, Usama; Farrell, William E.; Munk, Walter

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) propagate in the ocean under the influence of both the compressibility of sea water and the restoring force of gravity. The gravity dependence vanishes if the wave vector is normal to the ocean surface, but becomes increasingly important as the wave vector acquires a horizontal tilt. They are excited by many sources, including non-linear surface wave interactions, disturbances of the ocean bottom (submarine earthquakes and landslides) and underwater explosions. In this introductory lecture on acoustic-gravity waves, we describe their properties, and their relation to organ pipe modes, to microseisms, and to deep ocean signatures by short surface waves. We discuss the generation of AGW by underwater earthquakes; knowledge of their behaviour with water depth can be applied for the early detection of tsunamis. We also discuss their generation by the non-linear interaction of surface gravity waves, which explains the major role they play in transforming energy from the ocean surface to the crust, as part of the microseisms phenomenon. Finally, they contribute to horizontal water transport at depth, which might affect benthic life.

  13. Acoustics in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Miriam J.

    This paper explores the issues associated with poor acoustics within schools. Additionally, it suggests remedies for existing buildings and those under renovation, as well as concerns for new construction. The paper discusses the effects of unwanted noise on students in terms of physiological, motivational, and cognitive influences. Issues are…

  14. Improved acoustic levitation apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berge, L. H.; Johnson, J. L.; Oran, W. A.; Reiss, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Concave driver and reflector enhance and shape levitation forces in acoustic resonance system. Single-mode standing-wave pattern is focused by ring element situated between driver and reflector. Concave surfaces increase levitating forces up to factor of 6 as opposed to conventional flat surfaces, making it possible to suspend heavier objects.

  15. Intelligent Engine Systems: Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojno, John; Martens, Steve; Simpson, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    An extensive study of new fan exhaust nozzle technologies was performed. Three new uniform chevron nozzles were designed, based on extensive CFD analysis. Two new azimuthally varying variants were defined. All five were tested, along with two existing nozzles, on a representative model-scale, medium BPR exhaust nozzle. Substantial acoustic benefits were obtained from the uniform chevron nozzle designs, the best benefit being provided by an existing design. However, one of the azimuthally varying nozzle designs exhibited even better performance than any of the uniform chevron nozzles. In addition to the fan chevron nozzles, a new technology was demonstrated, using devices that enhance mixing when applied to an exhaust nozzle. The acoustic benefits from these devices applied to medium BPR nozzles were similar, and in some cases superior to, those obtained from conventional uniform chevron nozzles. However, none of the low noise technologies provided equivalent acoustic benefits on a model-scale high BPR exhaust nozzle, similar to current large commercial applications. New technologies must be identified to improve the acoustics of state-of-the-art high BPR jet engines.

  16. Acoustic leak detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, M.J.

    1993-08-03

    An acoustic leak detection system is described for determining the location of leaks in storage tanks, comprising: (a) sensor means for detecting a leak signal; (b) data acquisition means for digitizing and storing leak signals meeting preset criterion; and (c) analysis means for analyzing the digitized signals and computing the location of the source of the leak signals.

  17. Micro acoustic spectrum analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Schubert, W. Kent; Butler, Michael A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Anderson, Larry F.

    2004-11-23

    A micro acoustic spectrum analyzer for determining the frequency components of a fluctuating sound signal comprises a microphone to pick up the fluctuating sound signal and produce an alternating current electrical signal; at least one microfabricated resonator, each resonator having a different resonant frequency, that vibrate in response to the alternating current electrical signal; and at least one detector to detect the vibration of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can further comprise a mixer to mix a reference signal with the alternating current electrical signal from the microphone to shift the frequency spectrum to a frequency range that is a better matched to the resonant frequencies of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can be designed specifically for portability, size, cost, accuracy, speed, power requirements, and use in a harsh environment. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer is particularly suited for applications where size, accessibility, and power requirements are limited, such as the monitoring of industrial equipment and processes, detection of security intrusions, or evaluation of military threats.

  18. Teaching acoustics online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Andrew; Rossing, Thomas D.

    2003-10-01

    We teach an introductory course in musical acoustics using a Blackboard. Students in this course can access audio and video materials as well as printed materials on our course website. All homework is submitted online, as are tests and examinations. The students also have the opportunity to use synchronous and asynchronous chat rooms to discuss the course with each other or with the instructors.

  19. Acoustics- Version 1.0

    2012-09-13

    This package contains modules that model acoustic sensors and acoustic sources (hearable) in Umbra. It is typically used to represent hearing in characters within Umbra. Typically, the acoustic sensors detect acoustic sources at a given point; however, it also contains the capability to detect bullet cracks by detecting the sound along the bullet path that is closest to the sensor. A memory module, acoustic memory, represents remembered sounds within a given character. Over time, themore » sounds are removed, as a character forgets what it has heard.« less

  20. Acoustics- Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-13

    This package contains modules that model acoustic sensors and acoustic sources (hearable) in Umbra. It is typically used to represent hearing in characters within Umbra. Typically, the acoustic sensors detect acoustic sources at a given point; however, it also contains the capability to detect bullet cracks by detecting the sound along the bullet path that is closest to the sensor. A memory module, acoustic memory, represents remembered sounds within a given character. Over time, the sounds are removed, as a character forgets what it has heard.

  1. Holograms for acoustics.

    PubMed

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-01-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound. PMID:27652563

  2. Holograms for acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G.; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  3. Characterization of defects in Mn-Zn ferrites by scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Boehning, C.W.; Tuohig, W.D.

    1987-06-01

    A scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM) has been used to evaluate the integrity of Mn-Zn ferrite ceramic components which comprise part of the magnetic circuit in an electromechanical code interrogation device. Cracking of the ferrites during processing and assembly emerged as a significant manufacturing problem. Operations such as grinding, metallization, joining, and welding were suspected of causing damage, and acoustic microscopy was used to monitor these processes. Parts which produced suspicious acoustic images were dismantled and destructively sectioned to identify specific physical defects. Correlations between the defects and their acoustic signatures were established. This procedure has provided the basis for several process modifications and improvements which have resulted in acceptable production yields. The SLAM is used as an engineering tool for the detection and characterization of defects and is presently being used routinely to inspect production ferrite components.

  4. Acoustic studies for alpha background rejection in dark matter bubble chamber detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bou-Cabo, M.; Felis, I.; Ardid, M.; Collaboration: COUPP Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    COUPP (Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle Physics) is an experiment with bubble chambers able to detect dark matter directly either with Spin-Dependent or with Spin-Independent interactions. The target material is a superheated liquid (usually CF3I) that can be bubble nucleated due to nuclear recoils produced by elastic collisions of dark matter particles. The bubble growth inside the chamber is accompanied with an acoustic signature. The acoustic technique has been successfully used to have a good alpha discrimination (about 99%). In this paper, we present different studies and results related with the characterization of the acoustic properties of the detector and the different phenomena involved in the acoustic measurements of the bubble growth, such as sound generation, sound transmission and optimization of piezoelectric transducers.

  5. Block truncation signature coding for hyperspectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Sumit; Chang, Chein-I.

    2008-08-01

    This paper introduces a new signature coding which is designed based on the well-known Block Truncation Coding (BTC). It comprises of bit-maps of the signature blocks generated by different threshold criteria. Two new BTC-based algorithms are developed for signature coding, to be called Block Truncation Signature Coding (BTSC) and 2-level BTSC (2BTSC). In order to compare the developed BTC based algorithms with current binary signature coding schemes such as Spectral Program Analysis Manager (SPAM) developed by Mazer et al. and Spectral Feature-based Binary Coding (SFBC) by Qian et al., three different thresholding functions, local block mean, local block gradient, local block correlation are derived to improve the BTSC performance where the combined bit-maps generated by these thresholds can provide better spectral signature characterization. Experimental results reveal that the new BTC-based signature coding performs more effectively in characterizing spectral variations than currently available binary signature coding methods.

  6. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  7. Aero-acoustics of Drag Generating Swirling Exhaust Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, P. N.; Mobed, D.; Spakovszky, Z. S.; Brooks, T. F.; Humphreys, W. M. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft on approach in high-drag and high-lift configuration create unsteady flow structures which inherently generate noise. For devices such as flaps, spoilers and the undercarriage there is a strong correlation between overall noise and drag such that, in the quest for quieter aircraft, one challenge is to generate drag at low noise levels. This paper presents a rigorous aero-acoustic assessment of a novel drag concept. The idea is that a swirling exhaust flow can yield a steady, and thus relatively quiet, streamwise vortex which is supported by a radial pressure gradient responsible for pressure drag. Flows with swirl are naturally limited by instabilities such as vortex breakdown. The paper presents a first aero-acoustic assessment of ram pressure driven swirling exhaust flows and their associated instabilities. The technical approach combines an in-depth aerodynamic analysis, plausibility arguments to qualitatively describe the nature of acoustic sources, and detailed, quantitative acoustic measurements using a medium aperture directional microphone array in combination with a previously established Deconvolution Approach for Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS). A model scale engine nacelle with stationary swirl vanes was designed and tested in the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility at a full-scale approach Mach number of 0.17. The analysis shows that the acoustic signature is comprised of quadrupole-type turbulent mixing noise of the swirling core flow and scattering noise from vane boundary layers and turbulent eddies of the burst vortex structure near sharp edges. The exposed edges are the nacelle and pylon trailing edge and the centerbody supporting the vanes. For the highest stable swirl angle setting a nacelle area based drag coefficient of 0.8 was achieved with a full-scale Overall Sound Pressure Level (OASPL) of about 40dBA at the ICAO approach certification point.

  8. 17 CFR 232.302 - Signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Signatures. 232.302 Section 232.302 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION REGULATION S-T-GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR ELECTRONIC FILINGS Preparation of Electronic Submissions § 232.302 Signatures. (a) Required signatures to, or within,...

  9. 48 CFR 4.102 - Contractor's signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contractor's signature. 4... ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Contract Execution 4.102 Contractor's signature. (a) Individuals. A contract with an... be signed by that individual, and the signature shall be followed by the individual's typed,...

  10. Infrasonic signature of the 2009 major sudden stratospheric warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evers, L. G.; Siegmund, P.

    2009-12-01

    The study of infrasound is experiencing a renaissance since it was chosen as a verification technique for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. The success of the verification technique strongly depends on knowledge of upper atmospheric processes. The ability of infrasound to probe the upper atmosphere starts to be exploited, taking the field beyond its monitoring application. Processes in the stratosphere couple to the troposphere and influence our daily weather and climate. Infrasound delivers actual observations on the state of the stratosphere with a high spatial and temporal resolution. Here we show the infrasonic signature, passively obtained, of a drastic change in the stratosphere due to the major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) of January 2009. With this study, we infer the enormous capacity of infrasound in acoustic remote sensing of stratospheric processes on a global scale with surface based instruments.

  11. Combining passive thermography and acoustic emission for large area fatigue damage growth assessment of a composite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-05-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.

  12. Sound signatures and production mechanisms of three species of pipefishes (Family: Syngnathidae).

    PubMed

    Lim, Adam Chee Ooi; Chong, Ving Ching; Wong, Chiow San; Muniandy, Sithi Vinayakam

    2015-01-01

    Background. Syngnathid fishes produce three kinds of sounds, named click, growl and purr. These sounds are generated by different mechanisms to give a consistent signal pattern or signature which is believed to play a role in intraspecific and interspecific communication. Commonly known sounds are produced when the fish feeds (click, purr) or is under duress (growl). While there are more acoustic studies on seahorses, pipefishes have not received much attention. Here we document the differences in feeding click signals between three species of pipefishes and relate them to cranial morphology and kinesis, or the sound-producing mechanism. Methods. The feeding clicks of two species of freshwater pipefishes, Doryichthys martensii and Doryichthys deokhathoides and one species of estuarine pipefish, Syngnathoides biaculeatus, were recorded by a hydrophone in acoustic dampened tanks. The acoustic signals were analysed using time-scale distribution (or scalogram) based on wavelet transform. A detailed time-varying analysis of the spectral contents of the localized acoustic signal was obtained by jointly interpreting the oscillogram, scalogram and power spectrum. The heads of both Doryichthys species were prepared for microtomographical scans which were analysed using a 3D imaging software. Additionally, the cranial bones of all three species were examined using a clearing and double-staining method for histological studies. Results. The sound characteristics of the feeding click of the pipefish is species-specific, appearing to be dependent on three bones: the supraoccipital, 1st postcranial plate and 2nd postcranial plate. The sounds are generated when the head of the Dorichthyes pipefishes flexes backward during the feeding strike, as the supraoccipital slides backwards, striking and pushing the 1st postcranial plate against (and striking) the 2nd postcranial plate. In the Syngnathoides pipefish, in the absence of the 1st postcranial plate, the supraoccipital rubs

  13. Sound signatures and production mechanisms of three species of pipefishes (Family: Syngnathidae)

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Adam Chee Ooi; Wong, Chiow San; Muniandy, Sithi Vinayakam

    2015-01-01

    Background. Syngnathid fishes produce three kinds of sounds, named click, growl and purr. These sounds are generated by different mechanisms to give a consistent signal pattern or signature which is believed to play a role in intraspecific and interspecific communication. Commonly known sounds are produced when the fish feeds (click, purr) or is under duress (growl). While there are more acoustic studies on seahorses, pipefishes have not received much attention. Here we document the differences in feeding click signals between three species of pipefishes and relate them to cranial morphology and kinesis, or the sound-producing mechanism. Methods. The feeding clicks of two species of freshwater pipefishes, Doryichthys martensii and Doryichthys deokhathoides and one species of estuarine pipefish, Syngnathoides biaculeatus, were recorded by a hydrophone in acoustic dampened tanks. The acoustic signals were analysed using time-scale distribution (or scalogram) based on wavelet transform. A detailed time-varying analysis of the spectral contents of the localized acoustic signal was obtained by jointly interpreting the oscillogram, scalogram and power spectrum. The heads of both Doryichthys species were prepared for microtomographical scans which were analysed using a 3D imaging software. Additionally, the cranial bones of all three species were examined using a clearing and double-staining method for histological studies. Results. The sound characteristics of the feeding click of the pipefish is species-specific, appearing to be dependent on three bones: the supraoccipital, 1st postcranial plate and 2nd postcranial plate. The sounds are generated when the head of the Dorichthyes pipefishes flexes backward during the feeding strike, as the supraoccipital slides backwards, striking and pushing the 1st postcranial plate against (and striking) the 2nd postcranial plate. In the Syngnathoides pipefish, in the absence of the 1st postcranial plate, the supraoccipital rubs

  14. Sound signatures and production mechanisms of three species of pipefishes (Family: Syngnathidae).

    PubMed

    Lim, Adam Chee Ooi; Chong, Ving Ching; Wong, Chiow San; Muniandy, Sithi Vinayakam

    2015-01-01

    Background. Syngnathid fishes produce three kinds of sounds, named click, growl and purr. These sounds are generated by different mechanisms to give a consistent signal pattern or signature which is believed to play a role in intraspecific and interspecific communication. Commonly known sounds are produced when the fish feeds (click, purr) or is under duress (growl). While there are more acoustic studies on seahorses, pipefishes have not received much attention. Here we document the differences in feeding click signals between three species of pipefishes and relate them to cranial morphology and kinesis, or the sound-producing mechanism. Methods. The feeding clicks of two species of freshwater pipefishes, Doryichthys martensii and Doryichthys deokhathoides and one species of estuarine pipefish, Syngnathoides biaculeatus, were recorded by a hydrophone in acoustic dampened tanks. The acoustic signals were analysed using time-scale distribution (or scalogram) based on wavelet transform. A detailed time-varying analysis of the spectral contents of the localized acoustic signal was obtained by jointly interpreting the oscillogram, scalogram and power spectrum. The heads of both Doryichthys species were prepared for microtomographical scans which were analysed using a 3D imaging software. Additionally, the cranial bones of all three species were examined using a clearing and double-staining method for histological studies. Results. The sound characteristics of the feeding click of the pipefish is species-specific, appearing to be dependent on three bones: the supraoccipital, 1st postcranial plate and 2nd postcranial plate. The sounds are generated when the head of the Dorichthyes pipefishes flexes backward during the feeding strike, as the supraoccipital slides backwards, striking and pushing the 1st postcranial plate against (and striking) the 2nd postcranial plate. In the Syngnathoides pipefish, in the absence of the 1st postcranial plate, the supraoccipital rubs

  15. Acoustic source separation for the detection of coronary artery sounds.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Daniel B; Roan, Michael J; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2011-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death in the United States, being responsible for more than 20% of all deaths in the country. This is in large part due to the difficulty of diagnostic screening for CAD. Phonoangiography seeks to detect CAD via the acoustic signature associated with turbulent flow near an abnormally constricted, or stenosed, region. However, the usefulness of the technique is severely hindered by the low strength of the CAD signal compared to the background noise within the chest. In this work, acoustic finite element analysis (FEA) was performed on physiologically accurate chest geometries to demonstrate the feasibility of an original acoustic source separation methodology for isolating coronary sounds. This approach is based upon pseudoinversion of mixing matrices determined through a combination of experiment and computation. This allows calculation of the sound emitted by the coronary arteries based upon measurements of the acoustic velocity on the chest surface. This work demonstrates the feasibility of such a technique computationally and examines the vulnerability of the proposed approach to measurement errors. PMID:22225070

  16. Transducer Development and Characterization for Underwater Acoustic Neutrino Detection Calibration.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, María; Llorens, Carlos D; Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    A short bipolar pressure pulse with "pancake" directivity is produced and propagated when an Ultra-High Energy (UHE) neutrino interacts with a nucleus in water. Nowadays, acoustic sensor networks are being deployed in deep seas to detect this phenomenon as a first step toward building a neutrino telescope. In order to study the feasibility of the method, it is critical to have a calibrator that is able to mimic the neutrino signature. In previous works the possibility of using the acoustic parametric technique for this aim was proven. In this study, the array is operated at a high frequency and, by means of the parametric effect, the emission of the low-frequency acoustic bipolar pulse is generated mimicking the UHE neutrino acoustic pulse. To this end, the development of the transducer to be used in the parametric array is described in all its phases. The transducer design process, the characterization tests for the bare piezoelectric ceramic, and the addition of backing and matching layers are presented. The efficiencies and directivity patterns obtained for both primary and parametric beams confirm that the design of the proposed calibrator meets all the requirements for the emitter.

  17. Transducer Development and Characterization for Underwater Acoustic Neutrino Detection Calibration.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, María; Llorens, Carlos D; Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    A short bipolar pressure pulse with "pancake" directivity is produced and propagated when an Ultra-High Energy (UHE) neutrino interacts with a nucleus in water. Nowadays, acoustic sensor networks are being deployed in deep seas to detect this phenomenon as a first step toward building a neutrino telescope. In order to study the feasibility of the method, it is critical to have a calibrator that is able to mimic the neutrino signature. In previous works the possibility of using the acoustic parametric technique for this aim was proven. In this study, the array is operated at a high frequency and, by means of the parametric effect, the emission of the low-frequency acoustic bipolar pulse is generated mimicking the UHE neutrino acoustic pulse. To this end, the development of the transducer to be used in the parametric array is described in all its phases. The transducer design process, the characterization tests for the bare piezoelectric ceramic, and the addition of backing and matching layers are presented. The efficiencies and directivity patterns obtained for both primary and parametric beams confirm that the design of the proposed calibrator meets all the requirements for the emitter. PMID:27490547

  18. Transducer Development and Characterization for Underwater Acoustic Neutrino Detection Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, María; Llorens, Carlos D.; Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    A short bipolar pressure pulse with “pancake” directivity is produced and propagated when an Ultra-High Energy (UHE) neutrino interacts with a nucleus in water. Nowadays, acoustic sensor networks are being deployed in deep seas to detect this phenomenon as a first step toward building a neutrino telescope. In order to study the feasibility of the method, it is critical to have a calibrator that is able to mimic the neutrino signature. In previous works the possibility of using the acoustic parametric technique for this aim was proven. In this study, the array is operated at a high frequency and, by means of the parametric effect, the emission of the low-frequency acoustic bipolar pulse is generated mimicking the UHE neutrino acoustic pulse. To this end, the development of the transducer to be used in the parametric array is described in all its phases. The transducer design process, the characterization tests for the bare piezoelectric ceramic, and the addition of backing and matching layers are presented. The efficiencies and directivity patterns obtained for both primary and parametric beams confirm that the design of the proposed calibrator meets all the requirements for the emitter. PMID:27490547

  19. Evolutionary Signatures of River Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, K.

    2014-12-01

    River networks exhibit fractal characteristics and it has long been wondered how such regular patterns have been formed. This subject has been actively investigated mainly by two great schools of thoughts, i.e., chance and organization. Along this line, several fundamental questions have partially been addressed or remained. They include whether river networks pursue certain optimal conditions, and if so what is the ultimate optimality signature. Hydrologists have traditionally perceived this issue from fluvial-oriented perspectives. Nevertheless, geological processes can be more dominant in the formation of river networks in reality. To shed new lights on this subject, it is necessary to better understand complex feedbacks between various processes over different time scales, and eventually the emerging characteristic signature. Here, I will present highlights of earlier studies on this line and some noteworthy approaches being tried recently.

  20. Signatures of topological Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yang; Pientka, Falko; Berg, Erez; Oreg, Yuval; von Oppen, Felix

    2016-08-01

    Quasiparticle poisoning and diabatic transitions may significantly narrow the window for the experimental observation of the 4 π -periodic dc Josephson effect predicted for topological Josephson junctions. Here, we show that switching-current measurements provide accessible and robust signatures for topological superconductivity which persist in the presence of quasiparticle poisoning processes. Such measurements provide access to the phase-dependent subgap spectrum and Josephson currents of the topological junction when incorporating it into an asymmetric SQUID together with a conventional Josephson junction with large critical current. We also argue that pump-probe experiments with multiple current pulses can be used to measure the quasiparticle poisoning rates of the topological junction. The proposed signatures are particularly robust, even in the presence of Zeeman fields and spin-orbit coupling, when focusing on short Josephson junctions. Finally, we also consider microwave excitations of short topological Josephson junctions which may complement switching-current measurements.

  1. Signatures of a Shadow Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Paul C. W.; Benner, Steven A.; Cleland, Carol E.; Lineweaver, Charles H.; McKay, Christopher P.; Wolfe-Simon, Felisa

    2009-03-01

    Astrobiologists are aware that extraterrestrial life might differ from known life, and considerable thought has been given to possible signatures associated with weird forms of life on other planets. So far, however, very little attention has been paid to the possibility that our own planet might also host communities of weird life. If life arises readily in Earth-like conditions, as many astrobiologists contend, then it may well have formed many times on Earth itself, which raises the question whether one or more shadow biospheres have existed in the past or still exist today. In this paper, we discuss possible signatures of weird life and outline some simple strategies for seeking evidence of a shadow biosphere.

  2. Signatures of a shadow biosphere.

    PubMed

    Davies, Paul C W; Benner, Steven A; Cleland, Carol E; Lineweaver, Charles H; McKay, Christopher P; Wolfe-Simon, Felisa

    2009-03-01

    Astrobiologists are aware that extraterrestrial life might differ from known life, and considerable thought has been given to possible signatures associated with weird forms of life on other planets. So far, however, very little attention has been paid to the possibility that our own planet might also host communities of weird life. If life arises readily in Earth-like conditions, as many astrobiologists contend, then it may well have formed many times on Earth itself, which raises the question whether one or more shadow biospheres have existed in the past or still exist today. In this paper, we discuss possible signatures of weird life and outline some simple strategies for seeking evidence of a shadow biosphere. PMID:19292603

  3. Polarization signatures of airborne particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Prashant; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2013-07-01

    Exploratory research has been conducted with the aim of completely determining the polarization signatures of selected particulates as a function of wavelength. This may lead to a better understanding of the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and such materials, perhaps leading to the point detection of bio-aerosols present in the atmosphere. To this end, a polarimeter capable of measuring the complete Mueller matrix of highly scattering samples in transmission and reflection (with good spectral resolution from 300 to 1100 nm) has been developed. The polarization properties of Bacillus subtilis (surrogate for anthrax spore) are compared to ambient particulate matter species such as pollen, dust, and soot. Differentiating features in the polarization signatures of these samples have been identified, thus demonstrating the potential applicability of this technique for the detection of bio-aerosol in the ambient atmosphere.

  4. Education in acoustics in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyara, Federico

    2002-11-01

    Over the last decades, education in acoustics (EA) in Argentina has experienced ups and downs due to economic and political issues interfering with long term projects. Unlike other countries, like Chile, where EA has reached maturity in spite of the acoustical industry having shown little development, Argentina has several well-established manufacturers of acoustic materials and equipment but no specific career with a major in acoustics. At the university level, acoustics is taught as a complementary--often elective--course for careers such as architecture, communication engineering, or music. In spite of this there are several research centers with programs covering environmental and community noise, effects of noise on man, acoustic signal processing, musical acoustics and acoustic emission, and several national and international meetings are held each year in which results are communicated and discussed. Several books on a variety of topics such as sound system, architectural acoustics, and noise control have been published as well. Another chapter in EA is technical and vocational education, ranging between secondary and postsecondary levels, with technical training on sound system operation or design. Over the last years there have been several attempts to implement master degrees in acoustics or audio engineering, with little or no success.

  5. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Mei, Jun; Aljahdali, Rasha

    We design a type of acoustic metasurface, which is composed of carefully designed slits in a rigid thin plate. The effective refractive indices of different slits are different but the impedances are kept the same as that of the host medium. Numerical simulations show that such a metasurface can redirect or reflect a normally incident wave at different frequencies, even though it is impedance matched to the host medium. We show that the underlying mechanisms can be understood by using the generalized Snell's law, and a unified analytic model based on mode-coupling theory. We demonstrate some simple realization of such acoustic metasurface with real materials. The principle is also extended to the design of planar acoustic lens which can focus acoustic waves. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces.

  6. Acoustic energy harvesting based on a planar acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuibao; Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically report on an innovative and practical acoustic energy harvester based on a defected acoustic metamaterial (AMM) with piezoelectric material. The idea is to create suitable resonant defects in an AMM to confine the strain energy originating from an acoustic incidence. This scavenged energy is converted into electrical energy by attaching a structured piezoelectric material into the defect area of the AMM. We show an acoustic energy harvester based on a meta-structure capable of producing electrical power from an acoustic pressure. Numerical simulations are provided to analyze and elucidate the principles and the performances of the proposed system. A maximum output voltage of 1.3 V and a power density of 0.54 μW/cm3 are obtained at a frequency of 2257.5 Hz. The proposed concept should have broad applications on energy harvesting as well as on low-frequency sound isolation, since this system acts as both acoustic insulator and energy harvester.

  7. R&D 100 Winner 2010: Acoustic Wave Biosensors

    ScienceCinema

    Larson, Richard; Branch, Darren; Edwards, Thayne

    2016-07-12

    The acoustic wave biosensor is innovative device that is a handheld, battery-powered, portable detection system capable of multiplex identification of a wide range of medically relevant pathogens and their biomolecular signatures — viruses, bacteria, proteins, and DNA — at clinically relevant levels. This detection occurs within minutes — not hours — at the point of care, whether that care is in a physician's office, a hospital bed, or at the scene of a biodefense or biomedical emergency.

  8. Nonlinear control of magnetic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemoczynski, Bogdan

    Magnetic properties of ferrite structures are known to cause fluctuations in Earth's magnetic field around the object. These fluctuations are known as the object's magnetic signature and are unique based on the object's geometry and material. It is a common practice to neutralize magnetic signatures periodically after certain time intervals, however there is a growing interest to develop real time degaussing systems for various applications. Development of real time degaussing system is a challenging problem because of magnetic hysteresis and difficulties in measurement or estimation of near-field flux data. The goal of this research is to develop a real time feedback control system that can be used to minimize magnetic signatures for ferrite structures. Experimental work on controlling the magnetic signature of a cylindrical steel shell structure with a magnetic disturbance provided evidence that the control process substantially increased the interior magnetic flux. This means near field estimation using interior sensor data is likely to be inaccurate. Follow up numerical work for rectangular and cylindrical cross sections investigated variations in shell wall flux density under a variety of ambient excitation and applied disturbances. Results showed magnetic disturbances could corrupt interior sensor data and magnetic shielding due to the shell walls makes the interior very sensitive to noise. The magnetic flux inside the shell wall showed little variation due to inner disturbances and its high base value makes it less susceptible to noise. This research proceeds to describe a nonlinear controller to use the shell wall data as an input. A nonlinear plant model of magnetics is developed using a constant tau to represent domain rotation lag and a gain function k to describe the magnetic hysteresis curve for the shell wall. The model is justified by producing hysteresis curves for multiple materials, matching experimental data using a particle swarm algorithm, and

  9. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  10. Radiosurgery of acoustic neurinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Flickinger, J.C.; Lunsford, L.D.; Coffey, R.J.; Linskey, M.E.; Bissonette, D.J.; Maitz, A.H.; Kondziolka, D. )

    1991-01-15

    Eighty-five patients with acoustic neurinomas underwent stereotactic radiosurgery with the gamma unit at the University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA) during its first 30 months of operation. Neuroimaging studies performed in 40 patients with more than 1 year follow-up showed that tumors were smaller in 22 (55%), unchanged in 17 (43%), and larger in one (2%). The 2-year actuarial rates for preservation of useful hearing and any hearing were 46% and 62%, respectively. Previously undetected neuropathies of the trigeminal (n = 12) and facial nerves (n = 14) occurred 1 week to 1 year after radiosurgery (median, 7 and 6 months, respectively), and improved at median intervals of 13 and 8 months, respectively, after onset. Hearing loss was significantly associated with increasing average tumor diameter (P = 0.04). No deterioration of any cranial nerve function has yet developed in seven patients with average tumor diameters less than 10 mm. Radiosurgery is an important treatment alternative for selected acoustic neurinoma patients.

  11. A Martian acoustic anemometer.

    PubMed

    Banfield, Don; Schindel, David W; Tarr, Steve; Dissly, Richard W

    2016-08-01

    An acoustic anemometer for use on Mars has been developed. To understand the processes that control the interaction between surface and atmosphere on Mars, not only the mean winds, but also the turbulent boundary layer, the fluxes of momentum, heat and molecular constituents between surface and atmosphere must be measured. Terrestrially this is done with acoustic anemometers, but the low density atmosphere on Mars makes it challenging to adapt such an instrument for use on Mars. This has been achieved using capacitive transducers and pulse compression, and was successfully demonstrated on a stratospheric balloon (simulating the Martian environment) and in a dedicated Mars Wind Tunnel facility. This instrument achieves a measurement accuracy of ∼5 cm/s with an update rate of >20 Hz under Martian conditions. PMID:27586767

  12. Acoustic tractor beam.

    PubMed

    Démoré, Christine E M; Dahl, Patrick M; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P; Spalding, Gabriel C

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system. PMID:24836252

  13. Acoustic Tractor Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démoré, Christine E. M.; Dahl, Patrick M.; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P.; Spalding, Gabriel C.

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system.

  14. Acoustics Discipline Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane; Thomas, Russell

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Annual Review, a summary of the progress made in 2007 in acoustics research under the Subsonic Fixed Wing project is given. The presentation describes highlights from in-house and external activities including partnerships and NRA-funded research with industry and academia. Brief progress reports from all acoustics Phase 1 NRAs are also included as are outlines of the planned activities for 2008 and all Phase 2 NRAs. N+1 and N+2 technology paths outlined for Subsonic Fixed Wing noise targets. NRA Round 1 progressing with focus on prediction method advancement. NRA Round 2 initiating work focused on N+2 technology, prediction methods, and validation. Excellent partnerships in progress supporting N+1 technology targets and providing key data sets.

  15. Acoustic methodology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    It is important for industry and NASA to assess the status of acoustic design technology for predicting and controlling helicopter external noise in order for a meaningful research program to be formulated which will address this problem. The prediction methodologies available to the designer and the acoustic engineer are three-fold. First is what has been described as a first principle analysis. This analysis approach attempts to remove any empiricism from the analysis process and deals with a theoretical mechanism approach to predicting the noise. The second approach attempts to combine first principle methodology (when available) with empirical data to formulate source predictors which can be combined to predict vehicle levels. The third is an empirical analysis, which attempts to generalize measured trends into a vehicle noise prediction method. This paper will briefly address each.

  16. Microbial Lifestyle and Genome Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Chitra; Paul, Sandip

    2012-01-01

    Microbes are known for their unique ability to adapt to varying lifestyle and environment, even to the extreme or adverse ones. The genomic architecture of a microbe may bear the signatures not only of its phylogenetic position, but also of the kind of lifestyle to which it is adapted. The present review aims to provide an account of the specific genome signatures observed in microbes acclimatized to distinct lifestyles or ecological niches. Niche-specific signatures identified at different levels of microbial genome organization like base composition, GC-skew, purine-pyrimidine ratio, dinucleotide abundance, codon bias, oligonucleotide composition etc. have been discussed. Among the specific cases highlighted in the review are the phenomena of genome shrinkage in obligatory host-restricted microbes, genome expansion in strictly intra-amoebal pathogens, strand-specific codon usage in intracellular species, acquisition of genome islands in pathogenic or symbiotic organisms, discriminatory genomic traits of marine microbes with distinct trophic strategies, and conspicuous sequence features of certain extremophiles like those adapted to high temperature or high salinity. PMID:23024607

  17. Selection signatures in Shetland ponies.

    PubMed

    Frischknecht, M; Flury, C; Leeb, T; Rieder, S; Neuditschko, M

    2016-06-01

    Shetland ponies were selected for numerous traits including small stature, strength, hardiness and longevity. Despite the different selection criteria, Shetland ponies are well known for their small stature. We performed a selection signature analysis including genome-wide SNPs of 75 Shetland ponies and 76 large-sized horses. Based upon this dataset, we identified a selection signature on equine chromosome (ECA) 1 between 103.8 Mb and 108.5 Mb. A total of 33 annotated genes are located within this interval including the IGF1R gene at 104.2 Mb and the ADAMTS17 gene at 105.4 Mb. These two genes are well known to have a major impact on body height in numerous species including humans. Homozygosity mapping in the Shetland ponies identified a region with increased homozygosity between 107.4 Mb and 108.5 Mb. None of the annotated genes in this region have so far been associated with height. Thus, we cannot exclude the possibility that the identified selection signature on ECA1 is associated with some trait other than height, for which Shetland ponies were selected. PMID:26857482

  18. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  19. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    1999-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported are a synopsis of the work and accomplishments reported by the Division during the 1996 calendar year. A bibliography containing 42 citations is provided.

  20. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    2001-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of the NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included in this report are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported is a synopsis of the work and accomplishments completed by the Division during the 1997, 1998, and 1999 calendar years. A bibliography containing 93 citations is provided.

  1. Comparison of MMW ground vehicle signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, Ph. D., Annie V.; Kissell, Ann

    2006-05-01

    A continuing question asked of MMW target signature and model providers is the applicability of data from one frequency band to another. Recent monopulse Ka-band ground target signature measurements made by US Army programs provide an opportunity to do an in-depth comparison of signatures of several ground vehicles. The vehicles measured correspond to those measured at W-band by another Army program. This paper provides a comparison of vehicle signatures produced by models derived by AMRDEC from the measurements. The results have implications for missile programs that do not have an extensive measurement budget but require target signatures and models for algorithm development.

  2. Acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William B.

    1988-01-01

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in geological formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth3 s magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation . The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be preformed in open boreholes and in cased well bores.

  3. Fast wideband acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Hald, Jørgen

    2016-04-01

    Patch near-field acoustical holography methods like statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography and equivalent source method are limited to relatively low frequencies, where the average array-element spacing is less than half of the acoustic wavelength, while beamforming provides useful resolution only at medium-to-high frequencies. With adequate array design, both methods can be used with the same array. But for holography to provide good low-frequency resolution, a small measurement distance is needed, whereas beamforming requires a larger distance to limit sidelobe issues. The wideband holography method of the present paper was developed to overcome that practical conflict. Only a single measurement is needed at a relatively short distance and a single result is obtained covering the full frequency range. The method uses the principles of compressed sensing: A sparse sound field representation is assumed with a chosen set of basis functions, a measurement is taken with an irregular array, and the inverse problem is solved with a method that enforces sparsity in the coefficient vector. Instead of using regularization based on the 1-norm of the coefficient vector, an iterative solution procedure is used that promotes sparsity. The iterative method is shown to provide very similar results in most cases and to be computationally much more efficient. PMID:27106299

  4. Virtual acoustic prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marty

    2003-10-01

    In this paper the re-creation of 3-D sound fields so the full psycho-acoustic impact of sound sources can be assessed before the manufacture of a product or environment is examined. Using head related transfer functions (HRTFs) coupled with a head tracked set of headphones the sound field at the left and right ears of a listener can be re-created for a set of sound sources. However, the HRTFs require that sources have a defined location and this is not the typical output from numerical codes which describe the sound field as a set of distributed modes. In this paper a method of creating a set of equivalent sources is described such that the standard set of HRTFs can be applied in real time. A structural-acoustic model of a cylinder driving an enclosed acoustic field will be used as an example. It will be shown that equivalent sources can be used to recreate all of the reverberation of the enclosed space. An efficient singular value decomposition technique allows the large number of sources required to be simulated in real time. An introduction to the requirements necessary for 3-D virtual prototyping using high frequency Statistical Energy Analysis models will be presented. [Work supported by AuSim and NASA.

  5. Acoustics, computers and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truchard, James J.

    2003-10-01

    The human ear has created a high standard for the requirements of acoustical measurements. The transient nature of most acoustical signals has limited the success of traditional volt meters. Professor Hixson's pioneering work in electroacoustical measurements at ARL and The University of Texas helped set the stage for modern computer-based measurements. The tremendous performance of modern PCs and extensive libraries of signal processing functions in virtual instrumentation application software has revolutionized the way acoustical measurements are made. Today's analog to digital converters have up to 24 bits of resolution with a dynamic range of over 120 dB and a single PC processor can process 112 channels of FFTs at 4 kHz in real time. Wavelet technology further extends the capabilities for analyzing transients. The tools available for measurements in speech, electroacoustics, noise, and vibration represent some of the most advanced measurement tools available. During the last 50 years, Professor Hixson has helped drive this revolution from simple oscilloscope measurements to the modern high performance computer-based measurements.

  6. Numerical solution of acoustic response due to hydro/aerodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roknaldin, Farzam

    In this work, a new methodology has been proposed which determines the acoustic response due to interaction of unsteady hydro/aero-dynamic sources with rigid/flexible structures. This methodology is based on Lighthill's acoustic analogy in which acoustic sources are pre-determined from unsteady flow calculations. The key feature of this methodology is the numerical solution of the acoustic problem. For this purpose, a new variational formulation of Lighthill's acoustic analogy has been developed which can be solved using the finite element method. This enables the true geometry of the structure and acoustically non-compact sources to be considered with relative ease. The feasibility of the approach has been investigated by studying the trailing-edge noise of the Eppler 387 airfoil due to a single quadrupole source, and the noise due to vortices shed from the NACA 0018 airfoil. In both cases the results are compared with analytical solutions that are available for certain limits. As an application to a practical problem, this methodology is used to compute the acoustic signature due to the boundary layer/wake turbulence over and behind the Eppler 387 wing at a cruise condition. Turbulent sources were obtained via Large Eddy Simulation, over an infinite span wing, using an unstructured grid finite element method in conjunction with the Dynamic Smagorinsky subgrid model. For this problem, sufficient numbers of grid points were used to resolve the wall layer. Flow separation, transition and turbulent reattachment were all captured and compared with the experimental data available from other sources. Finally, the acoustic problem is solved to obtain directivity patterns of acoustic pressures. The analysis indicates the importance of both wing geometry and the extent of acoustic sources on directivity.

  7. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Jonas T; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems, the theory predicts a relocation of the inhomogeneities into stable field-dependent configurations, which are qualitatively different from the horizontally layered configurations due to gravity. Experimental validation is obtained by confocal imaging of aqueous solutions in a glass-silicon microchip. PMID:27661695

  8. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Jonas T; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems, the theory predicts a relocation of the inhomogeneities into stable field-dependent configurations, which are qualitatively different from the horizontally layered configurations due to gravity. Experimental validation is obtained by confocal imaging of aqueous solutions in a glass-silicon microchip.

  9. The electro-acoustic transition process of pulsed corona discharge in conductive water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yifan; Yan, Hui; Wang, Bingzhe; Zhang, Xuming; Liu, Zhen; Yan, Keping

    2014-06-01

    A pulsed corona discharge in conductive water is studied theoretically and experimentally via pre-discharge analysis, thermodynamic and dynamic processes of a plasma-containing bubble, an acoustic signature and energy partitioning. The total particle density and electron density inside the bubble, internal temperature and pressure, bubble radius and bubble wall Mach number are simulated by solving a set of equations including the ideal gas equation, Rayleigh equation and energy balance equation. The bubble radius is also measured by a high-speed charge-coupled device camera on a homemade experimental device. The acoustic waveforms and their power spectral density are calculated indirectly. By using several diagnostic tools, the electrical parameters of the load, light emission from the plasma and acoustic waveforms are recorded simultaneously. Simulation and experimental results of the bubble radius and acoustic signature agree reasonably well over the range of energy inputs from 5 to 30 J per pulse. Different kinds of terminations or intermediates of the energy transition process are analysed through simulation and experimental data. The electro-acoustic efficiency varies from 0.8% to 1.9%, while most of the discharge energy is consumed by circuit loss, Joule heating and thermal radiation, or is transformed into kinetic energy in the water.

  10. Formal Definition and Construction of Nominative Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dennis Y. W.; Wong, Duncan S.; Huang, Xinyi; Wang, Guilin; Huang, Qiong; Mu, Yi; Susilo, Willy

    Since the introduction of nominative signature in 1996, there are three problems that have still not been solved. First, there is no convincing application proposed; second, there is no formal security model available; and third, there is no proven secure scheme constructed, given that all the previous schemes have already been found flawed. In this paper, we give positive answers to these problems. First, we illustrate that nominative signature is a better tool for building user certification systems which were originally implemented using universal designated-verifier signature. Second, we propose a formal definition and adversarial model for nominative signature. Third, we show that Chaum's undeniable signature can be transformed to an efficient nominative signature by simply using a standard signature. The security of our transformation can be proven under the standard number-theoretic assumption.

  11. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  12. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  13. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, S. Reynold; Allen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles. The use of such a model will help ensure compliance with acoustic requirements. Also, this project includes modeling validation and development feedback via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements to compare with the predictions.

  14. Wideband acoustic activation and detection of droplet vaporization events using a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer.

    PubMed

    Novell, Anthony; Arena, Christopher B; Oralkan, Omer; Dayton, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    An ongoing challenge exists in understanding and optimizing the acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) process to enhance contrast agent effectiveness for biomedical applications. Acoustic signatures from vaporization events can be identified and differentiated from microbubble or tissue signals based on their frequency content. The present study exploited the wide bandwidth of a 128-element capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array for activation (8 MHz) and real-time imaging (1 MHz) of ADV events from droplets circulating in a tube. Compared to a commercial piezoelectric probe, the CMUT array provides a substantial increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio. PMID:27369143

  15. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  16. Transition section for acoustic waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, H.H.B.

    1975-10-28

    A means of facilitating the transmission of acoustic waves with minimal reflection between two regions having different specific acoustic impedances is described comprising a region exhibiting a constant product of cross-sectional area and specific acoustic impedance at each cross-sectional plane along the axis of the transition region. A variety of structures that exhibit this feature is disclosed, the preferred embodiment comprising a nested structure of doubly reentrant cones. This structure is useful for monitoring the operation of nuclear reactors in which random acoustic signals are generated in the course of operation.

  17. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  18. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Lift-Off Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janie D.

    2011-01-01

    The lift-off acoustic (LOA) environment is an important design factor for any launch vehicle. For the Ares I vehicle, the LOA environments were derived by scaling flight data from other launch vehicles. The Ares I LOA predicted environments are compared to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) preliminary results.

  19. Genetic signatures of heroin addiction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Ding-Lieh; Shen, Tsu-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Chen, Kuang-Chi; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Heroin addiction is a complex psychiatric disorder with a chronic course and a high relapse rate, which results from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Heroin addiction has a substantial heritability in its etiology; hence, identification of individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction may help prevent the occurrence and relapse of heroin addiction and its complications. The study aimed to identify a small set of genetic signatures that may reliably predict the individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction. We first measured the transcript level of 13 genes (RASA1, PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CD74, CEBPB, AUTS2, ENO2, IMPDH2, HAT1, MBD1, and RGS3) in lymphoblastoid cell lines in a sample of 124 male heroin addicts and 124 male control subjects using real-time quantitative PCR. Seven genes (PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CEBPB, ENO2, and HAT1) showed significant differential expression between the 2 groups. Further analysis using 3 statistical methods including logistic regression analysis, support vector machine learning analysis, and a computer software BIASLESS revealed that a set of 4 genes (JUN, CEBPB, PRKCB, ENO2, or CEBPG) could predict the diagnosis of heroin addiction with the accuracy rate around 85% in our dataset. Our findings support the idea that it is possible to identify genetic signatures of heroin addiction using a small set of expressed genes. However, the study can only be considered as a proof-of-concept study. As the establishment of lymphoblastoid cell line is a laborious and lengthy process, it would be more practical in clinical settings to identify genetic signatures for heroin addiction directly from peripheral blood cells in the future study. PMID:27495086

  20. Genetic signatures of heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Ding-Lieh; Shen, Tsu-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Chen, Kuang-Chi; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-08-01

    Heroin addiction is a complex psychiatric disorder with a chronic course and a high relapse rate, which results from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Heroin addiction has a substantial heritability in its etiology; hence, identification of individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction may help prevent the occurrence and relapse of heroin addiction and its complications. The study aimed to identify a small set of genetic signatures that may reliably predict the individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction. We first measured the transcript level of 13 genes (RASA1, PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CD74, CEBPB, AUTS2, ENO2, IMPDH2, HAT1, MBD1, and RGS3) in lymphoblastoid cell lines in a sample of 124 male heroin addicts and 124 male control subjects using real-time quantitative PCR. Seven genes (PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CEBPB, ENO2, and HAT1) showed significant differential expression between the 2 groups. Further analysis using 3 statistical methods including logistic regression analysis, support vector machine learning analysis, and a computer software BIASLESS revealed that a set of 4 genes (JUN, CEBPB, PRKCB, ENO2, or CEBPG) could predict the diagnosis of heroin addiction with the accuracy rate around 85% in our dataset. Our findings support the idea that it is possible to identify genetic signatures of heroin addiction using a small set of expressed genes. However, the study can only be considered as a proof-of-concept study. As the establishment of lymphoblastoid cell line is a laborious and lengthy process, it would be more practical in clinical settings to identify genetic signatures for heroin addiction directly from peripheral blood cells in the future study. PMID:27495086

  1. Gut microbiota signatures of longevity.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanli; Hua, Yutong; Zeng, Bo; Ning, Ruihong; Li, Ying; Zhao, Jiangchao

    2016-09-26

    An aging global population poses substantial challenges to society [1]. Centenarians are a model for healthy aging because they have reached the extreme limit of life by escaping, surviving, or delaying chronic diseases [2]. The genetics of centenarians have been extensively examined [3], but less is known about their gut microbiotas. Recently, Biagi et al.[4] characterized the gut microbiota in Italian centenarians and semi-supercentenarians. Here, we compare the gut microbiota of Chinese long-living people with younger age groups, and with the results from the Italian population [4], to identify gut-microbial signatures of healthy aging. PMID:27676296

  2. Quantum signatures of chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastidas, V. M.; Omelchenko, I.; Zakharova, A.; Schöll, E.; Brandes, T.

    2015-12-01

    Chimera states are complex spatiotemporal patterns in networks of identical oscillators, characterized by the coexistence of synchronized and desynchronized dynamics. Here we propose to extend the phenomenon of chimera states to the quantum regime, and uncover intriguing quantum signatures of these states. We calculate the quantum fluctuations about semiclassical trajectories and demonstrate that chimera states in the quantum regime can be characterized by bosonic squeezing, weighted quantum correlations, and measures of mutual information. Our findings reveal the relation of chimera states to quantum information theory, and give promising directions for experimental realization of chimera states in quantum systems.

  3. Spectroscopic signature for ferroelectric ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, Marek J.; Gług, Maciej; Boczar, Marek; Boda, Łukasz

    2014-09-01

    Various forms of ice exist within our galaxy. Particularly intriguing type of ice - ‘ferroelectric ice' was discovered experimentally and is stable in temperatures below 72 K. This form of ice can generate enormous electric fields and can play an important role in planetary formation. In this letter we present Car-Parrinello simulation of infrared spectra of ferroelectric ice and compare them with spectra of hexagonal ice. Librational region of the spectra can be treated as spectroscopic signature of ice XI and can be of help to identify ferroelectric ice in the Universe.

  4. Quantum signatures of chimera states.

    PubMed

    Bastidas, V M; Omelchenko, I; Zakharova, A; Schöll, E; Brandes, T

    2015-12-01

    Chimera states are complex spatiotemporal patterns in networks of identical oscillators, characterized by the coexistence of synchronized and desynchronized dynamics. Here we propose to extend the phenomenon of chimera states to the quantum regime, and uncover intriguing quantum signatures of these states. We calculate the quantum fluctuations about semiclassical trajectories and demonstrate that chimera states in the quantum regime can be characterized by bosonic squeezing, weighted quantum correlations, and measures of mutual information. Our findings reveal the relation of chimera states to quantum information theory, and give promising directions for experimental realization of chimera states in quantum systems.

  5. Acoustic Mechanical Feedthroughs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  6. Frequency steerable acoustic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesi, Matteo

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an active research area devoted to the assessment of the structural integrity of critical components of aerospace, civil and mechanical systems. Guided wave methods have been proposed for SHM of plate-like structures using permanently attached piezoelectric transducers, which generate and sense waves to evaluate the presence of damage. Effective interrogation of structural health is often facilitated by sensors and actuators with the ability to perform electronic, i.e. phased array, scanning. The objective of this research is to design an innovative directional piezoelectric transducer to be employed for the localization of broadband acoustic events, or for the generation of Lamb waves for active interrogation of structural health. The proposed Frequency Steerable Acoustic Transducers (FSATs) are characterized by a spatial arrangement of active material which leads to directional characteristics varying with frequency. Thus FSATs can be employed both for directional sensing and generation of guided waves without relying on phasing and control of a large number of channels. The analytical expression of the shape of the FSATs is obtained through a theoretical formulation for continuously distributed active material as part of a shaped piezoelectric device. The FSAT configurations analyzed in this work are a quadrilateral array and a geometry which corresponds to a spiral in the wavenumber domain. The quadrilateral array is experimentally validated, confirming the concept of frequency-dependent directionality. Its limited directivity is improved by the Wavenumber Spiral FSAT (WS-FSAT), which, instead, is characterized by a continuous frequency dependent directionality. Preliminary validations of the WS-FSAT, using a laser doppler vibrometer, are followed by the implementation of the WS-FSAT as a properly shaped piezo transducer. The prototype is first used for localization of acoustic broadband sources. Signal processing

  7. Quantum broadcasting multiple blind signature with constant size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Min; Li, Zhenli

    2016-09-01

    Using quantum homomorphic signature in quantum network, we propose a quantum broadcasting multiple blind signature scheme. Different from classical signature and current quantum signature schemes, the multi-signature proposed in our scheme is not generated by simply putting the individual signatures together, but by aggregating the individual signatures based on homomorphic property. Therefore, the size of the multi-signature is constant. Furthermore, based on a wide range of investigation for the security of existing quantum signature protocols, our protocol is designed to resist possible forgery attacks against signature and message from the various attack sources and disavowal attacks from participants.

  8. Quantum broadcasting multiple blind signature with constant size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Min; Li, Zhenli

    2016-06-01

    Using quantum homomorphic signature in quantum network, we propose a quantum broadcasting multiple blind signature scheme. Different from classical signature and current quantum signature schemes, the multi-signature proposed in our scheme is not generated by simply putting the individual signatures together, but by aggregating the individual signatures based on homomorphic property. Therefore, the size of the multi-signature is constant. Furthermore, based on a wide range of investigation for the security of existing quantum signature protocols, our protocol is designed to resist possible forgery attacks against signature and message from the various attack sources and disavowal attacks from participants.

  9. The acoustics of snoring.

    PubMed

    Pevernagie, Dirk; Aarts, Ronald M; De Meyer, Micheline

    2010-04-01

    Snoring is a prevalent disorder affecting 20-40% of the general population. The mechanism of snoring is vibration of anatomical structures in the pharyngeal airway. Flutter of the soft palate accounts for the harsh aspect of the snoring sound. Natural or drug-induced sleep is required for its appearance. Snoring is subject to many influences such as body position, sleep stage, route of breathing and the presence or absence of sleep-disordered breathing. Its presentation may be variable within or between nights. While snoring is generally perceived as a social nuisance, rating of its noisiness is subjective and, therefore, inconsistent. Objective assessment of snoring is important to evaluate the effect of treatment interventions. Moreover, snoring carries information relating to the site and degree of obstruction of the upper airway. If evidence for monolevel snoring at the site of the soft palate is provided, the patient may benefit from palatal surgery. These considerations have inspired researchers to scrutinize the acoustic characteristics of snoring events. Similarly to speech, snoring is produced in the vocal tract. Because of this analogy, existing techniques for speech analysis have been applied to evaluate snoring sounds. It appears that the pitch of the snoring sound is in the low-frequency range (<500 Hz) and corresponds to a fundamental frequency with associated harmonics. The pitch of snoring is determined by vibration of the soft palate, while nonpalatal snoring is more 'noise-like', and has scattered energy content in the higher spectral sub-bands (>500 Hz). To evaluate acoustic properties of snoring, sleep nasendoscopy is often performed. Recent evidence suggests that the acoustic quality of snoring is markedly different in drug-induced sleep as compared with natural sleep. Most often, palatal surgery alters sound characteristics of snoring, but is no cure for this disorder. It is uncertain whether the perceived improvement after palatal surgery, as

  10. Dynamic acoustic tractor beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-03-01

    Pulling a sphere and vibrating it around an equilibrium position by amplitude-modulation in the near-field of a single finite circular piston transducer is theoretically demonstrated. Conditions are found where a fluid hexane sphere (with arbitrary radius) chosen as an example, centered on the axis of progressive propagating waves and submerged in non-viscous water, experiences an attractive (steady) force pulling it towards the transducer, as well as an oscillatory force forcing it to vibrate back-and-forth. Numerical predictions for the dynamic force illustrate the theory and suggest an innovative method in designing dynamic acoustical tractor beams.

  11. Coffee roasting acoustics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Preston S

    2014-06-01

    Cracking sounds emitted by coffee beans during the roasting process were recorded and analyzed to investigate the potential of using the sounds as the basis for an automated roast monitoring technique. Three parameters were found that could be exploited. Near the end of the roasting process, sounds known as "first crack" exhibit a higher acoustic amplitude than sounds emitted later, known as "second crack." First crack emits more low frequency energy than second crack. Finally, the rate of cracks appearing in the second crack chorus is higher than the rate in the first crack chorus.

  12. Numerical predictions in acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.

    1992-01-01

    Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) involves the calculation of the sound produced by a flow as well as the underlying flowfield itself from first principles. This paper describes the numerical challenges of CAA and recent research efforts to overcome these challenges. In addition, it includes the benefits of CAA in removing restrictions of linearity, single frequency, constant parameters, low Mach numbers, etc. found in standard acoustic analyses as well as means for evaluating the validity of these numerical approaches. Finally, numerous applications of CAA to both classical as well as modern problems of concern to the aerospace industry are presented.

  13. Wind turbine acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1990-01-01

    Available information on the physical characteristics of the noise generated by wind turbines is summarized, with example sound pressure time histories, narrow- and broadband frequency spectra, and noise radiation patterns. Reviewed are noise measurement standards, analysis technology, and a method of characterizing wind turbine noise. Prediction methods are given for both low-frequency rotational harmonics and broadband noise components. Also included are atmospheric propagation data showing the effects of distance and refraction by wind shear. Human perception thresholds, based on laboratory and field tests, are given. Building vibration analysis methods are summarized. The bibliography of this report lists technical publications on all aspects of wind turbine acoustics.

  14. Quantum positron acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Metref, Hassina; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear quantum positron-acoustic (QPA) waves are investigated for the first time, within the theoretical framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model. In the small but finite amplitude limit, both deformed Korteweg-de Vries and generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations governing, respectively, the dynamics of QPA solitary waves and double-layers are derived. Moreover, a full finite amplitude analysis is undertaken, and a numerical integration of the obtained highly nonlinear equations is carried out. The results complement our previously published results on this problem.

  15. Standoff photo acoustic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Van Neste, Charles W; Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George

    2008-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate a variation of photoacoustic spectroscopy that can be used for obtaining spectroscopic information of surface adsorbed chemicals in a standoff fashion. Pulsed light scattered from a target excites an acoustic resonator and the variation of the resonance amplitude as a function of illumination wavelength yields a representation of the absorption spectrum of the target. We report sensitive and selective detection of surface adsorbed compounds such as tributyl phosphate and residues of explosives such as trinitrotoluene at standoff distances ranging from 0.5-20 m, with a detection limit on the order of 100 ng/cm{sup 2}.

  16. Dynamic acoustic tractor beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-03-07

    Pulling a sphere and vibrating it around an equilibrium position by amplitude-modulation in the near-field of a single finite circular piston transducer is theoretically demonstrated. Conditions are found where a fluid hexane sphere (with arbitrary radius) chosen as an example, centered on the axis of progressive propagating waves and submerged in non-viscous water, experiences an attractive (steady) force pulling it towards the transducer, as well as an oscillatory force forcing it to vibrate back-and-forth. Numerical predictions for the dynamic force illustrate the theory and suggest an innovative method in designing dynamic acoustical tractor beams.

  17. Numerical predictions in acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, Jay C.

    Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) involves the calculation of the sound produced by a flow as well as the underlying flowfield itself from first principles. This paper describes the numerical challenges of CAA and recent research efforts to overcome these challenges. In addition, it includes the benefits of CAA in removing restrictions of linearity, single frequency, constant parameters, low Mach numbers, etc. found in standard acoustic analyses as well as means for evaluating the validity of these numerical approaches. Finally, numerous applications of CAA to both classical as well as modern problems of concern to the aerospace industry are presented.

  18. Characterizing phantom arteries with multi-channel laser ultrasonics and photo-acoustics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jami L; van Wijk, Kasper; Sabick, Michelle

    2014-03-01

    Multi-channel photo-acoustic and laser ultrasonic waves are used to sense the characteristics of proxies for healthy and diseased vessels. The acquisition system is non-contacting and non-invasive with a pulsed laser source and a laser vibrometer detector. As the wave signatures of our targets are typically low in amplitude, we exploit multi-channel acquisition and processing techniques. These are commonly used in seismology to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of data. We identify vessel proxies with a diameter on the order of 1 mm, at a depth of 18 mm. Variations in scattered and photo-acoustic signatures are related to differences in vessel wall properties and content. The methods described have the potential to improve imaging and better inform interventions for atherosclerotic vessels, such as the carotid artery. PMID:24412169

  19. Characterizing phantom arteries with multi-channel laser ultrasonics and photo-acoustics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jami L; van Wijk, Kasper; Sabick, Michelle

    2014-03-01

    Multi-channel photo-acoustic and laser ultrasonic waves are used to sense the characteristics of proxies for healthy and diseased vessels. The acquisition system is non-contacting and non-invasive with a pulsed laser source and a laser vibrometer detector. As the wave signatures of our targets are typically low in amplitude, we exploit multi-channel acquisition and processing techniques. These are commonly used in seismology to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of data. We identify vessel proxies with a diameter on the order of 1 mm, at a depth of 18 mm. Variations in scattered and photo-acoustic signatures are related to differences in vessel wall properties and content. The methods described have the potential to improve imaging and better inform interventions for atherosclerotic vessels, such as the carotid artery.

  20. Passive acoustic derived bubble flux and applications to natural gas seepage in the Mackenzie Delta, NWT, Canada and Coal Oil Point, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culling, D.; Leifer, I.; Dallimore, S.; Alcala, K.

    2012-12-01

    Methane is a prominent greenhouse gas that escapes naturally from thermogenic reservoirs as seepage from marine and lacustrine biogenic sources as bubble ebullition. Geologic methane emissions are critically important contributors to the global methane budget however, few quantitative flux measurements are available for shallow waters. This gap in knowledge is critical as in these settings gas can easily transit as bubbles through the water column and directly influence global atmospheric budgets. Video and active acoustic (sonar) measurements of bubble flux have spatial limitations requiring predictable bubble emission location. Passive acoustics are less affected by these limitations, in addition, they can provide data in water too shallow for effective sonar bubble observations. Lab tests were undertaken to quantify the acoustic signature of bubbles formed in non-cohesive sediments. specifically focusing on mechanisms that complicate interpretation of acoustic data. Lab tests then were compared to field data to provide measurement calibration/validation. The principles behind the acoustic analysis method are based on the Minnaert equation, which relates a bubble radius and acoustic frequency. Bubble size and the resultant acoustic frequency from known flows and capillary tube diameters are well documented; however changing sediment pathways adds to the complexity of bubble formation and the resultant bubble acoustic signal. These complex signals were investigated in a lab tank with a thick, cohesive fine-grained sediment bed, through which bubbles produced by a syringe pump migrated to the sediment-water interface. Then, the resultant bubbles were diverted into clear water and measured from high speed, high definition video, while the acoustic signature of bubble formation was recorded concurrently by a hydrophone. Bubble formation is influenced by currents, which shifts the acoustical signal towards a higher frequency with a more complex pattern than the

  1. Acoustical Environment for Academic Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lortie, L.J.

    Discussion of the parameters governing noise control and room acoustics are followed by a demonstration on how to achieve a good acoustical environment. Topics emphasized include--(1) design and control objectives, (2) noise sources and propagation, (3) reverberation parameters, (4) noise control factors and parameters, and (5) sound systems. Also…

  2. Improving Acoustics in American Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Peggy B.

    2000-01-01

    This introductory article to a clinical forum describes the following seven articles that discuss the problem of noisy classrooms and resulting reduction in learning, basic principles of noise and reverberation measurements in classrooms, solutions to the problem of poor classroom acoustics, and the development of a classroom acoustics standard.…

  3. Piano acoustics-A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askenfelt, Anders

    2003-10-01

    The design of the piano as we know it today dates back to the second half of the 19th century. The history of studies of the acoustics of the piano begins during the same period. In this talk, known facts and unanswered questions about the acoustics of the piano are reviewed.

  4. Digital Controller For Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarver, D. Kent

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic driver digitally controls sound fields along three axes. Allows computerized acoustic levitation and manipulation of small objects for such purposes as containerless processing and nuclear-fusion power experiments. Also used for controlling motion of vibration-testing tables in three dimensions.

  5. The electron geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, N.; Kaw, P. K.

    2012-09-15

    In this report, a novel new mode, named the electron geodesic acoustic mode, is presented. This mode can occur in toroidal plasmas like the conventional geodesic acoustic mode (GAM). The frequency of this new mode is much larger than that of the conventional GAM by a factor equal to the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio.

  6. Acoustic Emissions Reveal Combustion Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, D. N. R.; Seshan, P. K.

    1983-01-01

    Turbulent-flame acoustic emissions change with air/fuel ratio variations. Acoustic emissions sensed and processed to detect inefficient operation; control system responds by adjusting fuel/air mixture for greater efficiency. Useful for diagnosis of combustion processes and fuel/air control.

  7. Acoustic Levitation With One Driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Rudnick, I.; Elleman, D. D.; Stoneburner, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Report discusses acoustic levitation in rectangular chamber using one driver mounted at corner. Placement of driver at corner enables it to couple effectively to acoustic modes along all three axes. Use of single driver reduces cost, complexity and weight of levitation system below those of three driver system.

  8. Acoustic Levitation With One Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.

    1987-01-01

    Higher resonator modes enables simplification of equipment. Experimental acoustic levitator for high-temperature containerless processing has round cylindrical levitation chamber and only one acoustic transducer. Stable levitation of solid particle or liquid drop achieved by exciting sound in chamber to higher-order resonant mode that makes potential well for levitated particle or drop at some point within chamber.

  9. Acoustic Similarity and Dichotic Listening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Peter

    1978-01-01

    An experiment tests conjectures that right ear advantage (REA) has an auditory origin in competition or interference between acoustically similar stimuli and that feature-sharing effect (FSE) has its origin in assignment of features of phonetically similar stimuli. No effect on the REA for acoustic similarity, and a clear effect of acoustic…

  10. Electronic dummy for acoustical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, B. B.; Di Mattia, A. L.; Rosencheck, A. J.; Stern, M.; Torick, E. L.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic Dummy /ED/ used for acoustical testing represents the average male torso from the Xiphoid process upward and includes an acoustic replica of the human head. This head simulates natural flesh, and has an artificial voice and artificial ears that measure sound pressures at the eardrum or the entrance to the ear canal.

  11. Sound Advice on Classroom Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of acoustic standards in classroom design, presenting an interview with the Acoustical Society of America's (ASA's) standards manager which focuses on reasons for the new ASA standards, the standards document (which was written for K-12 classroom but applies to college classrooms), the need to avoid echo and be able to…

  12. Theoretical Characterizaiton of Visual Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashinski, D. O.; Chase, G. M.; di Nallo, O. E.; Scales, A. N.; Vanderley, D. L.; Byrd, E. F. C.

    2015-05-01

    We are investigating the accuracy of theoretical models used to predict the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared spectra, as well as other properties, of product materials ejected from the muzzle of currently fielded systems. Recent advances in solid propellants has made the management of muzzle signature (flash) a principle issue in weapons development across the calibers. A priori prediction of the electromagnetic spectra of formulations will allow researchers to tailor blends that yield desired signatures and determine spectrographic detection ranges. Quantum chemistry methods at various levels of sophistication have been employed to optimize molecular geometries, compute unscaled vibrational frequencies, and determine the optical spectra of specific gas-phase species. Electronic excitations are being computed using Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT). A full statistical analysis and reliability assessment of computational results is currently underway. A comparison of theoretical results to experimental values found in the literature is used to assess any affects of functional choice and basis set on calculation accuracy. The status of this work will be presented at the conference. Work supported by the ARL, DoD HPCMP, and USMA.

  13. Update on PIN or Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyas, Vashek

    We promised a year back some data on the experiment that we ran with chip and PIN. If you recall, it was the first phase that we reported on here last year, where we used the University bookstore, and two PIN pads, one with very solid privacy shielding, the other one without any. We ran 17 people through the first one, 15 people through the second one, and we also had the students do, about half of them forging the signature, half of them signing their own signature, on the back of the card that is used for purchasing books, or whatever.We had a second phase of the experiment, after long negotiations, and very complicated logistics, with a supermarket in Brno where we were able to do anything that we wanted through the experiment for five hours on the floor, with only the supermarket manager, the head of security, and the camera operators knowing about the experiment. So the shop assistants, the ground floor security, everybody basically on the floor, did not know about the experiment. That was one of the reasons why the supermarket, or management, agreed to take part, they wanted to control their own internal security procedures.

  14. (Convertible) Undeniable Signatures Without Random Oracles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Tsz Hon; Au, Man Ho; Liu, Joseph K.; Susilo, Willy

    We propose a convertible undeniable signature scheme without random oracles. Our construction is based on Waters' and Kurosawa and Heng's schemes that were proposed in Eurocrypt 2005. The security of our scheme is based on the CDH and the decision linear assumption. Comparing only the part of undeniable signatures, our scheme uses more standard assumptions than the existing undeniable signatures without random oracles due to Laguillamie and Vergnaud.

  15. Narrow terahertz attenuation signatures in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weidong; Brown, Elliott R; Viveros, Leamon; Burris, Kellie P; Stewart, C Neal

    2014-10-01

    Terahertz absorption signatures from culture-cultivated Bacillus thuringiensis were measured with a THz photomixing spectrometer operating from 400 to 1200 GHz. We observe two distinct signatures centered at ∼955 and 1015 GHz, and attribute them to the optically coupled particle vibrational resonance (surface phonon-polariton) of Bacillus spores. This demonstrates the potential of the THz attenuation signatures as "fingerprints" for label-free biomolecular detection.

  16. Cryptanalysis of Quantum Blind Signature Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Huijuan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study the cryptanalysis of two quantum blind signature schemes and one quantum proxy blind signature protocol. We show that in these protocols the verifier can forge the signature under known message attack. The attack strategies are described in detail respectively. This kind of problem deserves more research attention in the following related study. We further point out that the arbitrator should be involved in the procedure of any dispute and some discussions of these protocols are given.

  17. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  18. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.

  19. Acoustic controlled rotation and orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Allen, James L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic energy is applied to a pair of locations spaced about a chamber, to control rotation of an object levitated in the chamber. Two acoustic transducers applying energy of a single acoustic mode, one at each location, can (one or both) serve to levitate the object in three dimensions as well as control its rotation. Slow rotation is achieved by initially establishing a large phase difference and/or pressure ratio of the acoustic waves, which is sufficient to turn the object by more than 45 deg, which is immediately followed by reducing the phase difference and/or pressure ratio to maintain slow rotation. A small phase difference and/or pressure ratio enables control of the angular orientation of the object without rotating it. The sphericity of an object can be measured by its response to the acoustic energy.

  20. MEMS Based Acoustic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikaza (Inventor); Humphreys, William M. (Inventor); Arnold, David P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention described and shown in the specification aid drawings include a combination responsive to an acoustic wave that can be utilized as a dynamic pressure sensor. In one embodiment of the present invention, the combination has a substrate having a first surface and an opposite second surface, a microphone positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having an input and a first output and a second output, wherein the input receives a biased voltage, and the microphone generates an output signal responsive to the acoustic wave between the first output and the second output. The combination further has an amplifier positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having a first input and a second input and an output, wherein the first input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the first output of the microphone and the second input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the second output of the microphone for receiving the output sinual from the microphone. The amplifier is spaced from the microphone with a separation smaller than 0.5 mm.

  1. Opto-acoustic thrombolysis

    DOEpatents

    Celliers, Peter; Da Silva, Luiz; Glinsky, Michael; London, Richard; Maitland, Duncan; Matthews, Dennis; Fitch, Pat

    2000-01-01

    This invention is a catheter-based device for generating an ultrasound excitation in biological tissue. Pulsed laser light is guided through an optical fiber to provide the energy for producing the acoustic vibrations. The optical energy is deposited in a water-based absorbing fluid, e.g. saline, thrombolytic agent, blood or thrombus, and generates an acoustic impulse in the fluid through thermoelastic and/or thermodynamic mechanisms. By pulsing the laser at a repetition rate (which may vary from 10 Hz to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus or treating vasospasm. The catheter can also incorporate thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it can be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control and with optical sensors for characterization of thrombus type and consistency.

  2. Synthetic aperture acoustic imaging of canonical targets with a 2-15 kHz linear FM chirp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignola, Joseph F.; Judge, John A.; Good, Chelsea E.; Bishop, Steven S.; Gugino, Peter M.; Soumekh, Mehrdad

    2011-06-01

    Synthetic aperture image reconstruction applied to outdoor acoustic recordings is presented. Acoustic imaging is an alternate method having several military relevant advantages such as being immune to RF jamming, superior spatial resolution, capable of standoff side and forward-looking scanning, and relatively low cost, weight and size when compared to 0.5 - 3 GHz ground penetrating radar technologies. Synthetic aperture acoustic imaging is similar to synthetic aperture radar, but more akin to synthetic aperture sonar technologies owing to the nature of longitudinal or compressive wave propagation in the surrounding acoustic medium. The system's transceiver is a quasi mono-static microphone and audio speaker pair mounted on a rail 5meters in length. Received data sampling rate is 80 kHz with a 2- 15 kHz Linear Frequency Modulated (LFM) chirp, with a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 10 Hz and an inter-pulse period (IPP) of 50 milliseconds. Targets are positioned within the acoustic scene at slant range of two to ten meters on grass, dirt or gravel surfaces, and with and without intervening metallic chain link fencing. Acoustic image reconstruction results in means for literal interpretation and quantifiable analyses. A rudimentary technique characterizes acoustic scatter at the ground surfaces. Targets within the acoustic scene are first digitally spotlighted and further processed, providing frequency and aspect angle dependent signature information.

  3. Imaging radar polarization signatures - Theory and observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Zebker, Howard A.; Elachi, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Radar polarimetry theory is reviewed, and comparison between theory and experimental results obtained with an imaging radar polarimeter employing two orthogonally polarized antennas is made. Knowledge of the scattering matrix permits calculation of the scattering cross section of a scatterer for any transmit and receive polarization combination, and a new way of displaying the resulting scattering cross section as a function of polarization is introduced. Examples of polarization signatures are presented for several theoretical models of surface scattering, and these signatures are compared with experimentally measured polarization signatures. The coefficient of variation, derived from the polarization signature, may provide information regarding the amount of variation in scattering properties for a given area.

  4. 5 CFR 850.106 - Electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... card; (iii) Digitized signature; or (iv) Biometrics, such as fingerprints, retinal patterns, and voice recognition; (2) Cryptographic control methods, including— (i) Shared symmetric key cryptography; (ii)...

  5. Input apparatus for dynamic signature verification systems

    DOEpatents

    EerNisse, Errol P.; Land, Cecil E.; Snelling, Jay B.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to signature verification input apparatus comprising a writing instrument and platen containing piezoelectric transducers which generate signals in response to writing pressures.

  6. Novel Quantum Proxy Signature without Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guang-bao

    2015-08-01

    Proxy signature is an important research topic in classic cryptography since it has many application occasions in our real life. But only a few quantum proxy signature schemes have been proposed up to now. In this paper, we propose a quantum proxy signature scheme, which is designed based on quantum one-time pad. Our scheme can be realized easily since it only uses single-particle states. Security analysis shows that it is secure and meets all the properties of a proxy signature, such as verifiability, distinguishability, unforgeability and undeniability.

  7. Intrusion signature creation via clustering anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, Gilbert R.; Yang, Shanchieh J.

    2008-03-01

    Current practices for combating cyber attacks typically use Intrusion Detection Systems (IDSs) to detect and block multistage attacks. Because of the speed and impacts of new types of cyber attacks, current IDSs are limited in providing accurate detection while reliably adapting to new attacks. In signature-based IDS systems, this limitation is made apparent by the latency from day zero of an attack to the creation of an appropriate signature. This work hypothesizes that this latency can be shortened by creating signatures via anomaly-based algorithms. A hybrid supervised and unsupervised clustering algorithm is proposed for new signature creation. These new signatures created in real-time would take effect immediately, ideally detecting new attacks. This work first investigates a modified density-based clustering algorithm as an IDS, with its strengths and weaknesses identified. A signature creation algorithm leveraging the summarizing abilities of clustering is investigated. Lessons learned from the supervised signature creation are then leveraged for the development of unsupervised real-time signature classification. Automating signature creation and classification via clustering is demonstrated as satisfactory but with limitations.

  8. Secure Obfuscation for Encrypted Group Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hongfei; Liu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, group signature techniques are widely used in constructing privacy-preserving security schemes for various information systems. However, conventional techniques keep the schemes secure only in normal black-box attack contexts. In other words, these schemes suppose that (the implementation of) the group signature generation algorithm is running in a platform that is perfectly protected from various intrusions and attacks. As a complementary to existing studies, how to generate group signatures securely in a more austere security context, such as a white-box attack context, is studied in this paper. We use obfuscation as an approach to acquire a higher level of security. Concretely, we introduce a special group signature functionality-an encrypted group signature, and then provide an obfuscator for the proposed functionality. A series of new security notions for both the functionality and its obfuscator has been introduced. The most important one is the average-case secure virtual black-box property w.r.t. dependent oracles and restricted dependent oracles which captures the requirement of protecting the output of the proposed obfuscator against collision attacks from group members. The security notions fit for many other specialized obfuscators, such as obfuscators for identity-based signatures, threshold signatures and key-insulated signatures. Finally, the correctness and security of the proposed obfuscator have been proven. Thereby, the obfuscated encrypted group signature functionality can be applied to variants of privacy-preserving security schemes and enhance the security level of these schemes. PMID:26167686

  9. Acoustic Remote Sensing of Rogue Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Wade; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    We propose an early warning system for approaching rogue waves using the remote sensing of acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) - progressive sound waves that propagate at the speed of sound in the ocean. It is believed that AGWs are generated during the formation of rogue waves, carrying information on the rogue waves at near the speed of sound, i.e. much faster than the rogue wave. The capability of identifying those special sound waves would enable detecting rogue waves most efficiently. A lot of promising work has been reported on AGWs in the last few years, part of which in the context of remote sensing as an early detection of tsunami. However, to our knowledge none of the work addresses the problem of rogue waves directly. Although there remains some uncertainty as to the proper definition of a rogue wave, there is little doubt that they exist and no one can dispute the potential destructive power of rogue waves. An early warning system for such extreme waves would become a demanding safety technology. A closed form expression was developed for the pressure induced by an impulsive source at the free surface (the Green's function) from which the solution for more general sources can be developed. In particular, we used the model of the Draupner Wave of January 1st, 1995 as a source and calculated the induced AGW signature. In particular we studied the AGW signature associated with a special feature of this wave, and characteristic of rogue waves, of the absence of any local set-down beneath the main crest and the presence of a large local set-up.

  10. First Detection of the Acoustic Oscillation Phase Shift Expected from the Cosmic Neutrino Background.

    PubMed

    Follin, Brent; Knox, Lloyd; Millea, Marius; Pan, Zhen

    2015-08-28

    The unimpeded relativistic propagation of cosmological neutrinos prior to recombination of the baryon-photon plasma alters gravitational potentials and therefore the details of the time-dependent gravitational driving of acoustic oscillations. We report here a first detection of the resulting shifts in the temporal phase of the oscillations, which we infer from their signature in the cosmic microwave background temperature power spectrum. PMID:26371637

  11. Application of Wavelet Packet Analysis to the Measurement of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadowaki, Kevin; Garcia, Noel; Ford, Taurean; Pando, Jesus; SDSS-FAST Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We develop a method of wavelet packet analysis to measure the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) peak and apply this method to the CMASS galaxy catalog from the SDSS Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) collaboration. We compare our results to a fiducial ?CDM flat cosmological model and detect a BAO signature in the power spectrum comparable to the previous consensus results of the BOSS collaboration. We find DA = 1365rd /rd , fid at z = . 54 . Member ID Forthcoming.

  12. Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth

    SciTech Connect

    Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael

    2013-08-15

    A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

  13. High-fidelity simulation capability for virtual testing of seismic and acoustic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. Keith; Moran, Mark L.; Ketcham, Stephen A.; Lacombe, James; Anderson, Thomas S.; Symons, Neill P.; Aldridge, David F.; Marlin, David H.; Collier, Sandra L.; Ostashev, Vladimir E.

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes development and application of a high-fidelity, seismic/acoustic simulation capability for battlefield sensors. The purpose is to provide simulated sensor data so realistic that they cannot be distinguished by experts from actual field data. This emerging capability provides rapid, low-cost trade studies of unattended ground sensor network configurations, data processing and fusion strategies, and signatures emitted by prototype vehicles. There are three essential components to the modeling: (1) detailed mechanical signature models for vehicles and walkers, (2) high-resolution characterization of the subsurface and atmospheric environments, and (3) state-of-the-art seismic/acoustic models for propagating moving-vehicle signatures through realistic, complex environments. With regard to the first of these components, dynamic models of wheeled and tracked vehicles have been developed to generate ground force inputs to seismic propagation models. Vehicle models range from simple, 2D representations to highly detailed, 3D representations of entire linked-track suspension systems. Similarly detailed models of acoustic emissions from vehicle engines are under development. The propagation calculations for both the seismics and acoustics are based on finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) methodologies capable of handling complex environmental features such as heterogeneous geologies, urban structures, surface vegetation, and dynamic atmospheric turbulence. Any number of dynamic sources and virtual sensors may be incorporated into the FDTD model. The computational demands of 3D FDTD simulation over tactical distances require massively parallel computers. Several example calculations of seismic/acoustic wave propagation through complex atmospheric and terrain environments are shown.

  14. Application of a laser Doppler vibrometer for air-water to subsurface signature detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Phillip; Roeder, James; Robinson, Dennis; Majumdar, Arun

    2015-05-01

    There is much interest in detecting a target and optical communications from an airborne platform to a platform submerged under water. Accurate detection and communications between underwater and aerial platforms would increase the capabilities of surface, subsurface, and air, manned and unmanned vehicles engaged in oversea and undersea activities. The technique introduced in this paper involves a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) for acousto-optic sensing for detecting acoustic information propagated towards the water surface from a submerged platform inside a 12 gallon water tank. The LDV probes and penetrates the water surface from an aerial platform to detect air-water surface interface vibrations caused by an amplifier to a speaker generating a signal generated from underneath the water surface (varied water depth from 1" to 8"), ranging between 50Hz to 5kHz. As a comparison tool, a hydrophone was used simultaneously inside the water tank for recording the acoustic signature of the signal generated between 50Hz to 5kHz. For a signal generated by a submerged platform, the LDV can detect the signal. The LDV detects the signal via surface perturbations caused by the impinging acoustic pressure field; proving a technique of transmitting/sending information/messages from a submerged platform acoustically to the surface of the water and optically receiving the information/message using the LDV, via the Doppler Effect, allowing the LDV to become a high sensitivity optical-acoustic device. The technique developed has much potential usage in commercial oceanography applications. The present work is focused on the reception of acoustic information from an object located underwater.

  15. Multimaterial Acoustic Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chocat, Noemie

    The emergence of multimaterial fibers that combine a multiplicity of solid materials with disparate electrical, optical, and mechanical properties into a single fiber presents new opportunities for extending fiber applications well beyond optical transmission. Fiber reflectors, thermal detectors, photodetectors, chemical sensors, surface-emitting fiber lasers, fiber diodes, and other functional fiber devices have been demonstrated with this approach. Yet, throughout this development and indeed the development of fibers in general, a key premise has remained unchanged : that fibers are essentially static devices incapable of controllably changing their properties at high frequencies. Unique opportunities would arise if a rapid, electrically-driven mechanism for changing fiber properties existed. A wide spectrum of hitherto passive fiber devices could at once become active with applications spanning electronics, mechanics, acoustics, and optics, with the benefits of large surface-area, structural robustness, and mechanical flexibility. This thesis addresses the challenges and opportunities associated with the realization of electromechanical transduction in fibers through the integration of internal piezoelectric and electrostrictive domains. The fundamental challenges related to the fabrication of piezoelectric devices in fiber form are analyzed from a materials perspective, and candidate materials and geometries are selected that are compatible with the thermal drawing process. The first realization of a thermally drawn piezoelectric fiber device is reported and its piezoelectric response is established over a wide range of frequencies. The acoustic properties of piezoelectric fiber devices are characterized and related to their mechanical and geometric properties. Collective effects in multi-fiber constructs are discussed and demonstrated by the realization of a linear phased array of piezoelectric fibers capable of acoustic beam steering. High strain actuation

  16. Observation of hydrothermal flows with acoustic video camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, M.; Asada, A.; Tamaki, K.; Scientific Team Of Yk09-13 Leg 1

    2010-12-01

    Ridge 18-20deg.S, where hydrothermal plume signatures were previously perceived. DIDSON was equipped on the top of Shinkai6500 in order to get acoustic video images of hydrothermal plumes. In this cruise, seven dives of Shinkai6500 were conducted. The acoustic video images of the hydrothermal plumes had been captured in three of seven dives. These are only a few acoustic video images of the hydrothermal plumes. Processing and analyzing the acoustic video image data are going on. We will report the overview of the acoustic video image of the hydrothermal plumes and discuss possibility of DIDSON as an observation tool for seafloor hydrothermal activity.

  17. Holographic signatures of cosmological singularities.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Netta; Hertog, Thomas; Horowitz, Gary T

    2014-09-19

    To gain insight into the quantum nature of cosmological singularities, we study anisotropic Kasner solutions in gauge-gravity duality. The dual description of the bulk evolution towards the singularity involves N=4 super Yang-Mills theory on the expanding branch of deformed de Sitter space and is well defined. We compute two-point correlators of Yang-Mills operators of large dimensions using spacelike geodesics anchored on the boundary. The correlators show a strong signature of the singularity around horizon scales and decay at large boundary separation at different rates in different directions. More generally, the boundary evolution exhibits a process of particle creation similar to that in inflation. This leads us to conjecture that information on the quantum nature of cosmological singularities is encoded in long-wavelength features of the boundary wave function.

  18. Metabolic Signatures of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Martin T.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Djukovic, Danijel; Hoffman, Noah G.; Raftery, Daniel; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by shifts in the vaginal microbiota from Lactobacillus dominant to a microbiota with diverse anaerobic bacteria. Few studies have linked specific metabolites with bacteria found in the human vagina. Here, we report dramatic differences in metabolite compositions and concentrations associated with BV using a global metabolomics approach. We further validated important metabolites using samples from a second cohort of women and a different platform to measure metabolites. In the primary study, we compared metabolite profiles in cervicovaginal lavage fluid from 40 women with BV and 20 women without BV. Vaginal bacterial representation was determined using broad-range PCR with pyrosequencing and concentrations of bacteria by quantitative PCR. We detected 279 named biochemicals; levels of 62% of metabolites were significantly different in women with BV. Unsupervised clustering of metabolites separated women with and without BV. Women with BV have metabolite profiles marked by lower concentrations of amino acids and dipeptides, concomitant with higher levels of amino acid catabolites and polyamines. Higher levels of the signaling eicosanoid 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), a biomarker for inflammation, were noted in BV. Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus jensenii exhibited similar metabolite correlation patterns, which were distinct from correlation patterns exhibited by BV-associated bacteria. Several metabolites were significantly associated with clinical signs and symptoms (Amsel criteria) used to diagnose BV, and no metabolite was associated with all four clinical criteria. BV has strong metabolic signatures across multiple metabolic pathways, and these signatures are associated with the presence and concentrations of particular bacteria. PMID:25873373

  19. Basic Principles of Solar Acoustic Holography - (Invited Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, C.; Braun, D. C.

    2000-03-01

    We summarize the basic principles of holographic seismic imaging of the solar interior, drawing on familiar principles in optics and parallels with standard optical holography. Computational seismic holography is accomplished by the phase-coherent wave-mechanical reconstruction of the p-mode acoustic field into the solar interior based on helioseismic observations at the solar surface. It treats the acoustic field at the solar surface in a way broadly analogous to how the eye treats electromagnetic radiation at the surface of the cornea, wave-mechanically refocusing radiation from submerged sources to render stigmatic images that can be sampled over focal surfaces at any desired depth. Holographic diagnostics offer a straight-forward assessment of the informational content of the observed p-mode spectrum independent of prospective physical models of the local interior anomalies that it represents. Computational holography was proposed as the optimum approach whereby to address the severe diffraction effects that confront standard tomography in the solar p-mode environment. It has given us a number of remarkable discoveries in the last two years and now promises a new insight into solar interior structure and dynamics in the local perspective. We compare the diagnostic roles of simple acoustic-power holography and phase-sensitive holography, and anticipate approaches to solar interior modeling based on holographic signatures. We identify simple computational principles that, applied to high-quality helioseismic observations, make it easy for prospective analysts to produce high-quality holographic images for practical applications in local helioseismology.

  20. Electrostatic supersolitons and double layers at the acoustic speed

    SciTech Connect

    Verheest, Frank; Hellberg, Manfred A.

    2015-01-15

    Supersolitons are characterized by subsidiary extrema on the sides of a typical bipolar electric field signature or by association with a root beyond double layers in the fully nonlinear Sagdeev pseudopotential description. It has been proven that supersolitons may exist in several plasmas having at least three constituent species, but they cannot be found in weakly nonlinear theory. Another recent aspect of pseudopotential theory is that in certain plasma models and parameter regimes solitons and/or double layers can exist at the acoustic speed, having no reductive perturbation counterparts. Importantly, they signal coexistence between solitons having positive and negative polarity, in that one solution can be realized at a time, depending on infinitesimal perturbations from the equilibrium state. Weaving the two strands together, we demonstrate here that one can even find supersolitons and double layers at the acoustic speed, as illustrated using the model of cold positive and negative ions, in the presence of nonthermal electrons following a Cairns distribution. This model has been discussed before, but the existence and properties of supersolitons at the acoustic speed were not established at the time of publication.

  1. Yellow Sea ocean-acoustic solitary wave modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warn-Varnas, A. C.; Chin-Bing, S. A.; King, D. B.; Hawkins, J. A.; Lamb, K. G.; Teixeira, M.

    2005-08-01

    This study is in an area south of the Shandong peninsula, near the region where Zhou et al. (1991) observed anomalous drops in acoustical intensity. Solitary wave generation and propagation simulations are performed using the Lamb (1994) nonhydrostatic model. The model simulations show that, for summer conditions, the existing semi-diurnal tidal flow over the topographic variations formed internal bores and solitary waves. For the Shandong area, we analyzed summer observations from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) that tracked solitary wave trains from their surface roughness signatures. The images contained seven events consisting of internal bores and solitary waves that traveled in a well-defined direction for 2.5 days. The origin of the trains appeared at a well-defined point along a steep topographic drop. The SAR observations guided and tuned the model simulations, by comparing spectra of observed and modeled wavelengths. The tuned model yields wavelengths within factors of 2, or less, of those derived from SAR data. Wavelength and amplitude dispersion analysis showed two dispersion regimes. Modeled phase speeds were at the lower limit of phase speeds deduced from SAR data, from about 0.8 to 1.0 m/s. Acoustical intensity calculations in the presence of solitary wave trains will be undertaken in a subsequent paper using a parabolic equation acoustical model along the path of solitary wave train propagation.

  2. The acoustic emissions of cavitation bubbles in stretched vortices.

    PubMed

    Chang, Natasha A; Ceccio, Steven L

    2011-11-01

    Pairs of unequal strength, counter-rotating vortices were produced in order to examine the inception, dynamics, and acoustic emission of cavitation bubbles in rapidly stretching vortices. The acoustic signatures of these cavitation bubbles were characterized during their inception, growth, and collapse. Growing and collapsing bubbles often produced a sharp, broadband, pop sound. The spectrum of these bubbles, and the peak resonant frequency can generally be related to quiescent flow bubble dynamics and corresponding resonant frequencies. However, some elongated cavitation bubbles produced a short tonal burst, or chirp, with frequencies on the order of a few kilohertz. Theses frequencies are too low to be related to resonant frequencies of a bubble in a quiescent flow. Instead, the frequency content of the acoustic signal during bubble inception and growth is related to the volumetric oscillations of the bubble while it interacted with vortical flow that surrounds the bubble (i.e., the resonant frequency of the vortex-bubble system). A relationship was determined between the observed peak frequency of the oscillations, the highly stretched vortex properties, and the water nuclei content. It was found that different cavitation spectra could relate to different flow and fluid properties and therefore would not scale in the same manner.

  3. Preliminary theoretical acoustic and rf sounding calculations for MILL RACE

    SciTech Connect

    Warshaw, S.I.; Dubois, P.F.

    1981-11-02

    As participant in DOE/ISA's Ionospheric Monitoring Program, LLNL has the responsibility of providing theoretical understanding and calculational support for experimental activities carried out by Los Alamos National Laboratory in using ionospheric sounders to remotely detect violent atmospheric phenomena. We have developed a system of interconnected computer codes which simulate the entire range of atmospheric and ionospheric processes involved in this remote detection procedure. We are able to model the acoustic pulse shape from an atmospheric explosion, the subsequent nonlinear transport of this energy to all parts of the immediate atmosphere including the ionosphere, and the propagation of high-frequency ratio waves through the acoustically perturbed ionosphere. Los Alamos' coverage of DNA's MILL RACE event provided an excellent opportunity to assess the credibility of the calculational system to correctly predict how ionospheric sounders would respond to a surface-based chemical explosion. In this experiment, 600 tons of high explosive were detonated at White Sands Missile Range at 12:35:40 local time on 16 September 1981. Vertical incidence rf phase sounders and bistatic oblique incidence rf sounders fielded by Los Alamos and SRI International throughout New Mexico and southern Colorado detected the ionospheric perturbation that ensued. A brief account of preliminary calculations of the acoustic disturbance and the predicted ionospheric sounder signatures for MILL RACE is presented. (WHK)

  4. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  5. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-07-20

    The Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) has been designed to record and monitor the acoustic signal in natural gas transmission lines. In particular the three acoustic signals associated with a line leak. The system is portable ({approx}30 lbs) and is designed for line pressures up to 1000 psi. It has become apparent that cataloging of the various background acoustic signals in natural gas transmission line is very important if a system to identify leak signals is to be developed. The low-pressure (0-200 psig) laboratory test phase has been completed and a number of field trials have been conducted. Before the cataloging phase could begin, a few problems identified in field trials identified had to be corrected such as: (1) Decreased microphone sensitivity at line pressures above 250 psig. (2) The inability to deal with large data sets collected when cataloging the variety of signals in a transmission line. (3) The lack of an available online acoustic calibration system. These problems have been solved and the WVU PAMP is now fully functional over the entire pressure range found in the Natural Gas transmission lines in this region. Field portability and reliability have been greatly improved. Data collection and storage have also improved to the point were the full acoustic spectrum of acoustic signals can be accurately cataloged, recorded and described.

  6. Turbofan Acoustic Propagation and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    2000-01-01

    This document describes progress in the development of finite element codes for the prediction of near and far field acoustic radiation from the inlet and aft fan ducts of turbofan engines. The report consists of nine papers which have appeared in archival journals and conference proceedings, or are presently in review for publication. Topics included are: 1. Aft Fan Duct Acoustic Radiation; 2. Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements for Acoustic Radiation in a Uniformly Moving Medium; 3. A Reflection Free Boundary Condition for Propagation in Uniform Flow Using Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements; 4. A Numerical Comparison Between Multiple-Scales and FEM Solution for Sound Propagation in Lined Flow Ducts; 5. Acoustic Propagation at High Frequencies in Ducts; 6. The Boundary Condition at an Impedance Wall in a Nonuniform Duct with Potential Flow; 7. A Reverse Flow Theorem and Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows; 8. Reciprocity and Acoustics Power in One Dimensional Compressible Potential Flows; and 9. Numerical Experiments on Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows.

  7. Fusing geophysical signatures of locally recorded surface explosions to improve blast detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Nemzek, Robert; Arrowsmith, Stephen; Sentz, Kari

    2016-03-01

    We recorded acoustic, seismic and radio-frequency signatures of 70 solid charge (˜2-12 kg) surface explosions (shots) at local distances (0.1-1.5 km) to determine if such signals could be fused for blast monitoring. We observed that each geophysical signature was sufficiently repeatable between similar shots to be identifiable with multichannel correlation detectors. Using template signals from a large explosion, we then processed heavily contaminated data recording a smaller shot with these detectors, and missed or marginally detected the resultant target signals. By then fusing the p-values of these statistics through Fisher's combined probability test, we clearly identified the same explosion signals at thresholds consistent with the false alarm on noise rates of the correlation detectors. This resulting Fisher test thereby provided high-probability detections, zero false alarms and higher theoretical detection capability.

  8. Acoustic sensors using microstructures tunable with energy other than acoustic energy

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G.

    2003-11-25

    A sensor for detecting acoustic energy includes a microstructure tuned to a predetermined acoustic frequency and a device for detecting movement of the microstructure. A display device is operatively linked to the movement detecting device. When acoustic energy strikes the acoustic sensor, acoustic energy having a predetermined frequency moves the microstructure, where the movement is detected by the movement detecting device.

  9. Acoustic sensors using microstructures tunable with energy other than acoustic energy

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G.

    2005-06-07

    A sensor for detecting acoustic energy includes a microstructure tuned to a predetermined acoustic frequency and a device for detecting movement of the microstructure. A display device is operatively linked to the movement detecting device. When acoustic energy strikes the acoustic sensor, acoustic energy having a predetermined frequency moves the microstructure, where the movement is detected by the movement detecting device.

  10. Acoustic fault injection tool (AFIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.

    1999-05-01

    On September 18, 1997, Honeywell Technology Center (HTC) successfully completed a three-week flight test of its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS) at Patuxent River Flight Test Center. This flight test was the culmination of an ambitious 38-month proof-of-concept effort directed at demonstrating the feasibility of detecting crack propagation in helicopter rotor components. The program was funded as part of the U.S. Navy's Air Vehicle Diagnostic Systems (AVDS) program. Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. The application of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults has proven the feasibility of the technology. The flight-test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. During the RAMS flight test, 12 test flights were flown from which 25 Gbyte of digital acoustic data and about 15 hours of analog flight data recorder (FDR) data were collected from the eight on-rotor acoustic sensors. The focus of this paper is to describe the CH-46 flight-test configuration and present design details about a new innovative machinery diagnostic technology called acoustic fault injection. This technology involves the injection of acoustic sound into machinery to assess health and characterize operational status. The paper will also address the development of the Acoustic Fault Injection Tool (AFIT), which was successfully demonstrated during the CH-46 flight tests.

  11. Acoustic cavitation movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence A.

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation is a phenomenon that occurs on microsecond time scales and micron length scales, yet, it has many macroscopic manifestations. Accordingly, it is often difficult, at least for the author, to form realistic physical descriptions of the specific mechanisms through which it expresses itself in our macroscopic world. For example, there are still many who believe that cavitation erosion is due to the shock wave that is emitted by bubble implosion, rather than the liquid jet created on asymmetric collapse...and they may be right. Over the years, the author has accumulated a number of movies and high-speed photographs of cavitation activity, which he uses to form his own visual references. In the time allotted, he will show a number of these movies and photographs and discuss their relevance to existing technological problems. A limited number of CDs containing the presented materials will be available to interested individuals. [Work supported in part by the NIH, USAMRMC, and the ONR.

  12. Wind turbine acoustic standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.; Shepherd, K. P.; Grosveld, F.

    1981-01-01

    A program is being conducted to develop noise standards for wind turbines which minimize annoyance and which can be used to design specifications. The approach consists of presenting wind turbine noise stimuli to test subjects in a laboratory listening chamber. The responses of the subjects are recorded for a range of stimuli which encompass the designs, operating conditions, and ambient noise levels of current and future installations. Results to date have established the threshold of detectability for a range of impulsive stimuli of the type associated with blade/tower wake interactions. The status of the ongoing psychoacoustic tests, the subjective data, and the approach to the development of acoustic criteria/standards are described.

  13. Electromagnetic acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Alers, George A.; Burns, Jr., Leigh R.; MacLauchlan, Daniel T.

    1988-01-01

    A noncontact ultrasonic transducer for studying the acoustic properties of a metal workpiece includes a generally planar magnetizing coil positioned above the surface of the workpiece, and a generally planar eddy current coil between the magnetizing coil and the workpiece. When a large current is passed through the magnetizing coil, a large magnetic field is applied to the near-surface regions of the workpiece. The eddy current coil can then be operated as a transmitter by passing an alternating current therethrough to excite ultrasonic waves in the surface of the workpiece, or operated as a passive receiver to sense ultrasonic waves in the surface by measuring the output signal. The geometries of the two coils can be varied widely to be effective for different types of ultrasonic waves. The coils are preferably packaged in a housing which does not interfere with their operation, but protects them from a variety of adverse environmental conditions.

  14. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic signature components and controls. 11... SERVICES GENERAL ELECTRONIC RECORDS; ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES Electronic Signatures § 11.200 Electronic signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall:...

  15. Helmet-mounted acoustic array for hostile fire detection and localization in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Michael V.

    2008-04-01

    The detection and localization of hostile weapons firing has been demonstrated successfully with acoustic sensor arrays on unattended ground sensors (UGS), ground-vehicles, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Some of the more mature systems have demonstrated significant capabilities and provide direct support to ongoing counter-sniper operations. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is conducting research and development for a helmet-mounted system to acoustically detect and localize small arms firing, or other events such as RPG, mortars, and explosions, as well as other non-transient signatures. Since today's soldier is quickly being asked to take on more and more reconnaissance, surveillance, & target acquisition (RSTA) functions, sensor augmentation enables him to become a mobile and networked sensor node on the complex and dynamic battlefield. Having a body-worn threat detection and localization capability for events that pose an immediate danger to the soldiers around him can significantly enhance their survivability and lethality, as well as enable him to provide and use situational awareness clues on the networked battlefield. This paper addresses some of the difficulties encountered by an acoustic system in an urban environment. Complex reverberation, multipath, diffraction, and signature masking by building structures makes this a very harsh environment for robust detection and classification of shockwaves and muzzle blasts. Multifunctional acoustic detection arrays can provide persistent surveillance and enhanced situational awareness for every soldier.

  16. 5 CFR 850.106 - Electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic signatures. 850.106 Section 850.106 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... password; (ii) Smart card; (iii) Digitized signature; or (iv) Biometrics, such as fingerprints,...

  17. 5 CFR 850.106 - Electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Electronic signatures. 850.106 Section 850.106 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... password; (ii) Smart card; (iii) Digitized signature; or (iv) Biometrics, such as fingerprints,...

  18. Signature Genes as a Phylogenomic Tool

    PubMed Central

    Snel, Berend; Ettema, Thijs J. G.; Huynen, Martijn A.

    2008-01-01

    Gene content has been shown to contain a strong phylogenetic signal, yet its usage for phylogenetic questions is hampered by horizontal gene transfer and parallel gene loss and until now required completely sequenced genomes. Here, we introduce an approach that allows the phylogenetic signal in gene content to be applied to any set of sequences, using signature genes for phylogenetic classification. The hundreds of publicly available genomes allow us to identify signature genes at various taxonomic depths, and we show how the presence of signature genes in an unspecified sample can be used to characterize its taxonomic composition. We identify 8,362 signature genes specific for 112 prokaryotic taxa. We show that these signature genes can be used to address phylogenetic questions on the basis of gene content in cases where classic gene content or sequence analyses provide an ambiguous answer, such as for Nanoarchaeum equitans, and even in cases where complete genomes are not available, such as for metagenomics data. Cross-validation experiments leaving out up to 30% of the species show that ∼92% of the signature genes correctly place the species in a related clade. Analyses of metagenomics data sets with the signature gene approach are in good agreement with the previously reported species distributions based on phylogenetic analysis of marker genes. Summarizing, signature genes can complement traditional sequence-based methods in addressing taxonomic questions. PMID:18492663

  19. Does Social Work Have a Signature Pedagogy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earls Larrison, Tara; Korr, Wynne S.

    2013-01-01

    This article contributes to discourse on signature pedagogy by reconceptualizing how our pedagogies are understood and defined for social work education. We critique the view that field education is social work's signature pedagogy and consider what pedagogies are distinct about the teaching and learning of social work. Using Shulman's…

  20. 5 CFR 850.106 - Electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electronic signatures. 850.106 Section 850.106 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT SYSTEMS MODERNIZATION General Provisions § 850.106 Electronic signatures. (a) Subject to any provisions prescribed by...

  1. A Real Quantum Designated Verifier Signature Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei-Min; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Yang, Yu-Guang

    2015-09-01

    The effectiveness of most quantum signature schemes reported in the literature can be verified by a designated person, however, those quantum signature schemes aren't the real traditional designated verifier signature schemes, because the designated person hasn't the capability to efficiently simulate a signature which is indistinguishable from a signer, which cannot satisfy the requirements in some special environments such as E-voting, call for tenders and software licensing. For solving this problem, a real quantum designated verifier signature scheme is proposed in this paper. According to the property of unitary transformation and quantum one-way function, only a verifier designated by a signer can verify the "validity of a signature" and the designated verifier cannot prove to a third party that the signature was produced by the signer or by himself through a transcript simulation algorithm. Moreover, the quantum key distribution and quantum encryption algorithm guarantee the unconditional security of this scheme. Analysis results show that this new scheme satisfies the main security requirements of designated verifier signature scheme and the major attack strategies.

  2. DETECTING BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Labatie, A.; Starck, J. L.

    2012-02-20

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) are a feature imprinted in the galaxy distribution by acoustic waves traveling in the plasma of the early universe. Their detection at the expected scale in large-scale structures strongly supports current cosmological models with a nearly linear evolution from redshift z Almost-Equal-To 1000 and the existence of dark energy. In addition, BAOs provide a standard ruler for studying cosmic expansion. In this paper, we focus on methods for BAO detection using the correlation function measurement {xi}-hat. For each method, we want to understand the tested hypothesis (the hypothesis H{sub 0} to be rejected) and the underlying assumptions. We first present wavelet methods which are mildly model-dependent and mostly sensitive to the BAO feature. Then we turn to fully model-dependent methods. We present the method used most often based on the {chi}{sup 2} statistic, but we find that it has limitations. In general the assumptions of the {chi}{sup 2} method are not verified, and it only gives a rough estimate of the significance. The estimate can become very wrong when considering more realistic hypotheses, where the covariance matrix of {xi}-hat depends on cosmological parameters. Instead, we propose to use the {Delta}l method based on two modifications: we modify the procedure for computing the significance and make it rigorous, and we modify the statistic to obtain better results in the case of varying covariance matrix. We verify with simulations that correct significances are different from the ones obtained using the classical {chi}{sup 2} procedure. We also test a simple example of varying covariance matrix. In this case we find that our modified statistic outperforms the classical {chi}{sup 2} statistic when both significances are correctly computed. Finally, we find that taking into account variations of the covariance matrix can change both BAO detection levels and cosmological parameter constraints.

  3. Weapons bay acoustic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, L. L.; Shimovetz, R. M.

    1994-09-01

    An aircraft weapons bay exposed to freestream flow experiences an intense aeroacoustic environment in and around the bay. Experience has taught that the intensity of this environment can be severe enough to result in damage to a store, its internal equipment, or the structure of the weapons bay itself. To ensure that stores and sensitive internal equipment can withstand this hazardous environment and successfully complete the mission, they must be qualified to the most severe sound pressure levels anticipated for the mission. If the qualification test levels are too high, the store and its internal equipment will be over designed, resulting in unnecessary costs and possible performance penalties. If the qualification levels are below those experienced in flight, the store or its internal equipment may catastrophically fail during performance of the mission. Thus, it is desirable that the expected levels in weapons bays be accurately predicted. A large number of research efforts have been directed toward understanding flow-induced cavity oscillations. However, the phenomena are still not adequately understood to allow one to predict the fluctuating pressure levels for various configurations and flow conditions. This is especially true at supersonic flow speeds, where only a small amount of data are available. This paper will give a background of flow induced cavity oscillations and discuss predictions, control and suppression, and the future of weapons bay acoustic environments. A large number of research efforts have been directed toward understanding flow-induced cavity oscillations. However, the phenomena are still not adequately understood to allow one to predict the fluctuating pressure levels for various configurations and flow conditions. This is especially true at supersonic flow speeds, where only a small amount of data are available. This paper will give a background of flow induced cavity oscillations and discuss predictions, control and suppression, and

  4. A comparison of the acoustic and aerodynamic measurements of a model rotor tested in two anechoic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Lewy, S.; Caplot, M.

    1986-01-01

    Two aeroacoustic facilities--the CEPRA 19 in France and the DNW in the Netherlands--are compared. The two facilities have unique acoustic characteristics that make them appropriate for acoustic testing of model-scale helicopter rotors. An identical pressure-instrumented model-scale rotor was tested in each facility and acoustic test results are compared with full-scale-rotor test results. Blade surface pressures measured in both tunnels were used to correlated nominal rotor operating conditions in each tunnel, and also used to assess the steadiness of the rotor in each tunnel's flow. In-the-flow rotor acoustic signatures at moderate forward speeds (35-50 m/sec) are presented for each facility and discussed in relation to the differences in tunnel geometries and aeroacoustic characteristics. Both reports are presented in appendices to this paper. ;.);

  5. A comparison of the acoustic and aerodynamic measurements of a model rotor tested in two anechoic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Lewy, S.

    1986-01-01

    Two aeroacoustic facilities - the CEPRA 19 in France and the DNW in the Netherlands - are compared. The two facilities have unique acoustic characteristics that make them appropriate for acoustic testing of model-scale helicopter rotors. An identical pressure-instrumented model-scale rotor was tested in each facility and acoustic test results are compared with full-scale-rotor test results. Blade surface pressures measured in both tunnels were used to correlated nominal rotor operating conditions in each tunnel, and also used to assess the steadiness of the rotor in each tunnel's flow. In-the-flow rotor acoustic signatures at moderate forward speeds (35-50 m/sec) are presented for each facility and discussed in relation to the differences in tunnel geometries and aeroacoustic characteristics. Both reports are presented in appendices to this paper.

  6. Recent Langley helicopter acoustics contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Homer G.; Pao, S. P.; Powell, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    The helicopter acoustics program at NASA Langley has included technology for elements of noise control ranging from sources of noise to receivers of noise. The scope of Langley contributions for about the last decade is discussed. Specifically, the resolution of two certification noise quantification issues by subjective acoustics research, the development status of the helicopter system noise prediction program ROTONET are reviewed and the highlights from research on blade rotational, broadband, and blade vortex interaction noise sources are presented. Finally, research contributions on helicopter cabin (or interior) noise control are presented. A bibliography of publications from the Langley helicopter acoustics program for the past 10 years is included.

  7. An asymptotic model in acoustics: acoustic drift equations.

    PubMed

    Vladimirov, Vladimir A; Ilin, Konstantin

    2013-11-01

    A rigorous asymptotic procedure with the Mach number as a small parameter is used to derive the equations of mean flows which coexist and are affected by the background acoustic waves in the limit of very high Reynolds number.

  8. Delineation of excessive strength soils through acoustic to seismic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Wheeler B.

    Soils overlying a naturally occurring hardpans, such as a fragipan, normally experience decreased crop yield and increased erosion rates. The motivation for this work stems from the desire to map the fragipan horizon in order to judiciously distribute agricultural resources. Currently, the fragipan horizon is mapped via core samples, auger holes, cone penetrometer measurements, and trench studies. The focus of this study is the application of a/s coupling techniques, which are less invasive, potentially more expedient, and inherently sensitive to changes in mechanical properties, to determine the depth to the fragipan. Previous investigations correlated various attributes of the acoustic to seismic (a/s) signature to physical quantities of the soil. These results showed promise for characterizing the near surface distribution of the soil's mechanical properties. This work further refines the a/s coupling technique to determine the depth to the soil-fragipan interface and the mechanical properties of the soil-fragipan system. The a/s coupling signature was measured at two field sites along with seismic refraction, cone penetrometer, trench, and core sample surveys. The ground truth served as a guide for the inversion of the a/s coupling field data. A multi-layered Thompson-Haskell viscoelastic forward model was employed to model the a,/s signature of the soil. Simulations with the forward model indicated that the a/s signature behaved as a quarter wavelength resonance prior to the onset of critical angles.Significant shins in the amplitude and frequency of the a/s signature occurred as critical angles were traversed. Inversion of svnthetic data via a hybrid algorithm was successful for both one and two layers over a half-space when the shear velocity was constrained. The measured a/s and modeled a/s signatures did not agree whether using the ground truth in modeling the als signature or comparing to the results from the a/s inversion. This may be because the a/s is

  9. Topographic Signatures of Meandering Rivers with Differences in Outer Bank Cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S. A.; Belmont, P.

    2014-12-01

    Within a given valley setting, interactions between river hydraulics, sediment, topography, and vegetation determine attributes of channel morphology, including planform, width and depth, slope, and bed and bank properties. These feedbacks also govern river behavior, including migration and avulsion. Bank cohesion, from the addition of fine sediment and/or vegetation has been recognized in flume experiments as a necessary component to create and maintain a meandering channel planform. Greater bank cohesion slows bank erosion, limiting the rate at which a river can adjust laterally and preventing so-called "runaway widening" to a braided state. Feedbacks of bank cohesion on channel hydraulics and sediment transport may thus produce distinct topographic signatures, or patterns in channel width, depth, and point bar transverse slope. We expect that in bends of greater outer bank cohesion the channel will be narrower, deeper, and bars will have greater transverse slopes. Only recently have we recognized that biotic processes may imprint distinct topographic signatures on the landscape. This study explores topographic signatures of three US rivers: the lower Minnesota River, near Mankato, MN, the Le Sueur River, south central MN, and the Fall River, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO. Each of these rivers has variability in outer bank cohesion, quantified based on geotechnical and vegetation properties, and in-channel topography, which was derived from rtkGPS and acoustic bathymetry surveys. We present methods for incorporating biophysical feedbacks into geomorphic transport laws so that models can better simulate the spatial patterns and variability of topographic signatures.

  10. Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Wedge, David C.; Aparicio, Samuel A.J.R.; Behjati, Sam; Biankin, Andrew V.; Bignell, Graham R.; Bolli, Niccolo; Borg, Ake; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boyault, Sandrine; Burkhardt, Birgit; Butler, Adam P.; Caldas, Carlos; Davies, Helen R.; Desmedt, Christine; Eils, Roland; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Foekens, John A.; Greaves, Mel; Hosoda, Fumie; Hutter, Barbara; Ilicic, Tomislav; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Imielinsk, Marcin; Jäger, Natalie; Jones, David T.W.; Jones, David; Knappskog, Stian; Kool, Marcel; Lakhani, Sunil R.; López-Otín, Carlos; Martin, Sancha; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Nakamura, Hiromi; Northcott, Paul A.; Pajic, Marina; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Paradiso, Angelo; Pearson, John V.; Puente, Xose S.; Raine, Keiran; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Richardson, Andrea L.; Richter, Julia; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schlesner, Matthias; Schumacher, Ton N.; Span, Paul N.; Teague, Jon W.; Totoki, Yasushi; Tutt, Andrew N.J.; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; van Buuren, Marit M.; van ’t Veer, Laura; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Waddell, Nicola; Yates, Lucy R.; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Futreal, P. Andrew; McDermott, Ultan; Lichter, Peter; Meyerson, Matthew; Grimmond, Sean M.; Siebert, Reiner; Campo, Elías; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Pfister, Stefan M.; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    All cancers are caused by somatic mutations. However, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here, we analysed 4,938,362 mutations from 7,042 cancers and extracted more than 20 distinct mutational signatures. Some are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. In addition to these genome-wide mutational signatures, hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, kataegis, is found in many cancer types. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer with potential implications for understanding of cancer etiology, prevention and therapy. PMID:23945592

  11. Redactable signatures for signed CDA Documents.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhen-Yu; Hsueh, Chih-Wen; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Lai, Feipei; Lee, Hung-Chang; Chung, Yufang

    2012-06-01

    The Clinical Document Architecture, introduced by Health Level Seven, is a XML-based standard intending to specify the encoding, structure, and semantics of clinical documents for exchange. Since the clinical document is in XML form, its authenticity and integrity could be guaranteed by the use of the XML signature published by W3C. While a clinical document wants to conceal some personal or private information, the document needs to be redacted. It makes the signed signature of the original clinical document not be verified. The redactable signature is thus proposed to enable verification for the redacted document. Only a little research does the implementation of the redactable signature, and there still not exists an appropriate scheme for the clinical document. This paper will investigate the existing web-technologies and find a compact and applicable model to implement a suitable redactable signature for the clinical document viewer. PMID:21181244

  12. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark; Gosnell, Tom B.; Ham, Cheryl; Perkins, Dwight; Wong, James

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  13. Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Wedge, David C; Aparicio, Samuel A J R; Behjati, Sam; Biankin, Andrew V; Bignell, Graham R; Bolli, Niccolò; Borg, Ake; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boyault, Sandrine; Burkhardt, Birgit; Butler, Adam P; Caldas, Carlos; Davies, Helen R; Desmedt, Christine; Eils, Roland; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Foekens, John A; Greaves, Mel; Hosoda, Fumie; Hutter, Barbara; Ilicic, Tomislav; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Imielinski, Marcin; Imielinsk, Marcin; Jäger, Natalie; Jones, David T W; Jones, David; Knappskog, Stian; Kool, Marcel; Lakhani, Sunil R; López-Otín, Carlos; Martin, Sancha; Munshi, Nikhil C; Nakamura, Hiromi; Northcott, Paul A; Pajic, Marina; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Paradiso, Angelo; Pearson, John V; Puente, Xose S; Raine, Keiran; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Richardson, Andrea L; Richter, Julia; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schlesner, Matthias; Schumacher, Ton N; Span, Paul N; Teague, Jon W; Totoki, Yasushi; Tutt, Andrew N J; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; van Buuren, Marit M; van 't Veer, Laura; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Waddell, Nicola; Yates, Lucy R; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Futreal, P Andrew; McDermott, Ultan; Lichter, Peter; Meyerson, Matthew; Grimmond, Sean M; Siebert, Reiner; Campo, Elías; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Pfister, Stefan M; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R

    2013-08-22

    All cancers are caused by somatic mutations; however, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here we analysed 4,938,362 mutations from 7,042 cancers and extracted more than 20 distinct mutational signatures. Some are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single cancer class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. In addition to these genome-wide mutational signatures, hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, 'kataegis', is found in many cancer types. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer, with potential implications for understanding of cancer aetiology, prevention and therapy.

  14. Security Weaknesses in Arbitrated Quantum Signature Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Zhang, Kejia; Cao, Tianqing

    2014-01-01

    Arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) is a cryptographic scenario in which the sender (signer), Alice, generates the signature of a message and then a receiver (verifier), Bob, can verify the signature with the help of a trusted arbitrator, Trent. In this paper, we point out there exist some security weaknesses in two AQS protocols. Our analysis shows Alice can successfully disavow any of her signatures by a simple attack in the first protocol. Furthermore, we study the security weaknesses of the second protocol from the aspects of forgery and disavowal. Some potential improvements of this kind of protocols are given. We also design a new method to authenticate a signature or a message, which makes AQS protocols immune to Alice's disavowal attack and Bob's forgery attack effectively.

  15. Probing Acoustic Nonlinearity by Mixing Surface Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, David Howard; Telschow, Kenneth Louis

    2000-07-01

    Measurement methods aimed at determining material properties through nonlinear wave propagation are sensitive to artifacts caused by background nonlinearities inherent in the ultrasonic generation and detection methods. The focus of this paper is to describe our investigation of nonlinear mixing of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) as a means to decrease sensitivity to background nonlinearity and increase spatial sensitivity to acoustic nonlinearity induced by material microstructure.

  16. Acoustic Remote Sensing of Extreme Sea States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Wade; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    Extreme sea states from storms, landslides, ice-quakes, meteorite fall, submarines explosions, and earthquakes, are associated with a sudden change in water pressure. Consequently, acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) may radiate carrying information on those states at the speed of sound. Using remote sensing of AGWs, we propose an early detection system for such extreme sea states. We show that the AGW pressure signature for a small circularly symmetric sinusoidal component of oscillation of the free surface preserves the frequency but modifies the amplitude of the component. Further tests indicate that this amplitude is independent of the frequency but depends on the radial distance from the source, as expected. Therefore, an input spectrum for a sea state will give rise to a similar spectrum shape for the AGW pressure signal with an amplitude modulation function that can be estimated from the model. This then leads to a robust method to remote sense sea state spectra from measurements of their induced AGW pressure spectra.

  17. Structural acoustics of good and bad violins.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George

    2008-09-01

    Modal-acoustic radiation measurements on 17 "bad-to-excellent" quality-rated violins--including three-dimensional modal analyses of Titian and Willemotte Stradivari and Plowden Guarneri del Gesu violins to investigate extensional as well as flexural motions-were examined for quality-related trends, generally by contrasting the properties of "excellent" and "bad" violins. All violins tested showed the same five "signature" modes below 600 Hz, with no obvious quality trends for mode frequencies or total damping. Bad-excellent comparisons of band-/modal-averaged damping (total, radiation and internal), mobility, radiativity, directivity, fraction-of-vibrational-energy radiated, effective critical frequency, and radiativity profiles up to 4 kHz generally showed no significant difference; the only "robust" quality differentiator was the approximately 280 Hz, Helmholtz-type A0 cavity mode radiativity where excellent violins were significantly higher. Radiation and total damping of two old Italian violins appeared slightly higher than those for bad violins below 2 kHz, partly due to lower effective critical frequency and partly because of slightly lower mass. Stradivari violins showed the highest and lowest directivity of all instruments tested. The Titian and Plowden top plate flexural/extensional mobility ratios appeared correlated with their directivity. Extensional motion in the "bridge island" between f holes peaked near 2.4 kHz, coinciding with the BH peak and a bridge/bridge-island impedance ratio minimum.

  18. Effects of subsampling of passive acoustic recordings on acoustic metrics.

    PubMed

    Thomisch, Karolin; Boebel, Olaf; Zitterbart, Daniel P; Samaran, Flore; Van Parijs, Sofie; Van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2015-07-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring is an important tool in marine mammal studies. However, logistics and finances frequently constrain the number and servicing schedules of acoustic recorders, requiring a trade-off between deployment periods and sampling continuity, i.e., the implementation of a subsampling scheme. Optimizing such schemes to each project's specific research questions is desirable. This study investigates the impact of subsampling on the accuracy of two common metrics, acoustic presence and call rate, for different vocalization patterns (regimes) of baleen whales: (1) variable vocal activity, (2) vocalizations organized in song bouts, and (3) vocal activity with diel patterns. To this end, above metrics are compared for continuous and subsampled data subject to different sampling strategies, covering duty cycles between 50% and 2%. The results show that a reduction of the duty cycle impacts negatively on the accuracy of both acoustic presence and call rate estimates. For a given duty cycle, frequent short listening periods improve accuracy of daily acoustic presence estimates over few long listening periods. Overall, subsampling effects are most pronounced for low and/or temporally clustered vocal activity. These findings illustrate the importance of informed decisions when applying subsampling strategies to passive acoustic recordings or analyses for a given target species.

  19. Effects of subsampling of passive acoustic recordings on acoustic metrics.

    PubMed

    Thomisch, Karolin; Boebel, Olaf; Zitterbart, Daniel P; Samaran, Flore; Van Parijs, Sofie; Van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2015-07-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring is an important tool in marine mammal studies. However, logistics and finances frequently constrain the number and servicing schedules of acoustic recorders, requiring a trade-off between deployment periods and sampling continuity, i.e., the implementation of a subsampling scheme. Optimizing such schemes to each project's specific research questions is desirable. This study investigates the impact of subsampling on the accuracy of two common metrics, acoustic presence and call rate, for different vocalization patterns (regimes) of baleen whales: (1) variable vocal activity, (2) vocalizations organized in song bouts, and (3) vocal activity with diel patterns. To this end, above metrics are compared for continuous and subsampled data subject to different sampling strategies, covering duty cycles between 50% and 2%. The results show that a reduction of the duty cycle impacts negatively on the accuracy of both acoustic presence and call rate estimates. For a given duty cycle, frequent short listening periods improve accuracy of daily acoustic presence estimates over few long listening periods. Overall, subsampling effects are most pronounced for low and/or temporally clustered vocal activity. These findings illustrate the importance of informed decisions when applying subsampling strategies to passive acoustic recordings or analyses for a given target species. PMID:26233026

  20. Hybrid optical and acoustic force based sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahoney, Paul; Brodie, Graham W.; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E. M.; Cochran, Sandy; Spalding, Gabriel C.; MacDonald, Michael P.

    2014-09-01

    We report the combined use of optical sorting and acoustic levitation to give particle sorting. Differing sizes of microparticles are sorted optically both with and without the aid of acoustic levitation, and the results compared to show that the use of acoustic trapping can increase sorting efficiency. The use of a transparent ultrasonic transducer is also shown to streamline the integration of optics and acoustics. We also demonstrate the balance of optical radiation pressure and acoustic levitation to achieve vertical sorting.

  1. The effective acoustic environment of helicopter crewmen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, R. T., Jr.; Mozo, B. T.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of measuring the composite acoustic environment of helicopters in order to quantify the effective acoustic environment of the crewmen and to assess the real acoustic hazards of the personnel are examined. It is indicated that the attenuation characteristics of the helmets and hearing protectors and the variables of the physiology of the human ear be accounted for in determining the effective acoustic environment of Army helicopter crewmen as well as the acoustic hazards of voice communications systems noise.

  2. PC and PVC Acoustics Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luzader, Stephen

    1990-01-01

    Described are four musical instruments constructed from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe. The use of computerized synthesizers to play scales and chords is discussed. Suggestions for other illustrations of acoustics are included. (CW)

  3. Acoustics: Motion controlled by sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neild, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    A simple technique has been developed that produces holograms made of sound waves. These acoustic landscapes are used to manipulate microscale objects, and offer great potential in medical imaging and selective heating. See Letter p.518

  4. Acoustic Characterization of Mesoscale Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, D; Huber, R; Chambers, D; Cole, G; Balogun, O; Spicer, J; Murray, T

    2007-03-13

    This report describes the science and engineering performed to provide state-of-the-art acoustic capabilities for nondestructively characterizing mesoscale (millimeter-sized) objects--allowing micrometer resolution over the objects entire volume. Materials and structures used in mesoscale objects necessitate the use of (1) GHz acoustic frequencies and (2) non-contacting laser generation and detection of acoustic waves. This effort demonstrated that acoustic methods at gigahertz frequencies have the necessary penetration depth and spatial resolution to effectively detect density discontinuities, gaps, and delaminations. A prototype laser-based ultrasonic system was designed and built. The system uses a micro-chip laser for excitation of broadband ultrasonic waves with frequency components reaching 1.0 GHz, and a path-stabilized Michelson interferometer for detection. The proof-of-concept for mesoscale characterization is demonstrated by imaging a micro-fabricated etched pattern in a 70 {micro}m thick silicon wafer.

  5. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other...

  6. Study Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James; Workman,Gary

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work will be to develop techniques for monitoring the acoustic emissions from carbon epoxy composite structures at cryogenic temperatures. Performance of transducers at temperatures ranging from ambient to cryogenic and the characteristics of acoustic emission from composite structures will be studied and documented. This entire effort is directed towards characterization of structures used in NASA propulsion programs such as the X-33.

  7. Acoustic Rectification in Dispersive Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  8. Acoustics Research of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Ximing; Houston, Janice D.

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces some of the highest acoustic loading over a broad frequency for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are used in the prediction of the internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle but there are challenges. Present liftoff vehicle acoustic environment prediction methods utilize stationary data from previously conducted hold-down tests; i.e. static firings conducted in the 1960's, to generate 1/3 octave band Sound Pressure Level (SPL) spectra. These data sets are used to predict the liftoff acoustic environments for launch vehicles. To facilitate the accuracy and quality of acoustic loading, predictions at liftoff for future launch vehicles such as the Space Launch System (SLS), non-stationary flight data from the Ares I-X were processed in PC-Signal in two forms which included a simulated hold-down phase and the entire launch phase. In conjunction, the Prediction of Acoustic Vehicle Environments (PAVE) program was developed in MATLAB to allow for efficient predictions of sound pressure levels (SPLs) as a function of station number along the vehicle using semiempirical methods. This consisted, initially, of generating the Dimensionless Spectrum Function (DSF) and Dimensionless Source Location (DSL) curves from the Ares I-X flight data. These are then used in the MATLAB program to generate the 1/3 octave band SPL spectra. Concluding results show major differences in SPLs between the hold-down test data and the processed Ares IX flight data making the Ares I-X flight data more practical for future vehicle acoustic environment predictions.

  9. Acoustic techniques in nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, C.T.; Sinha, D.N.

    1995-07-01

    Acoustic techniques can be employed to address many questions relevant to current nuclear technology needs. These include establishing and monitoring intrinsic tags and seals, locating holdup in areas where conventional radiation-based measurements have limited capability, process monitoring, monitoring containers for corrosion or changes in pressure, and facility design verification. These acoustics applications are in their infancy with respect to safeguards and nuclear material management, but proof-of-principle has been demonstrated in many of the areas listed.

  10. Simplified Rotation In Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Gaspar, M. S.; Trinh, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    New technique based on old discovery used to control orientation of object levitated acoustically in axisymmetric chamber. Method does not require expensive equipment like additional acoustic drivers of precisely adjustable amplitude, phase, and frequency. Reflecting object acts as second source of sound. If reflecting object large enough, close enough to levitated object, or focuses reflected sound sufficiently, Rayleigh torque exerted on levitated object by reflected sound controls orientation of object.

  11. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  12. ACOUSTIC RECTIFICATION IN DISPERSIVE MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.

    2009-03-03

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  13. Acoustically-driven microfluidic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A W; Benett, W J; Tarte, L R

    2000-06-23

    We have demonstrated a non-contact method of concentrating and mixing particles in a plastic microfluidic chamber employing acoustic radiation pressure. A flaw cell package has also been designed that integrates liquid sample interconnects, electrical contacts and a removable sample chamber. Experiments were performed on 1, 3, 6, and 10 {micro}m polystyrene beads. Increased antibody binding to a solid-phase substrate was observed in the presence of acoustic mixing due to improve mass transport.

  14. Spectral signatures of penumbral transients

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, K.; Tritschler, A.

    2013-12-20

    In this work we investigate the properties of penumbral transients observed in the upper photospheric and chromospheric region above a sunspot penumbra using two-dimensional spectroscopic observations of the Ca II 854.21 nm line with a 5 s cadence. In our 30 minutes of observations, we identify several penumbral-micro jets (PMJs) with cotemporal observations from Dunn Solar Telescope/IBIS and Hinode/SOT. We find that the line profiles of these PMJ events show emission in the two wings of the line (±0.05 nm), but little modification of the line core. These are reminiscent of the line profiles of Ellerman bombs observed in plage and network regions. Furthermore, we find evidence that some PMJ events have a precursor phase starting 1 minute prior to the main brightening that might indicate initial heating of the plasma prior to an acoustic or bow shock event. With the IBIS data, we also find several other types of transient brightenings with timescales of less than 1 minute that are not clearly seen in the Hinode/SOT data. The spectral profiles and other characteristics of these events are significantly different from those of PMJs. The different appearances of all these transients are an indicator of the general complexity of the chromospheric magnetic field and underscore the highly dynamic behavior above sunspots. It also highlights the care that is needed in interpreting broadband filter images of chromospheric lines, which may conceal very different spectral profiles, and the underlying physical mechanisms at work.

  15. Arctic acoustics ultrasonic modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamuel, Jacques R.

    1990-03-01

    A unique collection of laboratory ultrasonic modeling results are presented revealing and characterizing hidden pulsed seismoacoustic wave phenomena from 3-D range dependent liquid/solid boundaries. The research succeeded in isolating and identifying low frequency (10 to 500 Hz) transmission loss mechanisms and provided physical insight into Arctic acoustic problems generally beyond the state-of-the-art of theoretical and numerical analysis. The ultrasonic modeling studies dealt with controversial issues and existing discrepancies on seismo-acoustic waves at water/ice interface, sea ice thickness determination, low frequency transmission loss, and bottom leaky Rayleigh waves. The areas investigated include leaky Rayleigh waves at water/ice interface, leaky flexural waves in floating ice plates, effects of dry/wet cracks in sea ice on plate waves and near grazing acoustic waves, edge waves in floating plates, low frequency backscatter from ice keel width resonances, conversion of underwater acoustic waves into plate waves by keels, nondispersive flexural wave along apex of small angle solid wedge, Scholte and leaky Rayleigh waves along apex of immersed 90 ice wedge, backscatter from trailing edge of floes, floating plate resonances associated with near-grazing underwater acoustic waves, acoustic coupling between adjacent floes, and multiple bottom leaky Rayleigh wave components in water layer over solid bottom.

  16. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  17. Acoustics Research of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Ximing; Houston, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces high acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are used in the prediction of the internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components. Present liftoff vehicle acoustic environment prediction methods utilize stationary data from previously conducted hold-down tests to generate 1/3 octave band Sound Pressure Level (SPL) spectra. In an effort to update the accuracy and quality of liftoff acoustic loading predictions, non-stationary flight data from the Ares I-X were processed in PC-Signal in two flight phases: simulated hold-down and liftoff. In conjunction, the Prediction of Acoustic Vehicle Environments (PAVE) program was developed in MATLAB to allow for efficient predictions of sound pressure levels (SPLs) as a function of station number along the vehicle using semi-empirical methods. This consisted of generating the Dimensionless Spectrum Function (DSF) and Dimensionless Source Location (DSL) curves from the Ares I-X flight data. These are then used in the MATLAB program to generate the 1/3 octave band SPL spectra. Concluding results show major differences in SPLs between the hold-down test data and the processed Ares I-X flight data making the Ares I-X flight data more practical for future vehicle acoustic environment predictions.

  18. Acoustical evaluation of preschool classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wonyoung; Hodgson, Murray

    2003-10-01

    An investigation was made of the acoustical environments in the Berwick Preschool, Vancouver, in response to complaints by the teachers. Reverberation times (RT), background noise levels (BNL), and in-class sound levels (Leq) were measured for acoustical evaluation in the classrooms. With respect to the measured RT and BNL, none of the classrooms in the preschool were acceptable according to the criteria relevant to this study. A questionnaire was administered to the teachers to assess their subjective responses to the acoustical and nonacoustical environments of the classrooms. Teachers agreed that the nonacoustical environments in the classrooms were fair, but that the acoustical environments had problems. Eight different classroom configurations were simulated to improve the acoustical environments, using the CATT room acoustical simulation program. When the surface absorption was increased, both the RT and speech levels decreased. RASTI was dependent on the volumes of the classrooms when the background noise levels were high; however, it depended on the total absorption of the classrooms when the background noise levels were low. Ceiling heights are critical as well. It is recommended that decreasing the volume of the classrooms is effective. Sound absorptive materials should be added to the walls or ceiling.

  19. Genomic signatures in microbes -- properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Bohlin, Jon

    2011-03-22

    The ratio of genomic oligonucleotide frequencies relative to the mean genomic AT/GC content has been shown to be similar for closely related species and, therefore, said to reflect a "genomic signature". The genomic signature has been found to be more similar within genomes than between closely related genomes. Furthermore, genomic signatures of closely related organisms are, in turn, more similar than more distantly related organisms. Since the genomic signature is remarkably stable within a genome, it can be extracted from only a fraction of the genomic DNA sequence. Genomic signatures, therefore, have many applications. The most notable examples include recognition of pathogenicity islands in microbial genomes and identification of hosts from arbitrary DNA sequences, the latter being of great importance in metagenomics. What shapes the genomic signature in microbial DNA has been readily discussed, but difficult to pinpoint exactly. Most attempts so far have mainly focused on correlations from in silico data. This mini-review seeks to summarize possible influences shaping the genomic signature and to survey a set of applications.

  20. SIRUS spectral signature analysis code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Gary J.; Caola, Mike J.; Geatches, Rachel M.; Roberts, Nick C.

    2003-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Centre (ATC) is responsible for developing IR signature prediction capabilities for its parent body, BAE SYSTEMS. To achieve this, the SIRUS code has been developed and used on a variety of projects for well over a decade. SIRUS is capable of providing accurate IR predictions for air breathing and rocket motor propelled vehicles. SIRUS models various physical components to derive its predictions. A key component is the radiance reflected from the surface of the modeled vehicle. This is modeled by fitting parameters to the measured Bi-Directional Reflectance Function (BDRF) of the surface material(s). The ATC have successfully implemented a parameterization scheme based on the published OPTASM model, and this is described. However, inconsistencies between reflectance measurements and values calculated from the parameterized fit have led to an elliptical parameter enhancement. The implementation of this is also described. Finally, an end-to-end measurement-parameterization capability is described, based on measurements taken with SOC600 instrumentation.

  1. Experimental signatures of quantum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boixo, Sergio

    2013-03-01

    Quantum annealing is a general strategy for solving optimization problems with the aid of quantum adiabatic evolution. How effective is rapid decoherence in precluding quantum effects in a quantum annealing experiment, and will engineered quantum annealing devices effectively perform classical thermalization when coupled to a decohering thermal environment? Using the D-Wave machine, we report experimental results for a simple problem which takes advantage of the fact that for quantum annealing the measurement statistics are determined by the energy spectrum along the quantum evolution, while in classical thermalization they are determined by the spectrum of the final Hamiltonian only. We establish an experimental signature which is consistent with quantum annealing, and at the same time inconsistent with classical thermalization, in spite of a decoherence timescale which is orders of magnitude shorter than the adiabatic evolution time. For larger and more difficult problems, we compare the measurements statistics of the D-Wave machine to large-scale numerical simulations of simulated annealing and simulated quantum annealing, implemented through classical and quantum Monte Carlo simulations. For our test cases the statistics of the machine are - within calibration uncertainties - indistinguishable from a simulated quantum annealer with suitably chosen parameters, but significantly different from a classical annealer. Work in collaboration with T. Albash, N. Chancellor, S. Isakov, D. Lidar, T. Roennow, F. Spedalieri, M. Troyer and Z. Wang.

  2. (abstract) Topographic Signatures in Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Tom G.; Evans, Diane L.

    1996-01-01

    Topographic information is required for many Earth Science investigations. For example, topography is an important element in regional and global geomorphic studies because it reflects the interplay between the climate-driven processes of erosion and the tectonic processes of uplift. A number of techniques have been developed to analyze digital topographic data, including Fourier texture analysis. A Fourier transform of the topography of an area allows the spatial frequency content of the topography to be analyzed. Band-pass filtering of the transform produces images representing the amplitude of different spatial wavelengths. These are then used in a multi-band classification to map units based on their spatial frequency content. The results using a radar image instead of digital topography showed good correspondence to a geologic map, however brightness variations in the image unrelated to topography caused errors. An additional benefit to the use of Fourier band-pass images for the classification is that the textural signatures of the units are quantative measures of the spatial characteristics of the units that may be used to map similar units in similar environments.

  3. Signature geometry and quantum engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samociuk, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    As the operating frequency of electromagnetic based devices increase, physical design geometry is playing an ever more important role. Evidence is considered in support of a relationship between the dimensionality of primitive geometric forms, such as transistors, and corresponding electromagnetic coupling efficiency. The industry of electronics is defined as the construction of devices by the patterning of primitive forms to physical materials. Examples are given to show the evolution of these primitives, down to nano scales, are requiring exacting geometry and three dimensional content. Consideration of microwave monolithic integrated circuits,(MMIC), photonics and metamaterials,(MM), support this trend and also add new requirements of strict geometric periodicity and multiplicity. Signature geometries,(SG), are characterized by distinctive attributes and examples are given. The transcendent form transcode algorithm, (TTA) is introduced as a multi dimensional SG and its use in designing photonic integrated circuits and metamaterials is discussed . A creative commons licensed research database, TRANSFORM, containing TTA geometries in OASIS file formats is described. An experimental methodology for using the database is given. Multidimensional SG and extraction of three dimensional cross sections as primitive forms is discussed as a foundation for quantum engineering and the exploitation of phenomena other than the electromagnetic.

  4. Molecular signatures of vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Olafsdottir, Thorunn; Lindqvist, Madelene; Harandi, Ali M

    2015-09-29

    Mass vaccination has saved millions of human lives and improved the quality of life in both developing and developed countries. The emergence of new pathogens and inadequate protection conferred by some of the existing vaccines such as vaccines for tuberculosis, influenza and pertussis especially in certain age groups have resulted in a move from empirically developed vaccines toward more pathogen tailored and rationally engineered vaccines. A deeper understanding of the interaction of innate and adaptive immunity at molecular level enables the development of vaccines that selectively target certain type of immune responses without excessive reactogenicity. Adjuvants constitute an imperative element of modern vaccines. Although a variety of candidate adjuvants have been evaluated in the past few decades, only a limited number of vaccine adjuvants are currently available for human use. A better understanding of the mode of action of adjuvants is pivotal to harness the potential of existing and new adjuvants in shaping a desired immune response. Recent advancement in systems biology powered by the emerging cutting edge omics technology has led to the identification of molecular signatures rapidly induced after vaccination in the blood that correlate and predict a later protective immune response or vaccine safety. This can pave ways to prospectively determine the potency and safety of vaccines and adjuvants. This review is intended to highlight the importance of big data analysis in advancing our understanding of the mechanisms of actions of adjuvants to inform rational development of future human vaccines. PMID:25989447

  5. Timing signatures of large scale solar eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Hock-Mysliwiec, Rachel; Henry, Timothy; Kirk, Michael S.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the timing signatures of large solar eruptions resulting in flares, CMEs and Solar Energetic Particle events. We probe solar active regions from the chromosphere through the corona, using data from space and ground-based observations, including ISOON, SDO, GONG, and GOES. Our studies include a number of flares and CMEs of mostly the M- and X-strengths as categorized by GOES. We find that the chromospheric signatures of these large eruptions occur 5-30 minutes in advance of coronal high temperature signatures. These timing measurements are then used as inputs to models and reconstruct the eruptive nature of these systems, and explore their utility in forecasts.

  6. Arbitrated quantum signature with an untrusted arbitrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Zhou, Zheng; Teng, Yi-Wei; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2011-02-01

    In an arbitrated signature scheme, all communications involve a so called arbitrator who has access to the contents of the messages. The security of most arbitrated signature schemes depends heavily on the trustworthiness of the arbitrators. In this paper we show how to construct an arbitrated quantum signature protocol of classical messages with an untrusted arbitrator. Its security is analyzed and it is proved to be secure even if the arbitrator is compromised. In addition, the proposed protocol does not require a direct quantum link between any two communicating users, which is an appealing advantage in the implementation of a practical quantum distributed communication network.

  7. Improved Quantum Signature Scheme with Weak Arbitrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qi; Li, Wen-Min

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we find a man-in-the-middle attack on the quantum signature scheme with a weak arbitrator (Luo et al., Int. J. Theor. Phys., 51:2135, 2012). In that scheme, the authors proposed a quantum signature based on quantum one way function which contains both verifying the signer phase and verifying the signed message phase. However, after our analysis we will show that Eve can adopt different strategies in respective phases to forge the signature without being detected. Then we present an improved scheme to increase the security.

  8. Contour mode resonators with acoustic reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; Fleming, James G.; Tuck, Melanie R.

    2008-06-10

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) resonator is disclosed which has a linear or ring-shaped acoustic resonator suspended above a substrate by an acoustic reflector. The acoustic resonator can be formed with a piezoelectric material (e.g. aluminum nitride, zinc oxide or PZT), or using an electrostatically-actuated material. The acoustic reflector (also termed an acoustic mirror) uses alternating sections of a relatively low acoustic impedance Z.sub.L material and a relatively high acoustic impedance Z.sub.H material to isolate the acoustic resonator from the substrate. The MEM resonator, which can be formed on a silicon substrate with conventional CMOS circuitry, has applications for forming oscillators, rf filters, and acoustic sensors.

  9. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S.; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting, and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next. PMID:23900527

  10. An acoustic glucose sensor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruifen; Stevenson, Adrian C; Lowe, Christopher R

    2012-05-15

    In vivo glucose monitoring is required for tighter glycaemic control. This report describes a new approach to construct a miniature implantable device based on a magnetic acoustic resonance sensor (MARS). A ≈ 600-800 nm thick glucose-responsive poly(acrylamide-co-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid) (poly(acrylamide-co-3-APB)) film was polymerised on the quartz disc (12 mm in diameter and 0.25 mm thick) of the MARS. The swelling/shrinking of the polymer film induced by the glucose binding to the phenylboronate caused changes in the resonance amplitude of the quartz disc in the MARS. A linear relationship between the response of the MARS and the glucose concentration in the range ≈ 0-15 mM was observed, with the optimum response of the MARS sensor being obtained when the polymer films contained ≈ 20 mol% 3-APB. The MARS glucose sensor also functioned under flow conditions (9 μl/min) with a response almost identical to the sensor under static or non-flow conditions. The results suggest that the MARS could offer a promising strategy for developing a small subcutaneously implanted continuous glucose monitor.

  11. Acoustic Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William M.; Candy, James V.

    Signal processing refers to the acquisition, storage, display, and generation of signals - also to the extraction of information from signals and the re-encoding of information. As such, signal processing in some form is an essential element in the practice of all aspects of acoustics. Signal processing algorithms enable acousticians to separate signals from noise, to perform automatic speech recognition, or to compress information for more efficient storage or transmission. Signal processing concepts are the building blocks used to construct models of speech and hearing. Now, in the 21st century, all signal processing is effectively digital signal processing. Widespread access to high-speed processing, massive memory, and inexpensive software make signal processing procedures of enormous sophistication and power available to anyone who wants to use them. Because advanced signal processing is now accessible to everybody, there is a need for primers that introduce basic mathematical concepts that underlie the digital algorithms. The present handbook chapter is intended to serve such a purpose.

  12. Software for Acoustic Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Joel D.

    2003-01-01

    SLAB is a software system that can be run on a personal computer to simulate an acoustic environment in real time. SLAB was developed to enable computational experimentation in which one can exert low-level control over a variety of signal-processing parameters, related to spatialization, for conducting psychoacoustic studies. Among the parameters that can be manipulated are the number and position of reflections, the fidelity (that is, the number of taps in finite-impulse-response filters), the system latency, and the update rate of the filters. Another goal in the development of SLAB was to provide an inexpensive means of dynamic synthesis of virtual audio over headphones, without need for special-purpose signal-processing hardware. SLAB has a modular, object-oriented design that affords the flexibility and extensibility needed to accommodate a variety of computational experiments and signal-flow structures. SLAB s spatial renderer has a fixed signal-flow architecture corresponding to a set of parallel signal paths from each source to a listener. This fixed architecture can be regarded as a compromise that optimizes efficiency at the expense of complete flexibility. Such a compromise is necessary, given the design goal of enabling computational psychoacoustic experimentation on inexpensive personal computers.

  13. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    A compact, portable instrument was developed to measure the acoustic impedance of the ground, or other surfaces, by direct pressure-volume velocity measurement. A Helmholz resonator, constructed of heavy-walled stainless steel but open at the bottom, is positioned over the surface having the unknown impedance. The sound source, a cam-driven piston of known stroke and thus known volume velocity, is located in the neck of the resonator. The cam speed is a variable up to a maximum 3600 rpm. The sound pressure at the test surface is measured by means of a microphone flush-mounted in the wall of the chamber. An optical monitor of the piston displacement permits measurement of the phase angle between the volume velocity and the sound pressure, from which the real and imaginary parts of the impedance can be evaluated. Measurements using a 5-lobed cam can be made up to 300 Hz. Detailed design criteria and results on a soil sample are presented.

  14. Covert underwater acoustic communications.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jun; He, Hao; Li, Jian; Roberts, William; Stoica, Petre

    2010-11-01

    Low probability of detection (LPD) communications are conducted at a low received signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to deter eavesdroppers to sense the presence of the transmitted signal. Successful detection at intended receiver heavily relies on the processing gain achieved by employing the direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) technique. For scenarios that lack a sufficiently low SNR to maintain LPD, another metric, referred to as low probability of interception (LPI), is of interest to protect the privacy of the transmitted information. If covert communications take place in underwater acoustic (UWA) environments, then additional challenges are present. The time-varying nature of the UWA channel prevents the employment of a long spreading waveform. Furthermore, UWA environments are frequency-selective channels with long memory, which imposes challenges to the design of the spreading waveform. In this paper, a covert UWA communication system that adopts the DSSS technique and a coherent RAKE receiver is investigated. Emphasis is placed on the design of a spreading waveform that not only accounts for the transceiver structure and frequency-selective nature of the UWA channel, but also possesses a superior LPI. The proposed techniques are evaluated using both simulated and SPACE'08 in-water experimental data.

  15. Passive Acoustic Vessel Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwal, Pasang Sherpa

    This thesis investigates the development of a low-cost passive acoustic system for localizing moving vessels to monitor areas where human activities such as fishing, snorkeling and poaching are restricted. The system uses several off-the-shelf sensors with unsynchronized clocks where the Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) or time delay is extracted by cross-correlation of the signal between paired sensors. The cross-correlation function uses phase correlation or Phase Transform (PHAT) which whitens the cross-spectrum in order to de-emphasize dominant frequency components. Using the locations of pairs of sensors as foci, hyperbolic equations can be defined using the time delay between them. With three or more sensors, multiple hyperbolic functions can be calculated which intersect at a unique point: the boat's location. It is also found that increasing separation distances between sensors decreased the correlation between the signals. However larger separation distances have better localization capability than with small distances. Experimental results from the Columbia and Willamette Rivers are presented to demonstrate performance.

  16. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-09-21

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next.

  17. Acoustics of the Intonarumori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafin, Stefania

    2005-04-01

    The Intonarumori were a family of musical instruments invented by the Italian futurist composer and painter Luigi Russolo. Each Intonarumori was made of a wooden parallelepiped sound box, inside which a wheel of different sizes and materials was setting into vibration a catgut or metal string. The pitch of the string was varied by using a lever, while the speed of the wheel was controlled by the performer using a crank. At one end of the string there was a drumhead that transmitted vibrations to the speaker. Unfortunately, all the original Intonarumori were destroyed after a fire during World War II. Since then, researchers have tried to understand the sound production mechanism of such instruments, especially by consulting the patents compiled by Russolo or by reading his book ``The art of noise.'' In this paper we describe the acoustics of the Intonarumori. Based on such description, we propose physical models that simulate such instruments. The intonarumori's string is modeled using a one dimensional waveguide, which is excited either by an impact or a friction model. The body of the instrument is modeled using a 3-D rectangular mesh, while the horn is considered as an omnidirectional radiator.

  18. Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-18

    Fishes and marine mammals may suffer a range of potential effects from exposure to intense underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording (USR) devices have been built to acquire samples of the underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities. Software becomes indispensable for processing and analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. The new Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility Software (AAMI) is specifically designed for analysis of underwater sound recordings to provide data in metrics that facilitate evaluation of the potential impacts of the sound on aquatic animals. In addition to the basic functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs and batch processing of sound files, the software utilizes recording system calibration data to compute important parameters in physical units. The software also facilitates comparison of the noise sound sample metrics with biological measures such as audiograms of the sensitivity of aquatic animals to the sound, integrating various components into a single analytical frame.

  19. Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface

    2012-12-18

    Fishes and marine mammals may suffer a range of potential effects from exposure to intense underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording (USR) devices have been built to acquire samples of the underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities. Software becomes indispensable for processing and analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. The new Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility Software (AAMI) is specificallymore » designed for analysis of underwater sound recordings to provide data in metrics that facilitate evaluation of the potential impacts of the sound on aquatic animals. In addition to the basic functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs and batch processing of sound files, the software utilizes recording system calibration data to compute important parameters in physical units. The software also facilitates comparison of the noise sound sample metrics with biological measures such as audiograms of the sensitivity of aquatic animals to the sound, integrating various components into a single analytical frame.« less

  20. Sub-Poissonian phonon statistics in an acoustical resonator coupled to a pumped two-level emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Ceban, V. Macovei, M. A.

    2015-11-15

    The concept of an acoustical analog of the optical laser has been developed recently in both theoretical and experimental works. We here discuss a model of a coherent phonon generator with a direct signature of the quantum properties of sound vibrations. The considered setup is made of a laser-driven quantum dot embedded in an acoustical nanocavity. The system dynamics is solved for a single phonon mode in the steady-state and in the strong quantum dot—phonon coupling regime beyond the secular approximation. We demonstrate that the phonon statistics exhibits quantum features, i.e., is sub-Poissonian.

  1. Methods for reconstructing acoustic quantities based on acoustic pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the acoustic imaging methods developed over the past three decades that enable one to reconstruct all acoustic quantities based on the acoustic pressure measurements taken around a target source at close distances. One such method that has received the most attention is known as near-field acoustical holography (NAH). The original NAH relies on Fourier transforms that are suitable for a surface containing a level of constant coordinate in a source-free region. Other methods are developed to reconstruct the acoustic quantities in three-dimensional space and on an arbitrary three-dimensional source surface. Note that there is a fine difference between Fourier transform based NAH and other methods that is largely overlooked. The former can offer a wave number spectrum, thus enabling visualization of various structural waves of different wavelengths that travel on the surface of a structure; the latter cannot provide such information, which is critical to acquire an in-depth understanding of the interrelationships between structural vibrations and sound radiation. All these methods are discussed in this paper, their advantages and limitations are compared, and the need for further development to analyze the root causes of noise and vibration problems is discussed.

  2. ACOUSTIC LINERS FOR TURBOFAN ENGINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minner, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed to design acoustic liners for turbofan engines. This program combines results from theoretical models of wave alternation in acoustically treated passages with experimental data from full-scale fan noise suppressors. By including experimentally obtained information, the program accounts for real effects such as wall boundary layers, duct terminations, and sound modal structure. The program has its greatest use in generating a number of design specifications to be used for evaluation of trade-offs. The program combines theoretical and empirical data in designing annular acoustic liners. First an estimate of the noise output of the fan is made based on basic fan aerodynamic design variables. Then, using a target noise spectrum after alternation and the estimated fan noise spectrum, a design spectrum is calculated as their difference. Next, the design spectrum is combined with knowledge of acoustic liner performance and the liner design variables to specify the acoustic design. Details of the liner design are calculated by combining the required acoustic impedance with a mathematical model relating acoustic impedance to the physical structure of the liner. Input to the noise prediction part of the program consists of basic fan operating parameters, distance that the target spectrum is to be measured and the target spectrum. The liner design portion of the program requires the required alternation spectrum, desired values of length to height and several option selection parameters. Output from the noise prediction portion is a noise spectrum consisting of discrete tones and broadband noise. This may be used as input to the liner design portion of the program. The liner design portion of the program produces backing depths, open area ratios, and face plate thicknesses. This program is written in FORTRAN V and has been implemented in batch mode on a UNIVAC 1100 series computer with a central memory requirement of 12K (decimal) of 36 bit words.

  3. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    John l. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-07-01

    The 1st generation acoustic monitoring package was designed to detect and analyze weak acoustic signals inside natural gas transmission lines. Besides a microphone it housed a three-inch diameter aerodynamic acoustic signal amplifier to maximize sensitivity to leak induced {Delta}p type signals. The theory and test results of this aerodynamic signal amplifier was described in the master's degree thesis of our Research Assistant Deepak Mehra who is about to graduate. To house such a large three-inch diameter sensor required the use of a steel 300-psi rated 4 inch weld neck flange, which itself weighed already 29 pounds. The completed 1st generation Acoustic Monitoring Package weighed almost 100 pounds. This was too cumbersome to mount in the field, on an access port at a pipeline shut-off valve. Therefore a 2nd generation and truly Portable Acoustic Monitor was built. It incorporated a fully self-contained {Delta}p type signal sensor, rated for line pressures up to 1000 psi with a base weight of only 6 pounds. This is the Rosemont Inc. Model 3051CD-Range 0, software driven sensor, which is believed to have industries best total performance. Its most sensitive unit was purchased with a {Delta}p range from 0 to 3 inch water. This resulted in the herein described 2nd generation: Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) for pipelines up to 1000 psi. Its 32-pound total weight includes an 18-volt battery. Together with a 3 pound laptop with its 4-channel data acquisition card, completes the equipment needed for field acoustic monitoring of natural gas transmission pipelines.

  4. Isotopic signatures by bulk analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.

    1997-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a series of measurement techniques for identification of nuclear signatures by analyzing bulk samples. Two specific applications for isotopic fingerprinting to identify the origin of anthropogenic radioactivity in bulk samples are presented. The first example is the analyses of environmental samples collected in the US Arctic to determine the impact of dumping of radionuclides in this polar region. Analyses of sediment and biota samples indicate that for the areas sampled the anthropogenic radionuclide content of sediments was predominantly the result of the deposition of global fallout. The anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations in fish, birds and mammals were very low. It can be surmised that marine food chains are presently not significantly affected. The second example is isotopic fingerprinting of water and sediment samples from the Rocky Flats Facility (RFP). The largest source of anthropogenic radioactivity presently affecting surface-waters at RFP is the sediments that are currently residing in the holding ponds. One gram of sediment from a holding pond contains approximately 50 times more plutonium than 1 liter of water from the pond. Essentially 100% of the uranium in Ponds A-1 and A-2 originated as depleted uranium. The largest source of radioactivity in the terminal Ponds A-4, B-5 and C-2 was naturally occurring uranium and its decay product radium. The uranium concentrations in the waters collected from the terminal ponds contained 0.05% or less of the interim standard calculated derived concentration guide for uranium in waters available to the public. All of the radioactivity observed in soil, sediment and water samples collected at RFP was naturally occurring, the result of processes at RFP or the result of global fallout. No extraneous anthropogenic alpha, beta or gamma activities were detected. The plutonium concentrations in Pond C-2 appear to vary seasonally.

  5. ACCRETING CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS: OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2015-01-20

    I calculate the spectral energy distributions of accreting circumplanetary disks using atmospheric radiative transfer models. Circumplanetary disks only accreting at 10{sup –10} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} around a 1 M{sub J} planet can be brighter than the planet itself. A moderately accreting circumplanetary disk ( M-dot ∼10{sup −8} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}; enough to form a 10 M{sub J} planet within 1 Myr) around a 1 M{sub J} planet has a maximum temperature of ∼2000 K, and at near-infrared wavelengths (J, H, K bands), this disk is as bright as a late-M-type brown dwarf or a 10 M{sub J} planet with a ''hot start''. To use direct imaging to find the accretion disks around low-mass planets (e.g., 1 M{sub J} ) and distinguish them from brown dwarfs or hot high-mass planets, it is crucial to obtain photometry at mid-infrared bands (L', M, N bands) because the emission from circumplanetary disks falls off more slowly toward longer wavelengths than those of brown dwarfs or planets. If young planets have strong magnetic fields (≳100 G), fields may truncate slowly accreting circumplanetary disks ( M-dot ≲10{sup −9} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) and lead to magnetospheric accretion, which can provide additional accretion signatures, such as UV/optical excess from the accretion shock and line emission.

  6. Acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions.

    PubMed

    Schöner, Michael G; Simon, Ralph; Schöner, Caroline R

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic communication is widespread and well-studied in animals but has been neglected in other organisms such as plants. However, there is growing evidence for acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions. While knowledge about active acoustic signalling in plants (i.e. active sound production) is still in its infancy, research on passive acoustic signalling (i.e. reflection of animal sounds) revealed that bat-dependent plants have adapted to the bats' echolocation systems by providing acoustic reflectors to attract their animal partners. Understanding the proximate mechanisms and ultimate causes of acoustic communication will shed light on an underestimated dimension of information transfer between plants and animals. PMID:27423052

  7. Reflective echo tomographic imaging using acoustic beams

    DOEpatents

    Kisner, Roger; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2014-11-25

    An inspection system includes a plurality of acoustic beamformers, where each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers including a plurality of acoustic transmitter elements. The system also includes at least one controller configured for causing each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers to generate an acoustic beam directed to a point in a volume of interest during a first time. Based on a reflected wave intensity detected at a plurality of acoustic receiver elements, an image of the volume of interest can be generated.

  8. Acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions.

    PubMed

    Schöner, Michael G; Simon, Ralph; Schöner, Caroline R

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic communication is widespread and well-studied in animals but has been neglected in other organisms such as plants. However, there is growing evidence for acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions. While knowledge about active acoustic signalling in plants (i.e. active sound production) is still in its infancy, research on passive acoustic signalling (i.e. reflection of animal sounds) revealed that bat-dependent plants have adapted to the bats' echolocation systems by providing acoustic reflectors to attract their animal partners. Understanding the proximate mechanisms and ultimate causes of acoustic communication will shed light on an underestimated dimension of information transfer between plants and animals.

  9. Analysis of multispectral signatures of the shot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastek, Mariusz; Dulski, Rafał; Piątkowski, Tadeusz; Madura, Henryk; Bareła, Jarosław; Polakowski, Henryk

    2011-06-01

    The paper presents some practical aspects of sniper IR signature measurements. Description of particular signatures for sniper shot in typical scenarios has been presented. We take into consideration sniper activities in the open area as well as in urban environment. The measurements were made at field test ground. High precision laboratory measurements were also performed. Several infrared cameras were used during measurements to cover all measurement assumptions. Some of the cameras are measurement-class devices with high accuracy and frame rates. The registrations were simultaneously made in UV, NWIR, SWIR and LWIR spectral bands. The infrared cameras have possibilities to install optical filters for multispectral measurement. An ultra fast visual camera was also used for visible spectra registration. Exemplary sniper IR signatures for typical situation were presented. LWIR imaging spectroradiometer HyperCam was also used during the laboratory measurements and field experiments. The signatures collected by HyperCam were useful for the determination of spectral characteristics of shot.

  10. Secure quantum signatures using insecure quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Ryan; Wallden, Petros; Kent, Adrian; Andersson, Erika

    2016-03-01

    Digital signatures are widely used in modern communication to guarantee authenticity and transferability of messages. The security of currently used classical schemes relies on computational assumptions. We present a quantum signature scheme that does not require trusted quantum channels. We prove that it is unconditionally secure against the most general coherent attacks, and show that it requires the transmission of significantly fewer quantum states than previous schemes. We also show that the quantum channel noise threshold for our scheme is less strict than for distilling a secure key using quantum key distribution. This shows that "direct" quantum signature schemes can be preferable to signature schemes relying on secret shared keys generated using quantum key distribution.

  11. 42 CFR 424.36 - Signature requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... beneficiary's legal guardian. (2) A relative or other person who receives social security or other... Part B may be signed by the entity on the beneficiary's behalf. (e) Acceptance of other signatures...

  12. 42 CFR 424.36 - Signature requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... beneficiary's legal guardian. (2) A relative or other person who receives social security or other... Part B may be signed by the entity on the beneficiary's behalf. (e) Acceptance of other signatures...

  13. 15 CFR 908.16 - Signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SUBMITTING REPORTS ON WEATHER MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES § 908.16 Signature. All reports filed with the National... or intending to conduct the weather modification activities referred to therein by such...

  14. Experimental demonstration of photonic quantum digital signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Robert J.; Clarke, Patrick J.; Dunjko, Vedran; Andersson, Erika; Jeffers, John; Buller, Gerald S.

    2012-09-01

    Digital signature schemes are often used in interconnected computer networks to verify the origin and authenticity of messages. Current classical digital signature schemes based on so-called "one-way functions" rely on computational complexity to provide security over sufficiently long timescales. However, there are currently no mathematical proofs that such functions will always be computationally complex. Quantum digital signatures offers a means of confirming both origin and authenticity of a message with security verified by information theoretical limits. The message cannot be forged or repudiated. We have constructed, tested and analyzed the security of what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first example of an experimental quantum digital signature system.

  15. Microbial Signatures In Sulfate-Rich Playas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glamoclija, M.; Steele, A.; Starke, V.; Zeidan, M.; Potochniak, S.; Sirisena, K.; Widanagamage, I. H.

    2016-05-01

    Microbes that live in playas represent organisms able to cope with transient environments, ranging from fresh to hyper-saline water settings and from wet to dry. We will try to identify mineral and chemical signatures of their presence.

  16. 15 CFR 908.16 - Signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SUBMITTING REPORTS ON WEATHER MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES § 908.16 Signature. All reports filed with the National... or intending to conduct the weather modification activities referred to therein by such...

  17. Transduction mechanism of acoustic-wave based chemical and biochemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucklum, Ralf; Hauptmann, Peter

    2003-11-01

    Acoustic-wave-based sensors are commonly known as mass-sensitive devices. However, acoustic chemical and biochemical sensors also face so-called non-gravimetric effects, especially if they work in a liquid environment. The one-dimensional transmission-line model (TLM) is a powerful tool, which considers the influence of geometric and material properties on the sensor transduction mechanism, most importantly the influence of viscoelastic phenomena. This paper demonstrates the concept of modelling acoustic microsensors on quartz crystal resonators. Particular attention is paid to special cases which allow for simplifications or specific solutions of the TLM, like the acoustic load concept (ALC), the BVD model or the Sauerbrey equation. Deviations from the one-dimensional assumption of the TLM are suspected to significantly contribute to the acoustic sensor response in biosystems. We therefore introduce a generalization of the ALC to get access to two- or three-dimensional effects, which are up to now not considered in the TLM. As examples, signatures of interfacial phenomena or non-uniform films are discussed.

  18. Signature scheme based on bilinear pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Rui Y.; Geng, Yong J.

    2013-03-01

    An identity-based signature scheme is proposed by using bilinear pairs technology. The scheme uses user's identity information as public key such as email address, IP address, telephone number so that it erases the cost of forming and managing public key infrastructure and avoids the problem of user private generating center generating forgery signature by using CL-PKC framework to generate user's private key.

  19. Research Plan for Fire Signatures and Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the prevention, suppression, and detection of fires aboard a spacecraft is presented. The topics include: 1) Fire Prevention, Detection, and Suppression Sub-Element Products; 2) FPDS Organizing Questions; 3) FPDS Organizing Questions; 4) Signatures, Sensors, and Simulations; 5) Quantification of Fire and Pre-Fire Signatures; 6) Smoke; 7) DAFT Hardware; 8) Additional Benefits of DAFT; 9) Development and Characterization of Sensors 10) Simulation of the Transport of Smoke and Fire Precursors; and 11) FPDS Organizing Questions.

  20. Quantum blind signature with an offline repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J.; Souto, A.; Mateus, P.

    2015-04-01

    We propose a quantum blind signature scheme that achieves perfect security under the assumption of an honest offline repository. The security of the protocol also relies on perfect private quantum channels, which are achievable using quantum one-time pads with keys shared via a quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol. The proposed approach ensures that signatures cannot be copied and that the sender must compromise to a single message, which are important advantages over classical protocols for certain applications.